Michael V.

O'Brien
City Manager

CITY OF WORCESTER

June 7, 2013 TO THE WORCESTER CITY COUNCIL COUNCILORS: I respectfully submit the Fiscal Year 2013 accomplishment highlights achieved by me and my Administration on behalf of this City Council and our community for my Annual Evaluation with Your Honorable Body scheduled for June 18, 2013.

We should take a moment to celebrate what has truly been the result of a focused and targeted agenda over the past nine years during this process this year. Through hard work and fiscal discipline, we have reached significant milestones across all areas of City Government in spite of fewer resources. The attached document fully details the comprehensive list of significant accomplishments. It is an impressive and remarkable list of achievements that is only possible through our collective work and collaboration to meet our community’s needs and top priorities.

Despite a challenging economy, in Fiscal Year 2013, the City completed several important economic initiatives, public safety enhancements, neighborhood revitalization projects, and infrastructure improvements, underscoring our ability to spend wisely and plan for the future to ensure the long-term success of our great City. Through prudent financial management and adhering to our Five Point Financial Plan, we were able to build our reserve funds and stabilize key services. These measures have distinguished Worcester as a solid investment resulting in a significant upgrade to our municipal bond ratings. These rating improvements also affirm our continued diligence to make the right decisions for the overall stability and future of our community.

OFFICE OF THE CITY MANAGER, CITY HALL, WORCESTER, MA 01608 TELEPHONE (508) 799-1175 | FAX (508) 799-1208 EMAIL: citymanager@worcesterma.gov

Over the past year, we saw our Downtown transformed with enhancing roadway connections through CitySquare, completing a new transportation hub in Washington Square, and expanding rail service at Union Station and the CSX terminal. We celebrated the announcement of JetBlue service to the Worcester Regional Airport, the opening of the Worcester Common Oval Public Ice Skating Rink, and the launch of an ambitious Community Health Improvement Plan. prioritize and stabilize core municipal services. Simultaneously, we were able to We increased public safety through

proven initiatives, new Police and Fire recruit classes, and the addition of neighborhood patrol foot beats.

Since July 1, 2012, the City resurfaced more streets and sidewalks than any time in its history. A total of 115 streets representing 21 miles were resurfaced and over 16 miles of sidewalk was reconstructed. We have implemented over $10M in Public Park improvements including the ground-breaking of a $3M renovation of historic Elm Park. Through on-going capital improvement projects, we are dramatically improving the learning environments for students and teachers within the Worcester Public Schools, reducing energy use, and generating cost savings. At our Public Library, we expanded hours of operation, introduced new technologies, and renovated facilities to improve customer service. My overarching goals in the upcoming fiscal year will include the on-going focus to preserve and improve the quality of life in our neighborhoods and to serve Worcester residents, businesses, and visitors in the most efficient and cost effective ways possible - while building a comprehensive approach that enhances the City’s economic stability and cultural vitality. I will work to strengthen core municipal services including our

commitment to enhance our public schools and expand programs in our public libraries, fulfill our collective promise for new public safety recruit classes, and to take the next steps in our public health initiatives. The difficult work will also continue to find new and innovative means to address escalating fixed costs. My Administration will also advance our economic development plan to take advantage of current and future opportunities for improvement and growth. These efforts will include, but are not limited to: working

with business groups and others to market our City to firms and companies to establish and relocate jobs here; establishing more creative cultural venues in the Downtown; and continuing to build partnerships and creative programs to revive neighborhoods. These are just a few of the many goals that I look forward to accomplishing with my Administration, this City Council, and our strong local business, education, and agency partners.

The work done to navigate past challenges and achieve continued success could not have been accomplished without the dedication of my Cabinet - Assistant City Manager Kathleen Johnson, Department of Public Works and Parks Commissioner Robert Moylan, City Solicitor David Moore, Police Chief Garry Gemme, Fire Chief Gerard Dio, Chief Financial Officer Thomas Zidelis, Chief Development Officer Timothy McGourthy, Division of Inspectional Services Commissioner John Kelly, Director of Emergency Management David Clemons, as well as Commissioner of Public Health Michael Hirsh, Director of Public Health Derek Brindisi, and Head Librarian Wei Jeng-Chu. I would also be remiss if I did not thank my Department and Division Heads - and each and every City employee for their commitment to public service and a job well done.

Our collective progress is also a product of our work with all of our elected officials - the Worcester City Council, the Patrick-Murray Administration, our State House Delegation, our Congressman James P. McGovern, and our Senators. I must also highlight my appreciation of the work of my fellow City Council colleagues, James DelSignore, City Auditor, and David Rushford, City Clerk, as well as their employees.

I am also grateful for the hard work, dedication and commitment of each and every Worcester Public School employee, from teachers to administrators and from custodians to cafeteria staff, as led by Superintendent Melinda Boone, the WPS Administration and the Worcester School Committee. I’d also like to thank the members of our Boards and Commissions who volunteer their time to improve the City.

I must take this opportunity to thank all our private partners that have worked side by side with us to capitalize on new growth and solve long-standing challenges. These partners come from every sector and range from for-profit corporations and small businesses, to not-for-profit service groups, to our world-renowned academic institutions, to our neighborhood community development corporations, and to our neighbors themselves. I am humbled time and time again by the willingness of all to share the lift and push for progress.

There is much work that lies ahead. With the support of your Honorable Body, I will continue to work tirelessly to position Worcester as a thriving and vibrant city. I look forward to it, and to the successes that will certainly follow all of our collective efforts. Respectfully submitted,

Michael V. O’Brien City Manager

City Manager Michael V. O’Brien Fiscal Year 2013 Highlighted Accomplishments

CATEGORY: FISCAL DISCIPLINE AND STEWARDSHIP Received Significant Upgrade to City’s Bond Ratings- Bond ratings provide an “arm’s length” review of the City’s finances and financial management in the context of whether the City is a solid investment for the long term. As such, they provide a regular evaluation of our fiscal performance. Typically, the City issues Bonds or Bond Anticipation Notes three to four times per year and, each and every time, our rating agencies review the City’s finances and financial management. Two of the three rating agencies upgraded the City’s ratings in FY13: Moody’s upgraded Worcester from Aa1 to Aa3 , S&P upgraded the City from A- to A+, Fitch maintained the City at AA-. The improved bond ratings led to lower interest rates and lower insurance costs, resulting in significant savings in our borrowing costs. These rating improvements also affirm our continued diligence to make the right decisions for the long-term stability and future of our community. The rating agencies cited the City’s financial management and operating stability, as well as recent efforts to address our crippling retiree health care liability; to implement robust redevelopment plans; and to continue to diversify our tax base. Comments from their reports included: "Worcester's recent history of sound operating results is a reflection of its strong financial management, prudent fiscal policies and conservative budgeting practices." – Fitch "Worcester's financial position has improved substantially over the past three fiscal years because of improved financial management policies, practices and controls as well as a demonstrated commitment throughout the City to strengthen its fiscal reserves." - S&P "The upgrade reflects Worcester's improved overall credit profile, the result of management's demonstrated commitment to improving its financial operations through its Five Point Plan." - Moody's Continuing Strong Financial Discipline, Maintaining Budget Controls, and Adhering to the Five Point Financial Plan- The City’s FY13 Budget was proposed and adopted in June 2012 as a balanced blueprint for the FY that complies with the Five Point Financial Plan. The Budget stabilized core services including Public Works and Parks services; improved manpower levels in both Police and Fire Departments; and maintained the City’s approximate $10.5M in unused tax levy capacity. These were achieved through the continued implementation of employee/ retiree health insurance, GIC-like plan design reforms initiated in FY12 and fully implemented in FY13. The FY13 Budget adhered to the Five Point Financial Plan, including budgeted deposits to the City’s reserve funds and increasing the snow budget by 10% to better reflect the costs of an average snowfall. Prepared for Budget Challenges with Prudent Financial Management- As monthly revenue updates indicated, the State foreshadowed that they may have to cut unrestricted local aid to cities and towns due to State revenue reductions in the Fall of 2012. The City prepared for 1

City Manager Michael V. O’Brien Fiscal Year 2013 Highlighted Accomplishments

projected State Aid cuts by taking conservative projections into account and by appropriating $1.5M to the City’s contingency account. This prudent financial management action paid significant dividends for FY13 by allowing us the flexibility to improve library services to open Mondays; to increase funding to the Worcester Public Schools to make up for Charter School reductions; to address Police Overtime expenditures; and to be better prepared to address our FY13 snow budget deficit at the FY13 year-end. Improved and Strengthened City’s Financial Well-Being- The City’s financial well-being for FY13 began with a successful close out of FY12. Per the City’s Financial Statements, the City improved its general fund balance to $27M, 5% of general fund revenues on a budgetary basis. Positive revenue and expenditure variances resulted from our conservative budgeting, tight budget controls, consistent revenue collections, and efficient departmental management. These combined efforts resulted in generating free cash and increasing the City’s general fund balance and reserve funds. Increased Positive Revenue Collections through Conservative Budgeting- A major contributor to the City’s positive FY12 year-end was due to positive revenue collections that came in ahead of conservative budget estimates. The City continues to perform Collector’s Deed Auctions and Tax Title Assignment sales to collect delinquent property taxes due where possible during the fiscal year, thereby meeting and exceeding FY revenue projection. Economic activity has improved both permit revenues and motor vehicle excise revenues. Improved City’s Financial Position through Reserve Building and Adherence to the Five Point Financial Plan- As directed by the Five Point Financial Plan, the City made all required deposits into the City’s reserve funds including:  $3,092,256 deposited into the Bond Rating Stabilization Fund to build general fund reserves and maintain the City’s bond rating.  $3,047,000 deposited into the North High Construction Fund to provide an ongoing funding source for the debt service payments associated with the construction of North High School.  $10,288,797 deposited into the City Manager’s Capital Campaign Stabilization Fund to fund the ongoing debt service associated with the construction of Worcester Technical High School, renovations to the Library, the Senior Center, and other school projects. Succeeded in Borrowing at Low Rates through Proper Debt Management- The City successfully issued $72.3M in bonds for FY13 inclusive of City buildings, infrastructure, parks, equipment, schools buildings, as well as all Water and Sewer borrowing, and achieved a positive bond premium from the issuance. The City has continued to demonstrate excellent access to capital markets and continues to be able to borrow at very competitive rates. The City’s borrowing is guided by the Capital Budget and the Five Year Financial Forecast that 2

