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Around
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Early deadline
notice given
In observance of the up-
coming holiday, the
Paulding County Progress
office will be closed on
Thursday, July 4.
The advertising deadline
for the Monday, July 10
Weekly Reminder will be
at 3 p.m. Wednesday,
July 3.
The office will resume
regular business hours
8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday,
July 5.
Weather report
A summary of June’s
weather highs and lows,
as recorded at Paulding’s
water treatment plant:
• Maximum tempera-
ture: 93° on June 23.
• Low temperature: 49°
on June 4 and 5.
• Most rain in a 24-
hour period: 1.88 inches
on June 1.
• Total rainfall for the
month: 5.57 inches.
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AULDING
AULDING
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C
OUNTY
OUNTY
VOL. 138 NO. 45 PAULDING, OHIO 419-399-4015 www.progressnewspaper.org WEDNESDAY, JULY 3, 2013 ONE DOLLAR USPS 423620
See FORT BROWN, page 2A
www.progressnewspaper.org
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ROGRESS
ROGRESS
background of the historic
site, the fort’s construction by
Capt. William Brown, and
descriptions from individuals
who traveled past the site
during the war.
The granite memorial
bench, donated by the mem-
bers of the Jacob Stemple
Chapter National Society
Daughters of 1812, was dedi-
cated “in grateful recognition
of the significance of this
site, especially in this bicen-
tennial year.”
Some of the attendees said
they had been present at the
1953 event in which the mon-
ument was dedicated. Ray
Keck said that he recalled
that when the new bridge was
being built, they excavated
the old one and found at least
four bodies buried there.
It is assumed those bodies
belonged to soldiers who
By NANCY WHITAKER
Progress Staff Writer
It was a bright, sunny
morning June 29 when ap-
proximately 125 people gath-
ered to celebrate the bicen-
tennial of Fort Brown. The
event, organized by members
of Jacob Stemple Chapter
Daughters 1812, was held to
commemorate the days over
200 years ago when soldiers
of the War of 1812 served
here.
Fort Brown was a stockade
built on the banks of the con-
fluence of the Auglaize and
the Little Auglaize rivers. A
granite monument was
placed at the site in 1953.
Some of the men, women
and children were dressed in
period attire, adding to the at-
mosphere of the celebration.
The hour-long program in-
cluded the presentation of
colors, invocation, Pledge of
Allegiance and American’s
Creed.
The Oakwood Community
Band played patriotic songs
including “The Star Spangled
Banner.”
The Laying of Wreaths
was conducted by several
local chapters of the
Daughters of the American
Revolution, one chapter of
the Sons of the American
Revolution and the host
Daughters of 1812.
Guest speaker was Richard
Rozevink, a historian from
Defiance, who provided
Paulding County United Way executive director Sonya
Herber looks over promotional material with Paulding County
Carnegie librarian Susan Pieper in preparation for this year’s
United Way campaign. See PACESETTER, page 2A
Staff Photo/Paulding County Progress
Saturday morning was bright and sunny and the weather cooperated for the Fort Brown bicentennial program. Here, an offi-
cer bows after placing a wreath at the Fort Brown memorial.
By JIM LANGHAM
Feature Writer
Paulding County United Way executive di-
rector Sonya Herber has announced that the
Paulding County Carnegie Library will be serv-
ing as the pacesetter for this year’s United Way
campaign.
Herber said that the library’s place in the up-
coming campaign will correspond with the
agency’s new emphasis of programs focusing
on health, environment and the development of
the whole person.
“This is in keeping with the United Way’s
transition toward a community-wide impact,”
said Pieper. “Let’s listen, let’s engage more fam-
ilies. Let’s read to educate people on how to
manage a budget, even if they are on a limited
income. Learning to live within one’s means
can be tight.
“We are real excited about the United Way’s
shift of philosophy,” continued Pieper. “I like
the way we are shifting to funding that benefits
more of the community through partnerships.
Imagine the possibility of living united; imagine
people pooling the resources of the whole com-
munity together for each person’s benefit.”
Pieper said that the library will kick off its
pacesetter campaign on July 30 from noon until
6 p.m. at the main library in Paulding. The day’s
activities will include matinees, hot dogs and
hamburgers and popcorn. There will also be the
opportunity to make crafts.
“We were the pacesetter in 2001. We had just
initiated our computer lab; then 9-11 hit and the
2001 campaign took on a different look. People
developed an attitude of, ‘I’ll give locally; I
can’t change what happens in New York,
Washington or Pennsylvania but I can help
things around here,’” said Pieper.
Herber said that the actual kickoff for this
year’s campaign will be on Aug. 14 from noon
until 1 p.m. at the Paulding County Senior
Center. This past campaign raised $55,502; this
year’s goal is $60,000. Herber said that she
would like to see most of the fund-raising for
that wrapped up in February.
“This county is a giving county,” said Pieper.
“We did a wonderful job with the Relay For
PCCL to serve as pacesetter
for upcoming UW campaign
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Sheriff’s K-9 unit to become a reality
or conducting foot pursuits according
to Sheriff Landers.
While there will be on-going vet
bills and other maintenance costs of
owning a K-9 unit, the sheriff was
pleased to note that all the dog food for
the K-9 unit will be donated from
Iams in Leipsic.
Monetary donations are still being
taken for those who wish to partici-
pate. In the meantime, Sheriff Landers
says, “We have enough to get us start-
ed. We just had more money come in
last week, but the account will always
be there.”
By DENISE GEBERS
Progress Staff Writer
PAULDING – By the end of sum-
mer, it is expected that the county’s
new K-9 unit will have been selected
and training begun.
According to Paulding County
Sheriff Jason Landers, over $12,000
has been donated toward the K-9 proj-
ect and a grant has also come into play.
“We had a patrol car on order be-
fore, then a grant came through that
will cover it,” he said. The vehicle
should be here sometime in August.
The Justice Assistance Grant (JAG)
from the Office of Ohio Criminal
Justice Services in Columbus is for
over $29,000. It will cover the cost of
the car plus some equipment.
Equipment for the cruiser includes a
kennel for the back seat area and a
cooling/heating system for the “cage.”
This system is designed to keep the car
at a safe temperature during heat or
cold. It comes with a pager to notify
the handler should the temperature be-
come unsafe.
Paulding County’s K-9 unit has not
yet been selected. Tentatively it has
been set up with the breeder to choose
the dog in September.
Deputy Gary Deitrick, an 18-year
veteran of the sheriff’s office, has been
designated to be the K-9 unit’s handler.
He and the dog will train simultane-
ously in Allen County, Ind. Sheriff
Landers said the 14-week course will
start in September.
“They will see every situation they
might face,” said the sheriff. “They
will train day, night, evening and
weekends. There will be some live
tracks.”
A live track would include situations
such as searching for a missing child
Bench dedicated at Fort Brown bicentennial
2A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, July 3, 2013
YOUR SOURCE FOR EXCLUSIVE PAULDING COUNTY NEWS! FOR
HOME DELIVERY: 419-399-4015
n PACESETTER
Continued from Page 1A
n FORT
BROWN
Continued from Page 1A
Your County.
Your Newspaper.
Paulding County Paulding County
Progress Progress
“Exclusive Paulding County News”
copyright © 2013 Published weekly by
The Paulding County Progress, Inc. P.O.
Box 180, 113 S. Williams St., Paulding,
Ohio 45879 Phone 419-399-4015
Fax: 419-399-4030;
website: www.progressnewspaper.org
Doug Nutter . . . . . . . . . . . . . Publisher
Advertising - dnutter@progressnewspaper.org
Melinda Krick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Editor
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USPS 423620
Entered at the Post Office in Paulding,
Ohio, as 2nd class matter. Subscription
rates: $36 per year for mailing addresses
in Defiance, Van Wert Putnam and
Paulding counties. $46 per year outside
these counties; local rate for Military per-
sonnel and students.
Deadline for display ad-
vertising 3 p.m. Monday.
News deadline 3 p.m.
Thursday.
Paulding County Progress
By NANCY WHITAKER
Progress Staff Writer
PAULDING – If you want
to learn more about the art of
art in Paulding County, you
can do so by picking up a
copy of Alice Gerber’s new
publication titled All the
Mommies Would Go Painting
Together.
The book was done in ap-
preciation of her mother’s
skill as a painter. Alice, the
daughter of Drs. Kirkwood
and Edythe Pritchard M.D.,
grew up in an era when sever-
al people belonged to an art
club.
The art club was started in
the late 1950s. In fact, Alice
said, “there is a ton of infor-
mation through the Paulding
papers, which documented
there was a very large group
of men and women who were
participating in some type of
art.”
Looking back, Alice re-
flected that when growing up,
her mom and some neighbor-
hood ladies would load up
their paint supplies and go to a
selected place and paint. Each
artist would study the same
scene and perhaps interpret it
differently as they picked up
their brush or pencil.
The people involved with
the art club entered many art
shows and won several
awards for their paintings.
There were art shows at the
Paulding library, Fort Wayne,
Van Wert, Toledo, Bryan,
Oakwood, Lima and
Defiance.
Some of the art club mem-
bers mentioned in Alice’s
Leatherman, Jean Dunlap and
Martha McCague, all of
Oakwood; Esther Corwin, Joy
Deken, Peg Dotterer, Joyce
Huseby, Olive Johnson, Bob
Lindsay, Wilma Miller, Mrs.
John Schaefer, Nancy Stiger,
Sylvia Young, Barbara
Zimmer, Millie Zug and many
more.
“It would be great if addi-
tional artists can be celebrated
in a similar book, completed
by those who knew them
best,” Alice suggested.
A celebration party was
held May 11 with former art
club members and painters
who were presented a copy of
the book.
The author graduated from
Paulding High School and
Taylor University. She was
employed by Paulding
County Job and Family
Services for 32 years, retiring
in 2012.
She has two daughters,
Audra Lynn Schoenauer and
Susanne Louise Gerber.
Susanne designed the cover
for the book.
Alice said, “This book is
dedicated to all of our mothers
(and dads) who found such re-
lease and joy in the paintings
of our towns and landscapes.”
She went on to say,
“Mothers paint our lives in
such grand ways. They fill us
up with all the colors of the
world.”
If anyone is interested in
purchasing the book, contact
her at 419-647-4940 week-
days after 10 a.m. The price of
the book is $15.65 plus ship-
ping.
died there.
Following the ceremony at
Fort Brown, an 1812-style
lunch of ham and beans, corn
bread, cookies and lemonade
was served in the Oakwood
Community Park.
The Progress has posted
an album containing more
than 60 photos from the June
29 event. To view, visit
www.progressnewspaper.org
and click on the big blue but-
ton “Click here to see and
buy photos.”
Life. I think that we can do an
equally good job with the
United Way campaign.”
Pieper said that one of her
main goals is partnering the li-
brary with other organizations
that could benefit from the li-
brary and assist in raising cam-
paign money.
“I want to partner with situ-
ations that benefit the entire
county,” said Pieper. “We want
this to become more and more
of a collaborative effort.”
Pieper said that over 50 per-
cent of the children in the
county are on a free or reduced
lunch program.
“That is a symptom of eco-
nomic need in our county,” ob-
served Pieper. “That matches
up with United Way pillars of
finance stability, health and
wellness and education pro-
grams.”
“Our goal is to create long-
lasting changes that prevent
problems from happening in
the first place,” said Herber.
“We invite you to be part of
the change. Together, united,
we can inspire hope and create
opportunities for a better to-
morrow.
“United Way of Paulding
County partners with local
agencies to mobilize the car-
ing power of communities to
achieve lasting social change,”
added Herber. “These pro-
grams help our friends and
neighbors in need.”
For information contact
Herber at 419-399-8240 or
unitedwayofpauldingcounty.o
rg.
Clean up and sewer topics of Paulding Council
By BILL SHERRY
Correspondent
PAULDING – The Paulding Vil -
lage Council met Monday evening
with five members present.
Council President Roger Sierer re-
marked that the property on Johnson
Road, the scene of a house fire sev-
eral months ago, was still not cleaned
up, and there had been reports that
rats have moved into the debris.
Mayor Greg White said that he
and village administrator Harry
Wiebe had looked at the situation
and that were going to get Police
Chief Randy Crawford involved in
the situation.
Wiebe presented council with an
administrator’s agenda which in-
cluded water and sewer assessments
for an account owned by Ernest C.
Crutchfield, and water, sewer and re-
fuse assessments for a residence
owned by Tamara S. Saul Eicher.
Wiebe also told council that he had
attended a safety committee meeting
and there had been some discussion
at that meeting concerning the vil-
lage’s solid waste issues.
Wiebe noted that there have been
some minor changes as the sewer
system is installed. He also advised
council that he was attempting to get
the engineer in charge of the sewer
separation project to present council
with the status of the project and
some of the pending issues.
White told council that the pro-
ceeds from Mayor’s Court for the
month of June were $1,413.80.
He also commented that he and
Wiebe had attended an open house
for the Hands of Hope, a pregnancy
crisis center that is now located at the
Samaritan Center.
Wiebe noted that the Samaritan
Center is also the location for the an-
imal care clinic. The Samaritan
Center is located on Wayne Street,
north of the Paulding County
Hospital, and was formerly the
building that was constructed and
used by Dr. Snyder in his medical
practice prior to retirement.
White extended wishes for a safe
and enjoyable holiday for the resi-
dents of Paulding and noted that the
village offices will be closed on
Thursday, July 4 and Friday, July 5 to
observe the holiday.
Solicitor Mike Jones requested
and council voted unanimously to go
into executive session to discuss real
estate legal matters.
The next meeting will be July 15.
Staff Photo/Paulding County Progress
On the picturesque banks of the Auglaize River, more than 100 people gathered Saturday to
mark the bicentennial of Fort Brown. Historian Richard Rozevink (above) was the featured
speaker.
Staff Photo/Paulding County Progress
Members of the Jacob Stemple Chapter Daughters War of 1812 dedicated a granite bench they donated for the Fort Brown
memorial site. They organized a bicentennial event held June 29.
Staff Photo/Paulding County Progress
In the 1950s, the art club in Paulding was very active. Alice Pritchard Gerber has authored a book commemorating the artists
of the area. Gerber presented copies of the book to former art club members and friends this spring.
‘All the Mommies Would Go Painting’
book as having influence on
each other’s style of painting
include local painters Dr.
Edna Preston, Kate Stahl,
Mary Ruth Clark, Isabelle
Ringler, Eileen Vance Jeffery
and Elizabeth Paulus.
Also part of the story are
Sonya and John Peeper, Fern
White, Carl and Dorothy
Chester, Genny Rife, Violet
Robinson, Gene Scarbrough,
John Narkter and H.G.
Davisson.
“I felt compelled to learn
from (her mother’s) friends
how they pulled this off. We
were all small children, yet
they found the time to paint,
attend art shows, take addi-
tional lessons and paint
more,” Alice said. “In October
2008, I hosted a party with
them and with friends whom I
considered family. It was then
that I knew their story needed
to be captured in print.”
She began working on the
project that year and it was in
2010 that Alice interviewed
former art club members. In
the fall of 2012, she spent
hours at the Paulding County
Carnegie Library looking for
any documentation concern-
ing the club activity, paintings
or members.
