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Fixed Point Result in Probabilistic Metric Space

Ruchi Singh, Smriti Mehta
1
and A D Singh
2

1
Department of Mathematics, Truba Instt. Of Engg. & I.T. Bhopal
2
Govt. M.V.M. College Bhopal
Email : smriti.mehta@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT
In this paper we prove common fixed point theorem for four mapping with weak compatibility in probabilistic
metric space.
Keywords: Menger space, Weak compatible mapping, Semi-compatible mapping, Weakly commuting mapping,
common fixed point.
AMS Subject Classification: 47H10, 54H25.

1. INTRODUCTION:
Fixed point theory in probabilistic metric spaces can be considered as a part of Probabilistic Analysis,
which is a very dynamic area of mathematical research. The notion of probabilistic metric space is introduced by
Menger in 1942 [9] and the first result about the existence of a fixed point of a mapping which is defined on a
Menger space is obtained by Sehgel and Barucha-Reid.
Recently, a number of fixed point theorems for single valued and multivalued mappings in menger
probabilistic metric space have been considered by many authors [1],[2],[3],[4],[5],[6]. In 1998, Jungck [7]
introduced the concept weakly compatible maps and proved many theorems in metric space. In this paper we
prove common fixed point theorem for four mapping with weak compatibility and rational contraction without
appeal to continuity in probabilistic metric space. Also we illustrate example in support of our theorem.

2. PRELIMINARIES:
Now we begin with some definition
Definition 2.1: Let R denote the set of reals and R
+
the non-negative reals. A mapping F: R → R
+
is called a
distribution function if it is non decreasing left continuous with
inf ( ) 0 sup ( ) 1
t R
t R
F t and F t


= =

Definition 2.2: A probabilistic metric space is an ordered pair (X, F) where X is a nonempty set, L be set of all
distribution function and F: X × X → I . We shall denote the distribution function by F (p, q) or F
p,q
; p, q ∈ X
and F
p,q
(x) will represents the value of F (p, q) at x ∈ R . The function F(p, q) is assumed to satisfy the
following conditions:
1. F
p,q
(x) = 1 ¡or oll x > u i¡ onJ only i¡ p = q
2. F
p,q
(u) = u ¡or c:cry p, q ∈ X
S. F
p,q
= F
q,p
¡or c:cry p, q ∈ X

4. F
p,q
(x) = 1 onJ F
q,¡
(y) = 1 tℎcn F
p,¡
(x +y) = 1 ¡or c:cry p, q, r ∈ X.
In metric space (X, J) , the metric d induces a mapping F: X × X → I such that
F
p,q
(x) = F
p,q
= E (x – J(p, q)) for every p, q ∈ X and x ∈ R, where H is the distribution function defined as
E(x) = _
u, if x ≤ u
1, if x > u

Definition 2.3: A mapping ∗: |u, 1] |u, 1] → |u, 1] is called t-norm if
1. (o ∗ 1) = o ∀ o ∈ |u,1]
2. (u ∗ u) = u, ∀ o, b ∈ |u,1]
3. (o ∗ b) = (b ∗ o),
4. (c ∗ J) ≥ (o ∗ b) ¡or c ≥ o, J ≥ b, and
5. ( (o ∗ b) ∗ c ) = ( o ∗ (b ∗ c ))
Example: (i) (o ∗ b) = ob, (ii) (o ∗ b) = min (o, b)
(iii) (o ∗ b) = mox (o + b − 1; u)
Definition 2.4: A Menger space is a triplet (X, F,∗) where (X, F)a PM-space and ∆ is is a t-norm with the
following condition
F
u,w
(x + y) ≥ F
u,¡
(x) ∗ F
¡,w
(y)

The above inequality is called Menger’s triangle inequality.
EXAMPLE: Let X = R, (o ∗ b) = min(o, b) o, b ∈ (u,1) and
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F
u,¡
(x) = _
E(x) ¡or u ≠ :
1 ¡or u = :