City Manager Michael V. O’Brien Fiscal Year 2013 Highlighted Accomplishments

incorporates future debt service charges into the analysis. The Five Point Financial Plan includes an inflation adjusted borrowing cap to limit the total tax levy exposure associated with borrowings. In FY13, the major areas for debt issuance have been related to the completion of two major important projects: 1) the city-wide energy efficiency effort, Energy Savings Contract (ESCo), to improve the efficiency and operation of all our City facilities; 2) the final stage of the City’s $20M street and sidewalk improvement program initiated in FY10. Completed 85% of the Energy Efficiency and Capital Improvement Project- Significant progress has been made on the $26M city-wide, energy-efficiency ESCo initiative that involves upgrades to 92 facilities, including our Public Schools. Implementation is expected to be concluded in 2014. The project is already generating energy savings in municipal departments that is “redirected” to pay for the capital costs of the effort. In addition to creating local jobs and saving approximately $1.4M in annual energy costs, this project will reduce municipal facility energy usage by nearly 20% and carbon emissions by more than 6,000 tons annually. This project fulfills one of the City's key commitments that earned it the designation of "Green Community" by the State DOER in May 2010. Secured $7.4 Million Dollars In Federal, State, and Private Grants to Support Public Safety, Public Health, Housing, and Employment Programs- The City was awarded more than $7.4M in grants for City operations. Another $12.8M in grant money has been identified and is currently pending. These funds have and will be used to support Police, Fire, Emergency Communications, and Public Health initiatives. Other grants will fund Economic Development, Workforce Development, Senior Center, Public Library, and Parks and Recreation programs.

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City Manager Michael V. O’Brien Fiscal Year 2013 Highlighted Accomplishments

CATEGORY: ECONOMIC GROWTH AND EXPANSION Sustained Infrastructure/Increased Commuter Rail Service- The new CSX terminal opened for operation in late 2012. The CSX yard in Worcester processes approximately 110,000 intermodal containers annually, and this number is expected to double over the long term. As a result of the investment, the Commonwealth increased commuter rail service on the Framingham/Worcester commuter rail line in October 2012 with the addition of 3 new inbound and 3 new outbound trains between the two cities for a total of 31 combined arrivals and departures at Worcester’s Union Station daily. In addition, the Commonwealth added 1 inbound special express and 1 outbound special express train daily in the Spring 2013. The project agreement established a Neighborhood Improvement Fund with the purpose of fostering economic development and addressing infrastructure improvements in neighboring areas. The Neighborhood Improvement Fund included a significant payment to the City for the benefit of Worcester residents totaling $5M, including a $1M Open Space Donation and a Community Investment Donation of $4M, as well as a $1 per loaded container gate fee for twenty (20) years for community mitigation. Enhanced Downtown Connections through CitySquare- The EOED has been working diligently with CitySquare II Development Co. LLC (CS2) in the redevelopment of the former Worcester Common Fashion Outlet Mall property. A new roadway network has been constructed, creating a much needed east–west connection through the Downtown. Front Street and Mercantile Street were ceremoniously opened to vehicular and pedestrian traffic on December 31, 2012. The new roadway network will be enhanced by the streetscape design, as outlined within the City’s new Streetscape Policy. Revamped DCU Center Arena & Convention Center Complex- The DCU Center, which averages over 700,000 attendees per year, is currently undergoing a $26M renovation project. Improvements are focused on the Arena and include interior and exterior architectural upgrades; footprint expansion for a new lobby, box office and concourse; upgrades to the mechanical, electrical, and plumbing systems; and two new suites as well as revamped restrooms. Currently closed for these improvements, the Arena will re-open on October 1, 2013. Enhanced Transportation Options - Union Station/WRTA Hub- On April 3, 2012, the WRTA broke ground on a 14,000 square foot transportation hub to be located adjacent to Union Station. This state-of-the-art facility will support, encourage, and promote connections between the various transportation modes at the Station. The WRTA opened this facility to the public on June 1, 2013. This new building houses administrative offices, customer service operations, and amenities that include a public waiting area and restroom facilities. The development also contains a transfer hub consisting of eight bus slips and provides riders with shelter in all types of weather. The Worcester Redevelopment Authority worked with the WRTA to secure the site and complete a lease arrangement. The WRTA Hub serves to complete the vision of Union Station as a true intermodal facility. 4

City Manager Michael V. O’Brien Fiscal Year 2013 Highlighted Accomplishments

Forged a New Beginning at CitySquare- CitySquare, a $565M, multi-phased project in the heart of Downtown Worcester, is one of the largest public-private development projects in the Commonwealth outside of the Boston area. The approximately $470M private investment will be supported by a $94M public investment in the project area, which was designated a District Improvement Financing (DIF) District in 2005. This designation, the first of such in the Commonwealth, enables the City to utilize tax and parking revenues generated from property within the DIF project area to fund public infrastructure and public project elements in support of this major and pivotal redevelopment project. The demolition of the former Worcester Common Fashion Outlet Mall paved the way for the construction of the first two new buildings within the project area. One Mercantile Place, a 214,000 square foot office building, opened its doors to Unum employees in January 2013. The Saint Vincent Cancer and Wellness Center, a state-ofthe-art 66,000 square foot facility, will open its doors to patients in Summer 2013. Energized an Airport with JetBlue- After an energetic and eager courtship by the City, State and Massport, JetBlue announced Worcester as its 80th destination city on April 3, 2013. The airline will launch daily service from the Worcester Regional Airport to Fort Lauderdale, FL and Orlando, FL on November 7, 2013. The return of commercial air service to ORH is a testament to Massport’s commitment to the City and region, and coincides with the agency’s announcement to move forward with the installation of a parallel taxiway and Category III instrument landing system, an investment of more than $30M. The City is also working closely with Massport on the new $7M Fixed Base Operations facility under construction (RETRIX). Expanded Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences University Worcester (MCPHSU)- MCPHSU expansion in Downtown Worcester continues, with a total investment of over $350M to date. MCPHSU-Worcester opened in September 2000 with a class of 125 students and one program. MCPHSU-Worcester employs 175 professionals and is expected to grow to 200 within the next two years. It was the first non-profit institution to make a voluntary Payment in Lieu of Taxes (PILOT) to support the Worcester Public Library in late 2008. In June 2010, MCPHSU-Worcester purchased the 243-room Crowne Plaza Hotel for $16.8M and has transformed the property into the Lincoln Square Living & Learning Center. MCPHSU has completed construction on a $10M, 54,000 square foot six-story building connected to the Lincoln Square Living & Learning Center. This addition features a retail optician and 24 examination rooms, as well as additional study and student spaces. The School of Optometry opened in 2012. In January 2013, MCPHSU acquired another Downtown property at 15 Belmont Street, which includes a total of 90,000 square feet for $2.9M, and is seeking to renovate the property into loft-style apartments. MCPHSU currently enrolls 1,200 students in Worcester. It plans to enroll a total of 2,000 students at the Worcester campus within the next 5 years. The City continues to provide MCPHSU with technical support on its planning and permitting efforts. Established Economic Development Coordinating Council (EDCC)- The City, Massachusetts Biomedical Initiatives, Worcester Business Development Corporation, and 5

City Manager Michael V. O’Brien Fiscal Year 2013 Highlighted Accomplishments

Worcester Regional Chamber of Commerce have partnered to form an Economic Development Coordinating Council (EDCC) to provide a forum for open discussion, prioritization, and implementation of a collective approach to broad-based economic development within Worcester that supports residential, business, and institutional growth. This partnership has been working to create a visionary strategic plan for public and private investment to promote sustainable growth and economic expansion in the City of Worcester and the surrounding region. Presented Theatre District Initiative- The City and the Worcester Business Development Corporation (WBDC) have entered into a partnership to strategically focus on master planning and infrastructure improvements to promote economic development within an approximately thirty (30) acre area surrounding the Hanover Theatre for the Performing Arts. The City and the WRA will use this “master plan” to identify buildings and sites to reposition them for adaptive, mixed-use development as part of an urban renewal effort. Several Downtown sites have been identified as primary opportunities for transformation, such as vacant and under-utilized buildings in need of renovation and parcels for new construction. Pioneered Opportunity at the South Worcester Industrial Park- The South Worcester Industrial Park (SWIP) is an 11-acre brownfield site. The SWIP project consists of infrastructure improvements, demolition, and environmental remediation to create pad-ready parcels for light manufacturing, industrial, and commercial use. This past year, the City completed the final component of demolition – demolishing the buildings located at 65 Armory Street. In addition, environmental remediation was completed at 65 Armory Street, 17 Southgate Place, and 25 Southgate Street, creating pad-ready development sites for disposition and private redevelopment. Adopted City of Worcester Streetscape Policy and Urban Design Guidelines- In an effort to raise the standards of architectural quality and make the Downtown and Canal District more accessible, vibrant, and enjoyable for residents, workers, and visitors, the EOED has created two documents: Streetscape Policy and Urban Design Guidelines (Policy). The Policy sets forth carefully crafted recommendations to be used by the City, private developers, businesses, and property owners as a manual for the design of the public realm. The Policy, recently approved by the City Council, is already being implemented at projects like the DCU Center, CitySquare, and the WRTA Hub. In addition, building upon the success of streetscape improvements within the Canal District, the DPWP is embarking on a $20M Downtown streetscape improvement project designed to promote the vision as set forth in the Policy. Created the Crown Hill Local Historic District- Unanimously adopted by City Council on March 12, 2013, this local historic district is the City's largest and supports the preservation of some of the City's best remaining examples of mid-to-late 19th century architecture. The Crown Hill Local Historic District is the third approved local historic district in Worcester. 6

