Mineral Wells Index

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INSIDE
WWWEATHERRR
CCCONTACTTT
DIGITAL
• SANTO ELEMENTARY
WILL HAVE ITS
KINDERGARTEN AND
PRE-KINDERGARTEN
ROUNDUP for the 2013-
2014 school year on
Tuesday, April 30, from 9
a.m. to 3 p.m. The roundup
takes place in the elemen-
tary school office.
Kindergarten students must
be 5 years old by Sept. 1,
2013, and pre-K students
mut be 4 years old by Sept.
1, 2013
Bring the child’s birth certifi-
cate, Social Security card,
chot records and proof of
residence. The elementary
school is located at 406
Farm-to-Market Road 2201,
Santo, 76472.
• NATIONAL DAY OF
PRAYER GATHERING will
be at noon, Thursday, May
2, at Zappe Park.
• PALO PINTO COUNTY
RELAY FOR LIFE will be
held at the MWHS track
Friday, May 3. This event
honors cancer survivors
and their caregivers and
also remembers those who
are no longer with us.
Funds are raised for the
American Cancer Society
through food and merchan-
dise sales, raffles, contests
and activities. There is
something for everyone to
enjoy including survivor
See GLANCE, page 2
Obituaries . . . . . . . 3
Opinion. . . . . . . . 4-5
Lifestyles. . . . . 10-11
Comics . . . . . . . . 12
Classifieds . . . 13-15
Sports . . . . . . . . . 18
Vol. 113, No. 256
GLANCE
Sunday Index
By CHRIS AGEE
cagee@mineralwellsindex.com
Local government and business lead-
ers recently completed a daylong sweep
of the State Capitol in an effort to save
the Mineral Wells Pre-Parole Transfer
Facility operated by Corrections
Corporation of America.
With help from local representatives
in the State House and Senate, Mayor
Mike Allen, City Manager Lance
Howerton and Chamber of Commerce
Executive Director Beth Henary Watson
met with representatives from strategic
offices Thursday.
The CCA-owned facility was targeted
for closure by the Senate in a recently
passed budget proposal, but the House
budget would instead provide funds to
the Texas Department of Criminal Justice
to determine when and where to make
such closures.
The trio of local representatives used
their opportunity with state
See CCA, page 3
City leaders visit Austin to support CCA
RODEO ROYALTY CONTESTANTS 2013
✔Ashlynn Robinson ✔Ambra Burkheimer ✔Klarissa Jo Henderson
Bullets help
raise funds
for West
From staff reports
The Texas Bullets football
players partnered with area
businesses – John McGuire of
Durant Toyota, Robby Williams
of Holiday Cleaners and John
Brunner of Durham Trailers &
Ranch – and collected over
$1,600 for West, Texas.
The team collected from fans
attending the game, players
and from players soliciting
donations throughout the town
as well, according to team
owner Jeromy Puckett.
“We loaded up two donated
trucks and trailers from
Durham Trailers and delivered
them personally to West collec-
tion centers in Hillsboro,” he
said.
“Many thanks to everyone
who gave, y'all are great peo-
ple and I am very blessed to
call all of y'all my friends. I
See BULLETS, page 2
By LIBBY CLUETT
lcluett@mineralwellsindex.com
The Palo Pinto County Livestock
Association will present, on May 9-11,
the 76th Annual Professional Rodeo.
And with rodeo, comes royalty, pomp
and circumstance.
Two girls vie for the honor of queen
and one for princess. To achieve this,
they have to sell the most rodeo tickets.
The advanced tickets contestants are
selling cost $10 for adults and $5 for
youth, ages 13 and under. (At the gate
tickets are $12 and $6, respectively.)
Performances start at 7:30 p.m. night-
ly and royalty will be crowned at the
Saturday, May 11, performance. The fol-
lowing are the contestants, their spon-
sors and the number to call for tickets
to support them:
• Ambra Burkheimer, a princess con-
testant, is sponsored by Fiberglass
Systems, Palo Pinto County Cowboy
Church, Lisa Ellestad-Boer Goats-R-Us,
Matheson Gas, Holloway Horse
Shoeing, Poor Boys Riding Club, Greg
and Michelle Phillips and Accuracy
Products. For tickets, call (940) 902-
1211.
• Ashlynn Robinson, a queen contes-
tant, is sponsored by The Sleep Shop,
(940) 468-2790, HMW Fabrications,
(940) 325-0300, Awesome Blossoms,
Hayes Station Old Fashion Soda Shop,
D&F Battery, Robinson Service Center,
Coco’s Boutique, Penny’s Floral Shop,
Emerald Lane Boutique and The Bead
Barn. For tickets, call (940) 654-0440,
(254) 433-1451 or (940) 325-3245.
• Klarissa Jo Henderson, a queen
contestant, is the granddaughter of
Dusty Rhodes and Ada Jo Rhodes, and
is sponsored by the Mesquite Pit, Jake
Maynard, Kerr Oil Field and Randy
Cheek and Ray Haynie.
Parading through town
Many citizens will get their first
glimpse of the royal contestants as they
ride in the annual rodeo parade on
Thursday, May 9. The parade is again
put on by The Cowboy Church of
Mineral Wells. Lineup begins at 4 p.m.
near the old train depot at S.E. 3rd
Street and S.E. 1st Avenue. The parade
sets off at 5 p.m.
The route has changed once more
See RODEO, page 3
Local cowgirls vie for rodeo royalty, parade route changes
Three Rams
state bound
By LIBBY CLUETT
lcluett@mineralwellsindex.com
Mineral Wells High
School sent a fleet of acade-
micians to Lubbock for last
weekend's Region 1, Class
3A University
Interscholastic League
meet, and they sailed home
with big loot.
Seemingly peaking at the
regional contest, many
Rams achieved personal-
best scores and math stu-
dents broke several school
records. The numbers sense
team, mathematics team
and calculator applications
team each set school
records and placed well.
At the end of the contest,
the MWHS academic team
finished in 12th place and
three students are now state
bound – Damon Campbell
and Kevin Gregory, both for
computer applications, and
David Naranjo, for feature
writing.
The following is how
See UIL, page 2

