UDK

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THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
Volume 125 Issue 5 kansan.com Monday, July 1, 2013
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—weather.com
weather,
Jay?
What’s the
Tuesday
Enjoy some sun
HI: 82
LO: 59
Mostly sunny. 20 percent
chance of rain.
Summer perfection
HI: 82
LO: 60
Partly cloudy. 10 percent
chance of rain.
Thursday
USA! USA! USA!
HI: 86
LO: 63
Mostly sunny. 10 percent of
chance of rain.
Friday
Work on the tan
HI: 89
LO: 66
Mostly sunny. 10 percent of
chance of rain.
Page 2 Monday, July 1, 2013
N
news
Wednesday
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Planned Parenthood and the Cen-
ter for Reproductive Rights have
fled separate lawsuits against a 47-
page anti-abortion bill signed by
Gov. Sam Brownback in April.
House Bill 2253 is scheduled to
take efect today. Te bill bans sex-
selection abortions, rescinds tax
incentives for abortion providers
and women who receive abortions,
prohibits employees and volunteers
of abortion providers from sharing
information about sexuality in pub-
lic schools and states that human
life begins “at fertilization.”
While Planned Parenthood has
fled a federal lawsuit against three
specifc components of the bill, the
Center for Reproductive Rights has
fled a state lawsuit against the bill in
its entirety. Te bill requires doctors
to disclose controversial informa-
tion about the medical risks associ-
ated with the procedure — includ-
ing the link between abortion and
breast cancer, which the American
Cancer Society disputes. Clinics also
have to provide “Printed materials
that inform the pregnant woman of
the probable anatomical and physi-
ological characteristics of the un-
born child at two week gestational
increments from fertilization to full
term.” Tese materials are to include
information about the fetus’s capac-
ity to feel pain by the 20th week of
development. Planned Parenthood
only performs abortions before 21.6
weeks and rarely does so before the
20th week.
Elise Higgins, the manager of gov-
ernment afairs at Planned Parent-
hood of Kansas and Mid-Missouri,
expressed her organization’s con-
cern with the 20th week threshold
in the state’s literature.
“It’s irrelevant to our patients,
and most credible medical au-
thorities will tell you that the lan-
guage is misleading,” she said.
Kathy Ostrowski, the legislative
director of Kansans for Life, the
largest pro-life organization in
Kansas, said the information about
fetal development and pain is un-
welcome yet factual.
“It’s a truthful consideration,” she
said. “Everybody knows these ba-
bies feel excruciating pain, it’s just
that the abortion clinics don’t want
people to hear about it.”
House Bill 2253 also includes a
provision requiring doctors to in-
form women that abortion termi-
nates the life of a “whole, separate,
unique, living being” — a provision
Planned Parenthood alleges is a vio-
lation of free speech because some
doctors do not share that view.
“We don’t think government of-
fcials should be able to force us to
publicly endorse their views about
abortion,” Higgins said.
Doctors are permitted to voice
their opinions about the matter,
even if they directly contradict the
above claim. Ostrowski said this ca-
veat renders Planned Parenthood’s
case about free speech meritless.
“A doctor could have posters on
the walls that read, ‘Disregard ev-
erything the state has told you,’” she
said, “But you have to say exactly
what you’re going to do when you
do a procedure.”
Higgins argues that the require-
ment to call the fetus a “whole,
separate, unique, living being” is
coercive.
“As long as we’re being com-
pelled by the government to make
that ideological statement, then
that’s a violation of free speech,”
she said.
Planned Parenthood has also
taken issue with a section of the
bill that requires the websites of
abortion providers to display a
link to and endorsement of the
Kansas Department of Health and
Environment right-to-know in-
formation site. Higgins said this is
more coerced speech.
“It’s not just the hyperlink, it’s the
endorsement,” she said. “We’re re-
quired to say that it’s scientifcally
accurate, unbiased and non judge-
mental information — all three of
which are false. Te information is
designed to coerce and shame wom-
en who are seeking abortions.”
Ostrowski said the information is
accurate and that women deserve
access to it.
“Tey say they’re pro-choice, but
they want to deny women informa-
tion,” she said. “How can a woman
be harmed by more information?”
— Edited by Allison Kohn
STATE GoVErNMENT
Pro-choice groups fle lawsuits against abortion bill
MATT JOHNSON
editor@kansan.com
ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this March 25, 2013, fle photo Kris Kitko, left, leads chants of protest at an abortion-
rights rally at the state Capitol in Bismarck, N.D. Abortion-rights advocates fled a
lawsuit in federal court Tuesday, June 25, 2013, in Bismarck, N.D., challenging two new
North Dakota laws that impose the nation’s toughest abortion restrictions. (AP Photo/
James MacPherson, File)
Page 3 Monday, July 1, 2013 The University Daily Kansan
Lawrence



poLice reports
Ben McLemore became only the third
freshman to leave KU early for the nBa.
there have been two sophomores and
nine juniors that have left KU
early for the nBa.
Information based on the
Douglas County Sheriff’s Office
booking recap.
a 20-year-old male was arrested on
saturday on the 600 block of Kasold
street on suspicion of operating a
vehicle while intoxicated. Bond was
set at $500.
a 20-year-old male was arrested on
sunday on the 1400 block of ohio
street on suspicion of posession of
alcohol by a minor, interference with
duties of an offcer and possession of
other illegal substances. Bond was
set at $900.
a 22-year-old male was arrested
on sunday at the 500 block of sixth
street on suspicion of transportation
of an open container of alcohol
and for operating the vehicle while
intoxicated. Bond was set at $1200.
— Allison Kohn
City sponsors race
through downtown
the Mass street Mile race took
runners on a course through downtown
Lawrence yesterday. the race began
at weaver’s Deparment store on ninth
and Massachusetts streets. there were
three heats: the men’s and women’s
competitive races and the recreational
mile. the mile-long race course was
fat and went down Massachusetts
street, new Hampshire street, Vermont
street and made a loop back to the
starting line in front of weaver’s.
“it’s a nice distance to go, and it’s
open to everyone,” said Gosilverback
employee Kelsey Vorgert.
the race was sponsored by
VanGo, inc., the city of Lawrence and
Gosilverback. while the races were
not competitive, participants who
placed frst received a piece of artwork
from children in VanGo’s after school
programs.
the fat race course was considered
a plus to many of the participants,
including crystal effer, who is visiting
the University this summer.
