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Axis Legacy Advisors™

PRESENTS:

How to Get the Best Education


Possible for Your Child -
Kindergarten - 6 th Grade
A Pare nt ’s H andbook

• FIRST EDITION •

Debra E. West, M.Ed.

Huntsville, Alabama
Copyright © 2008 Debra E. West
All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form or by any electronic or mechanical means includ-
ing information storage and retrieval systems – except in the case of brief quotations embodied in critical articles or
reviews, or in the case of the exercises in this book solely for the personal use of the purchaser – without permission in
writing from its publisher, Axis Publishing Company, LLC.

First Edition, 2009 Published by Axis Publishing Company, LLC


122 Holbrook Drive
Huntsville, Alabama 35806
dlw@donwestjr.com
www.Axis-Publishing.com
Creative Direction: Amy M. Neal
Editorial Review: Write Choice Services, Inc.

The purpose of this book is to provide the reader with an accurate and informative overview of the subject. This book is
sold with the understanding that neither the publisher nor the author(s) are engaging in, nor rendering legal, medical,
psychiatric, accounting or any other professional service. If you need legal, accounting, medical, psychiatric or other
expert advice, then you should seek the services of a duly licensed professional.

This book is intended for use by the consumer for his or her own benefit. If you use this book to counsel someone about
the law, accounting or other professional service, then you may be considered an unauthorized and illegal practice.

ISBN13: 978-0-9822479-5-2 ISBN: 0-9822479-5-8


Library of Congress Control Number: 2009922385
Printed in the United States of America

Publisher’s Cataloging-in-Publication Data

West, Debra Elaine, 1953-


How to get the best education for your child - kindergarten - 6th grade: a parent’s handbook / Debra E. West, M.Ed.
186 p. 28 cm.
Includes bibliographical references.
Summary: An instructional guide for parents providing grade specific learning benchmarks, recommended readings
and goal setting objectives. Includes checklists for choosing a school, meeting with teachers, and grade specific
monitoring for grades K-6th.
ISBN 978-0-9822479-5-2
1. Education -- Parent participation -- United States 2. Education -- Curricula -- United States
3. Early Childhood Education [1. Learning 2. Readiness for school 3. Elementary Education (Sears)]

LB1139.2 .H69 2009


372.21---dc22
2009922385
Acknowledgements
This book would not be possible without the loving support of
my husband and best friend, Donald West, Sr. I also want to
thank Don West, Jr., Dr. Rosaria Love, Ann McArthur-Jobe,
Lia Scott, Karim West, Dr. Rosemary Hodges, Dr. Julius Scruggs,
Josephine Scruggs, Danae Quirk, Tracy Van Buren,
Sandra Montgomery, Karen French, Robert West, Kay Nikookary,
Linda Johnson, Leza Thomas, Rogina Smith, Hundley Batts, Sr.,
Robyn Long, Akilah West, Emily West, and Debra E. Fulford for all
of their invaluable suggestions and prayers.

Acknowledgements i.
This book is dedicated to
Dr. Frances Bliss and Ollye B. Conley
Because of their encouragement, loving guidance, and devotion to education, I was
pushed out of the nest of mediocrity and expected to soar as high as the universe
would take me.

I also dedicate this book to my wonderful parents,


Robert and Elaine Holmes
They taught their three girls that there should first be a true love and service for
God, there must be integrity in everything that we do, and finally that hard work
will produce positive results. These principles have guided me and inspired me to
achieve my dreams.

Dedication ii.
About the Author
Throughout our journey together, which has been more than 35 years now, my husband, Don, and I
have faced struggles and victories, laughter and tears, hunger and plenty, but we always had a clear vision for
the future with a plan to get us there. We frequently visited our plan with our children present, worked the plan,
and planned the work.
I met my husband, Don, when we were both in ninth grade. We did not start to date until the summer
of our senior year in high school. After high school, I pursued my dreams of being a professional singer and Don
went off to college on a track scholarship. Two years into pursuing our early dreams, we married September, 17,
1973. Our first son, Donald Jr. was born, and I decided to come off of the road, so I stopped singing, and became
a full time wife and mother.
Don as a new husband and father left Penn State and started his work career as an entry-level manager
at The Bell Telephone Company of Pennsylvania and continued going to school at night at the University of
Pennsylvania. I pursued a Business of Administration degree at the local community college. By this time we
had three children Don Jr., Akilah, and Karim. In the midst of a lot of personal and family soul searching, Robert
was born. These were trying times for both of us because neither Don nor I could pursue our personal dreams
and our family was growing with too few resources.
In 1982, we moved to Huntsville, Alabama to regroup as a family and to continue our undergraduate
degrees as married students at Oakwood College, a private Christian liberal arts college. We chose Huntsville
because a good friend recommended it as a great place for families to prosper and grow spiritually. This
singular life decision to change our environment empowered us to find what it was that God wanted for both
Don and I, as well as for our children.
Two years into our college experience in Huntsville, we were expecting our fifth child, Debbie. The
children were growing up and we knew that we had to take immediate action to change the course of our
family’s future. Don insisted that I finish my education first because I had no work experience and thus had
limited earning potential. So, Don went to work both a full-time and a part-time job to support our family and
I transferred to the University of Alabama in Huntsville, (UAH), to complete my Bachelor of Arts degree in
Elementary Education. We put our shoulders to the plow and kept our focus on our plan.
I graduated from UAH in the spring of 1989 and got a teaching job at a magnet school, The Academy for
Science and Foreign Language, with Huntsville City Schools, teaching sixth grade. When I started working, our
family’s standard of living changed, and I began studies toward my master’s degree in elementary education.
My husband and I wanted the best education for our children, but we were not exactly sure how to go
about it. With low incomes and a large family, we focused on daily survival. We never seemed to have the time
to meet with teachers or administrators to monitor our children’s academic progress. We simply were not
thinking in those terms at the time. In short, my children did not benefit directly from the knowledge compiled
in this book, which inspires me to help you change the fate of yours and other families.
Today, Don Jr. is an attorney. Akilah is an assistant manager for a national coffee retailer. Karim and
Robert are informational technicians for international corporations. Debbie is a full time student at the local
community college. We are very proud of all of our children and firmly believe that our family’s success arose
from putting God first. Also, the children understand that we had a plan and high expectations for each one of
them.
In this book, I offer to you, the reader, the information I have discerned from God’s amazing grace,
mercy, and guidance to help parents navigate the educational maze that so many times keeps children from
getting the “Best Education Possible”. I only wish I had the information in this book when my own children were
in school.
About the author iii.
Introduction
I have taught elementary school for over 20 years. Additionally, I have
earned a master’s degree in elementary education. I currently work as a
reading coach. I know a little bit about how to get a good education for your
child. For years I have watched parents guide their children’s education. I also
have watched parents sit back and hope everything would get better or work
out. They are not “bad parents;” they are either afraid or do not know what to
do. They only show up when there is a serious problem and often are so
frustrated they handle the situation badly.
This is not a scientific study. It is simply years of experience working in
the public school system, watching parents who know just what to do and how
to handle a situation to their child’s advantage.
To everyone that reads this book, How to Get the Best Education Possible
for Your Child - Kindergarten - 6th Grade: A Parent’s Handbook, I hope it will be a
true blessing and encouragement for you to take action for your child and
every child in your reach. This book is an inspiration from God for all who are
willing to receive this gift. Not any one religion, denomination, or
socio-economic group is excluded from receiving the important information
contained in this workbook. It is something that will change your life and your
child’s future. I address the most important questions that need to be asked in
each section of the book.
Use this workbook to empower you as an active partner in your child’s
future. With important questions answered and you working for your child,
there is nothing impossible for such a time as this. If you only complete one or
two of the suggestions in each section, you will impact your child’s life. Please
read and use this workbook in the spirit it was written; in love, service, and
excitement for the miracles to unfold.

Introduction iv.
contents
Acknowledgments • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • i
Dedication • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ii
About the Author • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • iii
Introduction • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • iv

The Most Important Things You Can Do • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 3


Why is This Information Important? • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 5
How to Use This Workbook • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 7
Know the School District • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 9-11
I Already Own or Rent Property • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 13
Getting Started Know the School Administrators and Teachers • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 15-17
Things to Look for On the Tour • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 19
Meeting Your Child’s Teacher • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 21
Teacher Appreciation/Intrest Survey • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 23
Ten Things That Will Make You a Better Parent • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 25
What Makes a Balanced Parent • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 27

Things Your Child Should Know Before/Mid/End kindergarten • • • • • • • • • • • • • 31-35


Literature for kindergarten • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 37
Kindergarten
Poetry and Nursery Rhymes for kindergarten • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 39
Contractual Agreements for kindergarten • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 43-47

Things Your Child Should Know Before/Mid/End first grade • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 51-55


First Grade Literature for first grade • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 57
Poetry and Nursery Rhymes for first grade • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 59
Contractual Agreements for first grade • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 63-67

Things Your Child Should Know Before/Mid/End second grade • • • • • • • • • • • • • 71-75


Literature for second grade • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 77
Second Grade
Poetry and Nursery Rhymes for second grade • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 79
Contractual Agreements for second grade • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 83-87

Things Your Child Should Know Before/Mid/End third grade • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 91-95


Literature for third grade • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 97
Third Grade
Poetry and Prose for third grade • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 99
Contractual Agreements for third grade • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 103-107

Things Your Child Should Know Before/Mid/End fourth grade • • • • • • • • • • 111-115


Literature for fourth grade • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 117
Fourth Grade
Poetry and Prose for fourth grade • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 119
Contractual Agreements for fourth grade • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 123-127

Things Your Child Should Know Before/Mid/End fifth grade • • • • • • • • • • • • • 131-135


Fifth Grade Literature for fifth grade • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 137
Poetry and Prose for fifth grade • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 139
Contractual Agreements for fifth grade • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 143-147

Things Your Child Should Know Before/Mid/End sixth grade • • • • • • • • • • • • 150-155


Literature for sixth grade • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 157
Sixth Grade
Poetry and Prose for sixth grade • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 159
Contractual Agreements for sixth grade • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 163-167

Suggested Literature • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 169-179


Glossary • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 181
References • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 183
Notes • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 184-186
The Most Important Things You Can Do To
Have a Successful Child in School
Make sure your child reads or is read to at home every day: 10-20 minutes for a
younger child and 20-45 minutes for an older child. Research shows that students who
read at home in addition to encountering a strong reading curriculum at school perform in
the top 10% of the nation in standardize testing.

Review your child’s homework every evening. Do not hesitate to get tutoring or
one-on-one instructions if your child struggles with a lesson or assignment. Children do
not want to go on to the next lesson or grade without mastering the current material. If
you can not afford tutoring, look into the Girls and Boys Club, YMCA, church tutoring
programs, community outreach, or after school programs. Many times high school honor
students or college students tutor younger students. Ask teachers, principals, or other
parents for help.

Make sure your child reviews and knows all the skills from the grade he/she is
leaving. Teachers spend most of the first couple of weeks/months reviewing materials
from the past year. Reviewing skills with your child should be a routine during the summer
breaks.

Keep your child ahead in lessons. Get a “Teacher’s Manual” for the textbook series
being used in reading and math in the school your child attends. Over the summer make
sure they are getting ahead in lessons for the coming year or reviewing skills they have not
mastered.

Encourage your child to participate in extra curricular activities that they are
interested in or show natural talent in. (examples; sports, dance, art, music, gymnastics,
etc.) Such activities develop a well rounded individual with good self-esteem. Be involved
and go to every important event.

Most Important Things You Can Do 3.


Why Is this Information Important?
The information contained in this workbook can help your child have a successful
educational experience in school. The “No Child Left Behind” Act, made school systems,
administrators, and teachers accountable for student learning. Standardized test scores now drive
instruction and the curriculum. Regardless of legislation, schools will not improve until parents
and students are held to the same high standards of accountability.

In order for your child to “Get the Best Education Possible” you must make education a priority.
Let you child know that you expect him/her to go to school and get a good education, as well as
respecting those in charge and obeying all of the rules and regulations. You are the role model, so
do not expect your child to be respectful and work hard if you are not showing them how.
Remember that how you speak of your boss can influence how your child views and respects (or
does not respect) teachers and principals.

When it comes to your child’s education, you can talk to other parents and teachers who
have been successful in educating their own children. This is why I have developed this workbook.
It should answer most of your questions and then you can make the final decision as to the steps
you want to take.

The purpose and goal of parents and teachers is to prepare your child to succeed both in
school and in life. In order for children to go out and get good employment to take care of
themselves and their family, they must have an excellent education. The competition is tough and
parents should know what to do to help their children get awards, scholarships, and good jobs.
What should we be doing to prepare our children for future employment or career goals?

Some of the skills an employer looking for are:


• self starter
• problem solver
• creative thinker
• good communicator (both orally and writing)
• can work well with others
• organizer
• analyzer
• finish a project
• willing to grow
The question that needs to be answered is, “are you and your child’s school preparing your
child(ren) to be a successful, productive, citizen for the 21st century?”

Why Is this Important? 5.


How to Use this Workbook
This workbook contains eight sections. Start with the first section. It addresses the
information needed to make an intelligent decision about what school your child should attend.
It can be very scary if you do not know what to do or say. Read each page carefully and keep this
book with you. Check off everything you have completed and there is space to write in any
questions or answers. If you only ask or do two or three of the questions suggested it is better
than doing nothing at all. There are also ‘Journal Pages’ throughout the book to record your
additional thoughts, memories and helpful information.
Sections three through eight are divided into grade levels beginning with kindergarten
and ending with sixth grade. Each grade level starts with what your child should know before
entering that grade. The next page will show the things your child should know by mid-year and
then what your child should master by the end of the year. These are only suggestions. Check
your state requirements and objectives for your child’s grade level. I emphasize reading and
mathematics, because these are the core foundation of a solid education.
There is a section of poetry and suggested literature to read for each grade. These lists are
culturally diverse with wide interest levels. These lists include Caldecott and Newbery award
winners, (recognizing outstanding children’s books), and favorite books of teachers, students, and
parents. Use this section to develop a true love for reading good literature and life long readers.
Work to develop a community network of friends and family members. This will be a group
of people who love you and your child and are interested in your child’s well being. It is wonderful
to find a group of parents in your neighborhood or at your place of worship if you do not have
family nearby. The network will help if you are unable to attend conferences, special school
programs, PTA meetings, field trips, etc. They may advise you if you have any problems or have
questions and keep you informed of any opportunities being offered at school or in the
community. Make sure they are a positive group. Unfortunately, many times groups of parents
gather to complain and cause confusion. You do not want to be associated with negative or
unproductive groups.
If you have any problems during the school year, contact the teacher immediately. Work
out a positive solution. If you and the teacher are unable to work out a solution, you could make
an appointment to talk with the principal. If you are still unsatisfied, go see the superinnt or
school board members for input. Whatever you decide to do, pick your battles wisely and try not
to over-react. Most problems should be resolved with the teacher or at least with the teacher and
the principal.
Read each page of this manual carefully. Check off everything you have completed. There
is space to write or add any questions to the list. Everyone should try to answer as many of the
questions as possible in this workbook until they have all of their questions answered. It will
change you and your child’s school experience. Please use this book with the intentions it was
written, in love.