INSIDE
GLANCE
LADY RAMS/GRAHAM
FACE-OFF IN PLAYOFF
SEE SPORTS, PAGE 18
LIBBY CLUETT/INDEX
One of many colorful, lively scenes from Travis Elementary’s
production of the musical, “Seussical,” shows “JoJo,” Chase
Jordan, in a bathtub. The company of 70 students hopes citi-
zens will come see one of two performances – Monday and
Tuesday night, 7 p.m., at MWHS auditorium. Tickets will be
sold at the door; $5 for adults and $3 for students.
LOCAL MINERAL WELLS INDEX / SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 ◆ CALL CLASSIFIEDS AT 940-327-0838 PAGE 2
Come to our LOCAL office at:
6501 US HWY 180 E
Or call:
940-328-1281
Ad created by:
Caden Snow
Mineral Wells JH
7
th
grade
BULLETS
from page 1
couldn't ask for a better
group of guys that helped
today,” said Williams,
owner of Holiday Cleaners.
“I was very humbled by
the whole experience,”
Puckett shared. “Most of
the donations collected
were from citizens in
Mineral Wells, they donat-
ed almost $1,000,” he
added. “We have such an
amazing group of fans and
players and so many of
them were eager to help.”
The Texas Bullets play
their last home game of
the regular season tonight
at Ram Stadium. Kick off
is at 7:30 p.m.
The Bullets (6-2) will be
looking to get revenge this
week against the 8-0
Denton County Rhinos.
The Bullets fell in the first
match up between these
two teams earlier this sea-
son in Denton. The Bullets
come off a 64-0 home victo-
ry over the Cooke County
Outlaws last weekend.
Tickets are $8 for adults
and $4 for kids. Children
under 5 get in free.
UIL
Three Rams will
advance from
last weekend's
regional
University
Interscholastic
League competi-
tion to the state
meet. They are,
from left, Damon
Campbell, David
Naranjo and
Kevin Gregory.
Many Rams saw
success at the
regional contest.
COURTESY PHOTO
UIL
from page 1
Rams' results played out
at the regional UIL meet:
• Journalism events –
David Naranjo placed
second in Feature
Writing, fifth in Editorial
Writing and fifth in
Headline Writing. The
MWHS journalism team
was third overall.
• Computer
Applications – Damon
Campbell placed second,
and Kevin Gregory
third.
• Poetry
Interpretation – J.D.
Choate placed sixth.
• Number Sense – the
team set a school record
with 343 points and
placed fifth in the region.
Additionally, Kevin
Gregory set a MWHS
individual record score of
143 points and placed
10th. Jarrod Bennett and
Mollie Wilson set person-
al record scores of 120
and 80, respectively.
• Calculator – the
team set a school record
with 408 points. Gregory
set a school individual
record score of 171
points, while Rocio Perez
set a personal record of
115 points.
• Mathematics – again,
the team set a school
team record of 478 points,
placed fourth in the
region and had the fifth
highest score of regional
meets throughout the
state. Bennett led the
team with a score of 194
points and placed ninth.
Wilson set a personal
record of 140 points.
from page 1
bingo, flag football, kids
activities and
much more.
Opening cere-
monies at 7
p.m. Luminaria
ceremony at 9
p.m. Fight Back ceremo-
ny at midnight. Activities
throughout the night until
7 a.m. Saturday.
Everyone is welcome to
come celebrate more
birthdays. Stay an hour or
all night. For more infor-
mation call (940) 452-
2813 or (940) 325-1447.
• EIGHTH ANNUAL
NORTH TEXAS
GOSPELGRASS
FESTIVAL – May 4, 10
a.m.-10 p.m., at Harmony
Baptist Church, 242
Harmony Road, just off
Tin Top Road south of
Weatherford. Awesome
music, excellent food and
family fun; for more infor-
mation, visit www.thehar-
monybaptistchurch.org.
MORE EVENTS AND
PROGRAMS:
• TEXAS STAR POW-
WOW – Texas Star RV
Park is hosting a tradi-
tional pow-wow May 11.
Located at 4586 U.S.
Highway 281 South,
about three miles south
of Mineral Wells, the
event will be open to the
public – provided attend-
ees arrive with pre-1840
dress and camping sup-
plies. The pow-wow will
last from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
and will include drums,
dances, mountain man
and weapons demonstra-
tions, storytelling, flint
knapping, yarn spinning
and more. Raffles, fried
bread and Indian tacos
will also be available.For
more information, contact
Quite Dove at (940) 325-
5019.
• PRAY MINERAL
WELLS will have a
prayer gathering on
Saturday, May 18, 6-8
p.m. at 500 NE 4th Ave.
• THE WEATHERFORD
COLLEGE STUDENT
OCCUPATIONAL
THERAPY
ASSOCIATION, based at
the education center in
Mineral Wells, is request-
ing donations to help cre-
ate a safe and inclusive
play environment benefit-
ing children with disabili-
ties at the Mineral Wells
City Park. For informa-
tion, call (817) 933-0894.
• MINERAL WELLS
CENTER OF LIFE is cur-
rently having sign ups for
four classes, including:
“Jobs for Life” – Based on
a biblical curriculum, this
class equips students
with core work readiness
skills such as developing
a vocational plan, building
a resume, learning effec-
tive interviewing skills and
many others. It assists
the student in gaining
long-term employment
and developing the char-
acter needed for success.
“Grocery Shopping on a
Budget” – Eating healthy
doesn’t have to cost
more. Learn tips to help
you make choices that
are not only healthy but
also economical. Gain
confidence by learning
how to cook and buy
healthy meals on a bud-
get. “Financial
Management” – which
teaches basic financial
principles, such as how to
manage personal financ-
es and develop a budget.
Learn about spending
patterns, loans, credit
cards, ways to save
money and more.
“Computer Skills” –
Computer skills are
important in today’s job
market. This class teach-
es basic computer skills
to job seekers with mini-
mal computer expertise.
For information, call (940)
327-8700, or visit www.
mwcol.org.
• GED REMINDER:
Finish the GED Test this
year. A reminder from
Weatherford College
Testing Center: The cur-
rent version of the GED
test is expiring at the end
of 2013. Persons testing
for the GED must make
the required passing
scores by the end of test-
ing year 2013 or will be
required to start over. For
more information, contact
the Weatherford College
Testing Center at (817)
598-6383 or testing@wc.
edu.
• PPC FARM BUREAU
SCHOLARSHIPS – Local
youth should consider
$2,100 being offered by
the Palo Pinto County
Farm Bureau.
Scholarship require-
ments: Parents or grand-
parents must be a mem-
ber of Palo Pinto County
Farm Bureau; student
must be a senior at a
Palo Pinto County area
school. For more
See GLANCE, page 3
AT A GLANCE
Wendy White Bellenger
Wendy White Bellenger, 48, passed away Thursday,
April 25, 2013, surrounded by her family at home in
Weatherford.
Memorial service: 11
a.m. Monday at Grace
First Presbyterian Church,
606 Mockingbird Lane,
Weatherford. Interment: 9
a.m. Monday in Memory
Gardens of the Valley
Memorial Park. Visitation:
3 to 5 p.m. Sunday at
White’s Funeral Home,
130 Houston Ave.,
Weatherford.
Memorials: In lieu of
usual remembrances, the
Bellenger family suggests
contributions in Wendy’s
memory to the Wendy
White Bellenger TCU
Scholarship Fund or
Wendy White Bellenger
Gall Bladder Cancer Research Fund at M.D. Anderson.
Contributions should be sent to Plains Capital Bank,
attention: Sheri Fergason, 1001 Santa Fe Drive,
Weatherford, Texas 76086.
Wendy White Bellenger was born Sept. 10, 1964, in
Weatherford, the first of four children, to Bob and
Carolynn White. Wendy was the fourth generation of
the White family to work at the family funeral home
and just recently received her funeral director’s
license. Prior to the funeral industry, she worked in
the Southlake-Carroll ISD at Johnson Elementary
School, where she taught physical education for many
years. Wendy also had a career in banking as an exec-
utive assistant.
Wendy graduated from Weatherford High School
with the class of 1982 and then TCU, where she was a
member of Alpha Phi.
Wendy married Dana Bellenger on Sept. 1, 1984,
and they had two children, Zack and Rachel. She was
a longtime member of First Presbyterian
Church Grapevine.
Wendy was preceded in death by her brother, Wynn
Douglas White; sister, Laura White; paternal grand-
parents, Ford and Grace White; and maternal grandfa-
ther, Hubert Moore.
Survivors: Husband, Dana Bellenger, of
Weatherford; son, Zack Bellenger, of Fort Worth;
daughter, Rachel Bellenger, of College Station; parents,
Bob and Carolynn White, of Weatherford; sister, Anita
White, of Weatherford; grandmother, Irma Moore, of
Weatherford; aunt, Kay White Vincent, of Fort Worth;
numerous cousins; and a host of loving family and
friends.
White’s Funeral Home
Maj. (RUSA) Billy Foust
Billy Foust, 92, of Mineral Wells, began his new life
in the House of the Lord, on April 21, 2013.
Bill was a quiet, com-
passionate man who loved
his family and his country.
The greatest loves of his
life were his wife, Micki,
and his son, Jerome.
The second love in his
life was his service to his
country. Bill served 30
years in the US Army. He
was a fixed and rotary
wing pilot. He earned an
Air Medal with five oak
leaf clusters and the Silver
Star after capturing 20
German soldiers from
the air.
Upon retiring from the
Army he went to work as
the Safety Director for
Civil Service at Fitzsimons
Army Medical Center in
Colorado for another 25
years before deciding to
retire to Mineral Wells
with Micki to rest and
enjoy life and "hone-up"
his third love, golf.
Bill and Micki were both avid golfers and could be
seen daily on the greens together loving life and
enjoying one another and their friends.
Bill is survived by his soul mate and loving wife of
70 years, Micki; his son and daughter in law,
BG(RUSA) Jerome and Rosalind Foust, of Rockport;
his grandchildren and their families, Scott and Janelle
Foust and their daughter, Ella of El Paso; Kelley Foust
and her children Jacob, Patrick, Seth and Alexandra of
El Paso; sister in law, Bobbie Smith, nieces' Renda
Smith and Robbie Chriestenson and her family, Albert,
Chad, Ashley, Baylee, Robert, Terrie and Kassie; and
special family friends, Donna Lucado and Roy
Wasson, all of Mineral Wells; along with a host of
other friends.
Bill will be met in Heaven by a congregation of
loved ones including his parents, John C. and Frances
Miller Foust; his brothers and sister Jack, John and
Betty; his father and mother in law, Marshall and
Hassie Roberts; his brother in law, Bud Smith; along
with a host of other friends and family.
Bill requested no services and in lieu of flowers
please make a donation to organizations or charities
such as, Operation Second Chance at P.O. Box 461
Clarksburg MD 20871; any golf scholarship fund; or a
charity of your choice.
The family would like to express their appreciation
to the following persons and entities for your compas-
sion and humanity: Dr. Clement, PPGH, Dr. Puppala,
PPGH; Kathy, RN 3rd Floor PPGH; Integracare nurses
Sharon, Mo, Mary, Brenda and Ms. Olney; along with
the staff at Palo Pinto Nursing Center and his "favor-
ite" OT, Annie.
It would take pages to list all those who touched his
life. Just know the family sincerely appreciates every
person who smiled, said a positive word, asked about
us, prayed for and with us, or any who helped in
ways that you may not have known assisted us
through our loss.
Today's Weather
LocaI 5-Day Forecast
Sun
4/28
79/53
Partly
cloudy,
chance of a
thunder-
storm.
Sunrise:
6:49 AM
Sunset:
8:11 PM
Mon
4/29
82/57
Mix of sun
and clouds.
Highs in the
low 80s and
lows in the
upper 50s.
Sunrise:
6:48 AM
Sunset:
8:12 PM
Tue
4/30
86/59
Isolated
thunder-
storms.
Highs in the
mid 80s and
lows in the
upper 50s.
Sunrise:
6:47 AM
Sunset:
8:13 PM
Wed
5/1
86/63
Mostly
Cloudy.
Highs in the
mid 80s and
lows in the
low 60s.
Sunrise:
6:46 AM
Sunset:
8:13 PM
Thu
5/2
85/51
Cloudy.
Highs in the
mid 80s an
lows in the
low 50s.
Sunrise:
6:45 AM
Sunset:
8:14 PM
BrownsviIIe
85/71
Houston
80/66
Austin
79/64
DaIIas
80/58
EI Paso
85/60
AmariIIo
76/47
San Antonio
79/66
MineraI WeIIs
79/53
Texas At A GIance
Area Cities
City Hi Lo Cond City Hi Lo Cond
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OBITUARIES
Published obituaries are provided and paid for by funeral
homes and private parties. Any requested changes or addi-
tions to a published obituary must be approved by the
funeral home or private party that originally submitted the
obituary. The Index expresses its sincere condolences to
all persons affected by the loss of a loved one.
Foust
Last Puzzle
Solution
S-1113
A B C S
H E A T
E D N A
A F A R
R O D H U R I T A L L
T R I B U N E A E R I A L
A D A I R C O M A L O N E
I D I O M S N O T E M O N A
H O B N O B R U M O R
B I D A I P R E T T Y W O M A N
S I N G L E I N A P A S E O
R E A L I S T I C S I N G I N
T D S K A N E A N G E L
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L E T I T
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A D O
S A N
LOCAL MINERAL WELLS INDEX / SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 ◆ CALL CLASSIFIEDS AT 940-327-0838 PAGE 3
CCA
from page 1
representatives to share
their support of the House
proposal.
“We view this as some-
what of an arbitrary deci-
sion members of the legis-
lature wanted to make,”
Howerton said, which he
said was “based on errone-
ous information and a
bias, to a certain extent.”
Allen explained a con-
ference committee consist-
ing of members of both
chambers will ultimately
negotiate a final budget.
Sen. John Whitmire, D–
Houston, who initiated the
push to close the local
facility, also happens to sit
on that committee, he
added.
“We wanted to go into
why Whitmire picked out
the Mineral Wells facility
– that was their problem
with contraband – and
make sure they all knew
CCA spent almost $1 mil-
lion and essentially solved
the problem,” Allen said.
From an economic
standpoint, Watson said
the facility offers benefits
beyond the approximately
300 local jobs and signifi-
cant tax revenue.
“The two economic
points that really go into
our favor are the $10 per
day, per person less in
inmate cost compared to
the state average,” she
said, “also the fact that
their programming in
terms of developing
inmates to re-enter the
workforce and society is
unique in the state.”
In addition to life skills
and vocational training,
Watson said the facility’s
rate of high school equiva-
lency program graduates
is the highest in Texas.
The three ambassadors
to Austin met with repre-
sentatives from seven
offices, including the
Governor, Lt. Governor,
and Speaker of the House.
They also met with rep-
resentatives with a vested
interest in the matter, such
as Rep. Sylvester Turner,
D–Houston, who serves on
the conference committee,
and Rep. Tan Parker, R–
Flower Mound, who
serves as the House
Corrections Committee
chair.
“We started out in the
office of Rep. Jim Keffer
and talked with him for a
while,” Allen said. “He set
up a meeting in his office
with the Chief of Staff of
the Speaker of the House,
Jesse Ancira. Keffer was
very, very supportive and
him being there was very
important for the first
meeting and getting things
started.”
In addition to
Thursday’s meetings, the
local leaders spoke with
the office of Rep. Myra
Crownover, R–Denton,
during a conference call
Friday.
Looking back, all three
emissaries believed the
mission was not only justi-
fied but beneficial.
“At the end of the day, I
feel the trip was necessary
and effective because some
offices we visited were not
aware of why this facility
was targeted and we were
able to communicate that
message firsthand,”
Watson said, explaining in
many cases “they were not
going to hear it from any-
body but us.”
Howerton agreed, say-
ing many representatives
“had heard all the suppos-
edly negative things asso-
ciated with [the CCA facil-
ity] and we were able to
share what we think are
the positives.”
He expressed gratitude
to Keffer, Sen. Craig Estes,
R–Wichita Falls, and Rep.
Phil King, R–Weatherford,
for working to set up
meetings with state legisla-
tors, especially busy with
the demands of the current
legislative session.
(940) 325-4465
Fax (940) 325-2020
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YMel Rhodes. . . . . . . . . . Publisher
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Opinions
MINERAL WELLS INDEX / SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013
CALL CLASSIFIEDS AT 940-327-0838
PAGE 4
By BYRON YORK
T
here’s a confrontation coming
between the Obama administra-
tion and Republicans in Congress
over the most basic question of immi-
gration reform: How secure is
the U.S. border with Mexico?
Not only does the adminis-
tration not know -- and per-
haps doesn’t want to know --
but there are signs the border
is less secure than some of the
most skeptical Republicans
thought.
Last year the Border Patrol
began experimenting with a
new drone-based surveillance system
that had been developed for finding
Taliban fighters in Afghanistan.
Starting in the fall, officials used the
radar-based system over a fairly small
portion of the Arizona border. The
results were striking.
“According to internal reports,
Border Patrol agents used the airborne
radar to help find and detain 1,874
people in the Sonora Desert between
October 1 (2012) and January 17
(2013),” reported the Los Angeles
Times recently. “But the radar system
spotted an additional 1,962 people in
the same area who evaded arrest and
disappeared into the United States.”
That means officers caught
fewer than half of those who made
the crossing in that part of
Arizona. If those results are
representative of other sectors
of the border, then everything
the administration has said
about border security is
wrong.
“These revelations are in
stark contrast to the adminis-
tration’s declaration that the
border is more secure than
ever due to greater resources having
been deployed to the region, and that
lower rates of apprehensions signify
fewer individuals are crossing,” Rep.
Michael McCaul, chairman of the
House Homeland Security Committee,
wrote in a recent letter to Homeland
Security Secretary Janet Napolitano.
“Since the creation of DHS,
Congress has provided significant
funding increases in the number of
See YORK, page 5
We are all
‘Johnny Foreigners’
By COKIE ROBERTS
and STEVEN V. ROBERTS
O
n the popular TV drama
“Downton Abbey,” the central
character, Lord
Grantham, turns to
his dinner guests and
smirks, “There
always seems to be
something of the
Johnny Foreigner
about the Catholics.”
Grantham is an
Englishman, speak-
ing in 1920, but xeno-
phobia has always
been a central tenet
of American life as
well. We cherish our
heritage as a “nation
of immigrants,” and
yet we resent and reject each wave of
newcomers: Catholics and Jews,
Italians and Irish, Japanese and
Chinese. Since 9/11, Muslims have
topped our list of suspicious “Johnny
Foreigners.” And since the Boston
bombers were Muslims of Chechen
origin, their vicious attack has
spawned a cynical attempt to rekindle
nativist anxieties and thwart immigra-
tion reform.
Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky offered
a particularly egregious example of
immigrant-bashing. He sent a letter to
Senate leader Harry Reid bristling with
dark warnings about
newcomers who seethe
with “malicious intent”
and are poised “to com-
mit future acts of terror.”
His answer: Delay the
reform bill now before
the Senate. Which is tan-
tamount to killing it.
Vigilance against ter-
rorism is a profound
national priority, but the
sort of rhetoric
employed by Paul and
other opponents of
immigration reform is
inaccurate and irrespon-
sible. In fact, the Senate bill would
make us safer and stronger as a nation,
not weaker. Backers of reform must
push forward and face down the forces
of fear.
Sen. Pat Leahy of Vermont, the chair-
man of the Judiciary Committee, was
absolutely right when he warned those
See ROBERTS, page 5
York
New data could change
immigration debate
DRAWN TO AN OPINION
Opinions page disclaimer: The opinions expressed on this page are the opinions of the authors or creators and do not necessarily reflect those of the Mineral Wells Index, its
employees or its parent company, Newspaper Holdings Inc. While we do not intend to offend anyone, we welcome diverse opinions within certain and reasonable standards and
guidelines and we encourage our readers to respond to opinions with which they agree or disagree. It is our intent to foster open exchanges of ideas and philosophies.
Second Amendment
not to protect
hunters, etc.
To the Editor,
Our founding fathers
thought it so important that
the citizens be able keep
and bear arms that they spe-
cifically enumerated that
God-given right in our con-
stitution. Keep in mind that
they had just fought a war