“the race went very well,” she said.
“it was a great distance for me, and
there was a good number of hills.”
participant Jeremy Hammer said
that he was dared to do the race after
having already participated in the
Double road race earlier on sunday.
“it was fun and crazy,” he said after
fnishing.
— Elly Grimm
Elly GrImm/KanSan
participants ran in the Mass street Mile’s course through downtown Lawrence yester-
day. the city of Lawrence, VanGo, inc. and Gosilverback partnered to host the event.
Follow
@UDK_news
on Twitter
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www.firstmanagementinc.com
W
ithout cofee, my day
is like trench warfare.
Blaring sounds, blinding
light, and mud everywhere. I’ve
sold my soul to the cofee plant like
so many others and now my days
are sitting somewhere between
a quiet afernoon in ‘Nam and a
playground wrestling match.
If you’re anyone looking to do
anything, you’ve probably sat down
for a cup of cofee frst. Without
thinking, you’re flling up the
reservoir with a half-gallon of pale
brown water, punching the brew
button, and slamming back a mug
of raw fuel.
It’s impossible, at least for me, to
not feel like a motivational speaker
afer that frst cup. I’m snapping
my fngers, clicking my heels, and
cheerily addressing people by their
full names. Te 8 a.m. hour is
where about 90 percent of my daily
productivity is focused. I won’t
complain if I’m the model Ameri-
can worker (if only for 60 minutes).
Tat’s when the mid-morning
famine happens. Some evil scientist
at Folgers defnitely met with an
even more sinister scientist at Pan-
era to add a bread-craving chemical
to every batch of cofee ever. Fight-
ing past that 11 a.m. urge to gobble
some pastries has probably saved
me a thousand dollars and my
freshman 15.
Lunch and the hour and a half fol-
lowing are the least exciting of my
day. I have enough cafeine-laced
energy to function but not enough
to really excel. It’s the nadir of an
otherwise entertaining struggle to
get stuf done. But then comes the
lowest of lows. Te blasphemous
Five-Hour-Energy popularized the
concept of “that 2:30 p.m.” feeling
and at the same time underplayed
it. It’s even worse in the sum-
mertime, when walking around
soaks you in sweat and leaves you
gasping. In my more excited states I
convince myself I’m dying of cofee
withdrawal.
With a meth-head’s raven-
ous hunger, I’m on the lookout
for a Starbucks or a half-empty
cup that somebody forgot at the
Underground. I’m digging through
trashcans in break rooms to suck
on used flters. I am so high-strung
you could pluck me for a high E.
It’s there around 4 p.m. when I
fnally just resign myself to being
trapped in that haze of sluggishness
with no chance of escape until I hit
the sheets. I normally chalk it up to
a hard day’s work, but if I’m really
honest with myself, it’s just the side
efects of a poorly managed addic-
tion. I’d be terrible with heroine, I
swear.
Despite my daily epic struggle
with this bean, it’s hard not to rely
on it. If I weren’t so manic and
completely stuck in my head all the
time, it’d probably be good for me.
Te only real drawback to cofee
is dependence, and its benefts are
what carried America through
most of the 20th century. Between
the Great Depression, Great War,
and the 80s, I don’t know where
we’d be without it.
So on most days, I forego any
sense of caution with my cofee and
just go nuts. It hasn’t failed me yet,
and spending almost a third of my
day in the bathroom means I’m
playing a lot of games on my phone.
Who cares about that though? Cof-
fee up, America!
Kenney is a sophomore from
Leawood.
Page 4 Monday, July 1, 2013
O
opinion
Letter GuideLines
Send letters to kansanopdesk@gmail.com.
Write Letter tO tHe editOr in the e-mail
subject line.
Length: 300 words
The submission should include the author’s
name, grade and hometown.Find our full let-
ter to the editor policy online at kansan.
com/letters.
HOw tO submit A Letter tO tHe editOr cOntAct us
Allison Kohn, editor-in-chief
editor@kansan.com
nikki wentling, assignment editor
nwentling@kansan.com
mollie Pointer, business manager
mpointer@kansan.com
Lydia Young, sales manager
lyoung@kansan.com
megan Hinman, copy chief
mhinman@kansan.com
Jon schlitt, adviser
jschlitt@kansan.com
tHe editOriAL bOArd
Members of The Kansan Editorial Board are
Allison Kohn, Nikki Wentling, Katie Kutsko,
Megan Hinman
EquAliTy
Negative stereotypes defne gender roles
A cup o’ jo
Satisfying coffee addiction fuels daily routine
How are you
celebrating July 4?
Follow us on Twitter @uDK_
opinion. Tweet us your opinions,
and we just might publish them.
@Bowmanatee
@UDK_Opinion in light
of recent #immigration
discussions in the
legislative funhouse,
im fying my patriotic
self to cozumel!
#scubasurfnsand
@Corey_Fiodori
@UDK_Opinion i’ll
be celebrating my
patriotism by working
11 hours and makin
bank. #happy4th i
guess.
@SpectrumOfSound
@UDK_Opinion fnishing
the rest of my jayhawk
birthday cake
T
here was a pronounced
atmosphere of euphoria on
June 26 when the Supreme
Court ruled that section three
of the Defense of Marriage Act
(DOMA) was unconstitutional.
While the justices themselves were
responsible for the rendering of the
decision, it wouldn’t be possible to
have achieved such a milestone in
LGBT rights without the undying
support of its allies. Indeed, what
people must know is that personal
beliefs, on the micro level, can have
major implications for the rest of
the nation. To achieve the next step
in expanding LGBT rights, some
widely held attitudes about homo-
sexuality must change — namely,
gender norms. Tese anachronistic
social constructs charge men with
fulflling masculine roles in society,
and women with fulflling feminine
roles.
In relation to the plight of the
LBGT, gender norms ofen manifest
themselves in labels such as “too
gay,” which suggests a gay person
has moved out of their acceptable,
gender assigned role. People who
say this about others are obviously
making assumptions rooted in
stringent gender binaries, which
suggest that men should behave
like men and women should behave
like women. Tose who adhere to
this paradigm can only be partial
supporters of the LGBT at best.