How to Use this Workbook 7.


Best Education Possible Journal

www.BestEducationPossible.net
Know the School District
If you are relocating and have not purchased or rented a property, a critical consideration is LOCATION, LOCATION,
LOCATION as it pertains to your child(ren)’s education. The first question that you need to ask is what elementary,
middle, and high schools do the children attend. This will also impact the resale value of that home. This information
can be found at a local Realtor Association, School District Webpage, City’s Chamber of Commerce, and PTA officers.

An excellent national website that will give you a lot of information you are looking for about your school is
www.greatschools.net.

Answer yes/no if you were able to get the information, then #/% of students.
If you need more information, write it in the last column.

# or % of
Yes No Students
Need more information/Notes

• Academics offered, athletic programs, clubs etc.

• Graduation rate.

• Drop out rate.

• Suspension rate and types (ex. violent acts/drugs).

• Number of students in the average class?

• Do they offer after school care and how much is it?

• Are magnet programs available and how to apply?

• Are Special programs available for gifted classes?

• Are special programs available for special education?

• Is there good community involvement?

• Number of National Merit Scholars.

• Number of scholarships awarded.

• Percentage of students that attend college.

• Computers available in the classroom/lab.

• Are tutoring programs available?

• Are AP courses taught?*

Notes

*AP stands for Advanced Programs School District 9.


Best Education Possible Journal

Empowerment & Personal Responsibility through Education


More to Know About the School District
(Continue your research as you feel comfortable)

# or % of
Yes No Students
Need more information/Notes

• Test scores (SAT, ACT, Graduation Exit Exams etc).

• Racial diversity in population.

• Number of transfer students.

• Success of transfer students.

• ELL programs (English Language Learners).

• Number of National Merit Scholars.

• How many scholarships awarded?

• Percentage of students that go to college.

• Does the school offer distant learning.

Notes

School District (more) 11.


Best Education Possible Journal

www.BestEducationPossible.net
I Already Own or Rent a Property
If you already purchased or rented a property you still need to know about the school district and options available
to your child. These questions are important if you are not happy with the school your children would attend.

All the information on the previous page is important, but here are additional questions you need to address.

Yes No Short Answers

• Can my child transfer to a different school?

• If yes, How do I apply for a transfer?

• What kind of transportation is available?

• How long is the drive?

• Are there after school programs available? What is the cost?

• Are there any magnet programs and how do I apply?

• Are there charter school available and how do I apply?

• Does the state offer private school vouchers?

Notes

Already Own or Rent 13.


Best Education Possible Journal

Empowerment & Personal Responsibility through Education


Know the School Administrators
Getting to know personally the principals and teachers of your child(ren) provides tremendous benefit. They
establish a friendly, positive, working partnership. Make an appointment to meet with the principal. You should
have this book and all the questions answered in “Know the School District”.

The chart below presents the things you should ask the elementary school principal.

Short Answers Need more information

• How many students are in a class?

• How involved are parents in the school?

• How many violent acts were recorded in the last 2 years?

• Does the school have a mentoring family network?

• Is there good communication between home and school?

• Is there an after school program available?

• Can I go on tour of the school?

Notes

School District 15.


Best Education Possible Journal

www.BestEducationPossible.net
More Questions for the School Administration
(Continue your research as you feel comfortable)

Short Answers Need more information

• How much training do the teachers get during the year?

• Ratio of veteran teachers vs. new teachers at the school?

• Who is the PTA president? (Parent Teacher Association)

• How many members are there in the PTA?

• Are there any special requests for parents at this school?

• Do the children get recess and how much time?

• Does the school have a mentoring family network?

• How much money is spent per child in this school district?

• What is the reading program at this school?

• What is the math program at this school?

Notes

School Administration (more) 17.


Best Education Possible Journal

Empowerment & Personal Responsibility through Education


Things to Look For On the Tour
Try to visit the school when there are children there.

Yes No

Is the building clean and inviting?

Do you feel a sense of peace?

Is the atmosphere happy?

Do the children seem happy?

Are the teachers and staff happy and helpful?

Do you feel safe?

Are there children’s work on the walls in the halls and classrooms? (elementary only)

Does it look like good work by the children?

Are the teachers comfortable with you being there?

Is the cafeteria clean and welcoming?

Do they serve good lunches with choices?

Is this a place my child would be happy learning and attending school?

Does the building seem in order and under control?

Does the gym have good equipment and space for the children?

Does the school offer other activities for children who need extra help?

Write any other comment or questions you would like to address during or after the tour:

On the Tour 19.


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Meeting Your Child’s Teacher
Next to you, the parent, your child’s teacher will spend the most time with your child during the week.
Clearly the child-teacher relationship is very important. There are things that you can do to make sure your
child has a good year with their teacher.

Yes No

• Have you met with the teacher before or on the first day of school?

• Have you scheduled a conference with the teacher to provide additional information about your child?

• Have you developed a positive relationship with the teacher?

• Have you let the teacher know you are there to support her?

• Did you donate classroom supplies? (Ask the teacher to fill out a classroom wish list (form attached)).

• Do you always speak positively about the teacher in your child’s presence? (Whether or not you agree with the teacher).

• Do you volunteer whenever possible?


(If you can’t go make time before school, telephone conf., or have another
• Have you made all parent conferences? family member go).

• Are you visible? (Try to see the teacher once a month to say hello and to ask how are things going).

Find out the best way to reach the teacher.

Phone Number: _________________________________

E-mail address: _________________________________

*Remember to pick your battles. (If there is a problem try to work it out with the teacher first.)

Notes

Meeting the Teacher 21.


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Teacher Appreciation
Like all of us, teachers respond when they know they are truly appreciated. There should be a
room mother/father in every classroom. This person makes sure every parent is contacted for
special occasions, field trips, or events at school. When the school year begins, give the teacher
the interest survey and have her/him fill it out. Anytime there are special occasions give gifts as
a class or individuals according to what the teacher would like. This will please the teacher and
give the boost needed to keep working hard for your children. Small cards or letters of
appreciations are also treasured.

Teacher’s Interest Survey:


Name
Birthday
Favorite color
Hobby
Collections (ex. Stamps, dolls, coins)
Favorite flower
Favorite fruit
Favorite restaurant
Favorite foods
Favorite candy or dessert
Favorite snack food
Favorite author

Classroom Wish List:


____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________

Teacher Appreciation 23.


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Ten Things That Will Make
You a Better Parent

1. Ensure your child is at school every day he/she can be there. Arrive on
time.

2. Be a good, positive, role model. Your child is always watching you.

3. Make sure your child gets 8-12 hours of sleep every night.

4. Your child’s clothes and self should always be neat and clean.

5. Turn the TV/computer off during the week and talk to your child. Your
child needs to get physical exercise everyday.

6. Try to eat dinner at the same time every evening and discuss the day
with your child.

7. Help your child feel loved with praise, hugs, and kisses.

8. Discipline when necessary. Be consistent. Always focus on the


behavior not the child.

9. Stay involved with your child’s interest and know your child’s friends.

10. Expect the rom child, but have realistic goals and expectations.

Better Parent 25.


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Be a Balanced
Parent When You Discipline
It has been my experience that there are 3 types of parents when it comes to
discipline: the balanced parent, the too easy parent, and the harsh parent. We know that
no perfect parents exist. We also know that parents who balance love, praise, discipline,
and expectations are the most successful. The chart below is an example of the 3 types of
parents. Inspite of our efforts to be perfect, most of us are a combination of all three.

Which type of parent are you?

Balanced Too Easy Too Hard

Gives the child choices when it is Does everything for the child, even Makes all decisions for the child
appropriate and guides the child things the child could/should do and the child’s opinion is not heard
into making good decisions. for themselves. nor does it matter.

Discipline is consistent and loving Child’s discipline is inconsistent. Controls child through fear and
while letting the child know the You give consequences, but never harsh punishments. Child obeys
behavior is unacceptable and will follow through and child usually out of fear, not from knowing right
not be tolerated. ends up getting their way. from wrong.

Lets the child know that there are Finds excuses for child’s behavior Consequences are harsh and will
consequences for their behavior and blames everyone else except embarrass child in front of others.
and holds them accountable for child for poor behavior. Usually punishes while angry.
their actions.

Sees their child realistically and has Has a fairy tale world for their child Has unrealistic expectations for
realistic expectations for their child. and makes sure life is as easy as their child and will punish
possible. Lives through the child. harshly if expectations are not
met or fall short.

Gives their child love, self worth, Invites rebellion and unhappiness Invites rebellion and unhappiness
and respect therefore building with inconsistent parenting. The with the strong controlled
self-esteem. child thinks they are the center of environment.
the universe.

Balanced Parent 27.


K
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Things Your Child Should Know Before Entering Kindergarten
Each state establishes standards that students should meet at the end of a grade. No two states are
exactly the same. Check to determine what the standards are for your state and child’s grade level. In the
examples below, I share from my own teaching experience and those of teachers I respect. These skills
will hopefully put your child at an advantage.

Read to your child 15-20 minutes every day (see suggested kindergarten reading list p. 171)

1. Name upper and lower case letters.


2. Have an interest in listening to books being read to him/her.
3. Can speak clearly and express himself/herself in complete sentences.
4. Recognize numbers 0-9.
5. Knows his/her name (first, middle, and last name).
6. Able to use pencils, crayons, and scissors using correct grip.
7. Know his/her birthday, telephone number, and address.
8. Recognizes the eight (8) basic colors (red, blue, green, yellow, orange, purple, black, and brown).
9. Sign the contract for the beginning of the year (at the end of this chapter).

Notes on skills worked/mastered:

Notes on skills worked on and need more work:

Kindergarten 31.
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Things Your Child Should Know Mid-Year Kindergarten (January-February)

Read to your child 15-20 minutes every day (see suggested kindergarten reading list p. 171)

1. How to write his/her name using upper and lowercase letters.


2. Matching the letter sound to letter.
3. Identify certain words in print.
4. Answer questions about a story.
5. Handle books properly.
6. Use proper listening and speaking behaviors.
7. Begin to write letters and numbers.
8. Add objects totaling 5 or less.
9. Sign the contract for mid-year (at the end of this chapter).

Notes on skills worked/mastered:

Notes on skills worked on and need more work:

Kindergarten 33.
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Things Your Child Should Know By the End of Kindergarten (May-June)

Read to your child 15-20 minutes every day (see suggested reading list p. 171)

1. Recognize color words.


2. Read basic sight words.
3. Write a simple sentence.
4. Recall information from books like character, setting, details, ending of the story.
5. Identify a penny, nickel, dime, and quarter.
6. Tell time to the hour.
7. Solve simple addition and subtraction problems (for digits 0-10).
8. Recite short poems, rhymes, songs and stories.
9. Recognize patterns and be able to complete a pattern.
10. Sorting objects (things that are the same or similar).
11. Recognize shapes and draw shapes.
12. Sign the contract for the end of the year (at the end of this chapter).

Notes on skills worked/mastered:

Notes on skills worked on and need more work:

Kindergarten 35.
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Children’s Literature
Read to your child everyday. The following titles are books that I have found students enjoy
hearing or are award winning titles. Great literature abounds for children. Ask friends and
relatives to buy your child a book instead of toys for gifts. Research shows that reading to
your child early on will improve a child’s academic performance throughout life.

Kindergarten
1. The Black Snowman By Phil Mendez
2. The Ugly Duckling By Hans Christian Anderson
3. Mama Bird, Baby Birds By Angela Johnson
4. Snow White By Brothers Grimm
5. Is Your Mama a Llama By Deborah Guarino
6. Itchy, Itchy Chicken Pox By Grace Maccarone
7. Cinderella By Barbara Lanza
8. The First Thanksgiving By Garnet Jackson
9. Monster Math Picnic By Grace Maccarone
10. Amazing Grace By Mary Hoffman
11. Amelia Bedelia By Peggy Parish
12. Amelia Bedelia, Bookworm By Peggy Parish
13. Casey Jones By Kentucky Tale
14. The Velveteen Rabbit By Margery Williams
15. Angel Child, Dragon Child By Nucgeke Narua Surat
16. Apples to Oregon By Deborah Hopkinson
17. Arroz Con Leche By Lulu Delacre
18. Beatrice Doesn’t Want To By Laura Numeroff
19. Ben’s Trumpet By Rachel Isadora
20. Chicken Sunday By Patricia Polcco
21. Chester’s Way By Kevin Henkes
22. Clifford’s Series of Books By Norman Bridwell
23. Corduroy By Don Freeman
24. Curious George" By H.A. Rey
25. Dear Mr. Blueberry" By Simon James
26. Dora and Diego: The Rainforest By Lara Bergen
27. The Emperor’s Egg By Martin Jenkins
28. Everybody Cooks Rice By Norah Dooley
29. Fish is Fish By Leo Lionni
30. Flower Garden By Eve Bunting
31. The Lucy Cousins Book of Nursery Rhymes By Lucy Cousins

Kindergarten 37.
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Poetry and Nursery Rhymes
At this stage students need to hear rhyming words and understand the rhyming patterns.
Old nursery rhymes and rhyming patterns prepare children to hear and recognize
beginning, middle, and ending sounds for reading.