against an unjust govern-
ment largely equipped with
the arms that our citizens
maintained for their own
defense. The second amend-
ment to our constitution
was not intended to protect
the rights of hunters and
sportsmen, nor even target
shooters; it is intended to
ensure that our citizens be
able to defend themselves
with the finest military
weapons available.
“Background checks” are
just another stone placed in
the path of those who
choose to exercise their
God-given right.
Raf Seibert,
Mineral Wells
Disgusted by media
To the Editor,
For the folks that publish
the Mineral Wells Index I
want you to know that if I
wanted to read totally biased
left leaning newspaper
Op-Eds I would not have
cancelled my subscription to
See LETTERS, page 5
ADDRESS BOOK
FEDERAL
President Barack Obama
1600 Pennsylvania Ave.
Washington, D.C. 20500
(202) 456-1414
Fax: (202) 456-2461
president@whitehouse.gov
U.S. Senators
Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas)
United States Senate
B40B Dirksen Senate Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20510-4306
Phone: 202-224-5922
Fax: 202-228-0755
http://www.cruz.senate.gov/contact.cfm
Sen. John Cornyn (R-Austin)
Room 370, Russell Building
Washington, D.C. 20510
(202) 224-2934
Fax: (202) 228-2856
Web: http://cornyn.senate.gov/
U.S. CONGRESSMAN
Mike Conaway (R-Midland)
2430 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515
(202) 225-3605
Fax: (202) 225-1783
San Angelo District Office
33 Twohig, Ste. 307
San Angelo, TX 76903
(325) 247-2826
E-mail: www.house.gov/writerep
STATE
Gov. Rick Perry
P.O. Box 12428
Austin, TX 78711
(515) 463-2000
Fax: (512) 463-1849
E-mail through www.governor.state.tx.us
STATE SENATOR
State Sen. Craig Estes (R-Wichita Falls), District 30
P.O. Box 12068
Capitol Station
Austin, Texas 78711
(512) 463-0130
District office:
2220 San Jacinto Blvd., Ste. 318
Denton, TX 76205
(940) 898-0331
Fax : (940) 898-0926
E-mail: craig.estes@senate.state.tx.us
STATE REPRESENTATIVE
State Rep. Jim Keffer (R-Eastland), District 60
Office No. E2.802
P.O. Box 2910
Austin, TX 78768-2910
(512) 463-0656
(800) 433-1716
District office:
(800) 433-1716
james.keffer@house.state.tx.us
PALO PINTO COUNTY
Palo Pinto County Courthouse
P.O. Box 190
Palo Pinto, TX 76484-0190
Phone: (940) 659-1253
Fax: (940) 659-2590
Web: www.co.palo-pinto.tx.us/
County Judge David Nicklas – (940) 659-1253
Comm. Beth Ray, Pct. 1 – (940) 659-1210
Comm. Louis Ragle, Pct. 2 – (940) 659-1257
Comm. Mike Pierce, Pct. 3 – (940) 659-1258
Comm. Jeff Fryer, Pct. 4 – (940) 659-1259
E-mail – iris.stagner@co.palo-pinto.tx.us
CITY OF MINERAL WELLS
Mineral Wells City Hall
115 S.W. 1st St.
P.O. Box 460
Mineral Wells, TX 76067
Phone: (940) 328-7700
Fax: (940) 328-7704
Web: www.mineralwellstx.gov
Mayor Mike Allen – mayor@mineralwellstx.gov
Councilman At-Large, Place 1 Rick Bennett – council-
place1@mineralwellstx.gov
Councilman At-Large, Place 2 Margaret Colton – coun-
cilplace2@mineralwellstx.gov
Councilman Ward 1 Thomas Lively – councilward1@
mineralwellstx.gov
Councilman Ward 2 Tammy Underwood – council-
ward2@mineralwellstx.gov
Councilman Ward 3 John Upham – councilward3@
mineralwellstx.gov
Councilman Ward 4 Kevin Harrison – councilward4@
mineralwellstx.gov
The Roberts
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
The Index welcomes letters to the editor on a
variety of topics. We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for style, grammar and taste. Letters should
be concise and to the point. They must be
signed and include the author’s address and
phone number for verification. We will accept
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that do not conform to this policy will not be
published. Deadline for submitting letters for
Sunday publication is 5 p.m. Wednesday, or via
e-mail by noon Thursday. Submissions may be
dropped-off, mailed, faxed or sent electronically
to editor@mineralwellsindex.com.
OPINIONS MINERAL WELLS INDEX / SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 ◆ CALL CLASSIFIEDS AT 940-327-0838 PAGE 5
1 2 3 4
5
6
7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
21
TEXAS
CROSSWORD
by Charley & Guy Orbison
ACROSS
DOWN
1 TX "Dandy Donҋs"
old show: "____
Monday Night
Football"
5 TX Nolan Ryan
threw this
6 this town is the
gateway to Lake
Texana
7 TXism: "_ ___
piece" (distant)
8 Spurs point guard
Strickland (Ҋ90-ҋ92)
9 "Ben ___" is a
street in San
Antonio
12 TX George Straitҋs
"Give __ ___ We
Got Tonight" (2012)
17 newspaper:
"Quanah _______-
Chief"
19 Schaub pass
21 "Red _____ __"
fought oil well fres
22 TX-raised actress
Dorothy
23 cultural phrases
28 "take ____ of"
29 TX Willie sang
"____ Lisa" (Ҋ81)
30 hang out with
celebrities
31 unverifed story
35 Atakapa Indian
band from East TX
36 with "Oh," TX Roy
Orbison hit
42 TX Barbara
Mandrell hit:
"Sleeping ______
__ _ Double Bed"
44 San Antonio River
Walk: "_____ del
Rio"
46 true to life
48 TX Reynolds Ҋ52
"_____ҋ in the Rain"
1 TXism: "got _
_____ __ ___ __
Texas" (kind)
2 a "Mid-City" Ҋtween
Dallas & Ft. Worth
3 seat of Hemphill
Co.
4 newspaper in
Boerne or Friona
9 TX Dan Jenkins
book: "You Gotta
Play ____"
10 unknown
boundaries led to
this townҋs name
49 Friday night objectives
50 TX actor and singer:
Christian ____
51 TX Charley Prideҋs
"Kiss an _____
Good Morninҋ"
52 TX Dan Jenkins
book: "Life ___
Ownself"
53 Haing S. ____ was in
flm "Vietnam, Texas"
54 TXism: "___ __
be"
56 famous historic
Panhandle ranch
57 TX Amy Acker flm:
"Much ___
About Nothing"
58 ___ Angelo, TX
11 TX Bryan Hitt is
the drummer for
rock band "___
Speedwagon"
12 2011 album by
TX-raised Kelly
Rowland "Here
_ __"
13 rodeo event with
two cowboys
(2 wds.)
14 "The ____ Guthrie
Show" pilot was
flmed in Austin
15 high school
mascot in Dublin
and other TX
towns
16 Ҋ66 song recorded
by TX Orbison
18 biography cable
TV channel
20 Joan Crawford
was born in TX
as Lucille Fay
__Sueur
23 Gov. Jim Hoggҋs
daughter (init.)
24 birth date (abbr.)
25 long-legged
wading birds
26 some TX cars
race __ ____
tracks
27 groaned
32 "Bevoҋs" univ.
33 TXism: "thorn in
__ side"
34 expression of pain
36 I.M. ___ designed
Dallas City Hall
37 take a chance
38 involve
39 book by TX Sandra
Cisneros: "House
on _____ Street"
40 TX "Boots" Hansen
who fought oil fres
41 George W.ҋs brother
43 TX Sissy played this
Loretta in flm (init.)
45 TXism: "bone up __"
47 order of comb jellies
48 Sanskrit verb
55 TXism: "put __ __
the back burner"
P-1113
18 19
22
29
31 32 33 34
39 40 41 36 37 38
44 45
48
51
53
55
43
47
20
23 24 25 26 27
42
46
50
52
56
57
58
16
17
Copyright 2013 by Orbison Bros.
28
30
35
49
54
YORK
from page 4
Border Patrol agents, the
building of nearly 700
miles of fencing and the
deployment of advanced
technologies to increase
the nation’s ability to
monitor the border,” the
Texas Republican added.
“However, we do not
know if additional
resources have produced
better results.”
For years, Napolitano
and other officials at the
Department of Homeland
Security have pointed to
the declining number of
border apprehensions as
proof that the total num-
ber of illegal crossings is
also declining. Now, it
could mean the adminis-
tration just isn’t catching
most of the crossers.
“The results speak for
themselves,” says one
GOP Hill aide involved
in border security issues.
“We can’t really use
apprehensions as an
accurate measure when
we’re not even seeing
half the people.”
In light of the radar
numbers, McCaul has
asked Napolitano to pro-
vide data to back up her
assertion that the border
is more secure than ever.
The answer could have a
huge effect on the com-
prehensive immigration
reform bills Congress will
consider in coming weeks
and months.
For example, there are
reports that the Senate’s
bipartisan Gang of Eight
negotiators have added a
border security provision
to their proposal to give
immediate legalization to
the estimated 11 million
illegal immigrants in the
U.S. Before that legaliza-
tion occurs, Homeland
Security would have to
submit a plan that would,
within a decade, result in
the apprehension of 90
percent of those who
cross the border illegally.
The department would
also have to have 100 per-
cent of the border under
surveillance.
That’s not all. The
Gang of Eight plan is
then expected to call for
greater border security
measures -- and results --
before those newly legal-
ized immigrants are
placed on a path that
eventually will lead to
citizenship.
Both provisions will be
met with a lot of skepti-
cism, at least on the
Right. Will Republicans
really agree to legalize 11
million currently illegal
immigrants on the
strength of Janet
Napolitano’s promise to
secure the border some-
time in the next 10 years
-- especially after
Napolitano claimed, on
the basis of dubious evi-
dence, that the border is
already secure?
Some immigration
reformers see the radar
story as hopeful news,
showing that there are
new ways to use technol-
ogy to secure the border.
But of course it is the
administration’s job to
enforce border security,
and DHS has spent years
resisting even assessing
the situation.
McCaul and others
have introduced legisla-
tion that would require
Homeland Security to
come up with a compre-
hensive strategy to secure
the border -- and then
carry it out. The problem
is that such demands
have been made many
times in the past, and the
border is still not secure.
Given the Obama admin-
istration’s record, is there
any reason to believe that
things will be any differ-
ent this time, no matter
what promises are made?
(Byron York is chief polit-
ical correspondent for The
Washington Examiner.)
COPYRIGHT 2013
BYRON YORK
DISTRIBUTED BY
UNIVERSAL UCLICK
FOR UFS
Created by: Carlos Gray
ROBERTS
from page 4
forces not to “exploit the
Boston marathon bomb-
ing” and smear all immi-
grants with the terrorist
label. “Let no one be so
cruel as to try to use the
heinous acts of the young
men last week to derail the
dreams and futures of mil-
lions of hard-working peo-
ple,” he said.
The Senate bill would
spend billions on enhanced
border security -- too
much, in our view -- but if
that makes it possible for
more lawmakers to back
the measure, the price is
worth it. Moreover, the bill
would improve the system
for monitoring visitors who
come here on tourist or stu-
dent visas and extend their
stays illegally.
Speaker John Boehner
sees the virtue of this inno-
vation, urging the Senate to
stay on course and pass a
bill. “If we fix our immi-
gration system,” he told
Fox News, “it may actually
help us understand who all
is here, why they’re here,
and what legal status they
have.”
If the 11 million undocu-
mented immigrants could
obtain legal status, they’d
become better citizens,
integrated into the fabric of
daily life. They would no
longer be afraid of authori-
ties who could arrest and
deport them at any time.
Everyone is better off when
immigrants have incentives
to aid the police, not hide
from them.
National strength is not
just about military power;
it’s also about economic
and spiritual power. Part of
the advantage America has
over Europe stems from
the hard-working, tax-pay-
ing immigrants who help
finance our social welfare
system and invigorate our
communities with their
energy and enterprise.
Immigrants create busi-
nesses, from Korean gro-
cery stores and Greek din-
ers to global powerhouses
like Intel and Google. And
they perform services that
are vital to our national
well-being. If you took the
foreign-born workers out
of every hospital in
America -- the nurses and
doctors, orderlies and tech-
nicians -- most of the hos-
pitals would collapse
immediately.
The immigration issue is
very different from gun
control. Broader back-
ground checks failed in the
Senate because they lacked
true bipartisan backing;
only four Republicans sup-
ported the measure. But a
significant number of con-
servative Republicans are
joining the immigration
cause. As Rep. Paul Ryan,
the party’s most recent vice
presidential nominee, said
this week: “If anything,
what we see in Boston is
that we have to fix and
modernize our immigra-
tion systems for lots of rea-
sons. National security rea-
sons, economic security
reasons.”
Republicans have politi-
cal reasons as well, of
course. The smart ones
know that they are facing a
demographic disaster if
they keep alienating immi-
grant voters. But the dumb
ones remain clueless.
Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas
keeps saying that “Obama
wants a political issue
more than he wants a bill.”
But the sure-fire way to
give Obama that issue, and
undermine the GOP, is to
listen to Cruz & Co. and
oppose reform. If the bill
passes, Republicans share
the credit; if it loses, they
get all the blame.
Immigration reflects our
essential history as a
nation. True, that history
has often been stained by
disgraceful outbursts of
ignorance. But in the end,
we are all Johnny
Foreigners.
(Steve and Cokie Roberts
can be contacted by email at
stevecokie@gmail.com.)
COPYRIGHT 2013
STEVEN AND COKIE
ROBERTS
DISTRIBUTED BY
UNIVERSAL UCLICK
FOR UFS
LETTERS
from page 4
the the Star-Telgram.
The Sunday April 21,
2013, is only a continuing
example. Once again we
are presented with the
editorialization of Donna
Brazile, a senior
Democratic strategist who
we all know is going to
provide both sides of
political issues.
Along with this politi-
cal hack masqurading as
an intelligent journalist (is
that perhaps an oxy-
moron) we also get to
continue to read the bal-
anced commentary from
Cokie and Steve Roberts.
Cokie, you might be inter-
ested to know, is a con-
tributing senior news
analyst for National
Public Radio, an analyst
for This Week With
George Stepnanopoulos,
and a political commenta-
tor for ABC News. She is
also the daughter of a
husband & wife team of
Democratic U.S.
Representatives from
Louisiana. In fact, her
father was once Speaker
of the House
(source:Wikipedia). That
pedigree combined with
an elite Northeast educa-
tion (Wellesley) is sure to
produce a person willing
to provide fair and bal-
anced commentary on
political issues. In fact, in
the most recent copy of
the Index, she and her
husband, Robert, had a
virtual lovefest going on
for Hillery Clinton.
I was particularly
offended by two of the
political cartoons in the
April 21 edition. Both
dealt with gun legislation
and Congress. The first
very openly accused
Congress of taking bribes
for not passing increas-
ingly restrictive gun laws
and the other declared
that the U.S. Senate is a
group of cowards for the
same reason.
Now I have no love
loss for most elected offi-
cials and fully appreciate
that their main objective
is to get re-elected.
Knowing re-election is the
principal objective, might
the liberals in the country
at least attempt to admit
that it is not the monetary
influence of the NRA that
affected the vote but the
fear of repercussions from
the voters that had the
Senate’s attention.
Remember the last time
Congress passed a very
unpopular bit of legisla-
tion pushed by Obama
(Obamacare); Democrats
See LETTERS, page 6
OPINIONS MINERAL WELLS INDEX / SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 ◆ CALL CLASSIFIEDS AT 940-327-0838 PAGE 6
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LETTERS
from page 5
experienced a bloodbath
at the next election. The
liberal/progressive agen-
da regarding guns has
zero to do with crime con-
trol and is all about
increasing the dependence
on the government,
including the very funda-
mental right of self-
defense.
In this the Index is also
playing the liberal tune.
Case in point, in a recent
edition the headline was
something to the effect
that it was presenting local
opinions on the Senate
gun legislation. The article
consisted in the opinion of
a single resident (who just
so happened to see no
problem with the pro-
posed legislation) and the
Chief of Police who avoid-
ed the issue with the argu-
ment about the additional
fiscal burden that
enhanced background
checks would place on
local jurisdictions. I sus-
pect if the writer of the
article had spent a little
time talking to people he
would have found many
against the legislation for
every one he for it.
I guess this is the direc-
tion the nation’s newspa-
pers are going and that is
why the nation’s newspa-
pers are dying. Thinking
people want to know
what is going on and to
get an insight into both
sides of the issues they are
interested in. Newspapers
today are filled with one-
sided leftest liberal/pro-
gressive reporting, opin-
ions and editorials, and I,
for one, am disgusted
by it.
Semper Fi,
Gary Mike McConnell,
Mineral Wells
By NAT HENTOFF
I
’d feared that, after
George W. Bush and
Dick Cheney and, even
worse, Barack Obama,
the Fourth Amendment’s
protection of our personal
privacy had nearly van-
ished. But on April 17, a
majority of the Supreme
Court, ruling in Missouri
v. McNeely, remembered
a fundamental liberty we
lost during the British
occupation that helped
ignite the American
Revolution.
It should also be noted
that the ruling was large-
ly ignored by the pell-
mell media in all of its
forms.
As John W. Whitehead
of the Charlottesville,
Va.-based Rutherford
Institute (“Dedicated to
the defense of civil liber-
ties and human rights”)
put it in the organiza-
tion’s news release head-
lining this vital decision:
“Fourth Amendment
Victory: Citing Bodily
Integrity, U.S. Supreme
Court Prohibits Police
From Forcibly Taking
Warrantless Blood
Samples From DUI (driv-
ing under the influence)
Suspects” (rutherford.
org, April 18).
Whitehead had also
filed an amicus brief
before the court on behalf
of the defendant in
Missouri v. McNeely.
Here’s the case: While
driving erratically in
October 2010, Tyler
McNeely was pulled over
by a Missouri state high-
way patrolman, who
arrested him on suspi-
cion of drunk driving
and took him to a hospi-
tal to undergo a blood
test for alcohol content.
McNeely didn’t want to
subject himself to a blood
test, but the officer
ignored him and had his
blood drawn anyhow.
Based on the results of
the blood test, McNeely
was then charged with
driving under the influ-
ence.
It’s worth noting that
Justice Sonia Sotomayor,
writing for the majority
of the court in upholding
McNeely’s refusal to con-
sent, described the forced
extraction of a person’s
blood as:
“An invasion of bodily
integrity (that) implicates
an individual’s most per-
sonal and deep-rooted
expectations of privacy.”
Crucial to the outcome
of this case, as Whitehead
emphasizes, is “at no
point did the officer
attempt to obtain a war-
rant authorizing the
extraction.”
As I’ve previously stat-
ed, Sotomayor is a valu-
able addition to our high-
est court because of her
consistent critical think-
ing. It is quite a contrast
from the rigid, self-righ-
teous prejudgments of
Justice Samuel Alito. I
have her full judgment in
this case, and it is illumi-
nating -- not only for
legal scholars but also for
the citizenry at large -- to
see how she reached her
conclusion, which differs
from many drunken driv-
ing prosecutions.
The Fourth
Amendment forbids
“unreasonable searches
and seizures,” thereby
first requiring a warrant
from a judge to establish
probable cause for a
search. Sotomayor points
out that there is “expedi-
tious processing of war-
rant applications, particu-
larly in contexts like
drunk-driving investiga-
tions (to quickly get a
warrant) where the evi-
dence supporting proba-
ble cause is simple.”
“The law now allows a
federal magistrate judge
to consider ‘information
communicated by tele-
phone or other reliable
electronic means.’”
But there must be that
judge-issued warrant to
the probable cause of the
search before the extrac-
tion of blood -- not just
the police officer’s suspi-
cions.
Whitehead makes this
crucial point concerning
Missouri v. McNeely:
“While public safety is
of great concern, especial-
ly when it comes to seri-
ous offenses such as driv-
ing under the influence of
alcohol, Americans’ con-
stitutional rights cannot
be wholly discounted and
conveniently discarded.
“This case has far-
reaching implications that
go beyond one man’s
run-in with the police.
“The Supreme Court is
to be commended for rec-
ognizing that if we allow
the government agents
broad powers to invade
our bodies without con-
sent or court order, the
bodily integrity of all per-
sons in the United States
will be in serious jeopar-
dy.”
And that’s why
Missouri v. McNeely is so
important and should’ve
been widely covered.
So did you see any-
thing about this case in
the media you go to for
information on the state
of your individual consti-
tutional liberties?
At stake here and in
