You are on page 1of 17

MANNER OF ARTICULATION

9/22

Recap

So far, weve seen two dierent ways to describe sounds:

What is the state of the glottis? Is the sound voiced or voiceless?


[p] [b] [n]

What is the place of articulation?


[p] [t] [k]


2

Recap

Some sounds are the same for voicing, but have a dierent place of articulation:

[p] and [t]

Both voiceless, but [p] is bilabial and [t] is alveolar

[z] and [g]

Both voiced, but [z] is alveolar and [g] is velar

Recap

Some sounds have the same place of articulation, but dier in voicing

[p] and [b]

Both bilabial, but [p] is voiceless and [b] is voiced

[z] and [t]

Both are alveolar, but [z] is voiced and [t] is voiceless

Manner of Articulation

Today, well learn about a third way to describe sounds: their manner of articulation [d], [n], and [z] are all voiced alveolar sounds What makes them dierent sounds? (video) eir manner of articulation is dierent.

[t] is a stop (complete closure) [s] is a fricative (incomplete closure)


5

Manner of Articulation

Manner of articulation: the various con gurations produced by positioning the lips, tongue, velum, and glottis in dierent ways.

Oral vs. nasal Stops Fricatives Aricates Liquids Glides


6

Manner of ArticulationIPA

Oral vs. nasal


e velum: so part at the back of the mouth behind the uvula. e velum can be raised and lowered. When raised: blocks air ow through the nasal passage (the nose) oral sounds When lowered: air ows through the nasal passage nasal sounds

Why does the doctor ask you to say ahhh?


8

Oral vs. nasal

Look at the animations of [p] and [m] on the UIowa Phonetics Website. http://www.uiowa.edu/~acadtech/phonetics/english/ english_main.swf

Oral vs. nasal

Nasal consonants in English:

[m]:

bilabial nasal, as in map

[n]:

alveolar nasal, as in nap

[]:

velar nasal, as in sang

Vowels can be nasal too (dont worry about this for now)

Camp, bank, wink nasal leak What happens when you have a cold?
10

Stops

Stops: consonants made with a complete closure either in the oral cavity or in the glottis.

English stops: bilabial, alveolar, velar, glottal

Try holding the sounds [p], [t] and [k]: what happens to the air ow?

11

Stops

Oral stops: complete closure in the oral cavity and the velum is raised.

Oral stops: [p, t, k, b, d, g]

Glottal stop: [] complete closure in the glottis.

Always voiceless

Nasal stops: complete closure in the oral cavity, but the velum is raised. Air escapes through the nasal passage.

Nasal stops: [m, n, ] More sonorous than other stops (louder, more intense): air ow is not as restricted. Always voiced
12

Stops

Look at the animations of stops on the UIowa Phonetics Website. http://www.uiowa.edu/~acadtech/phonetics/english/ english_main.swf

13

Stops of English

Bilabial Oral Voiceless Voiced Nasal (Voiced) [p] [b] [m]

Alveolar [t] [d] [n]

Velar [k] [g] []

Glottal []

14

Fricatives

Fricative: consonants made with a continuous air ow through the mouth, accompanied by a continuous audible noise.

Can be held for a long period of time noisy, white noise Can be voiced or voiceless Never nasal (why?) Fricatives: [f, v, , , s, z, , , h]
15

Fricatives

Look at the animations of fricatives on the UIowa Phonetics Website. http://www.uiowa.edu/~acadtech/phonetics/english/ english_main.swf

16

Fricatives of English

Labiodental Voiceless Voiced [f ] [v]

Interdental [ ] []

Alveolar [s] [z]

Alveopalatal [] []

Glottal []

17