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THE ICAO(INTERNATIONAL CIVIL AVIATION ORGANIZATION)

First time in history establishment of an aeronautical commission was suggested at the Paris conference of peace in 1919. An international air convention was written and ratified by 38 states. The convention contemplated all aspects of civil aviationand also the establishment of an international commission for air navigation (ICAN) in order to monitorthe development of civil aviation and to propose measures for this development. The icao officially came into existence on 4 April 1947. At the invitation of the government of Canada, Montrealwaschosenasthesiteforitsheadquarters.Presently,the contracting states number more than 180. ICAO Comprises An Assembly -asovereignbodycomprisingmembersrepresenting all the "contracting states" (185). The Council -comprising33membersappointedbytheAssembly,for3years. The secretariat headedbythesecretarygeneral,isdivededintofivemaindivisionAirNavigationbureau,technicalco=operationbureau,legalbureau, bureauofadministrationand services. ICAO works closely withother originations andbodies whichare Relatedto aviation.Eg: WorldMeteorological Org, International TelecommunicationUnion

Purpose of ICAO To promote multilateral agreements between nations in order that international civil aviation may be developed in a safe orderly manner and that international air transportservices may be established on the basis of equality ofopportunity and operated soundly and economically.

The aims and objectives of the ICAO are to develop theprinciples and techniques of international air navigation and to advance the planning and development of international air transport so as to: 1.Ensure the safe and orderly growth of international civil aviation throughout the world. 2.Encourage the arts of aircraft design and operation for peaceful purposes. 3.Encourage the development of airways, airports and air navigation facilities for international civil aviation. 4.Meet the needs of the peoples of the world for safe,regular,efficientandeconomicalairtransport. 5.Prevent economic waste caused by unreasonable competition.

6.Ensure that the rights of the Contracting States are fully respected and that every Contracting State has a fair opportunity to operate international airlines. 7.Avoid discrimination between Contracting States. 8.Promote safety of flight in international air navigation. 9.Promote generally the development of all aspects of international civil aeronautics ROLE OF ICAO (INTERNATIONALCIVIL AVIATION ORGANISATION) 1. Basic rules of ICAO and the guidelines of the ICAO is laid down in the Chicago convention. 2. The objection of the ICAO to harmonise the legal requirements as well as the standards and procedure for the civil Aviation industry worldwide. 3. Different standards are published as annexes and the substandard are considered the minimum standards and issued as recommendations. 4. Standards are directives which ICAO members agree to follow. If a member has a standarddifferent from anICAO Standard, that member must notify the ICAO of the difference. 5. There are 18 annexes and the most important ones forthe Aircraft Maintenance Engineers has be highlighted inred. Note: The ICAO has no executive powers to incorporate or introduce legislationinto a National Authoritys National standard; this is left to eachcontractingnations ownNationalAuthority.

Annex 1. Personnel Licensing Annex 2. Rules of the Air Annex 3. Meteorological Service for International Air Navigation Annex 5. Units of Measurement to be used in Air and Ground Operations Annex 4. Aeronautical Charts Annex 6. Operation of Aircraft Annex 7. Aircraft Nationality and Registration Marks Annex 8. Airworthiness of Aircraft Annex 9. Facilitations Annex 10.AeronauticalTelecommunications Annex11.AirTrafficServices

Annex 12. Search and Rescue Annex 13.Aircraft Accident Investigation Annex 14. Aerodromes Annex 15. Aeronautical Information Services Annex 16. Environnemental Protection Annex 17. Security Safeguarding International CivilAviation against Acts of Unlawful Interference Annex 18 . The Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods byAir

Annex 1. Personnel Licensing provides information on licensing of flight crews, air traffic controllers, and aircraft maintenance personnel, including medical standards for flight crews and air traffic controllers. Annex 6. Operation of Aircraft Enumerates specifications to ensure a level of safety above a prescribed minimum in similar operations throughout the world. The three parts of this Annex are as follows: Part I. International Commercial Air Transport Airplanes Part II. International General Aviation Airplanes Part III. International Operations Helicopters. Annex 7. Aircraft Nationality and Registration Marks specifies requirements for registration and identification of aircraft. Annex 8. Airworthiness of Aircraft Specifies uniform procedures for certification and inspection of aircraft. Annex 10. Aeronautical Telecommunications Volume 1 provides for standardizing communications equipment and systems, Volume 2 standardizes communications procedures. Annex 13. Aircraft Accident Investigation provides for uniformity in notifying, investigating, and reporting on aircraft accidents. Annex 16. Environmental Protection Volume 1 contains specifications for aircraft noise certification, noise monitoring, and noise exposure units for land-use planning, Volume 2 contains specifications for aircraft engine emissions. Annex 18. The Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods by Air specifies requirements necessary to ensure hazardous materials are safely transported in aircraft while providing a level of safety that protects the aircraft and its occupants from undue risk.