City Manager Michael V. O’Brien Fiscal Year 2013 Highlighted Accomplishments

Supported our Neighborhoods (CDBG Year 38 Funding)- During FY 13, the Neighborhood Development Division had several accomplishments related to supporting local services and activities that provided assistance to struggling, low and moderate income residents in Worcester neighborhoods. This was accomplished primarily through administration of HUD CDBG funds allocated to neighborhood and community focused housing and public service non-profit agencies. Additionally, in light of several new challenges related to City/HUD discussions, the Division instituted many new internal and external procedures and practices to reform management of the funds. Below is a bulleted summary of accomplishments:  Implemented 25 CDBG public service programs and contracted with 19 agencies worth $525,806 that benefited approximately 10,929 low to moderate income residents.  Implemented 9 HOPWA contracts with 5 agencies worth $430,256 that benefitted 129 households.  Administered 5 Worcester County Continuum of Care for the Homeless HUD funded contacts worth $1,229,107 annually that provided 92 units of supportive and transitional housing for families and individuals in order to prevent homelessness.  Administered Massachusetts Department of Children & Families (DCF) funded Worcester Community Connections Coalition (WCCC) program worth $399,833 that operated a Family Resource Center which provides information, referral, and educational services for 1,000 families. These services empower low income, inner city households through coordination of community resources, meeting their service needs, and helping improve parenting skills.  Supported two neighborhood planning initiatives in the Tatnuck and Brown Square areas of Worcester.  Developed and utilized a new and improved Community Development Block Grant Application for Program Year 39 and going forward. Continued Lead Abatement Program- During the course of a 3-year grant cycle (2009-2012), 433 units were inspected and de-leaded with $5.7M in funding. Approximately 48,000 individuals were reached through 120 various outreach and educational activities throughout the grant term. In the next 24 months, the Housing Division is projecting assistance to 132 units with $2.4M in funding. Supported HOME Investment Partnership Program- The Housing Division supported 6 projects with a total of 206 affordable housing units through the HOME Program. $4.1M in HOME funding was committed and disbursed to these projects that then leveraged over $52M in private investment. Redeveloped Voke Lofts, 34 Grove Street- The EOED facilitated the redevelopment of the former Vocational School buildings at 26/34 Grove Street into mixed-income residential housing 7

City Manager Michael V. O’Brien Fiscal Year 2013 Highlighted Accomplishments

with off-street parking by assisting with the sale, financing, and permitting of the properties. The Voke Lofts project, currently under construction by Winn Development, consists of the preservation and adaptive reuse of the 116,306 square foot building into 84 units of housing. Revitalized Gardner-Kilby-Hammond- In 2012, the housing portion of this multi-phased $32M brownfield revitalization project was completed, spearheaded through a public/ private partnership involving the Federal/ State governments, Main South Community Development Corporation, the Boys & Girls Club, Clark University, and the City of Worcester. A total of 80 affordable, energy-efficient homeownership housing units were constructed and are now for sale to first-time homebuyers. Stabilized Properties through Chapter 139 Hearings and Chapter 143 Inspections- More than 250 buildings were reviewed at Chapter 139 hearings for being in a “burnt, dilapidated or dangerous condition”. These proactive actions led directly to the demolition of 5 dangerous properties. In cases where buildings in this condition are suitable for rehabilitation, the Department of Inspectional Services (DIS) ensures proper permits are issued and inspections completed and Certificates of Occupancy are secured before returning the property to productive reuse. In 66 cases where the City was notified of a potential insurance payout of more than $1,000 under MGL 143, the Chapter 149 committee ensured each property was inspected to determine whether proceeds should be held in escrow to ensure rehabilitation or demolition was conducted as required/ appropriate. The DIS, through bid contracted services, conducted board ups at 45 properties and cleaned and liened 80 properties. Additionally, utilizing the PRT Revolving Fund, minor repairs were made in 31 residential units leading to stabilized tenancy. Revitalized Underused Properties through the Brownfields Program- The Division of Business Assistance houses the City’s Brownfields Program. Accomplishments of the Program this year include:  The City received $450,000 of EPA Revolving Loan Fund Supplemental Funding for its Brownfields Cleanup Revolving Loan Fund Program.  The City provided New Garden Park, Inc. with a $250,000 loan and a $250,000 grant through its BCRLF Program for remediation activities at 18-20 Franklin Street. Partnered for Growth at Gateway Park- The City continues to work with Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) on the development of Gateway Park, a market-based brownfield redevelopment project located just north of the City’s Downtown core in Lincoln Square. A $40M, 125,000 square foot research and development building was the first to open in Gateway Park in 2007, accompanied by an $11M, 680-car parking garage. This past year, O’Connell Development Group Inc., operating as 50 Prescott Street LLC, completed construction of a second laboratory/office building at Gateway Park. This 92,000-square foot, $32M construction 8

City Manager Michael V. O’Brien Fiscal Year 2013 Highlighted Accomplishments

project created 120 construction jobs and the potential of up to 140 permanent, full-time jobs. This building is the second of four new life sciences/office buildings planned for Gateway Park. In addition, on June 25, 2012, WPI broke ground on an 89,000-square-foot LEED certified residence hall within Gateway Park. The anticipated completion date for this 250-bed apartment style residence hall is Summer 2013. Enforced Vacant and Foreclosing Properties Ordinances- In FY13, the Department of Inspectional Services, in coordination with the Law Department, continued aggressive enforcement of the Vacant Properties and Foreclosing Properties Ordinance against the owners of these types of properties to ensure they registered and posted the required $5,000 bond for each property they owned. Over 850 properties are currently registered and bonded - up from 540 in FY12. Over $4M has been collected and is currently deposited in escrow. These funds are used for inspecting, securing, and marking other such buildings that are not in compliance with this Ordinance and a portion of the 10% administrative fee has been included as an offset to the DIS Budget for FY14. Appointed Receiverships- During FY13, 12 properties were reviewed: one (1) is currently pending court approval for the appointment of a receiver, two (2) were found not suitable candidates, and nine (9) were granted receivership and rehabilitated. An additional property was sold before receivership and is currently being rehabilitated. The number of units stabilized allowing families to remain in place this year was eleven (11). The City requests court appointed receivers for occupied properties where there is no viable ownership or management (a program that we began in 2008). In total, 68 properties have been reviewed under the program leading to the appointment of receivers and rehabilitation or ownership or new ownership rehabilitating the property or demolition. This has directly led to stabilizing housing for over 200 families. Partnered with the Attorney General for the Abandoned Housing Initiative (AHI) and Receiverships- The collaborative program between the City of Worcester and the Attorney General’s office has led to the review of 23 properties as potential receiverships. One property was granted a receiver and rehabilitation is currently underway. Four properties have been rehabilitated and newly occupied after gaining compliance from the owner. One property has been demolished. On February 24th, the City of Worcester and the AG’s office held a receiver outreach seminar to gain new receivers which was well attended and directly led to five (5) new receivers being approved. Established new PILOT Agreement with UMass Medical School- To reach mutual goals, the City and UMass Medical School established a new PILOT agreement following the School’s acquisition of the Massachusetts Biotechnology Research Park on Plantation Street from Alexandria Real Estate. This PILOT Agreement structures a voluntary payment that supports programs that align with the mission of the City and the School. The agreement provides for UMass Medical School to make voluntary payments to the City of $1,575,000 over five (5) 9