The book includes many
pictures of various paintings
done years ago by local
artists.
A few local artists included
Jean Hughes, Mary Marlin,
Mary Schilb, Mrs. Richard
Schilb and Mrs. Verne
Tussing, all of Antwerp;
Verde Leatherman, Charles
Leather man, Chester
The following is a weekly
report regarding current and
upcoming highway road con-
struction projects in the Ohio
Department of Transportation
District One, which includes
Paulding County:
• Ohio 111 in the village of
Paulding west of U.S. 127
will close July 8 for four
weeks for sanitary and storm
sewer installation. Traffic de-
toured onto Ohio 49, U.S. 24
and U.S. 127 back to Ohio
111.
• U.S. 24 at various loca-
tions will be restricted to one
lane through the work zone
for berm restoration.
• U.S. 127 from U.S. 224
to the south corporation limit
of Paulding restricted to one
lane through the work zone
for striping and reflector in-
stallation. The project is ex-
pected to be completed next
week.
• Ohio 111 east of Ohio
127 and south of Ohio 637
will be restricted to one lane
throughout the work zone for
pavement repair.
ODOT road projects
facebook.com/pauldingpaper
twitter.com/pauldingpaper
www.progressnewspaper.org
JOSEPH LYVERS
1963-2013
PAYNE – Joseph Daniel
Lyvers, 49, of Payne, passed
away Saturday, June 29 at
Defiance Inpatient Hospice
Center.
Wednesday, July 3, 2013 Paulding County Progress - 3A
Obituaries
Updated weekdays at
www.progressnewspaper.org
The Amish Cook
By: Lovina Eicher
farm machinery along the
road.
Church services were held
here again this past Sunday.
We had a nice sized atten-
dance, but not as many as last
time. Our lunch menu con-
sisted of wheat and white
bread, butter, strawberry jam,
Bologna, cheese spread,
peanut butter spread, red
beets, freezer and dill pickles,
hot peppers, monster, sugar,
chocolate chip and peanut
butter cookies, coffee and
iced tea.
We also always make an 8
quart kettle of chicken noodle
soup for the younger children
that don’t eat sandwiches yet.
Then in honor of Father’s
Day, we also served strawber-
ries and ice cream.
All the dishes and bench
wagons are back in the bench
wagon waiting to be pulled to
the next place. It is always a
lot of work to get ready to
host church services, but it is
relaxing once it’s over and
everything is cleaned.
I didn’t get around to hav-
ing the garage sale I wanted
to have before our church
services. That is now on my
“to do” list to organize all that
before canning season is in
full swing.
I would also like to go to
the local U-pick to get straw-
berries to make strawberry
freezer jam. That is a favorite
jam around here.
Sister Emma has her own
strawberry plants and fur-
nished all the strawberries for
It is a Wednesday after-
noon. This morning the tem-
perature was 51°. We went
out to weed and hoe in the
garden after the morning
house-work was done. It was
cool when we started, but the
warm sun soon made it get
hot. We came in to eat some
lunch and take a break.
With church services being
held here twice recently, the
gardens were neglected more
than usual this past month.
Everything is growing real
well. We are getting enough
rain that we don’t need to
water the garden.
Tomatoes are loaded on the
plants and the corn is past
knee-high already. We are al-
ready enjoying hot peppers.
We planted Seranno and ba-
nana peppers.
The bananas will soon be big
enough to stuff with cream
cheese and Colby cheese then
wrap with bacon and grill. We
like the banana peppers better
than the jalapeno peppers to
do as they aren’t as hot. We
have also been enjoying let-
tuce, radishes, and green
onions from our garden for
quite some time.
Yesterday we took Dia-
mond, our 19-year-old horse,
to town to get new shoes for
the boys.
Diamond seems to get
slower and slower to make
the trip to town and back, but
he is safe and sound around
all the traffic. It means a lot to
have a horse that doesn’t shy
away from the big trucks and
church services on Sunday.
She is getting a good yield. I
would like to get a new plants
started. My last ones didn’t
do so well.
I made these for supper one
evening with Emma’s straw-
berries. I hope you’ll like
them as much as we did.
STRAWBERRY
SHORTCAKE
CUPCAKES
1 quart fresh strawberries
1 1/2 cups flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
4 tablespoons sugar, divided
1 tablespoon baking powder
1 egg
1/4 cup cold butter or mar-
garine
1/2 cup milk
Whipped cream or Cool
Whip
Instructions: Mash or slice
the strawberries; place in a
bowl and add 2 tablespoons
sugar, mix and set aside.
In another bowl combine
flour, baking powder, salt and
remaining 2 tablespoons
sugar.
Cut in butter until crumbly.
In a small bowl, beat egg and
milk and stir into flour mix-
ture just until moistened.
Fill eight greased muffin
cups 2/3 full.
Bake at 425° for 12 minutes or
until golden.
Remove from the pan to cool
on a wire rack.
Just before serving, split short-
cakes in half horizontally.
Spoon berries and whipped
cream between layers and over
top.
Would you like to work with
funeral directors who understand
how valuable it is for you and your
family to have a truly meaningful
funeral experience?
When the time comes to honor a
loved one’s memory in a personal
way, give us a call.
Dooley
FUNERAL HOME
Antwerp
419-258-5684
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Payne
419-263-0000
For a Life Worth Celebrating
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www.dooleyfuneralhome.com
HEITMEYER
FUNERAL HOME
610 Walnut Street
Oakwood, Ohio
419-594-3660
Monument Display on Site
Pre-Arrangement Specialists
45c1
REAL ESTATE TAXES ARE
DUE WED., JULY 17, 2013
Failure To Receive Tax Bill Will
Not Avoid Penalty or
Interest Charges.
Please bring your tax bill with
you when coming into the
office to make a payment.
If you cannot make it into the
office, please use the addressed
envelope enclosed with your tax
bill and mail it to the office.
TRAILER TAX WILL BE DUE
WED., JULY 31, 2013
Paulding County Treasurer
Lou Ann Wannemacher
Phone: 419-399-8280
Office Hours are
Monday thru Friday
8 am until 4:30 pm
S
u
s
ie’s
F
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m
ily
B
a
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y
45c2
is going on VACATION.
We will be closed July 4th thru the 15
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.
But we will be right back
Tuesday, July 16
th
at 6:00 am
We Love You All!
T
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The Trophy Center
Engraving, A Specialty Since 1950
419.222.0841
1175 W. North St.
Lima, OH 45805
www.trophycenter.net
We also have
wedding party gifts!




















Carol’s
Main Street
Makeovers
105 N. Main, Payne
419-263-2030
45c1
2013-14 NPAC season
to feature big names
By LINDSAY MCCOY
DHI Correspondent
VAN WERT – The Nis-
wonger Performing Arts Cen-
ter (NPAC) of Van Wert has
announced its upcoming
2013-14 concert season
schedule with some exciting
new and returning guests in-
cluding popular country
artists, Trace Adkins and Kel-
lie Pickler, and a variety of
other special performances.
“It seems like just yester-
day we were fighting to build
this place,” said NPAC exec-
utive director Paul Hover-
man. “Now, we are getting
ready to celebrate our seventh
season. We are very excited
for this year’s season, and
with 24 scheduled events we
have something that will
tickle the fancy of everyone.”
The process of planning
and scheduling this year’s
season began many months
ago in November thanks to
the tireless work of the NPAC
Programing Committee.
The season is set to kick off
in less than four months on
Oct. 5, with contemporary
Christian artist, Michael W.
Smith. Smith is a three-time
Grammy Award winner and
has sold more than 13 million
albums. His biggest success
came in 1991 with his hit,
“Place in this World”, which
reached number six on the
Billboard Hot 100. This is an
artist that Hoverman has been
hoping to bring to Van Wert
for a long time.
Debby Boone will be visit-
ing the NPAC on Oct. 20,
with Under the StreetLamp
on Nov. 1, and the Ohio State
Marching Band will be mak-
ing an appearance on Nov. 7.
“This season, we are ex-
pecting by far our biggest
concert we have ever brought
in, and we expect to sell out
very quickly” exclaimed
Hoverman. American country
music artist and 2013 winner
of “Celebrity Apprentice,”
Trace Adkins, will grace Van
Wert with his huge presence
on Nov. 16.
Adkins has charted more
than 20 singles on the Bill-
board country music charts
including, “Ladies Love
Country Boys,” “You’re
Gonna Miss This,” and
“Songs About Me.”
If any tickets are left remain-
ing for the public following
Grand Series and Select Se-
ries ticket sales, they will go
on sale 90 days prior to Nov.
16.
Adkins will be followed by
a variety of Christmas per-
formances including Sonos
Handbells on Dec. 1, return-
ing performer Tony Orlando,
on Dec. 7, Dave Koz and
Friends on Dec. 10, and Point
of Grade on Dec. 15.
January will kickoff with
two exciting performances,
The Cinderella Ballet and
Kellie Pickler.
The Cinderella Ballet will
be returning to Van Wert from
Russia for their second per-
formance on the NPAC stage.
Kellie Pickler is another
American music country
artist who gamed fame as a
contestant on the fifth season
of American Idol. Pickler re-
cently made her way back to
television on ABC’s hit se-
ries, “Dancing with the
Stars.”
“We weren’t sure we could
get Pickler, but everything
landed just right,” noted Hov-
erman.
Van Wert will also be wel-
coming two Broadway plays,
“The Addams Family” on
Jan. 31, and will conclude
with the “West Side Story” on
May 11, just in time for
Mother’s Day.
In honor of Valentine’s
Day, “The Newlywed Game”
host, Bob Eubanks, will host
The Not So Newly Wed game
with a variety of bloopers
from the popular American
television game show that pit-
ted newly married couples
against each other in a series
of revealing question rounds
to determine how well the
spouses knew each other.
The month of February will
conclude with Orion Samuel-
son, and March will begin
with American soul music
group, The Spinners, on
March 1. This R&B group
has been active for over 50
years, and Hoverman noted
that people will be surprised
how many of this group’s
songs they recognize.
The Toledo Symphony will
be performing the works of
Rodgers and Hammerstein on
March 9 with the addition of
two local vocalists Mary Ann
Faulk and Jake Wilder. On
March 15, children of all ages
can come to enjoy Dinosaur
Train Live. Dinosaur Train is
currently the third highest
rated kid’s show airing on
PBS. Join Buddy the Tyran-
nosaurus Rex on the train to
explore and meet all other
sorts of dinosaurs.
March 19 will feature
speaker Courtnee Carrigan of
Columbus talking about di-
versity. The Church Base-
ment Ladies will be
performing an all new show
on March 23 when the ladies
of the Lutheran Church see
one of their own married to a
boy of the Catholic church.
This show is expected to
bring a lot of laughs as it has
in the past.
“HMS Pinafore” is a comic
opera of New York City by
Gilbert and Sullivan and is set
to take the stage on March 29.
Jungle Jack Hanna and a va-
riety of his furry guests will
be making their way to Van
Wert on April 5. Hanna, an
American zookeeper of
Columbus, has traveled all
over the world as one of the
most notable animal experts
in the states. Hanna will be
followed by the Voices of
Unity Choir on April 26.
“This is our season,” con-
cluded Hoverman. Grand se-
ries sales are set to begin on
June 20, at noon. The grand
series includes 19 events at
one value price dependent
upon the section of seating.
Select series sales began on
June 26. The select series al-
lows the public to pick three
to five or six or more concerts
at a discounted prices. All
other sales begin 90 days
prior to each event.
“This would not be possi-
ble without our sponsors,”
said NPAC marketing direc-
tor Tafi Stober. The 2013-14
season sponsor this year is
Statewide Ford of Van Wert.
For more information on
ticket sales, phone 419-238-
6722 (NPAC) or visit the
website www.npacvw.org.
KELLIE PICKLER
MICHAEL W. SMITH
The Progress ...
is Paulding County’s
newspaper of record.
Blighted buildings demolished
through state funding program
By JIM LANGHAM
Feataure Writer
Three structures in Paulding County have
been demolished and others are up for contract
through an Ohio Attorney General’s Office
program known as “Moving Ohio Forward.”
The local county has received $104,296 to as-
sist with demolition so far and could receive
more if circumstances warrant.
Those residences demolished so far are lo-
cated at 105 N. Fifth St. in Oakwood, 414 W.
Harrison St. in Paulding and 109 Stone St. in
Antwerp.
Other sites under consideration or bid in-
clude 207 Auglaize, Oakwood; 15825 Third
St., Broughton; 101 Logan St., Scott; 1957
Ohio 49, Payne; 658 Broadway, Latty; 400
South St., Oakwood; 122 Oswalt, Antwerp;
and 104 Third St., Oakwood.
Commissioner Tony Zartman noted that
several circumstances are necessary in order
to gain the right to tear down buildings includ-
ing agreement with owner or condemning
from villages. Zartman said that letters have
been sent to mayors and trustees concerning
the sites.
“The commissioners do not have the power
to condemn. Only villages and townships have
the power,” Zartman said.
“Paulding County is now accepting nomi-
nations for projects to be funded with these
grant dollars,” said Commissioner Fred
Pieper. “The projects will then be assessed and
prioritized by a committee established by the
commissioners.”
Grant guidelines for demolition including
the following:
1. It must be a residential home, meaning it is
on zoned land for residential use, has been used
as a residential dwelling, or connected to a struc-
ture that has been a residential dwelling mix.
2. It must be vacant, the property is unoccu-
pied and has been so for at least 90 days, but was
previously residential and documentation of such
status can be verified.
3. The home could be abandoned or mortgage
or tax foreclosure proceedings have been initi-
ated for that property and no mortgage or tax
payments have been made for at least 90 days.
4. The structure should be classified as
“blighted.” Examples of this state could in-
clude a dilapidated roof, infestation, deterio-
ration or extensive damage.
“Each property is bid separately, separate
cost and separate contractor,” said Pieper.
“There is a chance that this could be ex-
tended at the end of the year,” continued
Pieper. “Anything over $500,000 would have
to have matching money.”
Pieper said that one of the determining fac-
tors on whether or not the agreement would be
extended would be whether or not Franklin
County seeks renewal. The commissioner said
that Franklin County had been awarded $4.5
million. If that funding is not renewed, then it
could become available to other counties.
Commissioners’ journals
are posted online
The Paulding County commissioners are in session
every Monday and Wednesday. The commissioners’ jour-
nals are sent to the Paulding County Progress which
posts these meeting summaries online. Check our Web
site at www.progressnewspaper.org and click on “For the
Record” then “Commissioners.” These are open to every-
one and do not require a subscription to access.
4A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, July 3, 2013
Property Transfers
Sheriff’s Report
Mike Kauser was the speaker at the Paulding Kiwanis Club.
He was representing the fair ground committee to build three
new buildings in the agriculture area to bring them up to code.
The buildings will house the sheep, goats, swine and poultry.
These buildings are to be paid for from donations; one donor
said if the committee can raise $100,000, they will match it. The
estimated cost is around $250,000 for the total project. More than
$65,000 has been raised so far. He noted that farm community
has been very generous in helping to fund the effort. Tiffany
Beckman was the program chairman.
