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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Thursday • June 27, 2013 • Vol XII, Edition 269
CAT-AND-MOUSE
NATION PAGE 16
UPSETS AT
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Supreme Court gives gay
marriage a historic boost
A big step for civil rights
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — In a historic day for gay rights,
the Supreme Court gave the nation’s legally married
gay couples equal federal footing with all other mar-
ried Americans on Wednesday and also cleared the way
for same-sex marriages to resume in California.
In deciding its first cases on the issue, the high
court did not issue the sweeping declaration sought
by gay rights advocates that would have allowed
same-sex couples to marry anywhere in the country.
But in two rulings, both by bare 5-4
majorities, the justices gave gay
marriage supporters encouragement
in confronting the nationwide patch-
work of laws that outlaw such unions
in roughly three dozen states.
Gay-rights supporters cheered and
hugged outside the court. Opponents
said they mourned the rulings and vowed to keep up
their fight .
In the first of the narrow rulings in its final session
of the term, the court wiped away part of a federal
anti-gay marriage law, the Defense of Marriage Act,
that has kept legally married same-sex couples from
receiving tax, health and pension benefits that are
otherwise available to married couples.
Justice Anthony Kennedy, joined by the four liber-
al justices, said the purpose of the law was to impose
a disadvantage and “a stigma upon all who enter into
•THERULING:The court’s 5-to-4 majority
ruled the sponsors of California’s voter-
approved ban, known as Proposition 8,
did not have legal authority to defend the
measure once state officials refused to do
so.In so doing,the justices let stand a lower
court decision that invalidated Proposition
8 as a violation of the civil rights of gay
Californians.
• NEXT STEPS: Gov. Jerry Brown and
Attorney General Kamala Harris already
have informed California’s 58 county clerks
that they must issue marriage licenses to
gay couples as soon as certain procedural
steps are taken by the courts.For example,
the 9th U.S.Circuit Court of Appeals must
rescind its 2009 order requiring the state
to continue enforcing Proposition 8 while
the case remained on appeal.
•WHITHER THE WEDDINGS: It likely will
be at least 25 days before the 9th Circuit
decides whether to let gay marriages
resume. That’s how long Proposition 8
sponsors have to ask the Supreme Court
to reconsider its decision on the legal
authority of the sponsors to defend the
initiative.It’s unlikely the high court would
grant such a rehearing. Further
complicating matters is that lawyers for
the ban’s backers insist the high court’s
decision only legalized marriages for the
two couples who sued to overturn
Proposition 8. They could go back to court
to argue that point and potentially further
delay statewide gay marriage.
• NEWLYWEDS NO MORE: During the
five-month window in 2008 between the
time gay marriage was legalized in
California and Proposition 8 passed, an
Decision details
Court rulingpraised,
but not by everyone
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The Supreme Court’s ruling on Proposition 8 and
the federal Defense of Marriage Act was much wel-
come news for local marriage-equality advocates but
many said the ruling did not go far enough and other
non-supporters blasted the ruling outright.
The Rev. Terri Echelbarger with the Peninsula
Metropolitan Community Church in San Mateo has a
large congregation of gays and lesbians, many who
attended an early evening rally in Redwood City yes-
terday to celebrate the ruling.
“This is an awesome day for California and the
other 12 states that recognize same-sex marriage. It’s
one more step for equality, we can celebrate. And,
there are still 37 states that treat its gay and lesbian
citizens as unequal citizens,” Echelbarger wrote the
Daily Journal in an email before yesterday’s rally.
“God does not discriminate but our nation still does?”
While the San Francisco Bay Area may have some
of the most welcoming churches for gays and les-
bians anywhere in the world, not all clergy in the area
appreciated yesterday’s ruling, however.
Rally features joy, reflection
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
“Love and justice” was the chant Joy
Caneda from San Bruno asked the crowd
in Redwood City to join yesterday
evening.
Caneda married her wife, Catherine
Monta, in California in 2008 during the
short window when it was legal. On
Wednesday evening, the moms brought
their children — 11-year-old Julian and 2-
year-old Alex — to the steps of the San
Mateo County Clerk’s Office in Redwood
City. They were gathered before the doors
a couple enters to get a marriage license.
They were there to celebrate the Supreme
Court’s decision to support gay marriage,
and speakers took turns sharing their
feelings as part of a short, after-work
rally put on by the mid SF Peninsula
Chapter of Marriage Equality USA. The
See RULING, Page 6
See RIGHTS, Page 20
See REACTION, Page 6
Gathering highlights
long wait for equality
DAYNA ALPINE/DAILY JOURNAL
Left, Pat Watson and Michelle Hedding celebrate the Supreme Court’s ruling to allow
same-sex marriages in California with other local supporters,top right.Below right,Carol
Cook and Susan Grieger show their wedding bands. They have had three ceremonies
and look forward to a final one now that the court has allowed it in the state.
ANDREW SCHEINER/DAILY JOURNAL
Sue Rochman,Robin Romdalvik and Maddox Rochman-Romdalvik react to news that the U.S.
Supreme Court allowed same-sex marriage in California yesterday at San Francisco City Hall.
Opinionpage 9
Inside
• San Mateo
County’s own
scrapbook
of history
See RALLY, Page 6
Stars react to Supreme
Court gay-marriage rulings
LOS ANGELES — Hollywood has
long been a vocal supporter of mar-
riage equality, with some stars —
including Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie
— saying they’d hold off on tying the
knot until the right to wed was extend-
ed to all Americans.
With Wednesday’s Supreme Court
rulings striking down the federal
Defense of Marriage Act and clearing
the way for same-sex marriages to
resume in California, stars went
online to share their elation:
• “Big news from the Supreme Court.
Goodbye (hash)DOMA (hash)Prop8.
Hello (hash)equality.” — Ben Affleck.
• “Historic day. Well done
(hash)SCOTUS.” — Leonardo
DiCaprio.
• “I look forward
to exercising my
American civil lib-
erties... and getting
fully, completely
and legally married
this year to my true
love of over three
years, Linda
Wallem.” —
Melissa Etheridge
in announcing her
engagement.
• “It’s a supremely wonderful day for
equality. Prop 8 is over, and so is
DOMA. Congratulations everyone.
And I mean every-
one.” — Ellen
DeGeneres.
• “(hash)Prop8 is
no more. Marriage
equality & the free-
dom so many
sought is here. At
the end of the day
we are ALL people
who deserve equali-
ty!” — Marlee
Matlin.
• “(at)daxshepard1 will you marry
me? Xo (hash)marriageequality
(hash)loveislove” — Kristen Bell to
her fiance, Dax Shepard. The couple
previously said they’d wait to wed
until it was legal for everyone.
• “After many prayers and tears, A
historic day for Justice and Equality
for ALL. Goodbye (hash)DOMA
Goodbye (hash)Prop8 Hello Love.” —
Pauley Perrette.
• “We stand tall
today.(hash)DomaStruckDown So
many fought for so long. Be proud, the
prejudice are now the minority.” —
Lady Gaga.
• “Remember the old days when
(hash)DOMA was around and gay peo-
ple couldn’t get married in California?
Crazy right!?” — Jesse Tyler Ferguson
of “Modern Family. ”
• “I am standing on the right side of
history. I stand with (at)HRC for mar-
riage equality. (hash)SCOTUS
(hash)time4marriage” — Alicia Keys,
who included a
link to the Human
R i g h t s
Campaign’s web-
site.
• “Awesome,
awesome day to be
an American. Yay,
marriage equali-
ty!!!!! Knew it was
coming. Glad it
was today. Congrats, Us!” — Martha
Plimpton.
• “Today my heart soars, and my
faith in the promise of our great nation
is renewed. Now, if there’s anything
we gays know how to do well, it is to
celebrate! Let the joy of this day ring
out with PRIDE.” — George Takei, on
Facebook.
• “Today, we celebrate. Tomorrow,
we keep working for full equality for
all and to bring the freedom to marry
for gay couples to the 37 states that
still remain.” — Statement from
Cyndi Lauper, founder of the True
Colors Fund to end homelessness for
lesbian, gay and transgender youth.
• “LOVE WINS X LOVE WINS X
LOVE WINS X LOVE WINS X LOVE
WINS ? LOVE WINS!!! X (hash)mar-
riageequality (hash)equality
(hash)love (hash)SCOTUS” — Sophia
Bush.
• “Yeah, marriage equality!!!! On our
way! (hash)PeopleLikeUs
(hash)TieItUp” — Kelly Clarkson.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Thursday • June 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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Actor Tobey
Maguire is 38.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1963
President John F. Kennedy spent the
first full day of a visit to Ireland, the
land of his ancestors, stopping by the
County Wexford home of his great-
grandfather, Patrick Kennedy, who’d
emigrated to America in 1848.
“A man, after he has brushed off the dust
and chips of his life, will have left only the
hard, clean question: Was it good or was it
evil? Have I done well — or ill?”
— John Steinbeck, American author (1902-1968)
Fashion designer
Vera Wang is 64.
Khloe Kardashian
is 29.
Birthdays
REUTERS
An aerial view of Popocatepetl volcano spewing a column of smoke and ash 4,921 feet high into the sky, in the outskirts of
Puebla is seen in this picture provided by Mexico's National Disaster Prevention Center.
Thursday: Partly cloudy in the morning
then becoming sunny. Patchy fog in the
morning. Highs in the 70s to lower 80s.
West winds around 5 mph increasing to
northwest 10 to 20 mph in the afternoon.
Thursday night: Clear in the evening
then becoming partly cloudy. Patchy fog
after midnight. Lows in the mid 50s to
lower 60s. West winds 10 to 20 mph...Becoming 5 to 10
mph after midnight.
Friday: Mostly cloudy in the morning then becoming
sunny. Patchy fog in the morning. Highs in the 70s to mid
80s. West winds 5 to 15 mph.
Friday night: Mostly clear in the evening then becoming
partly cloudy. Lows in the mid 50s to lower 60s. Southwest
winds 5 to 15 mph.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
(Answers tomorrow)
IDIOT GLOAT HERMIT BOTANY
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: The lobster was this at the prospect of becom-
ing someone’s dinner — BOILING MAD
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
EAROP
FEYTH
EBUCON
MUCSAP
©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
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Print your
answer here:
0 7 8
1 18 33 39 46 33
Powerball
June 26 Powerball
4 20 26 31 36
June 26 Super Lotto Plus
Daily Four
30 24 34 36
Fantasy Five
8 7 1
Daily three midday
In 1787, English historian Edward Gibbon completed work
on his six-volume work, “The History of the Decline and
Fall of the Roman Empire.”
In 1844, Mormon leader Joseph Smith and his brother,
Hyrum, were killed by a mob in Carthage, Ill.
In 1846, New York and Boston were linked by telegraph
wires.
In 1893, the New York stock market crashed.
In 1922, the first Newberry Medal, recognizing excellence
in children’s literature, was awarded in Detroit to “The Story
of Mankind” by Hendrik Willem van Loon.
In 1942, the FBI announced the arrests of eight Nazi sabo-
teurs put ashore in Florida and Long Island, N.Y. (All were
tried and sentenced to death; six were executed while two
were spared for turning themselves in and cooperating with
U.S. authorities.)
In 1944, during World War II, American forces liberated the
French port of Cherbourg from the Germans.
In 1950, the U.N. Security Council passed a resolution call-
ing on member nations to help South Korea repel an inva-
sion from the North.
In 1957, more than 500 people were killed when Hurricane
Audrey slammed through coastal Louisiana and Texas.
In 1977, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down state laws and
bar association rules that prohibited lawyers from advertis-
ing their fees for routine services.
In 1988, at least 56 people were killed when a commuter
train ran into a stationary train at the Gare de Lyon terminal
in Paris.
Business executive Ross Perot is 83. Former Interior
Secretary Bruce Babbitt is 75. Singer-musician Bruce
Johnston (The Beach Boys) is 71. Actress Julia Duffy is 62.
Actress Isabelle Adjani is 58. Country singer Lorrie Morgan is
54. Actor Brian Drillinger is 53. Writer-producer-director J.J.
Abrams is 47. Sen. Kelly Ayotte, R-N.H., is 45. Olympic gold
and bronze medal figure skater Viktor Petrenko is 44. TV per-
sonality Jo Frost (TV: “Supernanny”) is 43. Actor Yancey
Arias is 42. Actor Christian Kane is 39. Gospel singer Leigh
Nash is 37. Actor Drake Bell is 27. Actor Ed Westwick is 26.
Actress Madylin Sweeten is 22. Actor Chandler Riggs is 14.
3 5 28 33 51 16
Mega number
June 25 Mega Millions
0 3 2
Daily three evening
4
12
22
Mega number
In other news ...
Melissa
Etheridge
George Takei Ellen
DeGeneres
The Daily Derby race winners California Classic, No. 05, in
first place;LuckyStar,No.02,insecondplace;andGoldRush,
No. 01, in third place. The race time was clocked at 1:48.70
3
Thursday • June 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
BURLINGAME
Disturbance. Gun shots were heard on the
3000 block of Trousdale Drive before 5:54
p.m. Sunday, June 2.
Grand theft. Awork van was stolen on the
1400 block of Carmelita Avenue before
7:08 a.m. Sunday, June 2.
Disturbance. A cab driver and customer
were in a dispute over the fare on the 1800
block of Bayshore Highway before 1:03
a.m. Sunday, June 2.
Burglary. A vehicle window was smashed
and change was stolen on the 1400 block of
Lincoln Avenue before 5:44 p.m. Saturday,
June 1.
Suspi ci ous ci rcumstances. Aman asked
police to inspect jars of marijuana he found
in his daughter’s room on the 1900 block of
Garden Drive before 5:09 p.m. Saturday,
June 1.
BELMONT
Vandal i sm. Aman broke a light fixture in
a new building on Biddulph Way before 8:24
a.m. Tuesday, June 4.
Suspi ci ous person. Two men were run-
ning from officers on Biddulph Way before
2:36 a.m. Tuesday, June 4.
Theft. An iPhone was stolen on Alameda de
las Pulgas before 10:12 p.m. Monday, June
3.
Suspi ci ous person. An intoxicated
woman was disturbing residents on Belmont
Avenue before 9:18 p.m. Monday, June 3.
Arre s t . Aman was arrested for driving with
a suspended license on Ralston and Villa
avenues before 2:33 a.m. Saturday, June 1.
FOSTER CITY
Suspi ci ous person. Two men were seen
staggering in the street on Foster City
Boulevard before 5:22 a.m. Thursday, June
6.
Suspi ci ous person. Someone reported
two men were soliciting neighbors on
Foster City Boulevard before 5:42 p.m.
Wednesday, June 5.
Suspi ci ous person. Aman at a bus stop
was smoking an illegal substance out of a
pipe on Chess Drive before 2:13 p.m.
Wednesday, June 5.
Petty theft. Someone reported $250 were
stolen from her wallet and $2500 worth of
unauthorized purchases were made from here
credit card on Lakeside Drive before 11:04
a.m. Wednesday, June 5.
Grand theft. Four gold chains, $200 cash
and two passports were stolen on Rock
Harbor Lane before 12:23 p.m. Sunday,
June 2.
I l l egal s ol i ci t i ng. A man was selling
magazines without a permit on Greenwich
Lane before 6:23 p.m. Saturday, June 1.
SAN CARLOS
Arre s t . Aman was arrested for possession
of a controlled substance and paraphernalia
on the 200 block of Exeter Avenue before
8:03 p.m. Friday, June 7.
Petty theft. Items were stolen on the 700
block of Elm Street before 11:33 a.m.
Thursday, June 6.
Arre s t s . A man and woman were arrested
for trespassing on the 100 block of Manor
Drive before 10:29 a.m. Thursday, June 6.
Suspended l i cense. Aman was cited and
released for driving with a suspended license
on the 1200 block of Laurel Street before
9:45 p.m. Wednesday, June 5.
Burglary. Property was burglarized on the
2700 block of Bromley Drive before 4:54
p.m. Wednesday, June 5.
Pet t y t hef t . A man was arrested and
booked into the San Mateo County Jail for
petty theft before 1:37 p.m. Wednesday,
June 5.
Police reports
That dog better hold it
A man threatened to shoot a woman if
her dog urinated on his lawn on the
1100 block of Bayswater Avenue in
Burlingame before 1:35 p.m. Sunday,
June 2.
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Draper University of Heroes is welcoming
its next 40 students to participate in the next
six-week class at the prestigious school for
entrepreneurs in downtown San Mateo start-
ing this week.
Among the students are three scholarship
winners that include: Alejandro Rivera — win-
ner of the Tina Seelig Scholarship; Maya Odei
— winner of the Heidi Roizen Scholarship;
and Spencer Handley — winner of the Andy
Tang Scholarship.
Rivera, a young entrepreneur from
Guatemala, impressed the selection committee
with his passion for collaborative learning,
university officials wrote in a statement.
Odei, a Stanford University student, was
selected for her aspiration to combine engi-
neering and business to become an “engi-pre-
neur.”
Handley, a student at the University at
California at Los Angeles, was chosen for his
remarkable drive and focus and his notable
entrepreneurial background which includes
fundraising and building a school in Kenya,
university officials wrote in a statement.
At the end of the immersive program, Draper
University students will participate in a busi-
ness pitch competition to a panel of venture
capitalists, where students have the opportu-
nity to obtain funding for their business.
“I am thrilled to welcome an exceptionally
strong class to Draper University this sum-
mer. We have superstars
here, these are the best and
the brightest from the best
schools in the world,” uni-
versity founder Tim Draper
wrote in a statement.
Draper is the venture
capitalist who first funded
Hotmail, Skype and Tesla
Motors.
Some of the universi-
ty’s new students includes
a YouTube maverick, a can-
cer survivor, Ph.D.s, start-
up founders, an NFL cheer-
leader, a top snowboarder,
a Division I lacrosse play-
er and a kung fu expert,
according to a press state-
ment. Countries represent-
ed by the summer class
include China, Columbia,
Ecuador, Egypt, Estonia,
Germany, Ghana,
Guatemala, India, Italy,
Mexico, Netherlands,
Sweden, Taiwan and the
United Kingdom. The class
also shows a growth in
female attendance with 31
percent, according to the
university.
Draper University is
welcoming next class
Maya Odei
Spencer
Handley
Alejandro
Rivera
4
Thursday • June 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
We Buy Gold, Jewelry,
Diamonds, Silver & Coins
Serving The Peninsula
for over 25years
Dental aide charged
with groping teen patient
A 48-year-old dental assistant at a
Redwood City office massaged a 15-year-old
female patient’s chest and groin, according
to prosecutors who charged him with five
counts of lewd acts on a child.
Gabriel Cruz Medina, of South San
Francisco, has pleaded not guilty to all
charges and, at a court conference yesterday,
confirmed a July 10 preliminary hearing
with a one-hour estimate. He also set a July
5 appearance to possibly settle the case.
Redwood City police arrested Medina in
April but the girl reported the alleged inci-
dent Nov. 19, 2012, the day she claims, dur-
ing a visit to Western Dental, he allegedly
massaged her breast and touched her genital
area several times over her clothing.
Medina is free from custody on $25,000
bail. If convicted, he faces approximately
five years in prison, according to District
Attorney Steve Wagstaffe.
Shark bites kayak off Pacifica beach
Warning notices have been posted at the
Pacifica State Beach yesterday after a man in
a kayak fishing off the coast said a shark bit
his boat before swimming away.
Pacifica Police Chief Jim Tasa said in a
report that the attack occurred around 4:55
p.m. Tuesday when the uninjured man in a
kayak called police.
The victim said a shark bit the kayak then
briefly circled the watercraft before swim-
ming away. The victim in the kayak was
able to return to shore unharmed, according
to Tasa.
The Pacifica Department of Public Works
posted signs at the beach yesterday warning
of the incident, but the attack occurred out-
side the area where surfers and swimmers
tend to frequent.
The beach will be monitored nonetheless,
Tasa reported.
New interim fire chief
named in Menlo Park
Anew interim fire chief has been named in
the Menlo Park Fire Protection District, the
second in less than two months to head the
department while the fire
chief recoveries from
injuries he received from
an off-duty fall.
Retired San Mateo-
Foster City fire chief
Daniel Belville will
assume his new position
on July 8, according to
an announcement yester-
day by the Menlo Park
Fire Protection District.
Current Interim Fire Chief Doug
Sporleder, who stepped in following Chief
Harold Schapelhouman’s May 11 fall and
subsequent back surgery, appointed Belville
on Monday.
At this time, officials report there is no
anticipated time of return for
Schapelhouman.
The Menlo Park Fire Protection District
provides emergency, medical and fire pre-
vention services to the town of Atherton
and the cities of East Palo Alto and Menlo
Park, as well as portions of unincorporated
San Mateo County.
Natural gas to be
vented in San Carlos
Pacific Gas and Electric will be conducting
natural gas venting throughout the day at
Commercial Street and Old County Road in
San Carlos, according to the utility.
This will allow PG&E crews to safely
complete work on the new automated valve
that they are in the process of installing at
this location. The venting of natural gas
will occur at various times throughout the
day for short intervals, according to the
utility.