City Manager Michael V. O’Brien Fiscal Year 2013 Highlighted Accomplishments

years. These payments will be directed over these five years to support additional Worcester Public Library services and to support the biotech and bioscience classrooms and curriculum at our Worcester Technical High School. The agreement embodies our collective goals of improvements to education and economic development. Preserved History- The State Legislature adopted a Home Rule petition on July 31, 2012, allowing the City to sell the 6,735 square foot historic Fire Alarm & Telegraph building located at 230 Park Avenue to Spencer Savings Bank and enter into a ground lease of surrounding park land for parking and a drive-up remote teller/ATM structure. In addition to the adaptive reuse of the building into a retail banking facility, Spencer Savings Bank has partnered with Preservation Worcester to provide for a community room within the building as well as additional public amenities. The total project cost is anticipated to be approximately $3.5M. The development team is currently seeking permitting approvals and construction will commence by July 2013. Opened New State of the Art Triage Center- On May 15, 2013, the South Middlesex Opportunity Council opened a new, state of the art Triage and Assessment Center at 25 Queen Street in Worcester. The Center consists of 25 emergency triage beds and 15 single room occupancy (SRO) units. The City is providing FY13/14 HOME Tenant Based Rental Assistance to operate the 15 SRO units along with Emergency Solutions and McKinney Vento Homeless Assistance funding to rapidly re-house unaccompanied homeless adults coming through the Triage Center. With the opening of the new facility on Queen Street, the former site located at 701 Main Street has been permanently closed. Showcased Worcester through Nationally and Internationally Recognized EventsDestination Worcester remains a valuable, strategic investment for the City, the Chamber of Commerce, and community and business partners alike. Under a focused mission to showcase and sell the City of Worcester to meeting and convention planners, and event and sports organizers, Destination Worcester serves as the single point of contact for the City’s hospitality industry. Destination Worcester provides enhanced communications and a streamlined process for booking events in Worcester. Over the past year, Destination Worcester and the City have successfully booked and hosted numerous nationally and internationally recognized sporting events:  The 2013 USA Gymnastics American Cup (March 1-2, 2013), the United States’ most prestigious all-around international invitational, was at the DCU Center. The event featured some of the world’s top gymnasts in an all-around format and was broadcast live nationally for two hours on NBC TV.  The 2012 US Rowing Masters National Championships (August 8-12, 2012) at Lake Quinsigamond was the largest event in the history of US Rowing. Over 2,000 competitors from 36 States, Canada and Mexico competed in the Championship hosted by the Quinsigamond Rowing Association.

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City Manager Michael V. O’Brien Fiscal Year 2013 Highlighted Accomplishments

 The 2012 NCAA Hockey Division I Men’s Hockey Regional Championship (March 24-25, 2012) was hosted by the College of the Holy Cross and held at the DCU Center. One of four sites in the USA for this Regional Championship, this event was broadcast on ESPN. This Championship will return to Worcester in March 2014.  The 2012 US Synchronized Skating National Championship (February 29 – March 3, 2012) attracted over 2,000 figure skaters to Worcester. This event was broadcast live on the internet through icenetwork.com, and resulted in contracting over 5,200 hotel room nights in Worcester and Central Massachusetts.  The 2012 Fed Cup: USA vs. The Republic of Belarus (February 4-5, 2012) was held at the DCU Center. Serena Williams and Venus Williams of the USA and Victoria Azarenka of Belarus (who was #1 in the World at the time) were in Worcester to compete. Team USA won the competition by the score of 5-0. The Worcester Tennis Club and USA Tennis – New England hosted a clinic with USA Team members for over 400 Worcester Public School children.

NOTABLE DESIGNATIONS AND AWARDS FOR FY13 Zillow IRX Index Golden Snow Globe Commonwealth Fund Credit Donkey The Daily Beast 1st - for Young Singles (2013) 1st - Best Commute Time (2013) 1st - Snowiest City (2013) 1st - Best Access to Healthcare (2013) 7th - Best Small City for College Grads (2013) 14th - Ranking Most Creative U.S. Cities (2012)

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City Manager Michael V. O’Brien Fiscal Year 2013 Highlighted Accomplishments

CATEGORY: MANAGEMENT EFFICIENCIES AND IMPROVEMENTS Restructured the Office of the City Manager and Increased Focus on City-Wide PrioritiesCreated role of Assistant City Manager to remove the City Manager from the day-to-day operations of the organization in order to focus on the city-wide goals and priorities of the City Council and the community. Over the last year, the City Manager has been able to redirect efforts to lead the City’s broad policy agenda, develop new initiatives, create economic development opportunities, and drive reforms. The Executive Office also restructured positions within the City Manager’s Office and the Economic Development Office to streamline and improve operations as well as improve staff management and oversight. Regionalized Public Health Services and Fiscal Achievement- As the City Manager’s Task Force recommended in its 2009 report, Worcester Division of Public Health (WDPH) should develop a regional public health district that has the strength and capacity to maximize area municipal resources in order to deliver efficient and effective public health services. WDPH has been able to leverage a total payment of $289,500 from participating municipalities to help offset the operational budget. In addition, the WDPH garnered an additional $1.7M in grants that were used to support the Division’s operational needs, thus allowing the total budget to be less than 30% tax levy. The WDPH continues to expand the Central Massachusetts Regional Public Health Alliance, now consisting of five neighboring communities including Shrewsbury, Millbury, Leicester, West Boylston and Holden, serving a total population of 265,899 residents. Launched the Community Health Improvement Plan- Advancing the health of a community is vital to increasing residents’ quality of life, its safety, spurring economic development, and ensuring its overall success. Health is a product of multiple factors, including education, housing, employment, transportation, and numerous other underlying issues. Understanding these factors and how they influence health are critical steps towards community health improvement. To accomplish these goals, WDPH, UMass Memorial Medical Center and Common Pathways (CHNA 8) led a comprehensive community health planning initiative to measurably improve the health of the Greater Worcester Area by conducting:  A multi-component Community Health Assessment (CHA) to provide a comprehensive portrait of the community’s health status as well as its strengths and needs.  A Community Health Improvement Plan (CHIP) to provide an action-oriented strategic plan, outlining priority health issues and how they will be addressed over the next three years. The five health priority domains consisting of Healthy Eating / Active Living, Behavioral Health (includes mental health and substance abuse), Access to Primary Care, Injury/Violence Prevention and Health Equity / Health Disparities were identified and developed by over 100 community partners. These domains will be addressed and implemented through evidenced 12

City Manager Michael V. O’Brien Fiscal Year 2013 Highlighted Accomplishments

based strategies over the next three years, and updated in year 4 in order to reach the overarching goal of being the “Healthiest City in New England by 2020”. Developed Communicable Disease Reporting System- This past year, the Worcester Division of Public Health (WDPH) worked with the Technical Services Division (TSD) to develop an online system for our local hospitals and healthcare providers to report suspected and confirmed illnesses listed in 105 CMR 300. The new Communicable Disease Reporting Website enables healthcare providers to quickly and easily report, 24/7/365, suspected and confirmed reportable illness to WDPH as required by Massachusetts General Law. This new system creates a more efficient and effective reporting mechanism that provides an electronic audit trail for both the Division’s use and providers use. Worcester hospitals are currently using this new system, and the WDPH plans to implement it with health centers in FY14. Created Academic Partnerships- The WDPH has formalized a cooperative working relationship with numerous academic institutions in the City with the long term intent of developing a Worcester Center for Public Health Practice (CPHP). Our colleges and universities have similar missions to address the health needs of specific groups (racial, cultural, geographical, and economic) and of the community as a whole. Given this unusually rich mix of college and university programs, WDPH has begun the process to maximize our collective efforts. While the WDPH has historically worked alongside these organizations, we intend to strengthen the public health system to better coordinate all of these academic resources. Reorganized Worcester Police Department (WPD)- In its continued effort to improve service delivery with increased efficiency, the WPD reorganized several departmental functions. In response to gun and other serious violence in the City, the WPD merged the shooting response team with the street violence prevention group (a working group made up of our federal, state, and local law enforcement and criminal justice partners). In addition, the Department continued to focus on tactical response area strategies to shift police resources to address identifiable neighborhood crime and violence trends. The traffic enforcement and accident investigation/reconstruction functions were also reorganized. The Department also increased command and control with the assignment of a captain to the Service Division and lockup areas. Departmental policies and procedures are continuously reviewed and amended to reflect best practice standards. This includes weekly command staff meetings to review and track overtime, court overtime, and additional departmental expenditures. One significant best practice to note is the collaboration with the leadership of the New England Police Benevolent Association Local 911 Executive Board to avoid grievances and costly litigation. Over the past year, there were no grievances filed by NEPBA against the police administration. Continued Efforts to Enhance Public Safety- The Worcester Police Department (WPD) continues to address the issues of crime, physical and social disorder, quality of life and neighborhood issues through partnerships between the Police Department, City departments, and the community. The Department continues its split-force model to optimize resources for 13

City Manager Michael V. O’Brien Fiscal Year 2013 Highlighted Accomplishments

emergency calls and calls-for-service, in-depth investigation into crimes, and increased interaction with the community. In FY13, the Department initiated the assignment of permanent foot patrols to neighborhoods prone to high crime to be conducted by on-duty officers as part of their regular shifts. WPD also conducted its Summer Impact Program and Community Policing efforts with designated officers to support neighborhood issues. On-going strategies also include statistical analysis and tactical response to street crime, hot spots, crime surges, crime prevention, crime control, apprehension and suppression, and problem solving through identification of the root cause of citizen complaints that involve multiple agencies and collaboration. Incorporated New Technology Initiatives at the Worcester Police Department- Several new initiatives were incorporated by WPD this year to enhance technology and communication efforts with residents. These initiatives and programs include:  Utilized social media platforms to disseminate information to the general public as well as the traditional media in a timely manner. The Facebook page has over 350,000 views with 11,500 followers and 7,000 Twitter followers.  Implemented in-house electronic evidence tracking application for improved evidence management and control.  Developed and disseminated videos over YouTube and Cable Access Channel 12 including segments on recruit training, the Crime Scene Unit and community events.  Implemented a new WPD application for the iPhone, the Real Time Crime Center and iPad technology for all investigative officers.  Recertified the Crime Lab’s Latent Print Unit and began work to certify the other functions of the Crime Scene Unit. Implemented Real Time Crime Center (RTCC)- RTCC is a program implemented by WPD to quickly access privately owned and managed video surveillance cameras during a public safety emergency or potential critical incident. These are the same privately owned and managed video cameras that WPD officers had to previously access as part of a criminal investigation. By establishing partnerships with the community and having immediate access to their video cameras, the RTCC is used to facilitate the gathering of suspect and crime scene information that can be quickly disseminated to responding officers and investigators. Investigators will continue to canvass the area of a crime or incident for additional surveillance cameras and follow the established protocol of requesting a copy of the relevant video from the individual owner of the video surveillance equipment. Introduced Online Crime Incident Data- Citizens can now gain access to neighborhood level crime incident data in near real time. Through CrimeReports.com, the City now offers residents, organizations, and businesses the ability to access crime data via the internet or from the CrimeReports iPhone app, available for free download in the Apple iTunes Store. This service 14