other government eva-
sions of a judicial warrant
in search cases is a prose-
cutor claiming a per se
rule, which findlaw.com
defines as “a generalized
rule applied (by prosecu-
tors) without consider-
ation for specific circum-
stances.”
In other words, what
this comes down to, as
Whitehead makes clear, is
the Supreme Court
“rejected arguments by
state officials asking it to
establish a per se rule
that all cases of drunk
See HENTOFF, page 7
Hentoff
SUPREME COURT SAVES OUR
PRIVACY; MEDIA SLEEPS
SWEET LAND OF LIBERTY
OPINIONS MINERAL WELLS INDEX / SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 ◆ CALL CLASSIFIEDS AT 940-327-0838 PAGE 7
Created by: Carlos Gray
HENTOFF
from page 6
driving present ‘exigent
circumstances’ allowing
police to extract blood
from a suspect without a
warrant.”
In the amicus brief to
the court, Whitehead, cit-
ing past Supreme Court
rulings, writes:
“Consequently, ‘there
remains (if it were to
continue) the nagging
feeling that the removal
of blood from within the
body of the accused by
means of force in routine
drunk driving cases
shocks the conscience.’”
Because so few mem-
bers of the media have
reported on Missouri v.
McNeely, it’s doubtful
that many American con-
sciences have been
shocked to realize how
often a driver’s blood is
forcibly taken from him
or her without consent
and without any inter-
vention by a judge-
issued warrant.
We don’t know how
often this invasion of pri-
vacy may still occur,
despite the court’s ruling
in Missouri v. McNeely.
Were I an assignment
editor for one of the
media outlets, I would
ask reporters to check
over a period of time
how often police and
prosecutors apply
Missouri v. McNeely as
decided by the Supreme
Court to drunk-driving
cases. I’d also check on
how many judges actual-
ly know of this decision.
I first heard of the
Supreme Court’s revival
of the Fourth
Amendment in this case
from one of John W.
Whitehead’s alerts, and,
accordingly, I strongly
suggest that any of you
who would like to be in
continual touch with this
nonpareil news analysis
pay heed to this invita-
tion:
“Those wishing to stay
informed about these
ongoing threats to our
freedom can sign up for
the Rutherford Institute’s
free weekly email alerts
by visiting www.ruther-
ford.org and clicking the
orange ‘Sign Up’ button
in the upper-right hand
corner.”
(Nat Hentoff is a nation-
ally renowned authority on
the First Amendment and
the Bill of Rights. He is a
member of the Reporters
Committee for Freedom of
the Press, and the Cato
Institute, where he is a
senior fellow.)
COPYRIGHT 2013 NAT
HENTOFF.
DISTRIBUTED BY
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MONTHLY
HAPPENINGS:
• FIRST CHRISTIAN
CHURCH FOOD
PANTRY hosts
PPGH Home
Health on the
third Tuesday
of each month
at 12:30 p.m.,
performing blood-pres-
sure readings and blood-
sugar checks. We appre-
ciate their very knowl-
edgeable medical
advice. The public is
invited to come each
month.
• BOYCE DITTO
PUBLIC LIBRARY’s
MYSTERY BOOK CLUB
meets every first
Tuesday at 6:30 in the
Boyce Ditto Library con-
ference room. Come join
us and find out whodun-
it. Next meeting is April
2.
• FRIENDS OF THE
BOYCE DITTO
LIBRARY have meetings
held on the 3rd Tuesday
of the month at 6:30 PM
in the conference room
at the library (2300 SE
Martin Luther King Jr.
Street. Contact 940-328-
7880 for more details.
Next meeting will be on
April 16th.
• THE MINERAL WELLS
WOMAN’S CLUB invites
women to join them on
the first Wednesday of
the month. Ask us about
membership and enjoy
good food, friends and
featured speakers. Time:
11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Place:
The old Post Office
Building, 201 N.E. 2nd
St. Cost for lunch: $6.
AT A GLANCE
LOCAL MINERAL WELLS INDEX / SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 ◆ CALL CLASSIFIEDS AT 940-327-0838 PAGE 8
By CHRIS AGEE
cagee@mineralwellsindex.com
GARNER – In just its second
year, the Garner Independent
School District choir has already
received national recognition.
According to music teacher and
choir director Julie Troutwine, 16
young singers recently traveled to
Colorado where they took part in
a competition with schools from
across the country.
The group took away two tro-
phies, she said, one for receiving a
superior rating and one for Best in
Class.
She said she is proud of her stu-
dents, explaining the choir pro-
gram has flourished since its
inception.
"This is my second year at
Garner and we started choir last
year," she said. "They didn't have a
choir up to that point."
With a passion and concentra-
tion on vocal performance,
Troutwine said she is pleased to
have the opportunity to share that
pursuit with the students at
Garner.
"We have a total of 20 in the
choir this year," she noted. "Last
year I had 10."
The increase in interest is signif-
icant, she said, especially consider-
ing Garner currently has just 188
students on campus.
"To have 20 kids in choir, I feel
really lucky," she said, explaining
"they can choose between art,
choir and band."
The students have been recog-
nized in numerous University
Interscholastic League events this
year, Troutwine said.
"Last year I had one little girl
get into the regional choir in the
fall," she added. "This year I had
four."
She explained the Colorado fes-
tival was not associated with UIL.
"We did submit an application,"
she said, noting the choir was
selected from applicants "all over
the United States."
Her students will remain active,
she explained, noting they are pre-
paring for an upcoming concert at
the school.
The public is invited to attend
the exhibition Tuesday at 7 p.m. at
the Garner school cafeteria.
"We did not get here without a
lot of fundraisers and a lot of com-
munity support," Troutwine noted,
thanking those who have been
active in helping the choir grow
and succeed.
Garner choir takes top prizes at national competition
LOCAL MINERAL WELLS INDEX / SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 ◆ CALL CLASSIFIEDS AT 940-327-0838 PAGE 9
STILLWATER, OKLA.,
APRIL 20, 2013 – Excitement filled
the air inside Wes Watkins Center
on April 16 as Oklahoma State
University’s Center for Veterinary
Health Sciences awarded more
than $431,000 at its annual Awards
Banquet. Among the 128 veteri-
nary student honorees was Alissa
Anderson of Mineral Wells, Texas.
Anderson, class of 2014, received
the Oakridge Equine Hospital
Scholarship for her interest in
equine veterinary medicine. She
also received a Student Chapter of
the American Veterinary Medical
Association (SCAVMA) Services
Scholarship for participating in
SCAVMA activities. Anderson is
the daughter of Douglas Hellie of
Albuquerque, N.M., and Ilona
Hellie of Mineral Wells.
“This event highlights the many
accomplishments of our veterinary
students and faculty,” says Dr. Jean
Sander, professor and dean of the
veterinary center. “We are truly
grateful for our many donors who
make these scholarships possible.
Veterinary students face a large
financial burden and anything we
can do to help alleviate that is
much appreciated.”
Scholarships presented for the
first time were: the Butch and
Luella Ruth Curtis Scholarships
(nine awards at $10,000 each); the
John B. Hays Endowed Scholarship
at $1,000; the Daniel Holland
Memorial Scholarship at $500 and
the Kammerlocher Endowed
Scholarship at $1,700.
Also recognized were the follow-
ing faculty members. Class
Teaching Awards, voted on by the
students in each year of instruction,
went to: Drs. Jim Lish, 1st Year;
Susan Little, 2nd Year; Sandra
Morgan, 3rd Year; and Lara
Sypniewski, 4th Year. Zoetis (for-
merly Pfizer Animal Health)
awarded a Distinguished Teaching
Award to Dr. Jim Lish and an
Award for Research Excellence to
Dr. Mason Reichard.
Oklahoma State University is a
modern land-grant university.
OSU’s Center for Veterinary Health
Sciences is the only veterinary col-
lege in Oklahoma. One of 28 veter-
inary colleges in the United States,
it is fully accredited by the Council
on Education of the American
Veterinary Medical Association.
The center’s Boren Veterinary
Medical Teaching Hospital is open
to the public and provides routine
and specialized care for small and
large animals. It also offers
24-hour emergency care and is cer-
tified by the American Animal
Hospital Association. OSU is pre-
paring students for a brighter
future and building a brighter
world for all. OSU improves the
lives of people in Oklahoma, the
nation, and the world through inte-
grated, high quality teaching,
research and outreach. For more
information, visit www.cvhs.
okstate.edu or call (405) 744-7000.
Oklahoma State Veterinary
Center Celebrates Students
– Alissa Anderson
COURTESY OF GENESEE PHOTO
Dr. Lyndi Gilliam, OSU Veterinary
Medical Hospital Equine Internal
Medicine Clinician (right), pres-
ents the Oakridge Equine
Hospital Scholarship to Alissa
Anderson of Mineral Wells.
T
he backlog of veter-
ans claims process-
ing has been disas-
trous over the past
few years. On Friday
April 19, 2013, the
Department of Veterans
Affairs announced initia-
tives to expedite compen-
sation claims decisions for
veterans who have waited
one year or longer. VA
claims raters will make
provisional decisions on
the oldest claims in inven-
tory, which will allow vet-
erans to begin collecting
compensation benefits
more quickly, if eligible.
Veterans will be able to
submit additional evi-
dence for consideration a
full year after the provi-
sional rating, before the
VA issues a final decision.
Too many veterans
have waited too long for
a decision on their bene-
fits and the VA finds this
to be unacceptable, and
that is why the VA is
implementing this aggres-
sive plan to eliminate the
backlog. This initiative is
the right thing to do for
veterans who have waited
the longest.
Provisional decisions will
be based on all evidence
provided to date by the
veteran or obtained on
their behalf by the VA. If
a VA medical examination
is needed to decide the
claim, it will be ordered
and expedited.
Provisional deci-
sions not only provide
veterans with applicable
benefits much more
quickly, but also give
them an additional one-
year safety net to to sub-
mit further evidence,
should it become avail-
able. The VA will consid-
er a veterans additional
evidence, in which case
they will be fast-tracked.
If any increase is deter-
mined to be warranted
based on the additional
evidence received, bene-
fits will be retroactive to
the date the claim was
initially filed. The evi-
dence protects the veter-
ans right to appeal
the decision.
If no further evi-
dence is received within
that year, VBA will
inform the veteran that
their rating is final and
provide information on
the standard appeals pro-
cess, which can be found
at www.bva.va.gov/ .
As a result of this ini-
tiative, metrics used to
track benefits claims
will experience signifi-
cant fluctuations. The
focus on processing
the oldest claims will
cause the overall measure
of the average length of
time to complete a claim,
currently 286 days, to
skew, rising significantly
in the near term because
of the number of old
claims that will be com-
pleted. Over time, as the
backlog of oldest claims is
cleared and more of the
incoming claims are pro-
cessed electronically
through the VA's new
paperless processing sys-
tem, the VA's average
time to complete claims
will significantly improve.
In addition, the average
days pending metric, or
average age of a claim in
the inventory,
will decease since the old-
est claims will no longer
be part of the inventory.
While compensation
claims are pending, eligi-
ble veterans are able
to receive health care and
other benefits from the
VA. Veterans who have
served in recent conflicts
are eligible for 5 years of
free healthcare from the
VA. Currently, 55 % of
returning Iraq and
Afghanistan veterans are
using VA healthcare, a
rate of utilization greater
than previous generations
of veterans. To learn more
about disability benefits
go to www.ebenifits.
va.gov/ebenefits-portal/ .
• MINERAL WELLS
ORDER OF THE
EASTERN STAR
Chapter No. 44 meets
the second Monday
every month at
601 N. Oak
Ave. Meeting
at 7:30 p.m.
Visit mineral-
wellsmasons.
org.
• MINERAL WELLS
SENIOR CENTER
dance is held the sec-
ond Friday of each
month. All ages are wel-
come. This is a smoking-
and alcohol-free facility.
Cover charge of $3 for
ages of 16 and over.
Come join us for an eve-
ning of fun. Doors open
at 6 p.m. and dance
begins at 6:30 p.m. and
ends at 9 p.m.
• MINERAL WELLS
AMVETS POST 133
meets the second
Saturday of the month at
11 a.m. at Holiday Hills
Country Club. All veter-
ans welcome.
• MINERAL WELLS
MASONIC LODGE NO.
611 – located at 601 N.
Oak Ave., meets the
second Tuesday of each
month. Meal at 6:30
p.m., meeting at 7:30
p.m.
• FOLKS AT MINERAL
WELLS HERITAGE
invite one and all to
attend monthly meetings
at Little Rock School
House (behind old
Mineral Wells
High School on West
Hubbard Street). We
gather on the second
Thursday of each month
at 7 p.m. Of course, visi-
tors are welcome.
AT A GLANCE
By SUE SEIBERT
sue_seibert@att.net
Family and close long-time friends.
You can’t get better than that!
As many of you know, our family has
a dinner once a month. We get together
on a Sunday afternoon to visit and to
celebrate any birthdays or anniversaries
that have happened or will happen that
month.
In the month of April we had two
birthdays – Raf’s sister, Mary, and our
son-in-law Brian both celebrated their
birthdays. Also, one of my closest
friends, Dianne, and her husband
Dub, celebrated their anniversary. On
a whim I decided to invite Dianne
and Dub, along with her brother Jack
and his girlfriend and my other life-
long friend, Helen. And everyone,
except our oldest daughter Kathi,
turned up...well, not all the grand-
children, as John is a policeman and
had to work and Joey is a Marine
now stationed in North Carolina.
Even our son-in-law Darrell and
granddaughter Beth came in from
Midland for the occasion!
What a wonderful time we had.
We have a nice deck and patio in the
back with loads of garden area and
freshly planted flowers and tomatoes.
Raf grilled hamburgers and hot dogs.
I make a salad with a wonderful lime
and cilantro vinaigrette and two cob-
blers, a strawberry cream cheese cob-
bler for my sister-in-law and a cherry
cobbler for Brian. Added to that, we
had chips and dips, fresh fruit and
vegetables, baked beans, hot dog
trimmings, and a lovely chocolate
cake that Dianne made. I’ll add the
strawberry cobbler recipe at the end
of the column. It is good!
I cannot stop thanking God for
yesterday. I am very blessed, not only
to have a loving family, whom I guess
I sometimes take for granted, but to
have friends whom I have known, lit-
erally...as my mother would say,
“since before we were born”.
Helen, Dianne, and I grew up togeth-
er. Our mothers were friends before we
were born. We went to church, church
camp at Glen Lake, YF, Girl Scouts, and,
of course, school together. We haven’t all
been together in several years. But, oh,
my, what fun we had. We laughed and
ate and laughed some more. We told
stories about our childhood and our
families. We remembered. I think there
is a special bond among friends who
have known each other for seventy
years and continue to be friends all dur-
ing that time.
There were times in my life when I
felt I was drowning, and if it hadn’t
been for either Dianne or Helen, and
their friendships, I might have done
just that. I am so thankful for their
friendship, and for the friendship of
others in our group who are still
around and have loved me and
allowed me to love them for all of
those seventy years of my life.
Strawberry Cream Cheese Cobbler
1 stick butter
1 egg
1 cup milk
1 cup flour
1 cup sugar
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 quarts whole strawberries,
capped and washed
4 ounces of cream cheese, cut in
small pieces
Preheat oven to 350˚F. Melt butter
and pour into 9”X13” glass baking
dish. In a small bowl, mix together
the egg, milk flour, sugar, baking
powder, and salt. Pour directly over
the butter in the baking dish, but do
not stir.
Add the strawberries, arranging in
a single layer as much as possible.
Sprinkle cream cheese pieces over
strawberries. Place in over and bake
for 45 minutes, or until top is golden
brown and edges are bubbling. Crust
will rise around the fruit, but the fruit
will peek through.
Enjoy!
Lifestyles
MINERAL WELLS INDEX / SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013
CALL CLASSIFIEDS AT 940-327-0838
PAGE 10
4600 Market Street Mineral Wells, Tx 76067
940-325-1152 • Fax 940-325-4224
Quality Body & Paint Work
Auto Glass Installed
Unibody & Frame Repair
Pinstriping & Accessories
on a
Wonderful
Day
Seibert
reflections . . .
By KAY MEALIO
kaymealio@embarqmail.com
This weather is caus-
ing some allergy prob-
lems for several people.
First, we have warm
temperatures, in the 70-
and 80-degree range
and, on Tuesday, it was
mostly in the middle
40s! The green trees and
grass make us dream of
summer activities and
realize that we’ll soon be
wishing for these cooler
temps.
April is Child Abuse
Awareness Month and
the Jack County Welfare
Board will be selling
blue Pinwheels for $10
in memory or in honor
of a child. They will be
displayed at the front of
the Perrin school on
Monday to promote
awareness. The pin-
wheels are a visual
reminder about child
abuse prevention and
symbolize the impor-
tance of everyone work-
ing together to protect
our children. For more
information, contact
Debra Tillery at (940)
507-1471 or Jo Brumfield
at (940) 859-6040. You
may purchase the pin-
wheels at any of the
Perrin Churches or at
the school. The fund
help stop child abuse in
our county.
The 100-year anniver-
sary of the Perrin School
District is upon us, and
we want the whole town
to celebrate in a big way.
The centennial will
begin on Thursday, Sept.
26, with a citywide festi-
val held on the concrete
parking lot between the
new gymnasium and the
ag barn. There will be
booths and games from
3:30 p.m. until dark,
when there will be a
bonfire held in the grass
west of the ag barn.
On Friday, Sept. 27,
beginning at 2:30 p.m.,
there will be a parade,
which will leave from
the elementary main
entrance, heading north.
The school is encourag-
ing alumni to enter
floats; and the first-ever
Perrin High School foot-
ball team is planning to
enter a float. At 7:30
p.m. begins the home-
coming game versus
Santo.
There will be recogni-
tion for: the alumni class
with the most attendees
present; alums who trav-
elled the furthest dis-
tance; the oldest alum-
nus present; and more.
This will be followed by
a post-game student
dance, held in the school
cafeteria.
On Saturday, Sept. 28,
several individual class-
es of alumni will likely
plan get-togethers on
this day.
Festival booth spaces
are available at no cost.
(Tobacco and alcohol are
not permitted on school
property, per state law.)
Bonfire is free admis-
sion. Parade entries are
free. Admission to the
Homecoming game is $5
for adults and $3 for stu-
dents. Admission to the
homecoming dance is $5
per couple or $3 per
individual (students,
dates and chaperones
only.)
Massive community
involvement is desired.
The participation of
churches, community
groups and all interested
individuals is invited.
Come support our
school and our town.
Let’s build the future by
honoring our past.
The Perrin Future
Business Leaders of
America club is once
again selling Beanie
Babies. All profit goes to
the March of Dimes to
save babies. There is a
great new selection, so
go by the school library
to check them out. Most
of the animals are $5,
but there are some new
camo bears that will be
$10. They can reorder if
they need to.
Early registration for
prekindergarten will be
held on May 7, 1-4 p.m.,
in the library. This is for
students who will be in
prekindergarten or kin-
dergarten during the
2013-14 school year.
Students currently
enrolled in prekinder-
garten are not required
to attend.
This summer the sec-
ond annual “Celebration
for Education” event
will be held in
Weatherford. Perrin-
Whitt CISD was selected
out of all the schools in
Parker County. On First
Monday, June 10, there
will be a public screen-
ing of “The
Revisionaries,” pro-
duced by the Texas
Freedom Network. This
will be at the Alkek Fine
Arts Center on
Weatherford College’s
main campus.
Refreshments will be
served at 6 p.m., with
the film beginning at
6:30 p.m.
The kindergarten class
welcomed Earth Day,
April 22, by planting
flowers in the play-
ground flowerbeds. A
big thanks to Loren Sell
and the agriculture