Common Pleas
FORUM
Reader’s
Opinion
Express your opinion
The Paulding County Progress provides
a public forum through “FORUM Reader
Opinion” Letters to the Editor for area res-
idents to express their opinions and ex-
change ideas on any topic of public
interest.
All letters submitted are subject to the
Publisher’s approval, and MUST include an
original signature and daytime telephone
number for verification. We won’t print un-
signed letters.
Letters should be brief and concise.
Letters must also conform to libel law and
be in good taste. Please limit letters to no
more than 500 words. We reserve the right
to edit and to correct grammatical errors.
We also reserve the right to verify state-
ments or facts presented in the letters.
The opinions stated are those of the
writer, and do not necessarily reflect that
of the newspaper.
Where to write: Letters to the Editor,
Paulding County Progress, P.O. Box 180,
Paulding OH 45879; or drop them off at
the office, 113 S. Williams St. The deadline
is noon Thursday the week prior to publi-
cation.
Attend our county
fair next year
Dear Editor,
Another Paulding County
Fair has come and gone.
I would like to thank the
fair board for the outstand-
ing job they did in present-
ing an incredible fair to this
county. So much hard work,
time and dedication went
into the fun we all had.
Thank you to the generous
donors for making Paulding
a “free fair” so that all can
enjoy. Thank these donors in
person if you have the op-
portunity, they are very spe-
cial, giving individuals.
If you missed the fair be-
cause you thought you’d
“save your money” to go to
Van Wert County Fair, that’s
too bad because ours has
turned the corner and now
offers much more, plus it’s
right in our backyard!
Support our local activi-
ties; it pays dividends. Our
children benefit so much
from the 4-H and FFA pro-
grams that we support.
I would encourage every-
one, if you have not attended
the fair recently, please do so
next year.
Holly Davis
Paulding
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The term “et al.” refers to and others; “et vir.,” and hus-
band; “et ux.,” and wife.
Benton Township
O’Dell C. Williams, dec. to Dennis O.
Williams, et al.; Sec. 18, 0.344 acre. Certifi-
cate of transfer.
Blue Creek Township
Rhonda J. Rager to Eric M. and Emily L.
Simindinger; Sec. 19, 1 acre. Warranty deed.
Jeffrey L. and Lori J. Miller to Eric R.
Buchman; Sec. 12, 31.528 acres. Warranty
deed.
Carryall Township
Randy L. and Cynthia K. Bell to Randy L.
and Cynthia K. Bell; Sec. 25, 2.88 acres. Quit
claim.
Crane Township
William J. Slone, dec. to Marcella Slone; Sec.
21, 3.43 acres and Sec. 28, 1.57 acres. Affidavit.
Jackson Township
Horizon Land I Ltd. to Witmer Properties
LLC; Sec. 6, 21.871 and 50.326 acres; and
Sec. 7, 1 acre. Warranty deed.
Clifford L. Baker, dec. to Sharon A. Baker;
Sec. 18, Lot 6, 0.51 acre. Affidavit.
Russell John and Mary Catherine Arend,
trustees to Arend Brothers Inc.; Sec. 22, 1.522
acres. Warranty deed.
Arend Brothers Inc. to Arend Brothers Inc.;
Sec. 22, 3.076 acres. Quit claim.
Guss A. and LeAnn Schlatter to Guss A. and
LeAnn Schlatter; Sec. 32, 1.5 acres. Warranty
deed.
Latty Township
Kacy N. Cooper, nka Kacy N. Wagner and
Brett Wagner to Charles K. Youtsey III; Sec.
35, 1.911 acres. Warranty deed.
Washington Township
Susan M. Barnhart to Brad M. and Bethany
R. Colley; Sec. 35, 1 acre. Warranty deed.
Marilyn A. Wannemacher to Marilyn A.
Wannemacher Life Estate, et al.; Sec. 24,
83.355 acres. Warranty deed.
Antwerp Village
Christopher L. Bohner and Pamela L. Her-
ber, fka Pamela L. Bohner to Pamela L. Her-
ber; Sec. 27, Outlots, 0.244 acre. Quit claim.
Oakwood Village
Marvin L. and Joyce S. Estle, et al. to
Thomas W. Pier; Lot 3, Estle First Addition,
0.233 acre. Warranty deed.
JPMorgan Chase Bank to Aaron Brewer;
Sec. 26, Lot 5, Outlots, 0.242 acre. Warranty
deed.
Paulding Village
Horizon Land I Ltd. to Witmer Properties
LLC; Lots 183-184, Noneman’s Emerald
Acres #3, 0.241 acre. Warranty deed.
Hiriam C. Smith, dec. to Cathrin W. Smith;
Lot 4, County Side Estates, 0.312 acre. Cer-
tificate of transfer.
Cathrin W. Smith, dec. to Clynton T. Smith,
et al.; Lot 4, Country Side Estates, 0.312 acre.
Certificate of transfer.
Russell E. and Kathryn P. Parrish to Karen
K. Bradford, trustee; Lots 19-20, Noneman-
DeMuth Allotment, 0.258 acre. Quit claim.
Gary J. and Sheila R. Justinger to Caitlin S.
Blair; Sec. 12, Lot 52, Outlots, 0.641 acre.
Warranty deed.
Payne Village
Harold Wannemacher, et al. to John Keith
Wannemacher; Lot 4, Anspach Subdivision,
0.227 acre. Warranty deed.
Weather report weekly summary as recorded at Paulding Village’s water treatment plant
Observations recorded for the 24 hours ending at 7:30 a.m. on the morning of:
DATE HIGH LOW PRECIPITATION
June 25 89 68 0.05”
June 26 91 68 0.51”
June 27 85 68 0.43”
June 28 85 66 0.06”
June 29 85 60 0.02”
June 30 77 61 0.23”
July 1 75 90 0.17”
Civil Docket
The term “et al.” refers to and others; “et vir.,”
and husband; “et ux.,” and wife.
In the matter of: Robert A. Bidlack,
Paulding and Joy K. Bidlack, Cecil.
Dissolution of marriage.
Amy M. Adams, Haviland vs. John
A. Adams, Paulding. Divorce.
Margaret Linder, Payne and Michael
J. Linder, Payne vs. Timothy L. Bostel-
man, Payne and Motorists Insurance
Group, Columbus. Personal injury.
Marriage Licenses
Charles Allan Mewhorter, 67, Oak-
wood, retired and Vicki Sue AuFrance,
65, Oakwood, secretary. Parents are
Vera Mewhorter; and Charles Fulmer
and Alice Pratt.
Jon Edward Ringler, 42, Defiance,
CNC operator and Denice J. Monroe,
33, Defiance, student. Parents are Ed-
ward Ringler and Mari Beth Thomas;
and Don Mottinger and Darlene
Kirchenbauer.
Martin Allen Yoder, 23, Defiance,
auto-body technician and Cheryl
Nicole Locker, 22, Defiance, preschool
teacher. Parents are Harold K. Yoder
and Mary L. Kudialis; and Robert
Locker and Pamela Heiney.
Administration Docket
In the Estate of Arthur C. Doster, ap-
plication to administer file.
In the Estate of Rita M. Brittig, last
will and testament filed.
Criminal Docket
Kevin W. Carlisle, 32, of Oakwood,
had a jury trial date of Sept. 17 set re-
cently concerning his indictment alleg-
ing illegal processing of drugs (F1),
illegal assembly or possession of chem-
icals for the manufacture of drugs (F2),
tampering with evidence (F3) and en-
dangering children (F3).
Raymond L. Webster, 73, of Payne,
had a felonious assault charge with
firearm specification (F2) dismissed
upon a motion of State.
Ricky A. Girod Jr., 24, of Oakwood,
requested intervention in lieu of convic-
tion regarding his indictment alleging
illegal processing of drugs (F2) and il-
legal assembly or possession of chem-
icals to manufacture drugs (F3). The
Court ordered he be transported to Re-
covery Services of Northwest Ohio in
Defiance for assessment of his eligibil-
ity for intervention at his own costs.
Ricky A. Girod Sr., 51, of Grover Hill,
had a hearing on a change of plea for il-
legal processing of drugs (F2) and illegal
assembly or possession of chemicals for
the manufacture of drugs (F3) on June
24. He will be sentenced July 23.
Stephanie R. Kremer, 32, of
Antwerp, was arraigned on a charge of
burglary (F2). A not guilty plea was en-
tered and courts dates were set for a
July 8 pretrial conference with an Aug.
6 jury trial. She is being held on a
$10,000 bond with no ten percent priv-
ilege.
Corey J. Davis, 20, of Holgate, was
arraigned June 19 for charges of bur-
glary (F2) and theft (F5). Not guilty
pleas were entered. Court dates were
scheduled for a July 26 pretrial confer-
ence and an Aug. 20 jury trial. He is
being held on $50,000 bond with no ten
percent privilege.
Jonathan R. Bowman, 22, of Defi-
ance, is being held on $50,000 bond
with no ten percent privilege following
arraignment for burglary (F2) and theft
(F5). Not guilty pleas were entered and
court dates were set for a July 26 pretrial
conference and an Aug. 20 jury trial.
Augustine A. Barajas, 24, of Pauld-
ing, was arraigned June 24 following
indictment alleging felonious assault
(F2) and aggravated assault (F4). Not
guilty pleas were entered. A pretrial
conference was set for Aug. 1 with a
Sept. 24 jury trial.
Daniel Miller, 43, of Antwerp, was
arraigned June 19 for charges of illegal
processing of drugs (F1), illegal assem-
bly or possession of chemicals for the
manufacture of drugs (F2) and endan-
gering children (F3). A pretrial confer-
ence was scheduled for June 27 with an
Aug. 13 jury trial.
Justin R. Sheaks, 22, of Defiance,
was released on his own recognizance
following arraignment recently for theft
(F5). Conditions of his release include
no arrests; no contact with the victim,
his family or his business; comply with
drug and alcohol restrictions, and abide
by a 10 p.m. curfew. He has an Aug. 1
pretrial conference with a Sept. 24 jury
trial date.
ACCIDENT REPORTS:
Thursday, June 20
12:58 p.m. Elizabeth Griffiths, 54,
of Paulding was cited for improper
passing following a two-vehicle col-
lision on West Wayne Street in Pauld-
ing. She was driving a 2004 Mercury
Mountaineer behind a 1999 Cadillac
Deville driven by Santos G. Bentan-
cur, 77 of Defiance. Reports say Ben-
tancur attempted a turn as Griffiths
attempted to pass and the vehicles col-
lided. Damage was minor to both.
Neither driver was hurt.
Saturday, June 22
6:34 p.m. William Joseph
Scheurich Jr., 67, of Paulding, was
cited for leaving the scene of an acci-
dent following a single-car accident
on Road 111 west of Road 123 in
Jackson Township. He was driving a
2001 Buick Park Lane west on Road
111 when reports say it veered off the
north side of the road into a pole,
through a field, then back onto the
roadway. The vehicle received func-
tional damage and was towed. The
driver was not hurt, but Paulding
EMS was called to transport his pas-
senger, Thomas Kent Wiswell, 54, of
Paulding. Also assisting at the scene
were the Paulding police and fire de-
partments. Court records show
deputies also filed three other charges
against Scheurich
INCIDENT REPORTS:
Thursday, June 20
5:05 p.m. A Benton Township resi-
dent of Ohio 500 told deputies some-
one turned their bulls loose.
6:39 p.m. Telephone harassment
complaint was lodged from Road
1048 in Auglaize Township.
7:21 p.m. Theft of a watch was re-
ported from Road 1048 in Auglaize
Township.
8:28 p.m. Deputies delivered a
message for Defiance County Sher-
iff’s office on Road 7 in Carryall
Township.
10:54 p.m. Domestic complaint
was investigated on Ohio 114 in
Washington Township.
Friday, June 21
9:36 a.m. Grover Hill EMS was
called to Ohio 114 Washington Town-
ship for a head injury. No transport
was made.
11:32 a.m. Deputies assisted with
an unwanted person on Road 71 in
Paulding Township.
3:37 p.m. Domestic complaint was
lodged from Road 148 in Brown
Township.
4:15 p.m. Deputies assisted Defi-
ance County Sheriff’s office by deliv-
ering a message on Road 230 in Crane
Township.
4:49 p.m. Telephone harassment
complaint was made from Payne.
6:11 p.m. Deputies documented a
car/deer accident on Ohio 613 in
Paulding Township.
7:38 p.m. Daniel Ordway was ar-
rested on a Defiance County warrant.
9:06 p.m. Underage driver was re-
ported from Road 1038 in Auglaize
Township.
9:07 p.m. A Melrose resident re-
ported a domestic issue.
10:24 p.m. Report of fireworks
being shot off in Briceton was inves-
tigated.
10:52 p.m. A car/deer collision on
US 24 in Crane Township was han-
dled.
10:58 p.m. Deputies were called to
Melrose for a domestic complaint.
11:16 p.m. Trespassing was the
complaint from Road 192 in Carryall
Township.
Saturday, June 22
9:48 a.m. Two Cecil/Crane Town-
ship fire units responded to a con-
trolled burn gone awry on Road 230
in Crane Township. They were on the
scene about 30 minutes.
12:12 p.m. Paulding EMS was
called to Paulding County Fairgrounds
where a female had been thrown from
a horse and couldn’t walk.
7:21 p.m. Post 81 OSHP handled a
motor vehicle accident on Road 5 north
of Ohio 613 in Harrison Township.
Sheriff’s deputies, Payne EMS and fire
department assisted at the scene. No
further information was available.
7:32 p.m. Mailbox damage was doc-
umented on Road 7 in Carryall Town-
ship.
10:35 p.m. One Paulding fire unit re-
sponded to an oven fire in Paulding.
They were there less than 25 minutes.
Paulding EMS made a transport from
the scene. Paulding police also assisted.
Sunday, June 23
9:49 a.m. Vandalism to a trailer on
Road 8 in Emerald Township was in-
vestigated.
10:25 a.m. Assault complaint came
in from Ohio 114 in Washington
Township.
2:57 p.m. Suspicious person was
noted on US 127 in Crane Township.
7:07 p.m. Domestic complaint was
registered from Payne.
7:31 p.m. Deputies were called to
Melrose for a domestic dispute.
Monday, June 24
12:46 p.m. Neighbor problems in-
volving juveniles were reported from
Road 104 in Brown Township.
2:33 p.m. Deputies arrested Jeff Holt
on a warrant.
5:26 p.m. Payne EMS and two fire
units responded to an open burn com-
plaint in the village. They were on the
scene less than 45 minutes.
6:10 p.m. Paulding Fire Department
notified the sheriff’s office of a con-
trolled burn exercise with three units
from Cecil/Crane Township Fire De-
partment. Some units were on the
scene over three hours.
6:46 p.m. Paulding County Fire
Marshal requested an EMS squad for
the controlled burn on Road 176 across
from Lafarge. Antwerp EMS was on
the scene less than two hours.
9 p.m. Harassment complaint came
in from Road 86 at Road 211 in Brown
Township.
10:17 p.m. Suspicious person was
noted in Melrose.
Tuesday, June 25
12:22 a.m. Threats by phone and
text were reported from Road 171 in
Brown Township.