City Manager Michael V. O’Brien Fiscal Year 2013 Highlighted Accomplishments

also lets local citizens sign up for free customizable email updates so they can monitor crime in their neighborhoods. Enhanced Training, Certification, and Staffing Structure within Communications Department- The City reached mutually beneficial agreement with Local 495, NAGE, SEIU, regarding Communication Department Dispatchers which allows for Emergency Medical Dispatcher Certifications, Regionalization, and an Employee Career Path Classification Plan. The agreement provides for enhanced training and certification of staff, ensures proper supervisory levels, and creates a competitive salary structure for current and future employees of the Communications Department, including three (3) levels of Regional Dispatcher and two (2) levels of Senior Regional Dispatcher. These enhancements result in increased performance and quality of 9-1-1 dispatch services. Created Uniform City Identification Procedure within Department of Emergency Communications- This year the Department of Emergency Communications created a uniform City identification badge for employees of the following departments: Communications, Fire Department, Division of Public Health, Department of Inspectional Services, Economic Development and all City Hall personnel. In the past, individual departments utilized their own ID templates which often times created confusion for public safety officers allowing employees to enter disaster scenes or secure areas. All City of Worcester IDs are now consistent in design and include security features such as ghost images of the person and hologram laminate. Public Safety IDs are vertical and all others are horizontal. WFD IDs include the individuals training credentials such as EMT, Scuba, or Incident Command. Updated Comprehensive Emergency Management System- The Emergency Management Division, in partnership with all City Departments, updated the City’s Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan. This document provides the basis for response to all natural and man-made hazards. As part of the Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan update, a Homeless Population Annex was completed. The purpose of this annex is to provide guidance and response procedures in caring for the homeless population during a disaster incident. This included outreach and documenting the many service providers for the homeless population. These providers will supply the foundation for a communication conduit to the homeless should a disaster strike. Improved Oversight and Management of CDBG Funding Programs- In past nearly 40 years, the City managed its Federal funding program with minimal guidance from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and without a standardized process for program selection and outcomes. While the City complied with required processes, the result was that organizations were funded year after year to undertake programs that, ultimately, did not meet full Federal requirements with clearly defined eligible outcomes. Over the past year, we have worked closely with HUD, both its regional office and its inspector general’s office, as well as a HUD-provided technical assistance consultant, to review our programs and establish best 15

City Manager Michael V. O’Brien Fiscal Year 2013 Highlighted Accomplishments

practices. In order to ensure that all issues are identified, a number of steps have been implemented:  Completed a thorough review of all expenditures and collected necessary documentation.  Created a system of checks and balances with the hiring of a Compliance Officer in the Executive Office of Economic Development and the appointment of a Compliance Officer in the Budget Office to ensure that every payment request is documented.  Held a series of neighborhood-based community needs assessments throughout the City’s low-moderate income neighborhoods to identify community priorities as balanced against objective data collection.  Established a clear Federal grant application process for interested parties that include a mandatory technical assistance session and a mandatory public presentation of any funding proposals.  Reorganized and empowered the Community Development Advisory Committee (CDAC).  Working with HUD’s regional office, improved project scopes and identified clear, eligible outcomes for contract reimbursements.  Reorganized and reinvigorated our contract monitoring processes to ensure that each grantee is visited by multiple staff members and reviewed for compliance with Federal and contractual requirements.  Established training goals for all staff to ensure that each person is current with rules and regulations. Enhanced Technology to Support Department of Public Works & Parks (DPW&P) Customer Service Center- Working with the Division of Technical Services, DPW&P continues to identify and enhance technology systems and programs to allow residents to report problems and issues of public safety or concerns in the most efficient manner. This year, over 760 individuals participated in live online chats with a Customer Service Member and the website had over 116,000 visits, an increase of over 30,000 last year. The impressive Customer Service Center FY13 statistics include:      Total # of Calls Total # of Work Orders % of Work Orders Completed Total # of DPW & P Emails Total # of Live Chat Sessions 71,719 38,141 92% 1,794 760

Implemented Cable Complaint System- In collaboration with the Division of Technical Services, the Cable Services Division developed and implemented a universal cable complaint system. This system is integrated into the DPW&P Customer Service System allowing for more 16

City Manager Michael V. O’Brien Fiscal Year 2013 Highlighted Accomplishments

uniformed format, efficiency, and tracking of cable complaints, issues or inquiries. The Cable Services Division receives a variety of cable TV related complaints from billing issues, to poor customer service, to outages. The new complaint system allows them to easily search and generate reports to spot trends or common issues. Enhanced and Customized Systems with the Department of Inspectional Services (DIS)DIS issued over 15,000 permits and licenses and conducted over 35,000 inspections in FY13. Division of Technical Services continues to work with DIS staff members to further customize and enhance the Customer Service Response System (CSRS) to enter and track customer complaints and work orders for Housing, Health and Building/ Zoning through to resolution thereby enhancing customer service and response times. The customization of the ViewPermit system continues with the integration of payment portion of the software being linked to the City’s Financial Management System - eliminating the redundant entry of payment information into two systems (thereby reducing workload and the potential for error). Testing will be completed in FY13 with implementation scheduled for early FY14. Convened Interdepartmental Review Team (IRT)- Conducted weekly standing meetings of the IRT consisting of staff from DIS, DPW (engineering), Planning and Regulatory Services, and other departments as necessary. These meetings result in more complete board/ commission application packages which often eliminate the need for boards/ commissions to hold subsequent meetings/ hearings to approve applications. This allows for quicker permit approvals and streamlines the development process. Enhanced Technical and Reporting Capabilities within Worcester Fire Department- The hiring of a dedicated departmental IT member enables the WFD to gather and analyze data critical to determining trends of fire incidents in neighborhoods or commercial areas, as well as to develop software applications to aid the Department in pre-incident planning initiatives; mobile data terminals in our fleet, and handle the day to day technical needs of our department. Improved Access and Infrastructure of Systems with the Worcester Public Library (WPL)As an effort of going “green”, IT staff configured a site for the Library Board Directors to access board documents remotely from anywhere at anytime. Library staff can now post any of the agenda items, meeting minutes, announcement, etc. onto the Board site for instant updates and easy retrieval; and during monthly Library Board and Committee meetings, members are able to use iPads provided by the Library or their own devices to view the documents online if they so choose. IT staff have upgraded the storage on the Backup Server and its software in August 2012, including backing up files to the cloud with simple user interface and report functions. The operational time to backup to disk and tape is much easier and faster. IT staff also use the Main Library’s Pharos computer reservation system to remotely govern all adult Internet computers at the Frances Perkins Branch Library.

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City Manager Michael V. O’Brien Fiscal Year 2013 Highlighted Accomplishments

Automated DPW Winter Operations- Automated DPW’s winter operations to utilize scanners and iPads to electronically monitor and control sand, salt, and plow operations. Throughout a winter storm event, real time data is collected by bar code scanners in sand/salt sheds, by mobile iPad applications used by plow inspectors in the field, and by DPW administrators using the Customer Service Request System. The collected data allows personnel at the DPW Call Center to stay informed on which areas of the City are being sanded, salted, or plowed, and how long these operations have been in progress. The data also ensures that the Call Center is up-to-date on which customer complaints have been resolved. This information can then be used to answer calls from the public regarding the status of a particular street or a specific complaint that was logged. When the winter event is over and all trucks are off the clock, the data is used to produce reports that summarize storm-related costs and create invoices for contractors who supplied the hired equipment for the storm operations. Implemented Video Cameras to Expand Security of City Facilities- Designed and implemented the infrastructure for a video surveillance system that will enable the City to provide and expand security for municipal buildings, parks, public plazas, and Downtown centers. A video system is a great security tool for keeping residents, consumers, and businesses safe. Cameras installed in high-traffic and risk-prone areas can help reduce street crime and vandalism, assist law enforcement in resolving cases, and allows for integration of video feeds from other agencies, schools, banks, etc. Conducted City-wide PC Upgrades- The Technical Services Division conducted an upgrade and replacement of desk top personal computers throughout City departments in order to prepare for the obsolescence of Windows XP. This extensive effort to replace the vast majority of City computers improved efficiency, computer speed, and reduced down time for personnel city-wide. Upgraded and Expanded Worcester Wi-Fi Access- Upgraded and expanded the Worcester Wi-Fi service to the following six City locations: Technical Services, Police Department, Health & Code, Senior Center, and DPW buildings at 20 East Worcester Street and 76 East Worcester Street. Before this expansion, only three City buildings had Wi-Fi service: Union Station, City Hall and Green Hill Golf Course. In addition, Wi-Fi will be extended to DPW’s Water Filtration site by July 1. Developed WPD Detective Bureau Case Management System- A case management system was developed for the WPD Detective Bureau to track and manage incidents/caseloads for the WPD and includes increased security with encryption, evidence tracking with bar coding that links to the specific case and tracking of evidence sent to Mass State Police Labs for analysis with case and evidence-linking, as part of the Forensic Liaison project. Enhanced Public Knowledge and Access to Emergency Communications/Emergency Management Information- As a consequence of the destructive Springfield, MA, tornado in 18

