You are on page 1of 71

CHAPTER 1

1.1. INTRODUCTION:
Since as long as the human species has forms settlements in history, some kind of retail business has existed, whether in the form of temporary shacks and kiosks at the village fairs, hats and weekly markets, or as permanent establishments. It is difficult to mark milestones or draw a line in time that announces the arrival of modern retail in India. In India retailing has emerged as one of the largest industry and is witnessing a huge revamping exercise, as traditional markets make way for new formats such as departmental stores, hypermarkets, supermarkets and speciality stores. Retailing in India is one of the business enterprises of the economy and accounts for 1415% of its GDP. According to the Global Retail Development Index 2012, India ranks fifth among the top 30 emerging markets for retail. The India retail market is estimated to be US $450 billion and one of the top five retail market in the world. India is one of the fastest growing retail markets in the world. Indias retail industry is essentially owner manned small shops accounts for 90%. In 2010 large format convenience store and supermarkets accounted for about 4% of the industry and these were present only in large urban centres. The India retail sector has been one of the central drivers of the Indian economy over the past decade. While still unorganised the sector is expected to augment at a CAGR of around 12 percent over the next ten years, reaching an estimated size of over $950 billion by 2020.During this period traditional retail is expected to grow at around 5 percent while organised retail is expected to grow at a much faster rate of 25 percent per annum. This also means that by 2020, organised retail would contribute to around 20 percent to the total value of the retail sales in India. In November 2011 Indias central government announced retail reforms for both multi brand and single brand stores. These market reforms paved the way for retail innovation and Competition with multi- brand retailer such as Wal-mart, Carrefour and Tesco, as well single brand majors such as IKEA, Nike and Apple. In December 2011 under pressure from the opposition, India government placed the retail reforms on hold till it reaches the consensus. In

January 2012, India approved reforms for single branded stores welcoming anyone in the world to innovate in Indian retail market with 100% ownership, but imposed the requirement that single brand retailer source 30% of its goods from India. Indian government continues the hold on retail reforms for multi-bran stores. The India retail industry is generally divided into organized and unorganized retailing: Organized retailing: Organised retailing refers to trading activities undertaken by licensed retailers, those who have registered for sales tax, income tax, etc. These include corporate-backed hypermarkets and retail chains, and also privately owned large retail businesses. Hence organised retail which now constitutes a small four per cent of total retail sector is growing at a much faster pace of 45-50% per annum and quadruples its share in total retail trade to 16% by 2011-12. Unorganised retailing: It refers to the traditional form of low-cost retailing, for example, local kirana shops, and owner operated general sores, paan/beedi shops, convenience stores, hand cart and street vendors, etc. The unorganised retail sector is growing at about 10% per annum with sales rising from US$ 309 billion in 2006-07 to US$ 496 billion in 2011-12.. Indias retail growth was largely driven by increasing disposable incomes, favourable demographics, changing lifestyles, growth of the middle class segment and a high potential for penetration into urban and rural markets. However with the onset of the global financial crisis Indian retailers have been suffering from the effects of rapid credit squeeze high operating costs and low customer confidence. The evolution of retail in India began with barter system, which was practiced in the earlier days. The emergence of retailing in India has to do more with the increasing purchasing power of the buyers, especially post liberalisation due to product variety.

1.2. STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM:


Since there is a growing trend for retailing industry due to the change in life-style of the living among people. They emerged the necessity to study the customer spending attitude and impact of loyalty card which will be guidance for the retailing industry to undertake the prospective projects.

1.3. REVIEW OF LITERATURE:


1. CUSTOMER MANAGEMENT Nipun Mehta(2010) It is often said that it cost 5 times as much to bring in a new customer, than to keep in an existing one. Customer Loyalty is one of the key drivers to business in any industry. Whether it is tough times or times when the business is booming, loyalty can be the differentiating factor between top line growths and de-growth, profit s and losses, volume growth or de-growth etc. Clearly, the more commoditized the business, the more mature the industry, the greater is the role of customer loyalty. This is because in a growing industry, or in a nascent state of business, the possibility and potential to add new customers can sometime lead to laxity in efforts to build customer loyalty. The universal truth is that customer loyaty built through variables like high quality customer service is an intangible that can make or break a business.

2.

IMPACT

OF

LOYALTY

PROGRAM

ON

RETAILING

BUSINESS

IN

INDIA: CREATING LONG TERM CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIPS.

Srivastava, Chetan China, Babu (2011) the article says that there has been a revolution during the last three decades in the Retail Industry, especially in India. The retail market has changed from a product-oriented industry to a more market-oriented to the service and experience oriented, with the customer as the core of their operations. This customer centricity has been the outcome of the hyper competition in the retail markets, and every retailer is doing their best to woo the customers from other retailers. This phenomenon has resulted in the maximization of the customer focus and the path towards bringing in the customer delight, just not the satisfaction. Customer Relationship programs have been taken as the strategy to attract customer for repeat purchase as well to up-sell and cross-sell to the existing customers at lower cost than attracting the new ones. Hence companies started to work its customer loyalty programs to keep customers for long time while making profit through them. Working with customer care the company hopes to create satisfied and loyal customers. One of the most popular ways of working with customer care in the retail business is customer loyalty program. The popularity of this is based on the beliefs that loyal customers are lucrative and
3

these programs would bond customers to the company. Under the loyalty program companies are offering different kind of benefits to the customer. Gift cards, frequent purchase program, point program, rewards, offers, Schemes, value added services etc are lucrative content of loyalty programs. The study is intended to examine how four well established companies in the retail business in India do business with a customer loyalty program concentrating on long-term relationship and improvement in sales.

3. The Long-Term Impact of Loyalty Programs on Consumer Purchase Behavior and Loyalty. Liu, Yuping(2010) The author says that despite the prevalent use of loyalty programs, there is limited evidence on the long-term effects of such programs, and their effectiveness is not well established. The current research examines the long-term impact of a loyalty program on consumers' usage levels and their exclusive loyalty to the firm. Using longitudinal data from a convenience store franchise, the study shows that consumers who were heavy buyers at the beginning of a loyalty program were most likely to claim their qualified rewards, but the program did not prompt them to change their purchase behavior. In contrast, consumers whose initial patronage levels were low or moderate gradually purchased more and became more loyal to the firm. For light buyers, the loyalty program broadened their relationship with the firm into other business areas. The findings suggest a need to consider consumer idiosyncrasies when studying loyalty programs and illustrate consumers' co creation of value in the marketing process. 4. Competing Loyalty Programs: Impact of Market Saturation, Market Share, and Category Expandability. Liu, Yuping Yang, Rong (2009) Loyalty programs have become an important component of firms' relationship management strategies. There are now some industries in which numerous rival loyalty programs are offered, inducing intense competition among these programs. However, existing research on loyalty programs has often studied such programs in a noncompetitive setting and has often focused on a single program in isolation. Addressing this gap, this research examines the effect of a firm's competitive positioning and market saturation on the performance of the firm's loyalty program. Based on the analysis of firm- and individual4