PG&E officials say there may be the smell
of natural gas in the air. Anyone with ques-
tions or concerns is asked to call 1-800-
743-5000.
Local briefs
Daniel Belville
By Terry Collins
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — San Francisco Bay Area
Rapid Transit workers moved a step closer
to a work stoppage after voting overwhelm-
ingly to allow union officials to call a strike
if contract negotiations fail, union leaders
said Wednesday.
Members of BART’s two largest unions
representing train operators, mechanics,
station agents and maintenance workers
voted Tuesday to authorize a potential
strike, union officials said.
More than 98 percent of voting members
of the Service Employees International
Union, Local 1021 and 99.9 percent voters
from the Amalgamated Transit Union, Local
1555, approved a strike vote.
Despite the vote, the two unions repre-
senting some 2,300 members say they’re
committed to negotiating a new contract
with BARTand currently have no immediate
plans to walk out after their contract expires
late Sunday night.
“We’re not trying to strand the Bay Area,”
said ATU Local President Antonette Bryant
before heading to another bargaining ses-
sion. “All we want is fair compensation and
a safe workplace.”
A new strike would affect hundreds of
thousands of daily commuters, virtually
affecting every mode of transportation
throughout the Bay Area.
Jim Wunderman, president and CEO of the
Bay Area Council, a business advocacy
organization, said when BART’s last strike
occurred in 1997 for six days, 275,000
commuters were affected, causing untold
misery. Now about 400,000 riders use BART
each weekday.
A transit stoppage would bring “serious
pain,” Wunderman added, especially to
those who live in the East Bay and work in
San Francisco, the Peninsula and Silicon
Valley.
“ABART strike would be disastrous, crip-
pling our transportation system and eco-
nomically paralyzing the entire region,”
Wunderman said. “Employers should pre-
pare for the worst, and BARTand the unions
should buckle down and get a contract
done.”
In the event of a strike, the Metropolitan
Transportation Commission plans to help
increase other transportation options such
as buses and ferries. This, despite the union
representing some 1,800 Alameda-Contra
Costa Transit workers could also go on
strike as early as next week as its contract
also expires on Sunday.
BART spokesman Rick Rice said
Wednesday that its unions’ strike authoriza-
tion vote was expected.
“We’re prepared to negotiate as much and
as often and as long as they want to,” Rice
said. “We’ll continue to work to get a deal
done.”
The unions are asking for raises adding up
to about 23.2 percent over three years.
BART has offered 1 percent raises, contin-
gent on the agency meeting economic
goals, in each year of the four-year contract
it’s proposed.
“We’ve still got a lot of talking to do,”
Rice said referring to the huge gap concern-
ing pay.
The unions also say they’re fighting man-
agement’s efforts to have workers con-
tribute to pensions, pay more for health
insurance, and help reduce overtime expens-
es.
The opposing parties remain optimistic
however that a deal can be reached, despite
the unions’ filing a lawsuit on Monday
against BART seeking an unfair labor prac-
tices declaration and claims the transit
agency is not bargaining in good faith.
Employees currently pay a flat $92 fee
each month for health insurance, no matter
the plan or how many people are covered.
Rice said the agency wants to increase that
payment, but he offered no details on an
amount.
BART workers authorize strike
5
Thursday • June 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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Florence (Betty) Rowe
Florence (Betty) Rowe, 86, of Redwood
City, died at Kaiser Hospital in Redwood
City the morning of June 24, 2013.
She was born Feb. 26, 1927 to Jake and
Marie Berger near Watford City, N.D. Her
family moved to Vernonia, Ore., where she
graduated from high
school in 1945.
After graduation, Betty
moved to Portland, Ore.
and worked as a tele-
phone operator and then
as a secretary until she
met Paul Rowe. Paul and
Betty married at Zion
Lutheran Church in
Portland Aug. 23, 1952.
They moved to San
Bruno with their first daughter, Lynn, in
1955. After their daughters Karen and Terry
were born, they moved to Redwood City in
1962. Betty worked at home taking care of
her family. She sewed all her daughters’
clothing and loved baking treats. Always
active, she participated in her church
Ladies’ Guild and enjoyed square, country
and ballroom dancing. She traveled widely,
fulfilling her dream of seeing Africa.
Betty is survived by her husband Paul,
three daughters, Lynn Curry (with husband
Daniel), Karen Rowe, and Terry Rowe;
granddaughters Rose Stassart and Angela
Fuller; great grandchildren Mackenzie and
Zane and Joanne Hodgson of Forest Grove,
Ore., her only surviving sibling.
Obituary
Florence (Betty)
Rowe
CITY GOVERNMENT
• Thinking about
feeding the birds in
Mi l l brae? Unless
those are birds you
own, don’t. On
Tuesday, the Ci t y
Counci l approved a
new ordinance banning the feeding of birds
within the city limits, with the exception of
pets owned by the person who is feeding
them.
EDUCATION
• On Tuesday, the San Mateo Union
Hi gh School Di st ri ct Board of
Trustees studied the financing options for
executing what’s left of two voter-approved
bond measures — M and O. No decisions
were made but the topic will be brought back
before the board in August or September
when there is more information about the
cost of the remaining projects. It was also
an opportunity for the board to weigh in on
the priority of projects. Lastly, the board
directed staff to be sure to communicate the
work with the public and gather input.
“Military spouses will no longer
be denied base services be-
cause they are lesbian or gay.
Binational married couples will
no longer be split apart by our
immigration laws. Federal
workers will finally be able to
provide health insurance for
their families. For Edith Wind-
sor, the widow who brought
this case to the Supreme Court,
today’s decision means the fed-
eral government must refund
the extra $363,000 she paid in
taxes after the death of her wife — her partner of 40
years.”
— U.S. Rep. Jackie Speier, D-San Mateo.
***
“Generations of Americans have fought for the preem-
inent promise of our country — that every person is
afforded the same fundamental rights as stated in our
Constitution, with the promise of liberty and justice for
all.Today,the decisions of the Supreme Court make real
the words and the promise of our Constitution by strik-
ing down unfair barriers for same-sex couples and
returning marriage equality to California. Now, the full-
ness of our Constitution reaches into the lives of millions
of Americans,making our nation a more perfect union.”
— U.S. Rep. Anna G. Eshoo, D-Palo Alto
***
“This is a great day in America.Today’s rulings are a major
step forward in ensuring equality for all.This should send
a strong message to those supporting intolerant policies
that,in a civilized society,we need to treat everyone with
dignity and respect regardless of who they love.
“This will clear the way for same sex couples to receive
the same legal protections,health benefits,tax benefits,
and pension benefits as more
traditional couples. My bill AB
373 fixes this for CalPERS long-
term care policies. There will
likely need to be more expan-
sive pieces of legislation
conforming other benefits to
account for this historic ruling.”
— Assemblyman
Kevin Mullin,
D-South San Francisco
***
“It’s a wonderful day for Cali-
fornians who believe in equal
rights for all. In 2008, Proposition 8 stripped the right to
marry from LGBT citizens, while DOMA imposed an un-
precedented standard that allowed states to ignore
marriage contracts formed elsewhere in our nation.
Today, the Supreme Court has reaffirmed the funda-
mental ideas our nation was founded upon and taken
a step towards equality and fairness. Now that the laws
that held same sex couples apart have been found un-
constitutional,we can finally live up to our creed that all
people are created equal. I look forward to again offici-
ating at weddings for all couples who wish to marry,this
time knowing that their right is here to stay.”
— State Sen. Leland Yee,
D-San Francisco/San Mateo
***
“Today’s decisions are defining moments for our coun-
try, landmark affirmations of basic civil rights by our
nation’s highest court and long sought victories for thou-
sands of couples who wish to honor their commitment
to one another through the institution of marriage.
“By striking down DOMA and ending the exclusion of
California’s same-sex couples and their families from
marriage, the court’s decisions further fulfill the great
promise of our Constitution and Declaration of Inde-
pendence that all men and women are created equal
and as such must be treated equally under the law.
“This day could not have arrived
without the courageous efforts
of civil rights pioneers who
bravely fought for legal recog-
nition of our rights and
humanity.Today we pay tribute
to them, knowing they have
helped pave the way for millions
of LGBT people to live happier
and more fulfilled lives, which
will only benefit their families
and the rest of society.”
— State Sen. Mark Leno, D-
San Francisco
***
“But the biggest issue is adoption. All statistics show
that children do best raised by their biological parents.
Adopted kids do best when raised by parents of oppo-
site sex. Kids being adopted into gay families will suffer
the most.”
—The Rev. Brad Allen with the Victory Interna-
tional Church in San Mateo
***
“Marriage equality has been a priority and a dream of the
LGBT community for decades.Today,with the Supreme
Court’s announcements, we are realizing that dream
and we now celebrate equal marriage rights for all Cal-
ifornians.”
— Assemblyman Rich Gordon, D-Menlo Park
***
“San Francisco looks forward to hosting weddings and
celebrations for all loving couples.There is no city more
romantic than ours. People from all over the world rec-
ognize the values that we have always stood for and
today’s decision confirms those so-called ‘San Francisco
values’of understanding and acceptance.We hope some
of those couples who were married here in 2004 will
come back soon for their 10th anniversary and we look
forward to welcoming many more.”
—The San FranciscoTravel Association
Local reactions
Jackie Speier
Kevin Mullin Mark Leno
By Paul Elias
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Gays might soon be
able to marry in California because the gov-
ernor and attorney general refused to defend
the will of voters.
That was the upshot of the U.S. Supreme
Court decision on Wednesday that cleared the
way for gay marriage to resume in the state.
The narrow ruling said private citizens could-
n’t defend the state’s voter-approved ban on
gay marriage known as Proposition 8, even
after government officials refused to do so.
That legal technicality has left many won-
dering about future hot-button ballot meas-
ures passed by voters but undone in court
when politicians refuse to fight for them.
When U.S. District Judge Vaughn Walker
struck down the marriage ban in 2010,
California’s governor and attorney general
refused to appeal the decision, saying they
viewed Proposition 8 as violating the civil
rights of gays.
The California Supreme Court later told the
9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals that state
law allows private citizens to stand-in for
elected officials to defend ballot measures, so
the federal appeals court allowed Proposition
8 backers to argue for the marriage ban in a
lawsuit filed by two gay couples.
The 9th Circuit then struck down
Proposition 8. And when Gov. Jerry Brown
and Attorney General Kamala Harris again
refused to appeal, supporters of the ban
appealed to the Supreme Court for its
approval to defend the ban.
On Wednesday, Chief Justice John Roberts
said the 9th Circuit was wrong to allow pri-
vate citizens to defend a state law passed by
voters, and the high court declined to rule on
the merits of the appeal. That left the lower
court’s decision to strike down Proposition 8
in place, which means gay marriages could
soon resume.
“We have never before upheld the standing
of a private party to defend the constitution-
ality of a state statute when state officials
have chosen not to,” wrote Roberts, who
was joined by Justices Antonin Scalia,
Stephen Breyer, Elena Kagan and Ruth Bader
Ginsburg. “We decline to do so for the first
time here.”
Harold Johnson, a lawyer with the Pacific
Legal Foundation, which helped argue for
Proposition 8 before the Supreme Court,
called the ruling a major blow to California’s
initiative process.
“Whether one opposes or supports
Proposition 8, it’s disturbing that the U.S.
Supreme Court has seriously undercut
California’s venerable institutions of direct
democracy,” Johnson said. “In essence, this
ruling lets elected officials pull the plug on
duly enacted initiatives simply by refusing
to defend them against federal lawsuits.”
Some legal scholars and others say
California and other states with similar
voter-backed ballot measures might have to
tweak how such elections are regulated to
ensure the results are properly represented in
legal actions.
“It’s an interesting and serious legal ques-
tion,” said California Lt. Gov. Gavin
Newsom, who as San Francisco’s mayor
sparked the gay marriage debate in the state
when he ordered same-sex marriages to be
performed in 2004. “I’m obviously ecstatic
with the outcome. But it is a legitimate legal
question.”
Newsom said he couldn’t think of any
other California ballot measure abandoned
by state officials in the face of a legal chal-
lenge.
Rare as those cases may be, several legal
scholars did suggest the appointment of a
special counsel to defend legal challenges to
ballot measures when no other government
official steps forward.
“States need to consider adopting laws to
defend ballot measures,” said Erwin
Chemerinsky, dean of the University of
California, Irvine law school. Chemerinsky,
who opposed the gay marriage ban, said he
supported the Supreme Court’s ruling
because Proposition 8 sponsors could not
show they suffered real harm as a result of the
measure, a requisite to establish standing in
court.
Marriage ruling raises ballot measure questions
6
Thursday • June 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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estimated 18,000 same-sex couples got married,according to the Williams
Institute,a UCLA-based think tank.The California Supreme Court upheld
the validity of those marriages in 2009, and nothing in Wednesday’s
decision changes that.
• INTERSTATETRANSFERS: Assuming the lower court decision applies
to more than two couples, same-sex couples who were legally married
in another state would have their marriages recognized if they move to
California. Proposition 8 prevented the state from either sanctioning
same-sex marriages or recognizing same-sex marriages performed
elsewhere.
Pastor Brad Allen with the Victory
International Church in San Mateo is one of
them.
“I worked on the Proposition 8 campaign and
am disappointed that a lawful and democratical-
ly enacted law was struck down as a “burden” on
the most affluent and best educated subset of the
American population. This group already, and
quite appropriately, enjoys all of the same anti-
discrimination laws that protect every other
group,” Allen wrote the Daily Journal in an
email.
Allen thinks the ruling is strongly inflation-
ary and will drive up the cost for all goods and
services because businesses will have increased
costs for additional spousal benefits.
But the biggest issue, he said, is adoption.
“All statistics show that children do best
raised by their biological parents. Adopted kids
do best when raised by parents of opposite sex.
Kids being adopted into gay families will suffer
the most,” Allen wrote in the email.
Married couple Derrick Kikuchi and Craig
Wiesner, from San Mateo, published a chil-
dren’s picture book titled “Operation Marriage”
that tells the true story of a family with two kids
who convince their mothers to get married dur-
ing that brief window when it was legal.
It was based on a true story and shows the
impact Proposition 8 had on the family and
how the parents persevered, Wiesner said yes-
terday.
Kikuchi and Wiesner were married in their
church more than 20 years ago and then married
again legally almost 15 years later when same-
sex marriage was briefly allowed in the state for
less than five months before the passage of
Proposition 8, Nov. 5, 2008. Proposition 8
was a voter-approved ballot measure that
defined marriage as being between a man and a
woman.
Although many homosexuals in the state
took advantage of that brief window, many did
not, Wiesner told the Daily Journal yesterday.
“It was the people who were locked out that
we were most concerned about,” Wiesner said
about those couples unable to legally marry.
About 18,000 same-sex couples married in
2008.
Assemblyman Rich Gordon, D-Menlo Park,
married his husband, Dr. Dennis McShane, in
2008 and they have been a couple nearly 30
years. He is also the state’s Lesbian Gay
Bisexual and Transgender Caucus chair.
“In 2008, I had the privilege of marrying my
partner of 26 years. This was one of the greatest
days of my life, as we were finally able to stand
together and say, in front of our friends, family
and loved ones, ‘we are a family.’ This is an
experience that many loving couples have been
unjustly denied until now. We are not just a gay
couple; we are two individuals who are deeply in
love,” Gordon wrote in a statement after the
court ruling was announced.
In San Mateo County, same-sex marriage
licenses will be issued as soon as the injunction
against Proposition 8 is lifted by the Ninth
Federal Circuit Court, about 30 days, Mark
Church, the county’s chief elections officer and
assessor-county clerk-recorder wrote the Daily
Journal in an email.
Proposition 8 was put on the ballot five
months after the state Supreme Court legalized
gay marriage and four years after then San
Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom ordered the
county clerk to issue marriage licenses to same-
sex couples. The state Supreme Court annulled
the marriages, however, in August 2004.
People filled the streets of San Francisco for a
good part of the day yesterday near the Civic
Center plaza celebrating the decision and the
city’s travel association contends it will bring
even more tourists to the area.
“San Francisco is where marriage equality
began in 2004 and, through the legal ups and
downs, we have been a beloved location for
weddings, commitment ceremonies and honey-
moons ever since,” Joe D’Alessandro, presi-
dent and of the San Francisco Travel
Association wrote in a statement. “San
Francisco looks forward to hosting weddings
and celebrations for all loving couples.”
silverfarb@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Continued from page 1
RULING
Continued from page 1
REACTION
event brought together politicians,
activists and locals who supported the
ruling.
Those in the audience nodded as
Caneda explained that this meant not
having to celebrate multiple anniver-
saries. She and Monta married spiritu-
ally in 2007 then legally in 2008, but
those rights were taken from others
with Proposition 8, she said.
“There is love and justice once
again,” Caneda said of the decision.
For Mitzi Henderson, past national
president of PFLAG (Parents, Families,
& Friends of Lesbians and Gays), the
decision was the end of a long battle.
She led PFLAG in 1996 when the
Defense of Marriage Act was approved.
She testified in Congress against the
proposal noting it would take away
over a thousand rights for gay couples.
“They got it all wrong at that time,”
she said, adding it was eye-opening to
watch a government that was supposed
to work for the people not listen to her
point of view.
Wednesday’s ruling was one that
Henderson welcomed with a “hip, hip
hooray!”
For many of the people in atten-
dance, the Supreme Court support was a
validation of their family and love. It
was commonly referred to as one’s
“national recognition day. ”
Susan Takalo, co-chair of the San
Mateo County Pride initiative, has
been with her wife Glynis Takalo since
1998. The pair, who live in Pacifica,
were among the 18,000 married in
2008. They waited until it was real,
Takalo said. Their anniversary, July 5,
is just around the corner. Traditionally
they celebrate with a big Fourth of July
gathering. This year, she said, will
simply be a lot happier.
The idea of celebrating one anniver-
sary was a welcomed change for future
couples.
The Rev. Terri Echelbarger from the
Peninsula Metropolitan Community
Church rattled off the anniversaries
that she and her wife share. Most share
the same date in September but hap-
pened in different years — a side effect
of laws not recognizing their marriage.
Since Wednesday’s ruling was
announced, Echelbarger has been get-
ting calls from couples who she mar-
ried prior to it being legal who want to
do it again on their upcoming anniver-
sary.
The Rev. Bill Kennedy, community
minister at the Unitarian Universalist
Fellowship of Redwood City, told the
story of marrying two friends a few
years ago on National Coming Out
Day. But, to make it legal, the group
traveled to Canada for the ceremony.
Kennedy, at the time, questioned how
long couples would need to travel inter-
nationally to be legally married.
Wednesday’s decision to allow gay
marriage is a step forward; however it is
not yet legal in all states. As a result,
Kennedy told people to realize there is
still much work to be done.
“We, with love and determination,
will get there,” said Kennedy.
Jeffrey Adair, San Mateo County
Democratic Central Committee south-
ern vice chair, showed his ring and said
that it has even more meaning today
with federal recognition.
Redwood City native James Lee was
simply happy to not only see the
changes in rights but also that it was
being celebrated locally.
Wednesday’s decision does not mean
the fight is over. There’s a waiting peri-
od before marriage licenses can be
issued, said Steve Epstein, acting chair
of the mid SF Peninsula Chapter of
Marriage Equality USA. Epstein
encouraged those who had gathered to
stay involved and active in the weeks
to come.
heather@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
RALLY
NATION 7
Thursday • June 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Downtown Laurel Street
For more information, visit www.sancarloschamber.org
Brought to you by: Music sponsored by:
Social Media Day
Beer and Wine Sales
Music and Surprises!
No Market July 4th
San Carlos
Farmer’s Market
Thursdays 4-8pm
By Nancy Benac
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Two landmark
Supreme Court rulings that bolster
gay marriage rights don’t remove all
barriers to same-sex unions by a
long shot. Where gay couples live
still will have a lot to do with how
they’re treated.
Some questions and answers about
Wednesday’s court rulings:
Q: Can you boil down these
two big rulings — 104 pages
in all — to the basics?
A: In one case, the court said
legally married gay couples are enti-
tled to the same federal benefit s
available to straight couples. In the
other, it cleared the way for gay mar-
riages to resume in California,
where voters banned them in 2008.
Q: What type of benefits are
we talking about?
A: More than you’d expect. There
are more than 1,000 federal laws in
which marital status matters, cover-
ing everything from income and
inheritance taxes to health benefit s
and pensions. In states where gay
marriage is legal, same-sex couples
may actually be looking forward to
filing their income taxes next April
— married, filing jointly.
Q. Why does it matter where
a gay couple lives?
A: Even with Wednesday’s ruling,
where legally married gay couples
live still may affect the federal ben-
efits they can obtain, at least for
now. Social Security survivor bene-
fits, for example, depend on where a
couple is living when a spouse dies.
If that happens in a state that bans
or does not recognize the union, it’s
not for sure that the surviving
spouse will be entitled to the pay-
ments. Immigration law, mean-
while, only looks at where people
were married, not where they live.