City Manager Michael V. O’Brien Fiscal Year 2013 Highlighted Accomplishments

June 2011, all web content for Emergency Communications and Emergency Management has been revised to include updated preparedness information.  Updated information was made available on September 7, 2012, in conjunction with National Preparedness month and a billboard was located on I-290.  Revised content includes information on incident phases, preparedness; citizens with disabilities; resources and volunteerism.  URL www.worcesterma.gov/911 was added for Emergency Communications.  URL www.worcesterma.gov/ready was added for Emergency Management.  Worcester Hazards section highlights examples of disasters that have struck Worcester through the years to emphasize the importance of being prepared. Selected for Customer Service Mobile Application Project- Working in collaboration with the City of Boston and funding provided by the Commonwealth Innovation Challenge Grant, this project includes a single mobile application concerned residents can use across the State to report issues they see while driving through Worcester. With the help of the City’s Technical Services Department along with our Consultant, this mobile application will work directly with the existing Customer Service Request System. When a resident launches the app on their mobile phone, if the app detects they are in Worcester, it will automatically present the City of Worcester’s Department of Public Works custom branding and specific request types will be displayed on the residents phone that relate to Worcester. The resident will log their issue and it will at be linked to the CSRS Application and follow the predetermined process as if the person called the Customer Service Center. Once the work order has been completed, the resident will be automatically notified that their issue has been resolved. Enhanced Training and Operating Procedures for the Delivery of Regional Public Health Initiatives- The Worcester Department of Public Health (WDPH) continues to pursue workforce development and standardizations of public health practice in order to achieve excellence in the delivery of service at the local and regional level, while at the same time creating a professional public health practice foundation that is required to prepare for national accreditation. Currently, WDPH is training all Regional Public Health Specialists in a uniform and standard application of environmental health inspections, with a focus on professionally crafted inspection reports and administrative letters that are consistent as to from and legal content. To date, numerous standard operating procedures have been developed, adopted and are being implemented throughout the Alliance. This includes environmental health topics including but not limited to, Food Code Plan Review, Compulsive Hoarding, Swimming Pool and Title V. Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) provide the foundation from which our field staff and Board of Health members are able to effectively monitor environmental health program status while providing needed educational and regulatory oversight. Both field staff and regional Board of Health members have and will continue to be a part of a uniform training program. Management team members from the WDPH attended four National Conferences this year to present “Best 19

City Manager Michael V. O’Brien Fiscal Year 2013 Highlighted Accomplishments

Practice Models” for Workforce Quality Improvement, Regionalization and Community Health Improvement Plan Initiatives. Conducted Strategic Planning Process and Updated Policies at the Worcester Public Library (WPL)- The Library made numerous advances over the past year to maintain and/ or enhance the quality of essential routine services, support infrastructure and create a communication process that provides measurable improvement in the Library’s operation. WPL embarked on a strategic planning process at the start of February 2013 to guide its future growth and services. Library staff and Board members recently facilitated focus group interviews with children, teens, adults, immigrants, refugees, and community leaders. These important discussions assisted in determining how the Library can work with and better serve diverse populations. Library administrators worked to develop clearly written policies and procedures that are documented, updated, and followed to streamline operations. The Library Board approved the following policies and procedures: Patron Behavior Policy, Safety of Children in the Library, Social Media Policy, Library Space Use Policy, and Staff Development and Continuing Education Policy. Expanded Customer Services, Facilities, and Hours at the Worcester Public Library (WPL)- Libby (Library Express), the innovative state-of-the-art mobile library service, launched on June 4, 2012. Over the last year, Libby visited numerous special events including Wheels to Water, Out to Lunch Concert Series on the Common, promotional activity at the College of the Holy Cross, and stART on the Street. In addition, Libby visited two groups at 19 Worcester Public Schools during the Fall/Winter and Winter/Spring schedules. The Worcester Public Library restored operation on Mondays, some evenings, and most Sundays during FY13. With the implementation of the new RFID (Radio-frequency identification) and the AMH (Automated Materials Handling) systems, customers will have the option for self-checkout and self-payment beginning June 20th. These systems also enable the Library to redirect its labor force to increase valuable contact with its customers and expand its hours to include additional days and evenings. The first floor of the Main Library has also undergone a redesign to allow for a new welcome area, training center, Bookstore and Café to enhance customer service. Completed Training on National Incident Management System (NIMS)- Department of Inspectional Services meets 100% of minimum NIMS Compliance with all staff having completed both the 100 and 700 series training. In addition, 10 staff members have completed training beyond the requirement and 5 staff members have completed the entire series. This training is critical for preparedness, eligibility for Federal Public Safety grants and to ensure the City of Worcester is a NIMS compliant community. Expanded City Management Training Programs- The Human Resources Training Division provided more management training opportunities in a pro-active approach to improve efficient delivery of services through the systematic training of supervisory staff in all departments for all managerial levels. The training consisted of Effective Communication and Supervisory Methods, 20

City Manager Michael V. O’Brien Fiscal Year 2013 Highlighted Accomplishments

Documentation Techniques and Personnel Records Law, Harassment and DiscriminationWorkplace Violence and Liability, Employee Leaves & Processes for FMLA, Sick Leave, SNLA, Military Leave, Vacation & Personal Leave, Team Building and Progressive Discipline. This program is important as the training strengthens management and leadership skills and educates supervisors on relevant employment laws, reducing risk of liability and fostering consistency in all departments. Increased Opportunities for Professional Development- The Human Resources Training Division, through collaboration and partnerships with local Colleges and Universities, provided employees the opportunity to enhance their skills through the Tuition Waiver Program and discounted graduate and undergraduate programs. This year, 37 tuition waivers were granted to employees who participated in the Tuition Waiver Program at 7 different locations. Clark University and Assumption College offered employee discounts on graduate programs. This year, 5 employees took advantage of these collaborative programs and 2 employees graduated in May receiving a Master of Public Administration Degree from Clark University. In FY13, the Division also began a new partnership with Becker College who provided a 3 credit course called ‘Effective Communication’ to employees at no cost. Out of the 22 employees who took advantage of this course, 3 entered into Becker’s accelerated Bachelor degree program. Delivered Extensive Training to City Employees, Appointees, and Interns- Training efforts of the Human Resources Department Training Division in FY13 included a cross-section of valuable and useful topics to enhance the skills and knowledge of our employees and volunteers. Much emphasis is put on customer service skills and interpersonal/communication skills to improve the delivery of public services.            New Employee Orientation Board & Commission Training Staff Liaison Training Management Training Advanced Customer Service Time Management Ethics Training Harassment Prevention Training Identifying Potential Gang Problems Email Communication Constructive Confrontation Dealing with the Troubled Employee Open Meeting Law Problem Solving All About E-readers and iPads Retirement Planning Tuition Waiver Program Graduate Programs  Heavy Lifting Ergonomics  DOT regulated Drug & Alcohol Training      

Provided Wellness Programs and Initiatives to Improve Employee Health and Reduce Health Care Costs- Numerous initiatives have been developed to help employees become engaged in healthy lifestyle practices. In cooperation with Fallon Community Health Plan, employee engagement has increased tremendously with over 1,300 employees participating in some type of Wellness program. Due to the large number of employees who enrolled in FCHP, 21

City Manager Michael V. O’Brien Fiscal Year 2013 Highlighted Accomplishments

the partnership has expanded to include the formation of a Wellness Advisory Committee, which is represented by every department in the City. The partnership also resulted in the development of the “Healthy Advantage Magazine”, a wellness publication for City employees. FY13 Wellness Programs included: Free Golf Lessons, Diabetes & Exercise Seminars, Walking Challenges, Go Red for Women Campaign, Quit to Win Smoking Cessation Program, 50 Days to Fabulous nutrition course, Safe Lifting Ergonomics Seminar, Running/Walking Teams, Holiday Healthy Recipe Contest, Stress Management Seminars, on-site flu and blood pressure clinics and free biometric screenings to measure employee’s progress and create awareness of risk of disease. Highlights of FY13 initiatives were:  Extreme Loser Challenge WFD resulted in 41 firefighters losing 513 pounds and collectively lowering glucose by 182 points and cholesterol by 544 points.  Newly formed City Slickers running team resulted in new runners completing half marathons, triathlons and all the Tour de Worcester races.  Walk to Fitness challenge engaged 13 different departments and the winning team, Law Office, had an unprecedented 100% employee participation rate.  Newly formed partnership with the Audubon Society to promote hiking by making City Parks more accessible and affordable. Improved Employee Relations through Effective Communications and Processes- The Human Resources Department continues to improve relationships between departments and union groups by assisting in open communication, mediation, and resolution of issues and conflicts. In FY13, over 200 grievances were resolved at the department level and through inhouse mediation, ultimately saving time and money for both the City and the unions. In addition, the Labor Relations Division investigated twelve (12) complaints of alleged employee misconduct regarding sexual harassment and harassment based on discrimination. The prompt and thorough investigative action averted costly litigation and served to help departments restore relationships and effective communication in the work environment. The number of ADA interactive conferences have more than doubled since FY12 to fifteen (15) as departments recognize the value of engaging in the interactive process as required by law to retain and accommodate experienced and qualified employees who may require a reasonable accommodation to return to work or continue to work for the City. Educated and Transitioned Employees and Retirees to new Health and Other City Benefits- Over 33,000 City and WPS health care plan members are managed by the Benefits Division each year to review and select their health and other benefit selections. In FY13, over 1,000 benefit changes were made and processed to transition early retirees from the old health plans (BCBS Blue Choice, FCHP Direct, and FCHP Select) to the new GIC-like Tiered plans that all of the active employees had changed during FY12: BCBS Blue Care Elect, BCBS Network Blue New England, City of Worcester Advantage and City of Worcester Direct. Throughout the year, the Division transitioned over 300 Medicare eligible retirees to enroll in Medicare and new health plans. Over 130 new retirees, 200 City and WPS new hires, and 250 22