Kindergarten
1. “Over In the Meadow” - Traditional
2. ”Mary, Mary, Quite Contrary” - Traditional
3. “Little Miss Muffet” - Traditional
4. ”Humpty Dumpty” - Traditional
5. “Miss Mary Mac” - Traditional
6. ”You Are My Sunshine” - Traditional
7. “Down on the Farm” - Traditional
8. ”The Hokey Pokey” - Traditional
9. “Old Mother Hubbard” - Traditional
10. ”Hickory, Dickory, Dock” - Traditional
11. “Hey, Diddle, Diddle” - Traditional
12. ”Three Blind Mice” - Traditional
13. “Simple Simon” - Traditional
14. ”Rain, Rain, Go Away” - Traditional
15. “One, Two, Buckle My Shoe” - Traditional
16. ”Papa Papa” - Traditional
17. “Jack Be Nimble” - Traditional
18. ”These Hands” - Traditional
19. “We’re Going on a Lion Hunt” - Traditional
20. ”I Like It When” - Traditional

See other suggested children’s literature on p. 171

Kindergarten 39.
Contract
The following pages are extremely important. They are contractual agreements
between your child and you. Most children in kindergarten will not be able to read
or understand what a contract means. Explain that a contract is a promise that you
will make with each other in front of a witness, and the promise should not be
broken. Read it aloud and sign it in the presence of a concerned witness. Change
the contract as often as needed and change the objective as often as needed. There
will be a new contractual agreement three times a year: one at the beginning of the
school year, one mid-year, and one at the beginning of summer break. (There are
three contracts following each grade level for your use).

A good example of a parent’s objective would be to complete the first sections of


this manual. A good example of a student’s objective would to know all the upper
and lower case letters and 8 basic colors. Whatever the objectives may be, make
sure they are realistic.
Our Goals & Objectives - Beginning of the Year

Empowerment & Personal Responsibility through Education


Beginning: Kindergarten

Parent/Guardian Contractual Agreement

I, ________________________________, on this day _____________________ agree to help


Parents’/Guardian’s Name Date

___________________________ in any way that I can “Get the Best Education Possible.” I will use
Students Name

this manual to guide me and will become a cooperative working partner with

________________________________________. I will attend all conferences and assist the


Name of school my child attends

school in anyway that I can. I will not use the manual to intimidate or get my way but to assist

my child and I in making good choices.

Signature Date

Student’s Agreement
I, ________________________________, on this day _____________________ agree to do my
Students Name Date
absolute best every day so I can “Get the Best Education Possible.” I will listen, study, and work

hard. I will complete all assignments and only turn in my best work. I will strive for excellence in

everything I do.

Signature Date

Parent’s/Guardian’s main objectives for this semester:

Student’s objectives for this semester:

Witness

Signature Date
Kindergarten 43.
Our Goals & Objectives - Mid-Year

Empowerment & Personal Responsibility through Education


Mid-Year: Kindergarten
(January -February)

Parent/Guardian Contractual Agreement

I, ________________________________, on this day _____________________ agree to help


Parents’/Guardian’s Name Date
___________________________ in any way that I can “Get the Best Education Possible.” I will use
Students Name

this manual to guide me and will become a cooperative working partner with

________________________________________. I will attend all conferences and assist the


Name of school my child attends

school in anyway that I can. I will not use the manual to intimidate or get my way but to assist

my child and I in making good choices.

Signature Date

Student’s Agreement
I, ________________________________, on this day _____________________ agree to do my
Students Name Date
absolute best every day so I can “Get the Best Education Possible.” I will listen, study, and work

hard. I will complete all assignments and only turn in my best work. I will strive for excellence in

everything I do.

Signature Date

Parent’s/Guardian’s main objectives for this semester:

Student’s objectives for this semester:

Witness

Signature Date
Kindergarten 45.
Our Goals & Objectives - End of Year / Summer Break

Empowerment & Personal Responsibility through Education


End of Year: Kindergarten
(Summer Break)

Parent/Guardian Contractual Agreement

I, ________________________________, on this day _____________________ agree to help


Parents’/Guardian’s Name Date
___________________________ in any way that I can “Get the Best Education Possible.” I will use
Students Name

this manual to guide me and will become a cooperative working partner with

________________________________________. I will attend all conferences and assist the


Name of school my child attends

school in anyway that I can. I will not use the manual to intimidate or get my way but to assist

my child and I in making good choices.

Signature Date

Student’s Agreement
I, ________________________________, on this day _____________________ agree to do my
Students Name Date
absolute best every day so I can “Get the Best Education Possible.” I will listen, study, and work

hard. I will complete all assignments and only turn in my best work. I will strive for excellence in

everything I do.

Signature Date

Parent’s/Guardian’s main objectives for this semester:

Student’s objectives for this semester:

Witness

Signature Date
Kindergarten 47.
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Things Your Child Should Know Before Entering First Grade
Each state establishes standards that students should meet at the end of a grade. No two states are
exactly the same. Check to determine what the standards are for your state and child’s grade level. In
the examples below, I share from my own teaching experience and those of teachers I respect. These
skills will hopefully put your child at an advantage.

Read to your child 15-20 minutes every day (see suggested reading list p. 171)

1. Should be able to read 5-10 sight words.


2. Express him/herself verbally (let them tell jokes, riddles, tongue twisters).
3. Know the letter sounds and able to sound out words with some help.
4. Demonstrate an interest in books for reading and being read to.
5. Can identify characters, settings, problems, and solutions in stories.
6. Counting to 100 and write to 100.
7. Counting by ones and twos.
8. Sign the contract for the beginning of the year (at the end of this chapter).

Notes on skills worked/mastered:

Notes on skills worked on and need more work:

First Grade 51.


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Things Your Child Should Know Mid-Year First Grade (January-February)

Read to your child 15-20 minutes every day (see suggested reading list p. 171)

1. Able to read 20-30 words a minute.


2. Read with expression and retell story.
3. Know the letter sounds and able to sound out words with some help.
4. Identify compound words (raincoat, fireplace, handbag, hotdog).
5. Identify three-letter consonant blends (o: oa, ow).
6. Can count to 100 by 2’s, 5’s, and 10’s.
7. Identify coins and paper money.
8. Two digit addition and subtraction.
9. Adding three numbers. (1+2+3 or 4+5+6)
10. Telling time to the hour and half hour.
11. Sign the contract for mid-year (at the end of this chapter).

Notes on skills worked/mastered:

Notes on skills worked on and need more work:

First Grade 53.


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Things Your Child Should Know End of Year First Grade (May - June)

Read to your child 15-20 minutes every day (see suggested reading list p. 171)

1. Be able to read 40-60 words a minute.


2. Answer questions about what you read to see if they understand.
3. After you read a simple nursery rhyme ask your child to read it.
4. Be able to write a simple sentence and use correct punctuation.
5. Practice writing once or twice a week.
6. Draw a picture about what they write.
7. Express him/herself verbally (let them tell jokes, riddles, tongue twisters).
8. Know the letter sounds and able to sound out words with some help.
9. Have flash cards of sight words (While grocery shopping, let your child cross off items put in the basket).
10. Adding three numbers.
11. Telling time to the hour, half hour, and quarter hour.
12. Knowing greater than and less than.
13. Identify prefixes un-, and re- (happy-unhappy, run-rerun).
14. Sign the contract for the end of the year (at the end of this chapter).

Notes on skills worked/mastered:

Notes on skills worked on and need more work:

First Grade 55.


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Children’s Literature
Read to your child everyday. The following titles are books that I have found students enjoy
hearing or are award winning titles. Great literature abounds for children. Ask friends and
relatives to buy your child a book instead of toys for gifts. Research shows that reading to
your child early on will improve a child’s academic performance throughout life.

First Grade
1. Just the Two of Us By Will Smith
2. A Kiss for Little Bear By Else Holmelund
3. Latkes and Applesauce: A Hanukkah Story By Fran Manushkin
4. Brer Rabbit an African American Folktale
5. Hansel and Gretel a tale from Brothers Grimm
6. Tom Thumb a tale from Brothers Grim
7. Jack and the Beanstalk a tale from Brothers Grimm
8. Momma, Where Are You From By Mare Bradby
9. Medio Pollito a Hispanic Folktale
10. The Pied Piper of Hamelin a Traditional tale
11. Pinocchio By C. Collodi
12. Make Way for Ducklings By Robert McCloskey
13. The Princess and the Pea By Hans Christian Anderson
14. Puss-in-Boots By Hans Christian Anderson
15. Lily’s Purple Plastic Purse By Levin Henkes
16. The Little Engine That Could By Watty Piper
17. Rupunzel a tale from Brothers Grimm
18. Rumpelstiltskin a tale from Brothers Grimm
19. Sleeping Beauty a tale from Brothers Grimm
20. The Magic Fish By Freya Littledale
21. The Tale of Peter Rabbit By Beatrix Potter
22. Mommy’s Hands By Jane Kamine and Kathryn Lasky
23. One Leaf Rides the Wind By Celeste Mannis
24. Officer Buckle and Gloria By Peggy Rathmann
25. One of Three By Angela Johnson
26. Over in the Meadow By Olive A. Wadsworth
27. Owl Moon By Jane Olen
28. The Patchwork Quilt By Valerie Flournoy
29. Stellaluna By Janell Cannon
30. The Snowy Day By Jack Keats

First Grade 57.


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Poetry and Nursery Rhymes
At this stage students need to hear rhyming words and understand the rhyming patterns.
Old nursery rhymes and rhyming patterns prepare children to hear and recognize
beginning, middle, and ending sounds for reading.

First Grade
1. "Thirty Days Hath September” - Traditional
2. "An Alphabet” - By Edward Lear
3. "An Autumn Greeting” - Anonymous
4. "What Does the Bee Do?“ - By Christina Rossetti
5. "Hope” - By Langston Hughes
6. "Peter Piper Pick a Peck of Pickled Peppers“ - Traditional
7. "She Sells Seashells” - Traditional
8. "Solomon Grundy“ - Traditional
9. "Queen of Hearts” - Traditional
10. "The Owl and the Pussy-cat“ - By Edward Lear
11. "The Pasture” - By Robert Frost
12. "The Swing” - By Robert Louis Stevenson
13. "My Shadow” - By Robert Louis Stevenson

See other suggested children’s literature on p. 171

First Grade 59.


Contract
The following pages are extremely important. They are contractual agreements
between your child and you. A first grade child may not fully understand what a
contract means. Explain that a contract is a promise that you will make with each
other in front of a witness, and the promise should not be broken. Read it aloud and
sign it in the presence of a concerned witness. Change the contract as often as
needed and change the objective as often as needed. There will be a new
contractual agreement three times a year: one at the beginning of the school year,
one mid-year, and one at the beginning of summer break. (There are three contracts
following each grade level for your use).

A good example of a parent’s objective would be to complete the first sections of


this manual. A good example of a first grade student’s objective would be to know
all the letter sounds and can count and write to 100. Whatever the objectives
maybe make sure they are realistic.
Our Goals & Objectives - Beginning of the Year

Empowerment & Personal Responsibility through Education


Beginning: First Grade

Parent/Guardian Contractual Agreement

I, ________________________________, on this day _____________________ agree to help


Parents’/Guardian’s Name Date
___________________________ in any way that I can “Get the Best Education Possible.” I will use
Students Name
this manual to guide me and will become a cooperative working partner with

________________________________________. I will attend all conferences and assist the


Name of school my child attends

school in anyway that I can. I will not use the manual to intimidate or get my way but to assist

my child and I in making good choices.

Signature Date

Student’s Agreement
I, ________________________________, on this day _____________________ agree to do my
Students Name Date
absolute best every day so I can “Get the Best Education Possible.” I will listen, study, and work

hard. I will complete all assignments and only turn in my best work. I will strive for excellence in

everything I do.

Signature Date

Parent’s/Guardian’s main objectives for this semester:

Student’s objectives for this semester:

Witness

Signature Date
First Grade 63.
Our Goals & Objectives - Mid-Year

Empowerment & Personal Responsibility through Education


Mid-Year: First Grade
(Jan-Feb)

Parent/Guardian Contractual Agreement

I, ________________________________, on this day _____________________ agree to help


Parents’/Guardian’s Name Date
___________________________ in any way that I can “Get the Best Education Possible.” I will use
Students Name

this manual to guide me and will become a cooperative working partner with

________________________________________. I will attend all conferences and assist the


Name of school my child attends

school in anyway that I can. I will not use the manual to intimidate or get my way but to assist

my child and I in making good choices.

Signature Date

Student’s Agreement
I, ________________________________, on this day _____________________ agree to do my
Students Name Date
absolute best every day so I can “Get the Best Education Possible.” I will listen, study, and work

hard. I will complete all assignments and only turn in my best work. I will strive for excellence in

everything I do.

Signature Date

Parent’s/Guardian’s main objectives for this semester:

Student’s objectives for this semester:

Witness

Signature Date
First Grade 65.
Our Goals & Objectives - End of Year / Summer Break

Empowerment & Personal Responsibility through Education


End of Year: First Grade
(Summer Break)

Parent/Guardian Contractual Agreement

I, ________________________________, on this day _____________________ agree to help


Parents’/Guardian’s Name Date
___________________________ in any way that I can “Get the Best Education Possible.” I will use
Students Name

this manual to guide me and will become a cooperative working partner with

________________________________________. I will attend all conferences and assist the


Name of school my child attends

school in anyway that I can. I will not use the manual to intimidate or get my way but to assist

my child and I in making good choices.

Signature Date

Student’s Agreement
I, ________________________________, on this day _____________________ agree to do my
Students Name Date
absolute best every day so I can “Get the Best Education Possible.” I will listen, study, and work

hard. I will complete all assignments and only turn in my best work. I will strive for excellence in

everything I do.

Signature Date

Parent’s/Guardian’s main objectives for this semester:

Student’s objectives for this semester:

Witness

Signature Date
First Grade 67.
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Things Your Child Should Know Before Entering Second Grade
Each state establishes standards that students should meet at the end of a grade. No two states are
exactly the same. Check to determine what the standards are for your state and child’s grade level. In
the examples below, I share from my own teaching experience and those of teachers I respect. These
skills will hopefully put your child at an advantage.

Continue to read aloud with your child 35-40 minutes a day. (see suggested reading list p.173)
Take your child to the public library

1. Should be able to read 40-60 words per minute and retell 25-50% of what was read.
2. Help your child write letters to friends and relative, thank you cards, and invitations.
4. Identify base words and endings (drop and dropped).
5. Identify contractions (can not and can’t).
6. Identify comparative endings (long, longer, longest).
7. Even and odd numbers.
8. Regrouping subtraction.
9. Adding two and three digit numbers.
10. Sign the contract for the beginning of the year (at the end of this chapter).

