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STUDENT HANDBOOK BSc (Hons) Chemistry MChem Chemistry 2011/2012

Course Leader: Dr. Robert Smith School of Forensic and Investigative Sciences

Please read this document alongside the School of Forensic and Investigative Sciences‟ “Student Guide to Assessment”. All course materials, including lecture notes and other additional materials related to your course and provided to you, whether electronically or in hard copy, as part of your study, are the property of (or licensed to) UCLan and MUST not be distributed, sold, published, made available to others or copied other than for your personal study use unless you have gained written permission to do so from the Head of School. This applies to the materials in their entirety and to any part of the materials.

If there is any conflict between the regulations mentioned in this booklet and the UCLan Academic Regulations then the latter represent the definitive information.

UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL LANCASHIRE

MISSION STATEMENT

WE PROMOTE ACCESS TO EXCELLENCE ENABLING YOU TO DEVELOP YOUR POTENTIAL We value and practise equality of opportunity, transparency and tolerance We strive for excellence in all we do: locally regionally, nationally and internationally We work in partnership with business, the community and other educators We encourage and promote research innovation and creativity

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I understand that I am responsible for: Making sure my programme of study is the correct one to take me to my target award.Student Check List You must read this handbook and check off the Induction Week tasks once they are completed. In Induction Week I have: Confirmed that I have enrolled with the university. Let the course leader (if I wish to) know of any disability which may affect my studies to ensure I receive appropriate support.ac. My student number is: - Registered to use the library and computer system. Notifying the School Office (01772 895687. Reading and following health and safety regulations. If you have any queries please see your personal tutor. Notifying the University immediately if I change my local or home address.uk) of any absence and providing a medical note. Check off items on the lower list once you understand and acknowledge your responsibilities. fzattendance@uclan. . Read this course handbook.

assessment deadlines.Making certain that I know.e. Handing in assignments in accordance with the guidelines in the Student Guide to Assessment i. and keep to. I must maintain contact with my personal tutor who is: Name: Email: Room Number: Telephone Number: . through eLearn and Turnitin unless advised otherwise.

Guidance and Conduct Student Support and Guidance Personal Tutors Who do I ask for Help/Guidance/Advice? Students with Disabilities Health and Safety Conduct Students‟ Union Where do I get information? 1 2 4 4 5 6 6 7 7 7 10 10 10 11 16 16 17 17 17 18 19 19 21 22 22 22 22 23 23 24 25 25 27 27 29 30 31 32 32 32 33 34 34 34 35 35 Chapter 2 Chapter 3 Chapter 4 Chapter 5 . Collusion and Re-presentation What if I fail a module? Progression Regulations Final Awards Exit Awards Appeals Student Support.Table of Contents Page Welcome to the School of Forensic and Investigative Sciences Who‟s Who in the School of Forensic and Investigative Sciences Chapter 1 Introduction Career Opportunities The Card Communication Supporting Diversity at UCLan Aims and Outcomes of the Programmes What are the Aims of the Programmes? What are the Learning Outcomes of the Programmes? Format and Contents How the Programmes are put together How the Programmes are Managed Programme Structures Elective Modules Accreditation of Prior Experience and Learning Part-time Students Progression How the Programmes are Delivered Learning Resources How much work do I have to do? Attendance Assessment and Progression Presentation of Written Work When will the Assessments take place? Assessment arrangements for students with a disability Submission of Assessments Deadlines for Assessments Extensions Extenuating Circumstances Feedback Cheating. Plagiarism.

Data Protection Chapter 6 Student Voice Course Representatives Staff-Student Liaison Committee (SSLC) Meetings Module Evaluation Questionnaires Complaints Personal Development Planning Details of the Chemistry Module Content BSc (Hons) Chemistry Programme Specification 35 36 36 36 37 37 38 39 44 49 Chapter 7 Appendix A: Appendix B: Appendix C: MChem Chemistry Programme Specification .

What do you expect from the time you spend studying? Presumably you hope to graduate with a degree. you expect to receive guidance and support from staff. assessments. The course is delivered by a team of chemists who have many years experience in the delivery of degree level chemistry. This handbook tells you about some of these regulations. following the School and University policies and regulations. handing in work. In addition many of the team are involved in research that crosses international boundaries and have collaborations overseas and this ensures that there is an excellent exchange of culture in everything we do. it is important that you develop the capacity for independent learning. and guidance on communication and IT skills. and you hope that this will lead to related employment. Firstly. The school appreciates the contribution of research to scholarly activity. Secondly. These will give detailed timetables and details of assessments. However. and as such is of national importance. for purely administrative purposes the course is managed by the School of Forensic and Investigative Sciences. which will be available on eLearn. you expect to gain „hands-on‟ experience of a range of equipment and experimental techniques. the chemistry team are some of the most research active staff within the university. you are expected to develop. All the staff involved in this course are committed to meeting these expectations. are familiar with their contents and use them. 1 . This research centre was awarded a grade 4 in the last HEFCE research assessment exercise. It is your responsibility to ensure that you receive these documents. however. key skills. This vibrant research culture influences many of the advanced topic and research projects delivered in the final year of the course. safety procedures. The overall teaching strategy within the School is one of „Dependence to Independence‟. and gives details about staff. They form the nucleus of the Centre for Materials Science. In your induction file there is also further information about your role in the development of your Personal Development Portfolio. attendance requirements. and you will expect to have the opportunity to take part in a range of social activities and to develop as an individual.WELCOME TO THE SCHOOL OF FORENSIC AND INVESTIGATIVE SCIENCES This is a true Chemistry degree in every sense. selforganisation. in turn there are certain expectations of you. Employers will certainly be looking for evidence of such skills! Finally. etc. such as numeracy. You will receive separate module booklets for each module you are studying. writing. etc. and therefore this will be expected increasingly as you progress through your course. you are expected to take a responsible approach and an active role in your study. or improve. working in a team. You expect to get high quality teaching from staff with experience in their own discipline. which will form a central part of your personal development plan.

ac.ac. We have included their qualifications so that you can see where their expertise lies.uk Ext 3533. BSc. Allison Jones Rob Smith Gary Bond Richard Hull Arati Iyengar Richard McCabe Janine McGuire Kev Pritchard Jennifer Readman BA (Hons) PhD (Chemistry) Lecturer (Chemistry) e-mail: jereadman@uclan.ac.ac. BSc. Room JBF109. BSc. PhD (Chemistry) MRSC MFSSoc Associate Head of School e-mail: aejones@uclan. Room JBF109. MSc (Forensic Science). 4381. Lecturer (Forensic Science) e-mail: kpritchard@uclan. Room JBF110. CSci CChem FRSC FHEA Professor (Chemistry/ and Fire Science) e-mail: trhull@uclan. Room JBF008. PhD (Genetics) School Disability Lead.uk Ext 3925. Room JBF001. BSc. Room JBF006. Room JBF103.ac. Lecturer (Chemistry/ Forensic Chemistry) e-mail: jgmcguire@uclan. BSc. PhD (Genetics) MIBiol.uk Ext 3543. PhD (Chemistry) MRSC Course Leader Lecturer (Chemistry) e-mail: rbsmith@uclan. Lecturer in Forensic Genetics. CBiol MFSSoc Dean of School e-mail: lkchatfield@uclan.ac.uk Ext 3535.uk Ext 4386.ac. Professor (Materials Chemistry) e-mail: gbond@uclan. Room JBF206. or who have particular roles in the delivery of the Course. This list represents those co-ordinating particular areas. Room JBF105. FSS Dip (Crime Scene Investigator) 2nd Year Tutor. 2 .Who’s Who in the School of Forensic and Investigative Sciences You will mainly be taught by staff from the School of Forensic and Investigative Sciences at the University. DPhil (Chemistry) Reader (Chemistry/ Forensic Chemistry) e-mail: rwmccabe@uclan.ac.ac. MSc. PhD (Chemistry) 1st Year Tutor.uk Ext: 3578. PhD (Chemistry) Academic Lead: Forensic Science. Academic Staff Lee Chatfield BSc.uk Ext.uk Ext 4379.uk Ext 4385.uk Ext 4384. Room MB130.ac. e-mail: aiyengar@uclan. BSc.

BA. Room MB127.ac. Room JBF108. BSc.ac. PhD (Fire Chemistry) Lecturer (Forensic Chemistry) e-mail: aastec@uclan. PhD (Anthropology) 3rd Year Tutor.uk Ext 4389.uk Ext 3759. Lecturer (Forensic Anthropology & Archaeology) e-mail: mpwysocki@uclan.uk.ac.Tapas Sen BSc. MRSC Lecturer (Inorganic and Materials Chemistry) e-mail: tsen@uclan. Anna Stec Michael Wysocki Administrative Staff Brun Garton Judith Dillon Helena Bylinski Sali Malone Katherine Chester Lindsay Cottingham Cheryl Walton Vanessa Webster Senior Administration Officer PA to Dean of School Senior Administration Assistant Clerical Assistant Clerical Assistant Programme Administrator Programme Administrator Clerical Assistant School Office: e-mail fisoffice@uclan.ac. MSc. Ext 4371 Room JBF005.uk Room JBF201 Ext 5687 3 . PhD.

The commercial exploitation of some discoveries in Chemistry has had disturbing effects on the environment. the elimination of these problems. and ourselves. Through an understanding of the chemistry of materials we can design and manufacture drugs to fight disease. Every change in the observable world from boiling water to the changes that occur as our bodies combat invading viruses has its basis in the submicroscopic world of atoms and molecules. and has not proved altogether appropriate in the less developed parts of the world. and the creation of ecologically sustainable industrial processes. computer chips to enhance communication. fertilizers to grow abundant food. demands the involvement of chemists. which means that you will have access to most modern analytical techniques to support your practical investigations. It is pivotal in our understanding of the treatment of diseases such as cancer and AIDS. More specialised equipment for research and project work is available through the Centre for Materials Science. responsible also for the cautious appraisal of the environmental implications of new chemical products. Solutions to the problems that sometimes arise will require the skills of men and women trained in many disciplines but Chemistry will be essential in the search for suitable alternative strategies. The chemical industry is now in the process of adopting and implementing more environmentally friendly processes and consequently a branch of chemistry has evolved known as “Green Chemistry”. fibres to provide comfort and variety in clothes. and much. A central analytical suite services the laboratories. Chemistry also helps us to comprehend the nature of our environment. Introduction Chemistry underpins almost every aspect of our daily lives. Obviously. much more. plastics to package food and replace worn-out body parts. Chemistry is the science that seeks to understand the properties and behaviour of matter in the macroscopic world through studying the properties and behaviour of atoms and molecules. Whether this is due to carelessness or to unforeseen difficulties. problems arise in the use or disposal of chemicals. of course.1. the prospective material rewards (and security of employment) 4 . Occasionally. ozone depletion and acid rain. Chemistry provides important understanding of our world and how it works. It provides essential information about issues such as global warming. our universe. fuels for transportation. During recent years the University has investigated significant resources in the area of science and technology and consequently boasts a range of modern wellequipped laboratories. The focus on the environmental implications of chemicals manufacture and processes is what gives this course distinction from those provided by other universities. Career Opportunities On graduating from University with a degree in Chemistry the possibilities are almost endless. Behind all this are the continuing research efforts of countless chemists. pesticides to protect our health and crops. Not all chemical technology has been an unqualified success.

We want you to gain the skills and attitudes that will help you to achieve your goals and aspirations. paints.are of importance but what of the chance to make contributions that impact on Society? Your employment potential with a Chemistry degree should be very high. modules. The rest of this handbook will explore how this works in practice and opportunities will be taken by the course team to refer to the statements on the Card throughout the year. soaps and toiletries.ac. This has obvious implications on employment prospects. voluntary opportunities. it is also about developing as a person and realising your potential. and a career actually involving Chemistry would certainly be relevant and meaningful. certificates and events to develop your skills  business start-up. seminars.uk/futures. The chemical industry provides direct employment for 214. whether or not you exploit your qualifications explicitly. This represents a clear statement of the University‟s intentions to deliver agreed standards for academic and administrative services. a Certificate which formally recognises your employability and enterprise achievements whilst at UCLan For more information visit the Futures Hub (next to the Library) or access them via www. The Card At induction you will have been given a copy of “The Card”.5 billion. The UK chemicals industry out performs virtually all other UK manufacturing industries with an average growth rate of 2. Your University experience is not only about achieving your chosen award.9% compared to a 0. which are generally considered to be good with a wide variety of industries employing chemists in areas such as pharmaceuticals. it is the UK manufacturing number one exporter with a trade surplus of £4. Remuneration is again above average with salaries in the sector currently 19% higher than the average in manufacturing generally. The importance of the UK chemical industry to the balance of trade for the country cannot be over stated. internships.uclan. You will get the best out of your time at UCLan if you are committed to:  Preparing for classes and attending punctually  Completing your work to the best of your ability and submitting it on time 5 . part-time employment and live projects  workshops.5% for all other manufacturing industries. It spells out what is expected of you as a student and the contribution that can be made to gain the most benefit from your time at UCLan. freelance and self-employment advice  the Futures Award. plastics etc. 23% of the UK chemical industry is based within the NW region. Futures offers a range of support for you including: career and employability advice and guidance  access to work placements.000 people within the UK and supports several hundred thousand additional jobs throughout the economy.