level data from the airline industry, the results indicate that larger firms tend to benefit more from their loyalty program offerings than smaller firms. Moreover, when the product category demand is rigid, the impact of an individual loyalty program decreases as the marketplace becomes more saturated with competing programs. However, when the product category is highly expandable, the saturation effect disappears. Under such situations, loyalty programs can help an industry gain competitive advantage over substitute offerings outside the industry, and multiple programs can effectively coexist even under a high level of market saturation. 5. Role of involvement in predicting brand loyalty. Sritharan, Jyothi. K.Tamizh: Rajakumar (2008) c. Samudhra.A Customer Loyalty program is a valuable tool in the creation of customer loyalty once other aspects that are building loyalty are satisfying, namely, the product line, the store concept and the service. Therefore, loyalty programs should be seen as a complement rather than the main loyalty driver. A customer club itself enhances the creation of loyalty by offering monetary and soft benefits. Monetary benefits induce the behavioural loyalty while soft benefits can also stimulate attitudinal loyalty. However, customers these days have many buying options and the competition is intense. Further, loyal customers do not always posses all the positive characteristics that they are often assumed to do. This is why companies need to revaluate if loyalty should be the ultimate objective. 6. Does Customer Demotion Jeopardize Loyalty? Wagner, TillmannHennig-Thurau, ThorstenRudolph, Thomas(2009) Hierarchical loyalty programs award elevated customer status (e.g., elite membership) to consumers who meet a predefined spending level.However, if a customer subsequently falls short of the required spending level, firms commonly revoke that status. The authors investigate the impact of such customer demotion on loyalty intentions toward the firm. Building on prospect theory and emotions theory, the authors hypothesize that changes in customer status have an asymmetric negative effect, such that the negative impact of customer demotion is stronger than the positive impact of status increases. An experimental scenario study provides evidence that loyalty intentions are indeed lower for demoted customers than for those who have never been awarded a preferred status, meaning that hierarchical loyalty programs can drive otherwise loyal
5

customers away from a firm. . The authors test the extent to which design variables of hierarchical loyalty programs may attenuate the negative consequences of status demotions with a second experimental scenario study and present an analytical model that links status demotion to customer equity to aid managerial decision making. 7. Feeling Superior: The Impact of Loyalty Program Structure on Consumers' Perceptions of Status. Dreze, Xavier Nunes, Joseph C(2009) The authors examine the status as it pertains to loyalty programs, investigating the impact of the number and size of tiers on consumers' perceptions of status.The increasing the number of elites in the top tier dilutes perceptions of status, while adding a subordinate tier enhances status. Tiers below the second tier do not affect those at the top but can make those in the tier immediately above feel more elite. Given the choice between alternative programs, those who do not qualify for status prefer hierarchies with multiple tiers. 8. Customer Loyalty Programs: Are They Profitable? Singh, Siddharth S.Jain, Dipak C,Krishnan (2008)Loyalty programs are very common in practice. Many researchers have worked at understanding the impact of loyalty programs on market competition and the mechanism behind it. Interestingly, almost all of the studies have explored a symmetric equilibrium where both of the competing firms offer a loyalty program. To our knowledge, the extant literature has not investigated in-depth whether asymmetric equilibrium can exist where only one firm chooses to offer a loyalty program and the other firm chooses to compete via lowering prices. Such a question is important because some markets do support such asymmetric equilibriums with respect to loyalty programs. Also, the existence of asymmetric equilibrium shows that a loyalty program need not be profitable for some firms. In this paper, we use a game-theoretic framework to investigate specific types of customer loyalty programs that provide benefit to loyal customers in the form of discount over market prices. The model considers consumer switching and includes two types of consumer heterogeneity. The first type of heterogeneity concerns the differences between customers with respect to their liking for loyalty programs, and the second type concerns the differences among the loyalty program members with respect to their ability to collect enough loyalty points to redeem loyalty
6

rewards. By analyzing a duopoly market, it was found that both symmetric equilibrium (i.e., where both competing firms offer the loyalty program) and asymmetric equilibrium (i.e., where one firm alone offers the loyalty program) can be sustained. 9. Factors influencing store loyalty-A Conceptual approach on supermarket R.Sreedhara and Dr.K.Nagendra Babu, (2010) The Organized retail in food and grocery segment in India is growing fast. It is spreading and its gaining momentum with many players entering the market with different type of formats. Consumers are having a variety of shopping experiences. At the same time, retaining customers is becoming increasingly important for retailers. Some customers are intrinsically loyal and patronize the same retail outlet brand. There are also large number of customers switching between retailers who offer them the best alternative at a particular time with comparable offers. 10. A Better way to design loyalty programs Hoffman, Janet L, Lowitt, Eric M.(2008) The article discusses methods and processes for designing loyalty programs to enhance customer relations and business operations. Customer retention has been deemed critical to business survival which must be complimented by a customer loyalty strategy. Recommended strategies for reducing the defection risk of customers that are high include aligning loyalty strategy with market targeting goals, enhancing service and useof loyalty strategy as both a defensive and an offensive weapon. Consumer behavior Behavior that consumers display in searching for, purchasing, using, evaluating and disposing of products and services that they expect will satisfy their needs. Consumer decision making Cognitive and emotional aspects such as family, advertisers, role models, moods and situations that influence a purchase

Customer satisfaction Customer satisfaction is the individual perception of the performance of the product or service in relation to his or her expectations Positioning Positioning is developing a distinct image for the product or service in the mind of the consumer, an image that will differentiate the offering from competing ones and squarely communicate to consumers that the particular product or service will fulfill their needs better than the competing brands Customer retention Providing value to the customers continuously so that they will stay with the brand rather than switch to another brand Loyalty Program A rewards program offered by a company to customers who frequently make purchases. A loyalty program may give a customer advanced access to new products, special sales coupons or free merchandise. Customers typically register their personal information with the company and are given a unique identifier, such as a numerical ID or membership card, and use that identifier when making a purchase.

1.4. OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY


To identify the factors that affect customers purchase at Big Bazaar. To identify the customers preferences for purchasing at the various sections of Big Bazaar. To determine the customers perception about the loyalty programme of Big Bazaar.

1.5. PERIOD OF THE STUDY:


The duration taken for collecting data from 100 respondents took a time of 2 months. Data was collected after preparing the questionnaire. After completing the data collection, the filled questionnaire was thoroughly checked to ensure accuracy, consistency and completeness.

1.6. SCOPE OF THE STUDY:


The least performing section of Big Bazaar can be identified and improvements in that section can be made. By analyzing the effectiveness of loyalty card we can able to retain more loyal customers and can also attract new customers.

1.7. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY:


Research is defined as the systematic and objective process of gathering, recording and analyzing data for aid in making business decisions. The research methodology deals with various aspects of research, it talks about the type of research to be used. The researcher plans how data can be collected. The researcher also plans for the data collection tools. The researcher plans what type of questionnaire to be followed &what ranking scales to be used .The researcher decides about the sample size, research boundary & the various statistical tools to be used in data analysis & interpretation.
In this study Descriptive research design is used.

DESCRIPTIVE RESEARCH DESIGN:


A descriptive research design is one of that simply describes something such as demographic characteristics of certain people who use something .The descriptive study we are typically concerned with determining frequently with which something occurs or how two variables vary together. This study is typically guided by an initial hypothesis .A descriptive study requires a clear specification of who, what, when, where, why &how aspects of the research.

SAMPLE: A part of the population is known as a sample. In this study a set of 100 respondents is considered as a sample. SAMPLING TECHNIQUE: In this study convenience sampling was employed. DATA COLLECTION METHOD: Most of the study is based on the primary data collection and secondary data leads to collect the employees details of the company. The primary data refers to fresh data collected for the study by the researcher with own personal effort. Data is collected through primary and secondary data. The needed primary data is collected through survey method by the way of questionnaire. The secondary data has been collected through the various records, journals, documents and others. PRIMARY DATA: Data which are collected a fresh & for the first time is called a primary data. It happens to be original in character. The researcher would have to decide which sort of data would be used for the study & according to it the can be sorted & used for the study. The collection of primary data is done by questionnaire method. SECONDARY DATA: Data which are collected from earlier research work is called secondary data. It is not original in character. It is a second hand data. This data are collected from profile, brochure, websites, manuals, and report & from information bulletin maintained by Human resource development Department.

10

STATISTICAL TOOLS: Simple Percentage Method and Chi-Square Test

PERCENTAGE ANALYSIS: Percentage often used in the data presentation for they simplify number, reducing all of them to a 0 to 100 range. Though the use of percentages, the data reduced in the standard form with the base equal to 100 which fact facilities relative comparisons. Number of Respondents Percentage of Respondents = ----------------------------------------Total no of Respondents CHI-SQUARE TEST The chi-square test a fairly, simple and definitely the most popular of all the other tools, the chi-square test is most widely used non-parametric tests in statistical work. It makes no assumption about being sampled. The quantity chi-square describes the magnitude of discrepancy between theory and observation. x 100.