department for donating
the flowers that were
planted. The class has
been studying plants
and how to take care of
our earth. They have
also planted lima beans
and are anxiously wait-
ing for them to pop
through the juice boxes
and grow. Mr. Sell also
gave a demonstration to
the kindergarteners
about plant life and gave
them a tour of the
school’s greenhouse.
Perrin FFA had a very
good turnout for their
annual plant sale last
Friday. All proceeds will
benefit the Jan Coquat
Memorial Scholarship.
They have hanging bas-
kets, bedding plants as
well as vegetables avail-
able. The greenhouse
will be open for sales to
the public for the
remainder of the year or
until all plants are sold.
For questions, contact
Loren Sell, Perrin
Agriculture Science
teacher, at (254) 485-
4966.
Thought for the week: If
there are two sides to every
question, why is there only
one answer?
MClHER´S DAY SPEClAL
SALON HOURS: Mondoy Frldoy, P.30 o.m. 2.00 p.m.
[Chemlcol Servlces no loler lhon 12.30 p.m.
/|| ¥û¥'' h/|K, 'h/¥|ûû & 'II||,
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moke your oppolnlmenl!
Senlor dlscounls ovolloble.
Z04 Hood Rood
Mlnerol Vells, l/ Zó0óZ Equal Opportunity/Equal access institution
$08$08l8l
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Perrin planning for
summer and a big
centennial next fall
 OUT & ABOUT IN PERRIN
Learn ‘N Tree
Leaves
by Wynelle or Laura Catlin
Garcinia cambogia,
according to Dr. Oz,
helps you lose weight
fast because it keeps a
lot of sugars and carbo-
hydrates from turning to
fat and being stored in
the body.
The active ingredi-
ent in garcinia cambogia
is hydroxycitric acid
or HCA. When sugars
and carbs are eaten, an
enzyme, citrate lyase,
helps turn foods into
fats, some of which are
stored as body fat.
HCA reduces levels
of that enzyme and that
helps to block storage
of fat. Sugars and carbs
are then converted into
glycogen, a fuel stored
in the liver and muscles
to generate energy.
Because the body is
producing less fat, stored
body fat is burned as
fuel.
Raising glycogen
levels helps suppress
the appetite. HCA helps
raise levels of sero-
tonin, the "feel good"
neurotransmitter. It also
helps reduce blood sugar
and blood pressure and
is energizing.
In one study of
garcinia cambogia, good
cholesterol increased
while bad cholesterol
and triglycerides de-
creased.
Come see us.
Learn’n Tree
Health Shoppe
NEW HOURS
Closed Sun. & Mon.
Tues. – Fri. 10-5
Sat. 10-2
Laura Catlin, L.V.N.
Wynelle Catlin, C.N.
940-325-9161
1510 SE 1st St.
LIFESTYLES MINERAL WELLS INDEX / SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 ◆ CALL CLASSIFIEDS AT 940-327-0838 PAGE 11
Created by: Caden Snow
By SHARRON HUDSON
millsapnews@mineralwellsindex.com
With this being such a busy time of year there is
much news to talk about. Both openings and anni-
versaries of businesses are taking place in our area.
The newest opening is the Blue Windmill Restaurant
in Cool.
As you step into the cafe the decor is Cowboy/
Native American, and you are welcomed by the
smiling faces of owner
Billie Holley and associate
Brenda Smith. There is
plenty of spacious seating
and the menu is off to a
good start with lunch spe-
cials daily. The opening
day special was BLT, but
Cool resident Linda
O'Bannon ate a hamburg-
er that she said was "very
good." A lot of care and
precision is put into each
meal, and the results are
great. If you need a bag of
ice it is available in a
machine outside, and
there are plans to carry
other quick items like
bread and milk.
The Blue Windmill is
open Tuesday-Saturday, 6
a.m.-6 p.m., and you are
invited to dine in or take
out. Located on Hwy 180
West across from the Cool
blinking lights, you can call
in for food at (682) 229-
7085. Billie invites every-
one to come visit, ands she says if you get to the trade-
mark blue windmill you are "there yet." Much success
to the Blue Windmill!
Joy's Shear Creations Hair Salon is celebrating a first
anniversary in downtown Millsap during the month
of May. Plans to celebrate include the special of 15 per-
cent off any service as a “Thank you” to clients for a
very successful first year. There will be a discount on a
"Day of Beauty," which does not have to be all done in
one day. The massage therapist and facialist are also
offering other specials. This is a great group of ladies
who work very hard to please the customers and do a
great job. It is a great convenience to have the exper-
tise of a day spa available right at our doorstep, and
we wish these ladies another great year. Happy
Anniversary Joy's Shear Creations!
Special recognition is in order to Cool area resi-
dent Joe Wimberly on his recent induction into the
Texas Rodeo Cowboy Hall of Fame. This lifetime
achievement award was presented during the
TRCHF Induction and Reunion Weekend as the Fort
Worth Stockyards area rolled out the red carpet to
honorees. For Wimberly the two day event included,
on Friday, the signing of the Official 2013 Poster,
posing for pictures and media interviews. There was
also an inductee reception at the Cowtown
Coliseum, which houses the Hall of Fame. Saturday
was the time devoted to the official inductions
which included several categories. This is one of the
highest honors that a cowboy or cowgirl can receive,
and we congratulate Mr. Wimberly on this achieve-
ment.
Students at the Millsap Elementary School are
preparing for the annual talent show, in which
grades three through five participate. An art show
has been added this year, with
exhibits of paintings, sculptures
and photos. The top ten projects
of third through fifth graders will
be on display the week of May 6.
The day for the show is May 9, at
6:30 p.m. This will be a great
experience, free to the public, so
plan to go and enjoy.
As we move toward the sum-
mer months many families will be
looking for facilities to house
family reunions. There are two
great choices in the immediate
area. The Cool Community
Center has a $100 a day rate, with
a $25 up-front deposit. For ques-
tions or reservations call (940)
682-4386. The Millsap Community
Center offers a $75 rate for the
day, and the number to call is
(940) 682-2071. Neither center
offers half-day rates. Both of these
centers are very well maintained
and great choices for gatherings.
As we move toward the May 11
Log Cabin Days Festival a unique
contest has been added to the
event. A sculpture created by
Millsapian Melvin Davis has been moved onto the
cabin grounds. It is the "Campfire Ring of Honor"
and is a memorial to deceased Heritage Society
members and cooks who helped at the past festivals.
The base of the sculpture is a huge rock, and here's
where the contest comes in. The rock has been
weighed on Walden's commercial scales, and tickets
are being sold on guessing the correct weight of the
stone. If you want to buy a chance, it is $2 for one,
or $5 for 3. Forms are available at Millsap City Hall
and Millsap Walden’s Farm and Ranch Supply and
will also be sold at the festival. The prize is $50 for
the guess nearest the correct weight, and you do not
have to be present to win. It's going to be a hard
guess, but a lot of fun!
Also, the Millsap Heritage Society will have their
regular monthly meeting one week early, with it tak-
ing place May 6, 7 p.m., at the cabin grounds.
Reminder: Waldens Consignment Sale is May 4,
10 a.m., at 201 Fairview, in Millsap. The Millsap
Neighborhood Ladies Home and Garden Club will
have a Bake Sale in the store and the Abandoned
Cemetery Association will be there selling lunches
of hotdogs, nachos, and frito pies.
Thanks for reading!
News around Millsap
 MILLSAP MATTERS
The Cross Timbers Chapter of the Native
Plant Society of Texas will host a lecture about
plants used by Native American Indians pre-
sented by Curtis Carter at 7 p.m. on May 9 at the
Harberger Community Center, 701 Narrow St.,
in Weatherford.
The public is welcome.
Carter has been an educator in public schools
for 24 years; currently teaching biology at
Springtown High School. He has had a life-long
fascination with Native American culture and
history, specializing in Cheyenne material cul-
ture of the 19th century.
As an avid replicator and experimental arche-
ologist, Carter researches, makes and then uses
the tools, clothing, foods, etc., used during the
mid-1800’s.
As an experimental archeologist, he has a
high degree of insight into the daily lives of
Plains Indian people from this time period.
An important part of Plains Indian life was
the use of plants from their environment. Ethno-
botany of the Plains Indian culture has become
an integral part of his research. Throughout the
year he shares his knowledge at schools, muse-
ums, historic sites and other venues. He will be
discussing the use of several plants used by
Plains Indian people, focusing primarily on
yucca.
The Cross Timbers Chapter of the NPSOT
meets the second Thursday of the month (except
July and December) at our new location, Cherry
Park Community Center, 313 Davis Street (on
the west side of Cherry Park) in Weatherford.
The group’s mission is to promote the conserva-
tion, research, and utilization of native plants
and plant habitats in Texas through education,
outreach, and example. For more information
visit our website http://npsot.org/CrossTimber
or contact Eileen Porter at (817) 596-5567. The
public is welcome and light refreshments will be
served.
Learn about
plants used by
Native Americans
HERMAN by Jim Unger KIT ‘N’ CARLYLE by Larry Wright
by Harriette Cole
DEAR HARRIETTE: What do you
do when you're in a relationship but you
want to start dating again? I met this
man on Facebook, and I would like to
take him out for his birthday. He is
handsome, and he is someone with
whom I can see myself having a relation-
ship. We started to correspond via email
for a few weeks until we exchanged
phone numbers. Talking on the phone is
just easier. My male friend liked the idea
of going out for his birthday, and that
made my heart smile.
During one of our numerous con-
versations, I told my male friend that I
was married and that my husband and I
have been separated for 15 years. To my
surprise, he was taken aback by the
statement. He told me that he doesn't
want a woman who is married. I told
him it was not a big deal. I really like
this guy, and I want to see what devel-
ops from our friendship. I am not plan-
ning to divorce my husband anytime
soon. I am lonely and want companion-
ship. What is a woman to do? -- Till
Death Do Us Part?, Baltimore
DEAR TILL DEATH DO US
PART?: Why are you surprised at your
suitor's surprise? I think it is a good
thing that a man does not want to date a
woman who is married. That you are
separated is different from married, and
you admit that you are not planning to
get divorced anytime soon. Why is that?
Are you benefiting in some way from
being married to your husband even
though you have not been together for
years? Is being married a safety for you?
You are living in that space of hav-
ing your cake and wanting to eat it, too.
You are legally married but not with
your husband. You are lonely and want
companionship, but you are not legally
available to receive it. You may want to
thank this suitor for making your dilem-
ma so obvious. Do yourself a favor: Take
care of first things first. Clear the way to
have a healthy new relationship.
DEAR HARRIETTE: My neighbor
from back home died several years ago. I
was included in his will, which went
through years of sluggish movement in
the court system. Finally, I have been
told what was left to me, and I don't
even want it. I feel so stupid having held
onto this notion that I was really getting
something. What do I do if I don't want
it? -- Willed Out, Shreveport, La.
DEAR WILLED OUT: You should
have received information from the
estate explaining that you do not have to
accept the items. Essentially, you need to
get in touch with the official person in
charge of the dispersion of the will.
Explain that while you appreciate your
neighbor's gesture, you will be unable to
use the item(s) left for you. Suggest that
the administrator of the estate dispose of
it in whatever way he or she sees fit -- or
search for another family member who
may appreciate that which isn't right for
you at this time.
(Lifestylist and author Harriette Cole is
president and creative director of Harriette
Cole Media. You can send questions to
askharriette@harriettecole.com or c/o
Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut St., Kansas
City, MO 64106.)
SENSE & SENSITIVITY - Married
woman wants to start dating again
Today is the 118th day of 2013 and the 40th day
of spring.
TODAY'S HISTORY: In 1789, a mutiny broke
out on the British trade ship Bounty.
In 1945, Italian partisans executed dictator
Benito Mussolini and his mistress by firing
squad. In 1952, the United States ended its oc-
cupation of Japan.
In 1994, CIA officer and analyst Aldrich Ames
pled guilty to providing U.S. secrets to the
Soviet Union and later Russia.
TODAY'S BIRTHDAYS: James Monroe
(1758-1831), fifth U.S. president; Lionel Bar-
rymore (1878-1954), actor; Oskar Schindler
(1908-1974), businessman; Harper Lee (1926-
), author; Ann-Margret (1941- ), singer/actress;
Jay Leno (1950- ), TV personality; John Daly
(1966- ), golfer; Jorge Garcia (1973- ), actor;
Penelope Cruz (1974- ), actress; Jessica Alba
(1981- ), actress.
TODAY'S FACT: Aldrich Ames made $4.6
million selling CIA secrets to the KGB from
1985 to 1993.
TODAY'S SPORTS: In 1967, Muhammad Ali
refused to be inducted into the U.S. Army and
was stripped of his heavyweight boxing title.
TODAY'S QUOTE: " I wanted you to see what
real courage is, instead of getting the idea that
courage is a man with a gun in his hand. It's
when you know you're licked before you begin
but you begin anyway and you see it through
no matter what." -- Harper Lee, from "To Kill a
Mockingbird"
TODAY'S NUMBER: 40 -- languages in which
Harper Lee's classic novel "To Kill a Mocking-
bird" is available.
TODAY'S MOON: Between full moon (April
25) and last quarter moon (May 2).
Universal Uclick Almanac
by Bernice Bede Osol
There are strong indications
that you will form a powerful
alliance in the year ahead that
could prove to be helpful to
your career. The value of this
partnership will depend on
your ability to keep it confi-
dential.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
-- There's a chance that you
could be domineering in a
one-on-one relationship, which
would be counterproductive.
Use charm to get what you
want.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
-- It's nice to be helpful, but
don't take on so many burdens
that it makes you ineffective.
When you're bogged down and
can't function, you won't do
anybody any good.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
-- Stick to the plan of a social
engagement, instead of trying
to make a last-minute change.
Your alterations won't add
anything of value.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- If
you're not careful, you could
easily yield to peer pressure
and agree to do something that
does not serve your best inter-
est. Be firm and stand your
ground.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) --
Just because someone is a col-
orful talker doesn't mean that
he or she is a knowledgeable
one. Don't be mesmerized by
the flash and totally overlook
substance.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) --
The need for instant gratifica-
tion could cause you to spend
your money foolishly. Wait
until you find the perfect buy
instead of snapping up the first
offer you come across.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
-- If you make an impulsive
commitment or promise,
there's a good chance you'll
end up regretting it. Be very
careful on what or to whom
you pledge your word.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
23-Dec. 21) -- If a friend or
associate is raring to go, you
might be a bit too retiring for
him or her. Instead of seeking
solitude, get out and try to
have fun.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) -- You'll be eager to hang
out with people, yet you might
not enjoy being in a large gath-
ering full of new faces. Stick
to your familiar inner circle.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) -- There is nothing wrong
with being a little competitive,
provided it's for a reasonable,
constructive purpose. Today,
however, your urge to win
might come from a negative
source.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) -- You'll be susceptible to
high-risk proposals that prom-
ise something for nothing.
Look at all "too good to be
true" deals with a gimlet eye.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
-- You'll enjoy conversational
exchanges as long as they're
not centered on personal or
weighty subjects. Don't allow
yourself to get drawn into
emotional repartee.
Astrograph
ARLO AND JANIS by Jimmy Johnson
BIG NATE by Lincoln Peirce
SOUP TO NUTS by Stromoski
BORN LOSER by Art amd Chip Sansom
ZITS by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman
FRANK AND ERNEST by Bob Thaves
THE GRIZWELLS by Bill Schorr
ACROSS
1 Vigor's partner
4 Frat letter
7 Soup du --
11 Charlemagne domain
(abbr.)
12 Foot part
13 All, in combos
14 Brides-to-be
16 Roman moralist
17 Make a pile
18 Lira successor
19 Nov. and Feb.
20 Cowpoke's sweetie
21 Snags a dogie
24 Young no-show
27 Mantra chants
28 Bangkok resident
30 Bleacher shouts
32 Snoop (around)
34 Ms. Peel of "The Avengers"
36 Herriot, for one
37 Furry swimmers
39 Foe
41 IV units
42 Wheel buy (2 wds.)
43 Salmon variety
45 Energetic
48 "-- Ha'i"
49 Creative
52 Hymn finale
53 Grasped
54 Loan letters
55 Synthesizer inventor
56 Jo's sister
57 Attention getter
DOWN
1 Channels 2-13
2 Orchidlike blossom
3 Ribs and chops
4 Goes on safari
5 High card
6 Cousins of "um"
7 Facetious
8 Actor Sharif
9 Golden Rule word
10 -- de Janeiro
12 Confront
15 Identify
18 -- de cologne
20 Bleak
21 L. -- Hubbard
22 Melville title
23 Furtive whisper
24 Soft caps
25 Cathedral part
26 Those folks
29 Towel word
31 Pig's dig
33 Drawing on glass
35 Epic by Virgil
38 Environmental prefix
40 Takes a snooze
42 Suitably
43 GI garb
44 Refrigerator stick
46 Nile god
47 Holy cow!
48 Comic book thud
49 I knew it!
50 "Losing My Religion" band
51 Whimper
Answer to Previous Puzzle
Comics
MINERAL WELLS INDEX / SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013
CALL CLASSIFIEDS AT 940-327-0838
PAGE 12
1
Mineral Wells Index
Classifieds
NEW CUSTOMERS ONLY!!!
Your 30 word ad runs 1 month
in the Mineral Wells Index,
Palo Pinto Shopper
Lonestar Horseman &
North Texas Star for ONLY $134/MO
Call for details!
We Accept
Place a classifed
Online at: mineralwellsindex.com
or Call: 940-327-0838
or Toll-Free 817-558-2855
or send a Fax 817-556-0879
Email: classad@trcle.com
8:00am - 5:00pm Monday - Friday
View the Classifeds Online at: www.mineralwellsindex.com
Tip of
the Day
Before Your Yard Sale
Prepare to start early: Collectors and
antique dealers like to show up early
in the morning. Spruce up: If your
sale is in the garage, clean it out and
sweep. If it’s outside, mow the lawn.
Featured
Job
Leading synthetic turf manufacture
now hiring tufting operators,
menders and creelers for 1st and
2nd shift. Apply in person at:
Challenger Industries, Inc., 205 Boring
Dr. (off S. Bypass), Dalton, GA. 30721,
EOE - Drug Free Workplace
Submit your photo to lauramartin@daltoncitizen.com
Classifieds
W E A CCEPT View the Classifieds Online at: www.daltondailycitizen.com
Call 706-272-7707 or 706-272-7703
or Toll-Free 877-217-6397
or send a Fax 706-272-7743 .
Hours are 8:00 am - 5:00 pm Monday to Friday.
Place a classified
Featured
Vehicle
2005 BMW M3 Cabriolet
36k miles, 6 sp., still under factory
warranty, carbon black on black,
Harman/Kardon sound, navigation,
heated seats, xenon headlights,
garage kept, one owner, asking
$43,000. Call: 706-260-1673
Featured
Home
1216 Percheron Drive in
Mountain Oak Estates
3 bedroom, 2 bath. Formal
living room, eat-in kitchen.
Northwest school district.
$159,000. Call: 706-529-0410
Your three line ad runs
Friday, Saturday and
Sunday in The Daily Citizen ,
online, and in The Weekly
Citizen . Call for details!
Featured
Vehicle
Featured
Home
Featured
Job
Tip of
The Day
Looking for the perfect employee?
Place your employment ad here and let
the classifeds do the work for you! Call
for details!
Flea M
arket
F
R
E
E
20 W
ords
5 Days
Items total $500 or less
Sell your unwanted or inexpensive items for FREE
Items totaling $501-$1000 pay only $6
817-598-0857