ICAO - STATUS OF ANNEX COMPONENTS 18 AnnexesSARPs Appendices Definitions Attachments

RESPONSIBILITY OF THE STATE The contracting state has a commitment to ensure a certain standard (quality) of air operations Definition: JAR 1 The Authority is the competent body responsible for the Safety of Civil Aviation RESPONSIBILITY OF THE STATE 1. Acceptance of the ICAO International Standards and Recommended Practices (SARPs) 2. The State has to issue Standards for Airworthiness of Aircraft. It is the legal aspect. 3. Some Standards may be mandatory even for foreign operators 4. But it is obviously much better if the Standards are the same, as often as possible, in the greatest number of State

DISCHARGE OF THE STATE RESPONSIBILITY 1. The State has to make sure that its required Airworthiness Standards are maintained 2. Authorisation initial delivery and continuous surveillance 3. Auditing & Inspection system TASK OF AIRWORTHINESS AUTHORITIES 1 To prescribe airworthiness requirements and procedure. 2. To inform the interested parties regarding the above mentioned prescriptions. This is performed in different ways. The authority publishes technical regulations, technical standards, circulars, etc., to be obtained on request or by other means. At present, much information can be found on the Internet. 3. To control aeronautical material, design, and manufacturing organizations, and aircraft operators. This is to ensure that all pertinent prescriptions are complied with. Control can be performed in different ways, with the appropriate involment of the relevant authority. 4. To certificate aeronautical material and organization. This is to declare in a legal form compliance with the applicable requirements of an aircraft or part of it, or a change to a type certificate, the capability of an organization, and so on.

Chicago convention

Annexes

manuals

Legal obligations

Requirments

Guidance for NAAs and for Operators

EU national law EU regulations EASA Implementing rules Acceptable Means of Compliance and guidance Material for the NAAs and operators

THE CIVIL AVIATION AUTHORITY (CAA) An independent public authority which is responsible to the UK Parliament for the execution of the Articles and Regulations of the current Civil Aviation Act. CAA responsible for : - Licensing and Certification procedures. - Supervision of air transport within, and to and from the UK. - Airworthiness and Registration of aircraft. - Safety and operation of aerodromes - Air traffic control - the national air traffic control system of theUK(NATs) The affairs of the CAA are presided over by an executive committee consisting of a: - Chairman and Deputy Chairman - Controller of National Air Traffic Services - Controller of Safety - Head of Air Transport Licensing - Controller of Finance and Planning There are two main divisions each under the control of a Director-General. These divisions are known as the 1. Safety RegulationGroup (SRG) and Operations.

Its Safety andRegulations Group(SRG) is directly responsible withregardto design, construction, test and maintenance of aircraft andtheir components. Its employees inthe field are called SURVEYORS.

THE AIRWORTHINESS REQUIREMENTS BOARD(ARB) An advisory body to the CAA on matters concerning airworthiness. It comprises members appointed by the CAA from: - Aircraft constructors (5). - Aircraft operators (5). - Pilots (2). - Insurance companies (2). - People who, due to their experience, have something to offer, to the industry, one of whom is the chairman (5). The CAA publishes reference materials based on the requirements of legislation, standards and procedures. NAME INFORMATION PUBLICATION ID Air Navigationorder The Order and The Regulation CAP 393 Air OperatorsCertificate Part 1 - Operation of Aircraft CAP 360 Part 2 Engineering Support Arrangements(superseded by JAR-OPS 1) Airworthiness Notices CAP 455 CAAApprovedOrganisations CAP 475 Civil Aircraft Airworthiness CAP 562 Information and Procedures Light Aircraft Maintenance (Aeroplanes) CAP 411 Schedule (Helicopters) CAP412 Mandatory Aircraft CAP476 Modifications and Inspections Summary Mandatory Aircraft CAP382 Reporting Scheme:Information &Guidance Log Books: >2730kg Aircraft CAP 408 Engines CAP 391 VPPropellers CAP388 Log Books: <2730kg Aircraft Engines VPPropellers CAP398 CAP 399 CAP400 CAP741

Aircraft Maintenance Engineers Log Book NAME Information

BRITISH CIVIL AIRWORTHINESS REQUIRMENTS

NAME Section A Section B Section K Section L

DESCRIPTION Airworthiness Procedures where CAAhas Prime Responsibility for Type Approval of the Product Airworthiness Procedures where CAA does not have Prime Responsibility forType Approval of the Product Light Aeroplanes Licensing