where E(x) = _
u x ≤ u
x u ≤ x ≤ 1
1 x ≥ 1

Then (X, F,∗ ) is a Menger space.
Definition 2.5: Let (X, F,∗) be a Menger space. If u ∈ X, e > u, z ∈ (u, 1), then an (e, z) neighbourhood of u,
denoted by u
u
(e, z) is defined as
u
u
(e, z) = |: ∈ X; F
u,¡
(e) > 1 − z|.
If (X, F,∗) be a Menger space with the continuous t-norm t, then the familyu
u
(e, z); u ∈ X; e > u, z ∈ (u,1) of
neighbourhood induces a hausdorff topology on X and if sup
a<1
(a ∗ a) = 1, it is metrizable.
Definition 2.6: A sequence {p
n
] in (X, F,∗) is said to be convergent to a point p ∈ X if for every e > u and
z > u, there exists an integer N = N(e, z) such that p
n
∈ u
p
(e, z) for all n ≥ N or equivalently F
x
n
,x
(e) >
1 −z for all n ≥ N.
Definition 2.7: A sequence {p
n
] in (X, F,∗) is said to be Cauchy sequence if for every e > u and z > u, there
exists an integer N = N(e, z) such that F
p
n
,p
m
(e) > 1 − z for all n, m ≥ N.
Definition 2.8: A Menger space (X, F,∗) with the continuous t-norm ∆ is said to be complete if every Cauchy
sequence in X converges to a point in X.
Definition 2.9: A coincidence point (or simply coincidence) of two mappings is a point in their domain having
the same image point under both mappings.
Formally, given two mappings ¡, g ∶ X → ¥ we say that a point x in X is a coincidence point of f and g if
¡(x) = g(x).
Definition 2.10: Let (X, F,∗) be a Menger space. Two mappings ¡, g ∶ X → X are said to be weakly compatible
if they commute at the coincidence point, i.e., the pair {¡, g] is weakly compatible pair if and only if ¡x = gx
implies that ¡gx = g¡x.
Example: Define the pair A, S: |u, S] → |u, S] by
A(x) = _
x, x ∈ |u, 1)
S, x ∈ |1, S]

, S(x) = _
S − x, x ∈ |u, 1)
S, x ∈ |1, S].

Then for any x ∈ |1, S], ASx = SAx, showing that A, S are weakly compatible maps on |u, S].
Definition 2.11: Let (X, F,∗) be a Menger space. Two mappings A, S ∶ X → X are said to be semi compatible if
F
ASx
n
,Sx
(t) → 1for all t > u whenever {x
n
] is a sequence in X such that Ax
n
, Sx
n
→ p for some p in X asn → ∞.
It follows that (A, S) is semi compatible and Ay = Sy imply ASy = SAy by taking {x
n
] = y onJ x = Ay = Sy.
Lemma 2.12[15]: Let {p
n
] be a sequence in Menger space (X, F,∗) where ∗ is continuous and (x ∗ x) ≥ x for
all x ∈ |u, 1]. If there exists a constant k ∈ (u, 1) such that x > u and n ∈ N F
p
n
,p
n+1
(kx) ≥ F
p
n-1
,p
n
(x), then
{p
n
] is a Cauchy sequence.
Lemma 2.13[13]: If (X, J) is a metric space, then the metric d induces a mapping F: X × X → I, defined by
F (p, q) = E (x – J (p, q)) , p, q ∈ X onJ x ∈ R. Further more if ∗: |u,1] × |u,1] → |u,1] is defined by
(o ∗ b) = min(o, b), then (X, F,∗) is a Menger space. It is complete if (X, J) is complete. The space (X, F,∗)
so obtained is called the induced Menger space.
Lemma 2.14[10]: Let (X, F,∗) be a Menger space. If there exists a constant k ∈ (u, 1) such that F
x,¡
(kt) ≥
F
x,¡
(t), for all x, y ∈ X and t > u then x = y .

3. MAIN RESULT:
Theorem 3.1: Let (X, F,∗) be a complete Menger space where ∗ is continuous and (t ∗ t) ≥ t for all t ∈ |u,1].
Let A, B, T and S be mappings from X into itself such that
3.1.1. A(X) ⊂ S(X) onJ B(X) ⊂ I(X)
3.1.2. S or I are continuous
3.1.3. The pair (S, A) and (I, B) are Semi compatible
3.1.4. There exists a number k ∈ (u,1) such that
F
Ax,B¡
(kt) ≥ F
Sx,1¡
(t) ∗ F
Sx,Ax
(t) ∗ F
Ax,1¡
(t) ∗ F
1¡,B¡
(t) ∗ F
Sx,B¡
((2 − o)t)
¡or oll x, y ∈ X, o ∈ (u,2) onJ t > u.
Then, A, B, S and I have a unique common fixed point in X.
Proof: Since A(X) ⊂ S(X) for any x
0
∈ X there exists a point x
1
∈ X such thatAx
0
= Sx
1
. Since B(X) ⊂
I(X) for this point x
1
we can choose a point x
2
∈ X such that Ix
1
= Bx
2
.