Because they believe being gay is
okay, so long as the gay person
in question does not cross their
arbitrarily constructed concepts of
masculinity and femininity. What’s
more, gay people themselves face a
stigma in their own communities
from this construct. Popular gay
dating apps are riddled with state-
ments like “no fems.” With just two
words, their entire personality has
been discounted.
Te statement, “too gay,” itself,
is a fallacy. Homosexuality exists
on a continuum and adheres to
no socially constructed bound-
ary. Studies have shown that many
people fall into a grey area of
sexuality, which makes these labels
even more arbitrary and harmful.
No human can be too much of who
the are, and this label only serves to
make them ashamed of it. When it
comes to being gay, the limit does
not exist.
Labels like these fracture group
cohesion by otherizing the LGBT
community internally and ex-
ternally and keep them at a safe
distance from their heterosexual
counterparts. In order to move into
equality, the LGBT community,
in its multiplicity, must be fully
embraced. Tat entails eliminat-
ing all conceptions of what roles
and behaviors men and women
should adopt in society. Legislative
victories will be hallow if the LGBT
still feel excluded because they play
a role society fnds unft for them.
Ten years ago, in 2003, the Su-
preme Court found in Lawrence v.
Texas that criminalizing consensual
homosexual sex acts was unconsti-
tutional. Now, in 2013, our nation
has taken the next greatest step. Te
societal gains made have been in
no way infnitesimal or negligible.
Our nation has gone from viewing
homosexuality as a criminal ofense
to a normal display of human afec-
tion in a mere decade, but there’s
more to be done. Heteronormative
beliefs are from a bygone era, and
so too they must go. If we embrace
all kinds of people for who they are,
maybe at the end of our lives, we
will be able to say we got to see the
world change.
Ashley is a sophomore from
Topeka. Follow him on Twitter
@punchlnekween.
By Wil Kenney
wkenney@kansan.com
By William Ashley
washley@kansan.com
Monday, May 13, 2013 Page 3 The University Daily Kansan Monday, June 10, 2013 Page 5 Monday, July 1, 2013
E
entertainment
Sudoku CroSSword
Cryptoquip
HOROSCOPES
check out
the answers
http://bit.ly/12oRX1u
aries (March 21-april 19)
Strengthen your infrastructure. include
everyone on your list. you're entering a lucra-
tive phase. keep it truthful.
taurus (april 20-May 20)
Spend time outdoors. deep breaths help,
too. don't make assumptions now. take care.
you're getting more sensitive.
Gemini (May 21-June 20)
it's not a good time for a celebration, yet.
Start by cleaning closets and organizing.
Check documents.
cancer (June 21-July 22)
Be wary of hidden expenses, and pay back a
debt. Verify with a female authority. you gain
clarity now.
Leo (July 23-aug. 22)
orders come from on high. New evidence
threatens old assumptions.
Virgo (aug. 23-sept. 22)
despite temporary confusion, formulate
a bold strategy. don't touch your savings.
decrease expenses instead.
Libra (sept. 23-oct. 22)
Set long-term goals to advance your agenda
over the next few days. obsessively squirrel
away nuts for the winter.
scorpio (oct. 23-nov. 21)
determine the plan early, and stay on mes-
sage. Negotiate for the big picture. watch for
holes in your pockets.
sagittarius (nov. 22-Dec. 21)
Speedy action is required. the argument
intensifes. today and tomorrow are good for
working and learning.
capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Study with passion, and uncover a trea-
sure. don't gossip about work. Shop later to
avoid buyer's remorse.
aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
work interrupts research. travel later.
Gather materials. An antique may be in-
volved. Authorize improvements.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)
Friends help you advance. Conditions are
unstable. quell an angry outburst by remind-
ing about consequences.
Page 6 Monday, July 1, 2013 The University Daily Kansan
Television
Avoid confusing, disturbing, silly, sucky television shows
By Kaitlyn Hilgers
khilgers@kansan.com
Whether it is a murder mystery, your
latest addiction, or a silly sitcom, be-
tween cable and Netfix, there is some-
thing for everyone to watch on televi-
sion. However, there are the shows that
really shouldn’t be for anybody. Tese
shows are shows that should be avoided
at all costs. Tey aren’t all that bad; they
just suck you in, causing you to lose a
full day. Sometimes, they actually do
suck.
Anything on BrAvo
Don’t get me wrong, I am the frst
one to switch to Bravo during my
channel surfng, and more ofen than
not, there is something that attracts my
interests. America’s Next Top Model
Marathon? Real Housewives? Top
Chef? Yes, please. I will sit down with
my morning cup of cofee promising
myself one episode, but time fies when
you are watching stupid people argue,
I guess, because all of a sudden it is the
evening and I have successfully wasted
a full day in front of the television. So
if you are hoping to be productive, it
would be wise to avoid Bravo.
‘girl Code’
Tis show just disturbs me on all
levels. Not only is it shallow and stereo-
typical, but it makes it seem as though
all women are like those on the show
and even look up to them. Every time
I watch this show, I am appalled that
women — and men, for that matter
— are showing support for a show that
literally tells me I should wear makeup
every day to look acceptable. I don’t like
anyone telling me what to do or how
to do something, and I especially don’t
like it from women who seem to think
they know everything. Shows should
learn to build women up, not tear them
down or tell them which kind of sport
fan they should be in order to impress
the men around them. I will watch
baseball all day, root for my Padres just
as loud as anyone else in the room and
not wear makeup all at the same time,
thank you very much. Ultimately, this
show is trash, and not even the good
kind of trash, the stinky kind.
‘hemloCk grove’
I really don’t know what it is about
this Netfix original that makes it so
unwatchable. When I read the descrip-
tion, I thought it would be scary, inter-
esting and downright good. Instead, it’s
a confusing, weird and just stupid show.
I have tried three times now to get into
it, and every time, I come out loathing
it even more for taking precious time
out of my day.
In the end, these are just my opin-
ions. For all I know, Girl Code could
be your next obsession or you could
think that Hemlock Grove is a televi-
sion masterpiece. But I have a hard
time believing that could happen, and
so with that, I recommend you spend
your time watching other shows. Like,
pretty much any other show. Seriously.
— edited by megan hinman
MTV
Carlly Aquilino, stand-up comedian and cast member of “Girl Code.”
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Page 7 Monday, July 1, 2013 The University Daily Kansan
Lawrence is deep in summer, with
humidity and rising temperatures
inevitable.
