RepublicanAmerican

TUESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2013 FINAL 75¢

REP-AM.COM

TIDE ROLLS
ALABAMA AND AJ MCCARRON HAMMER IRISH, 42-14, IN BCS TITLE GAME, PAGE 1C

Broadway stepping up
Stars to perform at Palace Theater for Newtown benefit
BY BRYNN MANDEL
REPUBLICAN-AMERICAN

MORE INSIDE
>> For details on the Jan. 28 event, “From Broadway with Love: A Benefit Concert for Sandy Hook,” including the performers and ticket information, turn to Page 7A. >> Dance classes led by stars from Broadway will be held in Newtown on Wednesday. Find details on Page 7A.

BEWARE OF DOGS
UCONN COACH KEVIN OLLIE HAPPY TO GET INTENSITY FROM HIS PLAYERS, PAGE 1C

Sometimes, a little song and dance helps audiences escape their troubles, however fleetingly. It is part of the arts’ aim: to suspend reality and transport people into alternate worlds. With entertainment’s transcendent capacity in mind — and a desire to do something in the wake of senseless tragedy — an impressive array of Broadway stars has signed on to perform at a Jan. 28 concert that aims to uplift and raise money for those affected by the Dec. 14 shooting at Newtown’s Sandy Hook Elementary School. On Monday, a veteran Broadway producer and an up-andcoming writer, both with Connecticut ties, announced plans to bring at least two dozen per-

EXPERTS OFFER ADVICE ON HEALING A CHILD’S PSYCHOLOGICAL WOUNDS
BY RICK HARRISON
REPUBLICAN-AMERICAN

formers — many Tony Award winners and nominees — who will lend their voices to a benefit dubbed “From Broadway with Love: A Benefit Concert for Sandy Hook.” The show, at Waterbury’s Palace Theater, offers a free night of entertainment to impacted families, first responSee SHOW, Page 7A

NEWTOWN — A new year in Newtown. As the holiday glow and international media spotlight fade, they leave behind lives still shattered by a senseless spray of bullets. And for the children who survived or lost siblings in the Dec. 14 massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School, >> List of common now begins the hard work of living childhood responses to trauma, Page 7A. again. “Most of the time, what would be is that people have an incredible amount of resilience,” said Dr. Sander Koyfman, the medical director of Adult Inpatient Psychiatry at Kings County Hospital in New See HEAL, Page 7A

No action yet on city salaries
Waterbury aldermen decided to take no action Monday night on proposed increases to salary ranges for some high-ranking jobs with the city. PAGE 1B

SEEKING A CURE UNDERWATER

Malloy says NHL talk on ice
Gov. Dannel P. Malloy denies a report that says he’s formed a group to explore bringing the NHL back to the state. But he admits there have been discussions about it. PAGE 3C

Foreclosures lead to penalties
Ten major banks agreed to pay $8.5 billion to settle federal complaints that they foreclosed on homeowners who should have been allowed to stay in the homes. PAGE 8C

Espinosa named to high court
Gov. Dannel P. Malloy furthered his pledge to diversify Connecticut’s judiciary by naming Carmen Espinosa of Southington to the state’s Supreme Court. PAGE 3A

Girl: Black dogs need respect
A 12-year-old girl says she started a club to raise awareness of bias against animals with black fur and get more of them out of shelters and into adoptive homes. PAGE 6D

OPINION OF THE DAY: “Do we prohibit SUVs because some get used in crimes? Or demand police permits to buy alcohol because drunk drivers kill thousands across the country? Yet when a gun is used, the attention shifts from the doer to the instrument.” — Joe Tampellini, Naugatuck
READ THE FULL LETTER ON PAGE 6A

JIM SHANNON REPUBLICAN-AMERICAN

Marcy J. Balunas, assistant professor in medicinal chemistry at the University of Connecticut School of Pharmacy in Storrs, has discovered a compound in algae in the Pacific Ocean that has tested well as a possible cancer treatment.