X2 is calculated as follows

(o
X2 = Oi = Observed frequency

ei ) 2

ei

Ei = Expected frequency.

11

1.8. LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY


The study is limited to the customer of Big Bazaar. As the needs and wants of customers do not remain constant this study may also change with the needs.

The sample size was restricted to 100 due to short time. The sample used was non-probability and the research is done only in Coimbatore. Few respondents were reluctant to fill the questionnaire due to their busy schedule. The study is based on questionnaire; the results would be varying according to opinion of the respondents.

1.9. CHAPTER SCHEME


Chapter 1: First chapter gives introduction, design and execution of the study. Chapter 2: Second chapter gives the introduction about the company profile. Chapter 3: Third chapter gives the analysis and interpretations of the data in the form of various tables and graphs. Chapter 4: Fourth chapter deals with the execution of statistical tools and techniques. Chapter 5: Fifth chapter gives the findings summarized, suggestions and conclusions of research on the basis of data analysis.

12

CHAPTER 2
COMPANY PROFILE:
Pantaloons Retail (India) Limited, is Indias leading retailer that operates multiple retail formats in both the value and lifestyle segment of the Indian consumer market. Headquartered in Mumbai, the company operates over 10 million square feet of retail space, has over 1000 stores across 61 cities in India and employs over 30,000 people. The companys leading formats include Pantaloons, a chain of fashion outlets, Big Bazaar, a uniquely Indian hypermarket chain, Food Bazaar , a supermarket chain, blends the look, touch and feel of Indian bazaars with aspects of modern retail like choice, convenience and quality and Central, a chain of seamless destination malls. Some of its other formats include, Depot, Shoe Factory, Brand Factory, Blue Sky, Fashion Station and Bazaar. The company also operates an online portal, Futurebazaar.com. A subsidiary company, Home solutions Retail (India) Limited, operates Home Town, a large-format home solutions store, collection in selling home furniture products and E-Zone focused on catering to the consumer electronics segment. Pantaloon Retail was awarded the International Retailer of the year 2007 by the US-based National Retail Federation(NRF) and the Emerging Market Retailer of the year 2007 at the World Retail Congress held in Barcelona. Pantaloon Retail is the flagship company of Future Group, a business group catering to the entire Indian consumption space. A pantaloon is not just an organization-it is an institution, a centre of learning & development. We believe that knowledge is the only weapon at our disposal and our quest for it is focused, systematic and unwavering. Over the years, the company has accelerated growth through its ability to lead change. A number of its pioneering concepts have now emerged as industry standards. For instance, the company integrated backwards into garment manufacturing even as it expanded its retail presence at the front end, well before any other Indian retail company attempted this. It was the first to introduce the concept of the retail departmental store for the entire family through Pantaloons in 1997. The company was the first to launch a hypermarket in India with Big Bazaar, a large discount store that it commissioned in Kolkata in October 2001. And the company introduced the country to the Food Bazaar, a unique bazaar within a hypermarket,
13

which was launched in July 2002 in Mumbai. Embracing our leadership value, the company launched all in July 2005 in Mumbai, making us the first retailer in India to open a fashion store for plus size men and women. Today we are the faster growing retail company in India. The number of stores is going to increase many folds year on year along with the new formats coming up. The way we work is distinctly Pantaloon. Our courage to dream and to turn our dreams into reality that change peoples lives is our biggest advantage. Pantaloon is an invitation to join a place where there are no boundaries to what you can achieve. It means never having to stop asking questions; it means never having to stop raising the bar. It is an opportunity to take risks, and it is this passion that makes our dreams a reality. Come enter a world where we promise you good days and bad days, but never a dull moment. Big Bazaar Indias Real Retail Story: Type Founded Headquarters Industry Promoter Parent Punch line : : : : : : : Hypermarket 2001 Jogeshwari, Mumbai Retail Kishore Biyani Pantaloons Retail India Ltd Is se sasta aur accha kahin nahi!

Big Bazaar, the flagship retail chain of the Future Group, is on the verge of achieving a unique milestone in the History of World Retail-by being the first hypermarket format in the globe to rollout fastest 101 stores in a short span of seven years. Currently, Big Bazaar has 149 stores in the country, Big Bazaars journey began in October 2001, when the young, first generation entrepreneur Kishore Biyani opened the countrys first hypermarket retail outlet in Kolkata (then Calcutta). In the same month, two more stores were added one each in

14

Hyderabad and Mumbai, thus starting on a successful sojourn which began the chapter of organized retailing in India. Speaking on this momentous occasion and remembering the days of conceptualizing the hypermarket idea Mr. Kishore Biyani said, We initially decided to name the format as Bazaar because we had designed the store keeping the Indian mandi style in mind. Since the size of the hypermarket was big than an average mandis, the thought came to name it as Big Bazaar. However, we had freezes on the punch line Issues Se Sasta Aur Achha Kahi Nahi much before we met the creative agency to design the final logo of Big Bazaar. Though, Big Bazaar was started purely as a fashion format including apparel, cosmetics, accessory and general merchandise, the first Food Bazaar format was added as Shop-In-Shop within Big Bazaar in the year 2002. Today, Big Bazaar, with its wide range of products and service offering, reflects the aspirations of millions of Indians. The journey of Big Bazaar can be divided into two phases one pre and the other post January 26th, 2005, when the company rewrote the retail chapter in India, with the introduction of a never-before sales campaign Sasbe Sasta Din. In just one day, almost the whole of Indian destination at various Big Bazaar stores in the country to shop at their Indian Retail experience, wherein understanding of the Indian consumers reflected in the products and services offered, creating innovative deals, expanding in the tier II and tier III towns, tying up with branded merchandise to offer exclusive products and services to its customers. Big Bazaar is present today in 59 cities and occupying over 5 million sq.ft. Retail space and driving over 10 million footfalls into its stores. The format is expecting the number of footfall in the stores to increase by over 140 million by this financial year. Over the years, Mr.Biyanin for his vision and leadership, and Big Bazaar for its unique proposition to its customers, have received every prestigious, consumer awards both nationally and internationally. Also Rajan Malhotre, President, Strategy & Convergence, Big Bazaar, says that What is important in our journey is not the number of stores, but the customers faith time span and today our country is creating a history in the World Organized Retail. Rajan Malhotra, who is also the first employee of Big Bazaar, joining the organization in early 2001 adds, Since beginning, we have kept Big Bazaar as a soft brand, which reflects the India and the Indians.
15

We believed in growing with the society, participating and celebrating all regional and local community festivals, giving customers preferences above everything else. Every Big Bazaar is a small family by its own and the head of the family Karta is the store manager. Kishore Biyani, the CEO of THE Future Group has a vast understanding of the consumers insight, has inculcated the habit of observing, understanding customers behaviour, in every employee of the group. Future Group is confident of the Indian Retail Story. The Group has not slowed down its expansion plans despite the fiscal woes in the economy present today. Future Group to plans to have 300 stores is expecting revenues of Rs 13,000 crore by year 2011. PRODUCT PROFILE: CATEGORIES PRODUCT PROFILE Fruits & Vegetables FOOD & GROCERY HOME FURNITURE HOME ENTERTAINMENT Meat & Fish Staples Ready & Instant Food Frozen Foods Home Care Personal Care Home Ware Home Linen Home Needs Living Room Dining Room Bed Room General Visual Audio

16

CATEGORIES APPLIANCES FASHION TOYS SPORTS

PRODUCT PROFILE Small Appliances Large Appliances Personal Care Appliances Mens Wear Womens Wear Kids Wear Accessories Foot Wear

Infant Toys Soft Toys Learning Toys Outdoor Toys Electronic Toys

Indoor Sports Outdoor Sports Health & Fitness

17

CHAPTER 3
ANALYSIS OF FACTORS INFLUENCING THE CUSTOMERS SPENDING ATTITUDES TABLE-3.1 AGE GROUP OF THE RESPONDENTS
SL.NO 1 2 3 4 AGE BELOW 20 21-30 31-40 ABOVE 40 TOTAL SOURCE: Primary data. NO. OF RESPONDENTS 27 48 22 3 100 PERCENTAGE 27 48 22 3 100

The table shows that 75% 0f the respondents are belongs to the age group of below 30 years and then 25% of the respondents are above 30 years that indicates most young stars are going to big bazaar.