Staying cool and hydrated is
essential to a healthy July and
August. Pavika Saripalli, a physician
at Watkins Health Center, busted
some of the most common myths
associated with food and drinks
during the warmer weather.
Myth: A cold beer will cool you
down.
Fact: “Alcohol dilates the blood
vessels. You may feel like you’re
more able to get heat out
of the body, but this has
not been proven,” Saripalli
said. “I never want to advocate more
than two drinks in 24 hours. Your
liver cannot process more than fve
servings of alcohol. It may make
you feel cooler, but it won’t actually
make you cooler.”
Myth: Spicy foods cool you down.
Fact: “Tere are no foods that can
actually raise or lower your body
temperature,” Saripalli said.
What you should be eating or
drinking:
“Dehydration will promote heat
retention, so you should be drinking
a lot of water,” Saripalli said. “You
can feel cooler by eating certain
foods like fruits and vegetables,
especially ones that contain a lot of
water like grapes, melons, lettuce,
cabbage and celery.”
What to avoid:
“Avoid cafene; it promotes a sense
of warmth. Take the least amount
of decongestants and ADD/ADHD
medicine as possible; they make you
feel hotter,” Saripalli said. “Don’t
eat any more carbohydrates than
what is necessary because carbs get
converted to heat quickly.”
So, before you reach for the beer
or hot sauce to cool yourself down,
remember that water is your best
bet, whether in a glass or in your
fruit.
easy Fruit salad recipe:
1 pint of strawberries, cleaned, hulled
and sliced
1 pound seedless grapes, halved
3 kiwis, peeled and sliced
3 bananas, sliced
1 (21 ounce) can of peach pie flling
Combine all ingredients in a large bowl
and gently mix in peach pie flling. Chill
for one hour before serving.
— Jenna Jakowatz
STaying Cool
Myth busters: warm weather foods
Erin brEmEr/Kansan
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PALM OF
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MOBILE
Page 8 Monday, July 1, 2013 The University Daily Kansan
Arts And sciences
erin bremer/Kansan
e. s. schubert, a University alum, is a fgurative bronze sculptor who lives and works in
downtown Kansas city, Kan. schubert uses traditional methods to make larger-than-
life, monumental bronze sculptures.
Students and University alumni
showed of their creativity dur-
ing the Maker Faire Kansas City at
Union Station this weekend.
Te Maker Faire is an opportunity
for any creator to show of their new
idea, product, craf or food.
Te event is a celebration of inven-
tion and innovation that brings
makers together and promote a
sense of community.
Te School of Journalism show-
cased its digital content production
and discussed how it can be incor-
porated into social media.
Attendees of the event practiced
combining music and graphics.
Austin Feathers, an electrical
engineering major, created bolts
of artifcial lighting inside Union
Station with his Tesla Coil Lightning
machine.
Outside, his home-made jet engine
fred up every hour.
E. Spencer Schubert, a University
graduate living in downtown Kansas
City, displayed his monument-sized
bronze sculptures.
Schubert owns his own studio
where he sells his sculptures com-
mercially.
— Edited by Allison Kohn
erin bremer
ebremer@kansan.com
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Page 9 Monday, July 1, 2013 The University Daily Kansan
Lawrence
Rochelle Schleicher, from Kansas
City, crossed the fnish of the 2013
Tour of Lawrence at the intersec-
tion of Jayhawk Boulevard and Sun-
fower Road afer 33 minutes and 40
seconds of cycling the challenging
course around Lawrence and the
University campus.
She was the winner of the women’s
Masters Category Four race, but the
difculty of climbing the hills of
Lawrence on her bicycle had lef lit-
tle energy for a celebration. However,
Schleicher still managed to enjoy the
ride.
“It’s a climber’s course,” Schleicher
said, referring to the many hills that
riders had to overcome to reach the
fnish. “So, either you like to climb or
you don’t. I loved it.”
Te annual event was on Satur-
day and Sunday. Te Meadowbrook
Apartments KU Campus Circuit
Race were on Saturday.
Bob Sanner has organized the event
since it began fve years ago. He be-
came interested in hosting a cycling
race in Lawrence afer watching the
collegiate nationals here nine years
ago.
When he began organizing the
event Sanner couldn’t think of any
better place for a cycling course in
the area than the hills of campus.
“I’m grateful that the University
administration allows us to do this,”
Sanner said as he stood near the
start/fnish line of the race. “I don’t
know if there’s any other event where
they shut the campus down for an
entire day.”
Members of the KU Cycling Club
team enjoyed competing on their
own campus, and used their famil-
iarity with the course to their advan-
tage.
Adam Trunnell, a junior from Lib-
erty, Mo., said he had been preparing
for the race all year by biking up the
hill to class.
He said that despite controversy the
sport of cycling has recently faced in
the media, there are a lot of people
who still love the sport, and Law-
rence is a perfect example.
“Lawrence is a nice pocket of a lot
of really good cycling,” Trunnell said.
“I think these races are great for the
community, the riders, and the Uni-
versity.”
— Edited by Allison Kohn
Max goodwin
mgoodwin@kansan.com
Tour of Lawrence brings cyclers to town, campus
Erin brEMEr/Kansan
above: Bikers race down the hills of Mt. Oread during the Fifth annual Tour of Lawrence on Saturday. The city was swarmed with
cyclists during the three-day event that consisted of races on campus and downtown. Left: Two cyclists weave through campus
Saturday during the campus circuit race, which acted as the Kca’s Kansas State road championship.
YOUR OFFICIAL KU
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Photocopying and Printing
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And more...
www.kucard.ku.edu | (785) 864-5845
USE YOUR KU CARD FOR
Page 10 Monday, July 1, 2013 The University Daily Kansan
‘Land of the free, home of the Brave’
EvEnTs
City of LawrenCe fireworks
DispLay
this annual freworks display sponsored
by the Lawrence Jaycees will take
place following the Party in Watson
Park at Seventh and Kentucky Streets.
the display is set to begin at about
9:45 p.m., and should last a half hour.
the freworks will also be visible from
Burcham Park on Second and Indiana
Streets.
fourth of JuLy party in the park
presenteD by the LawrenCe
originaLs
this celebration starts at 4 p.m. in
Watson park, located at Seventh and
Kentucky Streets, and it will continue
until the City of Lawrence fireworks
display begins. food from Lawrence
original restaurants and beer from
millerCoors will be available, as well as
live music and activities for children.
kCriverfest 2013
the KCriverfest is one of the largest
fourth of July celebrations in Kansas
City. It features live music, food, carnival
rides and a large freworks display. the
event begins at 4 p.m. at the Berkley
riverfront Park near Kansas City’s
river market district, and the hour-long
freworks display over the missouri river
will start at 10 p.m. tickets are $5,
but those who arrive before 5 p.m. will
receive free admission.