Notes on skills worked/mastered:

Notes on skills worked on and need more work:

Second Grade 71.


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Things Your Child Should Know Mid-Year Second Grade (January-February)

Continue to read aloud with your child 35-40 minutes a day. (see suggested reading list p.173)
Take your child to the public library

1. Should be able to read 60-80 words per minute and retell 25-50% of what was read.
2. Have your child read by him/herself every day.
3. Able to write a complete sentence and use correct punctuation.
4. Able to write a narrative (story) that is easily understood.
5. Identify prefixes (un-, re-, pre-, dis-) eg. happy - unhappy, pay – repay, historic – prehistoric, agree - disagree.
6. Identify suffixes (-ly, -ful, -er, -or) eg. love – lovely, joy – joyful, sweet – sweeter.
7. Skip counting.
8. Even and odd numbers.
9. Subtractions facts.
10. Regrouping subtraction.
11. Adding two and three digit numbers.
12. Estimating and rounding numbers to the nearest ten.
13. Sign contract for mid-year (at the end of this chapter).

Notes on skills worked/mastered:

Notes on skills worked on and need more work:

Second Grade 73.


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Things Your Child Should Know End of Year Second Grade (May - June)

Continue to read aloud with your child 35-40 minutes a day. (see suggested reading list p.173)

Take your child to the public library

1. Read 90-100 words per minute and retell 25-50% of what was read.
2. Have your child read by him/herself every day.
3. Play word games (Scrabble Junior, Crossword puzzles, Hangman, etc).
4. Able to write a complete sentence and use correct punctuation.
5. How to write letters to friends and relatives (eg. thank you cards and invitations).
6. Counting with tally marks.
7. Writing numbers as words and reading number lines.
8. Subtractions facts and regrouping subtraction.
9. Adding two and three digit numbers.
10. Estimating and rounding numbers to the nearest ten.
11. Simplify fractions and multiplying by 10.
12. Finding the missing number and solving simple word problems.
13. Identify prefixes (mis-, mid-) ex. understood – misunderstood, summer - midsummer.
14. Identify suffixes (-ness, -less) ex. calm – calmness, use, and useless.
15. Telling time and understanding the calendar.
16. Sign the contract for the end of the year (at the end of this chapter).

Notes on skills worked/mastered:

Notes on skills worked on and need more work:

Second Grade 75.


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Children’s Literature
Read to your child everyday. The following titles are books that I have found students enjoy
hearing or are award winning titles. Great literature abounds for children. Ask friends and
relatives to buy your child a book instead of toys for gifts. Research shows that reading to
your child early on will improve a child’s academic performance throughout life.

Second Grade
1. The Emperors New Clothes By Hans Christian Anderson
2. A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
3. Charlotte’s Webb By E. B. White
4. How the Camel Got His Hump By Kudyard Kipling
5. Beauty and the Beast a Traditional folktale
6. Peter’s Chair By Ezra Jack Keats
7. A Pocket for Corduroy By Don Freeman
8. El Pajaro Cu a folktale from Mexico
9. Peter Pan By James M. Barrie
10. A Pocket Full of Kisses By Audrey Penn
11. Polar Bear Night By Lauren Thompson
12. Ricardo’s Day By George Ancona
13. Rosie’s Walk By Pat Hutchins
14. Shades of Black Retold by Lucia M Gonzalez
15. How Iktomi Lost His Eyes a story from the Assinibone tribe
16. The Snowy Day By Ezra Jack Keats
17. The Fisherman and His Wife By The Brothers Grimm
18. A Splendid Friend, Indeed By Suzanne Bloom
19. Stone Soup By Ann McGovern
20. Stega Nona By Tomie dePaola
21. The Stray Dog By Marc Simont
22. These Hands By Hope Price

See other suggested children’s literature on p.173

Second Grade 77.


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Poetry and Nursery Rhymes
At this stage students need to hear rhyming words and understand the rhyming patterns.
Old nursery rhymes and rhyming patterns prepare children to hear and recognize
beginning, middle, and ending sounds for reading.

Second Grade
(Ask your child if he/she can understand the meaning of the poems and have him/her illustrate or draw a picture for the
poem)

1. “Smart” - By Shel Silverstein


2. “At the Zoo” - By William Makepeace Thackeray
3. “The Seaside” - By Robert Louis Stevenson
4. “Hurt No Living Thing” - By Christina Rossetti
5. “Rudolph Is Tired of the City” - By Gwendolyn Brooks
6. “Something Told the Wild Geese” - By Rachel Field
7. “Who Has Seen the Wind?” - By Christina Rossetti
8. “There Was an Old Man with a Beard” - By Edward Lear
9. “Bed in Summer” - By Robert Louis Stevenson
10. “Discovery” - By Harry Behn
11. “Harriet Tubman” - By Eloise Greenfield
12. “Lincoln” - By Nancy Byrd Turner
13. “The Cow” - By Robert Louis Stevenson
14. “The Night Before Christmas” - By Clement C. Moore
15. “Windy Nights” - By Robert Louis Stevenson

See other suggested children’s literature on p.173

Second Grade 79.


Contract
The following pages are extremely important. They are contractual agreements
between your child and you. Your second grade child should understand what a
contract is by now. Read it aloud and sign it in the presence of a concerned witness.
Change the contract as often as needed and change the objective as often as
needed. There will be a new contractual agreement three times a year: one at the
beginning of the school year, one mid-year, and one at the beginning of summer
break. (There are three contracts following each grade level for your use).

A good example of a parent’s objective would be to complete the first sections of


this manual. A good example of a second grade student’s objective would be to
read 15-30 minutes every day after school and to add and subtract 3 digit numbers.
Whatever the objectives may be, make sure they are realistic.
Our Goals & Objectives - Beginning of the Year

Empowerment & Personal Responsibility through Education


Beginning: Second Grade

Parent/Guardian Contractual Agreement

I, ________________________________, on this day _____________________ agree to help


Parents’/Guardian’s Name Date

___________________________ in any way that I can “Get the Best Education Possible.” I will use
Students Name

this manual to guide me and will become a cooperative working partner with

________________________________________. I will attend all conferences and assist the


Name of school my child attends

school in anyway that I can. I will not use the manual to intimidate or get my way but to assist

my child and I in making good choices.

Signature Date

Student’s Agreement
I, ________________________________, on this day _____________________ agree to do my
Students Name Date
absolute best every day so I can “Get the Best Education Possible.” I will listen, study, and work

hard. I will complete all assignments and only turn in my best work. I will strive for excellence in

everything I do.

Signature Date

Parent’s/Guardian’s main objectives for this semester:

Student’s objectives for this semester:

Witness

Signature Date
Second Grade 83.
Our Goals & Objectives - Mid-Year

Empowerment & Personal Responsibility through Education


Mid-Year: Second Grade
(January -February)

Parent/Guardian Contractual Agreement

I, ________________________________, on this day _____________________ agree to help


Parents’/Guardian’s Name Date

___________________________ in any way that I can “Get the Best Education Possible.” I will use
Students Name

this manual to guide me and will become a cooperative working partner with

________________________________________. I will attend all conferences and assist the


Name of school my child attends

school in anyway that I can. I will not use the manual to intimidate or get my way but to assist

my child and I in making good choices.

Signature Date

Student’s Agreement
I, ________________________________, on this day _____________________ agree to do my
Students Name Date
absolute best every day so I can “Get the Best Education Possible.” I will listen, study, and work

hard. I will complete all assignments and only turn in my best work. I will strive for excellence in

everything I do.

Signature Date

Parent’s/Guardian’s main objectives for this semester:

Student’s objectives for this semester:

Witness

Signature Date
Second Grade 85.
Our Goals & Objectives - End of Year / Summer Break

Empowerment & Personal Responsibility through Education


End of Year: Second Grade
(Summer Break)

Parent/Guardian Contractual Agreement

I, ________________________________, on this day _____________________ agree to help


Parents’/Guardian’s Name Date

___________________________ in any way that I can “Get the Best Education Possible.” I will use
Students Name

this manual to guide me and will become a cooperative working partner with

________________________________________. I will attend all conferences and assist the


Name of school my child attends

school in anyway that I can. I will not use the manual to intimidate or get my way but to assist

my child and I in making good choices.

Signature Date

Student’s Agreement
I, ________________________________, on this day _____________________ agree to do my
Students Name Date
absolute best every day so I can “Get the Best Education Possible.” I will listen, study, and work

hard. I will complete all assignments and only turn in my best work. I will strive for excellence in

everything I do.

Signature Date

Parent’s/Guardian’s main objectives for this semester:

Student’s objectives for this semester:

Witness

Signature Date
Second Grade 87.
3
Best Education Possible Journal

Empowerment & Personal Responsibility through Education


Things Your Child Should Know Before Entering Third Grade

Each state establishes standards that students should meet at the end of a grade. No two states are
exactly the same. Check to determine what the standards are for your state and child’s grade level. In
the examples below, I share from my own teaching experience and those of teachers I respect. These
skills will hopefully put your child at an advantage.

Continue to read aloud with your child or child should read independently for at least 30 minutes a
day. Read good literature (see suggested third grade reading list p. 175).

1. Should read 90-100 words per minute and retell 25-50% of what was read.
2. How to write a report and friendly letter and parts of speech.
3. Multiplication Tables and 4-digit subtraction.
4. Identify Prefixes (un-, re-, mis-, dis-) (eg.unhappy, rewrite, misplace, disobey).
5. Identify Suffixes (–ly, -ful, -ness, -less) (eg. finally, truly, beautiful, kindness).
6. Identify Silent consonants (wr, kn, st, mb, gn) (eg. write, knight, listen, thumb, gnaw).
7. Elapsed time in minutes and change for $1.00.
8. Numbers through Hundred thousands.
9. Expanded form 3,457 in expanded form is 3,000 + 400 + 50 + 7.
10. Elapsed time to the hour with a clock and with a calendar.
11. Round money values to the nearest dollar.
12. Determine monetary values of sets of unlike coins and bills up to $5.00.
13. Sign the contract for the beginning of the year (at the end of this chapter).

Notes on skills worked/mastered:

Notes on skills worked on and need more work:

Third Grade 91.


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Things Your Child Should Know Mid-Year Third Grade (January-February)

Continue to read aloud with your child or child should read independently for at least 30 minutes a
day. Read good literature. (see suggested third grade reading list p. 175)

1. Should read 100-110 words per minute and retell 25-50% of what was read.
2. How to write a report/business letter and the Parts of speech.
3. Identify Homophones (our, hour; ate, eight).
4. Identify Prefixes (pre-, mid-,over-, out-) (eg. prepaid, midnight, overhead, oversleep, outdo).
5. Multiplication thru 6 time tables.
6. Draw perpendicular lines.
7. Complete a given geometric pattern.
8. Basic Division.
9. Solve word problems.
10. Numbers through Hundred Thousands.
11. Expanded form 3,457 in expanded form is 3,000 + 400 + 50 + 7.
12. Rounding numbers.
13. 4-digit subtraction.
14. Sign the contract for mid-year (at the end of this chapter).

Notes on skills worked/mastered:

Notes on skills worked on and need more work:

Third Grade 93.


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Things Your Child Should Know End of Year Third Grade (May - June)

Continue to read aloud with your child or child should read independently for at least 30 minutes a day. Read
good literature. (see suggested third grade reading list p. 175)

1. Should read 110-120 words per minute and retell 25-50% of what was read.
2. Support your child’s interest and communicate daily with your child.
3. Encourage child to keep a journal and write letters to friends and relatives.
4. Learning geography (continents, largest countries, major rivers, major mountains, major cities of the world).
5. World History (Ancient Rome, Julius Caesar, Vikings, Early Explorers in North America, English Colonies).
6. Introduced to drawing, cutting, pasting, working with clay, etc. (also, visit museums and galleries).
7. Expose your child to singing, playing rhythms, musical instruments, and terms in music.
8. Common syllables (–tion, -sion, -ture) ex. action, question, fiction, picture, nature, decision).
9. Multisyllabic words (using word parts eg. prefix + base word + suffix) (joyfully, refilled, leadership, disagreement).
10. Multiplication tables with regrouping and division.
11. Draw points and lines (parallel lines, perpendicular lines, rays).
12. Solve word problems.
13. Identify numbers through hundred thousands.
14. Expanded form 3,457 in expanded form is 3,000 + 400 + 50 + 7.
15. Rounding numbers/estimating sums and differences.
16. Mental addition/subtraction and 4-digit subtraction.
17. Elapsed Time in minutes and change for $1.00.
18. Reading and writing graphs (line graphs, bar graph).
19. Geometry, measurement, roman numerals, and fractions.
20. Sign the contract for the end of the year (at the end of this chapter).
Notes on skills worked/mastered:

Notes on skills worked on and need more work:

Third Grade 95.


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Children’s Literature
Read to your child everyday. The following titles are books that I have found students enjoy
hearing or are award winning titles. Great literature abounds for children. Ask friends and
relatives to buy your child a book instead of toys for gifts. Research shows that reading to
your child early on will improve a child’s academic performance throughout life.

Third Grade
1. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland By Lewis Carroll
2. Aladdin and the Wonderful Lamp By Scheherazade
3. Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves By Scheherazade
4. The Hunter of the Great Bear By the Iroquois People
5. William Tell a Switzerland Legend
6. Jason and the Golden Fleece an Ancient Greek Myth
7. The People Could Fly an African American Tale
8. The Little Match Girl By Hans Christian Anderson
9. The River Bank By Kenneth Grahame
10. Three Words of Wisdom a Mexican Tale
11. Gone Is Gone a Story from Bohemia

See other suggested children’s literature on p. 175

Third Grade 97.


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Poetry and Prose

Third Grade
(Ask your child if he/she can understand the meaning of the poems and have him/her illustrate or draw a picture for the
poem)

1. "Jimmy Jet and His TV Set" - By Shel Silverstein


2. "Above the Bright Blue Sky" - By Albert Midlane
3. "Dream Variations" - By Langston Hughes
4. "All Things Bright and Beautiful" - By Cecil Frances Alexander
5. "By Myself" - By Eloise Greenfield
6. "A light Exists in Spring" - By Emily Dickinson
7. "Knoxville, Tennessee" - By Nikki Giovanni
8. "Trees" - By Sergeant Joyce Kilmer
9. "The Baby Dance" - By Ann Taylor
10. "An Evening Hymn" - By Thomas Ken
11. "Thanksgiving of All " - By Nancy Byrd Turner
12. "Adventures of Isabel" - By Ogden Nash
13. "Eletelephony" - By Laura Richards

See other suggested children’s literature on p. 175

Third Grade 99.


