CCS  Broadly  &  Considera0ons  to     Realize  Its  Benefits  

RECS  –  Research  Experience  in  Carbon  Sequestra0on      
Birmingham,  AL   18  June,  2013  
Carl  O.  Bauer  
President,  C.O.  Bauer  Consul3ng,  Inc.    
Director  (Re3red)  US  DOE  Na3onal  Energy  Technology  Laboratory  

   

WEO  2010  -­‐  Chapter  8  -­‐  Energy   Poverty  
Introduc3on  
 

“Making  energy  supply  secure  and  curbing  energy’s  contribu3on  to  climate  

change  are  oIen  referred  to  as  the  two  over-­‐riding  challenges  faced  by   the  energy  sector  on  the  road  to  a  sustainable  future.  This  chapter   highlights  another  key  strategic  challenge  for  the  energy  sector,  one  that   requires  immediate  and  focused  aSen0on  by  governments  and  the   interna0onal  community.     “It  is  the  alarming  fact  that  today  billions  of  people  lack  access  to  the  most   basic  energy  services,  electricity  and  clean  cooking  facili3es,  and,  worse,   this  situa3on  is  set  to  change  very  liOle  over  the  next  20  years,  actually   deteriora3ng  in  some  respects.  This  is  shameful  and  unacceptable.”  
 
78  Men'ons  of  Word  “Poverty”  in  WEO’10,  Including  a  Dedicated  Chapter  8  

The  global  challenge  is  to  meet     the  growing  demand  for  energy,     provide  it  at  an  affordable  cost,     and  reduce  emissions.  

©  SASKATCHEWAN  POWER  CORPORATION.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED.  

3

Does  CCS  have  a  role?  

©  SASKATCHEWAN  POWER  CORPORATION.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED.  

4

Energy Demand 2010
98 QBtu / Year 83% Fossil Energy Coal   Gas   21%   25%   Oil   37%   5,634 mmt CO2
Nuclear   9%   Renewables   8%  

Energy Demand 2035
104 QBtu / Year 80% Fossil Energy + 6% Coal   Gas   19%   28%   Oil   33%  
Nuclear   9%   Renewables   11%  

United States

5,607 mmt CO2

505 QBtu / Year 81% Fossil Energy Coal Gas 27% 22% Oil 32% 30,190 mmt CO2
Sources: U.S. data from EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2013er: World data from IEA, World Energy Outlook 2012

741 QBtu / Year 80% Fossil Energy + 47% Coal 30% Oil 27% 44,090 mmt CO2 Gas 23%
Nuclear 6% Renewables 14%

Nuclear 6% Renewables 13%

World

World  Energy  Mix  By  2035   2  IEA  WEO  Scenarios:  Current  Policy  (BAU)  &  450  ppm    
Renewables    107    

BAU  (2035)  ·∙  741  QBTU    
(11  billion  tons/yr)  

Today  (2010)  ·∙  505  QBTU  
Renewables    67     Nuclear    29     Gas    109    
(7  billion  tons/yr)  
U   QBT   6 3 +2

Nuclear   40   Gas    174    

Coal    219    

Coal    138     Oil    163    

Oil    201    

-­‐154  QBTU   450  ppm  (2035)  ·∙  587  QBTU  
Renewables    156     Coal    93     Oil    146     Gas    131    

-­‐126  QBTU  of  Coal   by  2035   6  billion  tons/yr   (82%  of  net  reducVon)  

(5  billion  tons/yr)  

Nuclear    62    

Source:  IEA  World  Energy  Outlook  2012   *May  not  add  up  exactly  due  to  rounding    

Non-­‐OECD  Energy  Mix  By  2035   2  IEA  WEO  Scenarios:  Current  Policy  (BAU)  &  450  ppm    
BAU  (2035)  ·∙  486  QBTU    
Coal    175     Gas    107     Oil    114    
-­‐100  QBTU  of  Coal  by  2035   5  billion  tons/yr   (86%  of  net  reducVon)  

Today  (2010)  ·  277  QBTU  
Renewables    49     Nuclear    5     Gas    56     Coal    95     Oil    71    
(5  billion  tons/yr)  
U   QBT   9 0 +2

Renewables    73     Nuclear   17.  263    

(9  billion  tons/yr)  

-­‐116  QBTU  
Renewables    99    

450  ppm  (2035)  ·∙  370  QBTU  
(4  billion  tons/yr)  

Coal    75     Oil    84    

Nuclear    31    

Gas    81    

Source:  IEA  World  Energy  Outlook  2012   *May  not  add  up  exactly  due  to  rounding    

Modified  IEA  Contribu0ons  to  CO2   Reduc0on  (2DS)   World  Gt/year  ·∙  from  6DS  to  2DS*   60   Switch  
23  Gt  (3%)  

50   40   Gt  CO2  

778  Gt    CumulaVve  CO2   Total  

 (8%)   59  Gt 2%)   95  Gt  (1

200  Gt  (26%)   165  Gt  (21%)  

Scale  of     CCS  and   Efficiency  

30   20   10   0   Overall  CCS  Share  of  Technology     Addressing  Energy  Poverty  with   CCS  
Power  genera0on  efficiency  and  fuel  switching   End-­‐use  fuel  switching   Renewables   2DS  