CHART-3.1 AGE GROUP OF THE RESPONDENTS


100 80 60 40 20 0 NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE

18

TABLE-3.2 GENDER OF THE RESPONDENTS


SL.NO 1 2 GENDER MALE FEMALE NO. OF RESPONDENTS 54 46 100 TOTAL SOURCE: Primary data. PERCENTAGE 54 46 100

The table shows that 54% of the respondents are male and 46% of the respondents are female that indicates most 54% of the respondents are male.

CHART-3.2 GENDER OF THE RESPONDENTS


120 100 80 60 40 20 0 Male Female Total NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE

19

TABLE-3.3 MARITAL STATUS OF THE RESPONDENTS


SL.NO 1 2 MARITAL STATUS MARRIED UNMARRIED TOTAL SOURCE: Primary data. NO. OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE 55 45 100 55 45 100

The table shows that 55% of respondents are married and 45% of the respondents are unmarried that indicates most 55% of the respondents are married.

CHART-3.3 MARITAL STATUS OF THE RESPONDENTS


120 100 80 60 40 20 0 Married Unmarried Total NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE

20

TABLE -3.4 TYPE OF FAMILY OF THE RESPONDENTS


SL.NO TYPE OF FAMILY 1 2 NUCLEAR JOINT FAMILY TOTAL SOURCE: Primary data. NO. OF RESPONDENTS 48 52 100 PERCENTAGE 48 52 100

The table shows that 48% of respondents are belongs to nuclear family and 52% of the respondents are belongs to joint family that indicates most 52% of the respondents are joint family.

CHART-3.4 TYPE OF FAMILY OF THE RESPONDENTS


120 100 80 60 40 20 0 Nuclear Joint family Total NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE

21

TABLE-3.5 NO OF DEPENDENT OF THE RESPONDENTS


SL.NO NO OF DEPENDENT BELOW 2 2-3 3-4 ABOVE 4 TOTAL SOURCE: Primary data. NO. OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE

1 2 3 4

12 50 17 21 100

12 50 17 21 100

The table shows that 62% of the respondents are belongs to no. of dependent of below 3 in number and then 38% of the respondents are belongs to no. of dependent of above 3 in number that indicates most are having no. of dependent of below 3.

CHART-3.5 NO OF DEPENDENT OF THE RESPONDENTS


120 100 80 60 40 20 0 Below 2 2-3 3-4 Above 4 Total NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE

22

TABLE- 3.6 OCCUPATION OF THE RESPONDENTS


SL.NO 1 2 3 4 5 OCCUPATION EMPLOYEE PROFESSIONAL BUSINESS STUDENT OTHERS TOTAL SOURCE: Primary data. NO. OF RESPONDENTS 21 10 32 31 6 100 PERCENTAGE 21 10 32 31 6 100

The table shows that 31% of the respondents are belongs to occupation of employee and professional and then 69% of the respondents belongs to occupation of business, student and others that indicates most of the respondents are having the occupation of business, student and others are going to big bazaar.

CHART-3.6 OCCUPATION OF THE RESPONDENTS


120 100 80 60 40 20 0 NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE

23

TABLE- 3.7 MONTHLY INCOME OF THE RESPONDENTS


SL.NO MONTHLY INCOME BELOW 10000 10001-20000 20001-30000 ABOVE 30000 TOTAL SOURCE: Primary data. NO. OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE

1 2 3 4

31 34 20 15 100

31 34 20 15 100

The above table shows that 65% of the respondents are belongs to the monthly income of below 20000 and then 35% of the respondents are belongs to the monthly income of above 20001 that indicates most having the monthly income of below 20000 are going to big bazaar.

CHART-3.7 MONTHLY INCOME OF THE RESPONDENTS


120 100 80 60 40 20 0 NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE

24

TABLE-3.8 AWARE OF LOYALTY CARD OF THE RESPONDENTS


SL.N O 1 2 AWARE OF LOYALTY CARD YES NO TOTAL SOURCE: Primary data. NO. OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE 100 NIL 100 100 NIL 100

The above table shows that 100% of the respondents are aware of loyalty card that indicates all the respondents should aware of loyalty card.

CHART-3.8 AWARE OF LOYALTY CARD OF THE RESPONDENTS


120 100 80 60 40 20 0 Yes No Total NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE

25

TABLE-3.9 LONG USING OF LOYALTY CARD OF THE RESPONDENTS


SL.NO 1 2 3 4 USAGE BELOW 1 YEAR 1-2 YEARS 3-4 YEARS ABOVE 4 YEARS TOTAL SOURCE: Primary data. NO. OF RESPONDENTS 34 52 11 3 100 PERCENTAGE 34 52 11 3 100

The above table shows that 86% of the respondents are belongs to below 2 years and then 14% of the respondents are belongs to above 3 years that indicates most of the respondents are using the loyalty card below 2years in big bazaar.

CHART-3.9 LONG USING OF LOYALTY CARD OF THE RESPONDENTS


120 100 80 60 40 20 0 Below 1 1-2 years 3-4 years Above 4 year years Total NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE

26

TABLE-3.10 FREQUENT SHOPPER AT BIG BAZAAR OF THE RESPONDENTS


SL.NO 1 2 FREQUENT SHOPPER YES NO TOTAL SOURCE: Primary data. NO. OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE 100 NIL 100 100 NIL 100

The above table shows that 100% of the respondents are frequent shopper at big bazaar that indicates all the respondents are frequent shopper at big bazaar.

CHART-3.10 FREQUENT SHOPPER AT BIG BAZAAR OF THE RESPONDENTS

200 180 160 140 120 100 80 60 40 20 0 Yes No Total PERCENTAGE NO OF RESPONDENTS

27

TABLE-3.11 FREQUENT SHOPPER AT BIG BAZAAR OF THE RESPONDENTS


SL.NO 1 2 3 4 5 FREQUENT SHOPPER ONCE IN A WEEK ONCE IN A FORTNIGHT ONCE IN A MONTH ONCE IN THREE MONTHS RARELY TOTAL NO. OF RESPONDENTS 27 12 43 13 5 100 PERCENTAGE 27 12 43 13 5 100

SOURCE: Primary data.

The table shows that 39% of the respondents are frequent shopper at once in a week and once in a fortnight and 56% of the respondents are frequent shopper at once in a month, once in three months and then 5% of the respondents are frequent shopper at rarely that indicates most of the respondents are shopping at once in month and once in three months to big bazaar.

CHART-3.11 FREQUENT SHOPPER AT BIG BAZAAR OF THE RESPONDENTS


120 100 80 60 40 20 0

NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE

28

TABLE-3.12 PURCHASING AT BIG BAZAAR WITH LOYALTY CARD OF THE RESPONDENTS


SL.NO 1 2 3 4 PURCHASING BELOW 1 YEARS 1-2 YEARS 3-4 YEARS ABOVE 4 YEARS TOTAL SOURCE: Primary data. NO. OF RESPONDENTS 31 55 12 2 100 PERCENTAGE 31 55 12 2 100

The above table shows that 86% of the respondents are purchasing at big bazaar with loyalty card belongs to below 2years and then 14% of the respondents are belongs to above 3years that indicates most of the respondents are purchasing at big bazaar below 2years with the using of loyalty card.