It’s complicated.
Q: What does the U.S. mar-
ri age map l ook l i ke ri ght
now?
A: It’s a patchwork. Same-sex
marriage is legal in 12 states and the
District of Columbia — represent-
ing 18 percent of the U.S. popula-
tion. When gay marriage resumes in
California, the figure will jump to
30 percent. Twenty-nine other
states have constitutional amend-
ments that ban gay marriage. Six
states have laws that ban it. Two
states neither allow gay marriage
nor ban it.
Q: How many same-sex cou-
ples in the U.S. have been
legally married?
A: The numbers are squishy. The
Pew Research Center estimates there
have been at least 71,000 legal mar-
riages since 2004, when
Massachusetts became the first state
to legalize them, but says there are
almost certainly more. The
Williams Institute, a UCLA-based
think tank, says approximately
114,000 couples are legally married
and more than 108,000 are in civil
unions or registered domestic part-
nerships. In California alone,
18,000 same-sex couples were mar-
ried during the 142-day period when
gay unions were legal there in 2008.
Q: What’s all this talk about
DOMA?
A: DOMA is the federal Defense
of Marriage Act, enacted in 1996.
The court on Wednesday struck down
a section of that law that defines
marriage as a union between a man
and a woman for purposes of federal
law. That’s what had denied legally
married gay couples access to a host
of federal benefits and programs that
are available to straight couples.
Q: Why all of the focus
Wednesday on California?
A: The second case that the court
addressed related to a 2008 state bal-
lot proposition that added a ban on
gay marriage to the California
Constitution. The court didn’t rule
on the merits of that ballot propos-
al, but it left in place a trial court’s
declaration that the proposition is
unconstitutional. That means same-
sex weddings could resume in
California in about a month,
although a federal appeals court
there said it may continue to bar gay
marriages even longer if propo-
nents of Proposition 8 ask for a
rehearing.
Q: What more could the
Supreme Court have done?
A: Tons. It could have given gay
Americans the same constitutional
right to marry as heterosexuals.
Instead, it sidestepped the looming
question of whether banning gay
marriage is unconstitutional.
Q: How does the public feel
about gay marriage?
A: Public support has grown dra-
matically in the last few years, with
a majority now favoring legal mar-
riage for gay couples. There’s even
broader support for extending to
gay couples the same legal rights
and benefits that are available to
married straight couples. An
Associated Press-National
Constitution Center poll last fall
found 63 percent favored granting
gay couples the same legal benefit s
straight couples had. And 53 percent
favored legal recognition of same-
sex marriages.
It’s complicated: Lots to sort out on gay marriage
s
REUTERS
A couple kisses outside the Supreme Court Wednesday. Although gay marriage earned a big victory, there still
are a lot of questions that need to be answered.
STATE/NATION 8
Thursday • June 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
by
Special:
4 Speakers
Head of Vietnam-era
draft lottery dies at 88
MILWAUKEE — Curtis Tarr, the former
head of the Selective Service System who
oversaw the lottery for the draft during the
Vietnam War, has died.
Tarr died of pneumonia on Friday at his
home in Walnut Creek his daughter, Pam
Tarr, said Wednesday. He was 88.
President Richard Nixon appointed Tarr as
director of the Selective Service System in
1970. The nation had held its first lottery
drawing for the draft in December 1969, and
Tarr was responsible for implementing the
changes, said Dick Flahavan, spokesman
for the Selective Service. Before the lottery,
local draft boards had control over who was
called and who was not.
Marine murder
conviction overturned
SAN DIEGO — The military’s highest court
has overturned a murder conviction against a
Camp Pendleton Marine in one of the most
significant cases against American troops
from the Iraq war.
The Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces
on Wednesday threw out the conviction of
Sgt. Lawrence Hutchins III.
According to the ruling posted on the
court’s website, the judges agreed with
Hutchins, who claimed his constitutional
rights were violated when he was held in soli-
tary confinement without access to a lawyer
for seven days during his interrogation.
Hutchins led an eight-man squad accused of
kidnapping a retired Iraqi policeman from his
home in April 2006, marching him to a ditch
and shooting him to death in Hamdania.
The squad’s other members served less than
18 months.
State briefs
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANFORD, Fla. — Afriend who was on the
phone with 17-year-old Trayvon Martin
moments before he was fatally shot by George
Zimmerman testified that she heard the Miami
teen shout, “Get off! Get off!” before his tele-
phone went dead.
Rachel Jeantel, 19, recounted to jurors in
Zimmerman’s second-degree murder trial how
Martin told her he was being followed by a
man as he walked through the Retreat at Twin
Lakes townhome complex on his way back
from a convenience store to the home of his
father’s fiancee.
Jeantel is considered one of the prosecu-
tion’s most important witnesses because she
was the last person to talk to Martin before
his encounter with Zimmerman on Feb. 26,
2012.
She testified that Martin described the man
following him as “a creepy-ass cracker” and
he thought he had evaded him. But she said a
short time later Martin let out a profanity.
Martin said Zimmerman was behind him and
she heard Martin ask: “What are you follow-
ing me for?”
She then heard what sounded like Martin’s
phone earpiece drop into the grass and she
heard him say, “Get off! Get off!” The phone
then went dead, she said.
Zimmerman, 29, could get life in prison if
convicted of second-degree murder for killing
Martin. Zimmerman followed him in his truck
and called a police dispatch number before he
and the teen got into a fight.
Zimmerman has claimed self-defense, say-
ing he opened fire after the teenager jumped
him and began slamming his head against the
concrete sidewalk. Zimmerman identifies
himself as Hispanic and has denied that his
confrontation with the black teenager had
anything to do with race, as Martin’s family
and its supporters have claimed.
Jeantel’s testimony came after two former
neighbors of Zimmerman testified Wednesday
about hearing howls and shouts for help in the
moments before the shooting.
Jayne Surdyka told the court that immedi-
ately before the shooting, she heard an
aggressive voice and a softer voice exchang-
ing words for several minutes in an area
behind her townhome at the Retreat at Twin
Lakes.
Martin’s friend describes final phone call
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
AUSTIN, Texas — After a one-woman fil i-
buster and a raucous crowd helped derail a
GOP-led effort to restrict Texas abortions,
Gov. Rick Perry announced Wednesday that
he’s calling lawmakers back next week to
try again.
Perry ordered the Legislature to meet July
1 to begin 30 more days of work. Like the
first special session, which ended in chaos
overnight, the second one will include on
its agenda a Republican-backed plan that
critics say would close nearly every abor-
tion clinic across the state and impose other
widespread limits on the procedure.
“I am calling the Legislature back into
session because too much important work
remains undone for the people of Texas,”
Perry said in a statement. “Texans value life
and want to protect women and the unborn.”
The first session’s debate over abortion
restrictions led to the most chaotic day in
the Texas Legislature in modern history,
starting with a marathon filibuster and end-
ing with a down-to-the wire, frenetic vote
marked by questions about whether
Republicans tried to break chamber rules
and jam the measure through.
A second filibuster is harder to pull off
though, since supporters of the bill will
ensure it clear preliminary hurdles and
reaches floor votes in the House and Senate
well before the second session expires.
The governor can convene as many extra
sessions as he likes and sets the agenda of
what lawmakers can work on. Also listed on
the session’s agenda are separate bills to
boost highway funding and deal with a juve-
nile justice issue.
Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst, who oversees
the flow of legislation in the Senate, hinted
that another special session was coming
when he told lawmakers “see you soon”
after the first session adjourned.
Many of the same abortion rights groups
that staged Tuesday’s night’s protests took
to Twitter on Wednesday, promising they
had more in store.
The entire process starts over, with bills
that must be filed by individual lawmakers,
undergo a public hearing and be passed out
of committee before they can be considered
by both chambers.
After abortion setback, Texas GOP set to try again
OPINION 9
Thursday • June 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The president’s
abuse of power
Orange County Register
P
resident Barack Obama
seems intent on going it
alone these days. Whether
it’s NSAsurveillance programs,
patently unconstitutional recess
appointments (which will soon
go before the Supreme Court) or
an executive order unilaterally
implementing the DREAM Act,
the president seems increasingly
hell-bent on using presidential
power to avoid consulting with
Congress or the public.
Anew entry was added to that
list Tuesday, when Mr. Obama
delivered a speech at Georgetown
University, announcing that he is
ordering the Environmental
Protection Agency to craft rules
that regulate carbon emissions
from coal power plants. While the
details of the plan remain murky,
it’s clear that the costs of the new
regulation will be onerous - par-
ticularly to existing plants that
will have to undergo costly retro-
fitting. As is inevitably the case
with such regulatory exercises,
those costs will end up being
pushed on to consumers. They
will also, of course, bleed the coal
industry of jobs.
Any hopes that the administra-
tion’s approach may be temperate
are quickly dispelled by the mem-
ory of Mr. Obama, as a candidate
in 2008, pledging to create an
environment in which coal power
- the nation’s leading and cheap-
est source of electricity - is made
so expensive that producers are
driven into bankruptcy.
It bears remembering that this
administration previously
attempted such a sweeping
reordering of the nation’s energy
production with the cap-and-trade
bill it vigorously promoted dur-
ing the president’s first few years
in office. The potential costs of
that plan were so oppressive (the
equivalent of a 15 percent tax
hike, according to the Treasury
Department) that it failed to win
public favor or pass out of a
Congress controlled entirely by
Obama’s Democratic allies. Most
politicians would have regarded
that result as a stop sign. For Mr.
Obama, it apparently indicated
only a detour.
Despite glib assurances by the
president and his ideological
allies that climate change is a
potentially apocalyptic menace,
the reality is decidedly more com-
plex. In order to make the case
for aggressive action, one must
make a series of increasingly
specific contentions: that global
warming is occurring; that its
effects are unambiguously bale-
ful; that it is, at least in part,
man-made; that there are govern-
ment actions that can reverse its
course; and that the benefits of
those actions outweigh the costs.
If President Obama believes
each of those assertions, he
should make the case to Congress
and the nation, not just a friendly
audience on a college campus. If,
as in the past, he fails, so be it. A
fundamental reordering of the
nation’s economy cannot be
undertaken simply as a matter of
executive prerogative. The logic
of governing a democracy has to
be something more sophisticated
than “because I said so.”
Letters to the editor
W
ith the Supreme Court
ruling still fresh, my
other half wandered
into the bathroom where I was
brushing my teeth.
“Did you come in to propose?” I
asked, my way of indirectly deliv-
ering the historic news.
“You’re dumb,” came the reply.
“Did
you feed
the
dogs?”
In the
amount
of time
it took
for the
justices
t o
deliver
their
decision
on
Proposition 8, the world had com-
pletely changed. And yet, in that
same span, nothing really had.
Marriage or no marriage, the dogs
were still unfed.
The five years since 2008’s
Proposition 8 are peppered with
those moments for every person,
gay, straight or whatever. Every
year and every day of life, actual-
l y. We are each a piece of history
even on those mundane days when
HISTORYin all caps isn’t being
made.
Agreen cloth-bound book
tucked away in the office of
Theresa Rabe, San Mateo County
deputy assessor-county clerk-
recorder, captured several of the
big steps locally on the way to
yesterday’s momentous sea
change. Beginning on Valentine’s
Day 2007, Rabe and then-commu-
nications director Carol Marks
with the blessing of then-county
clerk Warren Slocum asked same-
sex couples seeking marriage
licenses to sign a guest book and
add reflections. The office couldn’t
legally marry them but it could
acknowledge that it wanted to.
Aphoto in the cover’s cutout
shows a handmade sign at the cer-
emony that said “Value all fami-
lies.” Inside, the written thoughts
echoed the same common-sense
sentiment.
“My moms need this!” “Proud
parents of a gay son!” “20 years
and two beautiful children.” Even
then-county supervisor Rich
Gordon, now a state assembly-
man, shared a peek into his life.
“Waiting for equality but fully in
love with Dennis McShane.”
Tucked between the covers of
that otherwise unassuming mar-
riage album are also snapshots of
annual rallies in the county gov-
ernment center courtyard — local
officials addressing a crowd of
couples holding hands and
babies, Slocum and supporters
gay and straight adding their
names — and other mementos.
Newspaper clippings. Atulle wed-
ding favor of egg-shaped mints,
tying two diamond rings to it
with ribbon. Aposterboard heart
complete with doily and handwrit-
ten dreams. Official pages bearing
Mark Leno’s Assembly Bill 43
which would have legalized same-
sex marriage in California.
Copies of the letter Slocum sent
to every other county clerk in
California, asking them to stand
with him in seeking the right to
offer these couples something
beyond a rose and apology year
after year.
The shaping of history was
never lost on those who bore wit-
ness in San Mateo County on
those annual days of love.
“It’s what’s right, it’s love.
This is our life and will be our
history.” “The day is coming.”
“I’m proud to be a part of history
in the making.” “While I’m proud
to make history I wish it wasn’t
necessary.” Even, as though sim-
ply to mark one supporter’s inclu-
sion on this historical trek, “I
was here.”
By the time the Feb. 14, 2008
pages were added, the tone
remained optimistic with butterfly
stickers and red ink hearts deco-
rating the comments with hope
rather than anger.
“Let this be the year that every-
one is given the right to equali-
ty!” “One day all our children will
be able to grow up and marry the
ones they love.”
And then June 17, 2008 —
finally.
“So happy to be legal!” “Thank
you for treating me like a full cit-
izen.” “We had our ceremony
eight years ago today — the law
just caught up.” “Three+ kids.
Time to get married.”
Rabe always planned to give
the album to the San Mateo
County History Museum once
marriage was legalized. But what
should have been a change for the
future turned into a narrow window
and the album made room for
more pages for Valentine’s Day
2010.
“Fairness for everyone. Step it
up.” “Straight but not married.”
Another three years would pass
before yesterday’s invalidation of
Proposition 8. Three years before
the album was ready to take its
rightful place in the history San
Mateo County, the state and the
nation.
But hovering around the edges
of the album’s yearly equality bat-
tle reminders are subtle markers of
how the more public historical
milestones affect those other days
that don’t merit quite the same
limelight.
Threaded throughout in just a
line or two are stories of couples
who have more marriage certifi-
cates than a Hollywood celebrity
with multiple spouses notched on
their bedpost. Married in the
church, a civil ceremony in
Vermont and at San Francisco
City Hall, documented one cou-
ple.
“I hope this is the last time I
have to sign this book.”
Pages offer glimpses into fam-
ilies which undoubtedly have
diaper duty and carpools and
fights over eating vegetables
and all those personal bits of
life that the history books don’t
capture.
And yet, “I love my dady and
papi” in childlike scrawl on one
page. “Cool” and “hurray!” on
another in loopy lettering.
Parent-teacher conferences
don’t make the news. Having the
right to legally call the other par-
ent “my wife” or “my husband”
does — at least today.
One boy, obviously very
young, wrote Slocum a note of
thanks and drew a picture of him
next to a fire.
“You are nice. I like you. You
help people. Next to you I made
cool fire.”
Somewhere today that boy, now
six years older, is hopefully cele-
brating with his mommies or dad-
dies.
Rejoicing somewhere, too,
must be the teenage girl whose
binder paper note explained the
desire not to wed someone of the
same sex or even the opposite
gender. “We just want to marry
someone we love. Yes, I may only
be 15 but I dream of one day mar-
rying a girl.”
Now roughly 21, she may have
already met the one and she may
never have to choose between
having a ceremony and waiting
for legality.
Unlike the county book in
which her letter resides, her wed-
ding album will contain keep-
sakes of “I do” rather than wishes
of “I hope.” Fingers crossed, her
life — and those of everybody
going forward now — will be
filled with incredibly wonderful
moments.
Yet the real magic of this future
is what happens when the cameras
and headlines find a new focus but
the legal right remains to share
the same normal, boring morn-
ings as any married couple when
the most romantic thing uttered is
“Did you feed the dogs?”
Michelle Durand’s column “Off
the Beat” runs every Tuesday and
Thursday. She can be reached by
email: michelle@smdailyjour-
nal.com or by phone (650) 344-
5200 ext. 102. What do you think
of this column? Send a letter to
the editor: letters@smdailyjour-
nal.com
Equality moved forward
Editor,
While many clergy raised their
voices in praise for Wednesdays’
Supreme Court marriage decisions,
there were others who spoke out in
dismay. This was the case for inter-
racial marriage as well. In the end,
it’s been the courage of civil au-
thorities that moved equality
forward. Today, I am thankful. Met-
ropolitan Community Churches,
and our founder the Rev. Troy
Perry, filed the first lawsuit for
legal marriage more than 40 years
ago. Today, his vision, and that of
so many others, has started to be-
come a reality. Lesbian and gay
couples married in California dur-
ing 2008 are now truly equal
citizens; that simply feels good.
I’m looking forward to doing more
California weddings soon!
The Rev. Terri Echelbarger
San Mateo
Peninsula Metropolitan
Community Church
Scrapbook of history
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Other voices
BUSINESS 10
Thursday • June 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 14,910.68 +149.83 10-Yr Bond 2.54 -0.07
Nasdaq3376.22 +28.33 Oil (per barrel) 95.32
S&P 500 1603.26 +15.23 Gold 1,229.80
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Wednesday on the
New York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Pandora Media Inc., up $1.32 at $17.73
A Cowen analyst upgraded the Internet radio company citing ad revenue
gains and a likely “manageable”threat from Apple Inc.’s radio service.
The Mosaic Co., down $1 at $54.91
A Citi analyst downgraded shares of the fertilizer maker after the company
said it would delay a stock buyback program.
Chipotle Mexican Grill Inc., up $4.71 at $363.67
A Sterne Agee analyst started coverage of the casual restaurant chain with
a “Buy”rating, citing its growth potential.
UniFirst Corp., down $5.43 at $90.22
The uniform company cut its profit outlook for the full year, citing weak
results at its specialty garments business.
Nasdaq
Apollo Group Inc., down $1.99 at $17.39
The for-profit education company,which owns the University of Phoenix,
said its third-quarter earnings fell 40 percent.
Synaptics Inc., up $3.12 at $38.99
The touch-screen technology company raised its fiscal fourth-quarter
revenue outlook on strong demand for its products.
First Cash Financial Services Inc., down $5.80 at $49.40
The pawn store operator cut its earnings guidance for the year because
of falling gold prices and volatility in the Mexican peso.
Big movers
By Christina Rexrode
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — The stock market is
focusing on the positive.
Major stock indexes rose for a sec-
ond day on Wednesday. It was the first
two-day stretch of gains since the
Federal Reserve gave a timetable for
throttling back its economic stimulus
a week ago.
Even news that the economy grew at
a much slower annual rate in the first
quarter than previously estimated —
1.8 percent versus 2.4 percent — didn’t
dampen the buying. In fact, it persuad-
ed some traders that the Fed could
extend its easy money policies beyond
next year. That would likely be a boon
for the economy and the stock market.
The market’s gains were decisive.
The Dow Jones industrial average
jumped 149.83 points, or 1 percent,
14, 910. 14. All 10 sectors in the
Standard & Poor’s 500 index were
higher, led by health care and utilities.
Investors also seemed to realize that
they dumped too many stocks last
week, when they panicked after the Fed
outlined plans on how it might eventu-
ally end its stimulus measures.
“The sell-off was a little bit over-
done,” said David Coard, head of fixed-
income sales and trading at Williams
Capital Group in New York.
“Sometimes you’ve got to take a
breather. ”
The Standard & Poor’s 500 rose
15.23, or 1 percent, to 1,603.26. The
Nasdaq composite index gained 28.34,
or 0.9 percent, to 3,376.22.
The yield on the 10-year Treasury
note fell for the first time since June
14, slipping to 2.54 percent from 2.61
percent.
The price of gold plunged $45.30, or
3.6 percent, to $1,229.80 an ounce, its
lowest price in three years. The rea-
sons for the sell-off weren’t entirely
clear. Investors tend to buy gold when
they’re looking for a safe place to put
money. Wednesday, they did that by
buying stocks in dividend-rich, stable
sectors — such as utilities — as well as
government bonds.
The markets have been volatile for
weeks, ever since Fed Chairman Ben
Bernanke started hinting that a pull-
back in Fed stimulus programs would
start soon. In the last 25 trading days,
the Dow has ricocheted through 17
triple-digit swings, split almost even-
ly between ups and downs.
Still, some investors were already
turning their attention away from the
Fed and back toward company earn-
ings. There they saw reason for cau-
tion, not optimism.
Analysts expect earnings to grow
about 3 percent, though that is down
from estimates as high as 15 percent a
year ago, according to S&P Capital IQ.
Revenue is expected to fall by 0.3 per-
cent.
“We’re not seeing any significant
bottom-line growth,” said Chip Cobb,
senior vice president of BMT Asset
Management in Bryn Mawr, Penn. “It’s
all been cost-cutting measures.”
Chris Baggini, senior portfolio
manager at Turner Investments in
Berwyn, Penn., pointed out that the
stocks that performed best are the kind
that investors tend to buy when they’re
nervous about the economy.