      Not committing plagiarism Keeping up to date with course information through UCLan email or other channels Using the feedback you are given to improve subsequent work Making appropriate use of teaching staff‟s time Taking responsibility for your personal development planning and skills development Treating staff. disability.uclan.ac. Supporting Diversity at UCLan UCLan recognises and values individual difference and has a public duty to promote equality and remove discrimination in relation to race. If you send us email messages from other addresses they risk being filtered out as potential spam and discarded unread.php Communication The University expects you to use your UCLan email address and check daily for messages from staff. Staff aim to reply to emails within one working day. fellow students and neighbours in the local community with respect at all times We aim to:  Start and end all classes on time  Give you one week‟s notice of changes to your classes  Give you feedback on assessed work within 15 working days  Give you clear.uk/information/services/sas/the_i/rules_and_regulations/rules_re gulations. During your time at UCLan we expect you to be able to:  Experience "an integrated community based on mutual respect and tolerance where all staff and students can feel safe. gender. valued and supported"  Contribute to creating a positive environment where discriminatory practices and discrimination no longer happen Please review the UCLan Equality and Diversity Policy for further information. 6 . religion or belief. legible and informative feedback on your work  Be available for timed appointments  Treat you with respect at all times  Support you in your preparation for the work place More information on the Rules and Regulations can be found at: http://www. sexual orientation and age.

an appreciation of its application in different contexts and to involve them in an intellectually stimulating and satisfying experience of learning and studying  To provide students with a broad and balanced foundation of chemical knowledge and practical skills and an in-depth understanding of specialised areas of chemistry  To develop in students the ability to adapt and apply their chemical knowledge and skills to the solution of familiar and unfamiliar theoretical and practical problems in chemistry  To develop in students. a range of transferable skills. of value in chemical and non-chemical employment  To provide students with a knowledge and skills base from which they can proceed to further studies in specialised areas of chemistry or multidisciplinary areas involving chemistry  To instil a critical awareness of advances at the forefront of the chemical science discipline What are the Learning Outcomes of the Programmes? This list of the major learning outcomes of the programmes will give you an idea of the global learning goals. through an education in chemistry. which are in effect summaries of the module booklets and are available on eLearn. You could also refer to the module descriptions.2. which describe what you will achieve on your course of study. 7 . However in the module booklets you will see the syllabuses of the individual modules and their learning outcomes that will give your more information. a range of transferable skills. of value in chemical and non-chemical employment  To provide students with a knowledge and skills base from which they can proceed to further studies in specialised areas of chemistry or multidisciplinary areas involving chemistry The aims of the MChem Chemistry programme are:  To instil in students a sense of enthusiasm for chemistry. The aims of the BSc(Hons) Chemistry programme are:  To instil in students a sense of enthusiasm for chemistry. Aims and Outcomes of the Programmes All programmes at the University have overall aims and learning outcomes. an appreciation of its application in different contexts and to involve them in an intellectually stimulating and satisfying experience of learning and studying  To provide students with a broad and balanced foundation of chemical knowledge and practical skills  To develop in students the ability to apply their chemical knowledge and skills to the solution of theoretical and practical problems in chemistry  To develop in students. What are the Aims of the Programmes? It is important that you and the teaching team are clear about exactly what we are aiming to achieve. through an education in chemistry.

including initiatives in Green Chemistry At the end of the BSc(Hons) Chemistry programme you will have obtained the following cognitive skills and be able to:  Evaluate and analyse problems and plan novel strategies for their solution  Apply knowledge and understanding of chemical systems to the solution of qualitative and quantitative problems of a familiar and unfamiliar nature  Evaluate. however. from problem recognition stage through to the evaluation and appraisal of results and findings. interpret and synthesise chemical information and data  Present scientific material and arguments clearly and correctly. state of matter and the theories used to describe them  Deliberate on major issues currently at the frontiers of chemical research and development. including and specific hazards  Conduct standard laboratory procedures involved in synthetic and analytical work  Monitor. relating to the ability to interact with other people and to engage in team-working  Display time-management and organisational skills. by observation and measurements chemical properties. and systematically and reliably record and document the findings  Plan. and be able to:  Describe the major types of chemical reaction and the main characteristics associated with them including the stereochemistry and nomenclature of reactants. this to include the ability to select appropriate techniques and procedures During the BSc(Hons) Chemistry programme you will also develop transferable skills and be able to:  Demonstrate communication skills. taking into account their physical and chemical properties. principles and theories relating to the major types of chemical reaction and the main characteristics associated with them including the stereochemistry and nomenclature of reactants. starting materials and products  Discuss the principles and procedures used in chemical analysis and the characterisation of chemical compounds. as evidenced by the ability to plan and implement efficient and effective modes of working Most students registered on the BSc(Hons) Chemistry programme will go on to study and achieve a Bachelor of Science degree with Honours. covering a range of communication media  Exhibit numeracy and computational skills.At the end of the BSc(Hons) Chemistry programme you will have a knowledge and understanding of. including thermodynamics and kinetics  Describe characteristic properties of elements and their compounds. you may also exit 8 . including ICT skills and information retrieval  Show evidence of interpersonal skills. using a variety of presentation media to range of audiences At the end of the BSc(Hons) Chemistry programme you will be able to:  Apply knowledge and understanding of the essential concepts. design and execute practical investigations. including spectroscopy  Apply the key elements of physical chemistry. events or changes. starting materials and products  Handle chemical materials safely.

a Bachelor of Science degree without honours. you may also exit your degree scheme with a Bachelor of Science degree with Honours. but in addition you will have obtained the following cognitive skills and be able to:  Assimilate. Conduct standard laboratory procedures involved in synthetic and analytical work During the MChem Chemistry programme you will have developed the transferable skills above. and be self-critical in the evaluation of risks. plan and implement research questions to problems in the chemical sciences including evaluation of hazards and environmental effects  Develop general strategies including the identification of additional information required and problems where there is not a unique solution At the end of the MChem Chemistry programme you will have met all the Learning Outcomes above. a Diploma in Higher Education (DipHE) or a Certificate in Higher Education (CertHE). but in addition you will have a knowledge and understanding of. the outcome of which is potentially publishable  Assess the success of such a project At the end of the MChem Chemistry programme you will have met all the Learning Outcomes above. under minimum supervision. however. At the end of the MChem Chemistry programme you will have met all the Learning Outcomes above. experimental procedures and outcomes  Use an understanding of the limits of accuracy of experimental data to inform the planning of future work. but in addition you will be able to:  Demonstrate problem-solving skills including self-direction and originality  Communicate and interact with professionals from other disciplines  Ability to exercise initiative and personal responsibility  Ability to make decisions in complex and unpredictable situations  Independent learning ability required for continuing professional development Most students registered on the MChem Chemistry programme will go on to study and achieve an MChem degree with Honours. 9 . evaluate and present research results objectively  Undertake an individual research project.your degree scheme with a Bachelor of Science degree without honours. a Diploma in Higher Education (DipHE) or a Certificate in Higher Education (CertHE). and be able to:  Assess an unfamiliar problem and be able to design and implement a suitable solution  Design. but in addition you will be able to:  Work independently.

Each module you will study has a Module Tutor. The Course Leader is Rob Smith. They are responsible for organising groups for tutorials and practical sessions and authorising extensions to coursework deadlines if you have an acceptable reason for not completing your work on time. Bachelor of Science degree with Honours.ac. 1.5 modules are worth 10 credits. Listed in appendices B and C are the different credits that are needed to achieve an Undergraduate Masters degree with Honours. and to achieve an Undergraduate Masters Degree with Honours (MChem) you must study the equivalent of 24 modules over the course as described in the following tables. telephone numbers. How the Programmes are Managed At the front of this handbook you will find the names. In addition. Full time students will take six modules in each year of their studies: part time students will normally take 4 modules per year. degree programmes consist of a mixture of half.0. Do not hesitate to contact them if you are unclear about anything. 2. email addresses and room numbers of key people involved in the running of the Chemistry courses. room JBF006. there is a Year Tutor for each year of the course. e-mail rbsmith@uclan. Modules are also given a credit weighting so that modules at different Universities can be compared. full and (more rarely) double modules. Year One Two Three Tutor Janine McGuire Kev Pritchard Mick Wysocki 10 . which can be full modules with a weighting of 1. The MChem Chemistry and BSc (Hons) Chemistry programmes have a Course Leader who is responsible for planning and co-ordinating course delivery. They are listed below and their details can be found at the beginning of this book. You should see the module tutor about any issues to do with their module (coursework. personal tutor or year tutor.0) or triple modules (weighting 3.5). Typically. a Diploma in Higher Education or a Certificate in Higher Education. 01772 894384. Format and Contents How the Programmes are put together Your degree is composed of modules. etc.0 modules 20 credits. delivery and assessment of the module. You should see the course leader if there is anything going on with you that cannot be handled by a module tutor.). half modules (weighting 0. These are the people you should see if you wish to request an extension on any piece of work. revision. a Bachelor of Science degree without honours.0 modules 40 credits etc. The Module Tutor is responsible for the planning. so 0.3.0). double modules (weighting 2. tel. In some cases the Course Leader may also be the Module Tutor.uk. To achieve a Bachelor of Science Degree with Honours (BSc (Hons)) degree you must study the equivalent of 18 modules over the course.

Practical work is generally delivered through specialist experimental modules. Modules do not focus on the individual branches of chemistry but instead combine them to form common threads. All students entering the course will undertake an evaluation of their chemical knowledge during week one. students may be recommended to take FZ1063 Introduction to Chemistry as their elective.5. At the end of the academic year all modules undergo review. Year 1 The modules that you take in your first year (stage 1) are shown below. The University operates a quality assurance scheme. 11 . In addition to the compulsory modules you must take a level 4 elective module of the value 1.0 or two level 4 electives of the value 0. Every year the Course Leader submits a detailed report to the Head of School. which meets regularly to review the progress of the Course and take account of your comments . which requires the Course Leader to report periodically to the Head of School to keep him in touch with progress. Year Tutors and Module Tutors form the Course Team. Green Chemistry and more environmentally acceptable processes for chemicals manufacture is demanding an ever increasing role within the industry sector. Another feature of these programmes which sets them aside from most taught chemistry programmes is the emphasis placed on the interdisciplinary nature of the subject. The focus on Green Chemistry throughout the programmes makes these courses distinctive from chemistry degree programmes taught at other universities.both positive and negative. Experiments are designed to bring together different aspects of the syllabus and hence emphasise the multidisciplinary approaches which are necessary when study chemical processes in industrial or research environments. Otherwise you are free to choose electives from the University‟s elective catalogue. The timetable of when your classes are will be posted on the course page on eLearn and was given to you at induction. The importance of research in the area of Green Chemistry has not been over looked by funding bodies. Depending on the outcome of this evaluation. with specific initiatives having been launched by both the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) in recent years.Four Allison Jones The Course Leader. Programme Structures The MChem Chemistry and BSc (Hons) Chemistry programmes are designed to provide you with a balanced foundation in chemical knowledge and skills but in so doing it is hoped that we will be able to instil in you an enthusiasm for the subject. Adjustments will be made to the delivery of the Course if the Team feel that changes are necessary to make delivery and/or organisation better.

C) Elective (Shaded sections indicate compulsory modules.In semester 1 you will study Skills for Chemists [FZ1027]. an introduction to basic spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques used for the analysis of organic molecules is also included. kinetics and thermodynamics. and basic experimental procedures.0. C) FZ1026 Introduction to Chemical Concepts (1. searching for information. scientific applications of ICT. 2 or Year Semester 2 FZ1029 Introduction to the Synthesis and Analysis of Organic Compounds (1. C) Module Size 1 1 1 1 1 5 Semester Year Year 1 Year Year 1 or 2 x 0.5 1 FZ1028 Introduction to Green Chemistry (1. The theoretical aspects of Green Chemistry are delivered through the module Tools for Green Chemistry [FZ2029] which covers alternative strategies for organic 12 .0. C) 1.) Year 2 The material contained within year 2 of the course builds upon that delivered in year 1. In semester 1 you will also start your studies of green chemistry with Introduction to Green Chemistry [FZ1028]. the effect of stereochemistry on the reactivity of organic compounds and main group inorganic chemistry. the aim of this module is to ensure that you have the correct skills base to support your study of chemistry throughout the programme. The lecture / tutorial material delivered will be supported by the practical module Experimental Techniques in Chemistry [FZ1025]. COMPULSORY MODULES AT LEVEL 4 FZ1025 FZ1026 FZ1027 FZ1028 FZ1029 Experimental Techniques in Chemistry Introduction to Chemical Concepts Skills for Chemists Introduction to Green Chemistry Introduction to the Synthesis and Analysis of Organic Compounds MAXIMUM ELECTIVE Elective from the level 4 electives catalogue MAXIMUM Semester 1 FZ1025 Experimental Techniques in Chemistry (1. The lecture material in this module is supported by a series of practical classes. You will study Introduction to the Synthesis and Analysis of Organic Compounds [FZ1029] where will start to gain an understanding of the reactions of various functional groups and their inter-conversions.0. this will include. a knowledge of mathematics. C) FZ1027 Skills for Chemists (1. referencing sources.0.0. In semester 1 you will also start your studies in Introduction to Chemical Concepts [FZ1026] which will introduce you to classical analytical techniques.