Wednesday, June 26
5:37 a.m. Deputies documented a
car/deer accident on Road 232 in
Emerald Township.
11:15 a.m. Suspicious vehicle com-
plaint came in from Road 117 in Latty
Township.
1:58 p.m. A resident of Road 1037
in Auglaize Township reported hearing
shots fired in the area.
3:26 p.m. Vandalism was investi-
gated on Ohio 613 in Jackson Town-
ship.
8:02 p.m. Deputies assisted the De-
fiance County Sheriff’s office by con-
ducting a welfare check on Road 224
in Crane Township.
8:55 p.m. Assault complaint came in
from Melrose.
11:48 p.m. A deputy provided assis-
tance to the Payne Police Department
for less than 30 minutes.
Thursday, June 27
1:42 a.m. A deputy noted a suspi-
cious vehicle on Road 162 in Emerald
Township.
4:17 a.m. Assistance was given Post
81 in reference to a DWI arrest on
Road 8 in Carryall Township.
What is the purpose
of sewer separation?
PAULDING – Michael Karafa
from Jones & Henry Engineers has
provided an update on the Village of
Paulding’s ongoing sewer separation
project
The Purpose of the Village of
Paulding Phase 1 Sewer Separation
Project
Sanitary flow is flow coming from
your bathroom and storm flow comes
from rain. Together these flows share
a combined sewer. This 48-inch com-
bined brick sewer flows from the
downtown district and surrounding
area and transports this flow to the la-
goons.
In rain events, the sewer becomes
surcharged, and cannot handle this ad-
ditional flow. When this happens, there
is a 48-inch overflow pipe that allows
this additional flow to discharge into
Flat Rock Creek. This is called a Com-
bined Sewer Overflow (CSO).
The purpose of this project is to
provide separate storm sewers and
sanitary sewers in an effort to elimi-
nate this CSO into Flat Rock Creek.
The intent is that this outlet into Flat
Rock Creek will be a dedicated storm
sewer, once this project is completed
and all private property illicit connec-
tions are removed.
Wednesday, July 3, 2013 Paulding County Progress - 5A
In My Opinion
Be neighborly this July 4th
I have lived in the area for eight months and although I do
not live in Paulding County now, I did live here a few years
ago and appreciated my time serving the community in vari-
ous ways. Today, my wife and I are empty nesters living on a
cul-de-sac of homes that are basically all alike, at least on the
outside. I am convinced that on the inside it is a different
story.
I admit, when the semi-truck full of our lifetime collection of
stuff, pulled up in front of our house to unload our belongs, the
first thing I should have done was visit my new neighbors offer-
ing them a hand shake and letting them know what a privilege it
is to live next to them. But, I
confess, I didn’t do that. No, I
wanted to get the computer
hooked up, the television di-
aled in, my clothes in the
closet and locate the coffee
pot. Those things just seemed
important to me at the time.
Well, eight months have
past and I have spoken to my next door neighbor a few times.
We had a long conversation the other day when he informed me
that I was to mow the section of grass in the back behind the pri-
vacy fence. Oops! I didn’t know that. He politely reminded me
that he had mowed it once when it was knee high, but he would-
n’t do it again. I said thanks for the information and immedi-
ately mowed the area in question.
A young couple living directly across from us seems to have
their own agenda. They will pull up in their vehicle and if I am
in the yard they will sit in their car until I go in the house. And
once they are out of the car, they bolt to their front door. Obvi-
ously, I have not talked to the young couple, not even a hello.
Well, I take that back, sort of.
The other evening my wife was putting something in the
trunk of our car and when she turned around the young couple
was outside trying to escape to their car without being noticed.
My quick thinking wife acknowledged their presence with a
smile and a neighborly “hello” and in return there was silence,
absolutely no response. With that, I just knew I should have
been prepared with a plate of homemade cookies to give them
the day the movers arrived with our furniture.
Another neighbor, a husband and wife, with children of an
uncertain number are the vocal ones in the neighborhood. I am
not sure how many kids there are, but probably five or even six
based on the number of bicycles in the front yard. This family
has one volume when it comes to conversation and it is loud,
very loud. The kids are loud because mom is loud and dad is
loudest of all. But when they are outside, it is usually a normal
voice with a normal volume. And yet, not a word, not even a
wave to the empty nesters that live across the street as the van
drives by loaded with kids.
Now, there was some progress made recently. A neighbor
down the street stopped by one day when we were gone. She
left a notice in our door about her upcoming yard sale. Her flyer
was asking other neighbors to consider having a garage sale at
the same time. She even suggested how she would put a large
ad in the paper and we could all help pay for it. And when you
think about it, it would be the neighborly thing to do.
I don’t know, maybe back in November when we moved, my
wife and I should have made it a point to visit all our neighbors
and welcome ourselves to the neighborhood. But, we didn’t and
so today we live on a street where being neighborly seems out
of the question.
So, it’s just my opinion, that when you are outside this week,
getting the yard mowed, find the right spot to place the Ameri-
can flag and the neighbors are out working in their yard, why
not speak to each other? It will make your July fourth celebra-
tion more meaningful because after all, it’s the neighborly thing
to do.
Joe Shouse is a correspondent for the Paulding County
Progress.
The opinions stated are those of the writer, and do not neces-
sarily reflect that of the newspaper.
County Court
In My
Opinion
Joe
Shouse
Common Pleas
Police Report
Lions Club meets
PAULDING – Members of
the Paulding Lions Club meet
the second and fourth Thurs-
days of each month, exclud-
ing holidays, at the Paulding
Eagles. Meeting time is 7
p.m. The public is welcome
to attend.
K
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Painting
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Industrial • Commercial
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• Heavy Equipment
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• Utility & Horse Trailers
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• Grain Bins & Racks
• Homes & Buildings
• Fabricated Parts
• Roofs & Steel Buildings
ED KINCAID
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Oakwood, OH 45873
Office: 419-594-3899
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July 15th
New vendor coming to
hospital auxiliary
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Redesigned jewelry,
collectibles
8-4 hospital lobby
Make something new
from something old.
July 23rd
Four Boys Favorites
returns with
delectable clusters of
vanilla, maple,
caramel, and
peanut butter.
Buy by the pound or
by the piece.
9-12 hospital lobby
Semi-annual
Books are Fun
August 1, 8-4
Sponsored by the PCH
hospital auxiliary.
Fisher’s Flea Market
Duff Rd. (11520 TR 87) & St. Rt. 235 • Lakeview
www.fishersfleamarket.com
937-441-5521
2013 Season
April 13 thru September 29
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ACCIDENT REPORTS
Monday, June 24
9:05 a.m. David R. Shonkwiler, 37, of
Fairborn, was cited for failure to control
after the semi he was driving swerved
into a parked vehicle along East Perry
Street. Both vehicles suffered minor
damage. He was unhurt.
4:33 p.m. Norma J. Leslie, 83, of
Paulding, was cited for improper passing
following a two-vehicle accident on
North Williams Street at Baldwin Av-
enue. Kathy K. Feasby, 43, of Payne,
was stopped south bound on Williams in
a 2008 Mercury Mariner. Reports say
Leslie approached from behind in a 2007
Ford van, veering to the right, but still
striking the stopped car. Damage was
functional to each. Neither driver was
harmed.
Wednesday, June 26
11:55 a.m. Terrance A. Hohenberger,
67, of Defiance was cited for improper
backing after he backed his 2012 Chevy
Impala into a 2012 Chrysler 200 stopped
in traffic and operated by Charline A.
Miller, 68, of Paulding. Both vehicles
had minor damage. Neither driver was
hurt.
INCIDENT REPORTS
Thursday, June 20
6:49 p.m. Theft from a North Williams
Street business is under investigation.
Friday, June 21
12:10 a.m. Juvenile problems were
handled on West Jackson Street.
1:21 a.m. Possible prowler was re-
ported from North Williams Street. Of-
ficers were unable to locate anyone.
12:15 p.m. Theft of a bike was looked
into on West Harrison Street.
1:30 p.m. A North Main Street resident
requested no contact with another sub-
ject.
1:50 p.m. Harassment was reported by
a village resident.
4:39 p.m. Officers were notified of
bikes missing from the pool. The bikes
were found later.
9:06 p.m. Unruly juvenile complaint
came in from West Jackson Street.
Saturday, June 22
2:50 a.m. Officers administered a
BAC test for Post 81.
9:33 a.m. Unauthorized use of a debit
card was investigated on Nancy Street.
5:03 p.m. An East Perry Street resident
told officers a suspicious male was sell-
ing meat from a pick-up truck.
6:37 p.m. Officers assisted sheriff’s
deputies on Flat Rock Drive with an ac-
cident. Paulding EMS and fire units were
dispatched.
9:54 p.m. Owner of a West Wall Street
business said he had been notified some-
one was in his lot. They were gone when
officers arrived.
Sunday, June 23
1:13 a.m. Violation of a no contact
order was reported from North Dix
Street.
9:59 a.m. Officers assisted Defiance
County by taking a statement at Paulding
County Hospital about an incident in De-
fiance.
3:56 p.m. Fireworks were reported on
West Perry Street.
7:31 p.m. Neighbor problems involv-
ing a dog were looked into on North
Main Street.
10:22 p.m. Nancy Street resident told
officers they were having problems with
an unwanted person.
Monday, June 24
2:35 p.m. A parking mishap on South
DeWitt Street was documented.
Tuesday, June 25
1:09 a.m. Officers were called to a
family disturbance on East Wayne Street.
7 a.m. Owner of a semi parked
overnight on West Wall Street told police
a vehicle window was broken and a
computer keyboard was taken. A phone
charger was also missing.
8:20 a.m. A parking accident on South
Main Street was handled.
12:30 p.m. Unauthorized use of a debit
card was investigated on North Main
Street.
4:30 p.m. Threats were reported from
North Williams Street.
8:45 p.m. A boy was seen shooting at
cats with a BB gun on North Main Street.
He was gone when officers arrived.
Wednesday, June 26
9:30 a.m. A resident of North Drive re-
quested no contact with another subject.
6:44 p.m. Alleged threats were looked
into on North Main Street.
9:30 p.m. Officers documented a
backing accident on North Williams
Street.
Thursday, June 27
12:05 a.m. Payne police had officers
conduct a BAC test for them.
4:20 a.m. Officers assisted Post 81 with
a BAC test.
4:35 p.m. A rural Antwerp resident told
officers about a cell phone missing after
work on West Wall Street. The phone was
recovered.
7:20 p.m. Violation of a no contact order
by a Van Wert resident was noted.
8:20 p.m. Officers arrested Larry Dix for
domestic violence and took him to Pauld-
ing County Jail.
Friday, June 28
1:45 a.m. Officers arrested Michael
Dunn on a warrant.
Civil Docket:
Dupont Hospital, Cincinnati
vs. Jammie Roberta Grubb,
Paulding. Money only, judg-
ment for the plaintiff in the sum
of $2,312.68.
Credit Adjustments Inc., De-
fiance vs. Chelsy N. Shuherk,
Paulding. Other action, satis-
fied.
Credit Adjustments Inc., De-
fiance vs. Drew A. Messman,
Paulding. Small claims, satis-
fied.
David M. Allen, DDS,
Cincinnati vs. Angie Butler
Horine, Payne. Other action,
satisfied.
Paulding Collection Serv-
ices, Paulding vs. Ron Cupp,
Defiance. Small claims, judg-
ment for the plaintiff in the sum
of $250.
Midland Funding LLC, San
Diego vs. Russell Armstrong,
Paulding. Other action, judg-
ment for the plaintiff in the sum
of $2,206.67.
Omni Health Services,
Brecksville and Southern Ohio
Emergency Physicians LLP,
Traverse City, Mich. vs. Betty
J. Payne, Oakwood. Other ac-
tion, judgment for the plaintiff
in the sum of $1,753.38.
Autovest LLC, Cincinnati
vs. Milton Cowans, Paulding
and Debra Cowans, Paulding.
Other action, judgment for the
plaintiff in the sum of
$7,981.64.
Returned To You Ltd, Pauld-
ing vs. Dana Nofer, Convoy.
Small claims, judgment for the
plaintiff in the sum of
$1,213.33.
Equable Ascent Financial
LLC, Buffalo Grove, Ill. vs.
James Stanton, Paulding. Other
action, judgment for the plain-
tiff in the sum of $6,948.53.
Porter’s BP LLC, Paulding
vs. Jeff Pahl, Defiance. Small
claims, dismissed.
Criminal Docket:
Jeffery Mekus, Paulding,
cruelty to animals; $150 fine,
$124 costs, 30 days jail sus-
pended; probation ordered, 20
hours community service,
complete “Thinking for a
Change” program, not to own
any animals while on proba-
tion, make restitution.
Jeffery Mekus, Paulding,
cruelty to animals; $150 fine,
30 days jail suspended; dispo-
sition same as previous case.
Taelor J. Zimmer,
Hicksville, underage alcohol;
dismissed with prejudice per
State.
Scott M. Rau, Scott, para-
phernalia; dismissed, sen-
tenced stayed.
Scott M. Rau, Scott, children
endangerment; 180 days jail
suspended, $95 costs, sentence
stayed.
James E. Farr, Paulding, pro-
hibited activity; $183 fine, $86
costs, 60 days jail suspended;
antlers, skull cap and cape of
the deer are to be forfeited to
the Ohio Division of Wildlife.
Terry L. Rickard, Grover
Hill, confinement of dog; $50
fine, $87 costs.
Adrianna Bartley, Paulding,
failure to register dog; $50 fine
with $25 suspended if proof of
registration shown, $87 costs.
Adrianna Bartley, Paulding,
confinement of dog; $25 fine.
Chalcy A. Sharp, Grover
Hill, failure to register dog; $50
fine with $25 suspended if
proof of registration shown,
$87 costs.
Chalcy A. Sharp, Grover
Hill, confinement of dog; $25
fine.
Joshua A. Evans, Paulding,
theft; $160 costs, make restitu-
tion, repay court appointed
counsel; compete “Third Mil-
lennium” course, EMHA for
35 days each count, probation
ordered, no contact with vic-
tim.
Joshua A. Evans, Paulding,
theft; 35 da ys EMHA to run
concurrently with C ount A.
David A. Vielma, Haviland,
theft; $150 fine, $192 costs,
make restitution, 177 days jail
suspended; pay for stay at jail,
probation ordered, complete
“Third Millennium” course, 30
hours community service.
Chad E. Arnett, Paulding,
menacing; $250 fine, $129
costs, 30 days jail suspended;
no contact with victims, com-
munity control sanction viola-
tion can equal a longer sanction
term.
Chad E. Arnett, Paulding,
disorderly conduct; dismissed
per State.
Chaz Bullinger, Oakwood,
criminal damages; $300 fine,
$132 costs, make restitution,
180 days jail suspended with
pay for stay policy; complete
“Third Millennium” and
“Thinking for a Change”
courses, no contact with vic-
tims, 60 hours community
service, probation ordered,
seek employment.
Chaz Bullinger, Oakwood,
underage consumption; $100
fine, three days jail with 87
suspended.