Contract
The following pages are extremely important. They are contractual agreements
between your child and you. Read it aloud and sign it in the presence of a
concerned witness. Change the contract as often as needed and change the
objective as often as needed. There will be a new contractual agreement three
times a year: one at the beginning of the school year, one mid-year, and one at the
beginning of summer break. (There are three contracts following each grade level
for your use).

A good example of a parent’s objective would be to complete the first sections of


this manual. A good example of a third grade student’s objective would be to read
15-30 minutes after school and know the 0-3 multiplication tables. Whatever the
objectives may be, make sure they are realistic.
Our Goals & Objectives - Beginning of the Year

Empowerment & Personal Responsibility through Education


Beginning: Third Grade

Parent/Guardian Contractual Agreement

I, ________________________________, on this day _____________________ agree to help


Parents’/Guardian’s Name Date

___________________________ in any way that I can “Get the Best Education Possible.” I will use
Students Name

this manual to guide me and will become a cooperative working partner with

________________________________________. I will attend all conferences and assist the


Name of school my child attends

school in anyway that I can. I will not use the manual to intimidate or get my way but to assist

my child and I in making good choices.

Signature Date

Student’s Agreement
I, ________________________________, on this day _____________________ agree to do my
Students Name Date
absolute best every day so I can “Get the Best Education Possible.” I will listen, study, and work

hard. I will complete all assignments and only turn in my best work. I will strive for excellence in

everything I do.

Signature Date

Parent’s/Guardian’s main objectives for this semester:

Student’s objectives for this semester:

Witness

Signature Date
Third Grade 103.
Our Goals & Objectives - Mid-Year

Empowerment & Personal Responsibility through Education


Mid-Year: Third Grade
(January -February)

Parent/Guardian Contractual Agreement

I, ________________________________, on this day _____________________ agree to help


Parents’/Guardian’s Name Date

___________________________ in any way that I can “Get the Best Education Possible.” I will use
Students Name

this manual to guide me and will become a cooperative working partner with

________________________________________. I will attend all conferences and assist the


Name of school my child attends

school in anyway that I can. I will not use the manual to intimidate or get my way but to assist

my child and I in making good choices.

Signature Date

Student’s Agreement
I, ________________________________, on this day _____________________ agree to do my
Students Name Date
absolute best every day so I can “Get the Best Education Possible.” I will listen, study, and work

hard. I will complete all assignments and only turn in my best work. I will strive for excellence in

everything I do.

Signature Date

Parent’s/Guardian’s main objectives for this semester:

Student’s objectives for this semester:

Witness

Signature Date
Third Grade 105.
Our Goals & Objectives - End of Year / Summer Break

Empowerment & Personal Responsibility through Education


End of Year: Third Grade
(Summer Break)

Parent/Guardian Contractual Agreement

I, ________________________________, on this day _____________________ agree to help


Parents’/Guardian’s Name Date

___________________________ in any way that I can “Get the Best Education Possible.” I will use
Students Name

this manual to guide me and will become a cooperative working partner with

________________________________________. I will attend all conferences and assist the


Name of school my child attends

school in anyway that I can. I will not use the manual to intimidate or get my way but to assist

my child and I in making good choices.

Signature Date

Student’s Agreement
I, ________________________________, on this day _____________________ agree to do my
Students Name Date
absolute best every day so I can “Get the Best Education Possible.” I will listen, study, and work

hard. I will complete all assignments and only turn in my best work. I will strive for excellence in

everything I do.

Signature Date

Parent’s/Guardian’s main objectives for this semester:

Student’s objectives for this semester:

Witness

Signature Date
Third Grade 107.
4
Best Education Possible Journal

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Things Your Child Should Know Before Entering Fourth Grade
Each state establishes standards that students should meet at the end of a grade. No two states are
exactly the same. Check to determine what the standards are for your state and child’s grade level. In
the examples below, I share from my own teaching experience and those of teachers I respect. These
skills will hopefully put your child at an advantage.

Continue to read aloud with your child or child should read independently for at least 30 minutes a day. (see
suggested fourth grade reading list p. 175)

1. Should read 110-120 words per minute with expression and retell 25-50% of what was read.
2. Read poetry and skimming passages to understand significance.
3. Identify multiple-meanings of words (the sky is blue. I feel blue today).
4. Identify vowel sound in ball: a, au, aw, al (almost, always, because, fault, straw, walk).
5. Identify suffixes -y, -ish, -hood, -ment (chewy, foolish, childhood, enjoyment).
6. Know related words (sign, signal, nature, natural).
7. Multiplication and division 3 digits.
8. Understanding remainders in division.
9. Math place value and using a number line.
10. Fractions, decimals, tables and graphs.
11. Measurement (metric and U.S. customary units).
12. Geometry (Planes, Points, Segments, Lines, Rays, Area, Square Units, Volume, Shapes).
13. World Geography (North Pole, South Pole, Hemispheres, Coordinates, Map Scales).
14. Sign the contract for the beginning of the year (at the end of this chapter).

Notes on skills worked/mastered:

Notes on skills worked on and need more work:

Fourth Grade 111.


Best Education Possible Journal

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Things Your Child Should Know Mid-Year Fourth Grade (January-February)

Continue to read aloud with your child or child should read independently for at least 30 minutes a
day. (see suggested fourth grade reading list p. 175)

1. Should read 115-120 words per minute and retell 25-50% of what was read.
2. Identifying main idea.
3. Identifying author’s purpose.
4. Greek and Latin Roots (words with dge, ge, x, qu).
5. Multiple-Meaning words.
6. Prefixes (understand misunderstand, member, nonmember, finish, refinish).
7. Multiplication and division of 3 digits.
8. Understanding remainders in division.
9. Fractions and decimals and putting fractions in lowest forms.
10. Measurement (metric and U.S. customary units).
11. Using a number line and negative numbers.
12. Place value up to millions.
13. 50 states and capitals.
14. Sign the contract for mid-year (at the end of this chapter).

Notes on skills worked/mastered:

Notes on skills worked on and need more work:

Fourth Grade 113.


Best Education Possible Journal

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Things Your Child Should Know End of Year Fourth Grade (May - June)

Continue to read aloud with your child or child should read independently for at least 30 minutes a day. (see
suggested fourth grade reading list p. 175)

1. Should read 120-125 words per minute and retell 25-50% of what was read.
2. Sayings and Phrases (ex. The bigger they are the harder they fall; two wrongs don’t make a right).
3. Identify synonyms (amazing(astonishing)) (blissful(happy))(great(extraordinary).
4. Identify antonyms (perfect(blemished or defective)) (sweet (sour, bitter, or hateful)).
5. Form contractions (I am (I’m) (I would (I’d)) (we have(we’ve) (they are (they’re)).
6. World Geography (North Pole, South Pole, Hemispheres, Coordinates, Map Scales).
7. Europe in the Middle Ages (Barbarians, Dark Ages, Feudalism, etc.).
8. Early American Presidents.
9. Art (Art of the Middle Ages, Art of Africa, Art of China, American Art).
10. Exposure to all types of music and understanding them.
11. Math place value, square roots, and plotting points on a grid.
12. Multiplication and division of 3 digits and understanding remainders in division.
13. Fractions, decimals, mixed numbers, and putting fractions in lowest forms.
14. Measurement (metric and U.S. customary units).
15. Geometry (Planes, Points, Segments, Lines, Rays, Area, Square Units, Volume).
16. Human Body.
17. Sign the contract for the end of the year (at the end of this chapter).

Notes on skills worked/mastered:

Notes on skills worked on and need more work:

Fourth Grade 115.


Best Education Possible Journal

Empowerment & Personal Responsibility through Education


Children’s Literature
Read to your child everyday. The following titles are books that I have found students enjoy
hearing or are award winning titles. Great literature abounds for children. Ask friends and
relatives to buy your child a book instead of toys for gifts. Research shows that reading to
your child early on will improve a child’s academic performance throughout life.

Fourth Grade
1. The Fire on the Mountain a Story from Ethiopia
2. The Wonderful Chuang Brocade a Folktale from China
3. King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table an English legend
4. A Grain of Wheat: A Writer Begins By Clyde Robert Bulla
5. The Story of My Life By Helen Keller
6. Robin Hood By J. Walker McSpadden
7. Robinson Crusoe By Daniel Defoe
8. Gulliver’s Travels By Jonathan Swift
9. Treasure Island By Robert Louis Stevenson
10. Rip Van Winkle By Washington Irving
11. The Legend of Sleepy Hollow By Washington Irving
12. The Ugly Duckling By Hans Christian Anderson
13. A Bear Called Paddington By Michael Bond
14. James and the Giant Peach By Roald Dahl
15. Snow White in New York By Fiona French
16. Buffalo Woman By Paul Goble
17. Ralph S. Mouse By Beverly Cleary
18. Ramona and Her Father By Beverly Cleary
19. The Mouse and The Motorcycle By Beverly Cleary
20. Bud, Not Buddy By Christopher Paul Curtis
21. The Courage of Sarah Noble By Alice Dalgiesh
22. Because of Winn Dixie By Kate DiCamillo
23. Morning Girl By Michael Dorris
24. The Whipping Boy By Sid Fleishchman
25. Stone Fox By John Gardiner
26. My Side of the Mountain By Jean Craighead George
27. Bunnicula By Deborah and James Howe
28. Town Mouse, Country Mouse By Jan Brett
29. The Eagle and The Wren By Jane Goodall
30. Paul Bunyan: A Tall Tale By Steven Kellogg
31. Caddie Woodlawn By Carol Ryrie Brink
32. The Secret Garden By Frances Hodgson Burnett

Fourth Grade 117.


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Poetry and Prose

Fourth Grade
(Ask your child if he/she can understand the meaning of the poems and have him/her illustrate or draw a picture for the
poem)

1. "Monday’s Child is Fair of Face” - Traditional


2. "Bed in Summer” - By Robert Louis Stevenson
3. "Dreams” - By Langston Hughes
4. "The dream” - By Nikki Giavanni
5. "Clarence” - By Shel Silverstein
6. "Humanity” - By Elma Stuckey
7. "The Blind Boy” - By Colley Cibber
8. "Clouds” - By Christina G Rossetti
9. "Buttercup and Daisies” - By Mary Howitt
10. "The Exhortation of a Father to His Children” - By Robert Smith
11. "Above the Bright Blue Sky” - By Albert Midlane
12. "A Light Exisits in Spring” - By Emily Dickinson
13. "Fog” - By Carl Sandburg
14. "Things” - By Eloise Greenfield
15. "A Story of Fidgety Philip” - By Heinrich Hoffman
16. "Afternoon on a Hill” - By Edna St. Vincent Millay
17. "The Rhinoceros” - By Ogden Nash
18. "A Tragic Story” - By William Makepeace Thackeray
19. "Paul Revere’s Ride” - By Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
20. "All Things Bright and Beautiful” - By Cecil Frances Alexander

See other suggested children’s literature on p. 175

Fourth Grade 119.


Contract
The following pages are extremely important. They are contractual agreements
between your child and you. Read it aloud and sign it in the presence of a
concerned witness. Change the contract as often as needed and change the
objective as often as needed. There will be a new contractual agreement three
times a year: one at the beginning of the school year, one mid-year, and one at the
beginning of summer break. (There are three contracts following each grade level
for your use).

A good example of a parent’s objective would be to complete the first sections of


this manual. A good example of a fourth grade student’s objective would be to read
30 minutes after school and to practice division. Whatever the objectives maybe
make sure they are realistic.
Our Goals & Objectives - Beginning of the Year

Empowerment & Personal Responsibility through Education


Beginning: Fourth Grade

Parent/Guardian Contractual Agreement

I, ________________________________, on this day _____________________ agree to help


Parents’/Guardian’s Name Date

___________________________ in any way that I can “Get the Best Education Possible.” I will use
Students Name

this manual to guide me and will become a cooperative working partner with

________________________________________. I will attend all conferences and assist the


Name of school my child attends

school in anyway that I can. I will not use the manual to intimidate or get my way but to assist

my child and I in making good choices.

Signature Date

Student’s Agreement
I, ________________________________, on this day _____________________ agree to do my
Students Name Date
absolute best every day so I can “Get the Best Education Possible.” I will listen, study, and work

hard. I will complete all assignments and only turn in my best work. I will strive for excellence in

everything I do.

Signature Date

Parent’s/Guardian’s main objectives for this semester:

Student’s objectives for this semester:

Witness

Signature Date
Fourth Grade 123.
Our Goals & Objectives - Mid-Year

Empowerment & Personal Responsibility through Education


Mid-Year: Fourth Grade
(January -February)

Parent/Guardian Contractual Agreement

I, ________________________________, on this day _____________________ agree to help


Parents’/Guardian’s Name Date

___________________________ in any way that I can “Get the Best Education Possible.” I will use
Students Name

this manual to guide me and will become a cooperative working partner with

________________________________________. I will attend all conferences and assist the


Name of school my child attends

school in anyway that I can. I will not use the manual to intimidate or get my way but to assist

my child and I in making good choices.

Signature Date

Student’s Agreement
I, ________________________________, on this day _____________________ agree to do my
Students Name Date
absolute best every day so I can “Get the Best Education Possible.” I will listen, study, and work

hard. I will complete all assignments and only turn in my best work. I will strive for excellence in

everything I do.

Signature Date

Parent’s/Guardian’s main objectives for this semester:

Student’s objectives for this semester:

Witness

Signature Date
Fourth Grade 125.
Our Goals & Objectives - End of Year / Summer Break

Empowerment & Personal Responsibility through Education


End of Year: Fourth Grade
(Summer Break)

Parent/Guardian Contractual Agreement

I, ________________________________, on this day _____________________ agree to help


Parents’/Guardian’s Name Date

___________________________ in any way that I can “Get the Best Education Possible.” I will use
Students Name

this manual to guide me and will become a cooperative working partner with

________________________________________. I will attend all conferences and assist the


Name of school my child attends

school in anyway that I can. I will not use the manual to intimidate or get my way but to assist

my child and I in making good choices.