City Manager Michael V. O’Brien Fiscal Year 2013 Highlighted Accomplishments

employees in transition (resignations, layoffs, deaths and terminations) were assisted through the process to enroll or change their City benefits. Increased Minority Representation- Although restricted by continuing budget constraints, attrition, and Civil Service requirements, the City has been able to continue the on-going efforts to increase minority hiring and the percentage of overall minority employees by 1% over the last year to a total of 12%. In FY13, the City hired 20 new minority employees. Working collaboratively with clergy groups and community organizations, minority outreach efforts continued to increase the hiring of minority employees, most notably in the Worcester Police Department. This year, the department graduated the most diverse recruit class in the history of the department with 8 minority officers out of 17 graduates. The City has also improved minority representation on Boards and Commissions, whereby we currently have 167 members of the City’s Boards and Commissions: 117 male, 50 female, and 33 minorities or 20%. Enhanced Minority Outreach Efforts- An increase in minority appointments can be attributed to aggressive outreach to minority organizations, newspapers and colleges. For instance, City positions were posted at local colleges such as Becker College, Anna Maria College, Assumption College, QCC, and Worcester State University; local organizations/non-profits such as Centro Las Americas, Henry Lee Willis, Easter Seals, Worcester Housing Authority, YMCA, YWCA, Worcester Community Action Council (Employment & Training Services), Worcester Public Library, YOU Inc, and the Southeast Asian Coalition of Central Mass. Additional outreach was made utilizing a minority outreach list via email which consists of a wide range of community groups and individuals; City website; newspapers such as Vocero, Radiant and the Telegram & Gazette; and professional organizations that target women and minorities. A collaboration with several local organizations resulted in the development of recruitment materials targeting women and minorities for City positions which were distributed throughout the City. In combining all these recruitment efforts, we have improved communication, fostered collaboration and improved the recruitment of minority and women for City positions. Identified Health Disparities and Inequity- Earlier this year, as the Worcester Division of Public Health conducted the health assessment portion of the Community Health Improvement Program, reducing racial, ethnic and socioeconomic health disparities and inequalities emerged as a particular concern amongst many. In an effort to address these concerns, the WDPH and community partners identified Domain Area Five of the Community Health Improvement Plan to address health equity/ health disparities. The goal of Domain Five is to improve population health by systematically eliminating the institutional racism and the pathology of oppression/ discrimination by promoting equitable access to, and use of, health promoting resources in the community, and significantly reducing the structural and environmental factors that contribute to health disparities. Provided Community Fair Housing Training and Conference- Provided twenty-one community trainings and presentations on fair housing and referred twenty-one legal intakes for 23

City Manager Michael V. O’Brien Fiscal Year 2013 Highlighted Accomplishments

housing discrimination to Community Legal Aid per our agreement with our partner in the Worcester Fair Housing Project. The Office organized a Worcester Fair Housing Conference on April 6, 2013 in observance of April’s Fair Housing Month, as well as collaborated with numerous social and legal agencies in the Worcester area in addition to receiving the support and participation of employees from the City’s Inspectional Services, Housing Development and Neighborhood Stabilization and the City’s Lead Abatement Program. Produced Important Community “Know Your Rights” Training Videos- The Office of Human Rights and Disabilities collaborated with the Cable Services Division to develop, record, and televise training videos that were shared with the wider community. The following “Know Your Rights” programs were taped, aired and remain available on the City’s website for streaming: “Voter Rights”, “What to Do When Stopped by Police”, “Human Trafficking Awareness and Identification”, “What to Do if you Suspect Abuse or Neglect of the Elderly or Persons with Disabilities”, and the “Worcester Fair Housing Conference”. Provided Training on Issues of Human Rights and Diversity Representation- The Office of Human Rights & Disabilities provided training to employees across City Departments on the following topics: “Human Trafficking”, “What to Do if you Suspect Abuse of Elders or Persons with Disabilities”, “Cultural Diversity”, and “Human Rights”. The Director led the City Manager’s Coalition Against Bias & Hate in hosting an educational Spring forum on Diversity Representation in Appointed and Elected Officials in the City. As part of the forum, the Coalition worked closely with the Citizen Advisory Council (CAC) and reviewed and made public the diversity statistics on City Boards and Commissions and made a public call for community leader involvement to increase diversity in the coming year. Improved Communication and Customer Service to Diverse Community- The City has improved the ability to do outreach and provide enhanced customer service in multiple languages both within City departments and through collaboration with local organizations. A few examples include: the Department of Inspectional Services (DIS) has inspectors who speak both Spanish and Vietnamese fluently, allowing for both counter assistance and field services to the Spanish and Vietnamese population of the City of Worcester. DIS staff members who participate on Sweep Initiatives are provided with literature in multiple languages that are known to be heavily utilized in the pre-determined sweep area, providing key educational information to the residents of Worcester. The Fire Prevention and Education Division reached 40,000 residents through 800 workshops on education, risk reduction, life safety and detector education. These workshops were held in multiple high-rise housing complexes throughout the City, reaching our diverse population with materials provided in 3 languages. The Fire Prevention and Education Division has worked with the disabled and visually and hearing impaired community as well, providing special means of message delivery, including audio CDs. The Office of Human Rights and Disabilities distributed over 4,500 brochures on fair housing and lead paint discrimination in 3 languages during their extensive community education initiative on fair housing and legal rights. 24

City Manager Michael V. O’Brien Fiscal Year 2013 Highlighted Accomplishments

CATEGORY: DELIVERY OF CORE MUNICIPAL SERVICES A. Public Safety  Increased staffing levels in the WPD patrol division in order to safely and effectively respond to calls for service.  Initiated the Summer Impact Program by adding 18 police officers in uniform operating in marked police cruisers in designated areas to maximize staffing over the traditionally busy summer months.  Maintained the department’s commitment to community policing through established partnerships and by servicing the neighborhood watch program, including multiple citywide crime watch meetings.  Continued the department’s commitment to address violence associated with gangs, drugs and guns through increased collaboration with the street violence prevention group partnerships.  Increased the department commitment to pedestrian and school zone safety through aggressive enforcement and Operation Safe Crossing.  Applied for and received numerous grants including Byrne JAG, traffic enforcement, Shannon, underage alcohol enforcement, cold case, domestic violence, and Coverdell.  Hosted the annual Youth Summit, Summer Gang Program, and secured grant funding to provide summer jobs for at-risk youth. Continued our partnerships with the Youth Center, Boys and Girls Club, Worcester Public Schools, and other youth community groups.  Continued to work collaboratively with the clergy members to enhance and expand mentoring partnerships to include community outreach and interventions.  Visited over 250 residents following structural building fires in their neighborhoods educating them in arson prevention and awareness.  Provided 5,600 students with fire education in the schools through the S.A.F.E. grant.  Assisted the elderly community with installing working smoke detectors in their homes at no cost to the home owner.

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City Manager Michael V. O’Brien Fiscal Year 2013 Highlighted Accomplishments

 Replaced a 1989 front line piece of apparatus with a 2013-1200 gallon pumper, thus reducing our average age of front line engines to 11 years from 16 years.

B. Department of Public Works and Parks  Resurfaced 115 streets that included 21 miles. Additionally 16.5 miles of sidewalks were reconstructed. This was the second year of the three (3) year program to substantially increase the city-wide pavement condition with the $20M appropriation from City Council. These numbers represent about double the mileage of previous years.  Implemented an initial $3M investment in the renovation of Elm Park.  Planted over 1500 trees on the City’s right of way and in Public Parks since July 2012. An additional 500 trees will be planted in the fall of 2013. When included with past plantings and collaboration with the Worcester Tree Initiative the total number will exceed 30,000 (public & private) trees in the last five years.  Implemented a $10M program to renovate various parks between July of 2012 and the end of calendar year 2013. These renovations will include the following facilities: Elm Park, University Park, East Park, Worcester Common / Front & Sides of City Hall, Knights of Columbus, Duffy Field, Kendrick Field, Ty Cobb Field, Bennett Field, Green Hill Park, Greenwood Park, Holmes Field, Harrington Way, Mulcahy Field, Institute Park, Lake Park, Salisbury Park, and the Newton Square Veterans Memorial to name a few.  Continued the aggressive removal of dead and dying public shade trees with the goal of saving as many as possible. This process continues to include inspection of trees and trimming where needed. They have also reduced the number of stumps within the public right of way from over 1,000 to approximately a manageable 150. Going forward, resources to keep the number of stumps as small as possible will be priority.  Continued to maintain our Public Park system with over 115 acres mowed each week and the removal over 375 tons of trash from these facilities. This work continues to be completed with minimal staff and increasing responsibility, including over 12,000 individual permits that are processed and managed by the Parks Division for Park use. Each one required attention to detail for a quality experience of the facility users.  Provided the Following Services through Operation Divisions:    Street Operations: Water Operations: Sewer Operations: 6,340 Curb Miles of Arterials Swept 6,750 Cross Connection Inspections and Tests 455,000 Linear Feet of Sewer Main Flushed 26