Biological. C) FZ2029 Tools for Green Chemistry (1. In the second year there are no optional or elective modules. FZ3120 and FZ3025 are supported through the practical module Explorations of Chemical Processes [FZ3026]. Elements of Inorganic and Organic Chemistry [FZ2026] covers the synthesis. Physical Chemistry: Theory and Application in Analytical Science deals with physicochemical processes and their application in an analytical science. are taught alongside advanced approaches in organic synthesis and physicochemical processes in Advanced Concepts in Chemistry [FZ3025].) Year 3 The chemistry taught at level 6 (in year 3) is intended to introduce you to concepts and techniques at the forefront of the subject. organometallic (main group) and physical chemistry (molecular spectroscopy) and this module contains its own dedicated experimental programme designed to underpin the lecture material. COMPULSORY MODULES AT LEVEL 5 FZ2024 Laboratory Studies of Chemical Concepts FZ2025 Physical Chemistry: Theory and Applications in Analytical Science FZ2026 Elements of Inorganic and Organic Chemistry FZ2027 Concepts in Chemistry FZ2028 Green Chemistry in Action FZ2029 Tools for Green Chemistry MAXIMUM Semester 1 Semester 2 FZ2024 Laboratory Studies of Chemical Concepts (1. C) FZ2026 Elements of Inorganic and Organic Chemistry (1. 13 . C) Module Size 1 1 1 1 1 1 6 Semester Year long Year long Year long Year long Year long Year long FZ2027 Concepts in Chemistry (1. C) FZ2028 Green Chemistry in Action (1.0. natural product chemistry and medicinal chemistry. C) FZ2025 Physical Chemistry: Theory and Application in Analytical Science (1.0. The practical application of the techniques covered within FZ2025 and FZ2026 will be reinforced through the practical module Laboratory Studies of Chemical Concepts [FZ2024]. This module uses a series of student driven mini projects to encourage you to use advanced analytical techniques to investigate chemical processes.synthesis. Concepts in Chemistry [FZ2027] contains elements of analytical. You will be given the opportunity to investigate these processes in the laboratory with the module Green Chemistry in Action [FZ2028]. the use of alternative energy sources to promote reactivity and the use of catalysts.0. The module in Research Topics [FZ3027] will focus on subject specialisations within the teaching team and will use material at the forefront of chemical research in these areas.0.0. properties and applications of both organic and inorganic substances. While more specialist topics such as bioinorganic chemistry. C) (Shaded sections indicate compulsory modules.0. Medicinal and Natural Product Chemistry [FZ3120] introduces the synthesis of biologically important molecules.

Subjects at the forefront of Green Chemistry are presented in Green Energy [FZ3029], which is delivered, in part, through the use of current research articles from appropriate journals. BSc (Hons) Chemistry Those students studying for a BSc (Hons) Chemistry award, will take the Chemistry Project [FZ3200] which is a year long 40 credit module, which has a literature review and associated practical element. COMPULSORY MODULES AT LEVEL 6 FZ3025 FZ3026 FZ3027 FZ3029 FZ3120 Advanced Concepts in Chemistry Exploration of Chemical Processes Research Topics Green Energy Biological, Medicinal and Natural Product Chemistry FZ3200 Chemistry Project
MAXIMUM

Module Size 1 1 1 0.5 0.5 2
6

Semester Year long Year long Year long 2 1 Year long

Semester 1

FZ3025 Advanced Concepts in Chemistry (1.0, C)

FZ3026 Exploration of Chemical Processes (1.0, C)

FZ3027 Research Topics (1.0, C)

Semester 2

FZ3120 Biological, Medicinal and Natural Product Chemistry (0.5, C) FZ3029 Green Energy (0.5, C)

FZ3200 Chemistry Project (2.0, C)

MChem Chemistry Those students studying for a MChem Chemistry award, two additional modules will be studied to help prepare you for the 4th year. These are FZ3121 Research Methods which is concerned with research methodology relevant to scientists in academic environments, and FZ3122 Organic Synthetics Methods which builds provides a thorough understanding of the reagents, reactions and procedures used in organic synthesis, the mechanistic consequences of synthetic organic reactions and the application of these to design successful syntheses of complex target molecules. Passing the project module is necessary for the award of a Bachelor of Science degree with honours. COMPULSORY MODULES AT LEVEL 6 FZ3025 Advanced Concepts in Chemistry FZ3026 Exploration of Chemical Processes Module Size 1 1 Semester Year long Year long
14

FZ3027 Research Topics FZ3029 Green Energy FZ3120 Biological, Medicinal and Natural Product Chemistry FZ3121 Research Methods FZ3122 Organic Synthetic Methods
MAXIMUM

1 0.5 0.5

Year long 2 1 Year long 1

1 1
6

Semester 1

FZ3025 Advanced Concepts in Chemistry (1.0, C)

FZ3026 Exploration of Chemical Processes (1.0, C)

FZ3027 Research Topics (1.0, C)

Semester 2

FZ3120 Biological, Medicinal and Natural Product Chemistry (0.5, C) FZ3029 Green Energy (0.5, C)

FZ3121 Research Methods (1.0, C)

FZ3122 Organic Synthetic Methods (1.0, C)

(Shaded sections indicate compulsory modules.) In the previous section the learning outcomes of the MChem Chemistry and BSc (Hons) Chemistry programmes were listed. It is often useful to know which learning outcomes will be covered in the different modules; the tables in Appendices B and C plot the different learning outcomes against each module. Year 4 – MChem Chemistry only The chemistry taught at level 7 (in year 4) is intended to extend your knowledge of concepts and techniques and instil in you a critical awareness of advances at the forefront of the chemical sciences discipline. In addition it will also require you to adapt apply your knowledge and skills to the solution of unfamiliar problems, and conduct an extended research project independently, to a publishable standard and assess the success of such a project. The research skills required to undertake such a project will be delivered in the Research Methods module [FZ4001], and then you will pick two out of six optional modules that focus on two main specialist areas of chemistry. Organic Synthesis Methods [FZ4605] and Applications in Synthesis [FZ4606] focus on Synthetic Organic Chemistry, and studying both of these modules would prepare you well for professional employment or doctoral studies in the area of synthetic organic chemistry. Separation Science and Mass Spectrometry [FZ4601], Sample Preparation and Screening [FZ4602, Molecular Spectroscopy [FZ4603] and Elemental and Surface Analysis [FZ4604] focus on Instrumental Analysis, and studying any two of these modules will prepare you well for professional employment or doctoral studies in the area of analytical chemistry or instrumental analysis. There is no need to pick one of these specialisms, and any combination of two modules will still ensure that you are well prepared for professional employment or doctoral studies in the chemical sciences.

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The Research Project [FZ4003] is a year long 60 credit module, which involves writing a proposal, an associated practical element and the production of a 10,000 word written submission. Passing the project module is necessary for the award of an Undergraduate Masters degree with honours, COMPULSORY MODULES AT LEVEL 7 FZ4003 Research Project Module Size 3 Semester Year long

OPTIONAL MODULES AT LEVEL 7 FZ4601 Separation Science and Mass Spectrometry FZ4602 Sample Preparation and Screening FZ4603 Molecular Spectroscopy FZ4604 Elemental and Surface Analysis FZ4606 Applications in Synthesis
MAXIMUM

1

1

1 1 1 1
6

1 2 2 2

Semester 1

FZ4003 Research Project (3.0, C)

Semester 2

FZ4601 Separation Science and Mass Spectrometry (1.0, O) FZ4603 Molecular Spectroscopy (1.0, O)

FZ4602 Sample Preparation and Screening (1.0, O) FZ4604 Elemental and Surface Analysis (1.0, O)

FZ4606 Applications in Synthesis (1.0, O)

(Shaded sections indicate compulsory modules.) In the previous section the learning outcomes of the MChem Chemistry and BSc (Hons) Chemistry programmes were listed. It is often useful to know which learning outcomes will be covered in the different modules; the tables in Appendices B and C plot the different learning outcomes against each module. Elective Modules Free-Choice Elective modules enable you to develop skills such as a language or acquire knowledge outside your main subject(s). You can make your choice from a selection of modules that are delivered across many subject areas from the Electives Catalogue. Accreditation of Prior Learning If you consider that you may have already achieved some of the learning outcomes of the course through previous learning, please consult your course leader and gain advice from the APL Coordinator to find out whether you can make a claim for accreditation of prior learning for part of your course.

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The course team will tell you about the various modules / combinations available and you will both agree on the most appropriate (and legal) course of study for you. In addition tutorial work may also include the development of teamwork. Consequently the subject matter covered is diverse and the School therefore uses a diverse portfolio of teaching and assessment methods to reflect the nature of this subject. This will also allow you to interact and learn from others with different backgrounds and expertise. Progression Discussions about your progression through the course normally take place in February each year. and what options are available to you. in particular students studying BSc (Hons) Forensic Chemistry. experts in their own field are brought in to speak with authority from their own experience and expertise. An individual programme will be worked out for each student to fit in with their needs and the pre-requisite requirements of any of the modules. A progression talk will be held by the Course Leader in February explaining which modules you should study next year. You are also encouraged to engage in independent study.Part Time Students Part-time students typically take 4 modules each year. There are formal lectures followed up by small group tutorials in which the subject of the lecture is explored in detail. you will also be studying along students on other courses. planning. and (d) the development of general investigative and presentational skills. where appropriate. The aim of the School is to promote deep and active learning and for you to achieve an appropriate balance between (a) the accumulation of subject specific knowledge (b) the understanding of subject-specific concepts (c) the application of these. and the generation and testing of hypotheses. It is an opportunity for you to make plans for your study over the next academic year. As with all university education you are responsible for your own learning. How the Programmes are Delivered Chemistry is a practically based subject covering elements of a range of theoretical principles. 17 . For some modules. In practice the lectures provide the theoretical background to the subject and tutorials often include problem solving exercises managed through pair or group work. The tutorials will also introduce you to the use of basic techniques and reinforce concepts introduced as theory. Most of the course is delivered by university staff but. In year 1 hour-long class sessions will normally be lectures or tutorials. Practical skills are developed through practical sessions which may incorporate stand alone practical exercises or individual or group projects. understanding accuracy and variability. the lectures are merely the starting point and you will have to undertake a substantial amount of study in order to succeed.

. however. Staff aim to provide feedback on all in-module assessments which contribute to the module mark within 15 working days of the scheduled submission or examination date. in the first year. and data handling exercises. which will help to prepare you for longer essays. LIS provide access to a huge range of electronic resources – e-journals and databases. writing.g. and the third and fourth years will comprise primarily longer essays and more challenging analysis of data. In addition to this you will be provided with individual written feedback for all assessments. In terms of examinations. communication skills through discussions and presentations. Take advantage of the free training sessions designed to enable you to gain all the skills you need for your research and study. whilst the pass mark the modules at level 7 (those a full time student would study in year 4) is 50%. (You can find more details in the School‟s Student Guide to Assessment and in the module booklets). 18 .. presentations or a combination of these. e. and are assessed through an equally wide range of exercises. 3 and 4 will also be delivered via a mixture of teaching methods. For example. The third year will include dissertation or a project report and use longer essays and more challenging data handling exercises.. images and texts. In the second year. lecture notes and/or presentations. The assessment methods for the modules are different. and 6 (those a full time student would study in years 1. Generic feedback on end of module assessments and dissertations will be made available within 15 working days following the publication of results. The pass mark for modules at levels 4. referencing. report writing) as well as to assess your knowledge. independent practical reports and practical examinations in the second year.Modules in years 2. seminar materials. essay questions and data handling will be introduced. 5. These learning experiences are designed to help you to master the many aspects of chemistry during the course of your degree.g. with increased emphasis on independent study followed by discussions. 2 and 3) is 40%. Learning Resources Extensive Resources are available to support your studies provided by LIS – library and IT staff. wherever practicable. e-books. Course and module materials are not provided in „hard copy‟ format. some by written assessment. This may be oral during a lecture or one-to-one session. presentations and data-interpretation/problem-solving exercises. in the first year. or comments posted on a website. Normally you will need to pass both coursework and examination components of modules to pass the module. designed to develop and improve your key skills (e. structured workbooks. coursework will include formats such as short notes. short directed essays. A range of other skills will be developed.g. or written (e. in the form of specimen answers). multiple choice questions and short questions are the preferred format. some will be by examination. practical reports. or other modes of passing on information.