Investors are “buying bonds and
bond-like stocks,” Baggini said.
Friday is the last trading day for the
second quarter, which could also make
the market’s moves erratic. Money
managers will be looking to get out of
their holdings and book profits for
Stocks up for second day in a row
By Ryan Nakashima
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Microsoft is trying to reverse slump-
ing PC sales and quiet growing criticism of its flagship oper-
ating system with the release of a revised version of Windows
8.
On Wednesday, Microsoft made a preview version of
Windows 8.1 available for download. It includes alterations
meant to address consumer dissatisfaction with the operating
system. Analysts believe users’ frustration with Windows 8 is
partly to blame for the biggest drop in personal computer
sales in nearly two decades.
At a conference in San Francisco, Microsoft CEO Steve
Ballmer acknowledged that the company pushed hard to get
people to adopt a radical new tile-based “Modern” user inter-
face in Windows 8. Microsoft is now back-pedaling, making it
easier to reach and use the older “Desktop” interface.
“Let’s make it easier to start applications the way we’re used
to,” Ballmer told the audience of software developers. “What
we will show you today is a refined blend of our Desktop expe-
rience and our Modern experience.”
Windows 8, released Oct. 26, was Microsoft’s answer to
changing customer behavior and the rise of tablet computers.
The operating system emphasizes touch controls over the
mouse and the keyboard, which had been the main way people
have interacted with their personal computers since the 1980s.
Microsoft and PC makers had been looking to Windows 8 to
revive sales of personal computers, but some people have
been put off by the radical makeover. Research firm IDC said
the operating system actually slowed down the market.
Although Microsoft says it has sold more than 100 million
Windows 8 licenses so far, IDC said worldwide shipments of
personal computers fell 14 percent in the first three months of
this year, the worst since tracking began in 1994.
Windows 8 was also supposed to make Microsoft more com-
petitive in the growing market for tablet computers. But
Windows tablets had less than a 4 percent market share in the
first quarter, compared with 57 percent for Android and 40 per-
cent for Apple’s iPad.
Among the changes present in Windows 8.1, users will be
able to boot up in Desktop mode. There, they’ll find a button
that resembles the old Start button. It won’t take users to the
old Start menu, but to the new Modern Windows 8 start screen.
Still, the re-introduction of the familiar button may make it
easier for longtime Windows users to get accustomed to the
changes. A common complaint about Windows 8 is that it
hides features and functions, and replaces buttons with ges-
tures and invisible click zones that have to be memorized.
Now, a single swipe up from the Modern start screen brings up
all programs, even those that are seldom used.
“It addresses a lot of the issues that people that I talk to had
about Windows 8,” said Charles Madison, a software develop-
er from New York.
Other new features of Windows 8.1 include more options to
use multiple apps. People will be able to determine how much
of the screen each app takes while showing up to four different
programs, rather than just two. The update will also offer more
integrated search results, showing users previews of websites,
apps and documents that are on the device, all at once.
Windows 8 tweaked,
blamed for PC slump
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — So this was the deal:
For $50, you got to see Brad Pitt’s hotly
anticipated zombie thriller “World War Z”
before all your friends. You also got 3D
glasses to keep, popcorn and sodas, a
poster, the DVD when it comes out, and
an intimate dinner with Brad.
Just kidding! No dinner with Brad.
But hundreds of fans did pay $50 for the
other stuff last week in a small-scale mar-
keting experiment in five theaters — and
the studio, Paramount Pictures, says it
worked well. With all the recent talk
about future movie ticket prices climbing
into the stratosphere, is it a harbinger of
things to come?
Before you scoff, it’s worth noting that
premium pricing happens all the time: in
Broadway theaters, where you could get
second-row seats for Tom Hanks in
“Lucky Guy” this week if you paid $300 a
pop, or at concerts, where you could pay
well over $1,000 for, say, a Rolling
Stones VIPpackage. At Yankee Stadium,
a top-tier Legends seat can also top
$1,000 per game, but season holders can
get perks like a free trip to spring train-
ing.
Still, the idea of $50 for a movie
strikes a lot of fans the wrong way.
“That’s possibly the craziest thing
I’ve ever heard,” said Dillon Mahoney,
19, a student at the University of
Pennsylvania, waiting in line for a regu-
lar “World War Z” showing. “I have a hard
time paying 50 bucks for a Phillies
game!”
“That’s my dinner,” noted another
Philadelphia moviegoer, Cheyanne
Farmer, 15. “That’s my allowance,” added
Rahyaan Hall, her friend. “For a month.”
In New York though, one fan did some
quick calculating and saw a reasonable
value. “With the DVD and all those other
things you mention, it probably comes
to more than $50,” said Alex Leighton,
24, who’d just bought tickets to “World
War Z.” “So you’re getting more than the
movie.”
That’s the point that Paramount wants
to make.
“This ended up being a headline that
didn’t really represent what the offer
was,” says Megan Colligan, the studio’s
president of domestic distribution and
marketing. “These people stepped up and
made their commitment to us, and we
gave them a great experience.”
Would you pay $50 to see a flick? Some fans did
<< Plenty of NBA draft questions exist , page 13
• Giants lefty recovering well from surgery, page 12
Thursday, June 27, 2013
NOW IN CUSTODY: AARON HERNANDEZ FACES MURDER CHARGES, RELEASED BY PATRIOTS >> PAGE 12
District 52 tournaments around the corner
A’s blank
the Reds
Warriors not
desperate for
a draft pick
The upsets continue
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Now that players like San Mateo’s
Sterling Miller and Hillsborough’s Nate
Fleischli have had their time in the postsea-
son spotlight during the District 52
Superbowls, the attention shifts to the
Peninsula’s premiere youth talent.
The District 52 All-Star tournaments
begin at week’s end and in the 9-10 age
bracket all eyes will be on
Menlo’s Burgess Park and
Entrada Field where the
Menlo-Atherton Little League
will co-host the double-elimi-
nation tourney.
Last season, the team from
Pacifica American formed part
of a baseball renaissance for the town and
captured its first ever 9-10 title. The banner
was obtained after Pacifica scored
all five of its runs in the first two
innings of the championship
game against Foster City. That
would be all the offense they
needed for a 5-3 win.
But that Pacifica team has
undergone some turnover, most
notably the loss of slugger Elijah Ricks,
who is busy representing team USA in an
under-12 baseball team — so the window
for what could be the tournament’s third dif-
ferent champion is as many years is wide
open.
In order to repeat, American must first get
past Redwood City East on Saturday at
Burgess Park field No. 2 beginning at 4:30
By Howard Fendrich
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON — As tumultuous a day as pro-
fessional tennis has produced in its nearly
half-century history ended in the most
unforeseeable, unexplainable way of all: A
second-round loss by Roger Federer at the
All England Club.
The seven-time Wimbledon champion and
17-time Grand Slam champ shuffled off
Centre Court with dusk approaching on the
fortnight’s first Wednesday, his head bowed,
his streak of reaching at least the quarterfi-
nals at a record 36 consecutive major tour-
naments snapped by a man ranked 116th.
His remarkable 6-7 (5), 7-6 (5), 7-5, 7-6
(5) defeat against Sergiy Stakhovsky
marked Federer’s earliest Grand Slam exit in
a decade. He lost in the first round of the
French Open on May 26, 2003, back before
he owned a single trophy from any of the
sport’s most important sites.
“This is a setback, a disappointment,
whatever you want to call it,” said Federer,
the defending champion. “Got to get over
this one. Some haven’t hurt this much,
that’s for sure.”
He had plenty of company on a wild, wild
Wednesday brimming with surprising
results, a slew of injuries — and all manner
of sliding and tumbling on the revered grass
courts, prompting questions about whether
something made them more slippery.
Seven players left because of withdrawals
or mid-match retirements, believed to be the
most in a single day at a Grand Slam tourna-
ment in the 45-year Open era. Among that
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — No need for A.J. Griffin to
glance over his shoulder
at the bullpen. This game
was all his to finish,
something that seemed
far-fetched when he
walked two of the game’s
first three batters.
Griffin tossed a two-hit-
ter for his first win in
more than a month, Josh
Donaldson hit a three-run
homer and the Oakland
Athletics beat the Cincinnati Reds 5-0 on
By Antonio Gonzalez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — The only way the Golden
State Warriors will generate any news during
Thursday night’s NBAdraft is if they make a
trade or spend some money.
Ultimately, the cost for either will deter-
mine what they decide.
With no pick in hand due to prior trades,
Warriors general manager Bob Myers and
his staff still prepared as if they have selec-
tions to make — just in case an opportunity
arises. After all, they often do on draft
night.
“We’d love to have a pick. I think a pick
is an asset, so we’d like to have it. We
don’t,” Myers said.
See TOURNEY, Page 14
See A’S, Page 14
See DRAFT, Page 13
See UPSET, Page 13
REUTERS
Former Wimbledon champions Maria Sharapova and Roger Federer headlined a shocking day of results at the All-England Club in London.
A.J. Griffin
District 52 fields:
Burgess Park and
Entrada Field, Menlo
Atherton
9-10 ALL-STARS
SPORTS 12
Thursday • June 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ATTLEBORO, Mass. — New England
Patriots tight end Aaron Hernandez was
arrested Wednesday and charged with murder
in the shooting death of a friend prosecutors
say had angered the NFL player at a night-
club a few days earlier by talking to the
wrong people.
Hernandez, 23, was taken from his North
Attleborough home in handcuffs just over a
week after Boston semi-pro football player
Odin Lloyd’s bullet-riddled body was found
in an industrial park a mile away.
Less than two hours after the arrest, the
Patriots announced they had cut Hernandez,
a 2011 Pro Bowl selection who signed a
five-year contract last summer worth $40
million.
Lloyd was a 27-year-old athlete with the
Boston Bandits who was dating the sister of
Hernandez’s fiancee. He was shot multiple
times on a secluded gravel road, authorities
said.
Hernandez “drove the victim to that
remote spot, and then he orchestrated his
execution,” prosecutor Bill McCauley said.
If convicted, Hernandez could get life in
prison without parole.
“It is at bottom a circumstantial case. It is
not a strong case,” his attorney, Michael
Fee, said at a court hearing during which
Hernandez was ordered held without bail on
murder charges and five weapons counts.
Lloyd’s family members cried and hugged
as the prosecutor outlined the killing.
TE Aaron Hernandez
charged with murder
REUTERS
Former New England Patriots tight end Aaron
Hernandez hears the evidence against him .
Surkamp completes first leg of rehab stint
By Rob Harris
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BELO HORIZONTE, Brazil — Paulinho
scored on a header from Neymar’s corner
kick in the 86th minute, and Brazil beat
Uruguay 2-1 Wednesday night to reach the
Confederations Cup final as anti-govern-
ment protesters clashed with police near
Mineirao Stadium.
Seeking its third straight title in the
World Cup preparation tournament, Brazil
will play in Sunday’s championship against
the winner of Thursday’s semifinal between
Spain and Italy.
Diego Forlan could have put Uruguay
ahead in the 14th minute, but goalkeeper
Julio Cesar dived to his left to stop Forlan’s
low penalty kick after Brazilian defender
David Luiz was called for tugging the shirt
of Diego Lugano. Only four of eight penal-
ties kicks in the tournament have been suc-
cessful.
Paulinho header sends Brazil to Confed final
By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
After undergoing Tommy John surgery
last July, Eric Surkamp is working towards a
full recovery. And after yesterday’s efficient
four-inning outing in San Jose, the Giants’
left-hander is heading in the right direction
— up.
With five starts under his belt since begin-
ning a rehab assignment on June 5 at High-
ASan Jose, Surkamp is being promoted to
Triple-A Fresno. The lefty dazzled against
Rockies’ affiliate Modesto yesterday, allow-
ing just one run on one hit while throwing
63 pitches.
“I think he’s throwing the ball well,” San
Jose manager Andy Skeels said. “Certainly
his last couple outings have been positive,
and today was a positive outing. I think he’s
moving in the right direction. Everything
was a little bit crisper today. His command
was a little bit better. From where he’s come
from, I think he’s doing really well.”
With the way 2012 turned out for the
Giants, it seems strange to think San
Francisco’s pitching rotation wasn’t set in
stone leading up to the regular season.
Of course, the Giants won their second
World Championship in three years, while
remarkably keeping their five-man pitching
rotation in tact virtually from wire to wire.
Through the final week of spring training,
however, there was some competition for
the final spot in the rotation between former
Cy Young Award winner Barry Zito and the
left-handed prospect Surkamp.
“I was excited about the opportunity, ”
Surkamp said. “It was down to the last week
of spring training. I was just happy to still
be up there with the team at that point.”
But following a March 24 outing,
Surkamp was bothered by elbow pain. It
would turn out to be his final game of the
year.
“I’d been throwing pretty well,” Surkamp
said. “It was kind of crazy. I was feeling
good, and then all of a sudden it just came
out of nowhere and blindsided me.”
The southpaw tried to soldier through the
pain, but started the year on the disabled
list. After initially trying to avoid going
under the knife, Surkamp underwent Tommy
John surgery in July, and ultimately was
unable to make a single regular-season
appearance.
Giants’ rehab epidemic
Through five starts this season, Surkamp
has impressed. Albeit in limited use as to
prevent him from earning a decision, he has
posted a 2.93 ERA while striking out 17
against three walks through 15 1/3 innings.
He has held opposing batters to a .157 bat-
ting average. Exhibiting such dominance
before the injury helped put Surkamp on the
map as one of the organization’s top pitch-
ing prospects in 2011, when he made six
starts as a late-season call-up.
In his longest outing of the season yes-
terday, Surkamp had razor-fine location to
the bottom of the zone. With his easy arm
action and low three-quarters release, the
lefty exhibits an uncanny resemblance to
Madison Bumgarner. And wearing No. 40
through his stint in San Jose only enhanced
the resemblance. He doesn’t throw nearly as
hard as Bumgarner, of course. Surkamp sat
between 87-89 mph with his fastball. But
he notched six strikeouts, as well as four
groundouts. The only blemish on his day
was in yielding a solo home run to Brian
Humphries in the third inning.
“I feel a hundred percent,” Surkamp said.
“Now it’s just building up the pitch count. I
threw 65 today. I go up five to 10 every out-
ing, and then hopefully before long it will
be at a hundred.”
Rehab assignments are becoming an all
too familiar sight in the Giants’ organiza-
tion this season. In fact, it was during
Surkamp’s previous outing at A’s affiliate
Stockton that Angel Pagan reinjured his
hamstring during his third plate appearance
while running to first on a groundout.
“It’s pretty much what it looked like,”
Skeels said. “He hit a groundball, took off
for first base, and about halfway down he felt
something grab him, and that was it.”
Bruins pride
As good as Surkamp was yesterday,
Modesto starter Eddie Butler was better. The
2012 supplemental first-round draft pick out
of Radford University threw five shutout
innings, taking a no-decision as Modesto
won 4-3 thanks to a two-run home run in the
ninth by designated hitter Will Swanner.
Butler relied on his defense, inducing
seven groundballs, including a pair of
flashy double plays from his middle infield-
ers Taylor Featherston and Niko Gallego.
Gallego — the son of A’s third base coach
Mike Gallego — hails from newly-crowned
national champion UCLA. Because his cur-
rent team was busy sweeping San Jose in a
three-game series, he wasn’t able to watch
the Bruins’ two-game sweep of Mississippi
State on TV.
SAN JOSE GIANTS
Eric Surkamp is recovering well from Tommy
John surgery.
p.m. Fellow Pacificans, the National team,
begin their run against the team from the
Redwood City West. Those two will tangle
at La Entrada field No. 1 starting at 2 p.m.
Hillsborough has owned this tournament.
They last won three years ago as part of a
run that saw them win five of the previous 11
9-10 brackets. As such, and with a solid
showing in both Superbowls, the red and
blue should be considered a favorite. First,
they have a first round matchup Saturday at
Burgess No. 2 with Palo Alto American. The
first pitch there is scheduled for 11:30 a.m.
The Minors champion came from San
Mateo and the city’s little league program is
riding high heading into the All-Star tourna-
ments. Chances are, the National team will
feature players from the 29-0 San Mateo
Indians squad that enjoyed a magical regular
season.
San Mateo American will take on Alpine-
West Menlo in the 9 a.m. game at La
Entrada’s field No. 1. That game will be fol-
lowed by National fighting against
Belmont-Redwood Shores at 11:30 p.m.
In the Burgess Park field No. 2 game that
begins at 9 a.m., Foster City, last year’s
runner-up, will take on Palo Alto National.
Half Moon Bay and San Carlos round out the
first round action. Those two teams will play
a 2 p.m. game at Burgess Park.
Menlo-Atherton, the host team, earned a
first round bye. They’ll start Sunday’s play
with a 9 a.m. game against the winner of
Foster City and Palo Alto National.
Sunday actually will be the tournament’s
busiest day with seven games scheduled in
the double-elimination tournament.
Play in the 9-10 All-Stars tournament
goes on until July 10.
SPORTS 13
Thursday • June 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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group: second-seeded Victoria
Azarenka; sixth-seeded Jo-Wilfried
Tsonga; 18th-seeded John Isner, who
will forever be remembered for win-
ning a 70-68 fifth set in the longest
match ever; and Steve Darcis, the man
who stunned 12-time major champion
Rafael Nadal on Monday.
“Very black day,” summed up 10th-
seeded Marin Cilic, who said a bad left
knee forced him to pull out of his
match.
The third-seeded Federer simply was
unable to derail Stakhovsky’s serve-
and-volley style, breaking the 27-
year-old Ukrainian only once.
Still, there actually was a real chance
for Federer to get back in the thick of
things. Ahead 6-5 in the fourth, he
held a set point as Stakhovsky served
at 30-40. But Stakhovsky came up
with this sequence: volley winner, 111
mph ace, serve-and-volley winner.
“I had my opportunities, had the
foot in the door. When I had the
chance, I couldn’t do it,” said Federer,
who is 122-18 on grass over his
career, while Stakhovsky is 13-12.
“It’s very frustrating, very disappoint-
ing. I’m going to accept it and move
forward from here. I have no choice.”
Continued from page 11
UPSETS
The second-year general manager has tried
to plan for every possible scenario.
Last week, Myers met with his front-
office staff at the team’s downtown Oakland
headquarters and asked each what player
they would take if the team had a top-20
pick. Everybody in the room gave an enthu-
siastic answer. Finally, Myers asked what
they would give up to acquire that player.
“Then the conversation changed a little
bit,” Myers said. “Then people get a little
quieter and said, ‘Well, I wouldn’t give up
that guy or I wouldn’t give up that.’ So you
find out how definitive the group is about a
certain player when you ask what the price
to get him would be.”
If Myers makes a move to acquire a pick,
it will likely be a second rounder. First-
round picks come with guaranteed con-
tracts, which can be riskier and costlier —
not to mention the Warriors would likely
have to give up a more valuable player to
acquire one.
The Warriors want to get a pick because
rookie salaries are inexpensive and the risk-
reward factor is far more favorable than a
veteran free agent. However, Myers said,
“We’re not desperate to get one.”
Golden State’s first-round pick (21st over-
all) this year is going to Utah, finally pay-
ing off a debt from a series of complicated
moves that started when the team sent a pro-
tected first-round pick to New Jersey for
Marcus Williams in 2008.
The Warriors’ second-round pick (51st
overall), which was shipped away in the
trade to get David Lee from the New York
Knicks in 2010, ended up in Orlando’s
hands.
Even though the Warriors are without a
draft pick now, owners Joe Lacob and Peter
Guber have given the general manager the
financial backing to buy picks before.
The Warriors paid Charlotte $2 million to
move up in the second round and select
Jeremy Tyler 39th overall in 2011.
Continued from page 11
DRAFT
Continued from page 11
TOURNEY
By Brian Mahoney
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — Nerlens Noel is coming off
a major knee injury. Alex Len is in a walk-
ing boot.
One of them could be the No. 1 pick
Thursday in an NBAdraft that appears short
on stardom, and neither looks ready to get
his career off to a running start.
“This draft is really unpredictable, a lot of
guys with injuries and you don’t have any,
like, LeBron James,” Len said Wednesday.
“So it’s going to be interesting.”
Ten years after James climbed on stage to
start a draft that goes down as one of the best
in recent memory, the No. 1 pick again
belongs to Cleveland.
The Cavaliers won’t find anyone who can
play like James on the court — if they keep
the pick — and even the climbing the stage
part will be a challenge for the big men who
opened their college seasons against each
other and are competing again now.
Noel tore the ACL in his left knee on Feb.
12, ending his lone season at Kentucky. The
6-foot-11 freshman led the nation in shot
blocking and his conference in rebounding,
but hasn’t been able to show the Cavaliers if
his offensive game has grown.
The only basketball work he did during
his visit to Cleveland was shooting some
free throws. Perhaps the pants he wore with
his sports jacket and orange tie were just too
tight, but Noel was walking gingerly as he
exited a hotel ballroom after meeting with
the media Wednesday.
“I wanted to do more. Unfortunately I got
hurt, but I mean I definitely felt right before
I got injured I was really coming along as a
player and just really coming into my own
during that part of the season,” Noel said.