City Manager Michael V. O’Brien Fiscal Year 2013 Highlighted Accomplishments

 

Central Garage: Sanitation Operations:

96% Preventive Maintenance Completed On-time 32% of Waste Recycled Curbside

 Celebrated the 10th year anniversary of the Abandoned Vehicle Removal Program (AVRP) this April. Once reported to DPW and confirmed abandoned, the vehicles are removed from City streets. The program’s continued success has virtually eliminated this perennial problem that plagued the City in the past. The AVRP has been a consistent revenue generator for the City as $ 552,391 in fines and fees have been collected since AVRP’s inception.  Completed more than 3,000 nuisance team work orders with 99 percent of violations being resolved. The Department of Inspectional Services Nuisance Team responded to 3,087 work orders in regard to issues including graffiti, housing conditions, potholes, missing or faded street signs, illegal dumping, and other trash related problems. These efforts ensure residential units are maintained in a condition that provides decent, safe and sanitary housing and keep neighborhoods free from rubbish and litter. In addition, the City Manager’s “Clean Team” removed nearly 14 thousand pounds of trash from neighborhoods in which events were held in FY13.  Responded to Significant Water Main Failure. On November 12, 2012, DPW responded to the failure of a 30 inch cast iron water pipe located on Chandler Street. This unprecedented failure required a shut-down of the water system and prompt response and resolution from the entire City Team on all levels of service-- from community wide notification, public health inspections and notifications to hospitals and Inspectional Services outreach to restaurant owners and food handlers . The follow up and follow through as to the cause of this failure and the action/ investments identified to minimize the risk of any re-occurrences are a positive reflection of the professionals we have working for the City. C. Education/Library  Continued to improve the educational environment for all students in our public schools through capital improvement projects working through the Massachusetts School Building Authority’s Accelerated Repair Program (MSBA). The main goal of the program is to improve the learning environments for children and teachers, reduce energy use, and generate cost savings. The City has completed an eligibility process and subsequent feasibility study with MSBA leading to the funding of five (5) Accelerated School Projects. These included new windows and doors at May Street, Chandler Magnet, Lake View and New Citizens Center schools, along with new boilers at Jacob Hiatt and the New Citizens Center School. The funding agreement will reimburse the city for 80% of eligible cost of the estimated 9.6 million dollar project. 27

City Manager Michael V. O’Brien Fiscal Year 2013 Highlighted Accomplishments

 Completed an eligibility process with MSBA for the Nelson Place School and was awarded a contract for a feasibility study that is now in process. This study will lead to the approval of a replacement facility for the existing Nelson Place School.  Implemented city-wide energy efficiency projects through our Energy Savings Contract (ESCo) with Honeywell that will provide nearly $15M in energy saving improvements to the Worcester Public Schools (WPS).  The summer reading programs, Dream Big! READ! for children, and Own the Night for teens were in full swing during the summer of 2012. A total of 885 children registered to participate in Dream Big! READ! Children wrote a total of 1162 reviews and recorded reading 2135 books. This is the Children’s Services first year using the electronic summer reading program provided by the Massachusetts Library System. Volunteers helped Library staff provide assistance to children who didn’t know how to record their reading on summerreading.org.  In addition to the computer basics class on Friday mornings, a separate “Email for Beginners” class is also offered on Tuesdays from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the Worcester Public Library. This is especially relevant for job seekers who need to learn to use email as part of completing online applications for employment.  A new offering on Wednesday evenings at the Worcester Public Library includes help with “College Admission Essays, Resumes, Job Applications, and Research.”  Worcester Public Library Youth Services launched the 2012-2013 Massachusetts Children’s Book Award (MCBA) season with three MCBA outreach programs to schools and the first meeting of the MCBA Book Group. D. Executive Office of Economic Development  Revamped Public Government Channel Programming – In addition to covering almost 300 meetings and events, the Cable Services Division successfully revamped the news magazine format program “Worcester in Focus” and created a brand new series, “Made in Worcester” that showcases City businesses and their products made in Worcester. Both programs have generated positive feedback and interest.  Provided Wheels to Water Program – Building upon the successes of past seasons, the Wheels to Water (W2W) program concluded its 4th year of operation. Due to the expansion of W2W, the number of registered participants in 2012 was 1,294. In total, the program in 2012 provided: open swim community drop-in visits – 3,274; pool/beach visits – 8,668; recreation site visits – 7,304; and 414 family swim visits. In addition, W2W provided over 2,355 swim lessons and supported 137 jobs for youth. 28

City Manager Michael V. O’Brien Fiscal Year 2013 Highlighted Accomplishments

 Provided support to approximately 450 businesses and property owners from across many industries through its business assistance programs, including financial assistance, technical assistance, and site search assistance.  Provided development review services related to 167 development applications and decision support services at over 75 Board/Commission meetings.  Established a key neighborhood-based business association in Quinsigamond Village, and is involved in 11 projects through the Quinsigamond Village Storefront & Façade Improvement Program and Quinsigamond Village Small Business Grant Program.  Provided employer services including listing job openings, referring qualified applicants, assisting with recruitment, and providing information on workforce development grants, credits, and programs. In addition, Workforce Development provides assistance to laidoff workers and employers implementing layoffs or closings.  Expanded the WOO Card program with 64 participating WOO Card venues. Usage continues to grow with 7,800 registered WOO Cards resulting in a total of 9,456 swipes at WOO venues in calendar year 2012.  Launched the inaugural season of The Oval presenting ice skating and special events throughout the winter. Thousands of visitors participated in skating and enjoying outdoor wintertime activity including the Festival of Lights, which engage more than 3,500 visitors.  Expanded Out to Lunch: This downtown summer concert series on the Worcester Common Oval has grown from 6 to 10 events and features diverse musical talent, local artists, crafters, farmers’ market, and food vendors.  Assisted 4 major film productions and a number of independent film companies who shot on location in Worcester throughout the year.  Provided jobs for 25 income-eligible young people ages 16 to 21 Park Steward Program. The program focused on clean-up and beautification activities within various neighborhoods and parks in Worcester.  Promoted Mixed-Use Development - 371-379 Main Street – The adaptive reuse of two existing underutilized historic buildings into a mixed-use development with ground floor commercial and 55 market-rate, micro-loft residential units on upper floors. The EOED assisted with the sale and permitting of the properties. 29

City Manager Michael V. O’Brien Fiscal Year 2013 Highlighted Accomplishments

E. Other Departmental Services

 Activated Worcester’s Emergency Operations Center (EOC) twice this year. First in
preparation and response to Super Storm Sandy on 10/29/12 (7:00 am – 10/30/12 4:00 pm) and also for the 2013 Blizzard NEMO 2/7/13 (10:00 am – 2/9/13 5:00 pm). The EOC is activated for all major weather events, life safety incidents or events that require coordination between City, State and Federal agencies. City departments provide liaisons to the EOC that communicate with their corresponding state and federal partners. All city departments have a role to play regardless of the activation type to help coordinate the public safety, health and medical needs for Worcester and the region. This single point of communications allows our residents to hear one, coordinated message from government.  Supported State activations outside of the EOC by the Worcester Division of Public Health (WDPH), in order to provide critical regional information to the Massachusetts Division of Public Health (MDPH), such as the water main break in November 2012 and situational awareness updates from MDPH to hospitals throughout Central MA following the Boston Marathon Bombings and Lockdown in April 2013.  Incorporated “Run Worcester”, a Mass In Motion Active Living Initiative with the goal of encouraging 750 youth to participate in 9 local races over the next year. To date, 150 youth have participated in the WFD6K and the Scary Monster Dash.

 Developed the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Public Notice for reasonable
accommodations. This policy was shared with all department heads and is displayed widely in all City buildings for public notice.

 Provided technical assistance to local businesses to assist them in removing physical
access and/or service barriers for persons with disabilities in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Massachusetts Architectural Access Board.  Responded to approximately 6,200 work orders for Building, Housing, and Health which were received through the Customer Service Response System at (508) 929-1300.  Addressed over 10,000 violations of Federal, State Code and Local Ordinances were ordered to be corrected by Building, Health and Housing inspectors in FY13. As has been the historical trend, 85% are corrected within 30 days, 95% within 60 days and 99% within 90 days.  Sought relief with the assistance of the Law Department for adjudication within the Worcester Housing Court. In FY13 approximately 900 cases were brought before the court and over 99% were adjudicated in the City’s favor. 30

City Manager Michael V. O’Brien Fiscal Year 2013 Highlighted Accomplishments

 Conducted five (5) sweeps by the Housing and Health Inspection Division of the Department of Inspectional Service. All violations discovered during the sweeps are entered into CSRS and orders to correct the violations are issued to the property owners. In all, 1129 properties were swept. The orders are tracked and properties are re-inspected until compliance is achieved. Approximately 85% of violations are corrected within 30 days, 95% within 60 days, and 99% within 90 days. Those property owners that do not come into compliance within the appropriate timeframes have their cases forwarded to the Housing Court for adjudication via the Law Department and continue to be monitored until 100% compliance is achieved.

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