A past exam paper (if there is an exam in the module) 8. You should bear this in 19 . The process is not as complicated as it sounds! A comprehensive „getting started‟ guide can be accessed at the following URL: http://www. if not included in the module booklet 4. tutorials or practical sessions and the rest in private study. on each module space.assignment briefs and materials and other relevant information and resources are made available in electronic form via eLearn. Timetables 4. Course Handbook 2. to be able to use eLearn effectively on your own computer your Internet browser needs to be set up in a specific way. Lecture notes (no later than 48hrs after the date of the lecture). Assignment briefs (including a marking scheme). on the Course page. All students can access the eLearn spaces for the course and modules that they are registered for.uclan. Module Description 2. This is the brand name for the on-line Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) that the University uses to support and enhance teaching and learning. Generic feedback on the examination paper Every student has access to the university computer facility. Student Guide to Assessment 3. On average. 7. Once logged into your eLearn area you can access material from the course and all of the modules you are studying without having to log in to each module separately. It needs to be able to use Java and the cache has to be configured so that new eLearn pages are immediately downloaded and the old eLearn pages stored in the cache are not reused. you will be able to access: 1. Handouts for tutorials and practicals 6. Any lesser commitment is unlikely to produce a good degree. Module Booklet 3. In practice.uk/information/services/iss/support/files/elearnoverviewv6. you should be planning to do between 36 and 40 hours per week. This consists of between 2 and 6 hours contact time with staff in lectures. Generic feedback on coursework assignments 5. However. the answer to that question is „a lot depends on you‟.ac. As a rough guide a single module completed in one semester will require 12-15 hours per week during the semester.pdf How much work do I have to do? The normal amount of work involved in achieving a successful outcome to your studies is to study for 10 hours per each credit you need to achieve – this includes attendance at UCLan and time spent in private study. You can also access the university computer facilities remotely from your own computer. then. you will be able to access: 1. Minutes of SSLC Meetings You can expect that. You can expect that.

uk. Attendance You are required to attend all timetabled learning activities for each module. You should contact the School Office as above and your request will be forwarded to the appropriate person.mind if you intend to undertake part-time employment or pursue other interests outside the curriculum. 20 . then the date of withdrawal will be recorded as the last day of attendance. To enter any other names would result in inaccurate records and be dishonest. a medical certificate must be produced. Any student who is found to make false entries can be disciplined under the student guide to regulations. you may be deemed to have withdrawn from the course.ac. In the event of absence due to illness. Exceptional requests for leave must be made to the Associate Head of School or nominee (usually the Course Leader). Each time you are asked to enter your details on SAM you must remember that the University has a responsibility to keep information up to date and that you must only enter your own details on the system. Unauthorised absence is not acceptable and may attract academic penalties and/or other penalties. so if you miss the practical without good reason you will attract a score of 0% in that assessment. If you have not gained the required authorisation for leave of absence. do not respond to communications from the University and if you are absent for four weeks or more. Some practical sessions may involve assessed work. If this is the case. Notification of illness or absence must be made to the School Office on 01772 895687 or by email to fzattendance@uclan. and you can check your attendance record through MyUCLan. Your attendance at classes will be monitored using SAM.

Often we need to test all of these learning outcomes at once. This helps you by providing feedback on the appropriateness of your study skills in meeting the learning objectives. It also assists the academic staff by providing information as to the appropriateness of the learning environment in facilitating student learning. In addition. Assessment and Progression Please note that all modules will be assessed. Formative assessment includes assessment strategies that encourage the student and tutor to build on the student‟s strengths and to plan remedial help to correct identified weaknesses. The nature of formative assessment varies between modules. and to do so at the times scheduled unless authorised extensions. special arrangements for disability. The assessment methods and what we are trying to assess by the particular method are shown below: Examinations Short answer questions are usually looking for how well you have learned factual information. You are expected to attempt all required assessments for each module for which you are registered. In some there are short tests or essays. Sometimes we need to assess how well you have assimilated facts. while in others there is informal feedback via activities such as tutorials or discussion of experiment results during laboratory sessions. sometimes we need to assess your understanding. Essay questions are looking for your understanding and critical analysis skills.4. Presentations 21 . It is important that we try to match assessment to the learning outcomes of each module. as is the ability to think on your feet using the facts that you have learned. or extenuating circumstances allow you to defer your assessment. we need to assess skills. Formative assessment encourages the development of personal self-awareness and self-evaluation such that corrective change can be instigated by the individual. and at other times your application of the facts. Formative assessment relates to the continuing and systematic appraisal of the degree of learning. The Course Team recognise the main purpose of assessment as:    the diagnosis of strengths and weaknesses of individual students encouragement to students to be involved in determining their own performance evaluation as to whether or not the student has met the learning outcomes of the module and programme in order to progress to the next level or achieve an exit award Assessment is continuous and uses both formative and summative methods. such as your ability to communicate your ideas. Your presentational skills under pressure are being assessed here.

through the year tutors. as well as your written communication and critical analysis skills. and assesses your skills in bringing a large body of work together in a concise coherent report.Essays Non-examination situation essays assess your understanding of the subject and ability to do research.ac. You may have more than one deadline at the same time. Assessment arrangements for students with a disability Arrangements are made for students who have a disability/learning difficulty for which valid supporting evidence can be made available. These assessed work cover sheets can be obtained on the module and course pages on eLearn and from the tray in the Assignment Submission Point JBF203. When will the Assessments take place? The course team. produced by the School. Once the work has a FULLY completed and signed cover sheet attached. or in the module booklet. and you are expected to manage your time sufficiently well to meet all deadlines whilst continuing with your attendance at classes. try to spread the assessment load. disability@uclan. it is important that you plan your work carefully in order to meet assessment deadlines. 22 . that accompanies this handbook. Presentation of Written Work The way in which you present your work will be taken into account when arriving at the final grade for the assessment. Submission of Assessments Normally all work should be submitted through eLearn and Turnitin. They also assess either your written or oral presentation skills when communicating your deliberations to the class or marker. it should be submitted through the assignment drop-box on eLearn or through one of the letter boxes in JBF203. These assess the application of the information that you have gained.uk. These assess the application of theory to practical situations. To assist you in this regard. All work should be submitted with a completed assessed work cover sheet with the declaration signed. Contact the Disability Adviser for advice and information. Nevertheless. Information about the requirements for individual assessments and their respective deadlines for submission / examination arrangements will be provided in the assignment brief. that will be posted on eLearn. refer to the Student Guide to Assessment. Case studies Projects You will find a detailed breakdown of the assessments in the individual module booklets.

Assessment deadlines will help you to develop a personal ethos.Deadlines for Assessments In the workplace you will be faced with many deadlines. this regulation will be strictly implemented. 5 and 6. 50% for level 7). If you submit work late and unauthorised. it would delay the return of coursework to the rest of the group if this regulation were not adhered to. 23 . The School with responsibility for your module will be authorised to give permission for one extension period of between 1 and 10 working days where evidence of circumstances has been accepted and where submission within this timescale would be reasonable taking into account those circumstances (Academic Regulation: G3). since in most cases work will be returned to students with specimen answers and feedback. This regulation is not intended to be draconian. We expect work to be handed in on time. A deadline is set at a particular time on a particular day and work submitted after this time without an extension granted by the relevant year tutor will be penalised.  Unauthorised late submission at resubmission will automatically be awarded a mark of 0%. before the deadline expires. Rather than disadvantage the majority of students for the sake of the few. it is imperative that you contact your year tutor. Authorisation of the late submission of work requires written permission. The contact details for each year tutor can be found on the relevant noticeboard outside JBF201. However.  Work submitted later than 5 working days after the published submission date will be awarded a mark of 0%. Extensions Assignments must be submitted no later than the date on your assignment brief. a universal penalty will be applied in relation to your work:  If you submit work within 5 working days following the published submission date the maximum mark you can attain is the minimum pass mark (ie 40% for levels 4. Days Late 1-5 >5 Penalty Maximum mark attainable is the minimum pass for that level 0% If you have problems that prevent you meeting a deadline for submission. If you anticipate that you will have difficulty in meeting assessment deadlines or you have missed or are likely to miss in-semester tests you must report this at the earliest possible opportunity to your year tutor. which will enable you to cope with tight work schedules.

accidents or serious family problems. They are only authorised to grant one extension period of between 1 and 10 working days where evidence of circumstances has been documented and accepted.php Extenuating Circumstances "Extenuating Circumstances" is a phrase which refers to exceptional factors outside of your control which have adversely affected your performance within your course. http://www.Extensions of deadlines for coursework on FZ or FV modules will only be granted in exceptional circumstances and can only be authorised by the relevant year tutor or. the Associate Head of School. You can apply for extenuating circumstances online via myUCLan (this can be accessed as a Useful Tool link on the Student Portal home page of the UCLan website) or use the paper based system if your circumstances are such that you cannot access myUCLan. You must submit claims within specified deadlines and submit corroborating evidence to the School office. in exceptional circumstances. More information about deadlines and gaining access to envelopes is available from the „i‟ website. We aim to inform you of a decision about granting an extension within 2 days of the receipt of the request. The normal work commitments of part-time students would not constitute an extenuating circumstance.uclan. Extensions must be sought well in advance of the deadline by contacting your year tutor). you may submit a case for consideration in accordance with the University‟s Extenuating Circumstan ces Procedure. The University does not look sympathetically on absences or delays caused by holiday commitments or by work commitments in the case of fulltime students. 24 . Normally extenuating circumstances will relate to a change in your circumstances since you commenced your course. the form and the assessment cover sheet will be signed by the Year Tutor and a new deadline set. A disability or learning difficulty does not constitute an extenuating circumstance (Academic Regulations: G5).uk/information/services/sas/quality/regulations/aca_regs. Examples are illness.ac. The year tutors are: Year One – Janine McGuire Year Two – Kev Pritchard Year Three – Mick Wysocki Year Four – Allison Jones If you are unable to submit work within 10 working days after the submission date due to verifiable extenuating circumstances. Everyday occurrences such as colds or known conditions such as hayfever will not qualify unless the effects are unusually severe and this is corroborated by a medical note. which have had a significant. and if your application for extension is granted. adverse effect on your studies. Upon receipt of the evidence and a completed application for coursework extension form. These factors may prevent you from attending examinations or other timed assessments or caused you to miss assessment submission dates.

plagiarism or collusion. note from your GP or a University counsellor. This should include. Cheating. Plagiarism. Collusion and Re-presentation You are required to sign a declaration indicating that individual work submitted for an assessment is your own. Assessment Boards will consider properly submitted claims from students who believe their performance has been adversely affected by extenuating circumstances. Assessment Boards are not permitted to alter individual assessment marks to take account of extenuating circumstances (Academic Regulations: G9 and Assessment Handbook). must be acknowledged. If you attempt to influence the standard of the award you obtain through cheating.g. Work submitted without such a declaration will not be marked. Generic feedback on end of module assessment and dissertations will be made available within 15 working days following the publication of results. or written e.B. even if your difficulties are continuing from one semester to another. legible and informative feedback for all your assessments (Academic Regulations: G2. inter alia: 25 . it will be considered as a serious academic and disciplinary offence as described within the Academic Regulations: G7 and Assessment Handbook  Cheating is any deliberate attempt to deceive and covers a range of offences includes. The use of work produced for another purpose by you. Staff will provide individual written feedback on all in-module formative and summative elements of assessment which contribute to a module within 15 working days of the scheduled submission or examination date. hospital appointment card. You are expected to review and reflect on your feedback and learn from each experience to improve your performance as you progress though the course. Extenuating Circumstances will only be considered if they are submitted within the published deadlines and that there is evidence to support them. car recovery/breakdown report. N. working alone or with others. Feedback may be oral. This may initially be generic feedback and may be verbal during a lecture or one-to-one session. or comments posted on a website or other. death certificate etc. posted on a website or other.4). you are advised to seek guidance from your Personal Tutor. Remember that extensions of up to 10 working days can be granted for coursework by the Year Tutor on the production of documented evidence. crime reference number. a medical certificate. In determining assessment recommendations. If you are in any doubt concerning a claim for Extenuating Circumstances.You will be expected to re-submit claims for extenuating circumstances for each assessment period. written. Feedback UCLan is committed to giving you clear. in the form of specimen answers. where appropriate.

 when it is detected for the first time on a resubmission for an already failed module. .Unfair use of a pocket calculator.Substitution of examination materials. are acceptable.Use of a communication device during the examination. . This means that all quotes. . no further resubmission for the module will be permitted.Impersonation. 'crib notes'. ideas. . or imitating in close detail another student‟s work . which is wholly unacceptable. Re-presentation is an attempt to gain credit twice for the same piece of work. Brief quotations from the published or unpublished works of another person. Plagiarism describes copying from the works of another person without suitably attributing the published or unpublished works of others.  the plagiarised element of assessment must be resubmitted to the required standard and the mark for the module following resubmission will be restricted to the minimum pass mark for that level (mark (ie 40% for levels 4. Plagiarism amounts to dishonesty. It does not include the normal situation in which you learn from your peers and share ideas. If an allegation is found to be proven then the appropriate penalty will be implemented: In the case of a single offence of cheating.Copying from another candidate's script or work. as this generates the knowledge and understanding necessary for each individual to independently undertake an assignment. and the appropriate fail grade will be awarded. music and images should be acknowledged and referenced within your assignments.Communicating during the examination with another candidate. . 5 and 6. suitably attributed.this includes with the other student‟s consent and also when 2 or more students divide the elements of an assignment amongst themselves and copy one another‟s answers. - Normally you will be required to submit your assignment through eLearn and Turnitin. . collusion or re-presentation:  the penalty will be 0% for the element of assessment. or texts books during an examination other than an examination where the rubric permits such usage. 50% for level 7). opinions. .   Being in possession of notes. and an overall fail for the module. and its contents will automatically be scanned against a variety of resources to check the original source of the material. . You must always use your own words except when using properly referenced quotations. The process of investigation and penalties which will be applied can be reviewed in the Academic Regulations: Appendix 9. nor should it be confused with group work on an assignment which is specifically authorised in the assignment brief.Having prior access to the examination questions unless permitted to do so by the rubric of the examination. 26 .Or any deliberate attempt to deceive. Collusion is an attempt to deceive the examiners by disguising the true authorship of an assignment by copying. plagiarism.