Traffic Docket:
Scott M. Rau, Scott,
OVI/under influence; $525
fine, $165 costs, 10 days jail,
one-year license suspension;
ALS terminated immediately,
community control ordered, 20
hours community service,
complete “Thinking for a
Change” program, sentence
stayed for appeal, 170 days jail
reserved.
Scott M. Rau, Scott, loud ex-
haust; dismissed at State’s re-
quest.
Michael J. Powers, Saint
Clair Shores, Mich., 78/65
speed; $33 fine, $77 costs.
Amy E. McQuiston, Cleve-
land Heights, 80/65 speed; $43
fine, $77 costs.
Alysha M. Edens, Van Wert,
71/55 speed; $43 fine, $80
costs.
Czeslaw Szotek, Missis-
sauga, Ont., seat belt; $30 fine,
$50 costs.
Jonathan D. Neebes, Lapeer,
Mich., seat belt; $30 fine, $47
costs.
Janet S. Szabo, 69/55
speed; $48 fine, $77 costs.
Calvin J. Straub, Holland,
77/65 speed; $33 fine, $80
costs.
Zachary L. Moore, Payne,
OVI/under influence; dis-
missed at State’s request.
Zachary L. Moore, Payne,
reckless operation; $250 fine,
$95 costs, three-month li-
cense suspension; ALS va-
cated, fees waived.
Zachary L. Moore, Payne,
turn signals; dismissed at
State’s request.
Samantha J. Lacy, Van
Wert, expired license; $92.46
costs, pay by Aug. 14 or ap-
pear.
Samantha J. Lacy, Van
Wert, 70/55 speed; $43 fine,
pay all by Aug. 14 or appear.
Samantha J. Lacy, Van
Wert, seat belt; $30 fine, pay
all by Aug. 14 or appear.
Dovie Marie Neer, Pauld-
ing, OVI/breath low; $375
fine, $165 costs, pay all by
Oct. 9 or appear, three days
jail, six-month license sus-
pension; ALS terminated, re-
imburse appointed counsel
fees, communty control or-
dered, evaluation at West-
wood, 20 hours community
service, complete “Thinking
for a Change” course, secure
valid license, 87 days jail re-
served.
Dovie Marie Neer, Pauld-
ing, left of center; dismissed
at State’s request.
Gregory M. Roberts,
Ridgetown, Ont., 78/65
speed; $33 fine, $77 costs.
Sandy Jean Pollack, De-
queen, Ark., 65/55 speed; $33
fine, $77 costs.
Joseph A. Zavac, Toledo,
75/65 speed; $33 fine, $77
costs.
David M. Titcombe, W.
Carrollton, 65/55 speed; $33
fine, $80 costs.
Cristovao Francisco, Mc-
Cordsville, Ind., 84/65 speed;
$43 fine, $77 costs.
Jose M. De Oliveira, Fort
Wayne, 91/65 speed; $43
fine, $77 costs.
Sarina B. Swing, Mount
Prospect, Ill., seat belt; $67
fine, $3 costs.
Lori E. Dimaiuat, Cheas-
peake, Va., 75/65 speed; $33
fine, $80 costs.
Efrain Oviedo, Houma,
La., 78/65 speed; $33 fine,
$80 costs.
Kim M. Donley, Paulding,
67/55 speed; $33 fine, $80
costs.
Vicki J. Profit, Van Wert,
66/55 speed; $33 fine, $80
costs.
Jeremy L. Linder, Defi-
ance, stop sign; $53 fine, $77
costs.
Douglas R. Kashner, Van
Wert, seat belt; $30 fine, $50
costs.
Ramon Alcantar Jr., Cic-
ero, Ill., 68/55 speed; $33
fine, $86.50 costs.
Hillary R. Krebs, Ann
Arbor, Mich., 88/65 speed;
$43 fine, $85 costs.
William J. Phillips,
Zionsville, Ind., 85/65 speed;
$43 fine, $77 costs.
Justin R. Ashworth, Pauld-
ing, stop sign; $53 fine, $82
costs.
Taylor A. Barney Jr., Mill-
bury, 90/65 speed; $43 fine,
$80 costs.
Dipti B. Patel, Orilla, Ont.,
following closely; $53 fine,
$77 costs.
David L. Wilson, South-
port, Ind., seat belt; $30 fine,
$47 costs.
Ryan M. Blair, Bluffton,
Ind., 84/65 speed; $43 fine,
$77 costs.
Nikolas James Hummel,
Dumfries, Va., 78/65 speed;
$33 fine, $80 costs.
Zachary M. Dietz, Fair-
field, 68/55 speed; $33 fine,
$80 costs.
Amanda K. Parrish, Havi-
land, 68/55 speed; $33 fine,
$80 costs.
Zeljka Vasiljevic, Surrey,
B.C., 69/55 speed; $33 fine,
$77 costs.
Daha Musse, Scarborough,
Ont., 67/55 speed; $33 fine,
$80 costs.
Slawomir Gruszczynski,
Whitby, Ont., seat belt; $30
fine, $47 costs.
David Wayne Herbert,
Muncie, Ind., 80/65 speed;
$43 fine, $80 costs.
Michael Keith Moore,
Dearborn, Mich., 79/65
speed; $33 fine, $77 costs.
Joey A. Farison, Fort
Wayne, seat belt; $30 fine,
$47 costs.
Eric A. Phares, Angola,
Ind., 87/65 speed; $43 fine,
$77 costs.
Josesph B. Podzinski,
Toledo, 88/65 speed; $43
fine, $80 costs.
Sean T. Oehler, Defiance,
seat belt; $20 fine, $50 costs.
Allison L. Habern, Van
wert, stop sign; $53 fine, $77
costs.
Hope E. Owens, Delphos,
71/55 speed; $43 fine, $77
costs.
Bobby S. Allen, Indianapo-
lis, 79/65 speed; $33 fine, $80
costs.
David J. Clemens, Conti-
nental, 70/55 speed; $43 fine,
$77 costs.
Phillip H. Harris, Oak-
wood, seat belt; $30 fine, $47
costs.
Bradley James Wilcox,
Haviland, failure to control;
$68 fine, $77 costs.
Amarjit S. Johal, Missis-
sauga, Ont., seat belt; $30
fine, $50 costs.
Rasalingam Rajadurai,
Toronto, 66/55 speed; $33
fine,$80 costs.
Felicia Marie Oehler, Defi-
ance, seat belt; $30 fine, $50
costs.
Luke A. Weible, Paulding,
77/55 speed; $63 fine, $77
costs.
Diaa S. Falweh, N. Olm-
sted, seat belt; $30 fine, $55
costs.
Louis Salinas II, Defiance,
seat belt; $30 fine, $47 costs.
Summer cooling
assistance begins
Northwestern Ohio Com-
munity Action Commission
(NOCAC) is accepting appli-
cations for the HEAP Sum-
mer Cooling program now
through Aug. 31. Assistance
with a payment of an electric
bill and/or distribution of a
free air conditioner will be
provided.
To qualify, a person must:
• be within 175% of the
Federal Poverty guidelines
($41,213 annual income for a
family of four)
• Be 60 years or older, or
• Have a medical condition
that would benefit from the
program documented by a
physician or nurse practi-
tioner.
Contact the local NOCAC
service office for more details
or to schedule an appoint-
ment. In Paulding County,
phone 419-399-3650. Income
for the past 90 days, electric
and gas bills, social security
cards for everyone in the
household, and disability
proof (if applicable) are re-
quired for every appointment.
6A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, July 3, 2013
Birthdays
(The Paulding Progress maintains
a file of birthdays and anniversaries. To
make any changes, please call our of-
fice at 419-399-4015 during business
hours, email to progress@progress -
newspaper.org, or drop us a note to
P.O. Box 180, Paulding.)
July 6 – Pat Arend, Drey
Gamble, Angela Gonzales,
Florence Gorman, Dominic
Laker, Tracy Rau, Kennedy
Salinas, Wanda Wan-
nemacher.
July 7 – Angel Adams,
Peyton Adams, Lee Dickey,
Justin Guelde, Olivia Hois-
ington, Teeghun Marlin,
Danielle Noffsinger, Braeden
Pease, Waneta Sanders, Tim
Wirts.
July 8 – Alissa Bok, Alexis
Dangler, Bob Gilbert, Jimena
Gomez, Susan Blackmore,
Jodie E. Parsons, Matthew
Shinners.
July 9 – Caci Hyman,
Kiera Goings, Donald
Greninger, Mechial Mullins,
Dan Nutter, Cheryl Russell,
Eliza Schlueter, Edward
Ware, Gerald Wirick.
July 10 – Emma Dotterer,
Jeremy Green, Nichole
Kennedy, Mildred Phillips,
Paige Rahrig.
July 11 – Pam Arend, Pat
Anniversaries
July 6 – Michael and Jen-
nifer Mudel.
July 7 – Art and Shirley
Hoellrich, Nick and Jessica
Merritt.
July 8 – Jack and Sue Mac-
Donald.
July 9 – John and Bonnie
Pier.
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Vantage prepares for 2013-14
By LINDSAY McCOY
DHI Correspondent
VAN WERT – Vantage Ca-
reer Center Board of Education
welcomed special guest and
career tech supervisor MaryJo
Wilhelm on June 27 to speak
about this week’s STEM
CAMP, which that day.
This year, Vantage submitted
a grant to Eaton Corporation
for their Charitable Fund for
$3,000 to run this camp paired
with the YWCA and 40 of their
Summer Food participants.
Each day students were
picked up at the YWCA and
came to Vantage to learn edu-
cation information dealing with
science, technology, electron-
ics, and math. Children spent
each day working within a dif-
ferent field which included a
day with computers, tractors,
alternative energy, measuring
the height of the Vantage facil-
ity with mirrors, and a fossil
hunt at Lafarge.
“It’s a great plus anytime we
can get kids and parents in this
building,” said Wilhelm. “We
are opening our doors so that
everyone can see what we have
to offer.”
Wilhelm is hopeful that this
camp, as well as other activities
throughout the summer, will
encourage non-traditional stu-
dents to the non-traditional
programs offered at Vantage.
High school director Ben
Winans and adult education di-
rector Pete Prichard also gave
reports on the end of the 2012-
13 school year and what is
being done to prepare Vantage
for the upcoming 2013-14
school year.
Prichard reported that Van-
tage is continuing to work with
Van Wert’s economic develop-
ment department to fill the
deficit between what is needed
in today’s jobs and what skills
their students have to offer.
Administration and teachers
are also looking at fiscal adjust-
ments to bring down costs for
the next school year. Profes-
sional activities are being ful-
filled online to help adult
education teachers to work on
their education skills to be-
come better teachers for adults
looking to continue their edu-
cation.
Winans reported that several
teachers are going through
OTEZ training for standard
changes that are quickly ap-
proaching for all school dis-
tricts in the next couple years.
Tile repair has been continued
throughout the building, and
July 8, the floors will be refin-
ished in the lab areas. Land-
scaping advances are
continuing throughout the
summer and are finally begin-
ning to come along. The school
has also received a full sized
van as well as a car and will be
purchasing additional needed
vehicles before the beginning
of the school year.
The board approved
amended revenues and appro-
priations for fiscal year 13 as
well as approved final num-
bers. Temporary revenues and
appropriations were also ap-
proved. Treasurer Lori Davis
reported that the district ended
the year very well, and rev-
enues were up by 1.6 percent.
Costs were down due to work-
ers comp premiums remaining
down and taxes being up.
Overall, revenue totals re-
mained $865,000 above ex-
penses at the end of the school
year.
Davis expects that in 2014
the revenues and expenses will
come back in line with those
before construction began and
that fiscal year 14 will see very
small changes from what has
initially been projected.
Davis also reported that the
refunding of bonds process is
still delayed while the bond un-
derwriter continues to watch
the market. The market is low-
ering, but still remains high.
Vantage will also be joining
Ohio Shared Services for a
debt collection program. Van-
tage will be used as a pilot
school for this program. No
fees will be charged to the
school. Vantage does build up
quite a bit of adult education
debt and if all works well will
move everything over to this
company.
Employment was approved
for Darrell Miller as attendance
discipline officer and Lucas
Compton as technology sup-
port specialist. Employment
was also approved for Annette
Klinger, Vicki Bidlack and
Glenn Schenk.
The approval of the
NEOLA new and revised
policies were also accepted.
The next regular Vantage Ca-
reer Center Board of Educa-
tion meeting is scheduled for
7 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 1.
July 10 – Duke and Phyllis
Albert, James and Sharon
Jackson.
July 11 – Steven and Mar-
sha Franklin, Penny and Den-
nis Saylor.
July 12 – Robert and Mary
Jane Gilbert, Bob and Margo
Kyser.
Bowers, Ben Brown, David
Cooper, Frank Guyton,
Robert Habern, Eleanor
Hoover, Neil McGill, Kevin
Wannemacher.
July 12 – Brian Bashore,
Shirley Cramer, Jerry Davis,
Angie Slade, Anna Grunden,
Savannah Habern, Stephanie
Habern, Adrian Nehls,
Michelle Porter, Chloe
Williams, Bill Wobler.
Independent Insurance Agents
award 7 college scholarships
The Paulding County Inde-
pendent Insurance Agents As-
sociation Inc. (PCIIAA) has
once again awarded $500
scholarships to seven Pauld-
ing County high graduates
who headed for college. The
scholarship program is one
way the association has given
back to the community since
1987.
Each year applications are
accepted from Paulding
County high school seniors.
The scholarships are awarded
based on their current GPA,
which must be a B average or
higher, their ACT scores,
community outreach and ex-
tracurricular activities. Each
year there are many applica-
tions submitted and the com-
mittee continues to be
amazed at the number of
wonderful young men and
women in our community
and are proud to be able to as-
sist these students as they
pursue their college educa-
tion.
This year the seven $500
scholarships were awarded to
the following :
• Shawn Dooley, who is a
graduate of Antwerp High
School, and the son of Shawn
and Michelle Dooley. Shawn
plans to attend Ohio Northern
University this fall where he
will pursue a degree in com-
puter science.
• Ryan Girardot, who is a
graduate of Antwerp High
School, and the son Todd and
Melissa Girardot. Ryan plans
to attend IPFW/ Fort Wayne
this fall where he will pursue
a degree in music education.
• Lydia Schneider, who is a
graduate of Antwerp High
School, and the daughter of
Mike Schneider and Kim-
berly Schneider. Lydia plans
to attend Kent State this fall
where she will pursue a major
in fashion design.
• Savannah Roughton, who
is a graduate of Paulding
High School, and the daugh-
ter of Eric Roughton and
Shelly Roughton. Savannah
plans to attend Bluffton Uni-
versity where she plans to
pursue a degree in chem-
istry/premedicine.
• Zane Wilhelm, who is
graduate of Paulding High
School, and the son of Randy
and Vicki Wilhelm. Zane will
be attending The University
of Toledo where he will pur-
sue a degree in engineering
and chemical engineering.
• Graden “Grady” Gu-
dakunst, who is a graduate of
Wayne Trace High School,
and the son of Jeffrey and
Kerry Gudakunst. Grady
plans to attend The Ohio
State University where he
will pursue actuarial science.
• Staci Wenninger, who is a
graduate of Wayne Trace
High School, and the daugh-
ter of Randy and Joni Wen-
ninger. Staci will be attending
Northwest State Community
College where she will pur-
sue a degree in radiology.