Signature Date

Student’s Agreement
I, ________________________________, on this day _____________________ agree to do my
Students Name Date
absolute best every day so I can “Get the Best Education Possible.” I will listen, study, and work

hard. I will complete all assignments and only turn in my best work. I will strive for excellence in

everything I do.

Signature Date

Parent’s/Guardian’s main objectives for this semester:

Student’s objectives for this semester:

Witness

Signature Date
Fourth Grade 127.
5
Best Education Possible Journal

Empowerment & Personal Responsibility through Education


Things Your Child Should Know Before Entering Fifth Grade

Each state establishes standards that students should meet at the end of a grade. No two states are
exactly the same. Check to determine what the standards are for your state and child’s grade level. In
the examples below, I share from my own teaching experience and those of teachers I respect. These
skills will hopefully put your child at an advantage.

Continue to read aloud with your child or child should read independently for 30 or more minutes a day. Your
child should be exposed to classic literature (see suggested fifth grade reading list p. 175)

1. Read 120-125 words per minute and retell 25-50% of what was read.
2. Read poetry and write narrative, expository, descriptive, and persuasive writing.
3. Grammar: sentence fragments, run on sentences, direct objects, indirect objects, predicates, adjective, adverbs,
interjections, agreement in case, colons, prefixes, suffixes, and italics.
4. Write research papers and reports.
5. Use transition words in writing: first, second, next, finally.
6. Determine purpose and audience of author.
7. Use figurative language to enhance oral and written communication.
8. Use prior knowledge to interpret meaning.
9. Identify homonyms: aunt – ant, close – clothes, higher – hire, shear – sheer.
10. Prime numbers.
11. Multiplication and division of 2-digit divisors and decimals.
12. Comparing Fractions and ratios, percents, and probabilities.
13. Fifth Grade Geometry.
14. Sign the contract for the beginning of the year (at the end of this chapter).

Notes on skills worked/mastered:

Notes on skills worked on and need more work:

Fifth Grade 131.


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Things Your Child Should Know Mid-Year Fifth Grade (January-February)

Continue to read aloud with your child or child should read independently for 30 or more minutes a
day. Your child should be exposed to classic literature (see suggested fifth grade reading list p. 175)

1. Should read 120-125 words per minute and retell 25-50% of what was read.
2. Editing writing.
3. Using adjective in writing: The enormously beautiful ancient buildings.
4. Responding in writing to open ended questions.
5. Using apostrophes with possessives: the boy’s shirt, cow’s milk, different schools’ budgets.
6. Multiplication and division of 2 digit divisors and decimals.
7. Comparing fractions and large numbers.
8. Ratios, percents, and probabilities.
9. Place value and expanded form.
10. Positive and negative numbers.
11. Integers.
12. Square Roots.
13. Sign the contract for mid-year (at the end of this chapter).

Notes on skills worked/mastered:

Notes on skills worked on and need more work:

Fifth Grade 133.


Best Education Possible Journal

Empowerment & Personal Responsibility through Education


Things Your Child Should Know End of Year Fifth Grade (May - June)

Continue to read aloud with your child or child should read independently for 30 or more minutes a
day. Your child should be exposed to classic literature (see suggested fifth grade reading list p. 175)

1. Should read 120-125 words per minute and retell 25-50% of what was read.
2. Apply colon to introduce list: “The following names will appear on the ballets:”.
3. Express meaning through writing.
4. Detail paragraphs in an organized manner.
5. World Geography: latitude, longitude, seasons, lakes of the world) and U.S. Geography.
6. European Exploration.
7. Feudal Japan.
8. Westward Expansion before/after the Civil War and the Civil War.
9. Visual Arts and Elements of Music.
10. Place value and Expanded form.
11. Comparing Large numbers and Fractions.
12. Positive and Negative numbers.
13. Integers, Square Roots, Exponents, and Prime Numbers.
14. Multiplication and Division of 2 digit divisors and Decimals.
15. Ratios, Percents, and Probabilities.
16. Fifth Grade Geometry.
17. Sign the contract for the end of the year (at the end of this chapter).

Notes on skills worked/mastered:

Notes on skills worked on and need more work:

Fifth Grade 135.


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Children’s Literature
Read to your child everyday. The following titles are books that I have found students enjoy
hearing or are award winning titles. Great literature abounds for children. Ask friends and
relatives to buy your child a book instead of toys for gifts. Research shows that reading to
your child early on will improve a child’s academic performance throughout life.

Fifth Grade
1. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
2. Don Quixote By Miguel de Cervantes
3. Little Women By Louisa May Alcott
4. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass By Frederick Douglass
5. The Secret Garden By Frances Hodgson Burnett
6. The Red-Headed League By Arthur Conan Doyle
7. Samurai’s Daughters a story from Japan
8. The Sun Dance a folktale from the Plain Indians
9. Coyote Goes to the Land of the Dead a Native American Tale
10. Number the Stars By Lois Lowry
11. Homer Price By Robert McCloskey
12. Fat Men from Space By Daniel Pinkwater
13. Where the Red Fern Grows By Wilson Rawls
14. How to Eat Fried Worms, and other Plays By Thomas Rockwell
15. Night of the Twister By Ivy Ruckman
16. Appalachia: The Voices of Sleeping Birds By Cynthia Rylant
17. The Encyclopedia Brown Series By Donald Sobol
18. Maniac Magee By Jerry Spinelli
19. The Cay By Theodore Taylor
20. The Boxcare Children Series By Gertrude Warner
21. Fables By Arnold Lubel
22. A Million Fish – More or Less By Patricia McKissack
23. The Tortoise and The Hare By Janet Stevens
24. The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe By C.S. Lewis
25. Yeh-Shen: A Cinderella Story by China By Ai-Ling Louie
26. The Dragon Kite By Nancy Luenn
27. Plantzilla By John Steptoe
28. Mufaro’s Beautiful Daughters By Chris Van Allsburg
29. Charolette’s Web By W.B. White
30. Island of the Blue Dolphins By Scott O’Dell
31. Pink and Say By Patricia Polacco
32. Nettie’s Trip South By Ann Turner

Fifth Grade 137.


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Poetry and Prose

Fifth Grade
(Ask your child if he or she understands the meaning of the poems)

1. "Evening (In words of one syllable)" - By Thomas Miller


2. "The Arrow and the Song" - By Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
3. "From Opposites" - By Richard Wilbur
4. "I, Too" - By Langston Hughes
5. "Narcissa" - By Gwendolyn Brooks
6. "A Wise Old Owl" - By Edward Hersey Richards
7. "The Eagle" - By Alfred Lord Tennyson
8. "The Road Not Taken" - By Robert Frost
9. "The Snow-storm" - By Ralph Waldo Emerson
10. "Bed in Summer" - By Rober Louis Stevenson
11. "The Baby Dance" - By Ann Taylor
12. "Incident" - By Countee Cullen
13. "Ferry Me Across the Water" - By Christina Rossetti
14. "I Like to see it Lab the Miles" - By Emily Dickinson
15. "A Bird Came Down the Walk" - By Emily Dickinson
16. "The Tyger" - By William Blake
17. "A Poison Tree" - By William Blake
18. "O Captain: My Captain" - By Walt Whitman
19. "Casey at the Bat" - By Ernest Lawrence Thayer
20. "Father’s Vineyard" - Anonymous

See other suggested children’s literature on p. 175

Fifth Grade 139.


Contract
The following pages are extremely important. They are contractual agreements
between your child and you. Read it aloud and sign it in the presence of a
concerned witness. Change the contract as often as needed and change the
objective as often as needed. There will be a new contractual agreement three
times a year: one at the beginning of the school year, one mid-year, and one at the
beginning of summer break. (There are three contracts following each grade level
for your use).

A good example of a parent’s objective would be to complete the first sections of


this manual. A good example of a fifth grade student’s objective would be to read
30 minutes after school and practice 2 and 3 digit multiplication and 2 digit divisor
problems. Whatever the objectives maybe make sure they are realistic.
Our Goals & Objectives - Beginning of the Year

Empowerment & Personal Responsibility through Education


Beginning: Fifth Grade

Parent/Guardian Contractual Agreement

I, ________________________________, on this day _____________________ agree to help


Parents’/Guardian’s Name Date

___________________________ in any way that I can “Get the Best Education Possible.” I will use
Students Name

this manual to guide me and will become a cooperative working partner with

________________________________________. I will attend all conferences and assist the


Name of school my child attends

school in anyway that I can. I will not use the manual to intimidate or get my way but to assist

my child and I in making good choices.

Signature Date

Student’s Agreement
I, ________________________________, on this day _____________________ agree to do my
Students Name Date
absolute best every day so I can “Get the Best Education Possible.” I will listen, study, and work

hard. I will complete all assignments and only turn in my best work. I will strive for excellence in

everything I do.

Signature Date

Parent’s/Guardian’s main objectives for this semester:

Student’s objectives for this semester:

Witness

Signature Date
Fifth Grade 143.
Our Goals & Objectives - Mid-Year

Empowerment & Personal Responsibility through Education


Mid-Year: Fifth Grade
(Jan-Feb)

Parent/Guardian Contractual Agreement

I, ________________________________, on this day _____________________ agree to help


Parents’/Guardian’s Name Date

___________________________ in any way that I can “Get the Best Education Possible.” I will use
Students Name

this manual to guide me and will become a cooperative working partner with

________________________________________. I will attend all conferences and assist the


Name of school my child attends

school in anyway that I can. I will not use the manual to intimidate or get my way but to assist

my child and I in making good choices.

Signature Date

Student’s Agreement
I, ________________________________, on this day _____________________ agree to do my
Students Name Date
absolute best every day so I can “Get the Best Education Possible.” I will listen, study, and work

hard. I will complete all assignments and only turn in my best work. I will strive for excellence in

everything I do.

Signature Date

Parent’s/Guardian’s main objectives for this semester:

Student’s objectives for this semester:

Witness

Signature Date
Fifth Grade 145.
Our Goals & Objectives - End of Year / Summer Break

Empowerment & Personal Responsibility through Education


End of Year: Fifth Grade
(Summer Break)

Parent/Guardian Contractual Agreement

I, ________________________________, on this day _____________________ agree to help


Parents’/Guardian’s Name Date

___________________________ in any way that I can “Get the Best Education Possible.” I will use
Students Name

this manual to guide me and will become a cooperative working partner with

________________________________________. I will attend all conferences and assist the


Name of school my child attends

school in anyway that I can. I will not use the manual to intimidate or get my way but to assist

my child and I in making good choices.

Signature Date

Student’s Agreement
I, ________________________________, on this day _____________________ agree to do my
Students Name Date
absolute best every day so I can “Get the Best Education Possible.” I will listen, study, and work

hard. I will complete all assignments and only turn in my best work. I will strive for excellence in

everything I do.

Signature Date

Parent’s/Guardian’s main objectives for this semester:

Student’s objectives for this semester:

Witness

Signature Date
Fifth Grade 147.
6
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Things Your Child Should Know Before Entering Sixth Grade
Each state establishes standards that students should meet at the end of a grade. No two states are
exactly the same. Check to determine what the standards are for your state and child’s grade level. In
the examples below, I share from my own teaching experience and those of teachers I respect. These
skills will hopefully put your child at an advantage.

Continue to read aloud with your child or child should read independently for 45 or more minutes a day.
Should expose your child to classic literature (see suggested fifth grade reading list p. 175)

1. Should read 120-130 words per minute and retell 25-50% of what was read.
2. Classic literature and poetry.
3. Apply strategies comparing and contrasting sixth grade literature.
4. Use context clues to determine meaning of a passage.
5. Identify epic poetry.
6. Multiply/divide: decimals, fractions, and mixed numbers.
7. Solve problems involving decimals, percent, and proportions.
8. Sixth grade geometry.
9. Angles, area and volume.
10. Integers – both positive and negatives.
11. Sign the contract for the beginning (at the end of this chapter).

Notes on skills worked/mastered:

Notes on skills worked on and need more work:

Sixth Grade 151.


Best Education Possible Journal

Empowerment & Personal Responsibility through Education


Things Your Child Should Know Mid-Year Sixth Grade (January-February)
Continue to read aloud with your child or child should read independently for 45 or more minutes a day.

1. Should read 120-130 words per minute and retell 25-50% of what was read.
2. Classic literature, poetry, and an introduction to mythology.
3. Interpret conflict and climax in literature.
4. Multiply/divide: Decimals, Fractions, and Mixed Numbers.
5. Identify three-dimensional figures based on attributes, properties, and component parts.
6. Classify triangles as right, obtuse, or acute.
7. Plot coordinates on a grids, graphs, and maps.
8. Compare parallel and perpendicular lines.
9. Proportions/percent and scale drawings.
10. Angles, area and volume.
11. Data Analysis and Probability.
12. Sign the contract for mid-year (at the end of this chapter).

Notes on skills worked/mastered:

Notes on skills worked on and need more work:

Sixth Grade 153.


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Things Your Child Should Know End of Year Sixth Grade (May - June)
Continue to read aloud with your child or child should read independently for 45 or more minutes a day.

1. Should read 125-135 words per minute and retell 25-50% of what was read.
2. Identify author’s purpose as informative or persuasive.
3. Draw conclusions to extended meaning of sixth grade literature.
4. Place Value: Trillions and Hundred Thousandths.
5. Measure: Customary Units and Metric.
6. Estimate angle measures: 45°, 90°, 180°, 270°, or 360° and measure angles.
7. Solve problems involving area of parallelograms and estimate perimeter/area.
8. Interpret information from bar/line/circle graphs.
9. Express probabilities as ratios, percents, and decimals.
10. Solve proportions and percent and interpret scale drawings.
11. Identify integers – both positive and negative.
12. Life/Physical sciences and Chemistry.
13. Introduction to American History.
14. Visual Arts: Spirit of the Greeks and Romans, American Realist, Impressionist, Abstractionism.
12. Sign the contract for the end of the year (at the end of this chapter).

Notes on skills worked/mastered:

Notes on skills worked on and need more work:

Sixth Grade 155.


Best Education Possible Journal

Empowerment & Personal Responsibility through Education


Children’s Literature
Read to your child everyday. The following titles are books that I have found students enjoy
hearing or are award winning titles. Great literature abounds for children. Ask friends and
relatives to buy your child a book instead of toys for gifts. Research shows that reading to
your child early on will improve a child’s academic performance throughout life.