940-327-0838

817-645-8093
B
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IN
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Buying or selling that perfect
set of wheels? Place your auto ad here.
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in print and online. 3 weeks - just $55.
Includes pictures.
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List your home for sale by owner here
with our classifed agent and sell it
quick! Unlimited lines, 200,00 potential
buyers. 3 full weeks - $85 includes
picture. Call for details!
Got Junk?
Spring Cleaning?
Place your garage sale ad here!
$17.00 for 2 days!
Includes rain insurance.
Call for details!


SATURDAY May 4
th
– 10 AM SHARP!
DECATUR, TEXAS
Wise County Sheriff’s Posse ~ Women’s Building
3101 South FM 51 ~ On Rodeo Grounds

Doors open at 8 am Day of Sale for Viewing, Auction will begin at 10 am Sharp!
Everything must be moved day of sale.

Rare Antique Firearms To Be Auctioned! Authentic Historical Pieces. A Rarest Authentic Antique 1855
“Colt” Revolving Shotgun ~ Only 1100 Made ~ Must See! A Very Rare Authentic Antique Highly Engraved 7 ½ Inch
Barrel “Colt” Single Action Peacemaker ~ With Engravings Everywhere ~ Beautiful Gun! A Very Rare Authentic
Antique 1894 “Winchester” Lever Action Rifle. A Very Rare Authentic Antique 1890 “Winchester” Slide Action Rifle. A
Very Rare Authentic Antique 1873 “Winchester” Lever Action Rifle. An Authentic Antique 1886 “Winchester” Lever
Action Rifle. A Very Rare Authentic Antique 1894 “Winchester” Saddle Gun. An Authentic Antique 1894 “Marlin” Rifle.
A Rare Authentic Antique 1861 “Colt” Army Revolver. Antique Swords and Many Other Antique Guns!

A Very Rare Antique “Kalliope” Metal Disc with Bells Music Box ~ Beautiful Sound and Extra Discs! A
Beautiful Rare Antique Oak Curved Glass China Cabinet. A Beautiful Antique Grandfather Clock with Beautiful Chimes
and Case. A Very Nice Antique “Victor” Victrola. A Beautiful Lawyers Stacking Bookcase. A Rare Antique “Jennings”
Slot Machine with Candy Vendor on Side ~ Never Seen One Before! A Beautiful Heavy Carved Desk. A Very Ornate
Brass “National” Cash Register. A Rare Antique “Royal Cola” Thermometer. A Rare Antique “Marx” Truck. And Many
More Unique Pieces of Furniture! Several Outstanding Framed Western Prints including “G. Harvey”. Rare Old West
Leather “U.S. Saddle Bags”. A Large Collection of Western Bronze Statues Including the “Wicked Pony” by Fredric
Remington. Western Oil Lamps, Cast Iron Locks. Very Rare 1847-C Charlotte $2 1/2 Gold Coin, 1904 $20 Gold Coin,
1910-D $10 Indian Gold Coin, 1881 $10 Gold Coin, 1893 $5 Gold Coin, 1855 $1 Type 2 Gold Coin, 1852 $1 Gold Coin
And Several Other Gold Coins. Over 200 Antique Silver Dollars. Very Rare Complete 24 Pc. Peace Silver Dollar
Collection, Very Rare 1860-O Seated Liberty Silver Dollar, 1882-CC Silver Dollar, 1852 3 Cent, 1827 Bust Half Dollar,
1865 Two Cent, 1858 Flying Eagle Cent and Many More Antique Coins! Beautiful Diamond Rings, Gorgeous Leaded
Glass Lamps, Mammy Cookie Jars, A Very Beautiful Ruby Red Cut Crystal Bowl, Salt & Pepper Sets, Perfume Bottles &
Much More!
To Many Items To List! This is Just A Partial List!
Come Early For A Good Seat!
Bring Your Truck, Newspaper & Boxes for Packing Your Items.
Make This Auction A Priority! No Buyer’s Premium!
Bring Cash or Check with Proper I.D.
Dealer’s Must Have Copy of Sales Tax Permit or Sales Tax will be Added, No Exceptions.
Announcements Made Day of Sale Supersede All Other Advertisement.
Auctioneer ~ Michael Miears Tx. Lic. # 12703 ~ 405-381-3402
ClassifiedsMineralWellsindex/sunday,april28,2013uCallClassifiedsat940-327-0838 page13
115 Auctions 115 Auctions 115 Auctions
110 Adoption
Actress, former, yearns to
be future Mom. Financially
Secure, Educated, very
Loving. Expenses paid
Kim 1-800-990-7667
UNPLANNED PREGNANCY?
THINKING OF ADOPTION?
Open or closed adoption. YOU
choose the family.
LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Ab-
by!s One True Gift Adoptions.
Call 24/7. 1-866-459-3371
(Void in Illinois/Indiana)
130 Flea Markets
Brand New Wedding Dress,
size 8. $35.00.
(940) 325-4144
Glass top range, $175.; Sofa,
$75.; 2- Computer printers,
$20. (469) 831-4468
Pink wood play house, 10 x 12
Could be used as a storage
building. Very good shape.
$500. OBO. 940-682-5750
141 Instructional
AIRLINES ARE HIRING –
Train for hands on
Aviation Maintenance Career.
FAA approved
program. Financial aid if quali-
fied – Housing
available CALL Aviation Insti-
tute of
Maintenance 1-800-335-9129
ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE
from Home.
*Medical, *Business, *Criminal
Justice, *Hospitality.
Job placement assistance.
Computer and
Fi nanci al Ai d i f qual i fi ed.
SCHEV authorized.
1-800-509-5085 www.Centura-
Online.com
SELL YOUR VEHICLE
Your Ad Will Run 1 Month
In Print & Online
For Only
$45.00
940-327-0838
Looking for a Job? Subscribe to
the Mineral Wells Index for your
employment information
147 Legals
LAKE PALO PINTO
AREA WATER SUPPLY
CORPORATION (WSC)
PUBLIC HEARING
ADVERTISEMENT:
A public hearing is being
held on Wednesday,
May 29, 2013 at 5:30
p.m. at the LPPA WSC
office (located at 4500
N. Lakeview Drive, Gor-
don, Texas 76453) to
discuss the proposed
expansion to the LPPA
WSC water treatment
plant. The total
estimated cost of the im-
p r o v e me n t s i s
$1,200,000.00. The
anticipated estimated
monthly bill to the
residential customer will
increase from $61.35 to
$70.71 in conjunction
with this project. The
Environmental Informa-
tion Document (EID) is
located for public view-
ing at the LPPA WSC
office, 4500 N. Lakeview
Drive in Gordon, Texas.
One of the purposes of
this hearing is to discuss
the potential environ-
mental impacts of the
project and alternatives
to it.
NOTICE TO BIDDERS
Palo Pinto County Munici-
pal Water District No. 1 is
accepting applications for
the performance of de-
pository services from de-
pository institutions in the
District.
Applications will be ac-
cepted in the District’s of-
fice at Mineral Wells City
Hall, 211 S.W. 1st Avenue,
P.O. Box 387, Mineral
Wells, Texas 76068, until
10:00 A.M., May 6, 2013.
The Board of Directors of
the Palo Pinto County Mu-
nicipal Water District No. 1
may consider the selection
of a depository at its May
meeting.
Copies of the General
Conditions and Depository
Requirements can be ob-
t ai ned f r om t he
Secretary/Treasurer, Palo
Pinto County Municipal
Water District No. 1, P.O.
Box 387, Mineral Wells,
Texas 76068.
Palo Pinto County Munici-
pal Water District No. 1
LEGAL NOTICE:
These Texas Lottery Com-
mi ssi on Scr at ch-Of f
games will close on July 3,
2013. You have until De-
cember 30, 2013, to re-
deem any tickets for these
games: #1386 Hit $100
($2) overall odds are 1 in
4.38, #1402 Amazing 8’s
($1) overall odds are 1 in
4.69, #1424 Dallas Cow-
boys ($5) overall odds are
1 in 3.67, #1425 Houston
Texans ($5) overall odds
are 1 in 3.66, #1458 Lucky
3’s ($3) overall odds are 1
in 3.72, #1472 Double Ac-
tion ($10) overall odds are
1 in 3.18, #1475 Wild
Doubler $$ ($1) overall
odds are 1 in 4.56, #1479
Match 3 Tripler ($1) over-
all odds are 1 in 4.43,
#1481 Wild Cherry ($1)
overall odds are 1 in 4.56,
#1482 Neon 9’s ($2) over-
all odds are 1 in 4.14,
#1484 $100,000 Winnings
($5) overall odds are 1 in
3.83, #1485 $100,000
Cash ($5) overall odds are
1 in 4.20, #1489 Black-
jack Tripler ($2) overall
odds are 1 in 4.21, #1503
$50,000 Fast Cash ($5)
overall odds are 1 in 3.11.
The odds listed here are
the overall odds of win-
ning any prize in a game,
i ncl udi ng break-even
prizes. Lottery retailers are
authorized to redeem
prizes of up to and includ-
ing $599. Prizes of $600 or
more must be claimed in
person at a Lottery Claim
Center or by mail with a
completed Texas Lottery
claim form; however, an-
nuity prizes or prizes over
$1,000,000 must be
claimed in person at the
Commission Headquarters
in Austin. Call Customer
S e r v i c e a t
1-800-37LOTTO or visit
the Lottery Web site at
txlottery.org for more in-
formation and location of
nearest Claim Center. The
Texas Lottery is not re-
sponsible for lost or stolen
tickets, or for tickets lost
in the mail. Tickets, trans-
actions, players, and win-
ners are subject to, and
players and winners agree
to abide by, all applicable
laws, Commission rules,
regulations, policies, di-
rectives, instructions, con-
ditions, procedures, and
final decisions of the Ex-
ecut i ve Di rect or. A
Scratch-Off game may
continue to be sold even
when all the top prizes
have been claimed. Must
be 18 years of age or
older to purchase a Texas
Lottery ticket. PLAY RE-
SPONSIBLY. The Texas
Lottery supports Texas
education.
147 Legals
LEGAL NOTICE:
These Texas Lottery Com-
mi ssi on Scr at ch-Of f
games will close on July 3,
2013. You have until De-
cember 30, 2013, to re-
deem any tickets for these
games: #1386 Hit $100
($2) overall odds are 1 in
4.38, #1402 Amazing 8’s
($1) overall odds are 1 in
4.69, #1424 Dallas Cow-
boys ($5) overall odds are
1 in 3.67, #1425 Houston
Texans ($5) overall odds
are 1 in 3.66, #1458 Lucky
3’s ($3) overall odds are 1
in 3.72, #1472 Double Ac-
tion ($10) overall odds are
1 in 3.18, #1475 Wild
Doubler $$ ($1) overall
odds are 1 in 4.56, #1479
Match 3 Tripler ($1) over-
all odds are 1 in 4.43,
#1481 Wild Cherry ($1)
overall odds are 1 in 4.56,
#1482 Neon 9’s ($2) over-
all odds are 1 in 4.14,
#1484 $100,000 Winnings
($5) overall odds are 1 in
3.83, #1485 $100,000
Cash ($5) overall odds are
1 in 4.20, #1489 Black-
jack Tripler ($2) overall
odds are 1 in 4.21, #1503
$50,000 Fast Cash ($5)
overall odds are 1 in 3.11.
The odds listed here are
the overall odds of win-
ning any prize in a game,
i ncl udi ng break-even
prizes. Lottery retailers are
authorized to redeem
prizes of up to and includ-
ing $599. Prizes of $600 or
more must be claimed in
person at a Lottery Claim
Center or by mail with a
completed Texas Lottery
claim form; however, an-
nuity prizes or prizes over
$1,000,000 must be
claimed in person at the
Commission Headquarters
in Austin. Call Customer
S e r v i c e a t
1-800-37LOTTO or visit
the Lottery Web site at
txlottery.org for more in-
formation and location of
nearest Claim Center. The
Texas Lottery is not re-
sponsible for lost or stolen
tickets, or for tickets lost
in the mail. Tickets, trans-
actions, players, and win-
ners are subject to, and
players and winners agree
to abide by, all applicable
laws, Commission rules,
regulations, policies, di-
rectives, instructions, con-
ditions, procedures, and
final decisions of the Ex-
ecut i ve Di rect or. A
Scratch-Off game may
continue to be sold even
when all the top prizes
have been claimed. Must
be 18 years of age or
older to purchase a Texas
Lottery ticket. PLAY RE-
SPONSIBLY. The Texas
Lottery supports Texas
education.
NOTICE TO BIDDERS
The City of Mineral Wells,
Texas is requesting sealed
bids for:
Demolition of Structures
Bids will be accepted in
the City Clerk’s office at
115 S.W. 1st St., P.O. Box
460, Mineral Wells, Texas,
until 2:00 p.m., May 8,
2013, then opened and
publicly read. The bids
may be considered for ap-
proval on May 21, 2013 at
6:30 p.m. in the City
Council Chambers.
Copies of the bid pro-
posal/bid request can be
obtained from the Inspec-
tion Department, City of
Mineral Wells, 211 S.W.
1st Ave., P.O. Box 460,
Mi neral Wel l s, Texas
76068.
147 Legals
NOTICE TO BIDDERS
The City of Mineral Wells,
Texas is requesting sealed
bids for:
Demolition of Structures
Bids will be accepted in
the City Clerk’s office at
115 S.W. 1st St., P.O. Box
460, Mineral Wells, Texas,
until 2:00 p.m., May 8,
2013, then opened and
publicly read. The bids
may be considered for ap-
proval on May 21, 2013 at
6:30 p.m. in the City
Council Chambers.
Copies of the bid pro-
posal/bid request can be
obtained from the Inspec-
tion Department, City of
Mineral Wells, 211 S.W.
1st Ave., P.O. Box 460,
Mi neral Wel l s, Texas
76068.
CLASSIFIED
POLICY
Advertisers Are Advised To
Check Their Ad The First Day
Of Publication And Report To
The Classified Department
Any Errors Or Omissions At
That Time. The correction will
be made in the next issue.
Claims for error adjustment
must be made immediately
after an advertisement is pub-
lished. The publisher does not
assume any responsibility for
an ad beyond the cost of the
ad itself. The publisher is not
responsible beyond the first
incorrect insertion or omis-
sion of an ad. The publisher
reserves the right to reject
any advertisement considered
objectionable in subject mat-
ter, phraseology, or opposed
to the public interest or
the policy of the newspaper.
No fraudulent, dishonest, or
misleading ads will be know-
ingly published. Each adver-
tiser who submits an adver-
tisement shall be responsible
to indemnity and hold harm-
less the publisher for any
cost, injury, or liability im-
posed upon it because of
the content of any adver-
tisement submitted.
215 Drivers
CLASS A CDL DRIVERS
w/ tanker endorsement.
WITH 2 YEARS EXPERIENCE
MUST BE 21 YEARS OF AGE
BROCK, TOLAR AREA.
APPLY IN PERSON
6515 W. HWY. 377
TOLAR, TX 76476 OR
FAX RESUME: 254-835-4554
HIRING Transport Drivers
• 2 years verifiable driving
experience or 1 year in the
oilfield.
• Clean MVR and
Back ground
• Class A License + Tanker
Endorsement
• 22 years or older
• Excellent benefits
and bonuses.
Hiring for Cleburne,
Weatherford, Jacksboro,
and Bridgeport yards.
CONTACT:
940-393-5525 - Danny
817-925-5154 - Jon
EOE
Looking for a Job? Subscribe to
the Mineral Wells Index for your
employment information
Looking for a Job? Subscribe to
the Mineral Wells Index for your
employment information
2
ClassifiedsMineralWellsindex/sunday,april28,2013uCallClassifiedsat940-327-0838 page14
390 Garage Sale
Nice 3 BR House For Sale
$49,900., in Mineral Wells
816 SW 1st St.
940-682-1640
INSERTION WEEKLY or WEEKEND April 15-28
The Mineral Wells Index