“But like I said, unfortunately I got hurt, so
I wasn’t able to show as much as I wanted
to.”
Nor has Len, but that hasn’t stopped the
7-1 center from the Ukraine who spent two
seasons at Maryland from climbing into the
mix at No. 1. His left foot started bothering
him around February, and he found out after
the season that it was a stress fracture.
He was aware he was projected as a top-10
pick before the draft combine, but may go
much higher even though his visits to teams
have consisted of nothing more than inter-
views. He no longer needs crutches but will
be in the boot for perhaps two more weeks.
So, with all these injury questions, what
about playing it safe and picking a healthy
guy?
“I mean, probably a lot of people wish it
could be that easy,” Kansas guard Ben
McLemore said. “But it’s a process for the
teams, they’ve got to see what’s available
and what they really need. And like I said,
this draft is up in the air and nobody knows
what’s going to happen, who’s going to get
drafted in which order. ”
Orlando has the No. 2 pick, followed by
Washington, Charlotte and Phoenix.
McLemore, Indiana’s Victor Oladipo,
Georgetown forward Otto Porter and nation-
al player of the year Trey Burke of Michigan
are among the other players who will hear
their names called early at Barclays Center
by NBA Commissioner David Stern in his
final draft.
It’s a class that won’t draw any compar-
isons to the one that James led, which fea-
tured future Miami Heat teammates Dwyane
Wade and Chris Bosh, along with NBAscor-
ing champion Carmelo Anthony among the
first five picks.
Brooklyn Nets general manager Billy
King said a number of teams are trying to
trade out of the draft and acquire extra picks
for next year, which is expected to be a
stronger class. But he doesn’t know if there
will be enough teams interested in being
trade partners to get those deals done.
Noel, Len atop an NBA draft full of questions
SPORTS 14
Thursday • June 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Wednesday for a sweep of their two-game
series.
Griffin (6-6) struck out seven and walked
two in a 108-pitch gem for his first career
complete game.
“I was trying not to think about it because
I was hoping I wasn’t going to blow it,”
Griffin said. “Obviously, I get a little extra
adrenaline going there.”
The shaggy-haired right-hander had been
0-3 in five starts since winning at Houston
on May 25. He didn’t allow a hit until Devin
Mesoraco’s one-out single in the fifth, and
Xavier Paul added a two-out double in the
seventh for Cincinnati.
Griffin’s mother, Kathy Griffin — “not
that one,” he quipped of the comedian —
attended her first game of the season at the
Coliseum to see his stellar start. With an off
day Thursday, the pitcher planned to take
his mom and girlfriend to a nice dinner.
It’s been a while since he has felt celebra-
tory. The A’s had lost each of his last five
starts.
“I was getting tired of not personally me
(not) getting a win but going out there
every fifth day and the team losing,” Griffin
said.
Pinch hitter Nate Freiman and Brandon
Moss each hit an RBI double for Oakland.
Griffin gave the A’s starters their first deci-
sion in four games after Oakland went three
in a row without one for the first time this
year. He struck out Jay Bruce swinging for a
1-2-3 ninth to end the 2-hour, 20-minute
game — looking as strong late as he did
early.
“The first two guys of the game it looked
like his command might not be there,” man-
ager Bob Melvin said. “Then he found it and
was spectacular. ”
Oakland’s fourth inning provided all the
run support Griffin needed.
Donaldson connected to highlight a four-
run fourth after hitting a two-run homer in
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — Clayton Kershaw out-
pitched Tim Lincecum in the seventh regu-
lar-season showdown
between the two former
Cy Young Award winners,
rookie Yasiel Puig had
three more hits and the
Los Angeles Dodgers ral-
lied to beat the San
Francisco Giants 4-2 on
Wednesday night for a
three-game sweep of the
defending World Series
champions.
Kershaw (6-5) allowed two runs and four
hits in eight-plus innings and had seven
strikeouts against an offense that totaled
just 14 runs over its previous six games
while going 8 for 47 with runners in scoring
position. The Giants’ only runs came in the
fourth on Buster Posey’s 10th homer and
second in two games, following a 14-game
drought.
Kershaw, who led the NL in ERA each of
the previous two seasons, has a 2.06 mark
through his first 17 starts — tying
Pittsburgh’s Jeff Locke for second place, .01
behind the Mets’ Matt Harvey.
Kenley Jansen got three outs for his sixth
save in eight attempts after Kershaw gave up
a leadoff single in the ninth by Marco
Scutaro.
Lincecum (4-8) gave up four runs and 10
hits in 5 1-3 innings and struck out four. The
two-time Cy Young winner is 1-7 with a 5.24
ERA in his last eight starts since beating
Atlanta 5-1 on May 12 with seven innings
of two-hit ball. The Giants have scored fewer
than three runs in six of Lincecum’s last
eight outings.
The Giants have lost four in a row and nine
of 12, putting them a season-worst two
games under .500 and dropping them into
fourth place in the NLWest.
Continued from page 11
A’S
Kershaw helps sink Giants a little further
By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN JOSE — The San Jose Sharks knew
it would take some time to see the benefit s
of the deal two years ago to acquire James
Sheppard from Minnesota.
After spending most of his first year in
San Jose rehabbing from a serious leg
injury, Sheppard completed his two-year
journey back to the NHL in January and
showed flashes of why the Wild drafted him
in the first round in 2006.
The Sharks re-signed Sheppard to a one-
year deal on Wednesday that prevents him
from becoming a restricted free agent next
month as they hope to build on that
progress even more this upcoming season.
“When you see a guy go through adversity
and a challenge like this it does reveal his
character,” general manager Doug Wilson
said. “But this is a kid who was a very high-
ly drafted player and a very talented player. I
think his best hockey is now ahead of him.
... Now I think you’ll see him flourish.
We’re not even going to put a limit on where
he can get to.”
The Sharks also signed Andrew Desjardins
to a two-year contract. Both forwards could
have been restricted free agents July 5 if
they had not reached deals.
“I’m very happy to have both these guys
signed,” Wilson said. “They play the way
we’re looking for our team to play. ”
The Sharks originally acquired Sheppard
in August 2011 from the Wild for a 2013
third-round draft pick. Sheppard had been
suspended the previous season by
Minnesota after suffering a career-threaten-
ing leg injury from an offseason ATV acci-
dent.
Sheppard played four minor league games
his first season with the Sharks but got more
time at Worcester during the lockout last
season.
He made his debut with San Jose on Jan.
22 and had one goal and three assists in 32
regular season games. He had no points in
11 playoff games but showed the Sharks
enough for them to want him back next sea-
son.
“It was such an intricate injury that I’m
not going to be 100 percent maybe ever but
I’m always getting closer and closer, ”
Sheppard said. “The more time passes the
better I feel and the stronger I feel. ... I still
expect to play better and I have more goals
for myself that I want to accomplish.”
Desjardins had two goals and one assist
and 61 penalty minutes in 42 games last
season playing mostly on the fourth line.
He won 54.2 percent of his faceoffs and got
significant time on a much-improved penal-
ty kill unit. Desjardins, 26, was the team’s
rookie of the year the previous season when
he had four goals and 13 assists.
Desjardins has had an impressive journey
since starting his professional career play-
ing in Laredo, Texas, in the Central Hockey
League.
“He’s never been given anything,”
Wilson said. “He fought, scratched and
clawed and earned respect of his teammates.
He’s a tough kid. He’s really the type of guy
you want on your team. He does all the
things that matter, faceoffs, PK, he’ll block
shots, certainly skate, he’ll battle anybody
and stand up for his teammates. He’s the
type of kid who has really earned his place
on this team.”
Sharks re-sign Desjardins, Sheppard
Tim Lincecum
SPORTS 15
Thursday • June 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 45 34 .570 —
Washington 39 38 .506 5
Philadelphia 37 41 .474 7 1/2
New York 31 43 .419 11 1/2
Miami 27 50 .351 17
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Pittsburgh 48 30 .615 —
St. Louis 48 30 .615 —
Cincinnati 45 34 .570 3 1/2
Chicago 32 44 .421 15
Milwaukee 32 44 .421 15
West Division
W L Pct GB
Arizona 41 36 .532 —
San Diego 39 39 .500 2 1/2
Colorado 39 40 .494 3
San Francisco 38 40 .487 3 1/2
Los Angeles 35 42 .455 6
Wednesday’s Games
Miami 5, Minnesota 3
Oakland 5, Cincinnati 0
Pittsburgh 4, Seattle 2
Boston 5, Colorado 3
Washington 3, Arizona 2
Kansas City 4, Atlanta 3, 10 innings
Chicago Cubs 5, Milwaukee 4
N.Y. Mets 3, Chicago White Sox 0
Houston 4, St. Louis 3
L.A. Dodgers 4, San Francisco 2
Philadelphia at San Diego, 10:10 p.m.
Thursday’s Games
Chicago Cubs (Garza 2-1) at Milwaukee
(W.Peralta 5-8), 11:10 a.m.
Arizona (Corbin 9-0) at Washington (Strasburg 4-
6), 1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Hefner 2-6) at Colorado (Chatwood 4-
1), 3:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Pettibone 3-3) at L.A. Dodgers
(Greinke 4-2), 7:10 p.m.
Friday’s Games
Milwaukee at Pittsburgh, 4:05 p.m.
San Diego at Miami, 4:10 p.m.
Washington at N.Y. Mets, 4:10 p.m.
Arizona at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m.
Cincinnati at Texas, 5:05 p.m.
San Francisco at Colorado, 5:40 p.m.
St. Louis at Oakland, 7:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Seattle, 7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia at L.A. Dodgers, 7:10 p.m.
East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 47 33 .588 —
New York 42 35 .545 3 1/2
Baltimore 43 36 .544 3 1/2
Tampa Bay 41 38 .519 5 1/2
Toronto 39 38 .506 6 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 42 34 .553 —
Cleveland 40 37 .519 2 1/2
Kansas City 36 39 .480 5 1/2
Minnesota 34 40 .459 7
Chicago 32 43 .427 9 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 45 33 .577 —
Oakland 46 34 .575 —
Los Angeles 35 43 .449 10
Seattle 34 45 .430 11 1/2
Houston 30 49 .380 15 1/2
Wednesday’sGames
Toronto 3,Tampa Bay 0
Miami 5, Minnesota 3
Oakland 5, Cincinnati 0
Pittsburgh 4, Seattle 2
Boston 5, Colorado 3
Cleveland 4, Baltimore 3
Texas 8, N.Y.Yankees 5
L.A. Angels 7, Detroit 4
Kansas City 4, Atlanta 3, 10 innings
N.Y. Mets 3, Chicago White Sox 0
Houston 4, St. Louis 3
Thursday’sGames
Texas (D.Holland 5-4) at N.Y.Yankees (P.Hughes 3-
6), 10:05 a.m.
L.A.Angels(Weaver 1-4) at Detroit (Fister 6-5),10:08
a.m.
Cleveland (Kluber 6-4) at Baltimore (Mig.Gonzalez
5-3), 4:05 p.m.
Toronto (Wang 1-0) at Boston (Lester 7-4),4:10 p.m.
Kansas City (Guthrie 7-5) at Minnesota (Deduno 3-
2), 5:10 p.m.
Friday’sGames
Clevelandat ChicagoWhiteSox,2:10p.m.,1st game
N.Y.Yankees at Baltimore, 4:05 p.m.
Detroit at Tampa Bay, 4:10 p.m.
Toronto at Boston, 4:10 p.m.
Cincinnati at Texas, 5:05 p.m.
Kansas City at Minnesota, 5:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Houston, 5:10 p.m.
Cleveland at Chicago White Sox, 5:40 p.m., 2nd
game
St. Louis at Oakland, 7:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Seattle, 7:10 p.m.
AMERICAN LEAGUE NATIONAL LEAGUE
vs.Galaxy
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/29
@Chicago
5:30p.m.
CSN-PLUS
7/3
@NERev
4:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/6
vs.Seattle
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/13
@Dodgers
7:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/25
@Dodgers
7:10p.m.
NBC
6/26
vs. Reds
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/25
@Colorado
5:40p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/28
@Colorado
1:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/29
@Colorado
1:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/30
vs. Reds
12:35p.m.
6/26
vs. Cardinals
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/28
vs. Cardinals
1:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/29
vs. Cardinals
1:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/30
@Reds
4:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/1
@Reds
4:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/2
vs. Cubs
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/2
vs. Cubs
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/3
vs.Norwich
City
7:30p.m.
7/20
vs.Portland
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/27
vs. Chivas
8p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/4
AmericanLeague
BOSTON RED SOX — Activated RHP Clayton
Mortensen from the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP
Pedro Beato to Pawtucket (IL). Announced senior
vice president and assistant general counsel Jen-
nifer Flynn will also serve as general counsel for
Fenway Sports Management.
CHICAGOWHITESOX—Placed3BConor Gillaspie
on the paternity leave list. Recalled 3B Brent Morel
from Charlotte (IL).
CLEVELANDINDIANS — Activated SS Asdrubal
Cabrera from the 15-day DL. Designated INF John
McDonald for assignment.
National League
PITTSBURGH PIRATES — Reinstated RHP Jean-
mar Gomez from the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP
Duke Welker to Indianapolis (IL).
SANDIEGOPADRES— Recalled LHP Robbie Erlin
from Tucson (PCL). Optioned RHP Brad Brach to
Tucson.
AmericanAssociation
KANSASCITYT-BONES— Traded INF Jeff Squier
to Lincoln for a player to be named.
SIOUXFALLSCANARIES—SignedOFMarcosRo-
driguez.
WICHITAWINGNUTS—SignedRHPBenGraham.
Released RHP Kyle Wahl.
Atlantic League
LONG ISLAND DUCKS — Signed of LHP Erick
Threets. Released RHP Connor Graham.
Can-Am League
NEW JERSEY JACKALS — Released LHP Bobby
Lucas.
ROCKLAND BOULDERS — Sold the contract of
OF Chris Edmondson to Atlanta (NL).
Frontier League
LAKE ERIE CRUSHERS — Signed LHP Connor
Whalen.
ROCKFORDAVIATORS— Acquired INF Brandon
Newton from Newark (Can-Am) for a player to be
named.Released1BEvanButtonandINFTedObre-
gon.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
GOLDENSTATEWARRIORS— Announced F Carl
Landry opted out of the final year of his contract to
become a free agent.
LOSANGELESLAKERS— Exercised their contract
optiononGJodieMeeksfor the2013-14season.Ex-
tended a qualifying offer to C Robert Sacre.
MIAMI HEAT— Exercised their contract option on
G Mario Chalmers for the 2013-14 season.
TORONTORAPTORS— Announced the resigna-
tion of president Bryan Colangelo who will remain
as a consultant with the team.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
CLEVELANDBROWNS— Released LB Ausar Wal-
cott.
DETROIT LIONS — Signed DE Israel Idonije to a
one-year contract. Released DE Freddie Bishop.
NEWENGLANDPATRIOTS— Released TE Aaron
Hernandez.
CanadianFootball League
EDMONTONESKIMOS— Signed LB Joash Gesse.
Released RB Tracy Lampley.
HOCKEY
National HockeyLeague
SANJOSESHARKS—SignedFAndrewDesjardins
to a two-year contract. Re-signed F James Shep-
pard to a one-year contract.
TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING — Re-signed D Keith
Aulie to a one-year contract.
WASHINGTON CAPITALS — Re-signed F Joel
Rechlicz to a one-year contract.
SOCCER
Major LeagueSoccer
D.C.UNITED—Terminatedthecontract of FRafael.
VANCOUVER WHITECAPS — Waived D Adam
Clement.
COLLEGE
NCAA—PlacedOregon’sfootball programonpro-
bationfor threeyearsandpenalizedtheschool one
scholarship for recruiting violations under previ-
ous coach Chip Kelly.
BIGEASTCONFERENCE— Named Val Ackerman
commissioner.
BARUCH— Promoted Danial Levent to men’s vol-
leyball coach.
MINNESOTASTATE (MANKATO) — Named Ben
Jones women’s assistant soccer coach.
TRANSACTIONS
Warriors’ Landry opts out
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — Power forward Carl Landry
has opted out of the final year of his two-
year, $8 million deal with the Golden State
Warriors to become a free agent.
Landry’s agent, Mark Bartelstein, said
Wednesday that his client was coming off a
big season and it only made sense for him to
hit the open market in hopes of landing a
long-term deal. He added that Landry could
still return to the Warriors.
The Warriors had expected Landry to
become a free agent. General manager Bob
Myers said last week that Landry’s contract
called for him to inform the team of his deci-
sion before Thursday, when the NBA draft
will take place.
The 29-year-old Landry averaged 10.8
points and six rebounds in 23.2 minutes off
the bench last season.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The NCAA stripped Oregon of a
scholarship in each of the next
two seasons and placed the pro-
gram on probation for three years,
opting against stiffer penalties
like a bowl ban despite issuing a
show-cause order against former
coach Chip Kelly, who apologized
to the school, its fans and it play-
ers.
The NCAA’s Division I
Committee on Infractions released
a report on Wednesday that said
Kelly failed to monitor the pro-
gram for its improper involve-
ment with Willie Lyles and his
Houston-based recruiting service.
Kelly was hit with an 18-month
show-cause order, a sanction that
likely will have limited impact
now that he’s coaching the
Philadelphia Eagles.
The program he left behind faces
three years of scholarship reduc-
tions, starting last year and
extending through 2014-15. It
also faces reductions in paid visits
and evaluation days, but avoided
some of the harsher penalties
handed down to other programs in
recent years.
“Now that the NCAA has con-
cluded their investigation and
penalized the University of
Oregon and its football program, I
want to apologize to the
University of Oregon, all of its
current and former players and
their fans,” Kelly said in a state-
ment. “I accept my share of
responsibility for the actions that
led to the penalties. As I have I
stated before, the NCAA investi-
gation and subsequent ruling had
no impact on my decision to leave
Oregon for Philadelphia. I have
also maintained throughout that I
had every intention to cooperate
with the NCAA’s investigation,
which I did.”
Oregon put on probation,
but does not face bowl ban
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OMAHA — Not only is UCLA
the national champion, the Bruins
also serve as a model for how to
build a winner in this new era of
college baseball.
The Bruins ended the year with
nary a .300 hitter, but, boy, could
they pitch and play defense.
“We play a lot of tight games,”
star closer David Berg said. “We
aren’t explosive offensively, but
we win a lot of games because we
do execute.”
They did all season, but never
more than at the College World
Series, where their grinding
offense and lockdown pitching
and defense both frustrated and fas-
cinated opponents.
Some coaches have lamented the
drop-off in offense since new bat
standards went into effect in 2011.
There also has been grumbling
about how unfriendly the cav-
ernous TD Ameritrade Park is to
home-run hitters.
Bruins coach John Savage said
before the finals that those coach-
es need to stop complaining and
start adjusting.
They might want to follow
Savage’s lead.
Apitching coach before he was a
head coach, Savage always has
adhered to the pitching-and-
defense mantra. As for offense, his
philosophy asks his team to capi-
talize on every opportunity and
scratch out runs any which way it
can.
It was a style well-suited to
2013, when college baseball’s
offensive numbers were at or near
the level of the wooden bat days
pre-1974.
This College World Series was
Exhibit Afor the game’s new age.
The combined batting average for
the 14 games was .237. There were
three home runs.
The Bruins (49-17) batted .227
and had no homers. That was the
lowest batting average by a
national champion in the metal-
bat era, and they were the first team
since 1966 to win a title with no
home runs.
UCLA is a fitting national
champ in era of low offense
16
Thursday • June 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
NATION
By Kimberly Dozier
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — U.S. intelli-
gence agencies are scrambling to
salvage their surveillance of al-
Qaida and other terrorists who are
working frantically to change how
they communicate after a National
Security Agency contractor leaked
details of two NSA spying pro-
grams. It’s an electronic game of
cat-and-mouse that could have
deadly consequences if a plot is
missed or a terrorist operative
manages to drop out of sight.
Terrorist groups had always
taken care to avoid detection —
from using anonymous email
accounts, to multiple cellphones,
to avoiding electronic communi-
cations at all, in the case of Osama
bin Laden. But there were some
methods of communication, like
the Skype video teleconferencing
software that some militants still
used, thinking they were safe,
according to U.S. counterterror-
ism officials who follow the
groups. They spoke anonymously
as a condition of describing their
surveillance of the groups. Those
militants now know to take care
with Skype — one of the 9 U.S.-
based Internet servers identified by
former NSA contractor Edward
Snowden’s leaks to The Guardian
and The Washington Post.
Two U.S. intelligence officials
say members of virtually every
terrorist group, including core al-
Qaida members, are attempting to
change how they communicate,
based on what they are reading in
the media, to hide from U.S. sur-
veillance. It is the first time intel-
ligence officials have described
which groups are reacting to the
leaks. The officials spoke anony-
mously because they were not
authorized to
speak about the
i n t e l l i g e n c e
matters pub-
licly.