Sixth Grade
1. Romeo and Juliet By William Shakespeare
2. Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
3. Animal Farm By George Orwell
4. Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl By Anne Frank
5. John F. Kennedy: Inaugural Address By John F. Kennedy
6. I Have a Dream By Martin Luther King, Jr.
7. The Miracle Worker By William Gibson
8. Sounder By William Armstrong
9. Tuck Everlasting By Natalie Babbitt
10. The Watsons Go to Birmingham By Paul Christopher Curtis
11. Ingri and Edgar Parin D’Aulaire’s Book of Greek Myths By Ingri D’Aulaire
12. The Tiger Rising By Kate DiCamillo
13. A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
14. Romiette and Julio By Sharon Draper
15. Tears of a Tiger By Sharon Draper
16. Out of the Dust By Karen Hesse
17. Hoot By Carl Hiaasen
18. Red Scarf Girl By Ji-Li
19. The Call of the Wild By Jack London
20. Jacab Have I Loved By Katherine Patterson
21. Esperanza Rising By Pam Mufioz Ryan
22. Small Steps By Louis Sachar
23. A Walk to Remember By Nicholas Sparks
24. The Pearl By John Steinbeck
25. Homecoming By Cynthia Voigt
26. Uglies By Scott Westerfeld
27. Immortal Bard By Issac Asimov
28. The Lion Roared By Virginia Eiseman
29. Zoo By Edward D. Hoch
30. The Legend of Sleepy Hollow By Washingtion Irving
31. Charles By Shirley Jackson
32. The Lottery By Shirley Jackson
Sixth Grade 157.
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Poetry and Prose

Sixth Grade
(Ask your child if he/she understands the meaning of the poems)

1. "The Field Mouse" - By Cecil Frances Alexander


2. "Lift Ev’ry Voice and Sing" - By James Weldon Johnson
3. "The Raven" - By Edgar Allan Poe
4. "Sympathy" - By Paul Laurence Dunbar
5. "Caged Bird" - By Maya Angelou
6. "Life Is Fine" - By Langston Hughes
7. "A Psalm of Life" - By Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
8. "A Song of Greatness (A Chippewa song)" - Translated by Mary Austin
9. "Stopping by the Woods on a Snowy Evening" - By Robert Frost
10. "The Story of Fidgety Philip" - By Heinrich Hoffman
12. "The First Tooth" - By Charles and Mary Lamb
13. "Flint" - By Christina Rossetti
14. "Father William" - By Lewis Carroll
15. "Good Night and Good Morning" - By Richard Monckton Wilnes, Lord Houghton
16. "This is Just to Say" - By William Carlos Williams
17. "A Migration of Grey Squirrels" - By William Howitt
19. "Woman Work" - By Maya Angelou
20. "The Story of Johnny Head-in-the-Air" - By Heinrich Hoffman
22. "Harlem" - By Langston Hughes
23. "The Negro Speaks of Rivers" - By Langston Hughes

See other suggested children’s literature on p. 175

Sixth Grade 159.


Contract
The following pages are extremely important. They are contractual agreements
between your child and you. Read it aloud and sign it in the presence of a
concerned witness. Change the contract as often as needed and change the
objective as often as needed. There will be a new contractual agreement three
times a year: one at the beginning of the school year, one mid-year, and one at the
beginning of summer break. (There are three contracts following each grade level
for your use).

A good example of a parent’s objective would be to complete the first sections of


this manual. A good example of a sixth grade student’s objective would be is to
read at least 30 minutes after school and to practice multiplying fractions and
mixed numbers. Whatever the objectives maybe make sure they are realistic.
Our Goals & Objectives - Beginning of the Year

Empowerment & Personal Responsibility through Education


Beginning: Sixth Grade

Parent/Guardian Contractual Agreement

I, ________________________________, on this day _____________________ agree to help


Parents’/Guardian’s Name Date

___________________________ in any way that I can “Get the Best Education Possible.” I will use
Students Name

this manual to guide me and will become a cooperative working partner with

________________________________________. I will attend all conferences and assist the


Name of school my child attends

school in anyway that I can. I will not use the manual to intimidate or get my way but to assist

my child and I in making good choices.

Signature Date

Student’s Agreement
I, ________________________________, on this day _____________________ agree to do my
Students Name Date
absolute best every day so I can “Get the Best Education Possible.” I will listen, study, and work

hard. I will complete all assignments and only turn in my best work. I will strive for excellence in

everything I do.

Signature Date

Parent’s/Guardian’s main objectives for this semester:

Student’s objectives for this semester:

Witness

Signature Date
Sixth Grade 163.
Our Goals & Objectives - Mid-Year

Empowerment & Personal Responsibility through Education


Mid-Year: Sixth Grade
(January -February)

Parent/Guardian Contractual Agreement

I, ________________________________, on this day _____________________ agree to help


Parents’/Guardian’s Name Date

___________________________ in any way that I can “Get the Best Education Possible.” I will use
Students Name

this manual to guide me and will become a cooperative working partner with

________________________________________. I will attend all conferences and assist the


Name of school my child attends

school in anyway that I can. I will not use the manual to intimidate or get my way but to assist

my child and I in making good choices.

Signature Date

Student’s Agreement
I, ________________________________, on this day _____________________ agree to do my
Students Name Date
absolute best every day so I can “Get the Best Education Possible.” I will listen, study, and work

hard. I will complete all assignments and only turn in my best work. I will strive for excellence in

everything I do.

Signature Date

Parent’s/Guardian’s main objectives for this semester:

Student’s objectives for this semester:

Witness

Signature Date
Sixth Grade 165.
Our Goals & Objectives - End of Year / Summer Break

Empowerment & Personal Responsibility through Education


End of Year: Sixth Grade
(Summer Break)

Parent/Guardian Contractual Agreement

I, ________________________________, on this day _____________________ agree to help


Parents’/Guardian’s Name Date

___________________________ in any way that I can “Get the Best Education Possible.” I will use
Students Name

this manual to guide me and will become a cooperative working partner with

________________________________________. I will attend all conferences and assist the


Name of school my child attends

school in anyway that I can. I will not use the manual to intimidate or get my way but to assist

my child and I in making good choices.

Signature Date

Student’s Agreement
I, ________________________________, on this day _____________________ agree to do my
Students Name Date
absolute best every day so I can “Get the Best Education Possible.” I will listen, study, and work

hard. I will complete all assignments and only turn in my best work. I will strive for excellence in

everything I do.

Signature Date

Parent’s/Guardian’s main objectives for this semester:

Student’s objectives for this semester:

Witness

Signature Date
Sixth Grade 167.
Best Education Possible Journal

Empowerment & Personal Responsibility through Education


Suggested Quality Children’s Literature
Reading with your child everyday will improve their reading as well as build vocabulary. Writing
skills will also improve. If you are reading to your child it is best to read 1 to 2 grade levels above
their reading level.

Author Title Grade Level

Ahlberg, Janet & Allan Each Peach Pear Plum Pre-K


Cole, Joanna The Magic School Bus series Pre-K
Ehiert, Lois Eating the Alphabet Pre-K
Henkers, Kevin Wembely, Worried Pre-K
Lionni, Leo The Alphabet Tree Pre-K
Numeroff, Laura If You Give a Mouse… Pre-K
Reid, Mary How Have I Grown Pre-K
Rylant, Cynthia Puppy Mudge Has a Snack Pre-K
Rylant, Cynthia Puppy Mudge Finds a Friend Pre-K
Rylant, Cynthia Puppy Mudge Wants to Play Pre-K
Thompson, Lauren Polar Night Pre-K
Weston, Tamson Hey, Pancakes Pre-K
Williams Sue I Went Walking Pre-K
Carle, Eric Does a kangaroo Have a Mother, Too? PreK-2nd
Carle, Eric A House of Hermit Crab PreK-2nd
Carle, Eric The Tiny Seed PreK-2nd
Carle, Eric The Very Hungry Caterpillar PreK-2nd
Johnson, Angela Tell Me a Story, Mama K-1st
Rau, Dana Meachen Lots of Balloons K-1st
Willems, Mo Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus! K-1st
Bogart, Jo Ellen 10 for Dinner K-2nd
Giganti, Paul Jr. Each Orange Had 8 Slices K-2nd
Kline, Suzy Horrible Harry K-2nd
Lionni, Leo A Busy Year K-2nd
Lionni, Leo A Color of His Own K-2nd
Lionni, Leo Inch by Inch K-2nd
Lobel, Arnold Frogs and Toad All Year K-2nd
Lobel, Arnold Frogs and Toad Are Friends K-2nd
Lobel, Arnold Frogs and Toad Together K-2nd
Miller, Debbie S. Are Trees Alive? K-2nd
Pandell, Karen Animal Action ABC K-2nd
Park, Barbara Junie B. Jones K-2nd
Williams, Margery The Velveteen Rabbit K-2nd
McKissack, Patricia C. Flossie and the Fox K-3rd
McNutty, Faith If You Decide to Go to the Moon K-3rd
Steptoe, Javaka In Daddy’s Arms I Am Tall K-3rd
Berenstain, Stan Bears’ Picnic, The 1st
Bridwell, Norman Clifford Gets a Job 1st
Bridwell, Norman Clifford the Big Red Dog 1st
Davidson, Avelyn Bus Ride, The 1st
Feiffer, Jules Bark, George 1st
Mayer, Mercer Just a Mess 1st
Mayer, Mercer Just Me and My Dad 1st
Taback, Simms This Is the House That Jack Built 1st

Suggested Literature 171.


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Suggested Quality Children’s Literature
(cont.)

Author Title Grade Level


Cowen-Fletcher, Jane It Takes a Village 1-2nd
Eastman, P.D. Big Dog…Little Dog 1-2nd
Gift, Patricia Reilly Ronald Morgan Goes to Bat 1-2nd
Kellogg, Steven If You Decide to Go to the Moon 1-2nd
Kellogg, Steven Johnny Appleseed 1-2nd
Kessler, Leonard Kick, Pass, and Run 1-2nd
Krensky, Stephen George Washington Carver 1-2nd
Marshall, Edward Fox in Love 1-2nd
Polacco, Patricia John Philip Duck 1-2nd
Sassa/Simont Stray Dog, The 1-2nd
Taback, Simms Joseph Had a Little Overcoat 1-2nd
Viorst, Judith Good-Bye Book, The 1-2nd
Gibbons, Gail From Seed to Plant 1-3rd
Gibbons, Gail Sharks 1-3rd
Gibbons, Gail The Moon Book 1-3rd
Schwartz, David M. How Much Is a Million 1-3rd
Gibbons, Gail Dinosaurs 1-4th
Maestro, Betsy Coming to America 1-4th
Fraustino, Lisa Rowe The Hickory Chair 1-5th
Adier, David Bones and the Cupcake Mystery 2nd
Adier, David Bones and the Dog Gone Mystery 2nd
Agee, Jon Milo’s Hat Trick 2nd
Banks, Kate Night Worker, The 2nd
Bennett, Kelly Not Norman: A Goldfish Story 2nd
Bogart, JoEllen Daniel’s Dog 2nd
Bridwell, Norman Clifford and the Big Storm 2nd
Bridwell, Norman Clifford Takes a Trip 2nd
Cooper, Elisha Magic Thinks Big 2nd
DiCarrillo, Kate Mercy Watson Fights Crime 2nd
Ehiert, Lois Growing Vegetable Soup 2nd
Elliott, Dan Ernie’s Little Lie 2nd
Eversole, Robyn Red Berry Wool 2nd
Falconer, Ian Olivia Forms a Band 2nd
Frost, Helen Thurgood Marshall 2nd
Frost, Helen Sojourner Truth 2nd
Gift, Patricia Reilly In the Dinosaur’s Paw 2nd
Howard, Elizabeth F. Virgie Goes to School with Us Boys 2nd
Kellogg, Steven The Missing Mitten Mystery 2nd
Krensky, Stephen Lionel in the Summer 2nd
Marshall, Edward Fox and His Friends 2nd
Mayer, Mercer There’s a Nightmare in My Closet 2nd
Noble, Trinka Hakes Day Jimmy’s Boa Ate the Wash, The 2nd
Numeroff, Laura If You Gave a Moose a Muffin 2nd
Numeroff, Laura If You Give a Pig a Pancake 2nd
Numeroff, Laura If You take a Mouse to School 2nd
Rylant, Cynthia Henry and Mudge and the Forever Sea 2nd
Schaefer, Lola M. George Washington 2nd
Thaler, Mike Gym Teacher from the Black Lagoon, The 2nd
Suggested Literature 173.
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Empowerment & Personal Responsibility through Education


Suggested Quality Children’s Literature
(cont.)

Author Title Grade Level


Thaler, Mike Principal from the Black Lagoon, The 2nd
Thaler, Mike Teacher from the Black Lagoon, The 2nd
Waber, Bernard Ira Sleeps Over 2nd
Arkhurst, Joyce Cooper The Adventures of Spider 2-3rd
Blume, Judy Freckle Juice 2-3rd
Brown, Marc Tolon Buster and the Giant Pumpkin 2-3rd
Brown, Marc Tolon Buster and the Great Swamp 2-3rd
Brown, Marc Tolon D.W.’s Lost Blankie 2-3rd
Bunting, Eve Fly Away Home 2-3rd
Byars, Betsy Golly Sisters Ride Again, The 2-3rd
Christelow, Eileen Great Pig Search, The 2-3rd
Cocca-Leffier, Maryann Bravery Soup 2-3rd
Colier, Bryan Uptown 2-3rd
Cronin, Doreen Diary of a Worm 2-3rd
Gift, Patricia Reilly Today Was a Terrible Day 2-3rd
Hamilton, Virginia People Could Fly: The Picture Book, The 2-3rd
Johnston, Tony Worm Family, The 2-3rd
Kellogg, Steven Pecos Bill 2-3rd
Kittinger, Jo S. Miss Spider’s Sunny Patch 2-3rd
McPhail, David Mole Music 2-3rd
Park, Barbara Junie B. Jones and the Stupid Smelly Bus 2-3rd
Park, Barbara Junie B. jones: Boss of Lunch 2-3rd
Park, Barbara Junie B. Jones Smells Something Fishy 2-3rd
Trapani, Iza Itsy Bitsy Spider, The 2-3rd
Woodson, Jacqueline Other Side, The 2-3rd
Auch, Mary Jane I Was a Third Spy 2-4th
Cameron, Ann Gloria’s Way 2-4th
Danziger, Paula Amber Brown Books 2-4th
DeGross, Monalisa Donavan’s Word Jar 2-4th
Hurwitz, Johanna Class Clown 2-4th
Le Guin, Ursula K. Catwings 2-4th
Medearis, Angela Shelf Class Act 2-4th
Pennypacker, Sara Clementine 2-4th
Pilkey, Dav Captain Underpants 2-4th
White, E. B. Charlotte’s Webb 2-4th
Cherry, Lynne The Great Kapok Tree 2-5th
Dadey, Debbie Ghostville Elementary 2-5th
Dyer, Heather The Girl with the Broken Wing 2-5th
Estes, Eleanor The Hundred Dresses 2-5th
Hesse, Karen The Cats in Krasinski Square 2-5th
Mathis, Sharon Bell The Hundred Penny Box 2-5th
Sobol, Donald J. Encyclopedia Brown 2-5th
Stilton, Geronimo Geronimo Stilton 2-5th
Mitchell, Margaree King Granddaddy’s Gift 2-6th
Myers, Walter Dean Harlem 2-6th
Auch, Mary Jane/Herm Poultrygeist 3rd
Allard, Henry Miss Nelson Has a Field Day 3rd
Brown, Marc Tolon Buster and the Dance Contest 3rd
Suggested Literature 175.
Best Education Possible Journal

www.BestEducationPossible.net
Suggested Quality Children’s Literature
(cont.)