JunkyarD Jazz
this weekly event hosted by the
american Legion invites music fans to
come and enjoy the Junkyard Jazz, a
traditional jazz band that was inducted
into the Kansas music hall of fame this
year. the show is free and will take place
at american Legion, 3408 W. Sixth St. the
concert is from 7 to 8:30 p.m.
— Cody Kuiper
Check out these events around Lawrence and Kansas City and show off your patriotism
No matter the letters, we're all tied together.


GO GREEK!
Φ
Β



Α
Χ
Ω



Α
Δ
Π



Α
Γ
Δ
ΧΩ
Δ
Δ
Δ



Δ
Γ



Γ

Κ
Α
Θ



Κ
Δ


Κ
Κ
Γ Π
Β
Φ



Σ
Δ
Τ



Σ
Κ
ΦΦ
ΒΒ
ΑΑ
ΧΧ
ΑΑ
ΩΩ
ΑΑ
ΔΔ
ΠΠ
Α
Δ
ΔΔ
ΔΔ
ΔΔΔ
ΓΓ
ΓΓ
ΚΚ
ΑΑ
ΘΘ
ΚΚ
Δ
Κ
ΦΦ
ΣΣ
ΔΔΔ
Τ
ΔΔ
ΣΣ
ΚΚ
Interested in joining a Sorority?
Visit kupanhellenic.org to register for Fall Formal Recruitment,
or ask your Orientation Assistant for more information!
Page 11 Monday, July 1, 2013 The University Daily Kansan
Dating
Last year, Kelcee Sachtleben and
her boyfriend took their 4th of July
celebration to a new level. Tey
spent the day at Clinton Lake sip-
ping summer brew and cruising the
water on a pontoon boat. At night,
they ate barbecue and lay under a
30-minute frework show right in
downtown Lawrence.
Lawrence doesn’t have sun-kissed
beaches or a wild party scene, but it
does ofer a range of amusing events
to make this Independence day one
to remember.
“I didn’t have the money to go to
the Ozarks or a big festival,” Sachtle-
ben said. “So, I just tried to relax
and make the best of it in Lawrence,
which ended up being a blast.”
If Sachtleben’s story sounds ap-
pealing, the full service marina at
Clinton Lake is ofering pontoon
boat rentals, varying in size and
price, from nine a.m. until fve p.m.
on July 4. Te sandy shores also pro-
vide for a great fshing experience
and the 400 campsites are ideal for a
day-long picnic or cookout.
No summer celebration is com-
plete with out one of Kansas City’s
most well-known foods, barbeque.
Dillon’s is ofering their week-long
Rib fest event from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Right outside the entrance will be
ready-to-eat Hardwood Smoked
Baby Back ribs available for only
$10.99 a slab.
Seth Nauman, assistant manager at
Dillon’s, said the ribs will add some
zest to peoples’ Fourth of July eating.
“We’re cooking them on a charcoal
grill daily,” Nauman said. “Tere
will also be samples for anyone
who’s interested. It’s defnitely worth
checking out because ribs make for a
great Fourth of July dinner.”
Make Independence Day the ulti-
mate date night. Afer dinner, grab
a bottle of wine and a blanket, and
head down to Seventh and Kentucky
streets for the annual freworks show
in Lawrence. Te display starts at
9:45 p.m. and should last about 30
minutes.
“Everyone should celebrate,”
Sachtleben said. “Even if you have to
work in the morning or go to class,
Fourth of July only comes once a
year. America didn’t fght Great
Britain for nothing.”
— Edited by Allison Kohn
Sarah noonan
snoonan@kansan.com
KanSan file photo
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Page 12 Monday, July 1, 2013 The University Daily Kansan
P
aul Feig’s cheerfully profane
lady cop comedy “Te Heat”
is the latest example of why
it’s never a good idea to judge a flm
by its trailer.
One of two disconcertingly similar
Melissa McCarthy vehicles initially
set to debut in early 2013, the frst
trailer for “Te Heat” undersold
Feig’s eagerly awaited follow-up
to “Bridesmaids” as a middling
mélange of odd couple slapstick and
police procedural clichés. McCa-
rthy’s other project, “Identity Tief,”
conversely attracted viewers with
ads promising a rollicking road
comedy in the tradition of “Planes,
Trains and Automobiles.”
Yet quality – or lack thereof – is
seldom the determinant factor of a
flm’s success. Even though “Identity
Tief ” ended up being, to quote my
own review, a “lazy, obnoxious belch
of a movie” that was greeted with
almost universal critical disdain
when it was released last February, it
still managed to turn a hefy proft at
the box ofce. In fact, its reception
may have played a part in convinc-
ing 20th Century Fox executives to
move “Te Heat,” whose advance
screenings had been generating con-
siderably more positive buzz, from
its original April 5 release date to the
butter-clogged heart of blockbuster
season.
Well, Fox’s gamble is our gain,
because “Te Heat” is actually one
of the summer’s sturdier tent-poles:
a wickedly funny buddy cop spoof
that capitalizes on the unlikely
chemistry of its two leading ladies.
Like “Bridesmaids,” this is also
a movie that seems bound and
determined to prove that women
can be every bit as raucous and
raunchy as their male counter-
parts, subjecting McCarthy and
her co-star Sandra Bullock to all
manner of violent pratfalls, gross-
out sight gags and a near-constant
stream of genitalia references.
Hooray for progress!
Bullock, essentially reprising
her endearingly awkward “Miss
Congeniality” character, plays
Sarah Ashburn, a high-strung
FBI agent tasked with hunting
down an infamous South Boston
drug lord. While interrogating a
low-level dealer (YouTube celebrity
Spoken Reasons), Sarah runs afoul
of Ofcer Shannon Mullins (McCa-
rthy), a sailor-mouthed Boston-Irish
cop who proudly wears her badge
under several layers of biker denim
and conveniently reversible t-shirts.