In Classifieds Help Wanted
1 column x fit to length

TEAR SHEETS MUST ACCOMPANY BILLING
IN ORDER TO RENDER PAYMENT

Contact: Lisa McCool lisa.mccool@richesondq.com
940 549-5041

TheRichesonGroup
PO Box 1299
Graham, TX 76450



SANTO,
MINERAL WELLS
& WEATHERFORD

LOCATIONS
HIRING
RESTAURANT
MANAGERS,
SHIFT LEADERS &
TEAM MEMBERS

Apply online
richesondq.com

TEAM MEMBERS &
SHIFT LEADERS earn
over minimum wage and
work a flexible schedule.

RESTAURANT
MANAGERS
earn a monthly salary
plus bonus potential.

200 Employment 200 Employment 200 Employment
225
General Help
Wanted
Car Wash Manager Needed
Flexible hours, ideal for active
person with handyman/main-
tenance & computer skills.
940-456-2024
Heavy Equipment Operator
Career! 3 Week Hands On
Training School. Bulldozers,
Backhoes, Excavators.
National Certifications. Lifetime
Job Placement Assistance. VA
B e n e f i t s E l i g i b l e !
1-866-362-6497
Place an eye catcher in your ad
for only $2.00!
225
General Help
Wanted
Hiring Production Workers
with Mechanical knowledge.
Drug test required.
Apply in Person
ValAir
1200 Harvey Rd.
Mineral Wells, TX 76067
940-468-3234
Truck Drivers Wanted
Best Pay and Home Time!
Apply Online Today over 750
Companies!
One Application, Hundreds of
Offers!
www.HammerLaneJobs.com
225
General Help
Wanted
JOB FAIR
Friday
May 3, 2013
10:00AM-2:00PM
Location:
HOLIDAY INN EXPRESS
6801 HWY 180 E
MINERAL WELLS, TX
College Students needed
for Summer projects,
Exp.Machine Maint. Techs,
Shipping /Receiving
Clerk w/Forklift,
Production
MUST HAVE:
HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA
OR EQUIVALENT NO FELONIES,
STEEL-TOED BOOTS OR SHOES
TOBACCO FREE CAMPUS, MUST
SPEAK ENGLISH
Express Employment
Professionals
(817)594-3600
Mechanic Needed
Must 21, able to travel, CDL
not required but a plus.
Oil Filed
Call 254-693-5556 to apply
225
General Help
Wanted
Lots of Jobs Available
Go online and apply at
Expresspros.com
We check these daily.
Please call us at
817-594-3600
after applying,
and we will set you an
appointment.
Hard Working Full Time
Employees for Wood Work
Drug Test Required
Call 254-646-3376
OIL & GAS COMPANY
NOW HIRING
Field Supervisor, Lease
Operator, Roustabout Pusher
w/ CDL for Eldorado/ Big Lake
Area. Send resume to
Fax 325-853-3680
Telesis P.O. Box 526
Eldorado TX 76936
PROMPT?
RELIABLE?
CONSCIENTIOUS?
FULL TIME
GENERAL
PRODUCTION JOBS
BENEFITS & QUARTERLY
BONUSES!
DETAILED TRAINING
FOR ALL TEAM MEMBERS
SO EVERYONE TAKES PRIDE
IN THEIR WORK & SHARES
IN BONUSES WHEN QUALITY AND
VOLUME GOALS ACHIEVED
JAMAK FABRICATION, INC
1401 N. Bowie Drive
Weatherford, TX 76086
EOE M/F/D/V
No phone calls please
235 Medical
Palo Pinto Nursing & Rehab is
looking for CERTIFIED NURSING
ASSISTANTS for all shifts, LVN!s
all sifts, and WEEKEND SUPERVI-
SOR. If interested please
contact Kristee Thomas or
Ca r r i e He n r y a t
#940-325-7813
Buying or Selling a Car?
Mineral Wells Index
Classified Ads
Work!
Call 940-327-0838
Place an eye catcher in your ad
for only $2.00!
235 Medical
A Great Place To Work
Certified
Medication Aides
for all shifts
With A $750 Sign-On
Bonus for FT Employees
Apply In Person
Come be a part of a great
team!
1715 Martin Dr.
Weatherford, TX
817-458-3100
365 Farm Equipment
Would Like to Buy Hydraulic 3
Pt Hook Up Post Driver.
(817)599-6796
400 Health & Beauty
CANADA DRUG CENTER.
Safe and affordable medica-
tions.
Save up to 75% on your medi-
cation needs.
Call 1-800-304-6217
$10.00 off first prescription
and FREE Shipping!
410 Heavy Equipment
Surplus Equipment. Online
auctions.
HUGE selection. BIG savings.
NO Buyer fees.
Low Seller fees. BARGAINS!
Register FREE!
Use Promo Code cnhi313.
LIVE support.
www.SurplusOnThe.NET
334-215-3019
420 Household Goods
Queen Mattress Almost new
13" Ashley Plush mattress. No
pillow top to break down. We
will deliver for cash. $200 or
$225 we deliver, 2 electric
scooters as is $50ea. (512)
547-0490
If this were your ad, a potential
buyer would be looking at it
right now. Call 940-327-0838
to place your ad here.
Place an eye catcher in your ad
for only $2.00!
445
Misc. Items For
Rent
SEE the SATELLITE TV Differ-
ence!
Packages as LOW as
$19.99/month!
FREE DVR Upgrade. FREE
HD Upgrade.
FREE Professional Installation!
Call NOW and Start SAVING!
1-866-725-5135
455 Misc. Merchandise
DENTAL PLAN: $14.95 A
Month.
FREE Vision, Prescription &
Chiropractic.
1-800-590-7622; www.APDEN-
TALPLAN.com/call
DISH Network. Starting at
$19.99/month (for 12 mos.) &
High Speed Internet starting at
$14.95/month
(where available.) SAVE! Ask
About SAME DAY Installation!
CALL Now! 1-888-663-6101
SEE the SATELLITE TV Differ-
ence!
Packages as LOW as
$19.99/month!
FREE DVR Upgrade. FREE
HD Upgrade.
FREE Professional Installation!
Call NOW and Start SAVING!
1-866-795-9295
TERESA & APRIL
CAN HELP WITH ALL
Classified Line Advertising
For:
~ CLEBURNE TIMES-REVIEW
~ BURLESON CROWLEY
CONNECTION
~ Johnson County News
~ Weatherford Democrat
~ Parker County Shopper
~ Aledo Extra
~ Mineral Wells Index
~ Palo Pinto Shopper
817-558-2855
E-MAIL
classad@trcle.com
Or Fax To:
817-556-0879
CONSTRUCTION PIPE
FOR SALE FOR SALE
Pipe & Sucker Rods
~~DELIVERY AVAILABLE~~
(325) 669-8712
If this were your ad, a potential
buyer would be looking at it
right now. Call 940-327-0838
to place your ad here.
Place an eye catcher in your ad
for only $2.00!
3
Country Club Estates
100 Country Club Parkway, Mineral Wells
940-328-1165
Monday-Friday 9-5:30 • Sat. & Sun. 10-2
W/D Connections, Range & Refrigerator
BEST LOCATION...BEST PRICE
FREE MONTH RENT! FREE MONTH RENT!
★ ★

HOMES
C/H & A
Carport
3 BR House
*$619
4 BR House
Fireplace
*$729
DUPLEXES
C/H Unit Air
1 BR Duplex
*$359
2 BR Duplex
*$389
3 BR Duplex
*$479
Residential
Commercial
Farm And
Ranch
2515 E. Hubbard Mineral Wells (940) 325-9555
See our listings @ www.premier-properties.cc or www.realtor.com
Premier
Properties


ASHLEY WINDHAM (940) 452-0685 • DANAGOPFFARTH (940) 452-6208
JERRY VAN NATTA(940) 682-8590
JASON CALLAHAN (817) 688-2951 • MICHAEL LEE (940) 682-1306
1113 3 BEDROOM BRICK HOME, FIREPLACE, 1 ACRE ...................................... 99,500
1124 3 BEDROOM BRICK, FIREPLACE, LARGE YARD, VIEW ........................ $137,500
1119 3 BEDROOM BRICK HOME, FENCED YARD, MUST SEE ......................... $95,000
1139 GREAT INVESTMENT DUPLEX 1 BEDROOM UNITS ................................ $40,000
1136 2 BEDROOM HOME, GUEST HOME, LARGE BARN, 21 AC ................... $325,000
1109 4-2 2 STORY HOME, BARNS, ON APPROX. 4 ACRES ............................ $105,000
1132 3-2 BRICK HAS WOOD FLOORS, INGROUND POOL ............................. $135,000
1117 4-3 BRICK, IN GROUND POOL, MURCO ADDITION ................................ $205,000
1127 4 BR BRICK HOME LOCATED NEAR GOLF COURSE ............................ $163,500
1202 100 ACRES GORGEOUS BUILTING SITES, LOTS OF TREES, GREAT FOR
HUNTING, HORSES ........................................................................................... $300,000
REDUCED
ClassifiedsMineralWellsindex/sunday,april28,2013uCallClassifiedsat940-327-0838 page15
600 Rentals 600 Rentals 600 Rentals 600 Rentals
868 General Services
SKID STEER and DUMP
TRUCK work all types...tree
grubbing, post hole digging,
land clearing, driveways,
gravel, dirt work, !haul off de-
bris, tear down and haul off
old houses and barns etc..
10+years experience.
Mineral Wells, Graford, PK,
and surrounding areas.
FREE ESTIMATES call/text
940-329-8611
Looking for a Job? Subscribe to
the Mineral Wells Index for your
employment information
868 General Services
WRIGHT
RANCH
3151 Bennett Road, Millsap, TX
817-992-7418
greg0762@yahoo.com
Specializing in:
All phases of dirt work
Land Clearing • Roads
Tanks/Lakes
Backhoe Service
Fence Building
Custom Hay Bailing
& Hay For Sale
Place a 7 Line Ad in the Business service
Directory to run a Month in the Mineral Wells
Index, Palo Pinto Shopper and North Texas
Star for only
$
133.33
call teresa or April at 940-327-0838
Garage sale ad deadline
is noon Wednesday for
ads running in Thursday
and Friday papers.
To Place Your Garage Sale Ad Please Call 940-327-0838
2
0
W
o
rd
s
1
o
r 2
D
a
y
s
$
1
7
.0
0
+ $7.00 for internet
2
0
W
o
rd
s
3
D
a
y
s
$
1
9
.0
0
+ $9.00 for internet
SHOPPING FOR A DEAL?
Keep a Sharp Eye
on the Classifieds.
Each week, our Classified section features
hundreds of new listings for everything from
pre-owned merchandise to real estate and even
employment opportunities. So chances are,
no matter what you’re looking for, the Classifieds
are the best place to start your search.
To Place Your Ad
Please Call
940-327-0838
470 Pets & Free Pets
SELL YOUR
PET HERE
PET SPECIAL
RUN A 5 LINE AD FOR 5 DAYS
IN THE DAILY PAPER
AND ONE TIME IN
THE SHOPPER.
FOR ONLY
$35.00
Picture, Center, Bold
& Border Included.
CLEBURNE
817-645-8093
WEATHERFORD
817-598-0857
MINERAL WELLS
940-327-0838
Email Ad & Photos To
classad@trcle.com
(Non-Refundable)
500 Real Estate
PUBLISHER’S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertising in
this newspaper is subject to
the fair Housing Act which
makes it illegal to advertise
“any preference, limitation
or discrimination based on
race, color, religion, or an
intention, to make any such
preference, limitation or
discrimination.” Familial
status includes children
under the age of 18 living
with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women
and people securing custody
of children under 18.
This newspaper will not
knowingly accept any
advertising for real estate
which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby
informed that all dwellings
advertised in this newspaper
are available on an equal
opport uni t y basi s. To
complain of discrimination
call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777
The toll-free telephone
number for the hearing
i mpa i r e d i s
1-800-927-9275
505 Sales
CANCEL YOUR TIMESHARE.
NO Risk Program
STOP Mortgage & Mainte-
nance Payments Today.
100% Money Back Guarantee.
FREE Consultation.
Call Us NOW. We Can Help!
1-888-356-5248
510 Homes
3/2 ON EXTRA LARGE LOT.
NOT LIVABLE
NEEDS COMPLETE REMODELING
703 SW 5th Ave.
$15,000
(817)683-2121
Place an eye catcher in your ad
for only $2.00!
510 Homes
3/2 ON EXTRA LARGE LOT.
NOT LIVABLE
NEEDS COMPLETE REMODELING
703 SW 5th Ave.
$15,000
(817)683-2121
3/2 WITH CARPORT, RECENTLY
REMODELED, ALL NEW INTERIOR
PAINT, NEW COUNTER TOP, CAR-
PET, NEW TILE, NEW DECK, IN A
LARGE FENCE BACKYARD.
$55,000.
No Owner Financing
1916 SE 20th St
Mineral Wells, TX
940-682-5196
Like new home for sale by
owner. 3 bedroom 2 bath and
2 car garage in a new subdivi-
sion. Large living area with
open concept kitchen. 1560
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Anyone with the least
bit of doubt about how
popular hunting wild hogs
and predators is in the
Lone Star state need only
to have been in Waco this
past week end at the 1st
Annual Predator and Wild
Hog Expo, held at the
Waco Convention
Center.
Scurry
Outdoors South
did a great job of
hosting the event
and guides, out-
fitters and manu-
facturers of out-
door products
filled the booth
spaces with their
wares from one
end of the conven-
tion hall to the other.
The public was obvious-
ly hugely interested in the
theme of the show “preda-
tor and hog hunting” which
was evidenced by the much
larger than expected crowds
for this first event.
I was present with my
friend Larry Weishuhn,
well known TV show host
and hunter from Texas,
representing Xtreme Hog
Hunter Magazine (www.
extremehoghunter.com)
and letting folks know
about our weekly out-
doors radio show.
One of the highlights of
the show was when well
known call maker Cleon P.
Callaway presented me
with one of his signature
bull elk bugles, which he
makes from cow horns,
one at a time. These cus-
tom calls are easy to blow
and perfectly duplicate the
bugles of bull elk.
Weishuhn and other
outdoor celebrities kept
the crowd entertained by
their presence on stage
and hunters and their
families perused the isles
stopping to visit with
guides and outfitters or
purchasing that hard to
find piece of hunting
equipment to make their
time afield more
fun and produc-
tive.
It would take
ten of my out-
doors column to
thoroughly intro-
duce you to all the
hunting opportu-
nities and prod-
ucts I encounter
but we do have
space this week to
highlight a few.
Electric hunting
buggies
Ken Blackstock, owner
of Plano Golf Carts
(www.planogolfcarts.
com) was on hand with a
couple of his very rugged
hand crafted electric
hunting “buggies.”
I’ve had the opportuni-
ty to thoroughly test
these vehicles and have
found them to be
extremely reliable and the
only electric hunting
vehicle that will truly get
you there but more
importantly, back!
I’ve used these
machines up in the
mountains of Colorado
and on ranches here in
Texas. They truly do have
a 20-mile range between
charges here in Texas.
Weishuhn has also
experienced the range
and ruggedness of
Blackstock’s vehicles and
mentioned that he would
like to see several electric
off road vehicles run a
distance test of a big
Texas ranch.
My money, and I
believe Weishuhn’s as
well, would be on
Blackstock’s vehicle!
Hold-a-hawg
Snare Trap
This unique and
humane snare uses a
plastic tube on the lock-
ing end of the snare to
protect animal’s leg from
the cable. A “deer stop”
keeps the lock from com-
pletely closing.
Using this system, hogs
numbers can be reduced
and anything caught can be
released unharmed.
Four different snare cable
sizes are available for trap-
ping coyotes to large hogs.
To learn more about this
unique method of control-
ling hogs and watch a very
interesting video of the
snare in use, visit www.
holdahawg.com.
Krooked oak
tree stands
Sometimes, it’s next to
impossible to find a straight
tree in the proper place to
hang a tree stand. Stand
builders Shaun Bradley and
Will James have solved the
problem with their stand
system that works on any
tree large enough to support
a hunter’s weight, regard-
less of the angle the tree is
growing.
The design of the stand
allows adjustments to be
made with a single pin for
left and right adjustments.
Leveling of the stand is
made by adjusting the
detachable base on the tree.
With additional bases
on trees in several loca-
tions, relocation of the
seat and platform is easy
and quietly performed.
The ability to use this
treestand in trees that
have not been suitable for
conventional stands in
the past allows hunters
many more options when
choosing that “just right”
hunting location.
To learn more about
these innovative new
stands, visit www.krooke-
doaktreestand.com.
Porkchop hog
decoy
The practice of using
decoys for attracting wild
hogs is catching on fast
among hog hunters.
Decoys work for ante-
lope, deer and most other
wildlife; it stands to reason
wild hogs would respond
positively to the sight of
one of their kind standing
beside a feeder or on a
well used hog trail.
Hogs do depend primar-
ily upon their keen sense of
smell but their eyesight is
much better than many
people think, especially
inside of 100 yards.
These decoys have been
used effectively for not
only hunting hogs but
trapping them as well. No
better confidence builder
for wild hogs approaching
a trap than seeing a hog
inside! To learn about the
PorkChop Hog Decoy,
visit www.boardown.com.
Mojo outdoors
shake-n-jake
Mojo Outdoors has for
years been a leader in
making “action” decoys.
The Shake in Jake is a
gobbler decoy that can be
remotely activated.
The decoy turns from
side to side and the tail
raises and lowers and
spreads, to mimic a strut-
ting gobbler.
With the use of this
decoy set in an area that
affords good visibility for
approaching birds, it’s pos-
sible to attract a boss gob-
bler from a great distance.
To learn more about
the Shake N Jake, visit
www.mojooutdoors.com.
Call maker Cleo P.
Carraway present
Well known Texas call
maker Cleon P. Carraway
was on hand with a wide
assortment of calls to
attract everything from
wild hogs to elk.
Cleon introduced his
signature, handmade elk
bugle crafted from a
steer’s horn.
Several experienced elk
hunters committed that
the call was the best they
had heard at imitating the
bugle of a bull elk, I agreed
wholeheartedly and, it is
extremely easy to blow.
There just something
about the cow horn that
adds realism to the tone.
To learn more about
Carraway’s calls, visit
www.wildgamecalls.com.
Bears plentiful
in Colorado
Outfitter Larry Large
with L & L Outfitters was
present with pictures of
bears from this past sea-
son and tales of a huge
influx of bruins on the
private lands he leases for
hunting in Colorado.
Last year’s elk hunters
all had bow shot oppor-
tunities at bear but most
did not have bear tags.
Large is offering bear
hunts in September and
says tags will become
available on June 9.
Last year, tags were still
available at the beginning
of elk season in late
August but he advises
hunters to apply early to
insure they can hunt.
For more information
on these archery bear
hunts, visit www.bow-
huntcoloradoelk.net.