IN. How to avoid plagiarism (www.uk/resources/plagiarism. Writing Tutorial Services. Smith. if you fail a single module the Assessment Board has the discretion to allow you to retake that module in the subsequent academic year as an extra module (i. USA (http://www. If you do not pass all the modules you cannot normally progress into the second year of the degree. Plagiarism: What It is and How to Recognize and Avoid It. Alison.ac.ac. Extract from University of Brighton Student Guide. This may have severe implications for your ability to complete your course of study.uk/sd/central/library/help/training/studyskills/plag/ . Another possibility.ac.html). but an exit award may then be made. the dissertation cannot be condoned in this respect. plagiarism.edu/uacc/plagiar. However. Plagiarism: a guide for law lecturers. or may exercise its discretion to condone the failure of a module in circumstances such as significant and acceptable extenuating circumstances where the learning outcomes have still been met. and there are strict limits on the number of modules that can be condoned within each Stage of any degree programme.ukcle.northwestern. UK Centre for Legal Education. All my own work? Plagiarism and how to avoid it.html ).edu/~wts/pamphlets/plagiarism.In the event of a repeat offence of cheating.pdf). Jean et al. A condoned module is still regarded as a fail. In the latter case you will be allowed to progress as if you had passed the module. or both).e. What if I fail a Module? If you fail a module the Assessment Board may offer reassessment (of coursework. Indiana University. 7th module).uk/resources/trns/plagiarism/guide. Progression Regulations Stage 1 to Stage 2 (level 4 to level 5) a) To proceed from year 1 to year 2 of the programme of study. Exceptionally. examination.indiana. UK Centre for Legal Education. You can find more about the various forms of plagiarism and how to avoid it in the following publications: Bone.. collusion or re-presentation (irrespective of whether the repeat offence involves the same form of unfair means) on the same or any other module within the course:  the appropriate penalty will be 0% for the module with no opportunity for reassessment.ukcle. http://northumbria. This decision is taken at the discretion of the Board (in line with the University Regulations) and will depend upon the specific circumstances surrounding the failure.html). normally you must pass ALL six modules. Bloomington. This penalty does not preclude you being able to retake the module in a subsequent year. 28th October 2003 (www. entirely at the discretion of the Assessment 27 . 12th July 2003 (http://www.

the maximum mark you can be awarded for any reassessed component is the minimum pass mark (ie 40% or P or S) and this mark will contribute to the overall aggregate mark for the module. be allowed to proceed to Honours on a part-time 28 b) . If you attempt 16 modules at stage Two and fail more than 4 modules you cannot be awarded an honours degree. at the discretion of the Assessment Board.e. or a component within it. however. If you fail one module the Assessment Board has the discretion to allow you to retake that module in the subsequent academic year as an extra module (i. If you fail more than one module but have an overall APM (Average Percentage Mark) of greater than 40% you may. (You should. may be reassessed only once.) You will not normally be allowed to attempt more than 6 additional modules in order to complete Stage One and progress to Stage Two. You will not normally be allowed to attempt more than 6 additional modules in order to complete Stage Two (years 2 and 3 combined). or Diploma of Higher Education or pass degree) for which you have qualified. Once you have passed those modules you could then be allowed to progress to year 2 of the course in the subsequent academic year. A module. if you fail one or more modules you may be permitted to re-take just the failed modules in the subsequent academic year as a part-time student. be allowed to proceed to Honours on a part-time route. If you fail more than one module but have an overall APM (Average Percentage Mark) of greater than 40% you may.. whether that is in-module reassessment or at the end of the module. you may be permitted to re-take just the failed modules in the subsequent academic year as a part-time student.e. 7th module). be aware that you cannot get a student loan or some other types of funding as a part-time student. If you fail one module the Assessment Board has the discretion to allow you to retake that module in the subsequent academic year as an extra module (i. and are required to be reassessed in that component.. BSc (Hons) Chemistry Students Year 2 to Year 3 (level 5 to level 6) At the end of year 2: a) b) To proceed to year 3 Honours you must normally pass all six modules. at the discretion of the Assessment Board. b) If you fail a component of assessment. 7th module). Once you have passed those modules you could then be allowed to progress to year 3 of the course in the subsequent academic year). (i.Board. MChem Chemistry Students Stage 2 to Stage 3 At the end of year 2: a) To proceed with the MChem you must normally pass all six modules and have achieved an APM of ≥ 60%. but will receive any lower award (Certificate of Higher Education.e.

e. 7th module).. you may be permitted to re-take just the failed modules in the subsequent academic year as a part-time student. If you fail more than one module but have an overall APM (Average Percentage Mark) of greater than 40% you may. You will not normally be allowed to attempt more than 2 additional modules in order to complete Stage Three (years 3 and 4 combined). The formula used is: APM  m1l1c 1  m 2l 2 c 2  .e. (i. MChem Chemistry Students Year 3 to Year 4 (level 6 to level 7) a) To proceed to year 4 of the MChem programme you must normally pass all six modules. at the discretion of the Assessment Board. be allowed to proceed to Honours on a part-time route.. you may be permitted to re-take just the failed modules in the subsequent academic year as a part-time student.  mnln c n l1c 1 l 2 c 2  . The University publishes the principles underpinning the way in which awards and results are decided in the University Academic Regulations: Section H... Once you have passed those modules you could then be allowed to progress to year 3 of the course in the subsequent academic year). For the MChem Chemistry award the degree classification is based on the highest classification achieved from either: 1. You will not normally be allowed to attempt more than 6 additional modules in order to complete Stage Two (year 2). Decisions about the overall classification of awards are made by Assessment Boards through the application of the academic and relevant course regulations. (i. whichever is the higher. Once you have passed those modules you could then be allowed to progress to year 3 of the course in the subsequent academic year). If you fail one module the Assessment Board has the discretion to allow you to retake that module in the subsequent academic year as an extra module (i. The Average Percentage Mark (APM) of your best 17 (340 credits) from 18 (360 credits) modules at Stage 2/3. The Average Percentage Mark (APM) of your best 11 (220 credits) from 12 (240 credits) modules at Stage 3 or 2.route. Final Awards Successful completion of your programme of study will lead to either the award of an MChem Chemistry or a BSc (Hons) Chemistry.e..  ln c n 29 b) .

or 2. the APM calculation takes into account the mark you got in a module (m).5 will be rounded up automatically by BANNER to the next degree classification. classify students by taking into account their overall profile and performance with the normal minimum requirement that: 1. The Average Percentage Mark (APM) of your level 5 and 6 modules (generally taken in years 2 and 3 of a full time course) weighted 3:7.99% 50-59. Bachelor Degree with Honours Bachelor Pass Degree Diploma of Higher Education Cert of Higher Education 360 credits.99% First Class Honours Degree Upper Second Class Honours Degree Lower Second Class Honours Degree Third Class Honours Degree A minimum APM of X9. The APM is no lower than 2 percentage points below that required for the higher classification. so that the modules are weighted which recognises higher level study through the ratio 1:2:3:4 for Level 4: Level 5: Level 6: Level 7. Exit Awards There are also several alternative „exit‟ awards shown in the table below that you may wish to consider. The dissertation module must be in the classification awarded (or above). Your Average Percentage Mark in year 3 only (i. the Average Percentage Mark (APM) will be calculated and used to determine the award classification as follows: APM 70-100% 60-69. including a minimum of 180 from level 5 modules and 60 from level 6 modules 240 credits including a minimum of 100 from level 5 modules 120 credits from level 4 modules 30 . In addition for the BSc(Hons) Chemistry award the Assessment Board may.Put simply. including a minimum of 220 from level 5 modules and 120 from level 6 modules 320 credits. A minimum of 3 modules (60 credits) at level 6 are in the classification band and 2. For the BSc (Hons) Chemistry award the degree classification is based on the highest classification achieved from either: 1.99% 40-49. by the discretion given to it in the Academic Regulations. the size or credit of the module (c) and also the level of the module (l).‟ and 3.e your level 6 modules) In either case.

uk for support and advice. If you want to appeal. for good reason. then you must do so within 7 days of your results being published. 31 . Contact the Students' Union Advice Centre suadvice@uclan. 2. been unable to make known to the Assessment Board. The dates for the publication of results can be found on the academic calendar. that the student‟s academic performance has been adversely affected by extenuating circumstances which the student has. that there has been a material administrative error at a stage of the examining process.ac. The onus is on you to find out your results and submit your appeal on time. 3. please bear in mind that your reasons must fall within the grounds specified in the University Academic Regulations: Section I. You cannot appeal simply because you disagree with the mark given. 4. that the assessment procedure and/or examinations have not been conducted in accordance with the approved regulations. The specified grounds for appeal are: 1. or that some material irregularities have occurred. that an Assessment Board has given insufficient weight to extenuating circumstances.For calculating awards 1 module = 20 credits Appeals If you consider that you have a reason to appeal against an assessment board decision.

There will be at least three contacts with your personal tutor in Year 2. and the skills you acquire which can be used other than in investigative work. We will guide you through the subject and instil in you the critical and enquiring characteristics required of an investigator. At times.5. This source of support is an important feature of the course and we would encourage you to see your Personal Tutor as a friend and helper. one of which should be „one to one‟ and one a t the start of Year 3. and where to find them. Equally important. Alternatively. is the manner in which you develop as an individual over that period. You should meet with your personal tutor regularly. though. outside MB126. with at least three of these being „one to one‟ meetings. it may be necessary for them to challenge you over your progress. During this meeting you should make arrangements about the process by which future regular contact will be maintained. administrative and practical issues. where problems are related to a particular module. you are encouraged to approach the module tutor. but it is not their role to constantly monitor you in these areas as may have happened at school or college. helpful and try to understand (but not necessarily share) your point of view when you need advice. on the year one noticeboard. You should have at least six meetings with the Personal Tutor in Year 1. assistance in accessing other services available to students within the University. Your Personal Tutor should be your first point of contact for advice on a wide range of academic. You should meet your personal tutor during induction week. Your personal tutor should be supportive. They are responsible for providing you with support and advice in relation to your programme of studies. Employers are looking for skills such as:      self-organisation assertiveness good communication skills team work problem solving Personal Tutors You will be assigned a Personal Tutor during induction week for the duration of your course and you will be able to find details of who you personal tutor is. personal. performance or attendance. 32 . In your course you will be presented with a vast amount of information and knowledge. Student Support Guidance and Conduct Student Support and Guidance Perhaps the most important thing that the School of Forensic and Investigative Sciences will give you is support. and time has been allocated on the induction timetable to enable to you do this. Their job is not to have all the answers but they will be able to direct you to the person or place where they can be found. and to offer whatever help and assistance they can to make your time at the University a satisfying and stimulating experience.