Would it surprise you to learn these
two eventually become the ultimate
crime-fghting duo?
Let’s be honest: the buddy cop
fick is one of screenwriting’s stalest
formulas. Recent examples like “Cop
Out” and “Showtime” lowered the
industry’s already low standards for
rote, cynical storytelling. “Te Heat”
distinguishes itself not by breaking
the mold but by acknowledging the
set-up’s inherent limitations, pep-
pering its familiar plot with savvy,
irreverent dialogue that knowingly
parodies the hyper-masculine ex-
cesses of flms like “Lethal Weapon”
and “Bad Boys,” particularly during
a scene where McCarthy goes on an
improvised tirade while searching
her captain’s ofce for his missing
testicles.
McCarthy, a talented actress
resigned to playing coarse, loud-
mouthed eccentrics, nevertheless
imbues the movie with an infectious
sense of fun and confdent charm,
especially whenever she’s taking
Bullock to task for being too ar-
rogant or socially awkward. Bullock,
meanwhile, proves herself a worthy
foil, taking the brunt of her co-star’s
insults while occasionally letting
loose with a few memorable barbs
of her own. A running gag involving
her one-sided friendship with her
neighbor’s cat is oddly inspired.
“Te Heat” also benefts from a
supporting cast of comedy notables,
including Michael McDonald
(MADtv) as a knife-wielding mob
assassin and Dan Bakkedahl as a mi-
sogynistic DEA agent who quickly
becomes McCarthy’s sworn enemy
(and the target of a seemingly inex-
haustible number of albino jokes).
In the end, though, the success of
“Te Heat” can be largely attributed
to McCarthy, a freewheeling comic
presence whose appeal transcends
typecasting.

movies
Feig’s ‘The Heat’ burns
through buddy cop clichés
By Landon McDonald
lmcdonald@kansan.com
TwenTieTh CenTury Fox Film CorporaTion
A neurotic FBi agent (sandra Bullock) teams up with a coarse Boston policewoman (melissa mcCarthy) in Paul Feig’s comedy “The
Heat.”
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Page 13 Monday, July 1, 2013 The University Daily Kansan
“Scarves are always an easy way to bring an
outft together and dress it up, even in the
summertime.”
— Stephanie Pederson “I go for the Ancient Roman style without
sleeves because it takes me back to the
past. The greaves and vam bracelets are a
must.”
— Shawn Bedient
“I love casual, fowy clothes especially
when it’s hot out. Something that covers
you but is airy makes for a nice walk down
Mass. Street.”
— Sabrina Evans
“You can always incorporate KU clothing
with the latest styles. High waisted shorts
with lace are trending right now, and I fgure
why not mix cute with a taste of KU?”
— Elyse Wilson
“I love the typical frat attire. A nice button
down polo and khaki shorts is a must for a
Sunday dinner.”
— Tim Ward
ARoUnd Town
Fashion Police
— Sarah Noonan
How do you describe your summer style? we
asked a few people in downtown Lawrence.
KANSAN.COM
THE STUDENT VOICE SINCE 2012
KANSAN.COM
HAS A NEW LOOK
THE UDK | DOWNLOAD FOR FREE
Page 14 Monday, July 1, 2013 The University Daily Kansan
HealtH
On a sweltering summer day 38
years ago, an order for a double meat-
eater’s deep dish pizza came up in the
kitchen window. Standing next to the
blistering heat rising from the oven,
Nancy O’Connor — then fresh out of
college — had a moment of clarity.
“I opened the oven door and went,
‘Wow, I wonder what it would be like
to walk away from this food,’” she
said.
Tousands of students are fnd-
ing themselves in O’Connor’s shoes,
making the movement away from
meat. A 2008 study by Vegetarian
Times reported that of the 7.3 mil-
lion vegetarian Americans, 42 per-
cent are age 18 to 34.
At O’Connor’s childhood home,
meat was the heart of the plate and
vegetables were an aferthought.
Even though when she lef for col-
lege a vegetarian lifestyle was almost
a sort of counterculture, she was em-
powered to explore outside the cui-
sine she grew up with.
It opened her eyes, and she never
looked back.
Now O’Connor teaches classes
geared toward a vegetarian diet at
the Community Mercantile (the
Merc). However, participants aren’t
all tried-and-true vegetarians. More
ofen than not, they’re simply look-
ing for ways to improve, balance and
broaden their palates.
O’Connor believes that for begin-
ners, eating vegetarian at least once
a week can have health and environ-
mental benefts. Her philosophy is
that meat can play a supporting role
on a plate.
“If you’re eating meat, it can be
more of an embellishment rather
than a star,” she explained.
For around $5, her students walk
away with a new recipe and a food
freebie from a one-hour class like “A
Crash Course in Tofu,” or “A Veggie
Picnic.”
And the refrigerators and freezers
at the Merc are stocked with every-
thing from veggie burgers and tofu
hot dogs to vegetarian Indian entrées
and pizzas.
Te Lawrence community is in-
credibly vegan- and vegetarian-
friendly, with local produce suppliers
like the Merc, Natural Grocers and
the Farmer’s Market. According to
VegGuide.org, there are 20 Lawrence
restaurants that ofer alternative,
vegetarian-friendly menu options.
In the 2013 Best of Lawrence awards,
Zen Zero took the gold for best veg-
etarian eatery.
Also included on the list are Ingre-
dient and Mad Greek, two of Lau-
ren Fleming’s favorite spots to chow
down on a vegetarian meal.
Fleming, a sophomore from Law-
rence, said she was challenged into
becoming a vegetarian when her sis-
ter decided to follow the lifestyle. It
was gradual — frst she gave up red
meat and then made a full transition
afer high school.
It was a little awkward at family
lunches at her grandparent’s cattle
farm. However, Fleming said her
vegetarian diet has infuenced her
family to broaden what they put on
their plates, like trying stir-fry and
substituting fsh for steak.
“It was an adjustment, but I think
it’s prompted them to become more
healthy,” she said.
Fleming’s love of animals was a de-
ciding factor in her choice. Images of
slaughterhouses in a documentary
she recently watched came to mind.
“I understand that back in the day,
that that’s how people survived, eat-
ing meat,” she said. “Now it’s com-
mercial farming where animals aren’t
treated that well.”