The officials
wouldn’t go
into details on
how they know
this, whether
it’s terrorists
s w i t c h i n g
email accounts or cellphone
providers or adopting new encryp-
tion techniques, but a lawmaker
briefed on the matter said al-
Qaida’s Yemeni offshoot, al-Qaida
in the Arabian Peninsula, has been
among the first to alter how it
reaches out to its operatives.
The lawmaker spoke anony-
mously because he would not, by
name, discuss the confidential
briefing.
Shortly after Edward Snowden
leaked documents about the secret
NSA surveillance programs, chat
rooms and websites used by like-
minded extremists and would-be
recruits advised users how to avoid
NSA detection, from telling them
not to use their real phone num-
bers to recommending specific
online software programs to keep
spies from tracking their comput-
ers’ physical locations.
House Intelligence Committee
Chairman Mike Rogers, R-Mich.,
said there are “changes we can
already see being made by the
folks who wish to do us harm, and
our allies harm.”
Sen. Angus King, I-Maine, said
Tuesday that Snowden “has basi-
cally alerted people who are ene-
mies of this country ... (like) al-
Qaida, about what techniques we
have been using to monitor their
activities and foil plots, and com-
promised those efforts, and it’s
very conceivable that people will
die as a result.”
Privacy activists are more skep-
tical of the claims. “I assume my
communication is being moni-
tored,” said Andrea Prasow, senior
counterterrorism counsel for
Human Rights Watch. She said
that’s why her group joined a law-
suit against the Director of
National Intelligence to find out if
its communications were being
monitored. The case was dismissed
by the U.S. Supreme Court last
fall. “I would be shocked if terror-
ists didn’t also assume that and
take steps to protect against it,”
she said.
“The government is telling us,
‘This has caused tremendous
harm.’ But also saying, ‘Trust us
we have all the information. The
US government has to do a lot
more than just say it,” Prasow
said.
NSA leaks cause Al-Qaida to alter protocols
Edward
Snowden
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Congress is
balking at the administration’s first
attempt to pay for lethal aid to the
Syrian rebels until the White House
presents a more fully developed pro-
posal than one they received last
week from Secretary of State John
Kerry, including options for what
the U.S. will do next if the initial
surge of arms fails to improve the
rebels’ standing in the civil war
that’s gone on for more than two
years.
Lawmakers last week rejected the
Obama administration’s initial pro-
posal to arm Syrian rebels, refusing
to fund the plan until the White
House presents options for what
action the U.S. might take at the
U.N. or what actions might trigger
the administration to set up an area
where U.S. or allied forces prohibit
Syrian planes from attacking rebel
positions, known as a no-fly zone.
Top lawmakers met with adminis-
tration officials at the White House
Wednesday to see if they could break
the impasse. Deputy Secretary of
State William Burns was attending
the meeting, which follows a classi-
fied briefing for lawmakers last
week.
A White House spokeswoman
declined comment.
“We want to make sure that we
know what the end game is and we
want to make sure it’s the right
strategy,” said Rep. Jim Langevin,
D-R.I., a member of the House
Intelligence Committee, describing
the ongoing exchanges with the
administration. “So we’re support-
ive of the president’s efforts to con-
tinue to put pressure on the Assad
regime and to support the rebels,
but we all continue to ask tough
questions — do we know who these
rebels are and in the long run, are we
backing the right group, and are any
action that we taking in total con-
cert with the allies and surrounding
nations in the region, so that this
doesn’t ever become a U.S.-only
effort.”
House Speaker John Boehner, R-
Ohio, met with President Barack
Obama on Tuesday.
“It was an important conversa-
tion about Syria and possible ways
forward,” Boehner told reporters
Wednesday. “We’ve got to make
some decisions there’s just no ifs,
ands or buts about it.” He gave no
details of what was discussed.
Separately, Gen. Martin
Dempsey, the chairman of the Joint
Chiefs of Staff, raised concerns
about the implications of a no-fly
zone.
“My concern has been that —
ensuring that Syria’s airplanes
don’t fly addresses about 10 percent
of the problem in terms of the casu-
alties that are taken in Syria,”
Dempsey told reporters at the
Pentagon. “And if we choose to
conduct a no-fly zone, it’s essential
an act of war, and I’d like to under-
stand the plan to make peace before
we start a war.”
The Obama administration
announced earlier this month that it
would start sending weapons to
Syrian opposition groups, after it
found conclusive evidence that
Syrian President Bashar Assad’s
regime has used chemical weapons
against opposition forces. The
White House said multiple chemical
attacks last year with substances
including the nerve agent sarin
killed up to 150 people. Britain and
the United States notified the United
Nations of 10 different incidents of
alleged chemical weapons use by
the Syrian government, a U.N.
diplomat said Wednesday, speaking
on condition of anonymity because
the incidents have not been pub-
licly divulged.
Rep. Tom Rooney, R-Fla., a mem-
ber of the House Intelligence com-
mittee, and Rep. Michael McCaul,
R-Texas, head of the Homeland
Security panel, introduced legisla-
tion late Tuesday that would block
the administration from providing
weapons to the rebels unless it gets
congressional approval first.
Lawmakers want more details before funding Syria
“We want to make sure that we know
what the end game is and we want to
make sure it’s the right strategy.”
— Rep. Jim Langevin, D-R.I.
17
Thursday • June 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
18
Thursday • June 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SUBURBAN LIVING
Easy to Use • Stylish • Comfortable
By Lee Reich
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Fruit trees that were so full of blossoms
this spring that they looked like giant
snowballs foretell a heavy crop of fruit later
this year.
Too heavy.
Too much, perhaps, for the branches to
support. And surely so heavy that next
year’s harvest could be paltry.
Some fruit trees are prone to a feast-and-
famine cycle — a heavy crop one year and a
light crop the next. My Macoun apple tree
is one of the worst in this regard among the
score or so apple varieties that I grow.
Fortunately, this tendency toward “bien-
nial bearing” can be reined in.
Blame it on hormones
Hormones produced in fruit seeds are to
blame for biennial bearing. The hormones
suppress flower-bud formation, which
begins in fruit trees the year before the flow-
ers actually unfold. So a heavy crop one
year — and, hence, a lot of seeds — quells
flower-bud formation that year, and flower-
ing and fruiting the next year. In a year with
few fruits, hormone levels stay low, so
many flower buds are initiated and in the
next year trees are a riot of blooms.
The way to thwart this feast-and-famine
tendency is to reduce the number of fruits in
a tree’s “feast” year.
Pruning is one way to do it — cutting off
some stems that would have flowered and
gone on to bear fruit. The time for pruning
most fruit trees is past, though; it was back
in late winter and early spring, before
growth began again.
Pruning, of course, has effects beyond
those on biennial bearing, and each kind of
fruit tree has its own pruning needs. Still, as
you prune to open a tree up to light and air,
and to control its size, you are also remov-
ing potential fruits and seeds. And shorten-
ing branches puts remaining fruits closer to
the trunk, where they are less likely to
break a limb.
But pruning alone is generally not
enough to get a fruit tree out of a bad habit.
Now is the time to start looking over your
trees and “thinning” — that is, removing —
excess fruitlets. Focus your energy on larg-
er fruits, such as apples, pears and peaches,
because thinning would be too tedious —
and has little effect — on small fruits such
as cherries and small plums.
Take matters into your own hands
The sooner you begin thinning, the
greater the benefit next year, especially
with apple trees. I use my thumbnail or a
pointy pair of flower shears. If you have a
lot of trees, you might opt for more labor-
saving methods, such as blasts of water
from a hose or batting the flowers with a
piece of hose slid over the end of a broom-
stick. Many commercial orchardists thin
their fruits with chemical sprays.
No need to complete all the fruit thinning
in one session. Ideally, do it in two waves.
The first is after fruits begin to form. The
second is right after June drop.
After carrying extra fruitlets to get it
through spring frosts and other early-sea-
son calamities, a tree gives a sigh of relief
that danger has past, and decides it’s OK to
shed some fruits. Once that happens, look
over your trees and put a few inches of space
between each developing fruit, selectively
saving those that are largest and most free
of blemishes.
Further rewards
Fruit thinning has other benefits, too. It
reduces pests, such as codling moth — the
“worm” in an apple — because Ms. Codling
prefers to lay eggs in apples that are touch-
ing each other.
Fruit thinning also lets the tree pump
more energy, which translates into bigger
size and better flavor, into those fruits that
remain.
If you grow Asian pears and want to grow
good-tasting ones, be especially bold with
fruit thinning. These trees tend to bear
heavily, and without bold thinning, the
fruits are almost tasteless. Put a few inches
between one fruit and the next, and their
taste will be ambrosial.
Fruit may need thinning for growth, flavor
Thinning fruit trees not only benefits the tree
but helps assure a good harvest the
following season.
SUBURBAN LIVING 19
Thursday • June 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Kim Cook
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Moth-wing light fixtures?
Thunderhead wallpaper? If you’re an
armchair naturalist, you’ll love one
of this year’s big home decor trends.
Artists and artisans have captured
flora, fauna and even meteorology in
media such as photography, illustra-
tion, metal and clay. The designs,
translated into wall decor and fur-
nishings, range from startling to
serene.
Clinton Friedman’s garden in
Durban, South Africa, is home to
more than 250 trees and 150 succu-
lent species. Desiccated leaves,
freshly pulled roots and labyrinthine
flower heads all serve as material for
his close-up photographs. West Elm
has previously collaborated with
Friedman on a pillow collection;
this season they’ve got his 28-inch,
square, white-framed prints of aloe
plants. The oversize spiky succu-
lents look like flora — or perhaps
even fauna — from another planet.
(www.westelm.com )
Brooklyn, N.Y.-based Christine
Facella has used her experience as an
illustrator and model maker at New
York’s Museum of Natural History to
inform her collection of porcelain
animal skulls. The accuracy and
intricacy of her work results from
sculpting up to 20 molds for each
piece.
Facella portrays many denizens of
the North American wilderness,
including coyotes, bobcats and
beavers. The skulls are a compelling
meld of antiquarian curiosity and
contemporary objet d’art. The teeth
on some gleam with 14-karat-gold
luster. (www.beetleandflor.com )
Lighting sculptor David
D’Imperio finds his inspiration in
nature’s structures: The organic
geometry of moth wings, honey-
combs and crystals gets turned into
elegant and unusual lighting in the
old post office in Stony Run, Pa.,
that D’Imperio has turned into a stu-
dio.
Pendants and chandeliers, as well
as suspended linear fixtures, are craft-
ed out of materials such as stainless
steel and aluminum. D’Imperio’s
Ozone light is a 5-foot length of
shimmering circles, like fizzy bub-
bles lit from within. Silver powder-
coated steel and frosted Pyrex glass
are transformed into the Neuron fix-
ture for wall or ceiling. You can
choose the color of the nucleus.
Hydra is an otherworldly chandelier
done in a metallic blue-green; the
designer was inspired by the micro-
scopic denizens of the deep sea.
(www.daviddimperio.com )
At this spring’s International
Contemporary Furniture Fair in New
York City, local designer Barbara
Barran’s showed her Ice rug, inspired
by the surface of frozen water. The
piece’s striations and cool, watery
tones gave the slightly unsettling
but wholly intriguing sense of
standing on actual ice. That she’s
rendered this illusion in hand-tufted
wool is even more remarkable.
(www.classicrug.com )
British designer Abigail Edwards
showed her nature-inspired wallpa-
per at the fair. She’s launched a new
design called Storm Clouds — omi-
nous thunderheads printed on a gray
or blue background, with white or
copper metallic lightning bolts. Her
Brambleweb paper depicts an Art
Nouveau-meets-Gothic swirl of
brambles tipped with tiny metallic
thorns. And Wilson’s Crystals are
inspired by the work of Wilson
Bentley, who spent half a century
photographing snowflakes. The
wallpaper features an intricate print
of 30 snowflakes.
Edwards also does a mural consist-
ing of 18 ceramic tiles digitally
printed with dragonflies darting or
sitting on lithe, curling branches.
(www.abigailedwards.com )
Mother Nature meets modern decor
South African photographer Clinton Friedman teamed with West Elm, a
home decor website, to produce floral-based art, part of a new trend in
home decorating.
Dr. Oz to launch lifestyle
magazine with Hearst
NEWYORK — Dr. Mehmet Oz is
trying something new: his own
lifestyle magazine.
Hearst Magazines said Monday a
pilot issue will be published early
next year, followed by a second issue,
“which could lead to a regular frequen-
cy in the second half of 2014.”
In a statement, Oz said the maga-
zine “will provide women with every-
thing they need to feel inspired and
live a long, healthy, joyful life.”
Earlier this month, “The Dr. Oz
Show” won its third Daytime Emmy
Award for best informative talk show.
Paula Deen dropped by
Wal-Mart after ’Today’ tears
NEW YORK — Paula Deen was
dropped by Wal-Mart and her name
was stripped from four buffet restau-
rants on Wednesday, hours after she
went on television and tearfully
defended herself amid the mounting
fallout over her admission of using a
racial slur.
The story has become both a day-
by-day struggle by a successful busi-
nesswoman to keep her career afloat
and an object lesson on the level of
tolerance and forgiveness in society
for being caught making an insensi-
tive remark.
Wal-Mart Stores Inc. said
Wednesday that it ended its relation-
ship with Deen and will not place
“any new orders beyond what’s
already committed.”
Lifestyle briefs
LOCAL/NATION/WORLD 20
Thursday • June 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THURSDAY, JUNE27
NCHRAPeninsulaRegionNetworking
Social. 5:30p.m.to7:30p.m.Alana’sCafe,
1020MainSt.,RedwoodCity.$25NCHRA
members, $35 non-members. For more
information call 415-291-1992.
Mustache Harbor. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Central Park, 50 E. Fifth Ave., San Mateo.
A group of dedicated and talented
musicians brought together by their
astrological signs and a love for vintage
soft rock and sweet ’staches. For more
information visit ci.sanmateo.ca.us.
Parkinson’sFundraiser. 6p.m.-7:30p.m.
1733 California Drive,Burlingame.Event
features the photography of William
Crandall Sr.,aresident of MillsEstateVilla.
Photographs will be available for
purchase. Light appetizers and
refreshments will be served. For more
information call 692-0600.
Movies on the Square: ‘Back to the
Future.’ 8:45 p.m. Courthouse Square,
2200 Broadway, Redwood City. Free. For
more information call 780-7311 or go to
www.redwoodcity.org/events/movies.ht
ml.
FRIDAY, JUNE28
ReleasingtheInnerEntrepreneurwith
Tim Russell. 7:30 a.m. to 8:30 a.m.
Wedgewood Banquet Center, Crystal
Springs Golf Course, 6650 Golf Course
Drive,Burlingame.$15includesbreakfast
- paid at the door. For more information
call 515-5891.
Real Estate Trends and Transactions
withChrisEckert,ClarkeFunkhouser,
and Michael Berube. 7:45 a.m. is
registration and coffee. Program is from
8 a.m. to 9 a.m. Poplar Creek Grill, 1700
Coyote Point Drive, San Mateo. $30 for a
continental breakfast and the program.
For more information call 401-2441.
Home Safety and Fraud Prevention.
10 a.m. to Noon. Twin Pines Senior and
Community Center, 20 Twin Pines Lane,
Belmont. The Belmont Police
Department and Fire Department
present ‘Don’t Get Burned: A workshop
on Home Safety and Fraud Prevention.
This workshop is for ages 18+. Free. For
more information call 595-7441 or go to
www.belmont.gov.
Student Photography Class Gallery
Showing — Pacifica Boys and Girls
Clubs. Moonraker Restaurant, 105
Rockaway Beach Ave.,Pacifica.For more
information call 589-7090x14 or email
sdoal@theclubs.org
PrideandJoy—Pop/Soul. 6 p.m. to 8
p.m.CourthouseSquare,2200Broadway,
RedwoodCity.Free.For moreinformation
call 780-7311.
Start theSummer Concert. 6 p.m. to 8
p.m. Lot J, Primrose Road, Burlingame.
Live music by Beatles cover band, Nigel
andClive.Hot cocoa,popcorn,andcotton
candy will be available to support the
Burlingame Youth Scholarship Fund.For
more information call 558-7300.
Adult Film Night Deliciously Reel:
Babette’sFeast. 7 p.m.Belmont Library,
1110 Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont.
Screening of the 1988 Academy Award-
winning movie for Best Foreign
Language Film (Denmark). For more
information call 591-8286.
SouthSanFranciscoOpenMic.7 p.m.
to11p.m.116El CampoDrive,SouthSan
Francisco.Free.For moreinformationcall
451-2450.
Non-traditional dating convention.
7:30 p.m. Grosvenor Hotel SFO, 380 S.
Airport Blvd.,SouthSanFrancisco.Dressy
attire requested. $20 at the door. For
more information go to
www.thepartyhotline.com.
Waltz, Polka, Tango, Charleston and
other dancing. 7:30 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Veterans Memorial Senior Center, 1455
Madision Ave., Redwood City.There will
be light refreshments, water and coffee.
$5 per person, $7 for non-members.
Laurie Knox at Freewheel Brewing
Company. 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. 3736
Florence St., Redwood City. Laurie and
Jeff, members of local Menlo Park band
Loose Gravel, will perform acoustic sets
covering classics be female singer-
songwriters Crow, Morissette, Raitt and
others.
Foster City Social Dance. 8:30 p.m. to
11:30 p.m.Foster City Recreation Center,
650 Shell Blvd., Foster City. Dance the
night awayinthelovelyLagoonRoomat
Foster City Recreation Center. $12. For
more information email
cheryl@booglewoogleballroom.com.
Movies on the Square: ‘Back to the
Future.’ 8:45 p.m. Courthouse Square,
2200 Broadway, Redwood City. Free. For
more information call 780-7311 or go to
www.redwoodcity.org/events/movies.ht
ml.
Live Salsa, Bachata, Merengue and
ChaChaChaWithLaFuerzaGigante.
9 p.m. Club Fox, 2209 Broadway,
RedwoodCity.$15.For moreinformation
go to www.clubfoxrwc.com.
Calendar
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BELO HORIZONTE, Brazil — Brazilian pro-
testers and police clashed Wednesday near a
stadium hosting a Confederations Cup foot-
ball match, with tens of thousands of demon-
strators trying to march on the site con-
fronting police firing tear gas and rubber bul-
lets.
Anti-government protesters in part angered
by the billions spent in World Cup prepara-
tions picked up tear gas canisters and lobbed
them back at police, along with a shower of
rocks. Adense fog of the acrid gas enveloped
the mass of protesters, about a mile (2 kilome-
ters) away from the stadium where Brazil was
playing Uruguay in a semifinal match of the
warm-up tournament for next year’s World
Cup.
Police set up 2-kilometer (1-mile) perimeter
around the stadium, normal procedure for inter-
national tournaments. Mounted police and riot
units maintained another security line about 1
kilometer (half-mile) from the stadium.
“The protesters started this when they tried
to break through our outer barrier,” said police
Capt. Flavio Almeida. “We had no choice but
to respond.”
About 50,000 protesters had earlier massed
in a central plaza in Belo Horizonte.
“We don’t need the World Cup,” said
Leonardo Fabri, a 19-year-old protester. “We
need education, we need better health services,
a more humane police.”
It’s the latest protest to turn violent as Latin
America’s biggest nation has been hit by
nationwide protests since June 17.
Elsewhere in Brazil the situation was mostly
calm, in part because Brazil’s congress shelved
legislation that was a target of nationwide
protests. Peaceful protests were seen in
Brasilia and the northeastern city of Recife.
Brazil protesters, police clash near match
REUTERS
A protester is detained by a police officer
during protests in Belo Horizonte.
against the federal marriage act, labeling the
law “discrimination enshrined in law.”
“It treated loving, committed gay and les-
bian couples as a separate and lesser class of
people,” Obama said in a statement. “The
Supreme Court has righted that wrong, and our
country is better off for it.”
House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, said
he was disappointed in the outcome of the fed-
eral marriage case and hoped states continue to
define marriage as the union of a man and a
woman. Boehner, as speaker, had stepped in as
the main defender of the law before the court
after the Obama administration declined to
defend it.
The other case, dealing with California’s
constitutional ban on same-sex marriage, was
resolved by an unusual lineup of justices in a
technical legal fashion that said nothing about
gay marriage. But the effect was to leave in
place a trial court’s declaration that
California’s Proposition 8 ban was unconstitu-
tional. Gov. Jerry Brown quickly ordered that
marriage licenses be issued to gay couples as
soon as a federal appeals court lifts its hold on
the lower court ruling. That will take least 25
days, the appeals court said.
California, where gay marriage was briefly
legal in 2008, would be the 13th state, along
with the District of Columbia, to allow same-
sex couples to marry and would raise the share
of the U.S. population in gay marriage states
to 30 percent. Six states have adopted same-
sex marriage in the past year, amid a rapid evo-
lution in public opinion that now shows
majority support for the right to marry in most
polls.
The 12 other states are Connecticut,
Delaware, Iowa, Maine, Maryland,
Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Hampshire,
New York, Rhode Island, Vermont and
Washington.