If you need to get advice in an emergency or when your personal tutor is not available then you can go and see your year tutor or course leader. It is highly unlikely that you will have a problem we have not encountered before. Medical Centre and general life in Preston. These were distributed by your School during induction week. health. Both you and your tutors should keep appropriate records of meetings and this may form part of your Personal Development Process. They work towards improving your student experience here at UCLan. The „i‟ also produces a Student Organiser and „i book‟ which contain useful guidance for you. If you have good reason for wishing to change your personal tutor. Pre School Centre. Studying Abroad. personal problems. housing. more information about their role can be found by clicking on this link to their web site . Student Finance. Welfare. then this can be arranged by contacting the Associate Head of School. Independent Academic Advice. Counselling. He or she will meet with you at the start of the course and will remain your Personal Tutor throughout your time throughout the course. Student Liaison Officers have recent experience of what it is like to be a student and can advise you of the support systems available. There is a centralised Student and Academic Support Service which has The 'i' Student Information Centre as its first point of contact. Disability Advice. you should check your UNIVERSITY e-mail account regularly. Who do I ask for Help/Guidance/Advice? Any problems you may choose to discuss with a member of staff. International Advice. Each module has a Module Tutor – a member of staff responsible for that module. will be treated in strict confidence and will not be divulged to anyone without your permission (including parents).   33 . Mentoring. or go to the School Office (JBF201) and staff there will endeavour to find a member of staff who can deal with your enquiry. that depends on the nature of the problem:  Learning/teaching in a module.Student Liaison Officer. Throughout the year contact with you personal tutor is usually maintained through e-mail and as stated on your Student Card. These are questions for your Personal Tutor. academic or otherwise. The important thing is not to sit on a problem and hope it will go away – it will not! As to whom you should ask. Multi Faith Centre. You can obtain information on a wide range of topics including student administration such as Council Tax and letters to verify your status plus Scholarships. money. Which options to take – Electives – structure of your course – progression (moving from year to year).There will be appointment sheets by staff offices so that you can arrange meetings either by booking an appointment or emailing them (details of this are at the front of the booklet). The Module Tutor will be your first port of call for questions about the learning/teaching within the module.

 Administrative questions. Safety glasses are not required when the laboratory is used only for data handling exercises. your Chemistry course is a practical course and you will be required to carry out practical work in the Chemistry laboratories. Students with Disabilities If you have a disability that may affect your studies. 34 .uk . In particular you should note the requirement that laboratory coats and safety glasses should be worn at all times in the laboratory. any member of academic staff is able to issue an informal oral warning and the University will support staff by invoking formal procedures where necessary. Conduct You will be expected to abide by the Regulations for the Conduct of Students in the University Student Guide to Regulations. Please help to keep it safe by reporting any incidents. You must understand and follow all the regulations and safety codes necessary for a safe campus environment. These form an essential element of your personal development and contribute to the safety of others. UCLan expects you to behave in a respectful manner demonstrated by using appropriate language in class. They can help you with your academic records and other administrative matters. please either contact the Disability Advisory Service . In particular. With your agreement information will be passed on to the Disability Advisory Service. The School Office is in Room JBF201. Health and Safety As a student of the University you are responsible for the safety of yourself and for that of others around you. Safety assessments have been undertaken for each module of your course and you will be advised of all applicable safety codes and any specific safety issues during the induction to your course and modules.disability@uclan. You can read more about UCLan expectations in the regulations for the Conduct of Students. Arati‟s contact details can be found at the beginning of this book and you can contact her direct for further advice / support.ac. If your behaviour is considered to be unacceptable. The School has a named lead for students with disabilities . Where necessary. Specific details of the School safety policies are given to you in separate safety documentation. accidents or potentially unsafe situations to a member of staff as soon as possible. Laboratories are hazardous areas unless all safety regulations are known and implemented. The University will make reasonable adjustments to accommodate your needs and to provide appropriate support for you to complete your study successfully. You must ensure that you understand and apply all necessary safety codes.Arati Iyengar. you will be asked for evidence to help identify appropriate adjustments.or let one of the course team know as soon as possible. and switching mobile phones / other devices off prior to attending classes.

uk for more information. It is your responsibility to check that board daily to find out things that affect you. please contact the Data Protection Liaison Officer. Every student has an e-mail address at the university and we will sometimes disseminate information via that medium so you must check your inbox on a daily basis. details of exams etc. Strategic Development Service. but we know that sometimes you might come up against problems ranging from academic situations or finding a job. or visit the website at www.ac. on the first floor outside MB114. These are all explained during the enrolment process at the commencement of your studies.mail suadvice@uclan.co. details of your year tutor and will also direct you to more specific notice boards elsewhere. You should see the eLearn space for your course for your timetables. report on the hot stories on campus or represent your peers as a Course Representative. details of exams. These notice boards will give you general information such as any last minute changes in arrangements. share your passion or hobby with like-minded people. Call in at the Student‟s Union. information on progression. or e. We hope your time at UCLan is trouble free. to dealing with debt and claiming the benefits you‟re ent itled to. 35 . The SU offers you the chance to play the sport you love. PR1 2HE. Where do I get Information? eLearn will be used to provide you with nearly all the information you need. In addition „Year notice boards’ are located in Maudland Building. Check SU Advice online for impartial advice on a whole range of issues.uk. If you would like a more detailed explanation of the University‟s policy on the use and disclosure of personal information. University of Central Lancashire. Preston.uclansu. Data Protection All of the personal information obtained from you and other sources in connection with your studies at the University will be held securely and will be used by the University both during your course and after you leave the University for a variety of purposes. democratic organisation and exists to make life better for you and wants every UCLan student to have a great experience at University.Students’ Union The Students‟ Union is a student-led. The Union is all about you taking the opportunities that are offered and making the most of them.

Your Course Leader will facilitate the meetings using Guidelines and provide a record of the meeting with any decisions and / or responses made and / or actions taken as a result of the discussions held. Course Representatives The course team will make arrangements for you to elect a course representative who can represent any issues you may have to the course team within Student Staff Liaison Committee (SSLC) meetings.  Experience of modules . Student Voice You can play an important part in the process of improving the quality of this course through the feedback you give. In addition to the ongoing discussion with the course team throughout the year. personal tutoring arrangements and The Card.  Review of enrolment / induction experience. They will be requesting that you complete the National Student Survey (during semester 2 for students in their final year of study) or the UCLan Student Survey (all other students). and encourage your involvement in all feedback opportunities. Student Staff Liaison Committee (SSLC) Meetings The purpose of a SSLC meeting is to provide the opportunity for course representatives to feedback to staff about the course. assessment.  Experience of academic support which may include e. Personal Development Planning. The course team encourage student feedback in all areas and recognise that additional items for discussion may also be raised at the meeting  Update on actions completed since the last meeting  Feedback about the previous year – discussion of external examiner‟s report.  Course organisation and management (from each individual year group. normally related to the following agenda items (dependent on time of year). If you are interested in becoming a course representative yourself and wish to find out more about the role you can visit the Student Union and Student Liaison Officer sites for more information and volunteer for the role when the opportunity arises. 36 . The meetings include discussion of items forwarded by course representatives. The minutes of the last SSLC meeting will be posted on the course space on eLearn. library. there are a range of mechanisms for you to feedback about your experience of teaching and learning.  Any other issues raised by students or staff. Your Student Liaison Officer will be invited to attend and support the resolution of any issues. IT. and the course overall).g. We aim to respond to your feedback and let you know of our plans for improvement. provide ongoing advice and support.6. The SLO and the Students Union can support you in voicing your opinion. outcomes of National /UCLan student surveys. These meetings are normally scheduled once per semester.g. feedback.  Other aspects of University life relevant to student experience e.teaching. resources. the overall student experience and to inform developments which will improve future courses.

Complaints The University recognises that there may be occasions when you have cause for complaint about the service you have received. prompt and appropriate response. when this happens. 37 .all responses are anonymous. They capture feedback on your experience within each module and inform staff about where improvements could be made. please complete and return these to ensure your voice is heard .Module Evaluation Questionnaires Module evaluation questionnaires provide one of the most important means for you to express your opinion about your teaching and learning experience. the complaints procedure is intended to provide an accessible. You are likely to see the module team responses to previous student feedback in your module handbooks / information packs. Your module leaders will ensure that you receive the forms for completion either paper based or on-line. Click on this link for more information Complaints Procedure. fair and straightforward system which ensures as effective.

The University puts a high priority on your personal development.  help you to identify the ones you are weak in. employment-friendly skills you are learning in addition to your academic facts. and  to take action to improve those skills. If you do not have one. and articulate it in a way that is impressive to prospective employers.7. educational and career development. and can be defined as: A structured and supported process undertaken by an individual to reflect upon their own learning. at the end. how to manage your time to meet deadlines. You will be given a copy of a booklet called Developing in all the Right Places that is designed to help you realise what extra-curricular. (Many students imagine they do not need to keep a record of their personal skills learning as they will remember everything. to recall everything!) The booklet will also help you to see where you have developed even when you didn‟t realise it. Personal Development Planning While you are at university. but you will also learn other things that you might not be aware of. they will ask to see your personal development portfolio (PDP) to help them write it. and so on. You will learn how to study. and to plan for their personal. Keeping a PDP is part of the contract you make with the university when you sign up to become a student here. performance and / or achievement. how to work with other people. This approach can broadly be described as Personal Development Planning. they will refuse to write a reference for you. 38 . but it is our experience that your time at UCLan will fly by so quickly that it is hard. you will learn many things. When you ask staff for a reference. we have introduced a system that aims to:  help you to identify the skills you should be developing. You already expect to learn lots of facts and techniques to do with chemistry. and to encourage you to record your learning in this area so you can put together an impressive CV at the end of your time here. Employers are looking for skills such as:  self-organisation  team work  good written communication  good oral communication  problem solving So. and so keeping a record of your achievements is compulsory if you are to get a reference from academic staff in the School when you are applying for jobs. If you are to be an employable graduate it is vital that you can list the skills employers value in your CV.

The module therefore contains elements from Inorganic. It will provide you with the necessary skills for the safe.uk/forensic). and you should familiarise yourself with this computer-based system. It will also give you experience of concise and confident report writing. structure. Organic and Physical Chemistry as well as Analytical science. The topics that you will study include the following. analytical. Electives Full or half modules to the value of one module These modules are offered in year 1 only and should be selected from the electives catalogue. bonding and electronic properties control chemical and physical properties). Introduction to Chemical Concepts [FZ1026] This module aims to provide you with a basic knowledge of chemical concepts and to develop an appreciation of the interdependence of the various branches of chemistry. You will be encouraged to think of alternative strategies to the production of desired products by using environmentally friendly solvents. You should note that all modules are supported by eLearn. alternative feed stocks or through the use of catalysts to replace stoichiometric reagents. This module will develop competencies such as written communication. IT and communication skills that you will need as you progress through the course. Year 1 Experimental Techniques in Chemistry [FZ1025] This practical module aims to give you an understanding of the links between the various areas of chemistry. Organic (how structure. 39 . Skills for Chemists [FZ1027] This module will help you to develop the mathematical. competency with numbers and calculations and communication and Information Technology (C&IT) skills. The module will encourage you to think of chemical processes in terms of the atom economy. Introduction to Green Chemistry [FZ1028] This module will provide you with an introduction to the concepts of green chemistry. Physical (thermodynamics and kinetics) and Analytical (qualitative vs. energy consumption and waste minimisation.uclan. energetics and redox properties). quantitative analysis. in line with industry standards.APPENDIX A Details of the Chemistry Module Content These are the modules that are included in the BSc (Hons) Chemistry Course. You will be given guidance on using eLearn at the beginning of your course: details are also available on the School‟s website (www. together with FZ1026 and FZ1029. competent and efficient use of laboratory facilities and show you how to keep a record of experimental procedures used.ac. gravimetry and titrimetry). Inorganic (bonding. We have given an overview of their content here. using appropriate language.

It is designed to ensure students have a good grounding in basic organic synthetic chemistry and knowledge of the basic techniques for analysis and identification of chemical compounds. Year 2 Laboratory Studies of Chemical Concepts [FZ2024] This module aims to develop your practical expertise in the chemical laboratory. surface chemistry and electrochemistry and analytical methods derived therefrom. 40 . its rate of reaction with another reagent. It is designed to provide a more comprehensive and advanced understanding of the principles and applications of analytical techniques used in chemical analysis.and d-group elements. The module is also intended to help develop fundamental laboratory skills and techniques required for production. their synthesis and use in organic synthesis.g. The module will also cover the principles and applications of atomic spectrometry and methods of extraction and preparation of samples prior to analysis. Concepts in Chemistry [FZ2027] This module will build on knowledge acquired in your first year of study. Areas covered include kinetics. It will contain material covering the key concepts of physical chemistry and their applications within a range of common methods in analytical science. analysis and identification of chemical compounds. The module will also provide students with a knowledge and understanding of some of the principle components of alkene. help consolidate the theory delivered in FZ2025 and FZ2026 and to give an appreciation of the interdependence between the various branches of Chemistry. aromatic and carbonyl chemistry. Elements of Inorganic and Organic Chemistry [FZ2026] The module will build on previous knowledge acquired in the first year of study. with a typical practical involving the synthesis of an inorganic or organic molecule followed by characterisation of the compound by "wet" analytical or spectroscopic techniques and measurement of specified physical properties of the compound.APPENDIX A Introduction to the Synthesis and Analysis of Organic Compounds [FZ1029] This module will introduce students to the fundamental principles and theories of organic synthesis and chemical analysis of compounds. Ideas and concepts developed will inform much of the practical work conducted in FZ2024. The module is designed to provide students with an understanding and knowledge of organometallic compounds with specific reference to s-. The interaction of molecules with electromagnetic radiation is fundamental to our understanding of spectroscopic analysis therefore you will also study the principles and applications of molecular spectroscopy. Physical Chemistry: Theory and Applications in Analytical Science [FZ2025] This module will build on the material presented in FZ1024 and FZ1026. An integrated approach to the practicals will be taken. thermodynamics. p. This module also contains elements of inorganic chemistry and will introduce you to concepts and principles involved with main group organometallic compounds. e.