SHAWN DOOLEY RYAN GIRARDOT LYDIA SCHNEIDER
SAVANNAH
ROUGHTON
ZANE WILHELM GRADY GUDAKUNST
STACI WENNINGER
Poll results
Results from last week’s
poll question on our web site
www.progressnewspaper.org:
“What’s your favorite cloth-
ing item for hot weather?”
•33.3% – Shorts
•33.3% – Sandals/flip flops
•16.7% – Hat
•16.7% – Skirt/dress
•0% – Swimwear
Visit our web site and cast
your vote in this week’s poll
question.
Wednesday, July 3, 2013 Paulding County Progress - 7A
A Penny For
Your Thoughts....
By: Nancy Whitaker
MORE THAN BUTTER
This week has been a devas-
tating one for beloved Food
Network star, Paula Deen. Per-
sonally, I am just sick at the way
she has been treated by her em-
ployer and her sponsors.
I am sure others may have a
different opinion than I do, but
when you watch these stars and
let them into your your homes
everyday, you feel like you get
to know them. The same holds
true for Deen.
I love her cooking, her South-
ern friendliness and her rags to
riches story. Her wonderful
recipes calling for a stick of but-
ter tempts my tastebuds and en-
courages my creative cooking
skills.
The latest saga in Paula
Deen’s life stems from a gal
who managed one of Paula
Deen’s and her brother,
Bubba’s, restaurant for five
years.
The former employee claims
she was subjected to racial slurs,
jokes and sexual innuendoes
during her five years of employ-
ment. At first, the accuser ap-
proached the Deen family and
said she would settle out of
court for a price.
The Deen family did not
want to pay out the money and
claimed that the accusations
were just not true.
However, the accuser did
take it to court and Deen was
asked questions in her deposi-
tion, if she had ever used a racial
term at anytime during her life.
Deen replied at one time she
did in fact use the derogatory
term. She went on to explain, it
happened when she was being
robbed by a man at gun point.
She said she did not promote or
stand for racism and she had
been raised to tell the truth.
From there, the story became
the focus of news reports, talk-
ing heads and the social media.
Everyone jumped on the band-
wagon to voice their opinions.
But then, if it wasn’t bad that
Deen was being sued for an al-
leged racial term, her employer,
the Food Network, on which
she had a cooking show for the
past 12 years, chose not to
renew her contract.
The very people she thought
were friends and coworkers did
not want anything to do with
this star who had brought them
in a many fans and a lot of
dough. (Pun intended.)
Of course, Deen and her two
sons, who also have cooking
shows, were devastated. Their
fortune had not came easy. For
years Paula was a single parent
and she and her sons made
money selling bagged lunches
for workers during lunch hours.
Paula’s bagged lunches were
so good and tasty that they be-
came popular with the lunch
crowd. She became known as
The Bag Lady. Paula’s expertise
was in fact cooking. She loved
cooking the good old southern
dishes and all of her recipes
contained rich wonderful ingre-
dients.
Paula Deen was on the
“Today Show” last Wednesday,
sobbing and telling of her hon-
esty and how she had raised her
boys the same way. One news
outlet asked her, “You could
have lied on that deposition and
say that you had never used a
racial slur. Why didn’t you?”
Deen replied she did not lie
and that she has always be-
lieved, “If God brings you to it;
he will bring you through it.”
In the past few days some of
her main sponsors have
dropped her products while
some are sticking by her side.
A Facebook page was started
and is titled “We Support Paula
Deen.” Since it started just this
week, it has over 500,000 fans
who all support the cook, her
recipes, her personality, and yes
her butter.
Deen has a new cookbook set
to come out in October and
many of her fans called Ama-
zon or went online to pre-order
the book. The book is now
climbing up the ladder and will
probably be on the bestseller
list.
I feel that at one time or an-
other we have all used some
derogatory word that in no
longer kosher to use. It is too
bad how one person can take
away your livelihood, your
funds, and your self esteem and
all you have worked for without
at least giving this lady from the
south a fair shake.
People can stomp on our flag
and bad mouth the government
and no one says a thing. How-
ever, it is a shame to let one per-
son who has worked hard to get
where she is be turned over to a
pack of judgmental wolves.
The Bible says, “He who is
without sin, let him cast the first
stone.”
While we all have different
opinions, we are all human.
How do you feel about judg-
mental people? How would you
feel if you lost everything you
worked for due to a word you
might have used 30 years ago?
Let me know and I’ll give
you a Penny for Your Thoughts.
$1,000
Increase your odds the more you spend!
Just complete the entry blank
printed at the bottom of your receipt!
By entering contest you are giving permission to use your likeness in Chief advertising and agree to receive email promotions and communications from Chief. No purchase
necessary. Send self-addressed stamped envelope to Chief Supermarket c/o Chief’s $1,000 Weekly Cash Giveaway 1340 West High Street, Suite E, Defiance, OH 43512. Limit one
winner per household. Receive an entry every time you shop; receive additional entries for every $20 spent (maximum 8 entries per shopping trip), based on final totals before tax
and excluding Gift Cards, Money Orders, Coin Star, and Postage purchases.
www.chiefsupermarkets.com
Weekly Cash Giveaway
Creatures at the
Nature Center
By Mark Holtsberry
Education specialist
Paulding SWCD
Many wonderful creatures can be at the Na-
ture Center park and grounds. Snapping turtles
are very visible if careful attention is given.
Large specimens may weigh more than 35
pounds. Though they are very abundant, they
are not seen as frequently as most other turtles.
From May through June, females may be seen
crossing roads in search of sites to lay their
eggs. Although the snapping turtles powerful,
keen-edged jaw are capable of doing great
damage to a carelessly placed finger, stories
of snapping broom handles in half are an ex-
aggeration. I have seen a snapping turtle the
size of a basketball and had no intention of in-
troducing myself.
The Northern map turtle is another visible
resident of the Nature Center. The female is
bigger than the male. The turtle gets its name
from the network of fine yellow lines that
crisscross around its neck. These lines almost
look like a topographical map. They are very
noticeable on young specimens, but they fade
with age. Map turtles may be active year-
round, and have been observed walking
around under the ice during winter time.
The most frequently seen turtle at the park
are the Midland painted turtles. These turtles
can be seen basking in the sun on a log in the
water. Sometimes, about a dozen or so can be
seen on a log at any given sunny day. The pat-
terns look as if they were painted on by hand.
Only the Midland painted turtle occurs in
Ohio.
Although an occasional individual may at-
tempt to bite when first captured, these turtles
usually become very tame. These turtles are
seen crossing the road, walking on the trails
or on the banks. With the changing of the
weather, Midland painted turtles seek deep
water and burrow into the mud or debris at the
bottom. The small amount of oxygen they
need is absorbed from the water through the
inner lining of the mouth. Be careful on the
trails, no to step on and injure this turtle. They
are just trying to get where they need to go.
Enjoy the wonders and beauty at the Nature
Center!
Foundation golf outing is July 10
The 14th annual Dr. Mark Teets Memorial Golf Tournament,
sponsored by the Paulding County Hospital Foundation, will be
held July 10.
The four-person scramble, at Auglaize Golf Club, begins with
registration at 11 a.m. with a noon shotgun start. Rain date: July 17.
The golf outing will include an afternoon of great golf plus cart,
gifts, dinner and two complimentary beverages, all for a worthwhile
cause – the foundation’s scholarship program and other health-re-
lated projects.
A lucky golfer could win a 2013 Chevy Cruze for a hole-in-one,
plus other great prizes on every Par 3, courtesy of Stykemain
Chevrolet.
Other prizes will be awarded by the foundation for longest drive,
men and women; longest putt; and closest to pin.
Sponsorship opportunities are also available.
For registration information, contact Brenda Wieland at the hos-
pital, 419-399-1138.
‘Winning the Battle for a Generation’
ment of the chase.”
After several minutes, Custer decided it was
time for the kill. Again, He shoved the pistol into
the side of the buffalo. But, as if sensing Custer’s
intentions, the buffalo abruptly turned toward the
horse. The horse veered away from the buffalo’s
horns, and when Custer tried to grab the reins with
both hands, his finger accidentally fired a bullet
into his own horse’s head, killing it instantly.
Custer was thrown to the ground and then
struggled quickly to his feet to face the animal that
had been his prey only seconds before. Instead of
charging, the buffalo stared at the strange, foolish
man and walked off.
Horseless and alone, Custer began the long,
dangerous walk back to his regiment. In less than
a decade, this same recklessness and arrogance
would lead the General and his men to their death
on a flat-topped hill next to a river called the Little
Bighorn.
Does my pride get in the way of God’s work in
my life? Regarding the impact of pride in our lives
the scriptures tells us… Psalm 10:4 (NIV), 4 “In
his pride the wicked does not seek him; in all his
thoughts there is no room for God.”
For more information about the work of Youth
for Christ, you may contact Youth for Christ at
419-782-0656, P.O. Box 111, 210 Clinton Street,
Defiance, Ohio 43512, or email to: defyfc@em-
barqmail.com
By Rick Jones
exec. director, Defiance
Area Youth for Christ
Does pride get in the way of God’s work in
my life? Sometimes life lessons come hard and
are never learned, something we see exemplified
in the historical story I’ve referenced in this
week’s news article.
In the spring of 1867, George Custer and his
regiment were on a scouting expedition on the
plains of Kansas. Suddenly, Custer’s English
greyhounds, his constant companions, began to
chase some antelope over a distant hill.
In spite of himself, Custer could not resist join-
ing the chase. It was not long before the general,
his horse, and his pack of dogs had left his regi-
ment far behind.
He quickly forgot his men and his mission
when he crested the first hill and saw his first
buffalo; an enormous, shaggy bull. He put the
spurs to his horse’s sides and began the chase.
As the horse gained on the massive buffalo,
Custer yelled with excitement. An avid hunter,
he had to bring this trophy home.
He drew his pearl-handled pistol. But as he
came alongside the thundering beast and shoved
the barrel into its thick shaggy side, Custer
paused. Feeling the ground shake, hearing the
ragged breathing of both animals side by side,
he pulled the pistol back, to prolong the enjoy-
8A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, July 3, 2013
David A. & Harvey D.
Hyman and Families
Compliments of
Baughman
Tile Company
Ohio Gas
Company
1-800-331-7396
The Antwerp
Exchange
Bank Company
Stabler Steam Carpet
Cleaning Service
Payne 419-263-2211
Den Herder Funeral
Home
1-800-399-3522
(419) 399-2866
Red Angel Pizza
740 Emerald Rd, Paulding,
OH • 419-399-2295
Scott Variety Shop
Variety is our middlename
419-622-3014
If you would be interested
in helping to sponsor our
church directory, please
call us at the
Paulding County Progress
at 419-399-4015. This
directory is made possible
by our advertisers!
Mara Mart
Paulding
Member FDIC
The Church Directory Is Proudly Sponsored By The Following Businesses:
Paulding County Church Directory
Paulding United Methodist Church, 321 North Williams Street,
Paulding, church telephone number is 399-3591, Rev. Ben Lowell, Wor-
ship service at 9:45 a.m.; Sunday School, 11:15 a.m.; Wed. worship at
6:00pm. Our church office is located at 308 N. Main St.
Pentecostal Church of God, 601 W. Caroline St., Paulding, Elder
George Robinson, Sunday school at 10 a.m., worship service at noon,
prayer services Monday at 6 p.m. and Thursday at noon, Bible study
at 6 p.m. Tuesday.
Pioneer Christian Ministries, County Road 108 and Ohio 637, Paulding,
Rev. Chuck Oliver, Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship at 10:30
a.m., and Wednesday evening at 7:00 p.m. including a youth service on at
least three Wednesday evenings.
Rose Hill Church of God, corner of SR 637 and Charloe Trail, Paulding,
399-3113, Pastor Ron Hofacker, Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday wor-
ship at 10:30 a.m., Wednesday service from 7-8 p.m. with children’s hour.
St. John Lutheran Church–ELCA, 7611 Road 87, Briceton, Pastor
Karen Stetins, church telephone number is 419-399-4962 or 419-399-2320.
Sunday worship at 8:30 a.m., Sunday school at 9:30 a.m.
St. Paul Evangelical Lutheran Church, 601 Flat Rock Drive (P.O. Box
156), Paulding, Pastor Kare Stetins, church telephone number is 399-2320,
Sunday Worship at 10:15 a.m., Sunday school at 9 a.m.
PAYNE AND OUTLYING AREAS
Divine Mercy Catholic Parish, 203 W. Townline, Payne, 399-2576, Pas-
tor Very Rev. G. Allan Fillman, Masses: Saturday at 4:00 p.m.
Edgerton Wesleyan Church, 1717 Bertha St., Woodburn, (Edgerton)
Ind. 46797, Pastor Dave Dignal, church telephone number is 260-632-
4008, Sunday school at 9 a.m., children’s church at 10 a.m., worship at 10
a.m., home groups at 6 p.m., Wednesday evening services at 6:30 p.m.
(Indiana time).
Living Water Ministries, Contemporary worship service Sunday nights
at 10 a.m. & 6:30 p.m., The “Well” church for kids, Sunday mornings from
10-11:30 a.m. The church is currently in the process of relocating. For lo-
cation information, contact Pastor Rich Phelan, 419-263-2728.
Payne Church of Christ, 220 West Merrin Street, Payne, Pastor Mikeal
George. Sunday worship at 9:30 am. 419-263-2092; 419-574-2150 (cell).
Payne Church of the Nazarene, 509 E. Orchard St. (Ohio 500) Payne,
Pastor Mike Harper, 263-2422, Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday wor-
ship at 10:30 a.m. Sunday night service at 6:30 p.m., Wednesday prayer
meeting at 7:30 p.m.
St. Jacob United Church of Christ, southwest corner of Oak and Hyman
streets, Payne, Rev. Jim Langham, 263-2763. Sunday School-9:00 am,
Church service-10:00 am.
St. James Lutheran Church– NALC, West Townline Street (P.O. Box
42), Payne, 263-2129, Pastor Fred Meuter, 260-492-2581. Sunday School
at 9:00 a.m., Sunday worship at 10:00 a.m.
St. Paul United Methodist Church, (P.O. Box 154) 312 South Main
Street, Payne, Rev. David Rohrer, church telephone number is 263-2418,
parsonage telephone number is 263-2017, Sunday school at 9 a.m., Sun-
day worship at 8 a.m. and 10 a.m.
Editor’s Note: If your church doesn’t have service times listed, please
contact the Paulding County Progress office to notify of Sunday service
times.
Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship at 10:30 a.m., evening worship
at 6 p.m., Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m.
PAULDING AND OUTLYING
Bethel United Methodist, Forders Bridge, Cecil, Pastor Kevin Doseck
(419) 899-4153, worship service at 10:30 a.m., Sunday school at 9:30 a.m.
Bethlehem Temple Pentecostal, 818 West Jackson Street, Paulding,
399-3770, Rev. Burpo, Sunday school at 10 a.m., Sunday worship at 12
p.m.