Author Title Grade Level


Brown, Marc Tolon Mystery of the Stolen Bike, The 3rd
Brown, Marcia Stone Soup 3rd
Calmenson, Ann Frog Principal, The 3rd
Calmenson, Stephanie Shaggy, Waggy Dogs (And Other) 3rd
Creech, Sharon Fine, Fine School, A 3rd
Cameron, Ann Julian, Secret Agent 3rd
Cameron, Ann Stories Julian Tells, The 3rd
DeGroat, Diane Roses are Pink, Your Feet Really Stink 3rd
Delton, Judy Blue Skies, French Fries 3rd
Delton, Judy Pee Wee Jubilee, The 3rd
Edwards, Michelle Stinky Stern Forever 3rd
Edwards, Pamela Duncan Bravo, Livingston Mouse! 3rd
Edwards, Pamela Duncan Livingstone Mouse 3rd
Evensole, Robyn Red Berry Wool 3rd
Fox, Mem Possum Magic 3rd
Gibbons, Faye Mama and Me and the Model T 3rd
Greenburg, Dan My Teacher Ate My Homework 3rd
Greenburg, Dan Never Trust a Cat Who Wears Earrings 3rd
Greenburg, Dan Through the Medicine Cabinet 3rd
Henkes, Kevin Chrysanthemum 3rd
Henkes, Kevin Lily’s Purple Plastic Purse 3rd
McGovern, Ann Stone Soup 3rd
Rylant, Cynthia Henry and Mudge 3rd
Rylant, Cynthia Henry and Mudge and the Funny Lunch 3rd
Rylant, Cynthia Henry and Mudge and the Long Weekend 3rd
Rylant, Cynthia Henry and Mudge and the Starry Night 3rd
Auch, Mary Jane Chickenrella 3-4th
Borden, Louise Day Eddie Met the Author, The 3-4th
Brown, Marc Tolon Buster Plays Along 3-4th
Cooney, Barbara Miss Rumphius 3-4th
Dadey/Jones Mermaids Don’t Run Track 3-4th
Demi Empty Pot, The 3-4th
Freeman, Don Corduroy 3-4th
Freeman, Don Pocket For Corduroy, A 3-4th
Giff, Patricia Reilly Kidnap at the Catfish Café 3-4th
Gray, Libba Moore Miss Tizzy 3-4th
Hamilton, Virginia When Birds Could Talk & Bats Could Sing 3-4th
Hoffman, Mary Amazing Grace 3-4th
Hopkinson, Deborah Apples to Oregon 3-4th
McKissack, Patricia C. Goin’ Someplace Special 3-4th
Duffey, Betsy How to Be Cool in the Third Grade 3-5th
Howe, James Bunnicula 3-5th
Nagda, Ann Whitehead Dear Whiskers 3-5th
Taylor, Mildred D. The Gold Cadillac 3-5th
Bagilio, Ben M. Animal Ark 3-6th
Blume, Judy Double Fudge 3-6th

Suggested Literature 177.


Best Education Possible Journal

Empowerment & Personal Responsibility through Education


Suggested Quality Children’s Literature
(cont.)

Author Title Grade Level


Blume, Judy Otherwise Known as Sheila the Great 3-6th
Bunting, Eve Dreaming of America 3-6th
Byars, Betsy The Cybil War 3-6th
Carison, Natalie Savage The Family Under the Bridge 3-6th
Conrad, Pam Pedro’s Journal 3-6th
Dahl, Roald Charlie and the Chocolate Factory 3-6th
Fritz, Jean And Then What Happened, Paul Revere? 3-6th
Hurwitz, Johanna Class President 3-6th
Kent, Deborah The Trail of Tears 3-6th
King-Smith, Dick Pigs Might Fly 3-6th
Kraske, Robert Harry Houdini 3-6th
Lindgren, Astrid Pippi Longstocking 3-6th
Moskin, Marietta Day of the Blizzard 3-6th
Osborne, Mary Pope American Tall Tales 3-6th
Schanzer, Rosalyn George vs. George 3-6th
Selden, George The Cricket in Times Square 3-6th
Spinelli, Jerry Fourth Rat 3-6th
Webster, Christine The Pledge of Allegiance 3-6th
Wright, Betty Ren The Dollhouse Murders 3-6th
Clifford, Eth Help! I’m a Prisoner in the Library 4th
Peck, Robert Newton Soup 4th
Peck, Robert Newton Soup in Love 4th
Polacco, Patricia Thank You, Mr. Falker 4th
Roy, Ron A to Z Mysteries 4th
Naidoo, Beverley Journey to Jo’burg 4-5th
Naylor, Phyllis Reynolds Shiloh 4-5th
Paratore, Coleen M. Wedding Planner’s Daughter, The 4-5th
Peck, Richard Long Way from Chicago, A 4-5th
Haskins, Jim Get on Board 4-6th
DiCamillo, Kate Because of Winn-Dixie 4-7th
Martin, Ann M. The Baby-Sitters Club 4-7th
McKissack, Patricia Black Diamond 4-7th

Suggested Literature 179.


Best Education Possible Journal

www.BestEducationPossible.net
Glossary
Magnet Schools – A magnet school (sometimes "magnate school") is a public school which offers
specialized courses or curricula. The term magnet school is mostly associated with the United States, although
other countries have similar types of schools The use of the word magnet refers to the school drawing students
from across normal boundaries defined by authorities as school zones that feed into certain schools.

Charter Schools – Charter schools are elementary or secondary schools in the United States that
receive public money but have been freed from some of the rules, regulations, and statutes that apply to other
public schools in exchange for some type of accountability for producing certain results, which are set forth in
each school's charter.

Charter schools do not charge tuition and frequently have lottery based admissions. They therefore
provide an alternative to public schools. Some charter schools provide a curriculum that specializes in a certain
field-- e.g. arts, mathematics, etc. Others simply seek to provide a better and more efficient general education than
nearby public schools.

Some charter schools are founded by teachers, parents, or activists who feel restricted by traditional
public schools. State-run charters (schools not affiliated with local school districts) are often established by
non-profit groups, universities, and some government entities. Additionally, school districts sometimes permit
corporations to open chains of for-profit charter schools.

School Vouchers – A school voucher, also called an education voucher, is a certificate issued by the
government by which parents can pay for the education of their children at a school of their choice, rather than
the public school.

Glossary 181.
Best Education Possible Journal

Empowerment & Personal Responsibility through Education


References
WEBSITES
• National PTA - www.pta.org
• Public School Review - www.publicschoolreview.com
• iec National Center for Education Statistics - www.nces.ed.gov/ccd/schooL
• NSW Department of Education and Training - www.schools.nsw.edu.au/
• Public and Private School Ratings - www.greatschools.net
• National Coalition for Parent Involvement in Education - www.ncpie.org/
• Voluntary Public School Choice - www.ed.gov/programs/choice
• America’s Opportunity Scholarships for Kids - www.heritage.org
• The Public School Parent Network - www.psparents.net
• School-wide PBS - www.pbis.org/schoolwide.htm/
• Education World Article - www.eduationworld.com/a_special/parent_involvement.shtml
• About.Com (K-6 Children) - www.childparenting.about.com
• Learning First Alliance - www.learningfirst.org/
• Parent Page - www.edinformatics.com/parents.htm
• NEA Help for Parents - www.nea.org/parents
• Helping Children Succeed in School - www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/succeed/01-parental.html

BOOKS
• What Your Kindergartner Needs to Know Edited by E.D. Hirsch, Jr.
• What Your First Grader Needs to Know Edited by E.D. Hirsch, Jr.
• What Your Second Grader Needs to Know Edited by E.D. Hirsch, Jr.
• What Your Third Grader Needs to Know Edited by E.D. Hirsch, Jr.
• What Your Fourth Grader Needs to Know Edited by E.D. Hirsch, Jr.
• What Your Fifth Grader Needs to Know Edited by E.D. Hirsch, Jr.
• What Your Sixth Grader Needs to Know Edited by E.D. Hirsch, Jr.
• Alabama State Course of Study Alabama State Department
• Making Children Mind with Losing Yours by Dr. Kevin Leman, Revell Publishers

References 183.
Notes
Notes

Notes 185.
Notes
Empowerment & Personal Responsiblity through Education

Understanding the Logo


The Nurturing Adult

Depicted as a pregnant
woman, this figure
Child over the Shoulder
represents all caring adults
responsible for guiding the
Represents Parental Generativity.
next generation’s growth
This can be any child within your
and development.
reach or influence regardless of
Ultimately, this is any adult
biological relationship. It can be a
who cares to make sure all
neighbor, a friend’s child, or
our children get the ‘Best
another child in your child’s
Education Possible.’
classroom or school.

Pregnant Tummy

Represents Biological Generativity.


The entire figure taken together This includes your natural child(ren)
is meant to reflect how we each and all relatives who have a vested
are responsible for every child’s interest in that child’s development.
education in our communities. It can include parents, aunts, uncles,
grandparents, etc.
Ideas for Sharing the Best Education Possible

www.BestEducationPossible.net
Education is a foundational element to growth and development into fully
independent, happy and productive adult members of a global society. If you’ve been
touched or influenced by the guidance of this book and want to help make it available
to others at a wider level, we invite you to participate in…

The Best Education Possible


Citizen’s Idea
Initiative
Empowerment & Personal Responsibility through Education

A team of us who have read and been influenced and guided by How to get the Best Education Possible
for Your Child – Kindergarten – 6th Grade: A Parent’s Handbook are certain this book deserves a reading
across the broadest reaches of our culture. Not only is the guidance simple and straightforward, but the
guided journey through a student’s early childhood education can develop into a lasting gift of legacy and
inspiration. It offers one of the simplest forms of benchmarking a child’s performance and provides clear
tools and instructions for keeping your child on a track to success. It will encourage the most educated
and knowledgeable among us, but also engage and empower the masses who feel overwhelmed by the
process.

Large publishing companies have already expressed interest in collaborating to prepare grade specific
workbooks and activity sets and we will pursue that task after a significant number of these handbooks are
in circulation. Word of mouth has always and remains the most effective tool for a book like this to gain
traction in the wider societal enclaves across the nation.

If you have been empowered and assisted by the instructions in this useful handbook as we have been,
you may already have some unique ideas as how you can best let others know about it. Here are some
ideas to help share this book with others.

Give the book to family, friends, and even strangers as a gift. They will not only get a great instructional
manual, but also a foundational element to building lasting multi-generational success and fulfillment.

If you have a website or blog, consider sharing a bit about the book and how it touched your life. Don’t
give away all of the insights and instructions, but recommend that they read it as well and link to
http://www.BestEducationPossible.net.

Ask your favorite radio show or podcast to have the author on as a quest. Media people often give more
consideration to the requests of their listeners and viewers than the press releases of publicists.
Write a book review for your local paper, favorite magazine, blog or website you frequent. If you have ever
purchased an item from Amazon.com you can use your Amazon account to write a review of the book
simply by visiting its Amazon page at: http://www.amazon.com/dp/0982247958/. Amazon.com will also
allow you to rate the book with one to five stars, join in discussion pages, place subject tags and vote on
the usefulness of other’s reviews of the book.

If you participate on social networks like facebook, LinkedIn or Plaxo consider joining the Best Education
Possible groups and forums on those platforms and share your thoughts ideas and insights while
encouraging others in your online network to do the same. Here is a list of the specific URL’s:

facebook: http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=43176187590

LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/groups?gid=1781681

Plaxo: http://besteducationpossible.plaxogroups.com

If you own a shop or business, consider putting a display of these books on your counter to resell to
customers. We make books available at a discounted rate for resale. For individuals we offer volume
discount pricing for orders of six books or more.

If you know of people (authors, speakers, etc.) who have a voice to the wider community, ask them if they
would review a copy of the book and make some comments in their website, newsletter, etc.

Buy a set of books as gifts for single parents, for battered women’s shelters, prisons, rehabilitation homes,
public libraries and the like where people might be truly encouraged and empowered by its instruction
and contents.

Talk about the book on email lists you’re on, forums you frequent and other places you engage other
people on the Internet. Don’t make it an advertisement, but share how this handbook impacted your life
and offer people the link to the Best Education Possible website.

For more information and ideas on how you can help, please check out The Best Education Possible
Citizen’s Idea Initiative at our website.

www.BestEducationPossible.net
We invite you to continue your experience with
How to Get the Best Education Possible for Your Child - Kindergarten - 6th Grade
at our website:

www.BestEducationPossible.net
An Online Resource Community for Proactive Parents

* Share how you feel about getting the Best Education Possible for Your Child
and read what others are saying

* Share your insights and discuss the book and its contents with other readers in
your state and community

* Communicate with the Author

* Read the Author’s Blog

* Purchase additional copies of the book for family, friends and co-workers

* Get Up-to-Date Information and new Education Resources & Activities

For information about having the author speak to your


organization or group, please contact : Don West, Jr.
(404) 435-5419 * dlw@DonWestJr.com