Inductively we can find a sequence {y
n
] as follows
y
2n
= Ax
2n
= Sx
2n+1

onJ y
2n+1
= Bx
2n+1
= Ix
2n+2

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For n = u, 1, 2, S ………. by (3.1.4.), for all t > u onJ o = 1 − q with q ∈ (u,1), we have
F
¡
2n

2n+1
(kt) = F
Ax
2n
,Bx
2n+1
(kt)
≥ F
Sx
2n
,1x
2n+1
(t) ∗ F
Sx
2n+1
,Ax
2n+1
(t) ∗ F
Ax
2n
,1x
2n+1
(t) ∗ F
1x
2n+1
,Bx
2n+1
(t) ∗ F
Sx
2n
,Bx
2n+1
((1 + q)t)
= F
¡
2n-1

2n
(t) ∗ F
¡
2n

2n+1
(t) ∗ F
¡
2n

2n+1
(t) ∗
F
¡
2n

2n+1
(t) ∗ F
¡
2n-1

2n+1
((1 + q)t)
≥ F
¡
2n-1

2n
(t) ∗ F
¡
2n

2n+1
(t) ∗ F
¡
2n-1

2n
(t) ∗ F
¡
2n

2n+1
(qt)
= F
¡
2n-1

2n
(t) ∗ F
¡
2n

2n+1
(t) ∗ F
¡
2n

2n+1
(qt)
Since t-norm is continuous, letting q → 1, we have
F
¡
2n

2n+1
(kt) ≥ F
¡
2n-1

2n
(t) ∗ F
¡
2n

2n+1
(t)
Similarly
F
¡
2n+1

2n+2
(kt) ≥ F
¡
2n

2n+1
(t) ∗ F
¡
2n+1

2n+2
(t)
Similarly
F
¡
2n+2

2n+3
(kt) ≥ F
¡
2n+1

2n+2
(t) ∗ F
¡
2n+2

2n+3
(t)
Therefore
F
¡
n

n+1
(kt) ≥ F
¡
n-1

n
(t) ∗ F
¡
n

n+1
(t) ¡or oll n ∈ N
Consequently
F
¡
n

n+1
(t) ≥ F
¡
n-1

n
(k
-1
t) ∗, F
¡
n

n+1
(k
-1
t) ¡or oll n ∈ N
Repeated application of this inequality will imply that
F
¡
n