While the experiments contained within this module are designed to demonstrate the principles of green technology they will also draw upon material covered previously from across the course. The direction for the experimental work will be determined by you in consultation with academic staff. Each experiment should be design to occupy approximately 20 hours of laboratory time per group member (therefore assuming 3 students per group 60 hours in total). Some of the topics discussed have only recently transferred from the research frontier to commonplace use. the synthon approach to chemical synthesis. organic and physical chemistry that you have learnt in previous modules. Material covered includes bioinorganic chemistry.APPENDIX A Green Chemistry in Action [FZ2028] In this module you will have the chance to put into practice some of the techniques and methodologies that you studied in FZ2029. Ideas and concepts developed will inform much of the practical work conducted in FZ3026. The topics you will be asked to investigate will focus on the chemical processes covered in FZ3025. Therefore reinforcing those concepts and demonstrating the interdisciplinary nature of the subject. Research Topics [FZ3027] This module will focus on subject specialisations within the teaching team and will use material at the forefront of chemical research in these areas to illustrate some of the advanced Chemical concepts used in research. Year 3 Advanced Concepts in Chemistry [FZ3025] The module builds on much of the inorganic. This module is intended to increase your understanding of subjects such as heterogeneous catalysis. You will be made aware of the new environmentally friendly solvents such as supercritical fluids. inorganic multinuclear NMR. photocatalysis and biocatalysis. The module will be delivered by a combination of lectures. You will be introduced to the principles behind these new technologies which facilitate more environmentally friendly approaches to the production of chemicals such as microwave chemistry. 41 . you will be encouraged to apply some of the more advanced analysis techniques covered in FZ3025 as well as those covered in earlier years of the course. New energy sources are becoming increasingly important in chemicals synthesis. Tools for Green Chemistry [FZ2029] This module builds on the concepts introduced in FZ1028. dynamic electrochemistry and surface adsorption processes. photochemistry and sonochemistry. tutorials and seminars and research and internet references will be provided to encourage you to become independent learners as the module develops. Explorations of Chemical Processes [FZ3026] This laboratory-based module is designed to encourage you to engage in the planning and execution of small group experiments. and ionic liquids. biological transformation of molecules and synthesis of molecules of biological importance.

It will also ensure students have the ability to apply these potential routes to the design of successful syntheses of complex target molecules. analyse and interpret results. Biological. products and toxins. Organic Synthetic Methods [FZ3122] This module aims to develop. critical account of the work and how it relates to that of others.APPENDIX A Green Energy [FZ3029] In this module you will study subjects at the forefront of research which have an environmental impact. to manage and plan projects. develop the ability to extract relevant material from a literature survey. Separation Science and Mass Spectrometry [FZ4601] The aim of this module is to provide an understanding of the underlying principles of current separation technologies and mass spectrometry and to develop practical and analytical skills in a range of separation and mass spectrometric techniques. It will also give insight into some of the legal and ethical issues surrounding scientific work. in students. integrate different aspects of the course. It will also all students to develop the ability to critically appraise scientific methods and data. fuel cells as energy sources will be covered. Research Methods [FZ3121] This module is concerned with research methodology relevant to scientists in both academic and commercial environments. develop the ability to design and undertake an original investigation. In addition it will provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the mechanistic consequences of synthetic organic reactions and with the ability to discriminate between alternative synthetic routes to a complex target molecule and recognising which routes will have the highest potential of success. Medicinal and Natural Product Chemistry [FZ3120] This module aims to enable students to understand the biological side of natural and synthetic chemicals. develop the ability to present. reactions and procedures used in organic synthesis. You will be encouraged to research topics individually or in small groups. 42 . Year 4 Research Project [FZ4003] This module aims to develop the ability to understand and define clearly a problem to be solved. reinforced by practical exercises. a thorough understanding of the reagents. The students will understand these topics to greater depth so gaining knowledge and expertise of the biological side of chemistry. develop the ability to present a coherent. natural medicines. photovoltaic. This module will introduce basic aspects of conducting research. achieve a measure of independence. gain practical experience of designing scientific experiments and analysing the results. This module will cover topics such as drug design. The aim of the module is to provide the student with transferable career skills that will allow the student to communicate scientific ideas via a variety of media. These will be used to stimulate class debates and discussions. develop management skills. Subjects such as the use of nuclear fission and fusion.

APPENDIX A Sample Preparation and Screening [FZ4602] This module aims to provide students with a thorough understanding of the principles and techniques used for sample preparation and screening prior to analysis. (ii) the advanced knowledge on electron microscopy for imaging and analysing. Students will be developed (i) the advanced knowledge on diffraction techniques to analyse and identify various oxides. the module will aim to develop students‟ necessary practical skill to run various instruments and should be able to analyse and interpret the data obtained from such techniques with full confidence. It is designed to ensure students are fully conversant with the correct procedures involved in the collection. Atomic absorption. electrochemical and thermal methods. Molecular Spectroscopy [FZ4603] This module aims to provide a systematic understanding and critical awareness of the full analytical potential of the interaction of each part of the electromagnetic spectrum with matter. It will also ensure students have the ability to apply these potential routes to the successful scale-up of syntheses of commercially important molecules. 43 . in students. Applications in Synthesis [FZ4606] This module aims to develop. Finally. metals and advanced materials. transportation and storage of samples as well as applying appropriate sample preparation prior to analysis. This will be achieved through ensuring students have a rigorous understanding of the fundamental principles controlling such interactions. In addition it will provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the limitations placed on large scale processes due availability of starting materials and economic constraints and with the ability to discriminate between alternative synthetic routes to commercially important compounds and recognising which routes will have the highest potential of success. Elemental and Surface Analysis [FZ4604] The aim of this module is to develop advanced knowledge and understanding on surface and elemental analysis of inorganic solids / advanced materials.e. a thorough understanding of the reactions used in synthesis of molecules and materials of theoretical and commercial importance. (iii) the preliminary knowledge and understanding of surface spectroscopy (XPS/Auger/XAFES/XANES) (iv) preliminary knowledge and understanding of adsorption techniques (vi) advanced knowledge on various elemental analysis i.

Date of production/revision of this form 11. To develop in students. through an education in chemistry. Awarding Institution / Body University of Central Lancashire 2. Sources of information on the programme can be found in Section 17 1. UCAS Code F100 8. Title of Final Award BSc (Hons) Chemistry 6. a range of transferable skills. Aims of the Programme      July 2009 To instil in students a sense of enthusiasm for chemistry. To develop in students the ability to apply their chemical knowledge and skills to the solution of theoretical and practical problems in chemistry. To provide students with a knowledge and skills base from which they can proceed to further 44 . of value in chemical and non-chemical employment. an appreciation of its application in different contexts and to involve them in an intellectually stimulating and satisfying experience of learning and studying. University Department/Centre Forensic and Investigative Sciences 4. Modes of Attendance offered Full time 7. External Accreditation N/A 5. Teaching Institution and Location of Delivery University of Central Lancashire Preston Campus 3. Other external influences Chemistry Royal Society of Chemistry 10. To provide students with a broad and balanced foundation of chemical knowledge and practical skills. Relevant Subject Benchmarking Group(s) 9.APPENDIX B UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL LANCASHIRE Programme Specification This Programme Specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if he/she takes full advantage of the learning opportunities that are provided.

laboratory classes. problem solving. Apply knowledge and understanding of chemical systems to the solution of qualitative and quantitative problems of a familiar and unfamiliar nature. design and execute practical investigations. C3. data interpretation. A2. C4. Subject-specific skills B1. Discuss the principles and procedures used in chemical analysis and the characterisation of chemical compounds. and report writing and a viva voce. Preparation of laboratory reports and interpretation of other data. events or changes. Evaluate. C2. C. safe working practices described. Detail dependent on module. A4. viva voce and end of module seen and unseen examinations. Present scientific material and arguments clearly and correctly. discussions. principles and theories relating to the major types of chemical reaction and the main characteristics associated with them including the stereochemistry and nomenclature of reactants. using a variety of presentation media to a range of audiences. reports. Evaluate and analyse problems and plan novel strategies for their solution. taking into account their physical and chemical properties. 12. The most appropriate methods will be dependent on module. and systematically and reliably record and document the findings. laboratory notebooks. including specific hazards. B4. 45 . Detail module dependent. group and individual presentations. A5. case studies. Monitor. presentations. preparation of short notes. Learning Outcomes. B3. problem-solving.APPENDIX B studies in specialised areas of chemistry or multi-disciplinary areas involving chemistry. from problem recognition stage through to the evaluation and appraisal of results and findings. state of matter and the theories used to describe them. including thermodynamics and kinetics. essays. practical reports. data interpretation. Describe characteristic properties of elements and their compounds. Conduct standard laboratory procedures involved in synthetic and analytical work. Knowledge and Understanding A1. Apply knowledge and understanding of the essential concepts. Detail dependent on module. Ability to handle chemical materials safely. Deliberate on major issues currently at the frontiers of chemical research and development. tutorials. Teaching and Learning Methods Skills developed through lectures. including spectroscopy. including initiatives in Green Chemistry. Learning and Assessment Methods A. Teaching and Learning Methods Lectures. starting materials and products B2. Plan. B5. Teaching and Learning Methods Lectures. B. Teaching. practical work. Detail module dependent. by observation and measurements chemical properties. A3. Apply the key elements of physical chemistry. interpret and synthesise chemical information and data. starting materials and products. case studies. this to include the ability to select appropriate techniques and procedures. directed reading. Thinking Skills C1. Assessment methods Workbooks. tutorials and seminars. Assessment methods Practical reports. Describe the major types of chemical reaction and the main characteristics associated with them including the stereochemistry and nomenclature of reactants. laboratory classes with workbook or practical manuals. research project.

Assessment methods Written reports. group projects and presentations. D2. Detail dependent on module. teamwork through class work in tutorials/case studies/problem solving. individual presentations and a viva voce. essays. as evidenced by the ability to plan and implement efficient and effective modes of working. Teaching and Learning Methods Discussions and presentations such as moot court. Show evidence of interpersonal skills. Details dependent on module. preparation of short notes. group and individual presentations. word processed documents. Awards and Credits* 13. D3. 14. practical reports.APPENDIX B Assessment methods Workbooks. Programme Structures* Level Level 6 Module Code FZ3200 FZ3025 Module Title Chemistry Project Advanced Concepts in Chemistry Explorations of Chemical Processes Research Topics Biological. a viva voce and end of module seen and unseen examinations. Exhibit numeracy and computational skills. Detail dependent on module. covering a range of communication media. data analysis and presentation. relating to the ability to interact with other people and to engage in team-working. Display time-management and organisational skills. PowerPoint presentations. and crime scene and case simulations. IT through coursework. D4. Medicinal and Natural Product Chemistry Green Energy Laboratory Studies of Chemical Concepts Physical Chemistry: Theory and Applications in Analytical Science Elements of Inorganic and Organic Chemistry Concepts in Chemistry Green Chemistry in Action Tools for Green Chemistry Credit rating 40 (C) 20 (Comp) Bachelor Honours Degree in Chemistry Requires 360 credits including a minimum of 220 at Level 5 or above and 100 at Level 6 Bachelor Degree in Chemistry Requires 320 credits including a minimum of 180 at Level 5 or above and 60 at Level 6 FZ3026 20 (Comp) FZ3027 FZ3120 20 (Comp) 10 (Comp) FZ3029 Level 5 FZ2024 10 (Comp) 20 (Comp) Diploma of Higher Education in Chemistry Requires 240 credits including a minimum of 100 at Level 5 or above FZ2025 20 (Comp) FZ2026 20 (Comp) FZ2027 FZ2028 FZ2029 20 (Comp) 20 (Comp) 20 (Comp) 46 . collating information from various sources. Demonstrate communication skills. D. Other skills relevant to employability and personal development D1. including ICT skills and information retrieval. reports. oral presentations. numeracy and statistics in association with practical work.