Tere are numerous reasons to
choose a vegetarian lifestyle, but
O’Connor and Fleming agreed that it
shouldn’t matter why — that diet is a
very personal decision.
O’Connor’s sons have continued to
embrace a vegetarian lifestyle afer
leaving the house.
“It’s not because they’re forced to,”
she said. “I believe it can be an inspi-
rational way of eating.”
It just so happens that meat doesn’t
inspire her.
“I look at it as, for me, my answer is
just ‘no thank you.’”
— Edited by Allison Kohn
Vegetarianism attracts
college-aged people
Emma LEgauLt
elegault@kansan.com
Erin brEmEr/Kansan
an employee at the Community Mercantile in lawrence restocks the shelves with vegan options on Saturday. In addition to selling
organic and vegan products the Merc, offers a variety of cooking classes to customers each month.
PLEasE
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this
nEwsPaPEr
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@UDK_News on
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Counseling and Psychological Services
Watkins Memorial Health Center
782.864.2277
www.caps.ku.edu
www.facebook.com/KUCAPS
Page 15 Monday, July 1, 2013 The University Daily Kansan
Education
Please recycle this newsPaPer
Online courses increase, offer convenience
emma legault
elegault@kansan.com
67
undergraduate online
courses this summer
(39 in the cLaS) and 80
classes for fall 2013.
5 online Programs for graduates
• master’s in dietetics and nutrition
• master’s of science in education administration
• master’s of science in pharmaceutical
chemistry
• master’s of social work
• master’s of science degree in transition
education services
7 categories for
noncredit courses
• aerospace short courses
• biosciences
• fre and rescue
• law enforcement
• medical
• Osher lifelong learning
• test preparation.
2 online Programs for undergrads
• the Rn to Bachelor of Science degree
• bachelor of science in respiratory care degree
programs
costs are the same as classroom courses
and can have additional fees depending
on the school it’s offered through.
Financial aid applies to online courses.
exams are either online
or at a testing center
on campus or at an
approved off-site center
for students outside of
Lawrence.
Most offered through
Blackboard, some require
textbooks.
A few clicks and keyboard strokes
now equals college credit, and with
the ease and fexibility of online
classes, more students are opting for
the alternative format.
A 2011 study by the Babson
Survey Research Group found dur-
ing fall of that year, more than six
million students were taking at least
one online course, which was an
increase of 570,000 students from
the 2010.
John Grifn, a sophomore from
Dallas, took an online academic suc-
cess seminar last spring.
“What I liked most about it was
the convenience,” he said. “I didn’t
have to worry about being anywhere
and I could do it anywhere and work
at my own pace, which was nice.”
Because of that convenience and
no face-to-face interaction with his
teacher in a classroom, it was ofen
easy to procrastinate or forget about
assignments.
He had to focus on personal
responsibility to keep on top of
coursework.
Te University will ofer 80 online
classes for the fall semester, mostly
on Blackboard.
The intersection between Iowa and Bob’s Billings will be closed until August.
Here are detour routes from the Visitor’s Center and the Kansas Union.
Visitor’s Center
Kansas Union
Parking Garage
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Studio, 1, 2, & 3 bedroom apartments
2 and 3 bedroom townhomes
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Page 16 Monday, July 1, 2013 The University Daily Kansan
nation
In a highly anticipated decision,
the Supreme Court declared the
Defense of Marriage Act uncon-
stitutional last Wednesday.
The act defined marriage as
a union between a man and a
woman and denied federal ben-
efits to same-sex couples whose
marriages were recognized on
the state level. Following the Su-
preme Court’s decision, same-sex
couples can now receive those
benefits, like joint tax returns and
health insurance.
In his majority opinion, Justice
Anthony Kennedy wrote that
DOMA was struck down because
it “violates basic due process and
equal protection principles ap-
plicable to the Federal Govern-
ment.”
We asked students on campus
how they reacted to the Court’s
decision.
cody kupier
ckupier@kansan.com
Students weigh in on recent DOMA repeal
“How did you react to the Court’s decision?”
“i’m really excited that they struck down
DoMa, and it’s really great to see all the
love and support on the internet from peo-
ple who are excited about it. and i know
that there are lots of LGBt activists who
are happy to move on to other issues they
consider pressing, so it’s great to have
that too.”
— Jennifer Nish, Omaha Neb.
“i’m elated. Me and my boyfriend can
actually get married in Massachusetts
and still be here. obviously people would
think the frst step would be state-level
gay marriage, but it’s kind of backwards-
-good backwards -- where it comes feder-
ally frst and states will hopefully follow.”
— Scott Lloyd, Boston, Mass.
“i was kind of surprised since we’ve gen-
erally had a conservative history concern-
ing most acts, but it’s kind of exciting
because it’s a move in a direction, which
is good. So we should see what happens
in the future, if they keep it up or change
their minds.”
— Annette Jardon, Overland Park, Kan.
“Honestly, it seemed like a long time com-
ing. the frst time someone told me what
it was, i was like, ‘Doesn’t that violate
Full Faith and Credit on Face?’ it always
screamed unconstitutional to me. it’s not
a surprise, but a good step of progress
when we’re overturning unconstitutional,
discriminatory laws.”
— Scott Ross, Nevada, Mo.
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Page 17 Monday, July 1, 2013
University
Athletics seals new TV deal with ESPN
nathan fordyce
nfordyce@kansan.com
Kansan file photo
senior guard travis releford dunks the ball
during a game this past season. More peo-
ple will be able to watch men’s basketball
games, and many other KU athletic events,
with the University’s new television deals.
One week afer the University agreed
to a deal with Time Warner Cable and
Kansas City’s Metro Sports to expand
the coverage of the University’s athlet-
ic programs, they struck another deal
with the worldwide leader in sports,
ESPN.
Te deal with Time Warner fnished
up the tier three television rights.
Tere are three tiers in television
rights. Te frst are owned by national
networks, e.g. ESPN, and they get
the frst opportunity to pick games
for over-the-air broadcasts. Te sec-
ond tier rights are for the unselected
games that are appear on cable net-
works such as Time Warner. Te third
and fnal tier rights are to the games
remaining, which the school and con-
ference have to air as they see ft.
Having the Jayhawks streamed na-
tionwide is something Jim Marchiony,
the University’s Assistant Athletic Di-
rector of Public Afairs, said will allow
the Jayhawks to reach farther than
ever before.