UConn scientist seeking cancer fighter in algae
BY ALIA MALIK
REPUBLICAN-AMERICAN

WEB EXTRAS
TO DAY AT R E P -A M .CO M >> HIGH SCHOOL HOOPS
Photo galleries from two girls’ games: Kennedy vs. St. Paul, at left, and Wolcott Tech vs. Goodwin Tech. >> WORTH REPEATING “All of this while they attempt to raise my property taxes a considerable amount.” — posted by Resident on the story “Aldermen to consider pay raises tonight.”

STORRS — Marcy Balunas learned to scuba dive one December in a quarry in Ohio. That freezing cold day, along with a doctorate and years of scientific experience, prepared Balunas to discover a chemical compound in blue-green algae that could become highly effective in fighting cancer. The discovery is an example of a new focus in medicinal science, which has always found

healing properties in plants but is now also testing underwater life. “The state of natural products research is moving toward the marine world, but also moving toward microorganisms,” said Balunas, an assistant professor in medicinal chemistry at the University of Connecticut School of Pharmacy. The discovery of santacruzamate A, which can suppress some cancers by inhibiting enzymes, is a victory for Balu-

nas as she works toward a cure for the illness that killed her mother and grandmother. Balunas was in sixth grade when her grandmother died of breast cancer, and she was 26, completing her master’s degree in plant ecology, when her mother succumbed to the same disease. Six months after her mother’s death, Balunas carried the Olympic torch in her memory, and she later changed the direction of her work. See CURE, Page 8A

JIM SHANNON REPUBLICAN-AMERICAN

Marcy J. Balunas shows some cold obligate organisms grown from bacteria found in glaciers in Alaska.

REPUBLICAN-AMERICAN

43 Low 24
High

Sunny and mild next few days; reaching 50 degrees by Saturday. Page 8A

Mom goes viral with son’s phone code of conduct
BY LEANNE ITALIE
ASSOCIATED PRESS

Annie’sMailbox 12D Business 8C Classified 6B Comics 10-11D Crossword 9D Editorials 6A

Horoscope 12D Jumble 9D Lottery 2A Movie theaters 13D Obituaries 4-5B People 13D

Public record 2A Sports 1C Stocks 7C Sudoku 9D Television 14-15D Women 1D

40 pages. © 2013 Republican-American Established 1881, Waterbury, Connecticut All rights reserved

6

34373 12494

2

Read today’s editions online at rep-am.com

>> Read Janell Burley Hofmann’s rules regarding her son’s new iPhone on Page 8A.

NEW YORK — Janell Burley Hofmann honored her 13-yearold son’s “maturity and growth” at Christmas with his first iPhone, but it came with strings attached. Eighteen strings, to be exact, in a written code of conduct that placed the mommy blogger at the center of the debate over how parents should handle technology in the hands of their teens, especially younger ones just entering the frenetic world of social networks and smartphones. Thousands of people, includ-

ing those bemoaning too much helicopter parenting, commented and shared the funny, heartfelt agreement posted at the holiday by the Cape Cod, Mass., mom of five. The interest crashed her website and led her to appear with her eldest, Gregory, on morning TV. Hofmann’s first order of business: “1. It is my phone. I bought it. I pay for it. I am loaning it to you. Aren’t I the greatest?” She included caveats that some parenting and tech addiction experts consider crucial in easing new entrants onto Facebook, Instagram and shiny new mobile devices:

You must share passwords with a parent, answer their calls, hand over said device early on school nights and a little later on weekends. You must avoid hurtful texts and porn and pay for a replacement if your phone “falls into the toilet, smashes on the ground, or vanishes into thin air.” Of the latter Hofmann advises her teen, “Mow a lawn, stash some birthday money. It will happen, you should be prepared.” Hofmann said in an interview that she decided on the contract as she pondered the power of the technology she and her hus-

See RULES, Page 8A

Master your semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Special offer for students: Only $4.99/month.

Master your semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Cancel anytime.