n+1
(t) ≥ F
¡
n-1

n
(k
-1
t) ∗ F
¡
n

n+1
(k
-1
t) ≥ ⋯………. ≥ F
¡
n-1

n
(k
-1
t) ∗ F
¡
n

n+1
(k

t), i ∈ N
Since F
¡
n

n+1
(k

t) → 1 os i → ∞, it follows that
F
¡
n

n+1
(t) ≥ F
¡
n-1

n
(k
-1
t) ¡or oll n ∈ N

Consequently
F
¡
n

n+1
(kt) ≥ F
¡
n-1

n
(t) for all n ∈ N
Therefore by Lemma [2.12], {y
n
] is a Cauchy sequence in X. Since X is complete,{y
n
]converges to a point z ∈
X. Since {Ax
2n
], {Bx
2n+1
], {Sx
2n+1
] onJ {Ix
2n+2
] are subsequences of {y
n
] , they also converge to the point
z,
i. c. as n → ∞, Ax
2n
, Bx
2n+1
, Sx
2n+1
Ix
2n+2
→ z.
Case I: Since S is continuous. In this case we have
SAx
n
→ Sz, SSx
n
→ Sz
Also (A, S)is semi-compatible, we have ASx
n
→ Sz
Step I: Let x = Sx
n
, y = x
n
witℎ o = 1 in (S.1.4) we get
F
ASx
n
,Bx
n
(kt) ≥ F
SSx
n
,1x
n
(t) ∗ F
SSx
n
,ASx
n
(t) ∗ F
ASx
n
,1x
n
(t) ∗ F
1x
n
,Bx
n
(t) ∗ F
SSx
n
,Bx
n
(t)
F
Sz,z
(kt) ≥ F
Sz,z
(t) ∗ F
Sz,Sz
(t) ∗ F
Sz,z
(t) ∗ F
z,z
(t) ∗ F
Sz,z
(t)
F
Sz,z
(kt) ≥ F
Sz,z
(t)
So we get Sz = z.
Step II: By putting x = z, y = x
n
witℎ o = 1 in (S.1.4) we get
F
Az,Bx
n
(kt) ≥ F
Sz,1x
n
(t) ∗ F
Sz,Az
(t) ∗ F
Az,1x
n
(t) ∗ F
1x
n
,Bx
n
(t) ∗ F
Sz,Bx
n
(t)
F
Az,z
(kt) ≥ F
z,z
(t) ∗ F
z,Az
(t) ∗ F
Az,z
(t) ∗ F
z,z
(t) ∗ F
z,z
(t)
F
Az,z
(kt) ≥ F
Az,z
(t)
So we get Az = z.
Case II: Since T is continuous. In this case we have
IBx
n
→ Iz, IIx
n
→ Iz
Also (B, I)is semi-compatible, we have BIx
n
→ Iz
Step I: Let x = x
n
, y = Ix
n
witℎ o = 1 in (S.1.4) we get
F
Ax
n
,B1x
n
(kt) ≥ F
Sx
n
,11x
n
(t) ∗ F
Sx
n
,Ax
n
(t) ∗ F
Ax
n
,11x
n
(t) ∗ F
11x
n
,B1x
n
(t) ∗ F
Sx
n
,B1x
n
(t)
F
z,1z
(kt) ≥ F
z,1z
(t) ∗ F
z,z
(t) ∗ F
z,1z
(t) ∗ F
1z,1z
(t) ∗ F
z,1z
(t)
F
z,1z
(kt) ≥ F
z,1z
(t)
So we get Iz = z.
Step II: By putting x = x
n
, y = z witℎ o = 1 in (S.1.4) we get
F
Ax
n
,Bz
(kt) ≥ F
Sx
n
,1z
(t) ∗ F
Sx
n
,Ax
n
(t) ∗ F
Ax
n
,1z
(t) ∗ F
1z,Bz
(t) ∗ F
Sx
n
,Bz
(t)
F
z,Bz
(kt) ≥ F
z,z
(t) ∗ F
z,z
(t) ∗ F
z,z
(t) ∗ F
z,Bz
(t) ∗ F
z,Bz
(t)
F
Bz,z
(kt) ≥ F
Bz,z
(t)
So we get Bz = z.
Thus, we have Az = Sz = Iz = Bz = z.
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That is z is a common fixed point of S, I, A and B.
For uniqueness, let w (w ≠ z) be another common fixed point of S, I, A and B .Then Aw = Sw == Bw =
Iw = w .
Put x = z, y = w and [ = 1, in (3.1.4.), we get
F
Az,Bw
(kt) ≥ F
Sz,1w
(t) ∗ F
Sz,Aw
(t) ∗ F
Az,1w
(t) ∗ F
1w,Bw
(t) ∗ F
Sz,Bw
(t)
F
z,w
(kt) ≥ F
z,w
(t) ∗ F
z,w
(t) ∗ F
z,w
(t) ∗ F
w,w
(t) ∗ F
z,w
(t)
F
z,w
(kt) ≥ F
z,w
(t) ∗ F
z,w
(t) ∗ F
z,w
(t) ∗ 1 ∗ F
z,w
(t)
F
z,w
(kt) ≥ F
z,w
(t)
Thus we havez = w. Therefore z is a unique fixed point of A,S, B and T.
This completes the proof of the theorem.
COROLLARY 3.2: Let (X, F,∗) be a complete Menger space where ∗ is continuous and (t ∗ t) ≥ t for
all t ∈ |u,1]. Let A, and S be mappings from X into itself such that
3.2.1. A(X) ⊂ S(X)
3.2.2. S is continuous
3.2.3. The pair (S, A) is semi compatible
3.2.4. There exists a number k ∈ (u,1) such that
F
Ax,S¡
(kt) ≥ F
Sx,S¡
(t) ∗ F
Sx,Ax
(t) ∗ F
Ax,S¡
(t) ∗ F
S¡,A¡
(t) ∗ F
Sx,A¡
((2 − o)t)
¡or oll x, y ∈ X, o ∈ (u,2) onJ t > u.
Then, A, and S have a unique common fixed point in X.

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