CHART-3.12 PURCHASING AT BIG BAZAAR WITH LOYALTY CARD OF THE RESPONDENTS


120 100 80 60 40 20 0 Below 1-2 3-4 Above Total 1 year years years 4 years NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE

29

TABLE-3.13 FACTORS OF THE RESPONDENTS


SL.NO 1 2 3 4 5 FACTORS LOW COST HIGH QUALITY WIDE VARIETY LOCATION CUSTOMER SERVICE LOYALTY PROGRAMS PROMOTIONAL OFFERS PLEASANT AMBIANCE STATUS NO. OF RESPONDENTS 11 34 10 15 12 3 4 7 4 100 TOTAL SOURCE: Primary data. PERCENTAGE 11 34 10 15 12 3 4 7 4 100

6 7 8 9

The table shows that 82% of the respondents are visit big bazaar for the factors of low cost, high quality, wide variety, location and customer service and then 18% of the respondents are visit big bazaar for the factors of loyalty programs, promotional offers, pleasant ambiance and status that indicates most of the respondents are adopting first rank for giving importance to visit big bazaar for low cost, high quality, wide variety, location and customer service.

30

CHART-3.13 FACTORS OF THE RESPONDENTS


120

100

80

60 NO OF RESPONDENTS 40 PERCENTAGE

20

31

TABLE-3.14.1 TABLE SHOWING SATISFACTION OF PRICE OF THE RESPONDENTS


SL.NO 1 2 3 4 5 PRICE HIGHLY SATISFIED SATISFIED NEUTRAL DISSATISFIED HIGHLY DISSATISFIED NO. OF RESPONDENTS 51 38 8 1 2 100 TOTAL SOURCE: Primary data. PERCENTAGE 51 38 8 1 2 100

The table shows that 89% of the respondents are belongs to highly satisfied and satisfied, 8% of the respondents are belongs to neutral, and then 3% of the respondents are belongs to dissatisfied and highly dissatisfied that indicates majority of the respondents are satisfied with the price of the big bazaar.

32

CHART-3.14.1 SATISFACTION OF PRICE OF THE RESPONDENTS


120 100 80 60 40 20 0

NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE

TABLE-3.14.2 SATISFACTION OF QUALITY OF THE RESPONDENTS


SL.NO 1 2 3 4 5 QUALITY HIGHLY SATISFIED SATISFIED NEUTRAL DISSATISFIED HIGHLY DISSATISFIED NO. OF RESPONDENTS 29 54 11 5 1 100 TOTAL SOURCE: Primary data. PERCENTAGE 29 54 11 5 1 100

The table shows that 83% of the respondents are belongs to highly satisfied and satisfied, 11% of the respondents are belongs to neutral, and then 6% of the respondents are belongs to dissatisfied and highly dissatisfied that indicates most of the respondents are satisfied with the quality of the big bazaar.
33

CHART -3.14.2 SATISFACTION OF QUALITY OF THE RESPONDENTS


120 100 80 60 40 20 0

NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE

TABLE-3.14.3 SATISFACTION OF VARIETY OF THE RESPONDENTS


SL.NO 1 2 3 4 5 VARIETY HIGHLY SATISFIED SATISFIED NEUTRAL DISSATISFIED HIGHLY DISSATISFIED NO. OF RESPONDENTS 25 47 23 4 1 100 TOTAL SOURCE: Primary data. PERCENTAGE 25 47 23 4 1 100

The table shows that 72% of the respondents are belongs to highly satisfied and satisfied, 23% of the respondents are belongs to neutral, and then 5% of the respondents are belongs to dissatisfied and highly dissatisfied that indicates most of the respondents are satisfied with the variety of the big bazaar.
34

CHART-3.14.3 SATISFACTION OF VARIETY OF THE RESPONDENTS


120 100 80 60 40 20 0

NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE

TABLE-3.14.4 SATISFACTION OF ACCESSIBILITY OF THE RESPONDENTS


SL.NO 1 2 3 4 5 ACCESSIBILITY HIGHLY SATISFIED SATISFIED NEUTRAL DISSATISFIED HIGHLY DISSATISFIED NO. OF RESPONDENTS 16 37 29 14 4 100 TOTAL SOURCE: Primary data. PERCENTAGE 16 37 29 14 4 100

The table shows that 53% of the respondents are belongs to highly satisfied and satisfied, 29% of the respondents are belongs to neutral, and then 18% of the respondents are belongs to dissatisfied and highly dissatisfied that indicates most of the respondents are satisfied with the accessibility of the big bazaar.
35

CHART-3.14.4 SATISFACTION OF ACCESSIBILITY OF THE RESPONDENTS


120 100 80 60 40 20 0

NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE

TABLE-3.14.5 SATISFACTION OF CUSTOMER CARE OF THE RESPONDENTS


SL.NO 1 2 3 4 5 CUSTOMER CARE HIGHLY SATISFIED SATISFIED NEUTRAL DISSATISFIED HIGHLY DISSATISFIED NO. OF RESPONDENTS 18 41 25 12 4 100 TOTAL SOURCE: Primary data. PERCENTAGE 18 41 25 12 4 100

The table shows that 59% of the respondents are belongs to highly satisfied and satisfied, 25% of the respondents are belongs to neutral, and then 16% of the respondents are belongs to dissatisfied and highly dissatisfied that indicates most of the respondents are satisfied with the customer care of the big bazaar.
36

CHART-3.14.5 SATISFACTION OF CUSTOMER CARE OF THE RESPONDENTS


120 100 80 60 40 20 0

NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE

TABLE-3.14.6 SATISFACTION OF LOYALTY PROGRAMS OF THE RESPONDENTS


SL.NO 1 2 3 4 5 LOYALTY PROGRAMS HIGHLY SATISFIED SATISFIED NEUTRAL DISSATISFIED HIGHLY DISSATISFIED NO. OF RESPONDENTS 12 38 28 17 5 100 TOTAL SOURCE: Primary data. PERCENTAGE 12 38 28 17 5 100

The table shows that 50% of the respondents are belongs to highly satisfied and satisfied, 28% of the respondents are belongs to neutral, and then 22% of the respondents are belongs to dissatisfied and highly dissatisfied that indicates most of the respondents are satisfied with the loyalty programs of the big bazaar.
37

CHART-3.14.6 SATISFACTION OF LOYALTY PROGRAMS OF THE RESPONDENTS


120 100 80 60 40 20 0

NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE

TABLE-3.14.7 SATISFACTION OF PROMOTIONAL OFFERS OF THE RESPONDENTS


SL.NO 1 2 3 4 5 PROMOTIONAL OFFERS HIGHLY SATISFIED SATISFIED NEUTRAL DISSATISFIED HIGHLY DISSATISFIED NO. OF RESPONDENTS 14 36 30 9 11 100 TOTAL SOURCE: Primary data. PERCENTAGE 14 36 30 9 11 100

The table shows that 50% of the respondents are belongs to highly satisfied and satisfied, 30% of the respondents are belongs to neutral, and then 20% of the respondents are belongs to dissatisfied and highly dissatisfied that indicates most of the respondents are satisfied with the promotional offers of the big bazaar.
38

CHART-3.14.7 SATISFACTION OF PROMOTIONAL OFFERS OF THE RESPONDENTS


120 100 80 60 40 20 0

NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE

TABLE-3.14.8 SATISFACTION OF ENVIRONMENT OF THE RESPONDENTS


SL.NO 1 2 3 4 5 ENVIRONMENT HIGHLY SATISFIED SATISFIED NEUTRAL DISSATISFIED HIGHLY DISSATISFIED NO. OF RESPONDENTS 28 37 17 6 12 100 TOTAL SOURCE: Primary data. PERCENTAGE 28 37 17 6 12 100