The day’s rulings are clear for people who
were married and live in states that allow same-
sex marriage. They now are eligible for federal
benefits.
The picture is more complicated for same-sex
couples who traveled to another state to get
married, or who have moved from a gay mar-
riage state since being wed.
Their eligibility depends on the benefit s
they are seeking. For instance, immigration
law focuses on where people were married, not
where they live. But eligibility for Social
Security survivor benefits basically depend on
where a couple is living when a spouse dies.
This confusing array of regulations is reflect-
ed more broadly in the disparate treatment of
gay couples between states. And the court’s
decision did not touch on another part of the
federal marriage law that says a state does not
have to recognize a same-sex marriage per-
formed elsewhere.
Indeed, the outcome of the cases had support-
ers of gay marriage already anticipating their
next trip to the high court, which they reason
will be needed to legalize same-sex unions in
all 50 states.
The Human Rights Campaign’s president,
Chad Griffin, said his goal is to legalize same-
sex marriage nationwide within five years
through a combination of ballot measures,
court challenges and expansion of anti-dis-
crimination laws.
The rulings came 10 years to the day after the
court’s Lawrence v. Texas decision that struck
down state bans on gay sex. In his dissent at
the time, Justice Antonin Scalia predicted the
ruling would lead to same-sex marriage.
On Wednesday, Scalia issued another pun-
gent dissent in the Defense of Marriage Act
case in which he made a new prediction that the
ruling would be used to upend state restrictions
on marriage. Kennedy’s majority opinion
insisted the decision was limited to legally
married same-sex couples.
Scalia read aloud in a packed courtroom that
included the two couples who sued for the right
to marry in California. On the bench, Justice
Elena Kagan, who voted to strike down DOMA,
watched Scalia impassively as he read.
“It takes real cheek for today’s majority to
assure us, as it is going out the door, that a con-
stitutional requirement to give formal recogni-
tion to same-sex marriage is not at issue here—
when what has preceded that assurance is a lec-
ture on how superior the majority’s moral judg-
ment in favor of same-sex marriage is to the
Congress’ hateful moral judgment against it. I
promise you this: The only thing that will
‘confine’ the court’s holding is its sense of
what it can get away with,” Scalia said.
Continued from page 1
RIGHTS
COMICS/GAMES
6-27-13
wednesday’s PUZZLe sOLVed
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Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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4 Highchair attire
7 — fde
11 Lyric poem
12 Ranch measure
14 Culture medium
15 Pricey entrees
17 — -a-brac
18 Typos
19 Pitches
21 Caesar’s law
22 Before, to bards
23 Ancient Mexican
26 Battery terminals
29 Happy
30 Snapshots
31 Turn sharply
33 Bulg. neighbor
34 Walk in water
35 Fierce whale
36 Slip away
38 Accumulate
39 Travel choice
40 Dernier —
41 “The Jungle Book” hero
44 Legendary king
48 Sign
49 Lantern fuel
51 — Hathaway
52 Lawyer, briefy
53 Tooth-fllers’ org.
54 Not messy
55 Business VIP
56 Cat or turkey
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1 Mouse cousin
2 Scent
3 Midwest st.
4 Fasten
5 Climber’s tool (2 wds.)
6 Shivery comment
7 Pampered
8 Nasty one
9 Brad
10 Rainbow shapes
13 Flower oil
16 Light lunch
20 Tennis instructors
23 Boss, briefy
24 — vera
25 Tasty tubers
26 Offce assistant
27 Philanthropist Cornell
28 Marsupial pockets
30 Red powdery condiment
32 Car fll-up
34 Lament loudly
35 Fails to include
37 Lacey’s partner
38 Ravine
40 A la —
41 Castle defense
42 All, in combos
43 Make one’s way
45 Radiator output
46 Disentangle
47 Paper quantity
50 Catchall abbr.
diLBerT® CrOsswOrd PUZZLe
fUTUre sHOCk®
PearLs BefOre swine®
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THUrsday, JUne 27, 2013
CanCer (June 21-July 22) -- Your insights should
not be treated lightly, especially if they could lead to
an advantage in your career and/or add some weight
to your wallet.
LeO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Be an attentive listener,
because a colleague is likely to pass on some
extremely valuable information. You’ll need to read
between the lines to take advantage of it.
VirGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- A fortunate situation
could develop through someone who thinks the
same way you do. What transpires will be made
possible through mutual trust.
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Your ambitious
aims can be achieved if you put your mind to
it. I t will be important, however, that you think
and act big.
sCOrPiO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- When dealing
with others, you can call favorable at tention
to yourself by being understated. A whisper
commands at tention, while shouting turns
others of f.
saGiTTariUs (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- You
should pay at tention to both your intuition
and your common sense. Collectively, your
reasoning powers and your perceptions will be
exceptionally accurate.
CaPriCOrn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- The secret
to dealing successfully with others is to treat
everybody as an equal. This will be true
whether dealing with your boss or an underling.
aQUariUs (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- When shopping,
quality should be given priority over price when it
comes to a decision between two items. Take plenty
of time to study the intrinsic value of each.
PisCes (Feb. 20-March 20) -- To make the kind
of impression you’d like, you should take a little
more time than usual to select your attire. There’s a
chance you could encounter someone special.
aries (March 21-April 19) -- Your sincerity,
compassion and warmth will be a light and an
example to others. These attributes put you a cut or
two above all others.
TaUrUs (April 20-May 20) -- Make the needs of
your loved ones paramount to your own. True joy
comes from being a giver rather than a getter.
GeMini (May 21-June 20) -- An unusual occurrence
is likely to give you an advantage over your
associates. It could also be something of a fnancial
windfall.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Thursday • June 27, 2013 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Thursday • June 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
AUTMOTIVE -
NOW HIRING
SERVICE TECHNICIANS
OILSTOP DRIVE-THRU
OIL CHANGE
• Excellent benefits
• No experience necessary
• Complete training program
• Retirement program
• Advancement opportunities
• Competitive pay
APPLY IN PERSON AT
2009 El Camino Real, San Mateo
Monday-Saturday 8-6
For more info: www.oilstopinc.com
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
EXPERIENCED COOKS, Avanti Pizza. .
3536 Alameda, MENLO PARK, CA
(650)854-1222.
GARDENING HELP WANTED Watering
planting, P/T $15 an hour,
(650)552-9026
GREAT CLIPS
@ Sequoia Station
Redwood City
Now Hiring
Stylists & Managers.
Call Flo/Randy
408 247-8364 or 408 921-9994
Grand Opening Soon!
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
HOTEL -
Experienced front desk agent position,
and maintenance person position.
Fax resume: (650)589-7076.
Email: ac@citigardenhotel.com
110 Employment
MAINTENANCE
General Maintenance Assistant
private school, full time,
Tuesdays through Saturdays.
Grounds maintenance, cleaning, re-
pairs, painting, etc. Must be profes-
sional, reliable, lift 50+ lbs. Must
read, speak and write English fluent-
ly. Full criminal background check
and physical will be required.
To apply, email
jreams@mmboa.org
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
110 Employment
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
120 Child Care Services
AGAPE VILLAGES
Foster Family Agency
Become a Foster Parent!
We Need Loving Homes for
Disadvantaged Children
Entrusted to Our Care.
Monthly Compensation Provided.
Call 1-800-566-2225
Lic #397001741
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 521765
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Tien Shih Chen
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Tien Shih Chen filed a petition
with this court for a decree changing
name as follows: Present name: Tien
Shih Chen (a.k.a. Tien-Shi Chen) Pro-
posed name: Gavin Tien hih Chen (a.k.a.
Tien-Shi Chen) THE COURT ORDERS
that all persons interested in this matter
shall appear before this court at the hear-
ing indicated below to show cause, if
any, why the petition for change of name
should not be granted. Any person ob-
jecting to the name changes described
above must file a written objection that
includes the reasons for the objection at
least two court days before the matter is
scheduled to be heard and must appear
at the hearing to show cause why the pe-
tition should not be granted. If no written
objection is timely filed, the court may
grant the petition without a hearing. A
HEARING on the petition shall be held
on July 24, 2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ,
Room 2J , at 400 County Center, Red-
wood City, CA 94063. A copy of this Or-
der to Show Cause shall be published at
least once each week for four successive
weeks prior to the date set for hearing on
the petition in the following newspaper of
general circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 06/7/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 06/06/2013
(Published, 06/13/13, 06/20/13
06/27/2013, 07/04/2013)
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256161
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Birchwood, 175 Arch St., RED-
WOOD CITY, CA 94062 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owners: Kristin M.
Haselbach, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 06/04/2013.
/s/ Kristin M. Haselbach /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/06/13, 06/13/13, 06/20/13, 06/27/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256115
The following person is doing business
as: Amp Electric, 1735 E. Bayshore Rd.
Ste. 4A, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Boscacci, Inc, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 08/19/2008.
/s/ Hilda Boscacci/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/06/13, 06/13/13, 06/20/13, 06/27/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255995
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Happy Endings Bakeshop,
1171 Compass Lane, #106, FOSTER
CITY, CA 94404 is hereby registered by
the following owners: April Ulang & Tim
O’Neil, same address. The business is
conducted by a Married Couple. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 04/29/2013.
/s/ April Ulang /
/s/ Tim O’Neil /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/06/13, 06/13/13, 06/20/13, 06/27/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256073
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Crafted Catering, 530 Antia
Lane, MILLBRAE, CA 94030 is hereby
registered by the following owners: Ann-
Jeanette Mearig, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 0601/2013.
/s/ Ann-Jeanette Mearig /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/29/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/06/13, 06/13/13, 06/20/13, 06/27/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256139
The following person is doing business
as: Hands on Prints, 454 Peninsula Ave.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Pacific Rim
International School, CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 07/01/1995.
/s/ Christina Cheung /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/06/13, 06/13/13, 06/20/13, 06/27/13.)
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256289
The following person is doing business
as: EPF Wholesale Florist, 120 E. 3rd
Ave., SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Ed-
mond Sasounian, 1270 Tartan Trail Rd.,
Hillsborough, CA 94010. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Edmond Sasounian/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/13/13, 06/20/13, 06/27/13, 07/04/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256250
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Dry Clean for Less, 2) Alice’s Al-
terations, 18 E. 25th Ave., SAN MATEO,
CA 94403 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Yu Hee Leung, 1235 Visi-
tacion Ave., San Francisco, CA 94134.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on .
/s/ Yu Hee Leung /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/10/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/13/13, 06/20/13, 06/27/13, 07/04/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256198
The following person is doing business
as: A-1 Properties, 359 Castenada Dr.,
MILLBRAE, CA 94030 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Laurie Loy-
suong Yam, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on .
/s/ Laurie Loysuong Yam /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/5/2013. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/13/13, 06/20/13, 06/27/13, 07/04/13.)
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256208
The following person is doing business
as: Emerge Health and Welness, 840
Hinckley Rd., BURLINGAME, CA 94010
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Meghan Tompson, Oakland, CA
94605. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on .
/s/ Meghan Tompson /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/13/13, 06/20/13, 06/27/13, 07/04/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256206
The following person is doing business
as: Protomachines, LLC, 353 Mullet Ct.,
FOSTER CITY, CA 94404 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Protoma-
chines, LLC, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Limited Liability Company.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on .
/s/ George Loo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/13/13, 06/20/13, 06/27/13, 07/04/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256088
The following person is doing business
as: Rockaway Beach Dental Group, 205
Rockaway Beach Ave., Ste. 8, PACIF-
ICA, CA 94044 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Richard Evangelista,
DDS, Inc, CA. The business is conduct-
ed by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 03/18/2013.
/s/ Richard Evangelista /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/29/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/13/13, 06/20/13, 06/27/13, 07/04/13.)
23 Thursday • June 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256365
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Jolie Lox, 3349 Laurel Street,
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owners: Thema
McKinney, 378 Genoa Dr., Redwood
City, CA 94065 and Jill Hyatt, 1349 Lau-
rel St., San Carlos, CA 94070. The busi-
ness is conducted by a General Partner-
ship. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Thema McKinney /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/17/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/20/13, 06/27/13, 07/04/13, 07/11/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256350
The following person is doing business
as: Bubbly, 3000 Sand Hill Rd., #4-250,
MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Bubble
Motion, Inc., CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s/ Jeanne Joynson-Hewlett /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/17/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/20/13, 06/27/13, 07/04/13, 07/11/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255983
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: It’s My Party, 611 Manzanita
St., REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is here-
by registered by the following owners:
Otacilio P. de Sousa & Lilian B. de Sou-
sa, same address. The business is con-
ducted by Husband & Wife. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Otacilio P. de Sousa /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/21/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/20/13, 06/27/13, 07/04/13, 07/11/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256272
The following person is doing business
as: Clix System, 615 Hobart Ave., SAN
MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Lap-Kit Joseph
Cheung, 1525 Hayne Rd., Hillsborough,
CA 94010. The business is conducted
by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Lap-Kit Joseph Cheung /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/27/13, 07/04/13, 07/11/13, 07/18/13.)
SUMMONS
(CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER: CIV515356
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (Aviso Al
Demandado): Oscar Ramirez, Pablo Bry-
anAscencio and DOES 2-20
YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAIN-
TIFF: (Lo esta demandando el deman-
dante): Howard Weiss
NOTICE! You have been sued. The
court may decide against you without
your being heard unless you respond
within 30 days. Read the information be-
low.
You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after
this summons and legal papers are
served on you to file a written response
at the court and have a copy served on
the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not
protect you. Your written response must
be in proper legal form if you want the
court to hear your case. There may be a
court form that you can use for your re-
sponse. You can find these court forms
and more information at the California
Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your
county law library, or the courthouse
nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing
fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver
form. If you do not file your response on
time, you may lose the case by default,
and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning
from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You
may want to call an attorney right away.
If you do not know an attorney, you may
want to call an attorney referral service.
203 Public Notices
If you cannot afford an attorney, you may
be eligible for free legal services from a
nonprofit legal services program. You
can locate these nonprofit groups at the
California Legal Services Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the Califor-
nia Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by
contacting your local court or county bar
association. NOTE: The court has a stat-
utory lien for waived fees and costs on
any settlement or arbitration award of
$10,000 or more in a civil case. The
court’s lien must be paid before the court
will dismiss the case.
AVISO! Lo han demando. Si no re-
sponde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede
decidir en su contra sin escuchar su ver-
sion. Lea la informacion a continuacion.
Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de
que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles
legales para presentar una respuesta por
escrito en esta corte y hacer que se en-
tregue ena copia al demandante. Una
carta o una llamada telefonica no lo pro-
tegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene
que estar en formato legal correcto si de-
sea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que
usted pueda usar para su respuesta.
Puede encontrar estos formularios de la
corte y mas informacion en el Centro de
Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/),
en la biblio teca de leyes de su condado
o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si
no puede pagar la cuota de presenta-
cion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
de un formulario de exencion de pago de
cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a
tiempo, puede perder el caso por incum-
plimiento y la corte le podra quitar su su-
eldo, dinero y bienes sin mas adverten-
cia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es re-
comendable que llame a un abogado in-
mediatamente. Si no conoce a un abo-
dado, puede llamar a de servicio de re-
mision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a
un abogado, es posible que cumpia con
los requisitos para obtener servicios le-
gales gratuitos de un programa de servi-
cios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede
encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro
en el sitio web de California Legal Serv-
ices Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro
de Ayuda de las Cortes de California,
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/)
o poniendose en contacto con la corte o
el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO:
Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar
las cuotas y costos exentos por imponer
un gravamen sobre cualquier recupera-
cion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida
mediante un acuerdo o una concesion
de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil.
Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte
antes de que la corte pueda desechar el
caso.
The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y direccion de la corte es):
San Mateo County Superior Court
400 County Center
Redwood City, CA 94063
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff
without an attorney, is: (El nombre, direc-
cion y numero de telefono del abogado
del demandante, o del demandante que
no tiene abogado, es):
William T. Webb,
155 Montgomery St., Ste 1200
.SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94104
(415)277-7200
Date: (Fecha) June 4, 2013
John C. Fiton, Clerk (Secretario)
By M. Marlowe, Deputy (Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
June 6, 13, 20, 27, 2013.
210 Lost & Found
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
210 Lost & Found
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
SOLID OAK CRIB - Excellent condition
with Simmons mattress, $90.,
(650)610-9765
296 Appliances
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
HAIER 5200 BTU window air conditioner
- never used, in box, $95. obo, (650)591-
6842
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
JENN-AIR 30” downdraft slide-in range.
JES9800AAS, $875., never used, still in
the crate. Cost $2200 new.
(650)207-4664
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor,
(650)726-1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
WEBER BRAND Patio Refrigerator,
round top load, for beer, soda, and wa-
ter. $30 obo (650)591-6842
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
"OLD" IRON COFFEE GRINDER - $90.,
(650)596-0513
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
16 OLD glass telephone line insulators.
$60 San Mateo (650)341-8342
1940 VINTAGE telephone guaranty
bench Salem hardrock maple excellent
condition $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
67 USED United States (50) and Europe-
an (17) Postage Stamps. Most issued
before World War II. All different and de-
tached from envelopes. All for $4.00,
(650)787-8600
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
$100., (650)348-6428
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MENORAH - Antique Jewish tree of life,
10”W x 30”H, $100., (650)348-6428
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
PRISMS 9 in a box $99 obo
(650)363-0360
STAINED GLASS WINDOW - 30” x 18”,
diamond pattern, multi-colored, $95.,
SOLD!
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria
650-873-8167
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertable
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE STOVE, Brown brand, 30",
perfect condition, $75, (650)834-6075
ANTIQUE WALNUT Hall Tree, $800 obo
(650)375-8021
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
302 Antiques
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” high, 40” wide, 3 drawers, Display
case, bevelled glass, $700 obo
(650)766-3024
VINTAGE THOMASVILLE wingback
chair $50 firm, SSF (650)583-8069
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $20 each or both for $35 nice set.
SSF (650)583-8069
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HARMON/KANDON SPEAKERS (2)
mint condition, great, for small
office/room or extra speakers, 4 1/2 in.
high, includes cords $8., SOLD!
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
HP PRINTER - Model DJ1000, new, in
box, $38. obo, (650)995-0012
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
1940 MAHOGANY desk 34" by 72" 6
drawers center draw locks all comes with
clear glass top $70 OBO (650)315-5902
1940’S MAPLE dressing table with Mir-
ror & Stool. Needs loving and refinishing
to be beautiful again. Best Offer.
Burlingame SOLD!
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 PLANT stands $80 for both
(650)375-8021
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
2, 5 drawer medal cabinets 5' high 31/2'
wide both $40 SOLD
3 MEDAL base kitchen cabinets with
drawers and wood doors $99
(650)347-8061
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CABINET BLOND Wood, 6 drawers, 31”
Tall, 61” wide, 18” deep, $45
(650)592-2648
CHAIR (2), with arms, Italian 1988 Cha-
teau D'Ax, solid, perfect condition. $50
each or $85 for both. (650)591-0063
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
COPENHAGEN TEAK dining table with
dual 20" Dutch leaves extensions. 48/88"
long x 32" wide x 30" high. $95.00
(650)637-0930
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
COUCH. GREEN Cloth with end reclin-
ers on both sides. Beverage holder in the
middle, $50 (650)572-2864
304 Furniture
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER - 6 draw dresser 61" wide,
31" high, & 18" deep $50., (650)592-
2648
DRESSER, FOR SALE all wood excel-
lent condition $50 obo (650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
GLASS DINING Table 41” x 45” Round-
ed rectangle clear glass top and base
$85 (650)888-0129
GRANDMA ROCKING chair beautiful
white with gold trim $100 (650)755-9833
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
INDOOR OR OUTSIDE ROUND TABLE
- off white, 40”, $20.obo, (650)571-5790
LIGHT WOOD Rocking Chair & Has-
sock, gold cushions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
ORGAN BENCH $40 (650)375-8021
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
RECLINER ROCKER - Like new, brown,
vinyl, $99., (650)365-0202
ROCKING CHAIR - Beautiful light wood
rocking chair, very good condition, $65.,
OBO, SOLD!
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden, with
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR with wood carving,
armrest, rollers, and it swivels $99.,
(650)592-2648
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TEAK TV stand, wheels, rotational, glass
doors, drawer, 5 shelves. 31" wide x 26"
high X 18" deep. $75.00 (650)637-0930
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
WICKER ENTERTAINMENT CABINET -
H 78” x 43” x 16”, almost new, $89.,
(650)347-9920
WOODEN DESK 31/2' by 21/2' by 21/2'
$25 SOLD
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
24
Thursday • June 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Worked a
wedding, perhaps
5 Film on water
9 Worker with a
whip
14 Jackknifed, say
15 What you may do
when you
snooze?
16 Like Silas Marner
before finding
Eppie
17 Flow slowly
18 Conversant with
19 Cap’ns’
underlings
20 *Polite words
showing little
interest
23 Ready to sire
25 Forbid
26 Overly
27 Be a bad omen
31 RB’s units
32 *Words often
heard after
“Welcome”
35 Chamber
opening?
