Jayanagar Cycle Lanes

A Report on the cycle lanes based from on-site observations.

Contents

Introduction.................................................................................3

Insights from Interviews..............................................................4

On site Observations.....................................................................5

Suggestions...................................................................................9

Introduction
Mobility forms an important aspect of any urban system. But, associated with an increase in mobility are environmental,social and economic costs. Thus, due to the rapid rise in the numbers of motor vehicles,there is a growing need for more sustainable transportation systems.Walking and cycling are transport choices that have the least evnvironmental impact. Also, creating transport systems that encourage these modes will also help in reducing traffic congestion. Bicycles are perfect for last mile connectivity especially when they are facilitated at all the key mobility hubs.This report is the the first step towards the creation of an online game which will help in spreading awareness and understanding implementaional problems regarding the cycle lanes. The Gubbi lab report on bicyle friendly street states that “the National Urban Transport Policy (NUTP) by the Government of India has already set the guiding principles for ensuring safe, convenient and sustainable transportation systems in cities. In order to realize one of the significant components of the policy, the Directorate of Urban Land Transport (DULT), Government of Karnataka has evinced a lot of interest in encouraging non-motorized transport especially for bicycles in cities. The primary goal of this initiative would be to: Create bicycle friendly streets in certain localities of Bangalore in a phased manner to encourage cycling as a mode of safe, convenient and sustainable mode of urban transport.”(Gubbi labs,2012) However, the response received was very mild and its use, negligible. Thus there was a need for some further research. To understand why the lanes did not achieve the expected response, the locations were visited, and informal interviews were conducted along with a photogrphic survey.The following report contains all the observations and insights obtained from the research.

Insights from Interviews
Number of people interviewed -15-20 Age-Between 11-60 Profession-Guards,Auto Drivers,School Children,Doctors From the informal interviews conducted the main insights were:1.Majority of people knew about the lanes.But they were dissatisfied with its implementation in certain areas. 2.The main problems stated were• Parked cars • Very few cyclists • Too much traffic • Lanes were built over parking spaces • Inappropriate lane widths in certain areas. • Confusion about the signages. • Too close to fast moving traffic • No boards/promotions regarding the lanes There was one person who thought that the cycle stencils on the road were signs of a political party done for the elections. On the other hand, in areas where there was less traffic and well spaced lanes the school-children were quite happy about the lanes.

On Site Observations
Observation-People walking on the cycle lane. Location - Jayanagar 9th Block

Observation-Placement of Non functional barricades on the cycle lane. Location-Jayanagar 9th Block

Observation-Child avoiding the lane due to the parked police bike. Location-Jayanagar 9th Block

Observation-Manholes reducing cycle lane space . Location-Jayanagar 9th Block

Observation-Garbage piled up on the cycle lane. Location-Jayanagar 9th Block

Observation-Cyclist preferring not to use the cycle lane . Location-Jayanagar 9th Block

Observation-Cars parked On the cycle lane. Location-Jayanagar 2nd Block

Observation-Bus-stop in Between the cycle lane Location-Jayanagar 2nd Block

Observation-Construction over the lanes . Location-Jayanagar 4th Block

Observation-Debris not coming on to the lane due to extra space. Location-Jayanagar 2nd Block

Observation-School children using the lanes. Location-Jayanagar 2nd Block

Suggestions
There are quite a few places around the world where cycle lanes are very popular. Design clearly is a more important factor compared to issues like climate and people when it comes to cycle lanes.Bogota,Columbia is one of the first places one reads about when it comes to implementing cycle lanes. Apart from building a huge network of bicycle paths,they also constructed other bicycling infrastucture to make the use of the lanes convinient for the people.They believed that a cycle path that goes from nowhere to nowhere probably would not be used as much as a well connected, integrated system.Special emphasis was put on connecting the cycle paths to their bus rapid transit system. For example they installed free, convenient and secure cycle storage facilities near major bus terminals.
(Michael O hare,2010)

Also,in his paper on evaluating the benefits of non motorised transport Todd Littman states that “walking and cycling are popular recreational activities. Improving walking and cycling conditions provides enjoyment and health benefits to users, and it can support related industries, including retail, recreation and tourism”.(Todd Littman,2012) Thus motivating people to cycle by making it fun has a lot of benefits. Ciclovia happens once a week in Bogota, every Sunday between 7am and 2pm. 120km of roads are shut to cars and opened up to cyclists, walkers and people to enjoy. It’s fun, with around 30% of locals, or 2 million people, taking part. Implementing cycle lanes in Bangalore is a challenge .The outcome would be the best if they are designed for people rather than being implemented under the assumption that people will adapt to them. Most of the mentioned problems can be solved if the BBMP, Traffic police and RACF perform the roles mentioned in the report sincerely.

References
1. Bicycle Friendly Streets in Jayanagar, Bangalore,Gubbi labs,2012 2.citiesforpeople.com,Michael O ‘hare ,2010 3. Evaluating Non-Motorized Transportation Benefits and Costs,Todd Littman, Victoria Transport Policy Institute

Report by
Girish Krishnan National Institute of Design girish.r@nid.edu

info@fieldsofview.in

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