The table shows that 65% of the respondents are belongs to highly satisfied and satisfied, 17% of the respondents are belongs to neutral, and then 18% of the respondents are belongs to dissatisfied and highly dissatisfied that indicates most of the respondents are satisfied with the environment of the big bazaar.
39

CHART-3.14.8 SATISFACTION OF ENVIRONMENT OF THE RESPONDENTS


120

100

80

60 NO OF RESPONDENTS 40 PERCENTAGE

20

40

TABLE-3.15 FACTORS OF THE RESPONDENTS


SL.NO 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 FACTORS FOOD BAZAAR HOME AND FASHION APPARELS FOOTWEAR BAZAAR ELECTRONIC BAZAAR FURNITURE BAZAAR ENTERTAINMENT HOUSEHOLD 8 100 TOTAL SOURCE: Primary data. 100 NO. OF RESPONDENTS 16 16 9 19 11 7 5 17 PERCENTAGE 16 16 9 19 11 7 5 17

The above table shows that 68% of the respondents are belongs to food bazaar, home & fashion, footwear and household and then 32% of the respondents are belongs to electronic bazaar, furniture bazaar, entertainment and apparels that indicates most of the respondents are adopting first rank for spending preference to food bazaar, home & fashion, apparels, footwear bazaar and household.

41

42

CHART-3.15 FACTORS OF THE RESPONDENTS


120

100

80

60 NO OF RESPONDENTS 40 PERCENTAGE

20

43

TABLE-3.16.1 AMOUNT SPENT PER VISIT IN FOOD BAZAAR OF THE RESPONDENTS


SL.NO 1 2 3 4 FOOD BAZAAR BELOW 100 101-500 501-1000 ABOVE 1000 NO. OF RESPONDENTS 21 51 18 10 100 TOTAL SOURCE: Primary data. PERCENTAGE 21 51 18 10 100

The table shows that 72% of the respondents are belongs to below Rs.500 and then 28% of the respondents are belongs to above Rs.500 that indicates most of the respondents are spent the amount per visit below Rs.500 in the section of food bazaar.

44

TABLE-3.16.2 AMOUNT SPENT PER VISIT IN HOME AND FASHION OF THE RESPONDENTS
SL.NO 1 2 3 4 HOME AND FASHION BELOW 2000 2001-5000 5001-7000 ABOVE 7000 NO. OF RESPONDENTS 24 47 23 6 100 TOTAL SOURCE: Primary data. PERCENTAGE 24 47 23 6 100

The table shows that 71% of the respondents are belongs to below Rs.5000 and then 29% of the respondents are belongs to above Rs.5000 that indicates most of the respondents are spent the amount per visit below Rs.5000 in the section of home & fashion.

45

TABLE-3.16.3 AMOUNT SPENT PER VISIT IN APPARELS OF THE RESPONDENTS


SL.NO 1 2 3 4 APPARELS BELOW 1000 1001-2000 2001-3000 ABOVE 3000 NO. OF RESPONDENTS 23 52 24 1 100 TOTAL SOURCE: Primary data. PERCENTAGE 23 52 24 1 100

The table shows that 75% of the respondents are belongs to below Rs.2000 and then 25% of the respondents are belongs to above Rs.2000 that indicates most of the respondents are spent the amount per visit below Rs.2000 in the section of apparels.

46

TABLE-3.16.4 AMOUNT SPENT PER VISIT IN FOOTWEAR BAZAAR OF THE RESPONDENTS


SL.NO 1 2 3 4 FOOTWEAR BAZAAR BELOW 500 501-1000 1001-2000 ABOVE 2000 NO. OF RESPONDENTS 24 45 25 6 100 TOTAL SOURCE: Primary data. PERCENTAGE 24 45 25 6 100

The table shows that 69% of the respondents are belongs to below Rs.1000 and then 31% of the respondents are belongs to above Rs.1000 that indicates most of the respondents are spent the amount per visit below Rs.1000 in the section of footwear bazaar.

47

TABLE-3.16.5 AMOUNT SPENT PER VISIT IN ELECTRONIC BAZAAR OF THE RESPONDENTS


SL.NO 1 2 3 4 ELECTRONIC BAZAAR BELOW 5000 5001-10001 10001-15000 ABOVE 15000 NO. OF RESPONDENTS 21 37 28 14 100 TOTAL SOURCE: Primary data. PERCENTAGE 21 37 28 14 100

The table shows that 58% of the respondents are belongs to below Rs.10000 and then 42% of the respondents are belongs to above Rs.10000 that indicates most of the respondents are spent the amount per visit below Rs.10000 in the section of electronic bazaar.

48

TABLE-3.16.6 AMOUNT SPENT PER VISIT IN FURNITURE BAZAAR OF THE RESPONDENTS


SL.NO 1 2 3 4 FURNITURE BAZAAR BELOW 2000 2001-5000 5001-7000 ABOVE 7000 NO. OF RESPONDENTS 12 20 29 39 100 TOTAL SOURCE: Primary data. PERCENTAGE 12 20 29 39 100

The table shows that 32% of the respondents are belongs to below Rs.5000 and then 68% of the respondents are belongs to above Rs.5000 that indicates most of the respondents are spent the amount per visit above Rs.5000 in the section of furniture bazaar.

49

TABLE-3.17 USE OF LOYALTY CARD OF THE RESPONDENTS


SL.NO USE OF LOYALTY CARD USEFUL SOME EXTENT NOT SURE USELESS TOTAL SOURCE: Primary data. NO. OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE

1 2 3 4

42 34 20 4 100

42 34 20 4 100

The above table shows that 76% of the respondents are belongs to useful and some extent and then 24% of the respondents are belongs to not sure and useless that indicates most of the respondents are says that use of loyalty card is useful in big bazaar.

50

CHART-3.17 USEFUL OF LOYALTY CARD OF THE RESPONDENTS


120 100 80 60 40 20 0 Useful Some extent Not sure Useless Total NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE

TABLE-3.18 USE OF LOYALTY CARD EVERY TIME OF THE RESPONDENTS


SL.NO EVERYTIME USE 1 ALWAYS 2 3 4 MOSTLY RARELY NEVER USE NO. OF RESPONDENTS 12 28 53 7 100 PERCENTAGE 12 28 53 7 100

TOTAL SOURCE: Primary data.

The above table shows that 40% of the respondents are belongs to use always, some extent and 53% the respondents of are belongs to use rarely and then 7% of the respondents are belongs to never use that indicates most of the respondents are using the loyalty card for rarely in big bazaar.

51

CHART-3.18 CHART SHOWING USEFUL USE OF LOYALTY CARD EVERY TIME OF THE RESPONDENTS
120 100 80 60 40 20 0 Always Mostly Rarely Never use Total NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE

52

CHAPTER 4
ANALYISIS OF VARIANCE THROUGH STATISTICAL METHODS CHI-SQUARE TEST
1. Level of significance between Marital Status and Price. H0-there is significant association between marital status and price. TABLE NO 4.1 Marital status Chi-Square(a,b) Df Asymp. Sig. 1.000 1 .317 Price 108.700 4 .000

From the above analysis it is clear the calculated value is 108.700 degree of freedom is 1 where greater than the table value (3.841). Hence null hypothesis is accepted, so alternative hypothesis H1 is rejected: there is significant association between marital status and price.

2. Level of significance between Marital Status and Quality. H0-there is significant association between marital status and quality. TABLE NO 4.2 marital status Chi-Square(a,b) Df Asymp. Sig. 1.000 1 .317 Quality 90.600 4 .000

From the above analysis it is clear the calculated value is 90.600, degree of freedom is 1 where greater than the table value (3.841). Hence null hypothesis is accepted, so alternative hypothesis H1 is rejected: there is significant association between marital status and quality

53

3. Level of significance between Marital Status and Loyalty programs. H0-there is significant association between marital status and loyalty programs. TABLE NO 4.3 Marital status Chi-Square(a,b) Df Asymp. Sig. 1.000 1 .317 Loyalty programs 33.700 4 .000

From the above analysis it is clear the calculated value is 33.700, degree of freedom is 1 where greater than the table value (3.841). Hence null hypothesis is accepted, so alternative hypothesis H1 is rejected: there is significant association between marital status and loyalty programs.

4. Level of significance between Marital Status and Price. H0-there is significant association between monthly income and price. TABLE NO 4.4 Monthly income Chi-Square(a,b) Df Asymp. Sig. 9.200 3 .027 Price 108.700 4 .000

From the above analysis it is clear the calculated value is 108.700, degree of freedom is 3 where greater than the table value (7.815). Hence null hypothesis is accepted, so alternative hypothesis H1 is rejected: there is significant association between monthly income and price.

54

5. Level of significance between Marital Status and Quality. H0-there is significant association between monthly income and quality. TABLE NO 4.5 Monthly income Chi-Square(a,b) Df Asymp. Sig. 9.200 3 .027 Quality 90.600 4 .000

From the above analysis it is clear the calculated value is 90.600, degree of freedom is 3 where greater than the table value (7.815). Hence null hypothesis is accepted, so alternative hypothesis H1 is rejected: there is significant association between monthly income and quality 6. Level of significance between Monthly income and Customer Care. H0-there is significant association between monthly income and customer care. TABLE NO 4.6 Monthly income Chi-Square(a,b) Df Asymp. Sig. 9.200 3 .027 Customer care 38.900 4 .000

From the above analysis it is clear the calculated value is 38.900, degree of freedom is 3 where greater than the table value (7.815). Hence null hypothesis is accepted, so alternative hypothesis H1 is rejected: there is significant association between monthly income and customer care.

55

7. Level of significance between Monthly income and Loyalty programs. H0-there is significant association between monthly income and loyalty programs. TABLE NO 4.7 Monthly income Chi-Square(a,b) Df Asymp. Sig. 9.200 3 .027 Loyalty programs 33.700 4 .000

From the above analysis it is clear the calculated value is 33.700, degree of freedom is 3 where greater than the table value (7.815). Hence null hypothesis is accepted, so alternative hypothesis H1 is rejected: there is significant association between monthly income and loyalty programs.

8. Level of significance between Monthly income and Promotional offers. H0-there is significant association between monthly income and promotional offers. TABLE NO 4.8 Monthly income Chi-Square(a,b) Df Asymp. Sig. 9.200 3 .027 Promotional offers 29.600 4 .000

From the above analysis it is clear the calculated value is 29.600, degree of freedom is 4 where greater than the table value (7.815). Hence null hypothesis is accepted, so alternative hypothesis H1 is rejected: there is significant association between monthly income and promotional offers.

56

9. Level of significance between Monthly income and Food Bazaar. H0-there is significant association between monthly income and food bazaar. TABLE NO 4.9 Monthly income Chi-Square(a,b) Df Asymp. Sig. 9.200 3 .027 Food bazaar 36.320 3 .000

From the above analysis it is clear the calculated value is 36.320, degree of freedom is 3 where greater than the table value (7.815). Hence null hypothesis is accepted, so alternative hypothesis H1 is rejected: there is significant association between monthly income and food bazaar.

10. Level of significance between Monthly income and Home and Fashion. H0-there is significant association between monthly income and home and fashion. TABLE NO 4.10 Monthly income Chi-Square(a,b) Df Asymp. Sig. 9.200 3 .027 Home and fashion 34.000 3 .000

From the above analysis it is clear the calculated value is 34.000, degree of freedom is 3 where greater than the table value (7.815). Hence null hypothesis is accepted, so alternative hypothesis H1 is rejected: there is significant association between monthly income and home and fashion.
57

11. Level of significance between Monthly income and Apparels. H0-there is significant association between monthly income and apparels. TABLE NO 4.11 Monthly income Chi-Square(a,b) Df Asymp. Sig. 9.200 3 .027 Apparels 52.400 3 .000

From the above analysis it is clear the calculated value is 52.400, degree of freedom is 3 where greater than the table value (7.815). Hence null hypothesis is accepted, so alternative hypothesis H1 is rejected: there is significant association between monthly income and apparel.

12. Level of significance between Monthly income and Footwear Bazaar. H0-there is significant association between monthly income and footwear bazaar TABLE NO 4.12 Monthly income Chi-Square(a,b) Df Asymp. Sig. 9.200 3 .027 Footwear bazaar 30.480 3 .000

From the above analysis it is clear the calculated value is 30.480, degree of freedom is 3 where greater than the table value (7.815). Hence null hypothesis is accepted, so alternative hypothesis H1 is rejected: there is significant association between monthly income and footwear bazaar.

58

13. Level of significance between Monthly income and Electronic Bazaar. H0-there is significant association between monthly income and electronic bazaar. TABLE NO 4.13 Monthly income Chi-Square(a,b) Df Asymp. Sig. 9.200 3 .027 Electronic bazaar 12.960 3 .005

From the above analysis it is clear the calculated value is 12.960, degree of freedom is 3 where greater than the table value (7.815). Hence null hypothesis is accepted, so alternative hypothesis H1 is rejected: there is significant association between monthly income and electronic bazaar. 14. Level of significance between frequently do you Shop at Big Bazaar and Monthly income H0-there is significant association between frequently do you shop at big bazaar and monthly income. TABLE NO 4.14 Frequently do you shop at big bazaar Chi-Square(a,b) Df Asymp. Sig. 43.200 4 .000 9.200 3 .027 Monthly income

From the above analysis it is clear the calculated value is 9.200, degree of freedom is 4 where greater than the table value (9.488). Hence null hypothesis is accepted, so alternative hypothesis H1 is rejected: there is significant association between frequently do you shop at big bazaar and monthly income.
59

15. Level of significance between how long purchasing the loyalty card at Big Bazaar and Price. H0-there is significant association between how long purchasing the loyalty card at big bazaar and price. TABLE NO 4.15 How long purchasing the loyalty card at big bazaar Chi-Square(a,b) Df Asymp. Sig. 61.840 3 .000 108.700 4 .000 Price

From the above analysis it is clear the calculated value is 108.700, degree of freedom is 3 where greater than the table value (7.815). Hence null hypothesis is accepted, so alternative hypothesis H1 is rejected: there is significant association between how long purchasing the loyalty card at big bazaar and price.

16. Level of significance between how long purchasing the loyalty card at Big Bazaar and Quality. H0-there is significant association between how long purchasing the loyalty card at big bazaar and quality. TABLE NO 4.16 How long purchasing the loyalty card at big bazaar Chi-Square(a,b) Df Asymp. Sig. 61.840 3 .000
60

Quality

90.600 4 .000

From the above analysis it is clear the calculated value is 90.600, degree of freedom is 3 where greater than the table value (7.815). Hence null hypothesis is accepted, so alternative hypothesis H1 is rejected: there is significant association how long purchasing the loyalty card at big bazaar and quality.

17. Level of significance between how long purchasing the loyalty card at Big Bazaar and Variety. H0-there is significant association between how long purchasing the loyalty card at big bazaar and variety. TABLE NO 4.17 How long purchasing the loyalty card at big bazaar Variety

Chi-Square(a,b) Df Asymp. Sig.

61.840 3 .000

68.900 4 .000

From the above analysis it is clear the calculated value is 68.900, degree of freedom is 3 where greater than the table value (7.815). Hence null hypothesis is accepted, so alternative hypothesis H1 is rejected: there is significant association between how long purchasing the loyalty card at big bazaar and variety.

61

18. Level of significance between how long purchasing the loyalty card at Big Bazaar and Accessibility. H0-there is significant association between how long purchasing the loyalty card at big bazaar and accessibility. TABLE NO 4.18 How long purchasing the loyalty card at big bazaar Accessibility

Chi-Square(a,b) Df Asymp. Sig.

61.840 3 .000

25.900 4 .000

From the above analysis it is clear the calculated value is 25.900, degree of freedom is 3 where greater than the table value (7.815). Hence null hypothesis is accepted, so alternative hypothesis H1 is rejected: there is significant association between how long purchasing the loyalty card at big bazaar and accessibility.

62

19. Level of significance between how long purchasing the loyalty card at Big Bazaar and Loyalty programs. H0-there is significant association between how long purchasing the loyalty card at big bazaar and loyalty programs. TABLE NO 4.19 How long purchasing the loyalty card at big bazaar Loyalty programs

Chi-Square(a,b) Df

61.840

33.700

Asymp. Sig.

.000

.000

From the above analysis it is clear the calculated value is 33.700, degree of freedom is 3 where greater than the table value (7.815). Hence null hypothesis is accepted, so alternative hypothesis H1 is rejected: there is significant association between how long purchasing the loyalty card at big bazaar and loyalty programs.

63

20. Level of significance between how long purchasing the loyalty card at Big Bazaar and Promotional offers. H0-there is significant association between how long purchasing the loyalty card at big bazaar and promotional offers. TABLE NO 4.20 How long purchasing the loyalty card at big bazaar Promotional offers

Chi-Square(a,b) Df Asymp. Sig.

61.840 3 .000

29.600 4 .000

From the above analysis it is clear the calculated value is 29.600, degree of freedom is 3 where greater than the table value (7.815). Hence null hypothesis is accepted, so alternative hypothesis H1 is rejected: there is significant association between how long purchasing the loyalty card at big bazaar and promotional offers.

64

CHAPTER 5
5.1. FINDINGS:
Most (75%) young stars are going to big bazaar. Most (54%) respondents are male. Most (55%) respondents are married. Most (52%) respondents are from a joint family. Big bazaar should include more of branded products in its product c a t e g o r y so as to attract the brand choosy people to come into b i g bazaar. Most respondents are having their occupation of business, than others are visiting big bazaar. Most respondents are having their monthly income of below 20000 INR. All the respondents are awared of the loyalty card. Most respondents are shopping at once or in month and once in three months at big bazaar.
Most respondents are giving first preference to visit big bazaar for low cost, high quality,

wide variety, location and customer service. Majority of the respondents are satisfied with the prices set at the big bazaar. Most respondents are satisfied with the accessibility of the big bazaar. Most respondents are satisfied with the customer service of the big bazaar. Most respondents are satisfied with the loyalty programs of the big bazaar. Most respondents are satisfied with the promotional offers of the big bazaar. Most respondents are giving first spending preference to food bazaar, home & fashion, apparels, footwear bazaar and household. Mega events like great Indian shopping festival has great impact inattracting customer to purchase more and more Most respondents are spending the amount per visit below Rs.5000 in the section of home & fashion.

65

Most respondents are spending the amount per visit below Rs.2000 in the section of apparels. Most respondents are spending the amount per visit below Rs.1000 in the section of footwear bazaar. Most respondents are spending the amount per visit below Rs.10000 in the section of electronic bazaar. Most respondents are spending the amount per visit above Rs.5000 in the section of furniture bazaar. Big bazaar follow rule of GAPACT G - Greeting the customer A - approach the customer P - purpose about the product A - Add on sales C - closing the deal T - thanks

5.2. SUGGESSTIONS
As majority of respondents are influenced by loyalty programe in general, the firm need to improve it in order to attract more customers to visit. Customers should be made aware of the loyalty card but they dont know how to use, so the big bazaar wants to give the n number of loyalty programs to the customers. Many respondents are not sure whether the loyalty card is useful to them or not and more felt its not useful to them. So, the value of the reward points has to be increased or the amount has to be decreased. As most of the respondents are students, special offers focusing on them can be done.

66

5.3. CONCLUSION
B i g b a z a a r i s a m a j o r s h o p p i n g c o m p l e x f o r t o d a y s c u s t o m e r s . I t i s a place where customers find variety of products at a reasonable price. Big bazaar has a good reputation of itself in the market. It has positioned itself in the market as a discounted store. It holds a huge customer base. T h e yo u t h generation also likes shopping and moving around big bazaar. It has been found that customers get influenced to visit big bazaar by the low cost and promotional offers that are offered. Customers are influenced by loyalty programmes in general, to visit retail outlets again. Customers are not aware about the benefits of the pay back card. Customers are not sure whether the pay back card is useful to them or not. Private brand like Milestone, Dreamline, Spunk are accepted by consumer due to good quality and reasonable price. T a r g e t achieved every week show that movement of product is good. Aggressive marketing is the key to increase market share in this area. Since market i s s t i l l u n t a p p e d . Discount and scehme decision are taken by the headquarters and new product is added time to time by the direction of category management. The report reveals that there is huge scope for the growth of organized retailing and improvement of Big bazaar.

67

BIBLIOGRAPHY Books:
1. Philip Kotler, Kevin Lane Keller, Abraham Koshy, Mithileshwar Jha, Marketing Management, 13th edition 2. Kothari C. R., Research Methodology Methods and Techniques, Second Revised Edition, New Age International Publications. 3. A New Brand World : Eight Principles for Achieving Brand Leadership in the Twenty-First Century - Scott Bedbury, Stephen Fenichell 4. Integrated marketing communications - Don Schultz 5. The Myth of Excellence: Why Great Companies Never Try to Be the Best at Everything is a book by Ryan Mathews and Fred D. Crawford.

Websites

1. http://search.ebscohost.com 2. http://www.wikipedia.com 3. http://www.Bigbazaar.com

68

ANNEXURE
A STUDY ON CUSTOMER SPENDING ATTITUDE AND IMPACT OF LOYALTY CARD AT BIG BAZAAR COIMBATORE QUESTIONNAIRE
Please fill up the following questionnaire correctly for my research purpose. 1) Name 2) Age Below 20 31-40 3) Gender Male 4) Marital status Married 5) Type of family Nuclear 6) No of dependent Below 2 3-4 7) Occupation Employee Business 8) Monthly income S Below 10000 20001-30000 10001-20000 Above 30000 Professional Student others 2-3 Above Joint family Unmarried Female 21-30 Above 40

9) Are you fully aware of the benefit of Loyalty card Yes No

10) If yes how long using loyalty card Below 1 years 3-4 years 1-2 years Above 4 years

69

11) Are you frequent shopper at big bazaar Yes No

12) If yes how frequently do you shop at big bazaar Once in a week Once in a month Once in a fortnight Once in three months Rarely

13) How long you have been purchasing at big bazaar with loyalty card Below 1 years 3-4 years 1-2 years Above 4 years

14) Why do you visit big bazaar please rank the reasons according to their importance (1-most important 9- least important) Low Cost High Quality Wide Variety Location Customer Service Loyalty Programs Promotional Offers Pleasant Ambiance Status

15) Level of satisfaction of loyalty card Factors Highly Satisfied Price Quality Variety Accessibility Customer Care Loyalty Programs Promotional Offers Environment Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied

70

16) Please specify your spending preference in the following sections (1-spending most .. 8-spending least) Food Bazaar Home and Fashion Apparels Footwear Bazaar Electronic Bazaar Furniture Bazaar Entertainment House Hold

17) Please mention the average amount spent per visit in each section Food Bazaar Home and Fashion Apparel Footwear Bazaar Electronic Bazaar Furniture Bazaar Below 100 Below 2000 Below 1000 Below 500 Below 5000 Below 2000 101-500 2001-5000 1001-2000 501-1000 5001-10000 2001-5000 501-1000 5001-7000 2001-3000 1001-2000 10001-15000 5001-7000 Above1000 Above7000 Above3000 Above2000 Above15000 Above 7000

18) Do you think it is useful to us Useful Not sure Some Extend Useless

19) Do you use the loyalty card every time you shop Always Rarely Mostly Never Use

71