36 Humorous
Margaret
37 Landed
41 *Verbal
gamesmanship
46 Old flier
49 Enlarge, as a
blueprint
50 Égotiste’s
pronoun
51 Ready for
53 City on the
Somme
55 *Metaphorical
boundary
59 With 62-Down,
certain ... and
where to find the
ends of the
answers to
starred clues
60 Scull crew
61 Names
64 Mule and
whitetail
65 Balanchine bend
66 Canon ending?
67 Peacock’s gait
68 Law firm
letterhead
abbreviations
69 Lines from the
heart?
DOWN
1 Smile specialist’s
deg.
2 Morning pick-me-
up
3 Smooths
4 Where to get a
ticket to ride
5 “__ Millionaire”:
2008 Best Picture
6 Column filler
7 Biennial games
org.
8 List
9 Bulgur salad
10 Up in the rigging
11 To a large
degree
12 Ball team, e.g.
13 Corrects in wood
shop
21 __ top
22 Old-time actress
Negri
23 “Back __!”: “Same
here!”
24 Bugs, for one
28 Places to tie up
29 Set of moral
principles
30 “__ roll!”
33 Hardly a rookie
34 “Knots Landing”
actress __ Park
Lincoln
38 Certain
November also-
ran
39 Will occur as
planned
40 The one here
42 Most pretentious
43 Trotsky of Russia
44 Ones resting on a
bridge
45 Vivaldi motif
46 Infants don’t eat
them
47 Parlor instrument
48 Backpacker, often
52 ’60s rockers’
jacket style
54 Many a low-
budget film
56 Engage in frequent
elbow-bending
57 Dutch artist Frans
58 La Salle of “ER”
62 See 59-Across
63 Mercedes
roadsters
By Jean O’Conor
(c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
06/27/13
06/27/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
306 Housewares
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
3 PIECE fireplace set with screen $25
(650)322-2814
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 (650)755-9833
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
BREVILLE JUICER - Like new, SOLD!
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
JAPANESE SERVER unused in box, 2
porcelain cups and carafe for serving tea
or sake. $8.00, (650)578-9208
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good con-
dition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 (650)755-9833
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
308 Tools
1/2 HORSE power 8" worm drive skill
saw $40 OBO (650)315-5902
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
308 Tools
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
BLACK & DECKER CORDLESS 18 volt
combo drill, vacuum, saw, sander, two
batteries & charger, brand new, $95.
obo, SOLD!
BLACK AND Decker, 10” trimmer/edger
, rechargeable, brand new, $50
(650)871-7200
BOB VILLA rolling tool box & organizer -
brand new with misc. tools, $40. obo,
(650)591-6842
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTMANS PROFESSIONAL car buf-
fer with case $40 OBO (650)315-5902
CRAFTSMAN 14.4 VOLT DRILL - bat-
tery & charger, never used, $35. obo,
SOLD!
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 3/8” 16.8 volt drill & vac-
uum combo, brand new, with charger,
$45. obo, SOLD!
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DEWALT 18 volt battery drill with 2 bat-
tery & charger $45 OBO SOLD!
DREMEL HIGH SPEED ROTARY TOOL
- all attachments, never used, $25. obo
SOLD!
308 Tools
ELECTRIC HEDGE trimmer good condi-
tion (Black Decker) $40 (650)342-6345
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
LADDER - 24' aluminum 2 section ladder
$20., SOLD
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
MAKITA 21” Belt Sander with long cord,
$35 (650)315-5902
MILLWAUKEE SAWSALL in case with
blades (like new) $50 OBO SOLD!
NEW DRILL DRIVER - 18V + battery &
charger, $30., (650)595-3933
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
SANDER, MAKITA finishing sander, 4.5
x 4.5"' used once. Complete with dust
bag and hard shell case. $35.00 SOLD!
SMALL ROTETILLER 115 Volt Works
well $99.00 (650)355-2996
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
TOOL BOX - custom made for long
saws, $75.,SOLD!
TOOLAND INC
Name brands * Huge inventory
Low prices
Personalized service
M-F 7"30 - 6; Sa: 9 - 4:30
1369 Industrial, San Carlos
(650)631-9636
www,tooland.com
TORO ELECTRIC POWER SWEEPER
blower - never used, in box, $35. obo,
(650)591-6842
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $65 (650)341-8342
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
IBM SELECTRIC II typewriter self cor-
recting $25 (650)322-2814
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
3 LARGE old brown mixing bowls $75
for all 3 (650)375-8021
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History,
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
5 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $9. for all
(650)347-5104
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADULT VIDEO 75 with jackets 75 with-
out $100 for all, SOLD!
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99., (650)580-
3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99., (650)580-
3316
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
ASTRONOMY BOOKS (2) Hard Cover
Cambridge Encyclopedia of Astronomy,
World of Discovery, $12., (650)578-9208
BACKPACK- Unused, blue, many pock-
ets, zippers, use handle or arm straps
$14., (650)578-9208
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BATHROOM VANITY light fixture - 2
frosted glass shades, brass finish, 14”W
x 8.75”H x 8.75”D, wall mount, excellent
condition, $43., (650)347-5104
BAY BRIDGE Framed 50th anniversary
poster (by Bechtel corp) $50
(650)873-4030
BELL COLLECTION 50 plus asking $50
for entire collection SOLD!
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY Jake AB Scissor Exercise Ma-
chine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
C2 MATCHING LIGHT SCONCES -
style wall mount, plug in, bronze finish,
12” L x 5”W , good working condition,
$12. both, (650)347-5104
COPPER LIKE TUB - unused, 16 inches
long, 6 in. high, 8 inch wide, OK tabletop-
per, display, chills beverages. $10.,
(650)578-9208
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
310 Misc. For Sale
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GOOD HEALTH FACT BOOK - un-
used, answers to get/stay healthy, hard
cover, 480 pages, $8., (650)578-9208
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HABACHI BBQ Grill heavy iron 22" high
15" wide $25 (650)593-8880
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX 55, repels and kills fleas
and ticks. 9 months worth, $60
(650)343-4461
KELTY SUPER TIOGA BACKPACK -
$40., (650)552-9436
KIRBY COMBO Shampooer/ Vacuum/
attachments. "Ultimate G Diamond
Model", $250., (650)637-0930
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $10., (650)347-5104
LAUNDRY SORTER - on wheels, triple
section, laundry sorter - $19., (650)347-
9920
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MEN’S LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MICHAEL CREIGHTON HARDBACK
BOOKS - 3 @ $3. each, (650)341-1861
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW COWBOY BOOTS - 9D, Unworn,
black, fancy, only $85., (650)595-3933
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
NIKE RESISTANCE ROPE - unopened
box, get in shape, medium resistance,
long length, $8., (650)578-9208
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PRINCESS CRYSTAL glasswear set
$50 (650)342-8436
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUZZLES - 22-1,000 pc puzzles, $2.50
each, (650)596-0513
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SET OF Blue stemwear glasses $25
(650)342-8436
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. White Rotary
sewing machine similar age, cabinet
style. $85 both. (650)574-4439
SLIDE PROJECTOR - Airequipt Super-
ba 66A slide projector and screen.
$50.00 for all. (650)345-3840
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STAINED GLASS panels multi colors
beautiful work 35" long 111/2" wide $79
OBO (650)349-6059
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TENT - one man packable tent - $20.,
(650)552-9436
TOM CLANCY HARDBACK BOOKS - 7
@ $3.00 each, (650)341-1861
TYPEWRITER IBM Selectric II with 15”
Carrige. $99 obo (650)363-0360
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLKSWAGON NEW Beatle hub cap,
3, $70 for All (650)283-0396
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
310 Misc. For Sale
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
WEBER GO ANYWHERE GAS BARBE-
QUE - never used, in box, $40., SOLD!
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 (650)341-8342
311 Musical Instruments
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
MARTIN D-18S 1971 Guitar $1500.
Great sound. Great Condition
(650)522-8322
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
100% COTTON New Beautiful burgundy
velvet drape 82"X52" W/6"hems: $45
(415)585-3622
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
ATTRACTIVE LADIES trench coat red,
weather proof size 6/8 $35
(650)345-3277
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
DINGO WESTERN BOOTS - (like new)
$60., (408)764-6142
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
FOX FUR Scarf 3 Piece $99 obo
(650)363-0360
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
LEVIS JACKET - size XXL, Beautiful
cond., med., $35., (650)595-3933
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
NEW! OLD NAVY Coat: Boy/Gril, fleece-
lined, hooded $15 (415)585-3622
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, beauitful color, megenta, with
shawl like new $40 obo (650)349-6059
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
brand new, never worn for $25
(650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, $30.
each, (808)271-3183
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all,
(650)851-0878
ELECTRICAL MATERIAL - Connectors,
couplings, switches, rain tight flex, and
more.Call. $50.00 for all (650)345-3840
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
25 Thursday • June 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
317 Building Materials
STEEL MORTAR BOX - 3 x 6, used for
hand mixing concrete or cement, $35.,
(650)368-0748
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 AIR rifles, shoots .177 pelets. $50 ea
Obo (650)591-6842
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
4 TENNIS RACKETS- and 2 racketball
rackets(head).$25.(650)368-0748.
AB-BUSTER as seen on T.V. was $100,
now $45., (650)596-0513
BIKE TRAINER Ascent fluid $85
(650)375-8021
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
FOR SALE medium size wet suit $95
call for info (650)851-0878
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF BAG with 15 clubs $35. SOLD.
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees good condition $19
(650)365-1797
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
ROLLER SKATES - Barely used, mens
size 13, boots attached to 8 wheels, $85.
obo, (650)223-7187
ROWING MACHINE. $30.00
(650)637-0930
SCHWINN STATIONARY RECUMBENT
BIKE, $45., SOLD!
STATIONARY EXERCISE BICYCLE -
Compact, excellent condition, $40. obo,
(650)834-2583
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL EXERCISE- Pro Form 415
Crosswalk, very good condition $200 call
(650)266-8025
VOLKI SNOW SKIS - $40.,
(408)764-6142
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALE
Saturday,
June 29th
8AM to 3PM
637 Bainbridge Street,
Foster City
Bedroom set,
housewares, bicycles,
clothing , desk,
patio set
and more!
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
325 Estate Sales
UNEXPECTED
TREASURES
Estate Sale
Woodside
Saturday, June 29
& Sunday June 30
9am to 2 pm each day
Watch for Address Friday
50 years accumulation
packed into home
Clocks, watch parts, tools,
furniture, vintage advertising, full
kitchen & garage
& more Unexpected Treasures
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
SLEEP APNEA breathing machine com-
plete in box helps you breathe, costs $$$
sacrifice for $75, (650)995-0012
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
381 Homes for Sale
VOLUNTEER WITH
Habitat for Humanity
and help us build homes and
communities in East Palo Alto.
Volunteers welcome
Wed-Sat from 8:30-4pm.
415-625-1022
www.habitatgsf.org
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)595-0805
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
515 Office Space
SAN MATEO DRIVE beautiful Medical
Office space for rent only $75/day.
Paulsurinder1@yahoo.com
620 Automobiles
004 INFINITI g35 x with 62k miles. All
wheel drive luxury sport sedan loaded
with all options (no navigations).#4508
come with warranty reduced price of
$12995.00 plus fees. (650)637-3900
2001 AUDI a6 Avanti wagon with 79k
miles in excellent conditions and fully
loaded, this is the best priced on internet.
#5050 reduced price at $8500.00 plus
fees.. (650)637-3900
2001 BMW 330 ci coupe with 108k miles
black on black automatic sports and pre-
mium package #5041 in great conditions,
clean car fax offerd at $8995.00 plus
fees. (650)637-3900
2002 CHRYSLER PT Cruiser Limited
with 121k miles; she is fully optioned and
in excellent driving conditions clean Car
Fax. #4515 sale price $4995.00 plus
fees. (650)637-3900
2003 FORD Mustang convertible with
102k miles. gt package with all power
group and power top. Ready for
summer.clean car fax#5031 on sale
for $7995.00 plus fees. (650)637-3900
2003 JEEP grand Cherokee Limited with
100k miles great looking suv one owner
clean Car fax fully loaded with
options.#4520.sale price $8995.00 plus
fees (650)637-3900
CHEVY 1998 Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$5,000, Call Glen @ (650) 583-1242
Ext. # 2
620 Automobiles
2004 CHEVY Malibu classic with 87k
miles. Clean Car Fax and 3 moths war-
ranty.automatic with all power package.
#4437 runs and looks great very roomy,
priced at $5850.00 plus fees. (650)637-
3900
2004 FORD Explorer Eddie bauer with
146k miles. third row seat all all other op-
tions clean Car fax #4330. This nice suv
has a very very low price of $7995.00
plus fees.. (650)637-3900
2004 HONDA Civic lx 4 door automatic
with 154k miles. Looks and drives very
nice; hard to find. #4517. Clean car and
3000 miles warranty. On sale
for $5995.00 plus fees. (650)637-3900
2008 HYUNDAI Accent gls 4 door auto-
matic with49k miles. Looks great and
runs excellent, awesome on gas and
very low miles. clean Car Fax. Priced at
$7995.00 plus fees. (650)637-3900
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
ACCURA 1997 3.0 CL CP Black, Auto-
matic $3300, (650)630-3216
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 2,000
Good Condition (650)481-5296
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
OLDSMOBIL”79Royal Delta 88, 122k
Miles, in excelleny Condition $1,800
(650)342-8510
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$2,500 Bid (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
DODGE ‘06 DAKOTA SLT model, Quad
Cab, V-8, 63K miles, Excellent Condtion.
$8500, OBO, Daly City. (650)755-5018
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
need some brake work. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,400.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 cc’s,
Awesome! $5,950/obo Rob SOLD!
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAG with
brackets $35., (650)670-2888
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
HONDA 1983 ASCOT VT 500 Motorcy-
cle, looks like 2012, must see. $1100,
obo, SOLD!
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $50. obo,
(650)223-7187
NEW MOTORCYCLE HELMET - Modu-
lar, dual visor, $69., (650)595-3933
645 Boats
‘72 18’ RAYSON V Drive flat boat, 468
Chevy motor with wing custom trailer,
$20,000 obo, (650)851-0878
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., SOLD!
650 RVs
‘73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 1976 Nova rims with tires 2057514
leave message $60 for all
(650)588-7005
2013 DODGE CHARGER wheels & tires,
Boss 338, 22-10, $1300 new,
(650)481-5296
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
FORD FOCUS steel wheels. 14in. rims.
$100. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
HONDA SPEAR tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
670 Auto Parts
HONDA WHEELS with tires. Four steel
13in rims. Factory Hub Caps. $150. San
Bruno. SOLD!
JEEP TJ 2004-2006 (1) ALUMINUM
WHEEL & TIRE, brand new condition,
$90., SOLD!
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
MECHANIC'S CREEPER - vintage,
Comet model SP, all wood with
pillow,four swivel wheels, great shape.
$40.00 (650)591-0063
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Bath
TUBZ
Over 400 Tubs on display!
World’s Largest “Hands-On, Feet-In”
Showroom
4840 Davenport Place
Fremont, CA 94538
(510)770-8686
www.tubz.net
Asphalt/Paving
AIM CONSTRUCTION
John Peterson
• Paving • Grading
• Slurry Sealing • Paving Stones
• Concrete • Patching
We AIM to please!
(650)468-6750
(408)422-7695
Lic.# 916680
Cabinetry
Contractors
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
Concrete, decks, retaining
walls, fences, bricks, roof,
gutters, & drains.
Call David
(650)270-9586
Lic# 914544 Bonded & Insured
Contractors
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
Home repairs &
Foundation work
Retaining wall • Decks • Fences
No job too small
Gary Afu
(650)207-2400
Lic# 904960
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
26
Thursday • June 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Cleaning
Concrete
CHETNER CONCRETE
Lic #706952
Driveways - Walkways
- Pool Decks - Patios - Stairs
- Exposed Aggregate - Masonry
- Retaining Walls - Drainage
- Foundation/Slabs
Free Estimates
(650)271-1442 Mike
POLY-AM
CONSTRUCTION
General Contractor
Free Estimate
Specializing in
Concrete • Brickwork • Stonewall
Interlocking Pavers • Landscaping
Tile • Retaining Wall
Bonded & Insured Lic. #685214
Ben: (650)375-1573
Cell: (650) 280-8617
Construction
Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
Solas
Electric
Best Rates
On all electrical work
7 days a week
Free Estimates
(650) 302-7906
CA License 950866
Bonded and Insured
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
JOSE’S
COMPLETE GARDENING
Complete gardening &
Landscaping
Commercial & Residential
Licensed
Free Estimates
(650)315-4011
LEAK PRO
Sprinkler repair, Valves, Timers,
Heads, Broken pipes,
Wire problems, Coverage,
Same Day Service
(800)770-7778
CSL #585999
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)4581572
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof
Repair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
AAA RATED!
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$40 & UP
HAUL
Since 1988
Licensed/Insured
Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating
(650)341-7482
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
Landscaping
ASP LANDSCAPING
• All kinds of Concrete • Stamp
• Retaining Wall • Tree Service
• Brick • Roofing • Fencing
• New Lawns
Free Estimates
(650)544-1435
(650)834-4495
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
Painting
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
VICTOR’S FENCES
House Painting
•Interior •Exterior
Power Wash
•Driveways •Sidewalk •Houses
Free Estimates
(650)583-1270
or (650)808-5833
Lic. # 106767
Plumbing
$89 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED DRAIN!
Installation of
Trenchless Pipes,
Water Heaters & Faucets
(650)461-0326
Lic# 983312
HAMZEH PLUMBING
5 stars on Yelp!
$25 OFF First Time Customers
All plumbing services
24 hour emergency service
(415)690-6540
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
BELMONT TILE &
FOLSOM LAKE TILE
Your local tile store
& contractor
• Tile • Mosaics
• Natural Stone Countertops
• Remodeling
Free Estimates
651 Harbor Blvd.
(near Old County Road)
Belmont
650.421.6508
www.belmontile.com
M-Sa 8:30 am - 5 pm
CASL# 857517
Window Coverings
RUDOLPH’S INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)685-1250
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame • 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos • 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates • Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
27 Thursday • June 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAY’S
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Cemetery
CRIPPEN & FLYNN FUNERAL
CHAPELS
Family owned & operated
Established 1949
Personalized cremation &
funeral services
Serving all faiths & traditions
Woodside chapel: (650)369-4103
FD 879
Carlmont chapel: (650)595-4103
FD 1825
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
DR INSIYA SABOOWALA DDS
DECCAN DENTAL
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
Cantonese, Mandarin & Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
TACO DEL MAR
NOW OPEN
856 N. Delaware St.
San Mateo, CA 94401
(650)348-3680
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WALLBEDS
AND MORE!
$400 off Any Wallbed
www.wallbedsnmore.com
248 Primrose Rd.,
BURLINGAME
(650)868-0082
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
Special Combination Pricing:
Facials, Microdermabrasion,
Waxing , Body Scrubs, Acu-
puncture , Foot & Body Massage
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
www.LeJuinDaySpa.com
(650) 347-6668
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
Health & Medical
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Home Care
MY ERRAND SERVICES
Help is on the way
• New Mother Assistance
• Senior Assistance • General Errands
• House & Pet Sitting • Event Help
• House Keeping • Janitorial Services
• Handyman Services
(650)201-0354
myerrandservicesca@gmail.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AUTO • HOME • LIFE
Brian Fornesi
Insurance Agency
Tel: (650)343-6521
bfornesi@farmersagent.com
Lic: 0B78218
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
GREAT FULL BODY
MASSAGE
Tranquil Massage
951 Old County Rd. Suite 1,
Belmont
10:00 to 9:30 everyday
(650) 654-2829
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
SEVEN STARS
DAY SPA
615 Woodside Road Redwood City
(650)299-9332
Body Massage $60/hour
$40/half hour,
$5 off one hour w/ this ad
Open Daily 9:30 AM to 9:30 PM
Massage Therapy
UNION SPA & SALON
Grand Opening
Full Massage and
Brazilian Wax
(650)755-2823
7345 Mission St., Daly City
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT
SENIOR LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
Video
ADULT VIDEOS $99 (415)298-0645
28
Thursday • June 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Coins ª Dental ª Jewelry ª Silver ª Watches ª Diamonds
1Z11 80fll0¶8M0 ß90 ª ëâ0·J4¡·¡00¡
Expert Fine Watch
& Jewelry Repair
Not affiliated with any watch company.
Only Authentic ROLEX Factory Parts Are Used
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t6OFRVBM$VTUPNFS$BSF
XXX#FTU3BUFE(PME#VZFSTDPN
Tuesday - Saturday
11:00am to 4:00pm
www.BestRatedGoldBuyers.com
KUPFER JEWELRYsBURLINGAME
(650) 347-7007
MUST PRESENT COUPON.
EXPIRES 6/30/13
WEBUY
$â0 $â0
OFF
Established 1979
ROLEX SERVICE
OR REPAIR