“It means hundreds of hours of KU-
themed programming that will be
produced and aired in Kansas City
and throughout the state of Kansas,”
Marchiony said. “Tat programming
entails at least 50 sporting events,
everything from men’s basketball,
women’s basketball, volleyball, track
and feld and hundred of hours of
KU-themed programming.”
Some of the themed programming
that will be aired will be pre-game
shows, post-game shows and a mag-
azine-type show that will be able to
focus on the entire University, not just
the athletic side.
Te University is the last of the Big
12 members to agree to their tier three
rights. Texas has their Longhorn Net-
work, which is ESPN-backed. Baylor,
Kansas State, Oklahoma, Oklahoma
State, TCU and Texas Tech have deals
with Fox. Iowa State and West Vir-
ginia have agreements with local net-
works in their regions.
Being last to sign to a deal, Marchio-
ny said the University was not rushed
to an agreement.
“We think our deal is a terrifc ar-
rangement,” Marchiony said. “It is
near the best anywhere. We were not
in a hurry. We wanted to make sure
that what we did, was to the beneft
of the entire athletic program and the
University as a whole.”
Te University wasn’t fnished with
signing deals for television rights as
they agreed to a seven-year deal with
ESPN to broadcast over ESPN3, ES-
PN’s live online streaming network.
Under that agreement, ESPN will
carry a minimum of 70 live events each
year including one football game, six
men’s basketball games, as many as 16
women’s basketball games, nine vol-
leyball matches, eight baseball games
and as many as 12 sofball, soccer and
track and feld events. Te deal also
includes 20 additional contests that
will be seen nationwide.
“ESPN3 continues to serve as a des-
tination for college sports fans, and
our agreement with Kansas Athlet-
ics extends that commitment,” John
Lasker, ESPN’s vice president of pro-
gramming and acquisitions, said in
a news release. “We look forward to
delivering these live events to the KU
fan base.”
— Edited by Megan Hinman
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Page 18 Monday, July 1, 2013 The University Daily Kansan
Page 19 Monday, July 1, 2013 The University Daily Kansan
column
BROOKLYN, N.Y. — About 50 peo-
ple, including us, fled of the Brook-
lyn-bound N train onto the musty,
underground platform at the Atlan-
tic Avenue subway station. I checked
the time on my phone — 7:28 p.m.
Te 2013 NBA Draf was ofcially
scheduled to kick of in two minutes.
“Dammit, we’re going to miss the
frst pick, and we’ll probably miss the
second pick, too,” I said to Tyler Burt-
scher, my friend and fellow University
student, who’d traveled down from
nearby Stamford, Conn. — where he’s
working this summer — to see the
draf with me.
Missing the frst, and possibly sec-
ond pick in this year’s draf would
have been devastating for any Jayhawk
fan, especially when you consider the
uncertainty surrounding this year’s
draf, and the fact that Ben McLemore
could very well have been picked frst
overall. He was who we were there to
see — and Jef Withey, of course —
and there was a good shot we’d miss
his selection. I’d read plenty of rumors
about how the Cleveland Cavaliers
could possibly trade their No. 1 selec-
tion if they didn’t bite on Kentucky’s
Nerlens Noel. What if they had traded
it while we were in the subway with
no cell signal? What if the team they’d
traded to was one that could use a
silky-smooth shooting guard like Mc-
Lemore? Even if the Cavs were going
to use their No. 1 pick, tons of “mock
drafs” predicted that the Orlando
Magic would surely take the one-and-
done Jayhawk with the second pick.
Tat was the likeliest of scenarios —
or so we thought — so if we hurried,
we’d maybe have a shot.
We could hear faint cheers inside
the arena, but there weren’t any boos,
so that meant NBA Commissioner
David Stern wasn’t yet at the podium.
We still had time.
As we eventually got our tickets and
made our way to our seats, we heard
more than a few “Rock Chalk” hollers
from passers-by and doled out our fair
share of high fves to other Jayhawk
fans. Bear in mind that we’re more
than a thousand miles away from
the holy land — Lawrence — and in
a place where most college basketball
fans’ blood runs Syracuse orange. In a
city of eight million, it’s comforting to
know that good people — Kansas fans
— are around, and that night, they
were all at the Barclays Center.
Tat smug con-artist David Stern
was approaching the podium to
the tune of more than a thousand
boos as we fnally found our seats.
He spoke about something for a few
minutes — no one was listening, they
were more focused on booing — be-
fore dropping perhaps the biggest
bombshell of the evening: “With the
frst pick in the 2013 NBA Draf, the
Cleveland Cavaliers select... Anthony
Bennett.”
ANTHONY BENNETT?! What?!
Who the hell is this guy? He’s the frst
pick? Not Nerlens Noel? Te entire
arena let out a collective “Whaaaat?!?!”
before booing, because this was the
draf, and that’s what you do: you boo.
Ten, the Magic were on the clock.
“Tis is where Ben’s supposed to go,”
I said to Tyler.
Nope. Victor Oladipo. He got a
rousing ovation from the thousands
of Indiana fans in the house, and a
few claps from me because the dude
can ball. But still, why didn’t they pick
McLemore? We waited … and waited
some more. Otto Porter. Cody Zeller.
Alex Len (WHAT?). Nerlens Noel (f-
nally).
And then, Stern gave us what we’d
come for: “With the seventh pick in
the 2013 NBA Draf, the Sacramento
Kings select Ben McLemore.” We
burst out of our chairs in applause
as Ben stood up, hugged his family,
hugged Coach Self and made his way
to the stage. I let up on my cheers for a
second and noticed something weird:
We’re like the only people who are
cheering right now.
But as far as I’m concerned, this was
the best possible draf we could have
gone to. Each pick was followed by
thousands of people thrusting their
hands up onto their heads, jaws agape
in surprise. People were throwing
their hats down in frustration. We got
to watch the weirdest draf in recent
memory. Tat’s hard to beat.
Dispatch from the draft: Jayhawks in Brooklyn
By AJ Barbosa
abarbosa@kansan.com
contributed photo
Barbosa is pictured with alumni Josh Swade (center) who made the ESPn documentary
“There’s no Place like Home,” about Dr. James naismith’s original rules of basketball.
Page 20 Monday, July 1, 2013 The University Daily Kansan
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