Listen to Outdoors with
Luke Clayton Outdoors
Radio at www.catfishra-
dio.com. Contact Luke
with fishing and hunting
news from your area
through the website.
OUTDOORS MINERAL WELLS INDEX / SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 ◆ CALL CLASSIFIEDS AT 940-327-0838 PAGE 16
Created by: Britney Kite
Predator, wild hog expo huge success in Waco
PHOTO BY LARRY LARGE
Famous Texas call maker Cleon P. Carraway (Lt) presents Clayton with one of
his signature elk bugles made from steer horn.
Luke Clayton
Local Pitch,
Hit and Run
contest April 28
Major League
Baseball and the local
AmVets Post 133 are
hosting a free Pitch, Hit
and Run contest for
children ages 7-14 on
April 28 at West City
Park’s White and Evans
fields.
Boys and girls will be
divided up in age
groups (7-8-, 9-10-,
11-12- and 13-14-year
olds) and individuals
will have a chance to
advance through four
levels of competition at
Major League ball parks
and the 2013 MLB All-
Star Game.
Individual pitching,
hitting and running
champions, along with
the all-around champi-
on in each age and gen-
der group at local com-
petitions will be award-
ed and advanced to the
sectional, level of com-
petition.
All participants must
bring a copy of their
birth certificate and
have a parent or guard-
ian fill out a registra-
tion/waiver form prior
to the start of competi-
tion.
Local registration
forms can be picked up
from team coaches of
Mineral Wells, Graford,
Millsap, Perrin and
Brock.
For more informa-
tion, call Jim Vines at
(940) 445-0734, or you
can email Vines at jim.
helpingveterans@gmail.
com.
LOCAL MINERAL WELLS INDEX / SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 ◆ CALL CLASSIFIEDS AT 940-327-0838 PAGE 17
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CALL CLASSIFIEDS AT 940-327-0838
PAGE 18
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Graham wins softball series opener
By TONY EIERDAM
sports@mineralwellsindex.com
GRAHAM – Graham
smashed 14 hits and took
advantage of Mineral
Wells errors as Lady
Blues cruised to a 10-1
win over the Lady Rams
here Friday night in game
one of their Class 3A,
best-of-three bi-district
playoff series.
Game two will be at 1
p.m. Saturday (April 27)
at Kessler Field on the
campus of Mineral Wells
High School, with game
three, if necessary, to fol-
low 30 minutes after the
conclusion of game two.
The winner of the
series will advance to the
area round and face
Hillsboro, the winner of
District 7-3A.
Lady Rams freshman
pitcher Kelsey Keeton took
the loss in the circle for the
Lady Rams. Keeton
allowed just two earned
runs on eight hits with no
walks and five strikeouts
in 3-2/3 innings.
Allie Stephens finished
in the circle, allowing no
earned runs on six hits
with no walks and two
strikeouts.
Nantz was the winning
pitcher for the Lady
Blues, allowing a run on
three hits with three
walks and six strikeouts
in seven innings.
Graham used a four-
run third inning – where
all of the runs were
unearned – to break open
a tight game.
Lady Blues’ sluggers
Nantz, Krisha Hamm and
Tanisha Reeve – hitting 3,
4, 5 in the batting order –
each recorded a double in
the third. MWHS also
committed a pair of
errors in the frame.
“We have a young out-
field (all three starting
outfielders are sopho-
mores) and they have
worked hard all year, and
they have come a long
way,” Lady Rams head
coach David Tarver said.
“Graham hits the ball
hard, and the wind was
blowing hard making it
difficult to catch every-
thing. It was a learning
experience.”
Graham added three
more runs in the fourth to
take a 7-1 lead. The big
hit in the inning was a
two-run home run over
the left-field fence by Lexi
Allen, who would record
four RBI in the contest.
The Lady Blues scored
three times again in the fifth
for a 10-1 advantage. The
big hit was a two-RBI single
by Allen off of Stephens.
The game would have
ended on run rule in the
fifth had it not been for a
spectacular play by
MWHS first-team, all-
state junior shortstop
Bethany Allen.
Nantz hit a line-shot
ground ball up the mid-
dle, but Allen dove to her
left and while hitting the
ground hauled in the ball,
popped to her feet and
threw a strike to first base
to get the Graham pitcher
by a step.
What made the play
even more remarkable
was the fact that just
moments earlier, Bethany
Allen had collided with
left-fielder Addie
Singleton on a short pop
fly to left and did not get
off the ground for several
minutes.
But both Bethany Allen
and Singleton remained
in the game and are likely
to play on Saturday.
Nantz retired the last
nine MWHS batters to
seal game one.
Tarver said the best
news was having the next
game – and possibly
another – at home to
complete the series.
“You have to forget
game one and move on to
game two,” Tarver said.
“We have two games at
our place if we win the
first game, and we feel
like we have a home-field
advantage.
“We just have to get
the job done.”
The Lady Rams took a
1-0 lead in the top of the
first inning.
Catcher Reagan
Patterson reached when
her hard-hit ground ball
was mishandled by
Graham shortstop Reeve.
Hope Patterson, the next
batter, walked, and Keeton
followed and was hit by a
pitch to load the bases.
Stephens followed and
her ground ball to second
base was misplayed,
allowing Reagan
Patterson to score.
The Lady Rams loaded
the bases again in the sec-
ond inning, but with two
outs Nantz forced a
ground out to end the
inning.
The Lady Rams man-
aged to get only one run-
ner on base in the third,
fourth and fifth innings,
but each runner was left
stranded.
By TONY EIERDAM
sports@mineralwellsindex.com
This season the Mineral
Wells High School base-
ball program got a boost
when it hired MWJH
coach Robert Moreno to
head the freshman team
and assist the varsity and
junior varsity squads.
Moreno, a well-known
batting coach in the area,
has coached at the junior
high school and high
school level for 30 years
after graduating from
Lamar University in
Beaumont, where he was a
four-year letterman on the
Cardinals’ baseball team.
Moreno was born in
Richland near Houston
and graduated high
school from Lamar
Consolidated, where he
was a four-sport athlete.
While at Lamar univer-
sity, Moreno played under
legendary college coach
Jim Gilligan, which helped
shape his baseball philoso-
phies and strategies.
Moreno teaches history
and government at
MWJH. He said he appre-
ciates being part of the
MWHS baseball staff.
“I have enjoyed being
here helping with the
varsity,” Moreno said.
“They have been success-
ful the last two years, and
I didn’t want to come in
here and do anything dif-
ferent. I just wanted to
come in and fit in.
“Baseball is a very dif-
ficult sport, and I hope I
am helping Coach (Bret)
Barrick and Coach (Will)
Burnes with an extra set
of eyes. For a good high
school program to be suc-
cessful, you need at least
three coaches. I have
worked on staffs with
four or five coaches.
“The aspects of the
game are so difficult that
you need that many eyes.
I was happy to come in
and help. I have really
enjoyed working with the
kids, they seem to trust
what we are teaching,
and I think the kids are
improving each day and
it will show when we get
to the playoffs.”
Moreno said he played
all of the sports growing
up, but grew most fond
of baseball.
“I always played every
sport when I was a kid,”
he said. “I was one of
those kids who would
stay out and play base-
ball until it was dark. I
also played football and
basketball. When I got to
college I had the opportu-
nity to play baseball.
“What helped me later
in my career is my associ-
ation with my college
coaches, especially what I
learned from Coach
Gilligan, the head coach.
“I remember my
coaches took me to a
Houston Astros game at
the Astrodome, and
(Dodgers skipper)
Tommy Lasorda climbed
into the stands before the
game and talked to us.
“Coach Gilligan intro-
duced me to many influ-
ential people in baseball
and taught me a lot. That
made me want to be a
baseball coach.”
Moreno said coaching
gives him the kind of sat-
isfaction that makes it
worth the late nights get-
ting home from road
games and the extra hours
on the practice field.
“What I enjoy most
about coaching is watching
the kids succeed,” Moreno
said. “Watching that light
turn on in their heads –
that they finally under-
stand what we have been
teaching – is rewarding.
“That’s what I like the
best about playoff time.
Playoffs to me is the third
season, with the second
season being the second
half of district play.
“We are looking for-
ward to the third part of
the season, the playoffs.”
More than likely every
player in the MWHS
baseball program has had
Moreno as a batting
instructor at one time or
another. He coaches bat-
ting on the side as a per-
sonal instructor, and he is
a regular at the different
baseball camps in the
area, including Barrick’s.
Moreno has been a
head baseball coach at
Millsap, Joshua and
Jacksboro, and has been
an assistant coach at
Peaster and Lake Worth.
“There are two things
about hitting,” he said.
“No. 1, hitting is discipline.
The second thing is
mechanics. Proper mechan-
ics help with consistency.
To be a good hitter you
have to be consistent in all
areas of hitting, and that
begins with mechanics.
“You have to constantly
check the kids – and we
film the varsity hitters in
batting practice - to keep
them consistent. Hitting in
baseball is almost like
shooting free throws in
basketball – everything has
to be consistent and you
have to do the same thing
over and over again.”
Barrick said Moreno has
been a great addition to
the baseball coaching staff.
“Coach Moreno gives
us another set of eyes, and
he gives us another coach
so that we can get more
work done with the kids
in practice,” Barrick said.
“With just two coaches (in
the past) it made it hard to
work in specific areas, and
he has allowed us to have
a coach in the batting cage
working with the hitting.
“He had been a varsi-
ty coach for many years,
and he is well known
around this area.
“He is also well
known for his instruc-
tion in hitting. We have
had him as a hitting
instructor at our sum-
mer baseball camps.
“He is very unselfish,
and he gives all of his
time to these kids.
Coach Moreno has made
our staff a lot better.
“He has been a huge
asset to us in practice
and games.
“He has been valuable
to this program.”
Rams vs.
Iowa Park
Class 3A bi-district
(best of 3)
ALL GAMES AT DECATUR
Friday, May 3
Game 1
7 p.m.
Saturday, May 4
Game 2
1 p.m.
Game 3
(if necessary)
30 minutes following
conclusion of Game 2
COURTESY
David Barrett (right) and Daniel Ruth (left) of Progressive Waste Solutions
are shown presenting a check to John Clarke as the title sponsor to this
year’s Mineral Wells High School Project Graduation golf tournament. The
tournament was held April 20 at Holiday Hills Country Club.
PROJECT GRADUATION FUNDRAISER
TONY EIERDAM/INDEX
Mineral Wells assistant baseball coach Robert
Moreno coaches third base during a recent junior
varsity game. Moreno is head freshman coach this
season, and is the Rams’ varsity batting instructor
and bench coach.
Moreno’s experience helps Rams’ baseball program
Check Web
site for final
series results
For results of game
two and a possible
game three of the Class
3A bi-district playoff
series between the
Mineral Wells Lady
Rams and Graham visit
www.mineralwellsin-
dex.com for final results
of the series, or see
Tuesday’s Index.
TONY EIERDAM/INDEX
Lady Rams all-state shortsop Bethany Allen applies a tag to Graham runner Leslye
Seaberry. Seaberry, attempting to steal second base, was thrown out by catcher
Reagan Patterson Friday night during the Lady Rams’ 10-1 loss to Graham in game
one of a best-of-three playoff series at Graham.

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