235  Cumu laVve  Gt  ( 30%

)  

Nuclear   End-­‐use  energy  efficiency   Carbon  capture  and  storage  

2015  

2020  

2025  

2030  

2035  

2040  

2045  

2050  

Interna'onal  Energy  Agency  (2012),  Energy  Technology  Perspec'ves  2012,  OECD/IEA,  Paris;  online  data:  www.IEA.org/etp/explore  

CCS  by  Sector   (2DS)  
9.0   8.0   7.0   6.0   Gt  CO2   5.0   4.0   3.0   2.0   1.0   0.0   2009   2020   2025   2030   2035   *  -­‐  “Other  transforma'on”  includes   gas  works,  oil  refineries,  liquefac'on   plants  and  other   non-­‐specific  transforma'on   processes.  
123 Gt Cumulative CO2 Total

Power  ·∙  67  Gt  
NCC  Report  12  Gt  (33  Gt  Total)  
CCUS  (EOR)  SCC  Roadmap    4  Gt  (17  Gt  Total)  

475  MMt/yr*   260  MMt/yr  

*-­‐  NCC  Report  AspiraVonal  Case  100  GW  CO2-­‐EOR  by  2030    

2040  

2045  

2050  

Interna'onal  Energy  Agency  (2012),  Energy  Technology  Perspec'ves  2012,  OECD/IEA,  Paris   NCC  “Harnessing  Coal’s  Carbon  Content  to  Advance  the  Economy,  Environment,  and  Energy  Security”  6/22/2012  

Regional  Global  Electric  Power  Genera0on  Capacity   Equipped  with  CCS  (2DS)  
1,000   900   800   700   600   GW   500   400   300   200   100   0   2020   2025   2030   2035   2040  
SCC  CCUS   NCC  Report  (adds  ROZ  Fairways)   NCC  Report  
OECD  Asia/ Oceania  

111  Gt  of  CO2  for  CCUS  translated  to  GW   of  deployment   by  economic  region  

Other   non-­‐OECD  

India  

China  

OECD  Europe  
NCC  Report  (economic  EOR  potenVal  at  $85/bbl)   CCUS  Capacity  (EOR)  SCC  Roadmap  

OECD   Americas   2050  

2045  

Interna'onal  Energy  Agency  (2012),  Energy  Technology  Perspec'ves  2012,  OECD/IEA,  Paris;  OECD  Americas  includes  U.S.,  Canada,  Mexico  and  Chile   NCC  “Harnessing  Coal’s  Carbon  Content  to  Advance  the  Economy,  Environment,  and  Energy  Security”  6/22/2012    

IEA  "Redrawing  Energy-­‐Climate  Map"   June  10,  2013  
JUST    MADE  AVAILABLE  

GCCSI Table of Global CCS Projects 2013

GCCSI Map of Global CCS Projects 2013

USA  Coal  Plant  Re0rements  
Re3red  (2012)  and  Announced  Re3rements  (2012-­‐2020)  

38  GW  from  2012-­‐2020  
111  Plants  consisVng   of  256  Units  

2012  Re0red  and  2012-­‐2020  Announced  Re0rements  

*Summer  Capacity  

Sources  -­‐Ventyx  –  Velocity  Suite    

Boundary  Dam  Power  Sta0on  

©  SASKATCHEWAN  POWER  CORPORATION.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED.  

18

Boundary Dam Unit #3 Repowered
 
Steam SO2 Absorber CO2 Absorber

ESP 110 MW

Heat Recovery Loop

CO2 SO2 Reclaimer Reclaimer

Stack

Coal

Furnace

SO2

EOR Grade CO2

Compressor

Ash Conversation to Saleable Sulphuric Acid Permanent Geological Storage

Waste Storage

Carbon Capture Process
 

20

Boundary Dam #3 Carbon Capture Plant
 
UNIT #3
Flue Gas Cooler Building

Flue gas ductwork from Unit #3 to Carbon Capture Facility

SaskPower  BD3  Recent  Picture  

Carbon  Capture  and  Storage  
Point  Source  Capture   Terrestrial   Capture  
CO2  absorbed     from  air   Power  plants   Ethanol  plants   Cement  &  steel  refineries   Natural  gas  processing  

Terrestrial   Storage  
Trees,  grasses,   soils  

TransportaVon  
Pipelines  

Geologic  Storage  
Saline  formaVons   Depleted  oil  &  gas  fields   Unmineable  coal  seams   Basalts  and  shales  

Capture  and  Storage  of  CO2  and  Other  Greenhouse  Gases  That   Would  Otherwise  Be  Emifed  to  the  Atmosphere    

The  Water-­‐Energy  Nexus  
Energy  used  for   pumping  water   Dams produce electricity
Power plant cooling uses water

Water  used  for  mining   fuels  

Water  supply                                  uses  energy   Energy  used    in  water  /  wastewater      treatment  

Water  flows   Energy  flows  

Water  &  energy  use   in  the  home  are   related  

"Energy  Demands  on  Water  Resources,  Report  to  Congress  on  the  Interdependency  of  Energy  and   Water,"  U.S.  Department  of  Energy,  December  2006  

Energy Strategy Is Complex  
Consider All Major Implications of Energy Strategy  
Environmental! Sustainability  

Economic! Affordability  

Supply! Security  

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful