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Tom Sears Photo SupporTIng All ThAT IS locAl For oVer 24 yeArS!
White Mountain National Forest Offers Young Rangers Program Again This Year______
The beaver is the largest North American rodent, ranging in weight from 30-100 pounds. Their
large webbed hind feet are adapted for swimming, and their broad, flat, leathery tail serves as
a rudder and propeller. Although their ears are small, beavers have excellent hearing. Beavers
close their ears and nostrils while under water. Beaver teeth, including their bright orange inci-
sors, grow continuously. - Duane Cross Photo (www.duanecrosspics.com)
In New Hampshire - Bath, Benton, Bethlehem, Bristol, Campton, Canaan, Dalton, Dorchester, East Haverhill, Easton, Franconia, Glencliff, Groton,
Haverhill, Hebron, Landaff, Lincoln, Lisbon, Littleton, Lyman, Monroe, North Haverhill, North Woodstock, Orford, Piermont, Pike, Plymouth,
Rumney, Sugar Hill, Swiftwater, Thornton, Warren, Waterville Valley, Wentworth, and Woodsville. In Vermont - Bradford, Corinth, Fairlee, Groton,
Newbury, South Ryegate and Wells River
Northcountry News PO Box 10 Warren, NH 03279 603-764-5807 www.northcountrynewsnh.com
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In This Issue
Bermans Bits........................A4
Pic of the Week..........................A4
North Country Happenings....A5
Earth Talk................................A6
Adventures of Homesteading....A7
Keeping Each Other Well.............A7
- PULL OUT SECTION B -
Hiking W/Tom & Atticus ........B1
Restaurant Guide....................B2
Real Estate .............................B3
Northcountry Cookin................B3
Letters & Opinions.................B4
Puzzles.....................................B5
Comics.....................................B6
Classified Ads.........................B7
Business Directory.........B8-B15
Church Directory.....................B8
Thunder Ridge
Ranch, LLC
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Celebrate
Our
Independence
Trout Take Flight To New Hampshires
Remote Ponds_________________________
As fishing season continues, a
great way to get away from the
crowds is to seek refuge at a
remote trout pond trout, where
you'll find some of the states
best fishing. Generally, I hike
into these ponds starting in mid-
May, but with late snow melt
and ice-out, some of these
opportunities began a little later
this year. My rule of thumb is
when the blacks flies approach
unbearable levels, its time to
grab your Deet, float tube, a
light-weight fly rod and rubber
boots and pack a lunch for a day
on a remote pond. Brook trout
that have spent all winter under
the ice become voracious as the
first insects start to hatch and
surface activity with small
nymphs can be frenetic.
Every year, the New Hampshire
Fish and Game Department
contracts a helicopter to stock
remote ponds from Sunapee to
Pittsburg. During this one-day
event, which this year took
place on June 20, 2013, some 48
remote ponds are stocked with
brook trout fingerlings from
New Hampton Hatchery,
according to Fish and Game
Departments Chief of Inland
Fisheries Jason Smith. Fish
stocked last June should have
reached 5-6 inches in most
areas, with 2-year-olds reaching
12 inches or better. In fact, just
last week after a White
Mountain turkey hunt, an old
neighbor of Smith's revealed
some stories and photos from a
Story continues on page A3
fun learning experience.
Programs are scheduled for four
Tuesdays in July. On Tuesday,
July 9, US Forest Service,
Wildlife Biologist Clara Weloth,
will talk about Critters In Our
Woods, exploring different ani-
mals and how to identify them.
Former teacher Mike Callaghan,
will talk about the Clouds Over
Your Head, describing how and
why they are formed on July 6.
On July 23rd Forest Service
employee Candace Morrison
will present Everything A Tree
Hugger Wants To Know About
Trees. On July 30th Mike4
Callaghan returns to talk about
the evidence of Glaciers In Your
Backyard.
All programs are scheduled to
run from 9:30 10:45 a.m.
Children are invited to attend
The White Mountain National
Forest is pleased to announce
that a series of Young Ranger
programs will be offered again
this summer. Programs for
youngsters who have completed
grades 1 4 will be held at
Forest Service Headquarters, 71
White Mountain Drive,
Campton, NH. These free edu-
cational sessions introduce chil-
dren to the wonders of the
Forest and are intended to be a
one session in the series, or
attend them all. Weather permit-
ting, part of each program is
held outdoors. Parents are
required to attend and group
size is limited to 8 children.
These free programs have been
enthusiastically received in the
past, so please reserve in
advance at White Mountain
National Forest: (603) 536-
6100.
page A-2 northcountry news July 5, 2013 www.northcountrynewsnh.com
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Bella Taylor
www.curtnrod.com
Think local,
Shop local, eat local,
Support local!
northcountry news
Supporting All
Things local
Since 1989.
Please Tell Our Advertisers That You Saw
Their Ad In The Northcountry News!
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We Hope You Enjoy The Paper.
ncnewsnh@gmail.com July 5, 2013 northcountry news page A-3

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603-764-9496
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September 2nd
Northcountry News
PO Box 10 Warren, NH 03279
Phone & Fax 603-764-5807
Email: ncnewsnh@gmail.com
Web: www.northcountrynewsnh.com
The NORTHCOUNTRY NEWS is published every other Friday by
Bryan E. Flagg and is circulated free of charge throughout the
towns and communities listed on the front page.
Publisher & Editor - Bryan Flagg
Advertising - Bryan Flagg / Pat Wilson
Delivery Fulfillment - LeeAnn Roberge
Office/Bookkeeping - Suzanne Flagg
This paper assumes no financial responsibility for
typographical errors, however we will reprint a correction
notice, and/or that portion of the ad in which the error occurs.
The Northcountry News is proudly published and printed in
New Hampshire using 65% recycled paper and soy based inks.
We are printed by Seacoast Media Group, Portsmouth, NH
Silver Center Hosts Professional Childrens Theatre_________
HEATHS
Greenhouse & Nursery
Organic from
the Beginning
Since 1972
Franconia & Sugar Hill, NH 750 Rt. 18, just off I-93
heathsgreenhouse.com (603) 823-8500
3 Flowering Poted Plants 3 Fresh Rainbow Eggs
3 Fruit Trees & Bushes Galore 3 Natural Pest Control
3 Fresh Organic Veggies & Herbs
Daily 9am to Closing
Lots Of
Flavors To
Choose From....
Continued from page A1
recent trip to one of these
remote ponds showing brook
trout approaching 18 inches! A
similar source rumored to have
caught one in excess of 3
pounds. Smith received no visu-
al evidence, but it was convinc-
ing enough for him to want to
go and investigate for himself.
The stocking of remote ponds in
the backcountry of New
Hampshire provides a unique
opportunity for those anglers
seeking a true wilderness expe-
rience. Serene, remote ponds
not only produce beautiful
brook trout with high catch
rates, but also give the outdoor
enthusiast a chance to view
wildlife, hike, camp, or simply
find solitude. Many of these
remote ponds are located off
popular hiking trails (ensure a
safe hike by following the rec-
ommendations at
ht t p: / / www. hi kesafe. com).
Anglers generally can backpack
a float tube and waders, or sim-
ply wade from shore. Also, early
spring water temperatures can
still be fairly cool, so Smith rec-
ommends insulated waders if
you have them. They are a little
bit heavier, but well worth it to
keep warm in the cool water.
A few of these remote ponds are
designated as fly fishing only,
so be sure to check the regula-
tions prior to your trip. For the
list of remote ponds that are
stocked, check the Fish and
Game website at
http://www.fishnh.com/Fishing/
trout_remote.htm.
Aerial trout stocking is made
possible through fishing license
sales, with support from the
Wildlife Heritage Foundation of
New Hampshire. To contribute
to this effort, visit
http://www.nhwildlifefounda-
tion.org; designate your dona-
tion for aerial trout stocking.
Trout Take Flight To New Hampshires
Remote Ponds_________________________
Papermill Theatre Actors at
PSU each Thursday through-
out Summer
The Silver Center for the Arts at
Plymouth State University hosts
professional actors from the
Papermill Theatre in Lincoln
throughout the summer, pre-
senting their repertoire of chil-
drens stories adapted for the
stage.
Performances are 2 p.m. each
Thursday. All seats (including
babes in arms) are $6 and the
shows usually sell out early.
The production for July 11 is
The Jungle Book. Excerpts from
a collection of stories by
English Nobel laureate Rudyard
Kipling Mowgli is in a whole
new worldone filled with
kind and cunning friends but
also dangerous enemies. Will he
learn to adapt or will he return
to the world he knows best?
Performances remaining this
summer are:
July 18 Alices
Adventures in Wonderland
July 25 The
Hunchback of Notre Dame
August 1 Rapunzel
August 8 Just So Stories
August 15 Hansel and
Gretel
The North Country Center for
the Arts Childrens Theatre has
been delighting audiences for
more than 20 years, with origi-
nal adaptations of fairytales and
folktales produced and created
for children of all ages. Shows
are approximately 40 minutes
long and appeal to adults, and
children three years and older.
Characters greet the audience in
the Silver Center lobby after
each show.
Call (603) 535-ARTS (2787) or
(800) 779-3869 for tickets, or
shop online at http://silver.ply-
mouth.edu. Convenience fees
apply to online orders.
Summer box office hours are
Monday through Friday, 11
a.m.4 p.m. and one hour
before performances.
General information about PSU
events is online at
T h i s W e e k @ P S U ,
ht t p: / / t hi sweek. bl ogs. pl y-
mouth.edu.
Think local,
Shop local,
eat local,
Support local!
Its The right
Thing To do..
northcountry
news
Supporting All
Things local
Since 1989.
Page A-4 northcountry news July 5, 2013 www.northcountrynewsnh.com
Bermans Bits
by Dave Berman
Northcountry News Picture Of The Week
This is great! Who says Nascar is just for silly humans?
Mercedes the cat wanted a front row seat for the show and
never got bored with the race!!! - Kevin Lamarre Photo
If you have a photo which you think could make it as our pic-
ture of the week, let us know. Email it to
ncnewsnh@gmail.com. Your picture could become our next
Picture Of The Week!
Piermont Plant Pantry
Rte. 25 Piermont, NH 603-272-4372
SALE CONTINUES
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Remember To Visit Us In Monroe
www.piermontplantpantry.com
by Suzanne Flagg
norThcounTry
cooKIn
Complete Eye Health and Vision Examinations
Contact Lenses - New Fittings & Replacements
Optical Shop Featuring Quality Frames & Lenses
Certified Optician On Staff
Appointments Available Monday Through Friday
dr. William S. Holmes and Associates
OPTOMETRiSTS
603-747-3190
50 Smith St. Woodsville, NH
WOOdSviLLE
EYE CARE CENTER
MAD RIVER ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES
At the Falls
Next To Things N Strings
441 NH Rt. 49 Campton, NH
Hours: Wed.-Sat. 9:30am-5:00pm
Sun. 9:00am-3:00pm
Looking for something specific or for more info
call Brenda or Tom: 603-254-9901
Incessantly scouring the uni-
verse for the weird, the wacky,
and the stupid so you dont
have to.
Greetings, and thanks for join-
ing me for another week. First,
something to do.... Police in
Germany say a man has con-
fessed to a staggering 700
shootings of passing vehicles
over the last five years. The sus-
pect, a 57-year-old truck driver,
was arrested after a massive
police operation involving
decoy trucks and license plate
detection devices across the
country, the Independent
reports. Police say the man
fired shots from the cab of his
truck at vehicles coming in the
other direction, causing multiple
traffic accidents and almost
killing one woman. The reward
for information leading to his
arrest was quadrupled to
$130,000 last year after he
switched from .22 inch ammu-
nition to 9mm.
Next, sometimes it does NOT
pay to advertise. A Dubuque
woman allegedly looking for
someone to kill her father turned
to Craigslist to find a possible
hire. The Dubuque County
Sheriffs Office said Megan
Schmidt, 23, posted an inquiry
that offered $10,000 for an
undisclosed job. When you
would respond to it, Hey, Im
interested, what do you have?
she would immediately inform
these people that she would like
her father killed, Lynn said.
She openly gives out the job
specifics to anybody that
responded. Lynn said several
people called authorities about
Schmidts ad. An undercover
officer responded to the post
and met with Schmidt.
Basically we came in and took
her up on her offer, Lynn said.
We made sure she was serious
about this. Schmidt was arrest-
ed and is at the Dubuque County
Jail on $50,000 cash-only bond.
Usually this is something that
takes place in a seedy bar or
something like that, Lynn said.
Who utilizes Craigslist?
[www.azcentral.com]
Finally, a hoof-hiker? A
Canadian Mountie gave a possi-
bly orphaned baby moose a ride
in a cruiser to an animal protec-
tion group that is caring for it.
The calf is about 3 or 4 weeks
old. Bonnie Harris of the
Gander Society for the
Prevention of Cruelty to
Animals, said, The moose was
crying out for its mom but no
sign of her. A couple of people
from the Glenwood area had
said that there were two moose
hit in the last week in that area,
so we assumed it was probably
mom that was hit. The young
moose was placed in the back of
a Royal Canadian Mounted
Police cruiser and taken to the
Gander SPCA where she
calmed down after slurping
down a gallon of milk. She
would never have had a chance
left out there, Harris said. Plans
are to transfer the moose to
Salmonier Nature Park.
[www.upi.com]
Roseland Community Hospital,
located in a bad neighborhood
in the South Side of Chicago,
Ill., is millions in debt and fight-
ing to stay open. Along with the
neighbors, community activists,
and employees pushing for help
to keep the hospital open is an
unlikely group: a street gang,
which says it will protest the
possible closing side-by-side
with other groups. Its bad
enough were out here harming
each other, said Don Dirk
Acklin, co-founder of the Black
Disciples gang. But then for
the hospital to close that can
help people that is innocent and
being harmed? Thats geno-
cide. City-wide, over Fathers
Day weekend there were at least
39 people shot in 15 separate
incidents, with at least seven
killed despite Chicagos
notoriously strict gun control
laws. [WMAQ]
Perhaps distantly related to the
last Bit: After the conclusion of
the kindergarten graduation at
the Michel R. White Elementary
School in Cleveland, Ohio, the
school had to go on lockdown
when a fight between two girls
was joined by numerous adults.
Eight people were arrested, and
police said the potential charges
could include aggravated riot-
ing. Parent Brianna Smith was
upset that the school where her
7- and 12-year-old children
attend had such an incident at
graduation. It makes me not
want to send them for the rest of
the school year, she said.
[Cleveland Plain Dealer]
A few music thoughts: I find
Mary McGregors Torn
Between Two Lovers disturb-
ing. I find With Pen in Hand
by Vikki Carr so very sad as
there is too much of that hap-
pening. I LOVE Paradise by
the Dashboard Light. I remem-
ber slow dancing to Sixteen
Candles with my cheek resting
against a beehive hairdo held up
by enough hairspray to deflect a
bullet. Suggestive, sexist line
from 1954s Sh-Boom: If you
do what I want you to Baby,
wed be so fine. And, finally
the true (and disappointing)
lyrics to Louie Louie (60s
kids will understand):
http://www.youtube.com/watch
?v=wx-8_GI4d2c
Finally, romantic? A Denver
man proposed to his girlfriend
by sticking 8,000 Post-It Notes
in her apartment, spelling out
Will You Marry Me? with dif-
ferent colors, according to
KUSA. Brett Beutler, who also
wrote I Love You on every
note, said it took him two
months to prepare the notes for
the project. Then he had his
mother and brother help put
them up while his girlfriend,
Megan Loosli, was at work.
Loosli said she was completely
in shock and described it as
both a ridiculous and awesome
gesture. She said yes and plans
to leave up the Post-it Notes
until they are married. [KUSA]
Later.
It wont be long before fresh
cherry tomatoes will be ready in
area gardens! YUM! These
recipes can be used as appetiz-
ers, side dishes or snacks for
children and guests.
Cucumber Stuffed Tomatoes
24 large cherry tomatoes
3 oz.cream cheese, softened
2 TBSP mayonnaise
cup finely chopped peeled
cucumber
1 TBSP finely chopped onion
1 TBSP finely chopped black or
green olives
salt, pepper, dill
Cut a thin slice off the top of
each tomato. Scoop out and dis-
card pulp; invert tomatoes onto
paper towels to drain. In a small
bowl, combine cream cheese
and mayonnaise until smooth;
stir in remaining ingredients.
Spoon into tomatoes.
Refrigerate until serving.
Cheesy Stuffed Tomatoes
1 pint cherry tomatoes
4 oz cottage cheese
cup shredded cheddar, moz-
zarella or monterey jack cheese
cup finely chopped onion
2 TBSP olive oil
2 TBSP red wine vinegar
1 TBSP dried oregano
Salt and pepper to taste
Cut a thin slice off the top of
each tomato. Scoop out and dis-
card pulp. Invert tomatoes onto
paper towels to drain. Combine
cheeses and onion; spoon into
tomatoes. In a small, whisk the
oil, vinegar, oregano, salt and
pepper. Spoon over tomatoes.
Cover and refrigerate until serv-
ing.
Tuna Stuffed Tomatoes
1 pint cherry tomatoes
1 can (12 oz) tuna, drained and
flaked*
4 oz shredded cheddar cheese
cup mayonnaise
1 celery stalk finely chopped
cup finely chopped onion
Bacon bits (optional)
Cut a thin slice off the top of
each tomato. Scoop out and dis-
card pulp. Invert tomatoes onto
paper towels to drain. Combine
remaining ingredients and
spoon into tomatoes and refrig-
erate until serving.
*Crabmeat (flaked and cartilage
removed can be substituted for
tuna)
Got A Recipe
Youd Like To Share in
NorthCountry
Cookin?
Email Us:
ncnewsnh@gmail.com
or send to: PO Box 10
Warren, NH 03279
Wed love to share
your great tasting
recipes with our
many readers!
ncnewsnh@gmail.com July 5, 2013 northcountry news page A-5
As Always - Thank You For Your Support
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page A-6 northcountry news July 5, 2013 www.northcountrynewsnh.com
Its What The
Locals Read!
Northcountry
News
Read By
Thousands!
Research at Rumneys Quincy Bog are reveals lots about the past. Above, core samples are taken during the winter months and studied. Please see full story below.
- NCN Courtesy Photos
Spotlight On Science: What Research At Rumneys Quincy Bog Reveals About The Past____________________
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Green Mountains!
Quincy Bog Natural Area may
be best known as a local spot
that provides opportunities for
recreational walking, observing
plants and animals and attend-
ing organized programs and
walks for residents and visitors
in the Pemi-Baker area. But its
educational mission extends fur-
ther with partners. Local teach-
ers run field trips with younger
students hoping to earn a Jr.
Naturalist Badge. University
researchers bring students to
apply their academic learning
and research techniques to ques-
tions in a real-world setting.
Dr. Lisa Doner is one such
researcher using the Bog as a
teaching tool. Doner is a mem-
ber of the Center for the
Environment and the
Department of Environmental
Science and Policy at Plymouth
State University. Recently she
led a group of future scientists
to conduct field research and
collect samples from under-
neath the ice at Quincy Bog, in
the middle of winter. During the
following semester, students
began a basic analysis on the
collected material at the sedi-
mentology lab on the Plymouth
State University campus.
What secrets are hidden in the
layers of mud, sand and clay
beneath the Quincy Bog in
Rumney? First a couple of defi-
nitions to ground the reader. The
students used methods from two
branches of science called pale-
oecology and paleolimnology.
Paleoecology is the branch of
ecology that deals with the
interaction between ancient
organisms and their environ-
ment. Paleolimnology is the
study of ancient lakes from their
sediments and fossils. The pri-
mary method used in this study
is analyses of physical charac-
teristics of the sediments under-
lying the pond at the Quincy
Bog. This includes each sam-
ples density, ratio of mineral to
organic material, particle-size
and tendency to respond to
weak magnetic fields.
Two kinds of cores were collect-
ed: a surface core, that captures
the delicate interface between
the water and the sediments, and
a long core. The surface core
is important, says Dr. Doner,
because it holds recent sedi-
ments. It forms the bridge, in
essence, between our written
record and the geologic record,
since they overlap in time. She
continued to explain that the
surface might contain a
record of recent beaver dam
expansion, Quincy Bog Road
construction and development
projects, and floods that
occurred in the last century. The
long core, according to Doner,
is a sequence of 1-meter-long
cores.
The long core provided several
surprises, reported the
researcher. First, it seems that
the pond at the Bog has been
around for a very long time and
that beaver are not the sole rea-
son for the area being a wetland.
Second, the long core contains
materials near the bottom that
are consistent with glaciers that
passed through New Hampshire
12,000 years ago. Therefore
Doner surmises the core must
contain at least 12,000 years of
geologic memory.
The last surprise comes from
preliminary analysis of the sur-
face core. In recent times, per-
haps within the last 150 years,
explains Doner, an enormous
disturbance, or multiple distur-
bances, changed the character of
the site.
Before she can tell us more
about these disturbances, Doner
needs to learn the age of the sed-
iments involved. With the help
of a grant from the Geological
Society of America, two under-
graduate environmental science
students will use lead dating
techniques which provides a
timeline for events of the past
150 years. Doner says, Having
information about the age of the
sediments will allow us to look
at the deposits laid down during
1927, 1936, 1938, 1973 and
1989, to determine if the histor-
ically large floods in these years
left a mark in the Bogs sedi-
ments. Other possible explana-
tions will be reviewed as well as
the cores continue to be studied.
Additional dating is underway,
using radiocarbon analyses to
provide ages covering thou-
sands of years.
To read more about this interest-
ing project check out the current
volume of Bog Notes at
http://www.quincybog.org/bog-
notes.htm .
Quincy Bog volunteer Dan
Kemp has prepared a documen-
tary of this activity and it can be
viewed on the Quincy Bog web-
site at
http://www.quincybog.org/pho-
togallery.htm .
ncnewsnh@gmail.com July 5, 2013 northcountry news page A-7
Nature Tracks
Be Part Of Our
Home & Real Estate Section
Call Us Today! 603-764-5807
NORTH HAVER-
HILL, NH- Well away
from busy Rt. 10, on
very nice level half acre
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of heating cost !
Featuring a lovely mod-
ern kitchen, lots of living
area up and downstairs,
with 2 full baths, 2 car
garage and mini garage
for the toys. Quiet attrac-
tive neighborhood. Reduced. $157,500.
HAVERHILL, NH- Vintage Cape Built 1850. Located in
Haverhill Corners. Features- sitting area with a brick hearth
and woodstove, Nice size Living Room, 4 Bedrooms, 1
Baths, pine floors some wide plank, fully insulated and rewired,
Lot 0.41 level beautiful property. Needs some TLC. $79,500.
NORTH HAVERHILL, NH- Lovely 7 Room Ranch situated
on level 3.11 Acres. Living Room, Dining Area and Kitchen
with a very open concept and vaulted ceiling, 3 Bedrooms , 2
Baths. Rear yard with variety of fruit trees. Two good size
sheds, 2 car attached garage, full basement and generator.
Nicely landscaped level property. Move right in . $187,000.
LISBON, NH- Great Opportunity. Spacious 4 Bedroom
Colonial with a front porch. Features include a Eat in Kitchen
w/plenty of cabinets, first floor master bedroom, living room,
1
st
floor laundry, 2
nd
floor 3 Bedrooms, some hardwood floors,
walk up attic for storage, work shop, 2 car detached garage and
more. Fixer upper. Why Rent. Reduced $35,000.
LISBON, NH- All the charm of a traditional New England
Home- 2100 sq. ft, 10 Rooms, 4 Bedrooms, 1 baths.
Entertain in the 28 x 149 Living Room with large windows
very bright and airy also a fireplace which makes the room
cozy, formal Dining Room, wonderful pantry with glass faced
cabinets, 1
st
floor office, lavish maple floors, 3 bay garage with
plenty of overhead storage, business opportunities with all zon-
ing options. Lot 0.96. Excellent condition. Reduced $156,500.
www.Davis RealtyNHVT.com
davisrealty1958@gmail.com
139 Central Street,
Woodsville, NH 03785
(603) 747-3211
Bath Public Library
Announces Grant
Award_____________
Majestic custom built log home Irom British Columbia with
stunning mountain views built to the highest standards. The
home has stunning mountain views oI the mountains Irom the
wrap around porch, beyond the property's open Iield. This home
has logs around 24inches in circumIerence and some oI the logs
span up to IiIty Ieet long. The home Ieatures higher than aver-
age wooden ceilings throughout and hard wood Iloors, and
plenty oI open space making it the perIect home Ior entertain-
ing. Inside it Ieatures Iour bedrooms, a den, great room, a loIt,
eat in kitchen & Iour Iull bathrooms. The great room has a large
Iield stone chimney with one oI two wood burning stoves. In
addition to this there is a separate downstairs two bedroom one
bathroom in law apartment. There is a detached three car garage
and the whole house has a European radiant heating system.
Currently the property is priced at less than what it cost to build
it at only $599,000
Please call Francis to view the property at
617-835-2067 or 603-787-2315
WE WELCOMELiSTiNGS
COMMERCiAL&RESidENTiAL
Barbara Currier - Broker
Clinton Clay, Assoc. Broker
Bill Waldrip, Assoc. Broker
Kim Gould - Sales Assoc.
Joan M.Clay, Sales Assoc.
603-968-7796
Corner of Rte. 3 & 175 Holderness, NH
Mon-Fri 9-4 Sat 10-3 Sun by apt.
pineshoresllc.com
WARREN, NH $62,500
This home is located on
a country lot, off a pri-
vate road. Open con-
cept with an eat- in
kitchen, and outside
patio. The home has 2
out buildings for your
tools. Snuggled in at the
foot hills of the White
Mts. hour from Loon
Mountain for skiing.
Close to walking trails.
The nearby Baker River swimming holes make this a
great 4 season retreat.
WARREN, NH $99,000
Very private location,
located at the end of a
private road, natural
landscaped, W/flower
beds every where,
including garden area,
large deck,and out
buildings. The house
has custom made
counter tops in the
kitchen. Open concept,
lots of wood for a real
country feel, laundry area, muti heating systems,( elec-
tric, wood and propane). Come watch the wildlife and
take in the fresh air. Price to Sell. Being Sold As Is.
Hello folks and welcome to this
weeks edition of Nature
Tracks...
PUBLIC MEETING SET
REGARDING PROPOSED
STOCKING OF WALLEYE
IN MOORE RESERVOIR
The New Hampshire Fish and
Game Department will hold a
public informational meeting at
6 p.m. on July 22, 2013, at the
Littleton Opera House, 2 Union
Street, Littleton, N.H., to dis-
cuss the proposed stocking of
walleye into Moore Reservoir.
Moore Reservoir is an
impoundment on the
Connecticut River in the com-
munities of Littleton and
Dalton, New Hampshire; and
Waterford and Concord,
Vermont.
At the session, fisheries biolo-
gists will provide background
on the proposed stocking activi-
ties, and there will be an oppor-
tunity for public comment and
questions. This meeting will ini-
tiate the compliance process
with the National
Environmental Policy Act,
which is overseen by the U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Service.
"Walleye are currently only
found in the Connecticut River
from below the McIndoes Dam
in Monroe, N.H., downstream
into Massachusetts and
Connecticut. Creating a fishery
for them in Moore Reservoir
will be a welcome opportunity
for North Country and
Northeast Kingdom anglers,"
said Gabe Gries, a fisheries
biologist with the New
Hampshire Fish and Game
Department.
This proposed stocking is a
cooperative effort between the
New Hampshire Fish and Game
Department and the Vermont
Fish and Wildlife Department.
Walleye fingerlings would be
raised at the Vermont Fish and
Wildlife Departments Bald Hill
Fish Culture Station (Newark,
VT) with the first stocking pro-
posed for 2014. It is likely that
over time, a successful self-sus-
taining walleye population in
Moore Reservoir will also natu-
rally populate the two down-
stream reservoirs (Comerford
and McIndoes) that currently do
not contain walleye.
"Moore Reservoir has the
potential to produce trophy
walleyes due to its excellent
habitat and abundant forage,"
said Jud Kratzer, a fisheries
biologist with the Vermont Fish
and Wildlife Department.
If you are unable to attend the
public hearing but still wish to
comment on the proposal, email
your comments to Gabe Gries at
Gabriel.Gries@wildlife.nh.gov
or call 603-352-9669.
For directions to the Littleton
Opera House, visit
http://www.littletonareacham-
ber.com/opera_house.php
Fisheries research and fish
stocking activities in New
Hampshire are funded by fish-
ing license sales and the federal
Sport Fish Restoration program,
funded by an excise tax on the
purchase of fishing tackle and
motorboat fuels
"If you talk to the animals, they
will talk with you and you will
know each other. If you do not
talk to them you will not know
them, and what you do not know,
you will fear. What one fears, one
destroys..."
..............Chief Dan George
Thank you for joining us this
week. Until the next time, as
always, please take time to enjoy
the natural world around you.
The Bath Public Library has
received a grant from the New
Hampshire Humanities Council
to present Maggie Stier, The
Old Man of the Mountains:
Substance and Symbol, Friday,
July 26th, 2013 at 7:00 pm at
the Bath Village School.
The story of the Old Man of the
Mountain in Franconia Notch is
a story of New Hampshire itself,
reflecting history, the arts, liter-
ature, geography, philosophy
and public policy. Maggie
Stiers illustrated talk reveals
the ways that this iconic place
has sparked observers imagina-
tions, attracted intense personal
commitment, and symbolized
changing public sentiment. Stier
details the threats to the Old
Man and Franconia Notch that
led to protection as a State Park
and, later, to the construction of
the Franconia Notch Parkway.
She concludes with an analysis
of what caused the fall of the
Old Man in 2003, a summary of
private efforts to create a memo-
rial, and a discussion of how
this unique natural phenomenon
may be remembered by future
generations.
The audience is invited to bring
souvenirs, memorabilia or other
artifacts of the Old Man of the
Mountain for a shared display
before and after the program,
and to share their own experi-
ences and memories on the
topic.
This program is free and open to
the public.
For more information, contact
the Bath Public Library at 747-
3372 or e-mail
bathlibrary@together.net.
Your
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News
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Towns And
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page A-8 northcountry news July 5, 2013 www.northcountrynewsnh.com
North Country Happenings...
Think local,
Shop local, eat local
northcountry
news
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Things local
Since 1989.
Warren Masonic Hall - breakfast
from 7-9 on the first Sunday of
each month. Hope to see you
there.
-----------------------------------------
Breakfast - All you can eat, 2nd
Sunday of each month from
7:30-10am at the Masonic Hall,
North Haverhill, NH. $5adult;
$2.50 child.
-----------------------------------------
The Warren/Wentworth Food
Pantry, serving residents in
Warren, Wentworth and Glencliff,
is located behind the Warren
Wentworth Ambulance Service
building and is open every Friday
from 1 p.m. - 3 p.m. For eligibility
information or to make a dona-
tion, stop by or call 764-5265. The
pantry gratefully accepts food or
monetary donations as well as
donations of personal and house-
hold care items.
-----------------------------------------
Scottish Country Dancing, every
Wednesday evening, from 7:00
to 9:00 p.m. in the Fairlee Town
Hall, Route 5, Fairlee Vermont.
Cost is $3.00. All dances are
taught, no partner is necessary,
beginners are welcome. For more
information, call (802) 439-3459.
-----------------------------------------
Nightly Entertainment Indian
Head Resort, Lincoln
745-8000
www.indianheadresort.com
Woodstock Inn, Station & Brewery
745-3951, Lincoln.
www.woodstockinnNH.com
-----------------------------------------
Every Saturday Afternoon Wine
Tasting at Abbey Wine Cellars, 78
Main St, Lincoln. Saturdays 2-
5pm.
-----------------------------------------
Haverhill Memorial Post 5245 and
their Ladies Axillary hold their reg-
ular monthly meeting at 7pm on
the third Thursday of each
month at the VFW Post in North
Haverhill. All members are invited
to attend.
-----------------------------------------
Piermont Parents meeting the
Challenge NAMI (National
Alliance on Mental Illness) support
group meets the 1st and 3rd
On-Going Events
Wednesdays of each month, 7-
9pm at the Horse Meadow Senior
Center, North Haverhill, NH.
Please Call Rebecca Ladd at 603-
989-5476 or email at
rrladd@myexcel.com with any
questions.
-----------------------------------------
For all upcoming events at D
Acres - (D Acres is located at 218
Streeter Woods Road in
Dorchester, NH.) Visit
www.dacres.org.
-----------------------------------------
Beginner line dancing - Starr
King Fellowship, Plymouth, NH.
Sundays 4-5pm ($5.00 donation
requested) Contact: George @
536-1179 or
maloof@plymouth.edu
-----------------------------------------
If you have any talent at all, come
join us on Thursday Evenings,
Open Mic Night, at the
Greenhouse Restaurant in Warren,
NH. Come by to listen or join in!
Junction of Routes 25 & 25-C in
Warren, NH. Support our area
musicians. Come join us!
-----------------------------------------
To find out the on-going happen-
ings at the AMC Pinkham Notch
Center where programs are free &
open to the public: AMC Pinkham
Notch Visitor Center, Route 16,
Pinkham Notch, NH. For more
information contact the AMC at
(603) 466-2727 or www.out-
doors.org.
org or call them at: 603-869-9736.
-----------------------------------------
For ongoing schedule at Silver
Center for the Arts, Plymouth,
NH, call 603-536-ARTS or visit
them on the web at:
www..plymouth.edu/silver
-----------------------------------------
Wentworth Historical Society
meets monthly, 7:00 p.m, every
third Thursday, April - Dec. at
the Historical Society Museum in
Wentworth. Join us for historical
topics and stimulating conversa-
tion.
-----------------------------------------
The Baker's River Grange meets
the 2nd and 4th Friday every
month, 7:30 p.m., Grange Hall,
Rte.25, Rumney. Visitors wel-
comed!
-----------------------------------------
Gentle Yoga - Saturdays 8:30-
9:30; Wednesdays 5:00-6:00pm
at Starr King Fellowship,
Plymouth,NH. Contact Darlene
Nadeau 536-1179.
-----------------------------------------
Vinyasa Yoga every Tuesday
evening from 5:30-6:30 at Alumni
Hall in Haverhill, NH. starting
June 4. For more information visit
www.sundaymountainyoga.com or
email
sundaymountainyoga@gmail.com.
The Jefferson Fireman's
Association will be having one of
it's "Famous All You Can Eat"
breakfast on Sunday, July 7, from
7AM to 11 AM at the Odd Fellows
Hall on Rte 2 in Jefferson. Adults
$8.00 5-12 $4.00 under 4 free.
The menu will be pancakes, blue-
berry pancakes, scrambled eggs,
ham, bacon, sausage, home fries ,
home baked beans, many home
baked pastries. REAL MAPLE
SYRUP. Come have a great time!
-----------------------------------------
ELLSWORTH, NH, SUNDAY,
JULY 7, at 3:00 p.m., The Chapel
of St. John of the Mountains will
meet under the direction of Pastor
Ray Hahn. The choir of the
Wentworth Congregational
Church will present a cantata, The
Name Of Jesus. A pot-luck
cook-out will follow the service at
the home of Judy and Bing
Rodgers on Ellsworth Hill Road,
Campton. Bring a dish to share.
On July 14, the guest speaker will
be Rev. Robert P. Farah, Pastor of
the Center Harbor Christian
Church. Refreshments and fellow-
ship will follow. The Chapel is
non-denominational, and is open
to all. The Chapel is located 4 1/2
miles up Ellsworth Hill Road from
the intersection of Routes 3 and 49
(Campton Exit 28 off I-93).
Phone Pastor Ray Hahn at 536-
4308 for information.
-----------------------------------------
All You Can Eat Breakfast Buffet
Sunday, July 7, 7:30 a.m. -- 9:30
a.m. at the United Congregational
Church of Orford, Main Street
10:30 a.m. Worship, Orfordville
building. Scrambled eggs, bacon,
pancakes, homemade donuts and
muffins. Donations will be grate-
fully accepted.
-----------------------------------------
Prouty Virtual Kyle Mooney 5K
July Events
Memorial Walk in Warren, NH.
On Saturday, July 13th at 7am the
5k walk will start at the Fish
Hatchery in Warren, go around
Lund Lane, go once around the
Common, then back to the Fish
Hatchery. For Pre-registry, call
Janice at 603-764-9949 or DOnna
at 603-764-9469. Monies go to
Prouty in Kyle Mooneys name.
you can register online at www.the-
prouty.com. Click on register but-
ton and go from there.
-----------------------------------------
Warren Old Home Days - July 12,
13, 14th. Warren is Celebrating 250
years this seaon! Hope to see you
there!
-----------------------------------------
Church Supper at Campton
Baptist Church on Saturday, July
13th form 5-7. Spag. Supper. Spag.
with meatballs, salad, garlic bread,
dessert and bev. Adults $7;
Children $3 5 and under free.
-------------------------------------------
Lobster Bash at Warren Old Home
Days, Noon, Saturday, July 13th.
Lobster, steamers, corn on the cob,
potato, and punch - $22.00; Soda
$1.00. Limited number available.
To pre-buy tickets, please call 764-
9494 or 764-9316. To benefit the
Warren-Wentworth Ambulance
Service.
-----------------------------------------
Dorchester Going Places - Annual
fundraiser for the Dorchester
Grange #280 Scholarship Fund
Featuring a Mountain Bike-A-
Thon, Walk & Run-A-Thon,
Antique Car Show, and a Pancake
Breakfast. July 20 (rain-date July
21), from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Dorchester Town
Common/Dorchester Town Hall
(just off Route 118 on Town
House Road in Dorchester, NH)
For more information, visit our
website at
DorchesterGoingPlaces.org, email
Info@DorchesterGoingPlaces.org
or call 603-795-2726. Pre-registra-
tion for this fun-for-all-ages, fami-
ly-friendly event is encouraged..
-----------------------------------------
Vacation Bible School will be held
July 15-19 at Trinity Church of the
Nazarene in North Haverhill.
The theme for the week will be
"Deep Sea Adventure - Exploring
the Depth of Jesus' Love."There
will be Bible lessons, sea creatures,
games, snacks, and more.
Ollie the Octopus and Sally the
Seahorse will be on hand to help
the children learn about Jesus. The
time is 6:30 - 8:00 pm each night
and children ages 5-12 are invited
to attend. Younger children may
attend if accompanied by their par-
ent throughout the evening. There
is no charge to attend. Trinity
Church of the Nazarene is located
just off Rt. 10 next to the Grafton
County Complex
-----------------------------------------
Warren & Wentworth Libraries
2013 Garden Tour, Saturday, July
20 from 10am 4pm and Sunday,
July 21 from Noon 4pm. To ben-
efit the Joseph Patch Library in
Warren and the Webster Memorial
Library in Wentworth. Call the
Joseph Patch Library at 764-9072
or the Webster Memorial Library
at 764-5818
Wentworth Market Day, August 3
Market Day has been an ongoing
event held the first Saturday in
August for 38 years. Don't miss
this year! Join us in the town com-
mon, 9:00 - 4:00 for: live music,
Juggling Jim, Face painting,
Spinning, games, crafts, great food,
and much more. This is a well
attended event and vendors are
welcomed to rent a table for $10.
Contact Ellie, 764-9352
elmurray@roadrunner.com or
Martha 764-5256
morrillm@gmail.com.
-----------------------------------------
Campton Area Resource Center
2nd Annual Campton & Thornton
Market Day (Townwide Yard Sale/
Crafters/ Farmers Market) on
Saturday August 24th from 9AM
to 2PM
For more information or to regis-
ter contact: Michelle Bilodeau 254-
4028 or carcnh@gmail.com.
-----------------------------------------
2013 Warren/ Wentworth
Libraries second annual Garden
Tour scheduled for Saturday, July
20 and Sunday, July 21.
-----------------------------------------
Monthly Bereavement Support
Group Last Wednesday of
each month at 5:30 to 7:30pm at
Pemi-Baker Community Health.
June 26th, July 31st, August 28th,
September 25th, October 30th,
November 27th and December
18th (change due to holiday). Free
of Charge. Call Abigail at 536-
2232 ext. 305 for more informa-
tion.
Future Events
The Adventures
of
Tom & Atticus
norThcounTry newS
norThcounTry newS
letters & opinions legal notices help wanted restaurant guide letters & opinions legal notices help wanted restaurant guide
classifieds puzzles & comics Business & church director y events classifieds puzzles & comics Business & church director y events
For Advertising Information call 603-764-5807 email: ncnewsnh@gmail.com For Advertising Information call 603-764-5807 email: ncnewsnh@gmail.com
Visit us online At www.northcountr ynewsnh.com Visit us online At www.northcountr ynewsnh.com
Section B Section B
Section B 16 Page Pull Out
- Tom Ryan Photo
For those who follow Tom &
Atticus on their adventures.
Mojo Moose Gear now has
official Following Atticus
long and short sleeved t-shirts
along with coffee/tea mugs on
sale online at:
www.mojomoosegear.com.
Really nice gear!
Check it out.
You can always follow and
keep tabs on Tom and Atticus
by visiting their blog regularly
at:
tomandatticus.blogspot.com.
Free Tasting Samples
1400 Route 117 Sugar Hill, NH 03586
Visit our online store at:
www.HarmansCheese.com 823-8000
Starting May 1st.
Open:
7 Days a Week:
9:30 am - 5 pm
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Ship 2 pounds of Harman's Really-Aged Cheddar
anywhere in the USA for only $26.00.
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Quality Building Products At A Discount!
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North Haverhill, NH
1-800-488-8815
We Have
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& So Much More!
Shop Local...
burningbushwarrennh.com
We Are
Revamping Our
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including Some
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BURNiNGBUSH
HOME CENTER
230 NH Route 25
Warren, NH
764-9496
There is never a time when I'm
alone in the woods, thanks to
my four-legged talisman. He
leads, I follow, until, that is, we
come to a trail junction and he
wants to know which path we
will take next. Then he looks at
me expectantly, waiting for me
to point either right or left. As
great as it is to have Atticus for
company, Im even more
blessed because my hiking part-
ner is the best kind of company
silent; and he takes as much
joy in the woods as I do. Ralph
Waldo Emerson liked the
church best when it was empty.
I am the same way with the
woods: reverence through soli-
tude.
On Sunday morning, it was bit-
terly cold and we were early
enough to have the woods to
ourselves. The only sounds
were the crunch of frozen leaves
underfoot, an occasional melan-
choly birdsong, the rhythm of
my breathing and the wind hiss-
ing through the trees. The plan
was for a quick hike along the
Morgan-Percival loop in
Holderness overlooking Squam
Lake before heading over to
Newfound Lake to join two of
my brothers for lunch.
However, after the mild mean-
derings of the lower portion of
the trail and the short steeper
section in the last portion of the
Mt. Morgan Trail, I changed my
mind.
Atticus sat by a trail junction
sign: Straight ahead (and up) to
Mt. Morgan (0.4 miles and
eventually over to Mt. Percival);
or left to Mt. Webster (1.4
miles) along the Crawford
Ridgepole Trail. Because we
were now higher and more
exposed and the wind was
strong enough to make me pull
my balaclava over my head and
cover everything other than my
eyes and we were in a hurry, the
logical thing would have been to
climb Mt. Morgan and then hop
over to Mt. Percival and finish
the loop with plenty of time to
get to my brother's. But a funny
thing happens to me in the
woods even when they are
naked and so cold it's uncom-
fortable to stand still for more
than a minute. I become a child
again.
I'd never been to Mt. Webster
(nor even heard of it) and decid-
ed it would be a fine time to go.
And so Atticus and I followed
our hearts instead of our plans
and headed to points unknown.
The trail rolled pleasantly along
through the November woods
and we walked quickly in the
cold, dark shadows of the ridge
to the south with little protection
from the bitter wind coming
from the north. Soon, ice crys-
tals formed on my eyebrows and
eyelashes. If there had been
snow on the ground it would
have passed for the heart of win-
ter instead of the Sunday before
Thanksgiving.
While alone with Atticus in the
frozen woods with gusts bearing
down on us something wild was
awakened in me. It had to do
with making the choice to leave
a warm bed and the Sunday
paper behind to be out in ele-
ments most would never ven-
ture out in and until three years
ago I wouldn't have either. We
were suddenly as feral as our
surroundings, out in untamed
world, and perversely I found
comfort in my discomfort. It
came from withinand with-
out. For the woods were frozen
and harsh but still seemed to
pulse with unseen life; just as
my body did under several lay-
ers of clothing.
A friend of mine recently
described a feeling she had deep
within when she was moved to
tears by something warm and
beautiful and unexpected. It
wasn't a pang in her heart but
lower, but not in her gut either;
perhaps, I surmise, it was in her
soul. That's what it was like for
me on Sunday morning. I felt a
pang in my soul standing on the
mountainside and thought of
something the painter Andrew
Wyeth said: "I prefer winter and
fall, when you feel the bone
structure in the landscape the
loneliness of it the dead feel-
ing of winter. Something waits
beneath it the whole story
doesn't show."
There's something about there
being more to the story, to the
mystery of nature and what hap-
pens when we become part of
the story simply by participating
in it.
I could write on and on, I sup-
pose, about how we eventually
found the spur path to the sum-
mit of Mt. Webster and then
two-tenths of a mile later found
a nice outlook with a view down
on the lake and over towards
Whiteface's snowy white face
and the pointed peak of
Chocorua. Or I could tell you
how when we turned back and
made it to the summit of
Morgan that there was a river of
ice along the trail and we had to
rock and root hop our way to the
top and when we reached it we
sat shielded from the wind in a
warm sun overlooking a bril-
liant Squam Lake rippled by the
wind. However, to me the day
was defined by a whimsical
decision to stray from the route
and we found ourselves enjoy-
ing this most unlikely weather
on a lesser-used portion of trail.
It is special indeed when you
find yourself graced to become
part of what you love, as wild as
the wind and as primitive as the
mountainside itself. And we
were there not because we went
with friends or because I was
checking it off this or that list
but simply because something
within stirred me out of bed and
urged me on. It is the story of
why we go to the woods in the
first place, even as children. It is
the feeling of being part of
something not available to us
anywhere else but in the forest.
Some of our best journeys out-
side take me inside. Such is the
simple and uncomplicated joy
of being in the woods.
Section B page 2 northcountry news July 5, 2013 www.northcountrynewsnh.com
NOTICE OFEARLY
DEADLINE!
We will have an early deadline for our
next publication! The deadline will be
Thursday by Noon on July11th.
Two reasons: We are involved with the
Warren Old Home Days Which Start on
Friday July 12th and Computer Program
Updates. Thanks For Understanding...
Letter To The Editor___________________
- Notices, Letters, Opinions, Help Wanted, & More! -
NOTICE!
Additional Letters
Appear On
Next Page, B3
Hebron Gazebo Program Schedule 2013____________________
Letter To The Editor___________________
White Mountains Community College To
Host Writers And Book Festival________
NOTICE
All Letters To The Editor
Are Printed On Space
Availability, And A
First Come Basis.
We Reserve The Right
To Refuse Letters
Deemed Inappropriate
For Our Readership.
The views and opinions
expressed in the letters
&opinions section are
not necessarily those
of the paper or
its employees.
Northcountry News
Now Celebrating Over 24 Years!
Thank You For Making It Possible!
We Truly Appreciate It!
After wondering why so many
bear are running through our
campground, mobile home park
and laundromat area, we were
finally told that someone has
been feeding the bear in town
for 11 years!!
There was no fine imposed, in
fact there was no "punishment"
at all. I am bewildered by this.
We now have to go to great
expense and there will be a loss
of business for us, because of a
problem someone else created.
They certainly did not do the
bear families any favors. They
are so tame that they have been
going onto porches, decks and
near people's sites. They are not
a threat, but from what we
understand, their future is
bleak.
I guess I do not understand why
the persons responsible, do not
have to be held accountable and
how this could have gone on for
11 years. We are not the only
place affected by this problem,
these bears are running all over
town, several sightings a day.
When will people be held
responsible for their own
actions? This is illegal in New
Hampshire and a $1,000.00 fine
should have been imposed, but
for some reason it was let go
and now our whole area has to
deal with the fallout.
What a shame for all the resi-
dents and most of all, the poor
bear that will have their lives
cut short because of someone
who did not think about the way
this story will end.
Truly a sad story.
Carole Clark
Warren, N.H.
We regret that we well no longer
be collecting for Liberty House.
We hope you all well support
Liberty House financially as
well.
Please send a check to :
Liberty House 75 W. Baker St.,
Manchester NH 03103
Hopefully someone else will
continue to collect and provide
the things for our Veterans that
you all have done in all the
years past.Thank you.
So on behalf of Liberty House
and its Veterans, for this
Summer Collections and all oth-
ers, we would like to thank you;
Joanne Ross, Darlene Oaks and
her supporters, Dorchester;
Rumney Baptist Church an its
parishioners, Nancy Kolb, Ed &
Marge Mitchell, Rumney; Brent
& Marcia Johnson, Wentworth:
CARC, Cheryl Molton,
Campton, Donna Bagley, and
supporters, Warren; Liz Stygles,
Windfall Clothing, Orford: Russ
& Carol Clark, Mike Welch, Bill
& Anne Perry, N.Woodstock;
Mike Leclerc, Floyd Cawley,
Blue Green Resorts, Lincoln,
Holderness Baptist Church and
their parishoners; Lancaster
VFW, Lucille Cameron,
Lancaster, and for those who
just dropped things off, couldn't
have done it without your help.
And for our Newspapers who
kept you all "up to date" on our
Veterans, NorthCountry News,
Warren, Salmon Press
Newspapers /The Courier News,
Littleton, Record Plymouth,
Glenn Press,
Lincoln/Franconia.
Thank you all.
Roland & Nancy Leclerc,
North Woodstock, NH
The town of Hebron is pleased
to announce the 2013 Gazebo
Program. Once again this year
the concerts will be held at the
Hebron Common Saturday
nights starting at 6pm. The first
concert is on June 22 and the
band that evening is 60s
Invasion, who will be playing
the music of the 60s in their
own special way. The BBQ that
evening will be done by
Newfound Grocery. The next
concert is on July 6 and the band
that evening is Club Soda play-
ing rock and roll with the BBQ
by the Hebron Historical
Society and dessert provided by
the Cabin Fever group.60s and
70s rock will be in the air when
Postage Due takes the stage on
July 13 with the BBQ by
Newfound Grocery. The
Common will be grooving to
the beat of the Mango Groove
Steel Band on July 20th with the
Hebron Store supplying the
BBQ for that night. August
17th will end the concert series
with Family Fun Day! The day
starts out with a hike at 11am by
the Hebron Conservation
Commission Hike led by
Suzanne Smith leading a 2 mile
hike on the NEW Cockermouth
Ledge Trail in the Hebron Town
Forest. Plan on meeting at the
entrance to the Town Forest on
Groton Road at 11 am. Bring
lunch and water for a picnic on
the ledges. The hike would be
rated easy by White Mountain
standards. There are uphills but
nothing steep and no rocky
ledges to climb. For more infor-
mation, contact Suzanne at
744-9064.
Following that there are three
events at 2pm. The ever popular
Cribbage Contest which will be
held at the Gazebo starts the
afternoon off, and if you are
interested in purchasing some
books to read at the beach or at
your cabin or possibly at home
the Hebron Library Book Sale
also begins at the same time.
There is also going to be a State
Police Canine Demo held on the
Common. At 4pm please be sure
to have your dessert entries
turned in for the Dessert Contest
and at that time there will also
be Kids Games on the Common.
At 5pm Paul Connor and
Friends will perform while
everyone enjoys the bbq by the
Hebron Fire Department. Back
by popular demand at 7pm is the
Don Campbell Band performing
classic country music and many
of his original songs Fireworks
by Northstar Fireworks will
commence at 9 pm. The Hebron
Gazebo Programs are sponsored
by the taxpayers of Hebron,
Northway Bank, and donations
from individuals and organiza-
tions. FREE POPCORN thanks
to Bill White Realty. Any
Questions please call 744-3335.
NOTICE
This year, three groups will join
to present the White Mountains
Writers and Book Festival in
Berlin. The event will be hosted
September 28 by the White
Mountains Community College,
which is lending its facilities to
accommodate the Festival.
Now in its third year, the
Festival started at the Northern
Forest Heritage Park in con-
junction with North Country
Writers Night Out, a group that
meets monthly in Berlin and the
New Hampshire Writers
Project (NHWP), which organ-
izes writers groups around the
State.
The Festival has greatly
expanded since the first summer
workshops and Literary Flash
Competition were held at the
Northern Forest Heritage Park
in 2011. The 2012 gathering
included a morning of work-
shops, an afternoon keynote
address by television personali-
ty Fritz Weatherbee, and the
Literary Flash: Three Minutes
to Fame competition, which
was judged by a panel of three
independent visiting writers.
Vendors included local artists,
writers, artisans and an antique
book appraiser.
This years gathering will run
from 9:00 a.m. till 3:00 p.m.
September 28. The event will
include workshops, guest speak-
ers and vendors of arts, crafts
and books of local interest. The
concluding event will be writers
reading for the Literary Flash
competition, the first stop to the
New Hampshire state-wide
competition hosted by the
NHWP. The format must be an
original story that can be read in
3 minutes or less. Selections
must be pre-registered and will
be judged by a panel as well as
audience applause.
While there is a fee for the
workshops, the Festival is open
to the public. For further infor-
mation, please contact Tamara
Allen at taallen@ccsnh.edu.
Remember, Save the Date
September 28
ncnewsnh@gmail.com July 5, 2013 northcountry news Section B page 3
- Notices, Letters, Opinions, Help Wanted, & More! -
Letter To The Editor________________________________________ Nobody Asked, Just My Opinion________
NOTICE!
Additional Letters
To The Editor
Appear On
Previous Page, B2
NOTICE
Of Deadline
To view and print a
complete listing of our
deadlines & publication
dates, simply visit
our website.
northcountrynewsnh.com
HELPFUL HINTS & ANNOUNCEMENTS!
The pantry is located under the ambulance service
and is open Fridays from 1-3 PM.
A Reminder To Existing or New Pantry Clients: In the month of July,
we will be certifying/recertifying your qualification for Food Pantry
Emergency Assistance. A notice will be included in your next food box.
You will need to bring and remember the following: Recipients 18
years and older MUST present a driver's or non driver's license, and
show proof of residency (Rent or Mortgage agreement or Electric/Fuel
bill). All other forms need to be approved by the Pantry Coordinator.
You must provide birth dates and names of all persons under the age
of 18 and complete and sign the USDA Eligibility Form.
(Ad sponsored by Northcountry News)
Warren Wentworth Food Pantry News
Another couple of weeks and
another couple weeks of crazy
summer weather. Nothing new!
Ihave spoken to several local
people, received a couple of
phone calls and even received a
Letter To The Editor concerning
the context of this weeks col-
umn.
It seems that there are some
people who will just never get it
when it comes to leaving the
local wildlife alone.
Meaning, why is it that some
people have this great need and
desire to have to feed the local
bear population?
I mean, if Wooly Mammoths, T-
Rex or a Velociraptor was
roaming the local woods, would
you run out to feed them also?
Then why do you deem it neces-
sary to feed the deer and the
bear population?
I am a huge wildlife advocate. I
love the local wildlife. Thats
why I live where Ido. However,
as a wildlife lover, I do not feed
the local population! Do you
truly understand that all you are
ultimately doing is setting them
up for inevitable failure and
ultimate death?
Sorry folks, but thats the way it
is. Theres a reason why we
should not, and are told not to
feed the bear population. Its
just not a good scenario for the
bears.
Yes, feeding the birds, when we
can is fine. Ido that, but take
down my feeders when Ishould.
Here at my home alone, we have
at the very least, seven different
bear consistently visiting. Some,
so friendly you could probably
train them to hang out your
clothes! Is that what you really
want?
We just had a family on our
deck, knocking over our grill.
The local campgrounds are hav-
ing problems keeping them
away from dumpsters and peo-
ple. They are becoming way to
comfortable around people, and
shouldnt be!
Like Istated earlier, the ulti-
mate outcome is simply not
good. The problem bears, which
become that way because you
are feeding them, will be put to
death. Period. Is that what you
really want?
Why cant you just enjoy the
wildlife you may see walking
about, but leave it at that. Those
cute cuddly bear you are feed-
ing dont have a chance if you
keep it up! Please stop!
If nothing else sticks in your
head - remember this - A fed
bear is a dead bear!
Just stop!
Nobody asked,
Just my opinion!
BEF
Free and Fair Trade For A
Strong Global Economy
The Framers of the Constitution
mandated free trade among all
the states in the union. The free
economic system for the United
States was clearly spelled out in
Article I, Section 9 of the
Constitution.
"No tax or duty shall be laid on
articles exported from any state.
No preference shall be given by
any regulation of commerce or
revenue to the ports of one State
over those of another: nor shall
vessels bound to, or from, one
State, be obliged to enter, clear,
or pay duties in another."1
The original concept of free
trade is healthy for our country
and global economy. However,
trade agreements such as
NAFTA and WTO have simply
cost Americans hundreds of
thousands of jobs, moved plants
to Mexico and lowered wages
for American workers. How has
this helped America?
It's good economy for us to sell
to China, India and the rest of
the world. It's good for
Americans to have the choice to
buy from other countries. This is
good competition. It's not good
competition if China does not
play by the rules. If China is
using slave labor and manipu-
lating their currency so they can
sell merchandise cheaper, that is
not fair. If they are putting
unfair taxes on our products so
that they are not competitively
priced in China, that must stop.
It's not good when American
corporations ship our jobs to
Mexico, China and the far cor-
ners of the world. Corporations
who ship our jobs overseas
should continue to pay the cur-
rent corporate tax if more than
30% of their work force is out of
the country. On the other hand if
corporations will keep at least
70% of the jobs in the United
States then let's reward them
with a 15% tax rate.
Toyota, Honda and Nissan have
made the American auto indus-
try stay on their toes. I believe
we have great American cars
today. I drive a Ford truck and
an old Toyota van with over
250,000 miles on the odometer. I
do not believe we would have
the kind of American cars that
we have today without the com-
petition of foreign automakers.
As Americans we deserve the
right to choose which car we
want to drive. Competition gives
us better choices.
I do not mind that China and
India are making clothes and
furniture. I do mind if American
corporations are moving all of
our work there and hiring peo-
ple for two dollars an hour and
then shipping the products back
here to the United States to sell
to us for a high price and a high
profit.
The Amish are still proving
Americans can make the best
furniture in the world. We make
our products in America better.
Our corporations must be given
a chance to thrive. If our corpo-
rations are going to thrive we
should further do the following:
We should lower corporate tax
rates.
We must encourage right to
work policies.
We must have the opportunity to
ship our products to China,
India and around the world.
We can compete with the world.
We have hard workers and the
most creative minds on the plan-
et. Our labor force can compete
with anybody.
Other nations impose large fees
on our products to restrict their
citizens from buying our prod-
ucts and that is unfair. We
should not do business with
countries that limit our ability
to sell in their countries by
imposing ridiculous fees and
taxes. It's also unfair of
us to impose tariffs and fees on
foreign products to make it diffi-
cult for Americans to buy.
It's good for American compa-
nies to have competition and
Americans should have the right
to decide if they want to buy a
foreign product without govern-
ment penalty or management.
American products will only
become better and remain
financially competitive if there
are foreign products to choose
from.
Most Americans would prefer to
buy American products. At
every opportunity we should
buy American made products.
Examine the product carefully
as it seems to be harder all the
time to find items made in the
USA. Most all Americans are
trying to make their money
stretch further. Products that are
lower in price are going to have
our attention when we shop.
When we buy we each have to
be responsible for our own
money management and try to
determine what is good, better
and best for our hard earned
dollars.
.
http://www.usconstitution.net/xc
onst_A1Sec9.html
By Glenn Mollette
Glenn Mollette is the author of
American Issues, Every
American Has An Opinion and
nine other books. He is the
author of hundreds of articles
and features. Hear him each
Sunday night on XM radio 131
at 8 EST.
Find him on
www.facebook/glennmollette.co
m or email him directly at gmol-
lette@aol.com
Section B page 4 northcountry news July 5, 2013 www.northcountrynewsnh.com
north country
dining guide
north country
dining guide
Two Restaurants Under One Roof
TEXAS TOAST & PIGS EAR BBQ
Located At The Village Shops Rt. 112 Lincoln, NH
603-745-9977 www.LincolnVillageShops.com
Locally Owned & Operated by Proprietors, Mary Lynn & Don Landry
We are closed Tuesdays
Open the other 6 days from 8am-4pm til 8pm Fri & Sat
Just A Couple Of Our Many Tasty
Breakfast Specialties...
Pesto Brusheta
Two poached eggs, baqutte, Romas,
parmesan, Hollandaise
Stuffed French Toast
Texas Toast, strawberries, bananas
& cream topping
Or For Lunch Or Dinner Check
Out These Menu Samplings!
Pigs Ear 5 Star Sandwich
Smoked pulled pork, garlic buttered
toast, BBQ sauce
Smokeshack Sampler
Ribs, Beef, Pork, Chicken
Great meal for two!
Woodstock Inn
Station & Brewery
Route 3, Main Street North Woodstock
745-3951 www.WoodstockinnNH.com
Please Visit Us Online For The
Latest Specials, Entertainment &
Goings Ons!
Listen to music, gossip and drink
Wicked Organic Joe Coffee.
Made with local spring water.
The area's largest
collection of Classic Vinyl in NH.
A splendid time is
guaranteed for all
Mojo Headquarters
603.823.5697
Main Street Franconia, NH
At The Common Warren, NH
603-764-5288
Beer & Wine & Full Liquor Lic. M/C & Visa
Monday through Thursday 6am-2pm
Fri . 6am -8pm Sat. 6am -11pm Sun. 8am -2pm
Support Your Local
Restaurants... Cheers!
Gillys Restaurant
Serving Breakfast & Lunch
With That Homemade Touch
Open Every Day
M-F 6am-2pm Sat 6am-1pmSun 6:30am til Noon
603-744-2321
322Lake St. Bristol, NH
Tenney Mtn. Highway Plymouth, NH
536-6330 or 536-9869 (yumy)
HOURS: Open Daily At 11am
All-U-Can-Eat Days!
(While Supplies Last - Served Until 7:30pm)
MONDAY - Shrimp & Cup of Chowder
TUESDAY - Hickory Smoked Barbecue Ribs
WEDNESDAY - Haddock & Cup of Chowder
GREAT LUNCHEON SPECIALS!!
Tuesday is SENIOR CITIZEN DAY 15% Off
(Age 60 or over excludes all you can eat & other specials)
FISH FRY FRYDAY - Golden Fried Haddock
Inc. cup of chowder, salad, potato & veg. $11.95
Youre
Going To
Love Our
Chowder!
We Have
Beer &
Wine
Right off Exit 26 in Plymouth, NH. Only 20
Min. South of The Kancamagus Hwy.
Check Out Our Summer Menu!
All You Care To Eat Fish Fry!
Friday Eves $10.79
(tip & gratuity not included)
Karaoke Every Saturday Eve 8-11pm
Thank you to all who donated, helped with, and
attended this years Make A Wish Benefit.
It is truly appreciated!
Pizza Subs Dinners
Homemade Calzones
Biggest Subs In Town
536-3865
Hours: Monday - Saturday 11am-10pm Sunday 12-10pm
We Deliver...
Exit 28 Pizza 726-4901
Summer Patio Area...
Pizza Subs Salads
Dinner Menu
Eggplant & Chicken Parmesan
Fish & Chips
Hours: Mon - Thurs 11-9 Fri & Sat 11-10 Sun 12-9
Campton Corners 25 Vintinner Road Campton, NH
We
Deliver
Wed - Sun
Did
you know?
You can pay for and
send us your classified
ad online from
our website?
northcountrynewsnh.com
Its that
simple!
You Could Be Here!
This Size - This Spot
Full Color = $25/issue!
603-764-5807
Gift Certs.
Available
ncnewsnh@gmail.com July 5, 2013 northcountry news page 5
northcountry news k For The Fun of It!
F F F F puzzle Answers Appear on page B-7 F F F F
1. LANGUAGE: What's anoth-
er word for "legerdemain"?
2. SCIENCE: What is studied in
the science of speleology?
3. MOVIES: Who had the star-
ring role in "Mr. Deeds Goes to
Town"?
4. PRESIDENTS: Which presi-
dent banned segregation in the
armed forces?
5. FOOD: What is the main
ingredient in sauerkraut?
6. HISTORY: Which Mexican
revolutionary said, "It is better
to die on your feet than live on
your knees"?
7. COMICS: Who was the edi-
tor of The Daily Planet in
"Superman" comics?
8. GEOGRAPHY: What body
of water lies between the island
of Sardinia and mainland Italy?
9. SPORTS: What is Yogi
Berra's real name?
10. GENERAL KNOWL-
EDGE: Which news anchor
wrote the book "The Camera
Never Blinks"?
Answers Bottom Right.
T r i v i a T e s t A n s w e r s
A n s w e r s
1 . S l e i g h t o f h a n d
2 . C a v e s
3 . G a r y C o o p e r
4 . H a r r y T r u m a n , i n 1 9 4 8
5 . C a b b a g e
6 . E m i l i a n o Z a p a t a
7 . P e r r y W h i t e
8 . T y r r h e n i a n S e a
9 . L a w r e n c e P e t e r B e r r a
1 0 . D a n R a t h e r
( c ) 2 0 1 3 K i n g F e a t u r e s S y n d . ,
I n c .
YOUR
NORTHCOUNTRY
NEWS
Its What The
Locals Read!
Section B page 6 northcountry news July 5, 2013 www.northcountrynewsnh.com
northcountry news k For The Fun of It!
Northcountry Puzzle Answers
ncnewsnh@gmail.com July 5, 2013 northcountry news Section B page 7
north country classified Ads
2007 CIRRUS 31 CAMPER - Tow
behind, rarely used, loaded, a/c, tv,
queen size bed. Blue book i sup to 14k,
will sell for $9,500. Call 603-764-5288
for more information. (tfn-jh)
---------------------------------------------------
FOR SALE - SOFA - light beige, 3
cushion, comfy. $100.00; COMPUTER
DESK with storage....like new...
$75.00; MAPLE BED - queen - $100.00
- excellent condition; ANTIQUE CHINA
CABINET/BOOK CASE ,glass door,
one drawer $250.00; ANTIQUE
SEWING DESK - folding top - $100.00.
May be seen at 139 Breezy Pt Rd...
764-9979-764-9398. Please call to
make appt. All items negotiable.(tfn-p)
---------------------------------------------------
TOYO STOVE - Model 30, 5 to 15,000
BTUs, thermostaticlly controlled, vent
pipe, 55 gallon drum and stand includ-
ed. $325. Call 603-838-2458. (rts 7/05)
---------------------------------------------------
UNIQUE T-SHIRTS
Including Mount Moosilauke, hiking,
Tom & Atticus, and more!
Check out our website at
www.mojomoosegear.com.
Some really neat local stuff!
We do custom stuff too!
Mojo Moose Gear
Warren, NH
603.764.9134
PROFLOWERS - Send Bouquets for
Any Occasion. Birthday, Anniversary or
Just Because! Take 20 percent off your
order over $29! Go to
www.Proflowers.com/Enjoy or call 1-
877-466-9831 (TFN)
---------------------------------------------------
SHARI`S BERRIES - Order
Mouthwatering Gifts for Any Occasion!
SAVE 20 percent on qualifying gifts
over $29! Fresh Dipped Berries starting
at $19.99! Visit www.berries.com/easy
or Call 1-888-862-0107 (TFN)
NEW ENGLAND
OUTDOOR FURNACES
Central Boiler wood and pellet
furnaces. Save up to $1,600.
Call 866-543-7589
(tfn)
--------------------------------------------------
EPA Clean Burn Furnaces
Empyre Wood Boilers
Indoor & Outdoor
Call Steve
888-933-4440 x339
for local dealer
(7/5)
-
3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH, 1800 sq. ft.
MODULAR HOME - 1.75 acres,
attached garage, heated breezway,
alarm, remodeled kitchen and bath.
FORSALE
HOMEHEATiNG
GiFTS
REAL ESTATE
Asking $139,900. Please call 303-808-
4290. (7/5)
---------------------------------------------------
THETFORD VERMONT - 1982 double
wide, 90s upgrade, brick exterior, new
roof, 2 skylights, new windows. Interior
needs TLC, 3 brs, 1 1/2 baths, large
kitchen - dining, newer deck, 1.9 acres.
$106,000. 802-333-9671. (7/5)
---------------------------------------------------
SUGAR HILL - 2.6 ac lot on Streeter
Pond w/ 300 Ft shared lake front. Great
trout fishing, views of pond and West of
the mountains. App. septic and drive-
way cut. $85,000. Owner at 315-834-
9784. (11/11)
AVAILABLE NOW, a recently renovat-
ed one bedroom, one bathroom third
story apartment with washer & dryer.
Heat, plowing, trash included. Tenant
pays electric. No pets. No smoking.
Rent $550 per month. Located at 2994
Dartmouth College Hwy North
Haverhill. Please call Dan at 603-616-
7536. Photos available on craigslist ID
#: 3876247540 (tfn-dw)
---------------------------------------------------
TWO STORY, RECENTLY RENOVAT-
ED TOWNHOUSE for rent at 2994
Dartmouth College Hwy in North
Haverhill, NH. Two bedrooms, one full
bathroom including heat, trash, wash-
er/dryer, and plowing. Tenant pays
electric. No pets. $650 per month.
Available now. Call Dan at 603-616-
7536. (tfn - dw)
WHEELCHAIR LIFT FOR SALE - for
full size van or small bus. Power lift and
floor. Braun Corp. Model L20 Series
03. All parts included. Very good condi-
tion. $600 or BO. Call (603) 764-5835.
(tfn-sh)
DISH NETWORK. DISH TV Retailer.
Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.)
& High Speed Internet starting at
$14.95/month (where available.)
SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY
Installation! CALL Now! 1-800-297-
0813 (TFN)
SENiORS/HEALTH
TELEviSiON SERv.
RENTALS
FACT:
The Only Ad That
Never Works,
Is One That Was
Never Placed!!!
SUMMER IS HERE
SPECIAL!
CLASSIFIED AD COUPON!
Buy One Classified Ad and
get a second week FREE!*
*Will Run The Same Ad once. (Classified Line Ads Only.)
*Does Not Include Run Until It Sells Ads.
*Private Party Classified Ads Only!
Enclose This Coupon With Ad Form on this page
Offer Expires Thursday, July 17, 2013
Northcountry News Warren, NH 603-764-5807
VOLUNTEER DRIVERS NEEDED:
Transport Central is actively recruiting
volunteer drivers to transport seniors
and disabled to medical appointments.
If you have a few hours to donate, and
a passion for helping, please give us a
call. Mileage reimbursement at 55.5
cents/mile. Drivers must complete a
criminal background check, a DMV
check, and provide proof of insurance.
If you are interested or would like more
information, please contact Transport
Central at 855-654-3200 or 603-536-
4101. www.transportcentral.org.
ATTENTION!!! COLLECTORS,
CRAFTERS, ARTISTS, DESIGNERS:
We are accepting quality consignment
items for a new, eclectic, re-sale
shop/gallery opening at Alton Bay on
Lake Winnipesaukee. Looking for col-
lectables, retro & antique items, re-pur-
posed, recycled and hand crafted items
including: metal ware, yard art, taxi-
dermy, dcor & furniture, vintage cloth-
ing, textiles, wood items, leather works,
steam punk creations, art, jewelry, folk
WANTEd
volunteers Needed
PO Box 263
Pike, NH 03780
Lois 802-439-6280
info@twinstatehs.com
www.twinstatehs.com
Serving both sides of the
Connecticut Rver
Brought To You By Twin
State Humane Society &
The Northcountry News
Mobile Home Owners Wanted
Swiftwater Estates Cooperative Inc. Pioneer Rd, Bath, NH
Resident-Owned Community
603-747-2155
If you are looking for a place to re-locate your mobile home, or
place a new one this is the place you have been looking for.
Swiftwater Estates is a 16 unit park situated on 13.17 acres in the
town of Bath on town water and its own septic sysytems. The
park is located in a rural area south of the village of Swiftwater,
on the east side of Route 112, also known as Wild Ammonoosue
Road. It has easy access to Interstates; I- 91 and I- 93, 10 min-
utes from local Hospital, Shopping, and Restaurants, within the
Bath, Woodsville school district. Dogs and cats welcome.
$265.00 per month. First and last months rent required upon
approval and $100.00 Cooperative membership fee.
art,toys etc. e-mail photos and item
descriptions to: denise@iceoutnh.com,
aimee@iceoutnh.com or call 603-393-
1195. (7/5)
---------------------------------------------------
OLD WATCHES & POCKET WATCH-
ES - working or not. Also, coins, knives,
military and masonic items. Gold & sil-
ver. Call 603-747-4000. (11/08)
Animals / Feed / Grooming Accounting - Taxes
Your Tax Man!
Call For An Appointment Today
603-747-3613 Fax: 603-747-3287
49 Swiftwater Rd. Woodsville, NH
Walk-ins & Drop-offs Welcome
Peter B. LaVoice
Income Tax Preparation
E-FILE
norThcounTry newS BuSIneSS dIrecTory
A helpful guide To local Businesses & Their wares!
we Are Just A call Away! 603.764.5807 or email: ncnewsnh@gmail.com
A Very Fair deal! only $10 every Two weeks! Thats only $260 For An entire year! or opt For color!! only $12 every Two weeks!
Come
Visit
Adult Bible Study ................ 10 a.m.
Sunday School ..................... 10 a.m.
Sunday Morning Service ..... 11 a.m.
Evening Service ................... 6 p.m.
Wednesday Night Prayer ...... 7 p.m.
Calvary Baptist Church
20 Elm Street Woodsville, N.H.
(603) 747-3157 = Pastor Dan Chamberland
Open hearts
Open minds
Open doors
The people of the
United Methodist Church
Pastor david J. Moore
North Haverhill, NH
787-6887
warren united Methodist church
on The common
warren, nh
SundAy worShIp SerVIceS
SundAy School 10.00 AM
worShIp 10:00AM
north country church directory
Section B page 8 northcountry news July 5, 2013 www.northcountrynewsnh.com
Wizard of Pawz
Grooming
328 Plain Rd.
Bath, NH
603-747-4171
Appliances & Repair
603-787-6677
Serving New Hampshire & Vermont
Factory Authorized Service Provider
Whirlpool Maytag Frigidaire
Sub Zero Wolf Bosch Dacor
LG Thermador Fisher Paykel
Don Bowman, Owner
where else can you
Advertise your Small
Business For only
$20-$24 per Month?
northcountr y news northcountr y news
603-764-5807 603-764-5807
Inspiring Words for You!
Dear Friends, these are beautiful lyrics to
a beautiful song, His Eye Is On the
Sparrow.Why should I feel discouraged,why
should the shadows come, why should my heart be
lonely, and long for heaven and home, When Jesus
is my portion? My constant friend is He: His eye
is on the sparrow, and I know He watches me; I
sing because Im happy, I sing because Im free,
for His eye is on the sparrow, and I know He
watches me. Let not your heart be troubled, His
tender word I hear, and resting on His goodness, I
lose my doubts and fears;Though by the path He
leadeth, but one step I may see; His eye is on the
sparrow, and I know He watches me; Whenever I
am tempted, whenever clouds arise, When songs
give place to sighing, when hope within me dies, I
draw the closer to Him, from care He sets me free;
His eye is on the sparrow, and I know He watches
me; Matthew 10:29-32, Are not two sparrows
sold for a copper coin? And not one of them falls
to the ground apart from your Fathers will. But
the very hairs of your head are all numbered. Do
not fear therefore; you are of more value than
many sparrows. Friends, God loves you and He is
always watching over you. Put your faith in Him.
The Creator of heaven and earth. God bless you
all.
~Submitted by Jeannine Bartlett
Lloyd Donnellan
603-838-6622
Mobile Grooming Shop
For Dogs And Cats
Tattooing
239 West End Rd.
Landaff, NH 03585
Grooming for all
your furry friends...
Please Book Early As
Space Is Limited...
We Promptly Service All Brands
Authorized Servicer of
Maytag Whirlpool Crosley GE
Henrys
Appliance
Repair
Phone
603-272-4387
Over 16 Years
Of Service...
224 River Rd.
Piermont, NH 03779
North Haverhill, NH (603) 787-5758
www.acresofhope.net
WORSHIP SERVICE - Sundays @ 11am
Horse Meadow Senior Center
PRAYER MEETING - Wednesdays @
6:30pm Locations vary
Please Visit Our Website
For More Information...
north country Business directory - Support your local Businesses....
Additions, Decks,
Remodeling, Roofing,
Vinyl Siding,
Snow Plowing, Etc..
Gagnon Builder
Gary Gagnon
603-838-6285
257 Pettyboro Rd. Bath, NH
Building - Const. - Drywall
Building - Const. - Drywall
Stans Tire Barn
New & Used Tires
Famous Brand Names
Priced To Fit Your Budget
Quick Service!!
Lost River Rd. N Woodstock, NH
Daily 8am - 5pm Sat. 8am - 2pm
603-745-8449
~ Fully Guaranteed ~
Petes Tire & Auto
Major & Minor Auto Repairs
Towing Available
Pete
Thompson
Owner
Briar Hill Road North Haverhill, NH
603-787-2300
PATTENS AUTO REPAIR
Expert Auto - Lt. Truck Repairs
All Makes and Models
Complete Line Of Accessories Avail.
Specialize in Muscle & Performance
Authorized Amsoil Dealer
Official NH Inspection Station
Kevin Patten - 603-764-9084
1243 Mt. Moosilauke Hwy.
Wentworth, NH
Auto / Truck Care Auto / Truck Care
Auto / Truck Care
ncnewsnh@gmail.com July 5, 2013 northcountry news Section B page 9
Auto Detailing
Have your vehicle looking like
new again - inside & out:
Hand wash, waxing,
windows, interior
and upholstery
Mark Pollock Owner
603-787-6247
AMES AUTO
& OUTDOOREQUIPMENT
Sales & Service
Automotive Repairs A-Z
State Inspections Used Car Dealer
Chainsaws Trimmers
Brush Cutters Blowers
Authorized Jonsered Dealer
Owner, Jeff Ames
458 Buffalo Rd. Wentworth, NH
603-764-9992
Where The Customer Counts!!!
Bobs
Bobs
Construction
Construction
Concrete Foundations
Floors Slabs
Foundations Under Existing Houses
931 Buchler Rd Wheelock, VT 05851
http://bobsconcreteconstruction.com/
Ph: 802-626-8763 Cell: 802-535-5860
Fax 802-626-9350
AUTO LOANS
*ANY CREDIT SCORE ACCEPTED!!
www.downtownautojim.com
Apply online today in minutes.
Or call 603-724-9425
*loans based on income-not credit
At only $20/month
can you Actually Afford
not To Advertise?
call us Today!
603-764-5807
north country Business directory - Support your local Businesses....
Section B page 10 northcountry news July 5, 2013 www.northcountrynewsnh.com
Chamber Of Commerce
Cleaning Service
Catering BBQ Services
Cabinet Makers
Business Services Marketing
Lower Cohase Regional
Chamber of Commerce
P.O. Box 209, Bradford, VT 05033
Mark J. Nielsen - Exec. Director
1.802.757.2549
For Local Information Go To
WWW.COHASE.ORG
Community Calendar,
Business Directory, Area
Maps, Information on
Local Events
PO Box 1017 - Lincoln, NH 03251
603-745-6621
www.lincolnwoodstock.com
Chair Caning
Melanies
woven Memories
handwoven caning
Splint - rush Seating
Shaker Tape - Baskets
& Minor repairs
competitive pricing
Quality work
Melanie Miller 802-467-1326
melaniemiller58@yahoo.com
www.melanieswovenmemories.com
Building - Const. - Drywall Building - Const. - Drywall
CUSTOM HOMES FROM START TO FINISH
Framing Roofs Finish Decks Siding
All Your Building Needs...
89 Howe Hill Road Benton, NH 03785
603-787-6854
THE BAKER VALLEY
CHAMBER Of COMMERCE
P.O. Box 447, Rumney, NH 03266
Serving the Baker Valley
for Over 35 Years
Let this be your invitation to explore the charming and
unique blend of past & present, old & new, that typifies
rural New Hampshire and our valley in particular.
If you are planning a visit or are interested in
moving to the area, contact the BVCC at
bakervalleychamber@yahoo.com
to request a brochure.
Visit us on the Web at:
www.bakervalleychamber.org
Coins
Wally Morabito
Wally@NCCNH.com
Tues-Fri 10-5 Sat 10-3
Tel: (603) 536-2625
Fax: (603) 536-1342
64 Main Street
Plymouth, NH 03264
Buying Selling Appraisals
Dennis Gilpatric
Dennis@NCCNH.com
, LLC.
David A. Berman
Justice of the Peace
Personalized Advertising Products
I guarantee I can save you money!*
(*Ask for details)
(603) 786-9086
bermbits@gmail.com
PO Box 280 Rumney, NH 03266
Mark A. Vasselian
6037072615
PO Box 872 Ashland, NH 03217
M.A.V.
Remodeling
Fully insured
interior/Exterior Carpentry
interior Painting
Kitchen/Bath
TJS BBQ LLC Terry Straight
FAMOUS
BBQ PORK T
J

S
Available For All
Types Of Catering
WEDDINGS
GRADUATIONS
COMPANY OUTINGS
FESTIVALS & FAIRS
603-728-7569
tjsbbq4813@aol.com
www.tjsbarbeque.com
We do it all, so you
dont have to!
From Backyard
parties to black-tie
events...
Robert White Construction
Do It Right With White
New Homes Remodeling
Kitchens Bathrooms
Garages
Free Estimates 40 Years Experience
603-747-3370
509 Goose Lane - Bath, NH 03740
Email: nancywhite600@gmail.com
north country Business directory - Support your local Businesses....
ncnewsnh@gmail.com July 5, 2013 northcountry news Section B page 11
Electricians
Electricians
CONQUEROR ELECTRIC
23 HOUR/7 dAY
EMERGENCY SERviCE
Roland Clifford
Lic. NH 8085 VT EM-3119
Fully Licensed & Insured
Residential Commercial
No Job Too Small
New and Old House Wiring
Underground Service installations
Upgrade Service installations
Troubleshooting
N. Haverhill, NH 603-787-2360
Dental
Crushed Ledge Products
97 Monroe Rd.
(Rte 135 on the
Woodsville &
Bath Border)
Wed., Thur., Fri. 8-5 Sat. from 8-2
Appointments can be scheduled by
calling during those hours. Messages
can be left any time.
dr. Ralph M. Faluotico, Jr.
603-747-2037
MARTiNS QUARRY
is Open
Selling Crushed Ledge Products
Repair your driveway today
Competitive Prices
delivery Available
Serving vT & NH
7:00 4:00 p.m. M-F
(802) 222-5570
107 Rock Quarry drive
Bradford, vT 05033
TEDS EXCAVATING
603-787-6108
Septic Systems Bush Hogging
Driveways Foundations
Land Clearing
Sewer & Plumbing License
Over 30 Years Experience
Computers & Service
Paige Computer
Services
Custom Built Systems, Repairs, Parts,
Accessories, Software, Training
For All Your Computer Needs
50 Smith Street
Woodsville, NH 03785
(603) 747-2201
paigecs@gmail.com
Hours
Mon-Fri 10-6
Sat by appt.
Closed
Sunday
RICHCLIFFORD
CONCRETE
FORMCOMPANY
Foundations, Floors, Slabs, Retaining
Walls, Curbings & Sidewalks
Sanding & Plowing
RiCHCLiFFORd
PO Box204 54 Clifford drive
North Haverhill, NH
603-787-2573
Concrete - Excavation - Trucking
Concrete - Excavation - Trucking
We Are Your Total
Excavating Company
Septic And Water Systems,
Cellar Holes, Driveways, Roads,
Landclearing, Stumping
HORNE
EXCAVATING
Maurice Horne 787-6691 Kevin 787-2378
776 French Pond Rd. N. Haverhill, NH
Farrier - Horseshoeing
Gregory Nourys
Horseshoeing
Warren, NH 603-764-7696
Hot & Cold
Shoeing
Complete
Farrier Service
where else can you
Advertise your Small
Business For only
$20-$24 per Month?
northcountr y news northcountr y news
603-764-5807 603-764-5807
At only $20/month
can you Actually Afford
not To Advertise?
call us Today!
603-764-5807
north country Business directory - Support your local Businesses....
Section B page 12 northcountry news July 5, 2013 www.northcountrynewsnh.com
Hair Salon & Services
Hair Salon & Services
Donna Clarks
Shear Animal Styling Salon
& Serenity Day Spa
A People Salon!
187 Central St. Woodsville, NH
603-747-2818
Hair - Massage - Pedicures
Manicures - Facials - Aroma Therapy
Joans Hair Design
Rte. 10
Haverhill, NH
989-9899
Professional Care ...
...Is Best For Your Hair
Joan Wiggins ~ Stylist
Gifts - Crafts - & More
New England
Crafts & Gifts.
Dairy Producers
603-272-9026
Our Own Homemade Fudge
Ice Cream & Gelato
Year Round Hrs: Winter: Jan 1 - May 31 Sat & Sun 10-5
Summer: June 1 - Dec 31 Thurs - Sun 10-5
(other hours by appointment or by chance)
430 Route 10, Piermont, NH 03779
Greenhouse - Plants
Piermont
Plant Pantry Greenhouses
Bedding Vegetables Plants
Hanging Baskets Perennials & Mums
Wholesale / Retail
Rte. 25 Abby Metcalf
Piermont, NH (603) 272-4372
Email: plants7@yahoo.com
Heating Oil, Diesel & Gasoline
24-Hour Burner Service
(For Customers Only)
W.E. Jock Oil Co., Inc.
802-757-2163
Wells River, VT 05081
Forestry / Logging Equipment Garden Design & Services
Fuels
Florist / Flowers
Gas, Wood, Oil & Pellet Stoves
Inserts & Furnaces Maple Suagaring Supplies
Hardware, Plumbing, Lumber, Housewares
& So Much More...
230 NH Rt. 25 Warren, NH 03279
603-764-9496 M-Sat 8-5 / Sun 10-2
B
u
r
n
i
n
g
B
u
sh Hom
e
C
e
n
t
e
r
Hardware & Home Supplies
At only $20/$24 month
can you Actually Afford
not To Advertise?
call us Today!
603-764-5807
802-222-5280 800-455-5280
Largest Marvin Integrity window
and door showroom in the area.
Exit 16 on I-91, Bradford, VT
Visit our website: obiweb.com
ryezak oil & propane
Bulk & Bottled propane Service
home heating oil
residential commercial
1536 nh route 25 rumney, nh
603-786-9776
SEETHiS?
YOUR AdCOULd
BEHERE!
Health Centers
Heating - Stoves - Accessories
north country Business directory - Support your local Businesses....
ncnewsnh@gmail.com July 5, 2013 northcountry news Section B page 13
Plumbing / Heating / Duct Work
Photography - Wildlife - DVD
Painting Staining Services
Pet Aquarium & Supplies
Modular Homes
Home Inspections
Internet Service Providers
Masonry & Service
Maple Products & Supplies
Meat Products
(603) 764-9692
Visitors Welcome
Log Home Maintenance
E.L. Masonry
Chimneys
Brick Steps
Walkways
Stone Work
Free Estimates
Emile Lavoie
603-764-5805
Serving Central & Northern NH and VT
Residential & Commercial
Building Inspections
Water & Air Radon Testing
ASHI# 248268
NH Licence# 0060
TODD DUKETTE
Toll Free: 866-388-2692
Office: 603-787-5956
info@cbphi.com
www.cbphi.com
Power Equip. & Outdoor Fun
594 Tenney Mtn. Hwy. Plymouth, NH
Open 7 Days 603.536.3299
www.plymouthpet.com
Tropical & Marine Fish Corals
Inverts Birds Reptiles
Small Animals Supplies
Dog & Cat Supplies
Quality Sheet Metal
Duct Work
Catering to the
plumbing & heating business
(802) 274-6269
PO Box 87
East Ryegate, VT 05042
north country Business directory - Support your local Businesses....
Section B page 14 northcountry news July 5, 2013 www.northcountrynewsnh.com
Rubbish / Salvage / Trucking
Rubbish / Salvage / Trucking
Septic Services
Roofing / Standing Seam Radio - Local
Rentals - Tents
Readings Healing Support
RV Sales Service
Real Estate
Lynne Tardiff
LMC
Licensed in
NH & VT
79 Union St.
Littleton, NH 03561
603-259-3130
www.TardiffRealty.com
Nicholas Kendall
Specializing in
Standing Seam Roofing
Colors, Copper & Galvinized Steel
Free Estimates
PO Box 128 South Ryegate, VT 05069
(802) 584-4065
kendallstandingseam@yahoo.com
www.kendallstandingseam.com
KENDALL
STANDING SEAM
STOCKLEY
TRUCKING / SALVAGE
405 South Main St., Lisbon
Buying Copper, Brass, Alum. Etc..
FREE CAR REMOVAL
Hours:
Mon. - Fri. 7-4
603-838-2860
Prescription Services Canada
Property Managment & Maint.
Now Is The Time To Call
About Your 2013
Wedding or Special Event!
Solutions For All Of Your Disposal Needs
Servicing Residential & Commercial
Customers With Curbside Pickups
Containers For Cleanouts & Construction
Projects Of Every Size
Pike, NH 989-5300
Maplewood,
A Senior Residence
Formerly, Home For The Aged
14 Maple Street
Woodsville, NH 03785
603-747-3493
Residential Home with private rooms,
24 hour supervision, home-cooked meals,
housekeeping and laundry included.
A non-profit organization
serving people since 1921
Senior Services
Higher Realm
Archangel Intuitive
Spiritual Guidance Coach
Readings
Hospice Certified - Grief Support
Magdrael PO Box 71
(Marsha Lorraine Downs) Glencliff, NH
higherrealm01@gmail.com 603-764-9151
Services
SPC Home Maintenance, LLC
Property Management / Maintenance
Make The Call, We Do It All
Nothing Too Big Or Small
Fully Insured ~ Reliable & Fair
Scott Colgan
34 Lower Loop Campton, NH
536-2620 Will Return all calls...
ocolgan@aol.com
Country House
Septic Services
603-764-9200
Pumping
&
Septic Design
256 Swain Hill Road
Warren, NH 03279
north country Business directory - Support your local Businesses....
ncnewsnh@gmail.com July 5, 2013 northcountry news Section B page 15
Surveying
Tack
Surveying Sporting Hunting Fishing
Television Services
Timber Harvesting / Tree Work
Taxadermist Services
Storage Facilities
Small Engine Repair & Service
David Whitcher
Warren, NH 603-764-9982
NHTHC Certified
Member N.H.T.O.A.
Whitchers Tree Farm Whitchers Tree Farm
We Cut Wood & The Price We Cut Wood & The Price
u u Logging Logging
u u Firewood Firewood
u u Land Clearing Land Clearing
u u Tree Work Tree Work
Harry J. Burgess
Surveying/Forestry
192 Hibbard Road Bath, NH
Phone: (603) 838-5260
Fax: (603) 838-6692
Murrays
Storage Trailers
Many Sizes Available
For Sale Or Rent
(802) 757-8068 (802) 757-8068
2975 Ryegate Road 2975 Ryegate Road
(US Rt. 5) E. Ryegate, VT (US Rt. 5) E. Ryegate, VT
Services Stonework
Rodney & Theresa Elmer
Turkeys Fish Moose Bear Deer Coyotes
All Varieties of Wildlife Mounted
1308 Loop Rd Northfield, VT
802-485-7184
www.mountaindeertaxidermy.com
We know how
important your trophy is to you,
know matter how big or small!
Conveniently Located o of
Rt. 112 and Rt. 302 in Bath, NH
TWO SIZE UNITS AVAILABLE
Larger Unit - 9 W x 145 +- $ 65.00
Smaller Size Unit- 60 W x 130 +- $ 45.00
ATV, Camper and Boat outside storage available
call for details
DAVIS REALTY OF NH & VT, INC 603-747-3211
SHARP STONEWORK
Granite Work
Stone Walls Patios
Walkways
Mini Excavating & Loader Work
Fully insured
Free Estimates
donny Sharp Sr. Alexandria, NH
603-744-5764
Charlies
Gun & Sport
New & Used Guns
Bought Sold & Traded
116 Main Street N. Woodstock, NH
603-745-6112 6 days 9-5
- Hunting & Fishing Supplies
- Huge Fly Selection
- Gold Panning Supplies
- Knives
~Snowshoe Rentals & Much More!
Services
Swiftwater Self Storage
Clean, Dry Storage Bays
Located at Swiftwater Estates Inc.
Pioneer Dr. Rt. 112 Bath, NH
For Information Call
1-603-747-2155
NYSTROM SURvEYiNG ANd MAPPiNG
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603.787.9029 OR CELL 603.454.4980
Section B page 16 northcountry news July 5, 2013 www.northcountrynewsnh.com
NH Gymnastics Results For The Regional
Gymnastic Championships______________
Bath Library Summer Reading Program___
Ross-Wood Post #20's Color Guard from Woodsville, NH appeared recently at Bear Ridge
Speedway in Bradford, VT to honor their comrade Julius E. Tueckhardt "Tuck", who passed
away recently. "Tuck" was a longtime supporter of Bear Ridge and the color guard appearance
came just before the two feature races which had their laps modified to total "111" the name of
a dance club he ran for many years in Woodsville. - NCN Courtesy Photo
THE FLUME GORGE
A twomile selfguided nature walk
that includes an 800' long gorge
with sheer 70'90' rock walls. Other
attractions are the pool, glacial
boulders and covered bridges.
603-745-8391
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the 4,080' summit. On clear days,
visitors to the summit can see
views of four states and Canada.
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Below are the results for NH gymnastics (and for those girls who
train at Evergreen) for their performances at the Regional
Gymnastics Championships. Above is a photo of the girls. Left
to right. Alicia Brisson (Lyndonville, VT), Emma Hudson
(Sheffield, VT), Britney Le (Littleton), Emily McCormack
(Lisbon)
The Region VI XCEL Regional Gymnastics Championships took
place June 8 in Boxboro, MA. The top gymnasts in the Silver,
Gold, and Platinum levels from all of New England and New York
gave their very best to represent their state in the competition.
The gymnasts representing New Hampshire earned their place on
the team at the State Championships held in Dover, NH the week-
end of May 25-26. The top 7 finishers in each age group were
invited to the Regional Championships. Local gymnasts from
Evergreen Gymnastics in Lisbon helped to represent New
Hampshire in 4 of the groups.
Britney Le, 12, of Littleton was a participant on the XCEL Gold
age 8-12 team. Le received medals for her performances on the
Vault, her score of 8.825 earned her the 6th place spot, and Floor
Exercise, where her score of 9.125 gave her a 5th place finish. She
had a 34.8 in the All-Around. As a team New Hampshire came in
second place, only outscored by Massachusetts.
Emma Hudson, 13, of Sheffield, Vermont contributed to the
XCEL Gold age 13 team. Hudson came home with 3 medals. She
had a 3rd place finish on Vault with a score of 9.0, a 9.275 on
Balance Beam gave her a 5th place finish, and a 36.275 in the All-
Around placed her 7th. This All-Around score was a lifetime best
for Hudson. As a team this group of girls became the only New
Hampshire team to win first place during the weekend, they all
received plaques for their hard work.
Emily McCormack, 14, of Lisbon was a member of the XCEL
Gold age 14+ team. McCormack had podium finishes for Uneven
Bars, 9.175, and Floor Exercise, 8.775, both for 6th place. She had
a 35.1 in the All-Around. This New Hampshire Gold team also
came in second place after Massachusetts.
Alicia Brisson, 12, of
Lyndonville, Vermont attended
the competition in the XCEL
Platinum Junior division.
Brisson received medals for per-
formances on Vault, Uneven
Bars, and in the All-Around.
Her 8.45 on Vault was good for
a 4th place finish, a 9.5 on
Uneven Bars gave her a 3rd
place finish, and her score of
35.75 was an 8th place finish in
the All-Around. The New
Hampshire Platinum team
earned another second place fin-
ish to round out a very success-
ful weekend.
Readers of all ages will explore
all things underground this sum-
mer as Bath Public Library pres-
ents Dig Into Reading during
their summer reading program.
Activities will include programs
on pirates, dinosaurs, construc-
tion vehicles, deep water ocean
fish and Ancient Egypt.
The 2013 Summer Reading
Program is open to children,
preschool through 6th grade
with programs, crafts, story
hours, prizes and more.
Schedule of events are as fol-
lows:
Tuesday, July 9th, 10:00 am
Bath Village School
Big Truck Day and Ice Cream
Social in Playground
Tuesday, July 16th, 10:00 am
Bath Public Library -Dinosaurs
Tuesday, July 23rd - 10:00 am
Bath Village School. Dig into
the Deep Sea: Fish Arent
Afraid of the Dark
Tuesday, July 30th, 10:00 am
Bath Public Library. Dig Under
the Earth Registration for Dig
Into Reading begins right now.
For more information, call the
library at 747-3372. All pro-
grams are free of charge.
ncnewsnh@gmail.com July 5, 2013 northcountry news page A-9
While habitat loss as a result of human encroachment is a primary threat to birds and wildlife
of all kinds, outdoor cats, counting both pets and feral animals, no doubt exacerbate the prob-
lem by killing up to 3.7 billion birds each year -- along with up to 20 billion other small mam-
mals Credit: Istock Photo
Theres only one Earth!
Treat it gently.
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1. Who released "Washington
Square" in 1963?
2. How many prior names did
the Hudson Brothers group
have?
3. Which former Beatle released
"It Don't Come Easy," and
when?
4. Bobby Vinton had two 1963
hits, both with a color in the
title. One was "Blue Velvet."
What was the other song?
5. Name the song that has this
lyric: "It seemed like the real
thing but I was so blind, Mucho
mistrust, love's gone behind."
Answers
1. Jazz group The Village
Stompers. The instrumental has
been covered by others, some-
times with lyrics added. The
Stompers were from Greenwich
Village in New York.
2. Three: The New Yorkers,
Everyday Hudson, and Hudson.
Their first release under the
"Brothers" name was "So You
Are a Star" in 1974. They
briefly had a TV variety show
that same year.
3. Ringo Starr, in 1971. It's
thought that the lyrics were
about the group's breakup.
4. "Blue On Blue." That was
also the name of a Vinton album
with all songs having "blue"
themes.
5. "Heart of Glass," by Blondie
in 1979. The first version of the
song, in 1974-75, was titled
"Once I Had a Love." It went
through various incarnations
such as ballad and reggae until
they settled on the disco beat.
(c) 2013 King Features Synd.,
Inc.
Dear EarthTalk: I understand
that pet cats prey on lots of birds
and other "neighborhood"
wildlife, but isn't it cruel to
force felines to live indoors
only? And isnt human
encroachment the real issue for
bird populations, not a few
opportunistic cats?
-- Jason Braunstein, Laos, NM
While it is true that habitat loss
as a result of human encroach-
ment is a primary threat to birds
and wildlife of all kinds, out-
door cats are no doubt exacer-
bating the loss of biodiversity as
their numbers swell and they
carry on their instinctual busi-
ness of hunting.
The Smithsonian Conservation
Biology Institutes Peter Marra
estimates that outdoor cats in
the United States, counting both
pets and feral animals, kill up to
3.7 billion birds each year
along with up to 20 billion other
small mammals. Researchers
estimate that roughly 114 mil-
lion cats live in the contiguous
U.S., 84 million of them pets
and the rest feraland that as
many as 70 percent of pet cats
spend some time roaming out-
side and hunting.
Cats are a nonnative species,
reminds Marra, adding that they
often target native species and
can transform places that would
normally harbor many young
birds into sinks that drain birds
from neighboring populations.
As a result of this ongoing pre-
dation, many environmentalists
and animal lovers think cats
should stay inside. The big
message is responsible pet own-
ership, Marra says. He
acknowledges that feral cats
may be the bigger problem, but
pet cats still catch as many as
two billion wild animals a year.
The non-profit American
Humane Association reports
that there are several ways to
keep indoor cats happy even
though they are restricted from
chasing and hunting wildlife.
Getting Fluffy a companion
(another cat or even a dog) is a
good way to provide an outlet
for play. Likewise, interactive
toys, scratching posts, cat
perches and other amenities
check with any well-stocked
local pet storecan make the
indoor environment a stimulat-
ing yet safe one for housebound
cats and should serve to prevent
stir-crazy behavior.
Meanwhile, another non-profit,
the American Bird Conservancy
(ABC), adds another reason
why cat owners might want to
think about restricting their
pets territory to inside:
Research shows that indoor cats
live significantly longer lives
than their free-roaming counter-
parts. Life for outdoor cats is
risky, reports the group. They
can get hit by cars; attacked by
dogs, other cats, coyotes or
wildlife; contract fatal diseases,
such as rabies, feline distemper,
or feline immunodeficiency
virus; get lost, stolen, or poi-
soned; or suffer during severe
weather conditions.
But the fact that feral cat popu-
lations have gotten so large in
recent years makes the problem
that much more vexing.
Researchers concede that efforts
to catch and either neuter or
euthanize feral cats have proven
ineffective given their booming
populations, leaving cat owners
wondering whether jeopardiz-
ing Fluffy's mental health for
the sake of saving a few birds is
really even worthwhile.
CONTACTS: Smithsonian
Conservation Biology Institute,
nat i onal zoo. s i . edu/ s cbi / ;
American Humane Association,
www. ameri canhumane. org;
American Bird Conservancy,
www.abcbirds.org.
EarthTalk is written and edit-
ed by Roddy Scheer and Doug
Moss and is a registered trade-
mark of E - The Environmental
M a g a z i n e
(www.emagazine.com). Send
questions to:
eart ht al k@emagazi ne. com.
S u b s c r i b e :
www. emagazi ne. com/ sub-
scribe. Free Trial Issue:
www.emagazine.com/trial.
page A-10 northcountry news July 5, 2013 www.northcountrynewsnh.com
OBITUARY
OBITUARY
OBITUARY
Its What The Locals Read!
Northcountry News
Ross-Wood Post # 20, American Legion in Woodsville, paid it's
respects to Olde Glory on Friday June 14, 2013, Flag Day,
again this year. Chief among the duties in providing this honor
to our nations flag is the proper disposal of those flags that
have served us well and now have been replaced with crisp,
bright, new ones. This year, Cub Scouts, sponsored by our
Sons of the American Legion, had the honor of symbolically
presenting examples of the worn flags for inspection and dis-
posal according to long standing protocols. Joining us and
observing, were many post members, neighbors and members
of the general public. - NCNCourtesy Photo
CENTRAL NH AGGREGATES, LLC
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7:00 am noon Saturdays and by appointment
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Mulch N Clay N Stone dust N Ledge Pak
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Warren, NH- Leslie Irwin
Wright, 49, of Lund Lane died
unexpectedly at his home on
Tuesday, June 18, 2013.
Leslie was born in Woodsville,
NH on March 4, 1964 to Harry
T. and Lorraine Wright and
graduated from Woodsville
High School, Class of 1982.
Leslie served with the New
Hampshire National Guard
from 1981 through 1993. He
was on the crew of the War
Pig howitzer. He worked for
the Town of Warren Highway
Department for twenty years.
Also, he worked in excavating
and as a salvage dealer.
Leslie was a member of the
Rumney American Legion Post.
He played for the Warren 13
softball team and was an origi-
nal member of the Sackett
Brothers Band. He was a huge
fan of the Dallas Cowboys. He
loved NASCAR and playing his
guitar.
He was predeceased by his
father, Harry T. Wright, Sr. on
February 24, 2008.
He is survived by his mother,
Lorraine Bixby and her husband
Brad of North Haverhill, NH;
two sons, Calvin T. Wright of
Campton, NH and Corey P. Roy
of Rumney, NH; a sister,
Michelle L. Clark of
Wentworth, NH; a brother,
Harry T. Wright, Jr. of Warren;
and several aunts, uncles,
cousins, nieces, and nephews.
There will be no calling hours.
A graveside service was held on
Sunday, June 30, in the Warren
Village Cemetery.
Memorial contributions may be
made to the Wounded Warrior
Project, PO Box 758517,
Topeka, KS 66675.
For more information, or to
offer an online condolence,
please visit www.rickerfh.com
Ricker Funeral Home &
Cremation Care of Woodsville
is in charge of arrangements.
(Publishers note: We were sad-
dened to hear about Les. Our
thoughts go out to family and
friends. Les was a friend of
ours, as are many of his family
members.)
Henry Theodore Ted
Asselin, 81, of North Haverhill,
NH, died Wednesday, June 19,
2013, at his home.
Ted was born in Woodsville,
NH on September 20, 1931, to
Henry and Ernestine (Perry)
Asselin. He married Sheila
Eileen Moore on September 24,
1955 at Ft. McPherson, GA.
During his life Ted served in the
Army, including two tours in
Vietnam, where he earned a
Silver Star, Bronze Star, and
Purple Heart as well as numer-
ous other decorations through-
out a 22 year military career.
After retiring from the Army he
spent 13 years in civil service.
He also served in Berlin,
Germany during the airlift, in
Panama, and Redstone Arsenal,
AL. He is remembered for run-
ning the Rest A While and
Moosilauke Inn in Warren, NH,
and most notably for arranging
to have an out of service
Redstone Missile brought to his
home town of Warren and erect-
ed in front of the Historical
Society. After retiring from
Redstone Arsenal, Ted and his
wife, Sheila, returned to NH. He
will be most remembered for the
love he had for his family and
friends and his ability to tell
funny stories for hours. Most of
them were actually true.
Ted was predeceased by his par-
ents, Henry Asselin, Ernestine
Simpson, and step-father Ernest
Simpson. He is also prede-
ceased by sisters Patricia
Bourque and Judith Siakowski,
as well as his oldest son,
Michael Asselin.
He is survived by his wife of 57
years, Sheila Asselin of North
Haverhill, NH; two daughters,
Sharon DiFranza and husband
Joseph DiFranza, of Princeton,
MA, and Loretta Asselin-Zahn
and husband Robert Zahn, of
Washington, NH; four sons,
David Asselin, of Vienna,
Austria, Daniel Asselin, of
Weare, NH, Christopher Asselin
and wife Sheila Asselin, of
Goffstown, NH, and Patrick
Asselin, of Perry, GA; a brother,
John Asselin, of Ventura CA and
Port Huron, Michigan; a sister,
Claire Mickey Hagerty, of
Los Angeles, CA; sixteen
grandchildren and seventeen
great-grandchildren.
A committal service will be held
on July 8th at noon at the
Veterans Cemetery in
Boscawen, NH. There will be a
gathering nearby, at the
Boscawen Congregational
Church following the service
for family and friends to spend
time together celebrating Teds
life. All are cordially invited
In lieu of flowers donations may
be sent to the Baldwin
Memorial Library, Wells River,
VT 05081
(Publishers note: Another of
our friends here at the
Northcountry News Our
thoughts go out to Sheila and
family, and friends. It was an
honor to once paint Warrens
Redstone Missile, alongside the
person who brought it to town!)
Groton, VT- Frances Eleanor
(Frost) Tripp, 79, of Powder
Spring Road, passed into the
presence of her Lord and Savior
at the Kindred Nursing and
Rehabilitation-Hanover Terrace
home in Hanover, NH on
Sunday, June 16, 2013, after
several years of declining
health.
Frances was born on May 30,
1934, in Woodsville, NH, the
daughter of Elmer C. and Vera
(Shields) Frost. She graduated
from Groton High School in
1952 and from Providence-
Barrington Bible College in
Providence, RI in 1956 with a
degree in music. Following
graduation, she taught music in
several area schools for a few
years, and also taught private
piano lessons to numerous area
children.
On August 28, 1957, Frances
married Warren B. Tripp. After
living in Barre, VT for 27 years,
they moved to Groton in 1989.
During her lifetime, Frances
was a church organist or pianist
in several churches she attend-
ed. In addition to her love for
music, Frances loved young
children and taught them of the
love of Jesus and His plan of
salvation in Sunday School
classes and Beginner Church
programs in the churches she
attended. She also greatly
enjoyed the varied wildlife that
she was able to watch from their
Groton home.
She was predeceased by her par-
ents and by one sister, Elaine
Fiske, as well as two brothers-
in-law, Kenneth Fiske and Pearl
Ricker.
She is survived by her husband,
Warren Tripp of Groton; their
daughter, Martha Hudson and
husband Steven of
Gaithersburg, MD; and three
grandchildren, Nicholas Hudson
and wife Amanda, Brian
Hudson and wife Esther, and
Amy Hudson. These grandchil-
dren brought her great joy as she
followed their accomplish-
ments. She is also survived by a
sister, Evelyn Ricker and by a
brother, E. Charles Frost and
wife Diane, all of Groton and by
numerous cousins, nieces and
nephews.
There will be no calling hours.
A memorial service was held on
Friday, June 21 at the Calvary
Baptist Church in Woodsville,
with Pastor Dan Chamberland,
officiating. A private burial will
be in Groton Village Cemetery,
at the convenience of the family.
Memorial contributions may be
made to the Calvary Baptist
Church Building Fund, 20 Elm
Street, Woodsville, NH 03785.
For more information, or to
offer an online condolence,
please visit www.rickerfh.com
Ricker Funeral Home &
Cremation Care of Woodsville
is in charge of arrangements.
ncnewsnh@gmail.com July 5, 2013 northcountry news page A-11
Its What The Locals Read!
The Northcountry News
northcountry news
here For you - 24/7
Already read By Thousands!
& now By even More!!!
read us online - Free!
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The Bath Public Library 2013 Summer Reading Program Kick-off started out with Critters n
Creatures Live Animal Show. See story this page. - NCN Courtesy
Ashland NH Announces Return Of
Old Home Days________________________
Learn The Rocks History As An Exemplary Estate
At July 15th Program______________________________________
warren 250 years
lets celebrate!
Warren, NH
OLD HOME DAYS 2013
~ Convenient Clip And Save Schedule ~
FRidAY. JULY 12TH
4:00 PM CHICKEN B-B-Q {Fire Dept. Behind School}
7:00 PM JAM SESSION - Memory of Norm Sackett
{CHUCK SACKETT & BLACK BROOK BAND}
9:00 PM FIREWORKS (Behind School)
SATURdAY. JULY 13TH
7:00 AM 5K WALK (In Memory/Kyle Mooney) Fish Hatchery
7-10 AM BREAKFAST TO GO - Pythian Kitchen
7:30-11AM COMMEMORATIVE STAMP CANCELLATION (PO)
8 AM BLESSING OF ATVS - (Methodist Church)
TWIN STATE EMERGENCY TRAILER
12 - 4PM QUILT DISPLAY (Methodist Church)
FOREVER LOCKED LOCKED MOOSE DISPLAY
Finger Printing Being Done By Chief of Police
11:00 AM PARADE - (Theme - Warren 250 Years, Lets
Celebrate)
12 - 3 PM LOBSTER FEST - (WWAS- at the Common)
12:30 PM KIDDIES PARADE
12:30 PM ATV POKER RUN - Raffles
1 PM KIDS WATERMELON EATING CONTEST
1:30 - 2:30PM WARRENS BIRTHDAY PARTY (on the Common)
2:30 PM AE KWON DO DEMO - (On the Common)
3 - 5 PM THE CABLE GUYS
5:30 - 7:30 PM CRUNCH WESTERN BOYS
8-12 PM RED HAT BAND
9:00 PM FIREWORKS
SUNdAY JULY 14TH
7:00 AM BREAKFAST (Masons at the Masons Hall)
8:00 AM FISHING DERBY (Fire Dept. at the Hatchery)
9:00 AM ATV MUD RUN at RPM, Pine Hill Road
10:00 AM CHURCH SERVICE (On the Common)
12.30 PM 16th ANNUAL BLUEGRASS/ ACOUSTIC FEST.
{ON COMMON / INSIDE TOWN HALL IF RAIN}
1:00 PM PIG ROAST
TOUCHATRUCK
ON GOING FLEA MARKET CONCESSIONSCHUCK-
A-LUCK RAFFLES INDOOR YARDSALE
EVENTSCANBESUBJECTTOCHANGE.
ANYONE WISHING TO HAVE A FLOAT IN PARADE
PLEASEREGISTER BY 10 AM
in order to qualify for $$ prize.
~ Convenient Clip And Save Schedule ~
Now well known as a Christmas
tree farm and the North Country
Conservation & Education
Center for the Society for the
Protection of New Hampshire
Forests, The Rocks Estate has a
history that reaches back to the
gilded era of the turn of the 20th
Century.
Some of that history will be
revealed during a NH
Humanities Council program
titled Exemplary Country
Estates of New Hampshire and
presented by art historian and
independent scholar Cristina
Ashjian. The program is open to
the public and will begin at 7
p.m. at The Rocks on July 15.
In the early 20th Century, the
New Hampshire Board of
Agriculture launched a program
to boost the rural economy and
promote tourism through the
sale of abandoned farms to sum-
mer residents.
One such sale was a 100-acre
farm on a Bethlehem hillside to
Chicago businessman and
International Harvester
cofounder John Jacob Glessner
and his family. The Glessners
purchased the farm in 1882 and
gradually built The Rocks
Estate, which included a 19-
room mansion that served as the
familys summer home, elabo-
rate formal gardens, a windmill
and electric plant, greenhouse,
bee house, and observatory.
The Rocks is listed on the
National Register of Historic
Places, and many of the build-
ings built during the Glessners
ownership of The Rocks have
been restored and are in use
today. In 1978, John and
Frances Glessner's grandchil-
dren donated the 1,400-acre
Rocks Estate, including 22
buildings, to the Forest Society.
Using historic images and texts,
Ashjian will discuss The Rocks
and other Exemplary Estates
like The Fells on Lake Sunapee
and Saint-Gaudens National
Historic Site in Cornish. The
presentation will investigate the
fate of the private estates show-
cased in the states promotional
literature in the early 20th
Century, consider the social sta-
tus and philanthropy of the orig-
inal estate builders, and explore
the architecture and scope of the
various country houses.
Ashjian is an art historian and
an independent scholar based in
Moultonborough, where she is
the chair of the
Moultonborough Heritage
Commission. Her current
research focuses on late 19th
and early 20th century country
estates. Ashjian holds an MA in
the History of Art from the
Courtauld Institute of Art,
University of London and a PhD
in Modern Art and Architecture
from Northwestern University.
The Rocks is the North Country
Conservation and Education
Center of the Society for the
Protection of New Hampshire
F o r e s t s
(www.forestsociety.org). The
Forest Society is a non-profit
membership organization
founded in 1901 to protect the
states most important land-
The Bath Public Library 2013
Summer Reading Program
Kick-off started out with
Critters n Creatures Live
Animal Show Monday, June
10th at the Bath Village School.
The forty-five minute program
featured amazing animals that
dig and burrow. Special guests
included, Weasel the ferret,
Nestle the hedgehog, Taco the
armadillo, Truffles the box tur-
tle, Dino the lizard, Amiee the
spotted skunk, Wally the alliga-
tor, Kuniya the python and Spot
the tiger salamander.
The program was very well
attended, with over 130 adults
and children. Mona from
Critters n Creatures did an
informative and fun program.
Children were able to be up
close and personal with these
wonderful animals. They espe-
cially enjoyed the 30 minute
petting session that followed the
show.
This program was supported in
part by a grant from the U.S.
Institute of Museum and
Library Services and donations
from the Saul O. Sidore
Memorial Foundation in memo-
ry of Rebecca Lee Spitz.
2013
Warren Old Home Days
16th Annual
Blue Grass Acoustic Festival
On The Town Common
(Inside Town Hall If Rain)
Sunday July 14th
Beginning at 12:30pm
Featuring:
12:30--The Hobos
1:30--Bob Amos and the
Bluegrass Volunteers
2:30--Newfound Grass
3:30--Cardigan Mountain Tradition
scapes and promote wise use of
its natural resources.
The New Hampshire
Humanities Council nurtures
the joy of learning and inspires
community engagement by
bringing life-enhancing ideas
from the humanities to the peo-
ple of New Hampshire. They
connect people with ideas.
Learn more about the Council
and its work at www.nhhc.org.
There will be a quilt exhibit at the
Warren Methodist Church during
Old Home Day Festivities,
Saturday, July 13th from 10 to 4 PM.
Anyone is invited to display their
hand made quilts!
See you there...
page A-12 northcountry news July 5, 2013 www.northcountrynewsnh.com
14th Annual Intertribal Powwow At The
Kearsarge Indian Museum______________
Nongame And Endangered Wildlife
Program Observes 25th Anniversary____
3255 Dartmouth College Hwy. North Haverhill, NH 03774
(603) 787-6351 Fax (603) 787-2564
O Septic System Installation O
O Septic System Pumping O
Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum is pleased to announce the return of its annual powwow on July
13 and 14. See our website for a complete listing of upcoming events: www.indianmuseum.org.
Please see story to the left. - NCN Courtesy Photo
NEEDTOGETHITCHED?
We Sell & Install Trailer Hitches!
Reese and Draw-Tite
Gas Diesel Deli Meats Groceries
Beer Lottery Cigarettes & More
We Also Have Hunting & Fishing Licenses And
OHRV Registrations
Route 25 Wentworth, NH 764-5553
We Have 24/7 Fuel Pumps
With A Credit Card
Mon - Thurs. 5am - 8pm Fri 5am - 9pm
Sat 6am - 9pm Sun 6am - 8pm
Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum is pleased to announce the return of
its annual powwow on July 13 and 14. The dance arena will come
alive with the heartbeat of Native America as four drum groups
and their singers provide the music for one hundred dancers.
Learn about the different dance styles and the regalia that go with
each. Youll be invited to enter the circle for some of the dances
too!
Well also have storytelling, kids crafts, museum exhibits, ven-
dors selling beautiful crafts and good food to eat. Theres some-
thing for everyone in the family.
A powwow is a time for Native people to visit with old friends,
make new ones and sing and dance together. You can be a part of
that living tradition. Everyone is welcome.
Admission to the powwow is free for museum members and
Native Americans. Non-members pay only $8.50 for adults, $7.50
for seniors/students, $6.50 for children ages 6-12 or $26 per fam-
ily.
Gates open each day at 10am and the Grand Entry of all the
dancers and honoring of veterans is at noon. You wont want to
miss it this stirring sight.
For more information call 603-456-2600 or email info@indian-
museum.org
Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum was founded in 1990 by Charles
Bud and Nancy Thompson as an educational and cultural center
to connect visitors with Native American culture, past and present,
and to encourage respect for our environment. The Mt. Kearsarge
Indian Museum seeks to challenge all of us to improve the quality
of our lives and our world. The museum is open daily May 1
October 31, Monday Saturday 10am-5pm, Sunday noon-5pm
and on weekends November through mid-December.
See our website for a complete listing of upcoming events:
www.indianmuseum.org
GOVERNOR'S COMMENDA-
TION SIGNED ON JUNE 19,
2013
New Hampshire Fish and
Game's Nongame and
Endangered Wildlife Program is
celebrating 25 years this month.
Volunteers, partners and staff
are being recognized by the
Governor and Executive
Council for their efforts to
return populations of many
species to New Hampshire
wildlife that were rarely seen
just a few decades ago, includ-
ing Karner blue butterflies, New
England cottontails, peregrine
falcons and American marten.
In the mid-1980s, a crisis was
emerging for New Hampshire's
threatened and endangered
birds, mammals and fish.
Wildlife habitat was exposed to
enormous pressure from devel-
opment and recreational activi-
ties. Populations were dwin-
dling. Species were disappear-
ing, explained John Kanter,
program coordinator.
New Hampshire Audubon and
the US Fish and Wildlife
Service worked with State
Senator Susan McLane and the
New Hampshire State
Legislature to establish the pro-
gram, signed into law by
Governor John Sununu in June
of 1988.
N.H. Fish and Game's Nongame
and Endangered Wildlife
Program is the steward for the
state's nongame wildlife --
species not hunted, fished or
trapped. Through wildlife moni-
toring and management, plus
outreach and education, the
Nongame Program works to
protect over 400 species of
mammals, birds, reptiles and
amphibians, as well as thou-
sands of insects and other inver-
tebrates. The program works in
cooperation with other New
Hampshire agencies and organi-
zations to develop effective con-
servation strategies to protect
and enhance vital areas and
wildlife.
Every year since 1988 the legis-
lature has provided up to
$50,000 as a matching grant,
contingent on an equal amount
raised privately from individu-
als and businesses. Private con-
tributions for the program now
are more than $100,000 annual-
ly. The program also receives
critical federal support through
the State Wildlife Grants pro-
gram.
Successes over the past 25 years
include restoring a healthy
seabird colony of common,
Arctic, and roseate terns to the
Isles of Shoals, establishing a
new population of Karner blue
butterflies (the New Hampshire
State Butterfly) in Concord after
they had disappeared from the
wild, and bringing back breed-
ing populations of magnificent
bald eagles and peregrine fal-
cons.
To observe this important mile-
stone, themed talks, field days
and other events are taking
place throughout the year.
"Most of all, the anniversary is
an important chance to raise
awareness of what's been
accomplished for endangered
wildlife -- and the need to work
together to address the many
challenges ahead," said Kanter.
To learn more or to support the
Nongame and Endangered
Wildlife Program through vol-
unteering or financial support,
v i s i t
http://www.wildnh.com/nonga
me.
ncnewsnh@gmail.com July 5, 2013 northcountry news page A-13
Tek Talk
With Eli Heath Of
Paige Computer Services
Tech Tips, Talk & Advice
For Your Computer
Email us at:
paigecs@gmail.com
The Northcountry News...
Thank You For Allowing Us
Into Your Homes!
Maynard Farr recently received the Life time achievement
award from the Monroe 8th grade graduates for his continued
dedication and many years of service to the community.
- Cow Girl Up Photography
OPEN 7
DAYS A
W
EEK
3624 Bible Hill Road, VT
2 miles out of the Village of Wells River, VT on Bible Hill
Open 9am - 5pm

(802) 584-4849
Were Growing For You
All Hanging Baskets on SALE
5
0


each
Single Pots
CATCH THE WAVE!
4
th
of July
Clearance Sale
All Annuals
Sold at Cost
POTTED PLANTS
FOLIAGE PLANTS
SUCCULENTS
Gazania
Osteospermum
Gerbera Daisy
Dahlias
Geraniums
Begonias and
many more.
$
1
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0
0
Annuals
In 4 Pots
WAVE PETUNIAS In Stock
All Vegetable
& Herb
Plants FREE

BIBLE HILL ROAD
R O
U
T
E
5
R
O
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T
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5

In 1 quart and large pots. Many varieties to choose from.


Plenty of Perennials Still Available
5
0


The Jordan Institute Reorganizes, Names New Executive
Director From Benton, NH___________________________________
PLYMOUTH
CHIROPRACTIC
Valley Center 31 Rt. 25
Plymouth, NH 603-536-2221
Accepting CareCredit
Showcasing our
Microcurrent
Facial and Body
Sculpting.
"The All Natural
Face Lift"
Stop in or call to
see what it's
all about!
We are open one
Saturday per month
from 8AM - Noon!
Call us for details.
When you buy a new computer
it will have Windows 8
installed. Many people are use
to the look and feel of previous
versions of Windows. One of
the most noticeable changes in
Windows 8 is there is no start
menu or start button. Your start
menu is now a start screen; I am
going to give you some tips on
how you may bring back the
start button and give you the
feel of using Windows XP or
Windows 7.
To get the start button back in
Windows 8, I recommend a util-
ity from Stardock called Start8
you can get it here at
http://www.stardock.com/prod-
ucts/start8/. It costs around
$5.00 it will get the start menu
and the start button on Windows
8. Follow the directions when
you install and everything will
look more familiar to you.
I also recommend another utili-
ty they have called Modern Mix
ModernMix it takes a full-
screen Metro-style app and
turns it into a floating window
with a border, total, and close
buttons. It makes a Metro-style
app seem normal. You can
resize it, move it around, and
(importantly) close it. The way
it works is that each Metro-style
app gets a little floating button
in the top-right where you can
switch it between full-screen
and windowed mode. (You can
also just tap F10 to toggle.) Take
any Metro-style app and do this,
and it goes from being an app
you don't see the point off, to a
nice-looking app that you might
want to have in your life.
Microsoft has realized the woes
of its ways; computer sales are
down because people just do not
like the look and feel of
Windows 8. If you currently
have Windows 8 a free upgrade
called Blue or Windows 8.1 will
be out in the fall. This upgrade
will give you the option to have
the start button like Windows 7
or use the start screen and it will
fix many bugs the system has.
There are other free options for
the start menu one is called
Classic Shell that is at
http://www.classicshell.net/ iw
will give you the classic style
start menu however some peo-
ple have had problems with it,
but it is a free program if it
doesnt work uninstall it.
Another one is called Retro UI
and that is at http://retroui.com/
it is not free the cost is also
about $5.00, I recommend that
you research to see which one
fits your needs and check the
customer comments before you
install any of the programs.
Keep in mind you can only have
one installed at a time, if you try
to install any of the programs on
top of each other you may con-
fuse Windows and lock up your
computer.
So that is my suggestions if you
have found other utilitys or
have any tips to share with our
readers please email them to
me at paigecs@gmail.com or
visit my website at www.paige-
computerservices.com. You can
also call at (603)747-2201, hope
to hear from you soon.
JULY SIDING SALE
BUDGET LUMBER
1139 CLARK POND ROAD
NORTH HAVERHILL N.H. 03774
1-603-787-2517
ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS
WK DAYS 8AM TO PM 4
SAT 8 T0 2 SUN 8 TO 12
PRIDE VINYL SIDING SALE
WHITE DOUBLE 4 SIDING
$69.69 square (100 sq. feet)
SUPER DARK
SENTRY COLORS
$112.45 square
SENTRY DESIGNER
DARK COLORS
$124.93 square
This is a small sample of
siding available twice a week!
Month of
July Special
HURRY! BUY NOW!
While
Supplies Last!
COLORED (11 COLORS)
$72.44 square
Match or Contrast Accessories!
The Jordan Institute (TJI), a
non-profit organization widely
known in the state for promot-
ing energy efficiency policy and
projects in commercial build-
ings, is acting on recommenda-
tions from its recently complet-
ed strategic plan.
TJIs board appointed Laura
Richardson of Benton, NH as
Interim Executive Director of
The Jordan Institute, replacing
Dick Henry who has resigned,
effective June 14, to co-found
HotZero, a new company
focused on hot-water district
energy systems. Further, the
board approved the spin-off of a
for-profit subsidiary which will
be majority owned by The
Jordan Institute. This new com-
pany, Resilient Buildings
Group, Inc. (RBG), will expand
the energy efficiency in build-
ings consultation and project
work for which The Jordan
Institute is recognized. Dana
Nute will manage that company.
Existing Jordan Institute con-
tracts will be completed as con-
tracted and new project con-
tracts will be handled by RBG.
The Jordan Institute will contin-
ue to focus on public-policy ini-
tiatives related to energy effi-
ciency in buildings.
We are very excited about
these next steps and think that
The Jordan Institute is prepared
to strongly and effectively repo-
sition itself, said Kenneth
Colburn, president of the board
of directors of The Jordan
Institute.
I have thoroughly enjoyed my
six years with The Jordan
Institute and am delighted that
Laura Richardson will now be
leading the organization. Her
experience working in the ener-
gy field for many years, both in
the state and nationally, makes
her an excellent choice. I am
sure she will continue to grow
the work of The Jordan Institute
with extreme skill as the organi-
zation moves through this tran-
sition period and beyond, said
Dick Henry. Similarly, Dana
Nute is a superb choice to run
Resilient Buildings Group and
will continue his outstanding
work with high-performance
buildings in this new endeavor.
Richardson was The Jordan
Institutes Director of
Operations, and came to the
organization from the NH
Office of Energy and Planning
where she managed nine of the
energy programs funded by the
American Recovery and
Reinvestment Act (ARRA). She
previously directed the
StayWarmNH program and was
co-founder of the NH
Sustainable Energy Association.
Nute has been The Jordan
Institutes Director of Project
Implementation since
September 2012. He came to the
organization from the Belknap-
Merrimack Community Action
Agency (CAA) where for 12
years he was Director of Energy
and Housing Rehabilitation,
including the weatherization
program. He also led the Lead
Paint Program for the state
through Belknap-Merrimack
CAA and the NH Housing
Authority. Prior to his work at
Belknap-Merrimack CAA, he
managed numerous commercial
projects as a construction man-
ager and a civil engineer.
About The Jordan Institute: The
Jordan Institute aims to trans-
form the way buildings are
designed, built, renovated, oper-
ated, and perform in order to
reduce their cost of occupancy,
keep more of New Hampshires
dollars circulating locally
through energy savings, and
reduce pollution from buildings
that harms public health, com-
promises ecosystems, and con-
tributes to climate change. The
organization was founded in
1995. www.JordanInstitute.org
About Resilient Buildings
Group: The mission of the
Resilient Buildings Group is to
scale-up the number and quality
of high-performance, low-ener-
gy-use, resilient buildings in
New England.
www.ResilientBuildingsGroup.
com
page A-14 northcountry news July 5, 2013 www.northcountrynewsnh.com
Keeping Each Other Well
by Elizabeth Terp
Cosauke...
Adventures
in
Homesteading
by
Beth
Weick
WALKER MOTOR SALES, INC.
RT. 10 WOODSVILLE, NH
603-747-3389 or 603-747-3380
FIND US ON THE WEB AT:
www.WalkerMotorSales.com
Good Selection of Program and Pre-owned Vehicles
2012 Dodge Avenger SXT gray, loaded, low miles....
2012 Dodge Avenger SXT black,loaded,14,000 miles...
2012 Chrysler 200, silver, loaded, low miles...
2011 Jeep Wrangler Sport 4x4
2-dr, manual, blue, hard top, 13,000 miles...
2011 Jeep Patriot AWD
silver, automatic, loaded, 34,000 miles...
2010 Dodge Avenger SXT
red, loaded, clean, 25,000 miles...
2010 Dodge Journey SXT AWD
black, loaded, one owner, 34,000 miles
2010 Jeep Compass Sport AWD
blue, loaded, clean, 50,000 miles...
2009 Buick Lacrosse
4-dr, silver, loaded, one owner, 39,000 miles
2009 Jeep Commander Sport 4x4
black, loaded, one owner, 48,000 miles...
2008 Chrysler Sebring Convertible
silver, loaded, one owner..
2008 Toyota RAV4 AWD
red, automatic, clean, one owner...
2008 Dodge Avenger
silver, loaded, sunroof, one owner, 15,000 miles...
2007 Dodge Ram 1500 Quad Cab 4x4 PU
black, auto, 67,000 miles...
2006 Chrylser PT Cruiser
blue, automatic, air, 93,000 miles..
Stahler Furniture Sale
July 1st 31st
40% off all Lyndon Furniture
Up to 70% off all of Lyndon Furniture Seconds
Plus With any Lyndon Furniture purchase youll receive
a 10% gift certificate to be used towards a future
Lyndon Furniture purchase.
Stahler Furniture
Quality, Comfort & Style
469 Broad Street, Lyndonville, VT :: Mon. thru Fri. 9-5, Sat. 9-3, Sun. Closed
(802)626-5996 : (800)439-5996
Great deals on everything for your home.
Lyndon Furniture Sealy Tempur-Pedic Smith Brothers Craftmaster
FlexSteel Palliser Hubbardton Forge
Sale ends July 31st
Saving Normal
from DSM 5
Saving Normal, by Allen
Frances, the psychiatrist who
led the task force for the DSM
IV, is a must read. Its subtitle is:
An insiders revolt against out-
of-control psychiatric diagnosis,
DSM-5, big pharma and the
medicalization of ordinary life.
DSM-I, The Diagnostic and
Statistical Manual of Mental
Disorders, was published in
1952 to replace various existing
diagnostic classifications at a
time when psychiatry was
booming after WWII. Now,
over 60 years later and 19 years
since the DSM-IV was pub-
lished, we have a 900 page tome
in DSM-5, capable of classify-
ing every one of us with a men-
tal disorder. This is the classifi-
cation used to determine treat-
ment and insurance coverage.
Catchy acronyms like ADHD
(Attention Deficit Hyperactivity
Disorder), OCD (Obsessive
Compulsive Disorder), or
BiPolar (Manic Depressive
Disorder) or Alzheimers (for all
levels of dementia) encourage
lay people to diagnose and, with
the help of big pharma media
advertizing, expect their doctors
to prescribe a potpourrie of
drugs.
Children are being over-diag-
nosed and given prescribed
drugs early on. Many new disor-
ders have been added. In the
future, tantrums will be labeled
Disruptive Mood Dysregulation
Disorder. 100% of kids will
qualify for this disorder. The
rationale seems to be get them
as kids and have them for life
pharmaceutically.
Policy changes Frances sees
that will help are: no more fruc-
tose subsidies, no more coke
and fries with school lunches,
no more streets without side-
walks to discourage walking,
restore Phys. Ed. in schools, add
calorie counts to menus, subsi-
dize vegetables, lower insurance
premiums for losing weight,
encourage people to eat less and
exercise more.
DSM-5 mislabels medical disor-
ders as mental disorders.
Irritable bowel syndrome,
chronic fatigue, Lyme Disease,
fibromyalgia, chronic pain, and
more, now carry psychiatric dis-
order numbers.
Elsewhere in the news, oxy-
codon is being decried as an
abused drug. Ive observed that
small doses given to elderly
people for pain often causes
them to hallucinate. Because
they are elderly, they then risk
being pegged with a senile diag-
nosis and given psychotropics.
Treatment of US service people
for PTSD (Post Traumatic
Stress Disorder) is under fire in
the news this week. After 3 or
more deployments to participate
in the horrors of war, there are
reports that the Army is crimi-
nalizing PTSD behavior and
discharging service people with
PTSD instead of court-martial-
ing them if they agree to give up
their health benefits. The PTSD
diagnosis without treatment
makes it difficult for them to get
a job, much less resume their
personal lives. Is this how we
want to recognize and care for
our service people?
The rationale of using drugs to
correct a chemical imbalance
for the rest of your life has
been abused, not only with psy-
chotropic drugs but with drugs
for medical problems.
Frances reminds us that Big
Tobacco once seemed invinci-
ble, yet was taken down so
quickly. The same thing can
happen with Big Pharma when
we refuse to accept the buffet of
pills it promotes that rob us of
our health and financial solven-
cy, when we heed Hippocrates
caution to let our food be our
medicine, and when we inten-
tionally give our bodies the
exercise we need to keep all sys-
tems running smoothly.
Elizabeth Terp draws on her
experiences as a School Nurse-
Teacher, Psychiatric Nurse
Practitioner, Yoga Instructor and
Home Health Nurse. She wel-
comes your comments at PO
Box 547, Campton, NH 03223,
e -
mail:elizabethterp@yahoo.com,
or her Keeping Each Other Well
Blog: http://elizabethterp.word-
press.com.
Nurturing a Meadow
We live very much in the
woods. The property, nonethe-
less, is not entirely forested. We
now have The Clearing the
open area in which the cabin
and the garden are situated
and The Meadow, also known as
the Upper Field a patch cut
that now boasts clover and
grass, as well as a once-wild-
now-sort-of-tamed raspberry
patch.
These open spaces are a source
of pride and mutual smiles as
Ryan and I relish the magnani-
mous tone we impart to their
titles. Why? Because their
existence implies much work.
The Meadow, granted, had the
assistance of goats a few years
back to stall the natural process
of forest succession. For this
we are grateful, but to maintain
it as pasture we must work to
keep it as such. Thus enters the
scythe in the story of our home-
stead. This is self-propelled
mowing in the original sense of
the phrase: human powered,
muscled powered. Indeed.
With the scythe, we can trim the
clover and the hay grasses. This
encourages vigorous growth, as
well as keeps passage through
the area comfortable. A wildlife
niche distinct from the sur-
rounding woods is created with
this lush pasture setting. Too,
the clover is a source of nutri-
ent-rich mulch, and the grasses
a straw substitute (we must be
careful to cut prior to setting
seed) used for smothering weed
pressure and retaining moisture
within the garden beds.
The Clearing, however, has a
different story in that no animals
have helped us in its progression
from forest to field. The process
began with the felling of trees
and the stacking of brush. In the
time we were able to create a
garden and erect the cabin, a
whole new genre of flora
replaced the pines which once
stood in their place. While
weve been fortunate to have
many grasses, clover, and wild-
flowers appear, brambles, vir-
gins bower, and shrubby
beaked hazelnut have been
equally vigorous.
We do, of course, cut back the
plants of the latter list, in the
hope that those of the former
will dominate. This necessitates
much handwork, and spot-by-
spot care in picking and choos-
ing how to best nurture our par-
ticular style of lawn. Before
the scythe can be used, there is
woody debris, slash, rocks, and
uneven topography that must be
dug, moved, rolled, hauled, and
re-shaped all for the pursuit of
the repetitive, meditative, pow-
erful swing of the scythe blade.
Predictably, there are always
corners, edges, and tiny nooks
that require finer handiwork
and for this we have the hand
scythe. Commonly recognized
as the sickle blade, this curved
hand tool is excellent for preci-
sion and detail work in close
proximity to the garden or other
plants that must be preserved.
Ryan in particular enjoys the
rhythm and labor of working
with the full-sized scythe.
Hours of sweat have gone into
the basic and essential work of
sculpting an open environment.
I, by contrast, enjoy the hand
scythe a satisfying means to
tame the vigor of plants in and
around the garden. In this way
we are cultivating our lawn
not, perhaps, of suburban style,
but certainly of utility. A
lawn not simply for lawns
sake (and yes, it is with a broad
definition of the word that we
use it), but for the multiplicity
of functions it offers, and the
aesthetics that accompany it.
With the use of beloved hand
tools, we keep the forest at bay,
encourage the garden, and wel-
come the sun to shine on our lit-
tle home.
For ecological garden design
and maintenance, or weeds
pulled from your garden or
landscaped housefront, please
contact Beth via
b.a.weick@gmail.com (please
see Business Directory listing
under Garden Design &
Services).
ncnewsnh@gmail.com July 5, 2013 northcountry news page A-15
Northcountry News Parting Shot
A wonderful picture of one of our local heron population.
These birds are amazing to see both in flight or in a tree top.
- John Green
If you have a photo which you think could make it as our
Picture of the Week or Parting Shot - let us know. Email it to
ncnewsnh@gmail.com Your picture could become our next
Picture Of The Week!
Its What The
Locals Read!
Northcountry
News
603-764-5807
Northcountry News
DID YOU KNOW?
Tug of War was an Olympic event between
1900 and 1920!
During WWII, because a lot of players were
called to duty, the Pittsburgh Steelers and
Philadelphia Eagles combined to become
The Steagles!
Basketball great Wilt Chamberlain never
fouled out of a game!
Car airbags kill 1 person for every
22 lives that they save!
People who ride on roller coasters have a
higher chance of having a blood clot
in the brain!
A jiffy is an actual unit of time for 1/100th of
a second. Thus the saying, I will be
there in a jiffy!
WEEK OF JULY 8, 2013
ARIES (March 21 to April 19)
Don't be Sheepish about asking
questions and demanding
answers. You not only gain
needed information, but also
respect for your steadfast search
for the truth.
TAURUS (April 20 to May 20)
A money problem that shows up
early in the week is expeditious-
ly resolved by savvy Bovines
who know how to turn a
momentary financial lapse into
a monetary gain.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 20)
It's a good time to shed negative
energy-draining forces and
develop a positive approach to
handling current, as well as
upcoming, personal and/or pro-
fessional situations.
CANCER (June 21 to July 22)
Your urge to do your best on a
current task is commendable.
But don't let it become all-con-
suming. Spend some spiritually
restorative time with those who
love you.
LEO (July 23 to August 22)
This could be a good time for all
you Leos and Leonas to take
your bows for your recent
achievements and then go off to
enjoy some fun times with your
prides and joys.
VIRGO (August 23 to
September 22) A negative
response to a well-intentioned
suggestion could communicate
a sense of distrust you might
later find hard to refute. Think
carefully before reacting.
LIBRA (September 23 to
October 22) Your loving atten-
tion comforts a family member
who is feeling a bit out of sorts.
But be careful to prioritize your
time so you don't neglect your
work duties.
SCORPIO (October 23 to
November 21) Your curiosity
might be resented by some. But
those who know you will sup-
port your penchant for never
settling for less than the truth.
So stay with it.
SAGITTARIUS (November 22
to December 21) A pesky situa-
tion from the past recurs, albeit
in an altered form. Deal with it
promptly before it can go from
merely irksome to decidedly
troublesome.
CAPRICORN (December 22
to January 19) Don't wait too
long to submit your proposals
after giving them a last look-
over. If necessary, you should be
able to defend any portion
called into question.
AQUARIUS (January 20 to
February 18) A bid to use your
workplace dispute-settling skills
in another situation is tempting.
But be careful: You might not
have all the facts you'll need if
you agree to do it.
PISCES (February 19 to March
20) That sense of self-doubt is
so untypical of you, you should
have no qualms in shaking it off.
Remind yourself of all you've
done and can do, and then do it
again.
BORN THIS WEEK: Your
ability to charm others without
sacrificing sincerity is what
makes people want to follow
your leadership.
(c) 2013 King Features Synd.,
Inc.
Q: I have a copy of Time maga-
zine dated March 3, 1923,
which is Vol. 1, No. 1, the pre-
miere issue. It is in fairly good
condition, and I need to deter-
mine if it is a reprint or an orig-
inal. -- John, Sun City West,
Ariz.
A: Time was founded by Henry
Luce and Briton Hadden. Their
aim was to produce a publica-
tion that featured short, concise
summaries of events. The maga-
zine, even from the beginning,
was extremely popular. To
determine if you have an origi-
nal issue, I suggest you show it
to some of the established used
and rare book dealers in your
area. This first issued has been
reprinted several times, so an
expert's opinion is certainly nec-
essary. According to several col-
lectors I contacted, if it is
authentic and in good to very
good condition, it would retail
for about $150. The first issue of
Life Magazine, published Nov.
23, 1936, generally sells in the
$75 to $150 range.
***
Q: After my father passed away,
I came across several old stocks
and bonds dating back to 1918-
1929. Some of them are from
the National Diversified
Corporation, Buffalo Oil and
Gas, Texlovana Producing
Refining and Hannibal Rubber
Company. How do I go about
finding out if any of these are
still valid stocks? I tried looking
them up, and I couldn't find out
anything that was helpful. --
Susan, Alton, Ill.
A: Pierre Bonneau, CEO of
Stock Research International,
has been in business for more
than 45 years, and he can help
you. Contact him at P.O. Box
2359 Vineyard Haven, MA
02568; ssi@stockseachintl.com;
and 1-800-538-4523.
***
Write to Larry Cox in care of
King Features Weekly Service,
P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL
32853-6475, or send e-mail to
questionsforcox@aol.com. Due
to the large volume of mail he
receives, Mr. Cox is unable to
personally answer all reader
questions. Do not send any
materials requiring return mail.
(c) 2013 King Features Synd.,
Inc.
It was French Enlightenment
writer Voltaire who made the
following sage observation:
"Faith consists in believing
when it is beyond the power of
reason to believe."
If Niagara Falls emptied into
the Grand Canyon, the giant
chasm would be filled within 6
months.
Next time you're rolling the
dice, pick up a die and take a
closer look. The opposite sides
of each gaming cube always add
up to 7.
You might think of Uncle Sam
as a fictional character, but he's
actually based in fact. The orig-
inal Uncle Sam was one Samuel
Wilson, born in Massachusetts
in 1766. When he was 14 years
old, he joined the army to fight
in the American Revolution.
Once the war was over, he
moved to Troy, N.Y., started
working in the meat-packing
industry, and became known
locally as "Uncle Sam" due to
his jovial manner and ethical
business practices. During the
War of 1812, Sam won a con-
tract to provide meat to troops
stationed nearby. To keep track
of which crates of meat were
destined for the troops, he
stamped "U.S." on them, even
though that abbreviation for
United States was not yet in
common use. When his packing
plant was inspected in October
of 1812, a government inspector
asked a nearby worker what
"U.S." stood for. Unsure of the
abbreviation himself, the work-
er replied that it must stand for
the name of the owner, Uncle
Sam. Though the answer was in
error, it took hold, and soldiers
soon began calling military
rations "bounty of Uncle Sam."
If you remember the early-
1960s TV series "Route 66,"
you might be surprised to learn
that the show was actually shot
in Florida and Oregon, nowhere
near the fabled highway.
***
Thought for the Day: "Moral
indignation is jealousy with a
halo." -- H.G. Wells
(c) 2013 King Features Synd.,
Inc.
page A-16 northcountry news July 5, 2013 www.northcountrynewsnh.com
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