Calvary Bible Church, Ohio 111 West across from Paulding County Hos-
pital, 399-4919, elders John Mohr, 260-632-4356, Bob Fessel 419-399-
3398, Brad Sisson 419-263-3108, Don Baer 419-399-5805. Sunday school
at 9 a.m., morning worship at 10:15 a.m., Bible Study at 7 p.m. Wed.
Cecil Community Church, 203 S. Main St., Cecil. Pastor Ted Ramey.
Sun. school 10:00 am, Worship service 11:00 am, Sun. eve. 6:00 pm,
Wed. eve. 6:00 pm.
Cecil First Presbyterian Church, Main Street, Cecil, Sunday worship
at 8 a.m., Sunday school at 9 a.m.
Christian Fellowship Church, Paulding High School Auditeria, 10
a.m. Sunday. Pastor Greg Cramer.
Divine Mercy Catholic Parish, 417 N. Main, Paulding, 399-2576,
Pastor Very Rev. G. Allan Fillman, Masses: Saturday at 6 p.m.; Sunday
at 10:30 a.m.
Emmanuel Baptist Church, 1275 Emerald Road, Paulding, 419-399-
5061, Sunday School at 9:30 a.m., worship services at 10:45 a.m. and
6 p.m. Sunday and 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Pastor Drew Gardner.
First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), 1233 Emerald Road,
Paulding, 419-399-4576, Sunday school 9:00 a.m., Worship service
10:00 a.m.
First Presbyterian Church, 114 West Caroline Street, Paulding, 399-
2438, Rev. David Meriwether, 9:00am Sunday school, 10:15 a.m. praise
singing, 10:30 a.m. Sunday worship.
House of Love Ministries, 220 N. Williams St., Paulding. Pastor Pre-
dest (Dwayne) Richardson or Sister Brenda Richardson, 419-399-9205
or 419-796-8718, Sunday worship at 3:00 p.m. Jail Ministry, Food Min-
istry, Outreach Ministry. Overcomer Outreach - a Christian 12-steap
meeting, Sundays at 5:00 p.m.
New Beginnings Church (Church of God), Cecil, Pastor Roy Burk,
399-5041, Sunday worship at 11 a.m.
Paulding Church of Christ, East Perry Street, Paulding, Minister
Christopher Reno, 419-399-4761. Bible school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday
worship at 10:30 a.m.
Paulding Church of the Nazarene, 210 Dooley Dr., Paulding, 399-
3932, Revs. Kim and Cindy Semran, Sunday school at 9:15 a.m., Sun-
day worship at 10:30 a.m., Sunday evening at 6:00 p.m.: Kids’ Summer
Jam (ages 4-4th grade), Preteen class (5th-6th grade), Teen group (7th-
12th grade), and adult service. Wednesday at 7:00 p.m.: Teen group
(7th-12th grade), adult bible study and prayer. Nursery available for all
services.
Paulding Family Worship Center, 501 West Perry Street, Paulding,
399-3525, Rev. Monte Moore, Sunday worship at 10:30 a.m.
Grover Hill Church of the Nazarene, Maple and East Jackson streets,
Pastor Jonathan L. Hoagland, 587-3376, Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Morn-
ing worship at 10:30 a.m., Sunday evening gospel hour at 6 p.m., Wednes-
day evening service at 7 p.m.
Grover Hill Zion United Methodist Church, corner of First and Harrison,
587-3941; Pastor Mike Waldron, 419-238-1493 or 419-233-2241 (cell). Sun-
day school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship at 10:20 a.m., nursery available
during all services.
Mandale Church of Christ in Christian Union, Ohio 66, Pastor Justin
Sterrett, 419-786-9878, Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship at
10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m., Wednesday prayer meeting at 7 p.m.
Middle Creek United Methodist Church, County Road 24, Grover Hill,
Pastor William Sherry, Sunday worship at 9 a.m., Sunday school at 10:15
a.m., Sunday evening Bible study at 7 p.m.
Mt. Zion United Methodist Church, Grover Hill, County Road 151, Sun-
day school at 9:30 a.m., Pastor David Prior, Sunday worship at 10:30 a.m.,
Wednesday evening prayer meeting at 7:30 p.m.
Roselms Christian Church, Ohio 114, Pastor Gary Church, 594-2445,
Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship at 10:30 a.m.
HAVILAND/LATTY/SCOTT
Apostolic Christian Church, 12867 Road 82, Haviland, 399-5220, wor-
ship service at 10:30 a.m.
Country Chapel United Methodist Church, Haviland, 419-622-5746,
Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship at 10:15 a.m.
Latty Zion Baptist Church, Latty, Pastor Levi Collins Jr., 399-2748, Sun-
day school at 10 a.m., worship service at 11:15 a.m.
Harvest Field Pentecostal Church of God, 13625 Road 12, Scott, Pastor
Terry Martin, 419-622-2026, Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday morning
worship at 10:30 a.m., Sunday Evening worship at 6:00 pm, Wednesday
evening worship at 7:00 pm, Wednesday Youth Group at 7:00 pm.
Friends United Methodist Church, Latty, Pastor Ron Johnson. Sunday
worship at 9 a.m., Wednesday Bible Study at 7 p.m.
OAKWOOD/MELROSE AREAS
Auglaize Chapel Church of God, rural Oakwood, 3 miles south and half
mile west on County Road 60, Pastor Stan Harmon, 594-2248, Sunday
worship at 9:00 a.m. Sunday school at 10:30 a.m., Wednesday services for
children, youth and adults at 7:00 p.m.
Melrose United Methodist Church, Melrose, 594-2076, Pastor Eileen
Kochensparger 399-5818; Sunday school 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship at
10:30 a.m., Wednesday Bible study and prayer at 7:00 p.m.
Twin Oaks United Methodist Church, corner of Harmon and Second
streets, Oakwood, Pastor Eric Dailey. 419-594-2992. Sunday worship at
9:30 a.m., Sunday school at 10:45 a.m., Bible Study Wednesdays at 10:00
a.m.
Prairie Chapel Bible Church, one mile east and a half-mile north of Oak-
wood on the corner of roads 104 and 209, Pastor Earl Chapman, 594-2057,
ANTWERP AND SURROUNDING
Antwerp Community Church, 704 S. Erie St., SR 49, Antwerp; Pastor
Ricky L. Grimes 419-258-2069. Bible Study Fellowship 9:30 am; Contem-
porary Worship 10:30 am, Wednesday Discipleship Study, 7:00 pm
Antwerp United Methodist Church, East River Street, Rev. Pastor Mike
Schneider, church telephone number is 258-4901, Comtemporaty service
Sunday 8:30a.m., Sunday school 9:30a.m., Traditional Service 10:30a.m.
Divine Mercy Catholic Parish, 303 S. Monroe, Antwerp. Office: 417 N.
Main, Paulding, 399-2576, Pastor Very Rev. G. Allan Fillman, Masses: Sun-
day at 8:30am.
First Baptist Church, 5482 CR 424, Pastor Todd Murray, 258-2056, Sun-
day school at 9 a.m., Sunday worship 10 a.m.; evening service 6 p.m.,
Wednesday Bible Study 6:30 p.m.
First Presbyterian Church, 126 W. River St., Pastor Mike Pennington,
258-2864, Sunday school at 9:15 a.m., Sunday worship at 10:35 a.m.
Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witnesses, 2937 US 24, 258-2290. Public
talk 10 a.m. Sunday, Congregation Bible Study, Theocratic Ministry School
& Service Meeting, Theocratic school 7:30 p.m. Thursday.
Mt. Calvary Lutheran Church, Pastor Robert Becker. Sunday school at
9 a.m., Sunday worship at 10 a.m.
Riverside Christian Church, 15413 St. Rt. 49, (corner Ohio 49 and Road
192), Antwerp. 258-3895, Pastor Regan Clem.
ARTHUR/FIVE SPAN AREA
Apostolic Christian Church, 13562 Road 147, Defiance (Junction), 399-
3121, William Schlatter, Elder, Sunday services at 10:15 a.m. and 12:30
p.m., Sunday school at 1 p.m., Wednesday services at 8 p.m.
Bethel Christian Church, Ohio 66, Defiance (Arthur), Pastor Christopher
Baker, Sunday worship at 10:30 a.m.
Church of Christ, corner of County Roads 166 and 191, Evangelist Lon-
nie Lambert, 399-5022, Sunday worship at 10:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m., Bible
study at 9:30 a.m. Sunday.
Junction Bible Christian Church, County Road 111, Defiance (Junction),
393-2671 or JunctionBible@copper.net, Rev. C. Joseph Fifer, Sunday
school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship follows at 10:30 a.m & Bible Study on
Wed. at 7pm.
Pleasantview Missionary Baptist Church, County Road 180, Defiance
(Junction), Rev. Alan Ray Newsome, Sunday worship at 11 a.m., evening
service at 6 p.m.; Wednesday evening services at 7 p.m.
Rock Church, SR 637, Five Span-Arthur area, Pastor Bobby Branham
393-2924, Sunday school at 10 a.m., Sunday worship at 10:45 a.m., Sunday
evening worship at 7 p.m., Wednesday evening worship at 7 p.m., Youth
Service Wednesday at 7 p.m.
GROVER HILL AND OUTLYING
Bible Baptist Church, corner of Cleveland and Perry streets, Grover Hill,
Pastor Pat Holt, 587-4021, Sunday school at 10 a.m., Sunday worship at
11 a.m., Sunday evening worship at 6 p.m.; Wednesday prayer meeting at
7 p.m.
C &Y Oil
Company
Payne
The Paulding Progress &
Weekly Reminder
www.progressnewspaper.org
866-636-7260
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Paulding, OH 45879
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fact they are employees at Carpet Mart.
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RIBBON CUTTING – Hands of Hope pregnancy services celebrated new service by holding a ribbon cutting and open house
June 27. Among those attending were, from left – Tracy Trausch, Candyce Hawk, Shirley Briggeman, Malinda Ricker, JoEllen
Sisson and Doug Roop. The facility, located at 1030 W. Wayne St. in Paulding, is open on Fridays 9 a.m.-5 p.m. The center offers
free pregnancy tests, emotional and spiritual support, and education including prenatal care, parenting classes, Bible studies
and abstinence classes. For attending classes, clients earn “Baby Bucks” in which they can use to shop for needed items in the
Hands of Hope Baby Store. These services are available to all pregnant women through their child’s first birthday. Services are
free regardless of income. For more information, phone 419-399-2447.
Antwerp school board hires principal
By JOE SHOUSE
Correspondent
ANTWERP – The Antwerp
School board met last Thurs-
day and approved the hiring
of several personnel includ-
ing a new middle school prin-
cipal, band director, middle
school language arts teacher,
and a first grade teacher.
After rescinding the con-
tract for Stephanie Tear, who
was hired at the May meet-
ing, the board approved a
three-year contract for Tim
Manz as the new middle
school principal. The former
Fairview seventh grade sci-
ence teacher graduated from
Paulding High school in
2001.
“I am excited to start the
next chapter of my educa-
tional career. Antwerp is an
excellent small school district
and I look forward to working
with the Antwerp staff as we
work to achieve our goals,”
said Manz.
Manz, who did his student
teaching at Antwerp, gradu-
ated from Defiance College
in 2005 and went on to Bowl-
ing Green State University
where he received his admin-
istration degree in 2010.
Manz taught science at Mont-
pelier middle school for two
years and has been at
Fairview the last four years.
Also being approved for
one-year teaching contracts
were Brittni Engle (first
grade), Andrea Newell
(band), Jassmine Reyes (mid-
dle school language arts), and
Rick Weirich (shop).
Elementary school fees
were set and approved at $65
per student in kindergarten
through grade five for the
2013-14 school year. Profes-
sional Development Days
(waiver days) were set for
Aug. 30, Nov. 4, and Jan. 21,
2014. Two-hour delays will
be scheduled for Oct. 9, Feb.
12, 2014 and April 9, 2014.
Several items of purchase
were approved by the board
including:
• a chiller to replace the
old one to be installed at a
cost of $126,150.
• update the HVAC build-
ing automation system by
American Heattek Corpora-
tion for $29,500.
• a contract with Loop As-
phalt Services to seal and
paint all parking lots, drives,
and bike path and to install
permanent speed bumps for
$24,210.
• purchase 140 computers
and three carts at a cost of
$92,631.
• approved a contract with
Northwest Ohio Area Com-
puter Services Cooperative to
provide services for one year
for $11,536.15.
• approved contract with
Kennedy Cottrell Richards to
perform agreed upon proce-
dure audit for the Medicaid
school program as required
by the Ohio Department of
Job and Family Services for a
cost of $2,075 for each cost
reporting period.
• the following athletic
contracts: Jon Short (head
golf coach), Phil Range, (as-
sistant golf coach), Zac
Feasby (head baseball coach),
Garry Rodenberger (head
softball coach), Cord Ehrhart
(head track and field coach),
Susan Jewell (assistant cross
country coach), Kara Eicher
(JV volleyball coach),
Heather Barnhouse (fresh-
man volleyball coach), Diana
Rogge (eighth grade volley-
ball coach), Danielle Friend
(seventh grade volleyball
coach), Amy Hammer (mini-
Archer volleyball coach),
Mike Bute (assistant football
coach), Kevin Carr (assistant
football coach), Matt Steib-
ling (assistant football coach),
Zac Feasby (assistant football
coach), John Brown (assistant
football coach), Chris Walters
(junior high head football
coach), Greg Billman (volun-
teer football coach), Bill Fish
(volunteer weightroom assis-
tant), Scott McMichael (co-
assistant athletic director),
Jon Short (co-assistant ath-
letic director), and Jerika
Miller (junior high cheerlead-
ing coach).
• approved Lynette Vail
(co-advisor for academic
boosters), Kayla Bagley (co-
advisor for academic boost-
ers), Mary Smith (high school
music director, dinner the-
ater/elementary musical di-
rector, show choir director,
middle school and high
school choir director, elemen-
tary concert director), Andrea
Newell (marching band direc-
tor and eighth grade class advi-
sor), Amy Sorrell and Rose
Reinhart (co-sophomore class
advisors), Lisa G. Jordan (se-
nior class advisor), Doris Haw-
ley (color guard advisor), Amy
Sorrell (yearbook advisor),
Robin McKibben (accelerated
reading coordinator), Deb Altic
(scholastic bowl advisor),
Susan Jewell (webpage super-
visor).
Other items approved in-
cluded:
• approved Deb Altic, Bran-
don Dunderman, and Damian
Fisher as part-time summer
custodians.
• approved the resignation of
Karri Diehl.
• approved participation in
the Ohio School Comp 2014
Workers’ Compensation Group
Rating Program with an enroll-
ment fee of $1,150.
The next meeting is sched-
uled for July 18 at 5 p.m. at
Antwerp School.
Business News
Hurless attends CIC Institute
VAN WERT – Eric Hurless, insurance advisor of the
Stahl Stoller Meyer Insurance Center of Van Wert, has
successfully completed the Certified Insurance Coun-
selors Commercial Casualty Institute held in Perrysburg.
The insurance course attended was just one course of-
fered by the Professional Independent Agents Associa-
tion of Ohio. After the successful completion of five
courses covering all major areas of the insurance field,
and five comprehensive examinations, Hurless will be
awarded the CIC designation by The National Alliance
for Insurance Education & Research, the nation’s fore-
most provider of professional insurance and education.