PUBLICATION ID CAP 553 CAP 554 CAP 467 CAP 468

AIR NAVIGATION ORDER - The civil aviation act of 1949 placed aviation standards and practices on the UK statute books. - The ANO applies to all aircraft registered in the UnitedKingdom. Failure to comply with an ANO, in part or completely, could lead to prosecution. - The ANO is under constant review and at times is subjected to amendment action following parliamentary action. - The current ANO is dated July 19th 2000.The amendment state is included in the title reference given in the opening pages of the ANO. - The ANO is arranged as: Sections (1 - 9) Parts (110) Articles (1134) Schedules (1 - 14) - These are listed in numerical sequence within Section 1 of the ANO and set out the rules and regulations under which all types of British registered aircraft must be operated. - The Articles contained in Part III, Airworthiness and Equipment of Aircraft are of particular interest and importance to aircraft maintenance engineers. - The ANO also authorises the secretary of state for transport to make regulations, known as air navigation regulations (ANR)

PARLIAMENTARY PROCESS FOR INTRODUCTIN OF ANO AND ANR

Parliamentary white paper

Parliamentary Bill

Parliamentary Readings

1st Reading

2nd Reading

Parliamentary Committee stage

3rd Reading

Parliamentary Approval & Royal Assent

Act of Parliament

Civil Aviation Act

Order in council

Air Navigation Order

Sec of state for Transport

Air Navigation Regulation

BRITISH CIVIL AIRWORTHINESS REQUIRMENTS ( BCAR) BCARs are published by the SRG of the CAA and relay, to the aviation industry, the minimum airworthiness standards necessary to meet the ANO and ANR. They also constitute the basics for the issue of approvals and certificates required by the current ANO and ANR. Description AIRWORTHINESS PROCEDURES WHERE THE CAA HAS PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITY FOR TYPE APPROVAL OF THE PRODUCT AIRWORTHINESS PROCEDURES WHERE THE CAADOESNOT HAVE PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITY FOR TYPE APPROVAL OF THE PRODUCT. ROTORCRAFT ELECTRICAL LIGHT AEROPLANES LICENSING EMISSION CERTIFICATION NOISE PROVISIONAL AIRWORTHINESS REQUIREMENTS FOR CIVIL POWERED LIFT AIRCRAFT NON- RIGID AIRSHIPS RADIO SMALL LIGHT AEROPLANES CAP no 553 554 465 466 467 468 514 469 470 471 472 482

Section A* B* G J K L* M N P Q R S

CIVIL AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS INFORMATION AND PROCEDURES (CAAIP) CAAIPs are published by the CAA and consist OF 14 Sequentially numbered Parts and individual Leaflets within those parts. Note: Currently, there is no Part 13 - Each leaflet contains information on a variety of matters concerned with the manufacture, overhaul, repair, maintenance, operation and procedures of civil aircraft. - The information are general not specific to any Aircraft type or engine or components. - It is always advised to refer the maintenance manual to perform maintenance. All Airworthiness Notices (ANs), previously published in CAP 455,have now been cancelled or transferred to CAP 747 (MandatoryRequirements for Airworthiness) or CAP 562 (Civil AircraftAirworthiness Information and Procedures). CAP 455 has,therefore, now been withdrawn. MANDATORY REQUIRMENTS FOR AIRWORTHINESS (CAP 747) - This CAP 747 is the means by which airworthiness requirements made mandatory by the CAA are notified. - EASA has not yet implemented requirements that are related to operations. Therefore Operations-relatedrequirements may be included in CAP 747 till furthernotice form EASA. -

JAA ( THE JOINT AVIATION AUTHORITIES ) - The Joint Aviation Authorities (JAA) is an associated body of the European Civil Aviation Conference (ECAC)representing the civil aviation regulatory authorities of a number of European states who have agreed to co-operate in developing and implementing common safety regulatory standards and procedures. - The JAAs work started in 1970. - Since 1987, JAA activities have been extended to operations, maintenance, and licensing and certification design standards for all classes of aircraft. - JAA membership is based on the approval of the JAA Arrangements that the State Members signed in 1990 in Cyprus. Membership is open to the ECACs members, which at present consist of 41 countries. OBJECTIVES - Aviation safety - Transition from the JAA to the EASA - Business effectiveness - Consolidation of common standards - Worldwide aviation safety improvement. FUNCTIONS OF JAA Develop and adopt Joint Aviation Requirements (JARs)in the fields of aircraft design and manufacture, aircraft operations and maintenance, and the licensing of aviation personnel. Develop administrative and technical procedures for the implementation of the JARs. Implement JARs and the related administrative and technical procedures in a coordinated manner. Adopt measures to ensure, whenever possible, distort competition between the aviationindustries of Member States or place companies ofMember States at a competitive disadvantage withcompanies of non-Member States.

Provide the principal center of professional expertise inEurope on the harmonization of aviation safetyregulations. Co-operate on the harmonization of requirements andthe procedures with other safety regulatory authorities,particularlytheFederalAviationAdministration(FAA).