APPENDIX B Level 4 FZ1025 Experimental Techniques in Chemistry Introduction to Chemical Concepts Skills for Chemists Introduction to Green Chemistry Introduction to the Synthesis and Analysis of Organic Compounds Plus 1 module of elective 15. and GCSE Maths and English at Grade C or above.ac.uclan. Key sources of information about the programme      University web site (www.uk) UCAS web site (www. Personal Development Planning PDP is embedded and monitored through the modules that make up the course. including chemistry.ac. particularly the skills modules.uclan. 17. Students are introduced to the idea of PDP and career planning through sessions in induction week.uk/forensic) Factsheet Course Leader Admissions tutor  47 . Reflection and self-assessment on their achievements and goal setting is developed in many of the core modules and through the feedback provided on assessment coversheets. and the personal tutor system. Admissions criteria 240 points at A2 level or equivalent.ucas. Applicants with alternative entry qualifications are welcomed and these will be considered on an individual basis.uk) School website (www. and are provided with a PDP folder which provides information about opportunities for PDP and the School Guide to PDP called „Developing in all the Right Ways‟ and provides a place to keep any information and/or evidence which the student wishes to keep to hand. 20 (Comp) Certificate of Higher Education in Chemistry Requires 120 credits at Level 4 or above FZ1026 20 (Comp) FZ1027 FZ1028 20 (Comp) 20 (Comp) FZ1029 20 (Comp) 20 (Comp) 16. Regular meetings with personal tutors are used to discuss development and reflection.ac.

g. will be included within Student Course Handbooks . Medicinal and Natural Product Chemistry Laboratory Studies of Chemical Concepts Physical Chemistry: Theory and Applications in Analytical Science Elements of Inorganic and Organic Chemistry Concepts in Chemistry Green Chemistry in Action Tools for Green Chemistry Experimental Techniques in Chemistry Introduction to Chemical Concepts Skills for Chemists C COMP COMP COMP COMP COMP COMP COMP COMP COMP COMP COMP COMP COMP COMP √ √ √ √ √ Knowledge and understanding A2 √ Programme Learning Outcomes Subject-specific Skills Thinking Skills A3 √ A4 A5 B1 √ √ √ B2 √ B3 √ B4 √ B5 √ C1 √ C2 √ √ C3 √ √ Other skills relevant to employability and personal development C4 D1 D2 D3 D4 √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ Introduction to Green COMP Chemistry Introduction to the Synthesis and Analysis of COMP Organic Compounds √ √ Note: Mapping to other external frameworks. Compulsory (COMP) or Option (O) A1 FZ3200 FZ3025 LEVEL 6 FZ3026 FZ3027 FZ3029 FZ3120 FZ2024 FZ2025 LEVEL 5 FZ2026 FZ2027 FZ2028 FZ2029 FZ1025 FZ1026 LEVEL 4 FZ1027 FZ1028 FZ1029 Chemistry Project Advanced Concepts in Chemistry Explorations of Chemical Processes Research Topics Green Energy Biological. e. Curriculum Skills Map Please tick in the relevant boxes where individual Programme Learning Outcomes are being assessed Module Module Title Code Core (C).18. professional/statutory bodies.

of value in chemical and non-chemical employment. To provide students with a broad and balanced foundation of chemical knowledge and practical skills and an in-depth understanding of specialised areas of chemistry To develop in students the ability to adapt and apply their chemical knowledge and skills to the solution of familiar and unfamiliar theoretical and practical problems in chemistry. Title of Final Award MChem Chemistry 6. Date of production/revision of this form 11. External Accreditation N/A 5. Sources of information on the programme can be found in Section 17 1. through an education in chemistry. a range of transferable skills. University School/Centre Forensic and Investigative Sciences 4. Teaching Institution and Location of Delivery University of Central Lancashire Preston Campus 3. an appreciation of its application in different contexts and to involve them in an intellectually stimulating and satisfying experience of learning and studying. 49 . To develop in students. Relevant Subject Benchmarking Group(s) 9. UCAS Code 8. Aims of the Programme     February 2011 To instil in students a sense of enthusiasm for chemistry. Awarding Institution / Body University of Central Lancashire 2. Modes of Attendance offered Full time 7.APPENDIX C UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL LANCASHIRE Programme Specification This Programme Specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if he/she takes full advantage of the learning opportunities that are provided. Other external influences Chemistry Royal Society of Chemistry 10.

Assessment methods Workbooks. B5. 50 . and be self-critical in the evaluation of risks. Learning and Assessment Methods A. problem-solving. state of matter and the theories used to describe them. tutorials.  To instil a critical awareness of advances at the forefront of the chemical science discipline. Details dependent on module. C2. Teaching and Learning Methods Lectures. including spectroscopy. including specific hazards. experimental procedures and outcomes. Preparation of laboratory reports and interpretation of other data. by observation and measurements chemical properties. viva voce and end of module seen and unseen examinations. Describe characteristic properties of elements and their compounds. Knowledge and Understanding A1. under minimum supervision. A6. case studies. reports. and systematically and reliably record and document the findings. principles and theories relating to the major types of chemical reaction and the main characteristics associated with them including the stereochemistry and nomenclature of reactants. Discuss the principles and procedures used in chemical analysis and the characterisation of chemical compounds. this to include the ability to select appropriate techniques and procedures. from problem recognition stage through to the evaluation and critical appraisal of results and findings. design and execute practical investigations. B6. practical reports. tutorials and seminars. A4. B4. Plan. laboratory classes with workbook or practical manuals. Develop general strategies including the identification of additional information required and problems where there is not a unique solution. safe working practices described. Assessment methods Practical reports. Teaching. Apply knowledge and understanding of chemical systems to the solution of qualitative and quantitative problems of a familiar and unfamiliar nature. Teaching and Learning Methods Lectures. starting materials and products. directed reading. A7. Use an understanding of the limits of accuracy of experimental data to inform the planning of future work. discussions. starting materials and products. essays. data interpretation. C. Details dependent on module. B2. Thinking Skills C1. Describe the major types of chemical reaction and the main characteristics associated with them including the stereochemistry and nomenclature of reactants. taking into account their physical and chemical properties. Apply knowledge and understanding of the essential concepts. Subject-specific skills B1. A3. including initiatives in Green Chemistry. 12. The most appropriate methods will be used dependent on module. Evaluate and analyse problems and plan novel strategies for their solution. Apply the key elements of physical chemistry. Design. Assess an unfamiliar problem and be able to design and implement a suitable solution. laboratory classes. A8. and report writing and a viva voce. A2. group and individual presentations. including thermodynamics and kinetics. Work independently. The most appropriate methods will be used dependent on module. plan and implement research questions to problems in the chemical sciences including evaluation of hazards and environmental effects. events or changes. A5.APPENDIX C  To provide students with a knowledge and skills base from which they can proceed to further studies in specialised areas of chemistry or multi-disciplinary areas involving chemistry. B. Deliberate on major issues currently at the frontiers of chemical research and development. laboratory notebooks. B3. Learning Outcomes. Monitor. preparation of short notes. Ability to handle chemical materials safely.

Problem-solving skills including the demonstration of self-direction and originality D2. preparation of short notes. Assimilate. Communicate and interact with professionals from other disciplines D3. Assess the success of such a project Teaching and Learning Methods Skills developed through lectures. the outcome of which is potentially publishable. problem solving. Awards and Credits* 13. Teaching and Learning Methods Discussions and presentations. C4. collating information from various sources. presentations. C5. word processed documents. Medicinal and Natural Product Chemistry Research Methods Organic Synthetic Methods Credit rating 60 (C) 20 (O) 20 (O) 20 (O) 20 (O) 20 (O) 20 (Comp) 20 (Comp) 20 (Comp) 10 (Comp) 10 (Comp) 20 (Comp) 20 (Comp) MChem in Chemistry Requires 480 credits including a minimum of 120 at Level 7 or above and 200 at Level 6 or above and 360 at level 5 or above Level 6 Bachelor Honours Degree in Chemistry Requires 360 credits including a minimum of 220 at Level 5 or above and 100 at Level 6 Bachelor Degree in Chemistry Requires 320 credits including a minimum of 180 at Level 5 or above and 60 at Level 6 Diploma of Higher Education in Chemistry Level 5 FZ2024 Laboratory Studies of Chemical Concepts 20 51 . PowerPoint presentations. Programme Structures* Level Level 7 Module Code FZ4003 FZ4601 FZ4602 FZ4603 FZ4604 FZ4606 FZ3025 FZ3026 FZ3027 FZ3029 FZ3120 FZ3121 FZ3122 Module Title Research Project Separation Science and Mass Spectrometry Sample Preparation and Screening Molecular Spectroscopy Elemental and Surface Analysis Applications in Synthesis Advanced Concepts in Chemistry Explorations of Chemical Processes Research Topics Green Energy Biological. practical work. Details dependent on module. individual presentations and a viva voce. group projects and presentations. interpret and synthesise chemical information and data. The most appropriate methods will be used dependent on module. reports. teamwork through class work in tutorials. Evaluate. group and individual presentations. Details dependent on module.APPENDIX C C3. evaluate and present research results objectively. data analysis and presentation. Assessment methods Written reports. practical reports. Undertake an individual research project. oral presentations. research project. Ability to make decisions in complex and unpredictable situations D5. The most appropriate methods will be used dependent on module. IT through coursework. data interpretation. Other skills relevant to employability and personal development D1. C6. case studies. essays. a viva voce and end of module seen and unseen examinations. Ability to exercise initiative and personal responsibility D4. case studies and problem solving. numeracy and statistics in association with practical work. 14. Independent learning ability required for continuing professional development. Assessment methods Workbooks. D.

ac.ucas.uk) School website (www.ac. Key sources of information about the programme      University web site (www. including chemistry.uclan.ac. Regular meetings with personal tutors are used to discuss development and reflection. Reflection and self-assessment on their achievements and goal setting is developed in many of the core modules and through the feedback provided on assessment coversheets. Students are introduced to the idea of PDP and career planning through sessions in induction week. Admissions criteria 260 points at A2 level or equivalent. 17. and the personal tutor system.uclan. and GCSE Maths and English at Grade C or above. particularly the skills modules.uk/forensic) Course Leader Admissions tutor 20 Requires 240 credits including a minimum of 100 at Level 5 or above FZ2026 FZ2027 FZ2028 FZ2029 Level 4 FZ1025 FZ1026 FZ1027 FZ1028 FZ1029 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 Certificate of Higher Education in Chemistry Requires 120 credits at Level 4 or above 20 52 .uk) UCAS web site (www. Applicants with alternative entry qualifications are welcomed and these will be considered on an individual basis. 16. Personal Development Planning PDP is embedded and monitored through the modules that make up the course.APPENDIX C FZ2025 Physical Chemistry: Theory and Applications in Analytical Science Elements of Inorganic and Organic Chemistry Concepts in Chemistry Green Chemistry in Action Tools for Green Chemistry Experimental Techniques in Chemistry Introduction to Chemical Concepts Skills for Chemists Introduction to Green Chemistry Introduction to the Synthesis and Analysis of Organic Compounds Plus 1 module of elective 15. and are provided with a PDP folder which provides information about opportunities for PDP and the School Guide to PDP called „Developing in all the Right Ways‟ and provides a place to keep any information and/or evidence which the student wishes to keep to hand.

Curriculum Skills Map Please tick in the relevant boxes where individual Programme Learning Outcomes are being assessed Module Code Module Title Core (C). Compulsory (COMP) or Option (O) A1 FZ4003 Research Project Separation Science FZ4601 and Mass Spectrometry Sample Preparation FZ4602 and Screening Molecular FZ4603 Spectroscopy Elemental and FZ4604 Surface Analysis Applications in FZ4606 Synthesis Advanced Concepts FZ3025 in Chemistry Explorations of FZ3026 Chemical Processes FZ3027 Research Topics FZ3029 Green Energy Biological.18. Medicinal FZ3120 and Natural Product Chemistry FZ3121 Research Methods Organic Synthetic FZ3122 Methods Laboratory Studies FZ2024 of Chemical Concepts Physical Chemistry: Theory and FZ2025 Applications in Analytical Science Elements of FZ2026 Inorganic and Organic Chemistry C O O O O O COMP COMP COMP COMP COMP COMP COMP COMP                                                                      Programme Learning Outcomes Knowledge and understanding Subject-specific Skills Thinking Skills Other skills relevant to employability and personal development C6 D1 D2 D3 D4 D5                A2 A3 A4 A5 A6 A7 A8 B1 B2       B3 B4  B5   B6 C1  C2        C3        C4       C5                     LEVEL 7   LEVEL 5 LEVEL 6 COMP    COMP    .

e.FZ2027 FZ2028 FZ2029 FZ1025 FZ1026 FZ1027 FZ1028 FZ1029 Concepts in Chemistry Green Chemistry in Action Tools for Green Chemistry Experimental Techniques in Chemistry Introduction to Chemical Concepts Skills for Chemists Introduction to Green Chemistry Introduction to the Synthesis and Analysis of Organic Compounds COMP COMP COMP COMP COMP COMP COMP                            LEVEL 4            COMP Note: Mapping to other external frameworks. professional/statutory bodies. will be included within Student Course Handbooks .g.