Hurless has worked as an insurance advisor with Stahl
Stoller Meyer Insurance for over two years. He has been
in the insurance industry since 2006 fulfilling multiple
roles such as an underwriter and claims adjuster with var-
ious companies. He is proud to continue serving his com-
munity and protecting his client’s assets.
Hurless can be reached at ehurless@ssm-
insurance.com or 419-232-4776.
Wednesday, July 3, 2013 Paulding County Progress - 9A
In The
Garden
By
Kylee Baumle
Passionate or obsessed?
There was a lively discus-
sion on Facebook last week
as several of us watched Nik
Wallenda walk that tightrope
across the Grand Canyon
without a safety net or tether.
A common thought was that
you’d have to be a little crazy
to do what he did.
I tried to put myself in his
position, a little difficult to
do, but I considered his fam-
ily’s legacy and the tradition
of making a living by per-
forming stupendous feats.
Few outside his family can
truly understand what that is.
To be that passionate about
something might border on
obsession to some.
A few years ago, an ex-
tended family member told
me I was obsessed with gar-
dening. She said this like it
was a bad thing. Even though
she gardened a bit, her level
of involvement was a bit
lower than mine, and she just
didn’t understand how I could
spend so much time thinking
about it and doing it.
But, I contend that most of
us have something that we’re
more than a little enthusiastic
about, something that gives
us so much joy and satisfac-
tion that we can’t imagine not
doing it.
Life exposes us to many
things and our unique person-
alities cause us to gravitate
toward specific activities that
fulfill some sort of need
within us.
Gardening does that for
me. I came to enjoy it more
seriously later in life, though
I’d always grown either
houseplants or had a veg-
etable garden since the begin-
ning of my married life.
But eight years ago, a
switch was somehow flipped
and I embraced gardening
like I was born to do it.
We gardeners have various
reasons why we go out in the
spring, till the soil, plant the
seeds, care for the plants, har-
vest the crop, prune the
branches, and do it all over
again the next year and the
next. Some do it out of ne-
cessity, helping to feed their
families by growing edibles
and preserving them for later.
But, many of us do it for
the sheer joy of seeing the
miracles that occur daily in
our little plots of land. The
beauty of the flowers is a
given, but leaves are just as
glorious in their myriad of
shapes and patterns and even
colors.
We get a front row view of
God’s creation interacting
when we watch the butterflies
sipping nectar, the humming-
birds hovering over the honey-
suckle and the baby ladybugs
dining on aphids. I’ll never for-
get the time I watched a
monarch caterpillar form its
chrysalis on the hardy hibiscus.
Gardeners get to be artists,
crafting our works of art using
plants. So often, it’s a motion
picture, as we move this plant
there and decide that one
would look better over here.
Ours is an ongoing creation as
we get inspired throughout the
seasons.
We know a garden is never
really “done.” What’s the fun in
that? So much of the time, the
enjoyment comes from the jour-
ney, not in reaching the final
destination. There’s always
more to learn and more chal-
lenges to face and that’s what
keeps us doing what we do.
Just like Nik Wallenda.
Read Kylee Baumle’s blog,
Our Little Acre at www.ourlit-
tleacre.com and on Facebook
at www.facebook.com/OurLit-
tleAcre. Contact her at Pauld-
ingProgressGardener@gmail.
com.
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Call For More Information: 419-393-2211
Jr. Clinic
July 15, 16, 17
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SCHOLARSHIPS AWARDED – The Paulding County Hospital Foundation awarded seven scholarships totaling $6,500 to Paulding
County students pursuing a healthcare career education. From left are Sarah Nickols, Marlee Pease, Steven Strayer, Staci Wen-
ninger and Natalie Sinn. For the first time, the foundation awarded scholarships to current college students; the winners of these
$1,000 scholarships each are Kelly Zartman and Jessica Wenninger.
PEVS voters will see levy
renewal on fall ballot
PAULDING – The Pauld-
ing Exempted Village
Schools Board of Education
held its regular meeting June
25, approving a new curricu-
lum coordinator and a hand-
ful of teaching positions as
well as numerous other per-
sonnel items for the upcom-
ing school year. In addition,
the board agreed to seek re-
newal of a tax levy.
The media, administrators
and new staff were present at
the board meeting. Joel Eller-
brock, Elyse Myers, Britni
Dunlop and Brian Jacobs
were introduced.
The board voted to place a
2.36-mill, five-year renewal
levy on the November ballot
for voter approval. If re-
newed, the levy will provide
$418,250 annually for emer-
gency requirements of the
school district. The vote was
4-1 with James Foltz, Robert
Burkley, Mark Manz and
Greg Reinhart in favor, and
Elizabeth Hunt dissenting.
Interim superintendent
John Basinger and new su-
perintendent William Hanak
reported preliminary test re-
sults for the Ohio Achieve-
ment Assessments (OAAs)
and Ohio Graduation Tests
(OGTs), which showed the
district passing 19 of 21 indi-
cators, a great job by all
buildings.
Upon recommendation of
the superintendent, the board
approved several personnel
contracts:
• a two-year administrative
employee contract as curricu-
lum coordinator for Cortney
Karshner-Rethmel, and to ac-
cept the resignation of her
teaching contract effective at
the end of the current contract
year. Reinhart cast the lone
no vote.
• one-year limited extracur-
ricular contracts for Mike
Miller, head girls golf coach;
Shawn Brewer, head boys
basketball coach; Lyndsi
Schultz, head girls basketball
coach; and Josh Neilson,
head wrestling coach.
The board also approved
the following personnel
items:
• the resignations of
Chelsea Koester, high school
guidance counselor, and
Shawn Gerber, high school
social studies teacher.
• one-year limited con-
tracts, pending records, for
Kelsi Grime, Paulding Ele-
mentary kindergarten teacher;
Joel Ellerbrock, Paulding El-
ementary 4th grade teacher;
Elyse Myers, Oakwood Ele-
mentary 5th/6th grade
teacher.
• an additional 2.5 hours for
Elaine Sierer, educational
aide, increasing her to full-
time (7 hours).
• the resignation of Nic Al-
varez from his 2013-14 ex-
tracurricular contract as head
cross country coach.
• extracurricular contracts,
pending records: Beth Kelly,
jr. class advisor (50%); Sandy
Dobbelaere, jr. class advisor
(50%); Brett Foster, FFA ad-
visor; Angie Burtch, 7th
grade football cheer advisor
and 7th and 8th grade basket-
ball cheer advisor; Melissa
Martinez, volunteer jr. hi
football and basketball cheer
assistant; Shannon Foltz, var-
sity football and basketball
cheer advisor; Andrea Mead,
7th grade girls basketball;
Shawn Brewer, 5th and 6th
grade boys basketball; Lyndsi
Schultz, 5th and 6th grade
girls basketball; Wes Schultz,
volunteer varsity girls basket-
ball assistant; Josh Neilson,
5th and 6th grade wrestling;
Deedi Miller, volunteer girls
golf assistant; Matt Mead, HS
football assistant; Eric Mar-
tinez, HS football assistant;
Jon Thomas, HS football as-
sistant; Jeff Price, jr. high
football assistant; Seth
Thomas, jr. high football as-
sistant.
• substitute teachers and
substitute support staff (aides,
food service, custodial, secre-
taries, bus drivers, bus driver
training, on board instructors,
substitute mechanics, nurses),
pending records.
• a one-year limited interim
contract for Stacey Vaske,
Paulding Elementary kinder-
garten teacher, pending
records.
• one-year limited contracts
for Britni Dunlop, middle
school intervention specialist,
and Brian Jacobs, Paulding
Elementary kindergarten
teacher, both pending
records.
• accepting the resignation
of Melissa Stork, .4 Oakwood
Elementary art teacher, at the
end of the current contract
year.
• changing placement for
Julie McCullough, student
council advisor, with Manz
abstaining from the vote.
• reinstated Melissa Dearth
from the RIF list to full-time
HS social studies teacher ef-
fective for the 2013-14 school
year, with Hunt abstaining
from the vote.
The board approved three
new positions:
• an additional Intervention
Specialist position at Pauld-
ing Elementary for the 2013-
14 school year, due to
increase in student numbers.
• an additional Title I teach-
ing position at Paulding Ele-
mentary for the 2013-14
school year.
• a part-time (up to four
hours) Paulding Elementary
aide position for the 2013-14
school year.
In other business, the board
approved:
• requesting three full days
of in-service on Sept. 3, Sept.
30 and Dec. 2, and three two-
hour delays on Jan. 29, Feb.
26 and March 26 for the pur-
pose of providing profes-
sional development for our
teachers.
• cafeteria prices for the
2013-14 school year as fol-
lows, which are the same as
last year’s prices: Elementary
$2.25, MS/HS Paw Plate
$2.50, Panther Plate $2.85,
Salad $2.85, Specialty Salad
$3.35, Breakfast-Elementary
$1.35, Breakfast-MS/HS
$1.60, Adult Meal $3.25, Stu-
dent Extra Milk $.35, Adult
Extra Milk $.40.
• purchasing dairy products
from Schenkels Dairy for the
2013-14 school year. The
Bread bids were tabled till
next month.
• Oakwood and Paulding
elementary handbooks for the
2013-14 school year.
• renewal of the districts’
property, fleet and liability in-
surance coverages through
the Southwestern Ohio Edu-
cational Purchasing Council
(EPC-LFP). The total cost for
the insurance for the period of
July 1, 2013 through July 1,
2014 is $66,651.
• numerous new, revised
and deleted board of educa-
tion policies.
• sending approximately 30
students and two chaperones
to the Ohio Model United
Nations (OMUN) competi-
tion in Columbus in Decem-
ber at a cost of $200 per
student, which is paid for by
the students and fundraisers.
• site licenses for Fast For-
ward and Reading Assistant
from Scientific Learning for
$72,074.
• three mobile laptop labs –
one for Oakwood Elementary
and two for Paulding Ele-
mentary – from School Tech
Supply for $23,849 each.
The board adjourned into
executive session for about
half an hour to consider the
employment of a public em-
ployee or official; the com-
pensation of a public
employee or official; and the
investigation of charges or
complaints against a public
employee, official, licensee,
or student. No action was
taken.
Staff photo/Paulding County Progress
NEW BUSINESS OPENS – Fastenal is now open in the plaza at 829 N. Williams St. in Paulding.
The hours are 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday. They specialize in all types of fasteners in-
cluding bolts, screws, nuts, washers, sockets, etc. Other industrial supplies include tools, safety items,
material packaging, paints, office supplies and much more. Stop in and say hello.
10A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, July 3, 2013





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ACME Baseball
PAULDING 8 LINCOLNVIEW 1
Paulding moved to 16-4 on
the summer with an 8-1 win
over Lincolnview last week.
Kyle Kauser recorded the
victory, giving up eight hits
and one walk with ten strike-
outs in the complete game ef-
fort.
Kauser also had a double to
aid the Panther offense with
Quentin Vance adding a sin-
gle and a double.
The Panthers scored two
runs in the first before adding
four in the fourth and two in
the fifth. Lincolnview got its
only run in the third.
PAULDING 11 ANTWERP 3
Gerod Harder struck out a
dozen Antwerp hitters and
Paulding used a six-run third
to break open a close game as
the Panthers recorded an 11-
3 win over the Archers.
Harder gave up six hits,
three walks and three runs in
four plus innings to get the
win for the maroon and
white. Derek Smalley took
the loss for the Archers, al-
lowing nine hits and a pair of
walks while fanning six.
Quentin Vance had a single
and a triple for Paulding with
Treston Gonzales adding two
singles. Gerod Harder also
posted two singles and a dou-
ble with Guy Harder chipping
in two singles and Greg Kurtz
recording a single and a dou-
ble.
Smalley led the Archers
with a single and a double
while Collin Perry added two
singles. Jeffrey Coleman also
had a double for the blue and
white.
FAIRVIEW 2 PAULDING 0
Fairview scored twice in
the first and neither time
scored from that point on as
the Apaches posted a 2-0 win
over the Panthers.
Preston Johanns took the
loss for the maroon and
white, giving up two hits and
five walks. Vance and Treston
Gonzales led the Panther of-
fense with two singles and a
double, respectively.
NAPOLEON 5 PAULDING 0
The Panthers dropped a 5-
0 decision to Napoleon as the
Wildcats scored twice in the
second and sixth while
adding a single run in the
first.
Treston Gonzales had a
double to lead the Panther of-
fense. Kyle Kauser took the
loss, giving up seven hits and
two walks while striking out
three in 5-1/3 innings.
PAULDING 5 ALLEN EAST 2
Paulding held off a late
Allen East rally to post a 5-2
victory over the Mustangs.
Javier Gonzales went 6-1/3
innings to get the win, limit-
ing the Allen County squad to
one hit and four walks.
Treston Gonzales had two
singles to top the Panther of-
fense.
PAULDING 10 KALIDA 2
In action against Kalida,
the Panthers scored eight runs
over the first two innings and
never looked back en route to
a 10-2 victory over the Wild-
cats.
Treston Gonzales threw the
complete game win for
Paulding, scattering two hits
and five walks while striking
out 13.
The Panther hurler also
added a single, triple and five
runs batted in while Quentin
Vance added two singles.
Javier Gonzales chipped in
two singles for Paulding as
well.
PAULDING 4 MONTPELIER 3
PAULDING 5 MONTPELIER 1
The maroon and white
swept a double header from
visiting Montpelier as the
Panthers recorded victories of
4-3 and 5-1.
In the opener, the local
squad scored in the bottom of
the seventh to pick up the vic-
tory. Vance had a pair of sin-
gles for Paulding with
Gonzales getting the victory
on the hill.
The nightcap saw Corbin
Edwards record the win,
striking out two while walk-
ing four and giving up one
hit. Kyle Kauser had a single
and a double to lead the Pan-
ther offense.
VAN WERT 8 PAULDING 1
PAULDING 6 VAN WERT 4
Van Wert and Paulding
split a doubleheader recently
as the Cougars took game one
8-1 before the Panthers ral-
lied for a 6-4 win in game
two.
Quentin Vance had a single
and a double to lead the ma-
roon and white in the opener.
Van Wert scored three times
in the second and four more
in the third to cruise to the
victory.
Kyle Kauser suffered the
loss, tossing the complete
game but allowing a dozen
hits and one walk with four
strikeouts.
Game two saw Paulding
rally from an early 3-2 deficit
by scoring twice each in the
third and fourth en route to
the victory.
Javier Gonzales had two
singles to lead the Panther of-
fense while also getting the
victory, allowing 10 hits and
three walks.
PAULDING 9 KALIDA 4
The Panthers posted a 9-4
win over Kalida as well with
Gonzales tossing the com-
plete game, giving up nine
hits while fanning five.
Kyle Kauser had three sin-
gles with Treston Gonzales
and Alex Arellano adding two
singles each. Quentin Vance
posted two singles and a dou-
ble as well.
PAULDING 8 DELTA 6
PAULDING 2 DELTA 1
In doubleheader action
with Delta, the maroon and
white posted victories of 8-6
and 2-1.
Treston Gonzales, Corbin
Edwards, Greg Kurtz and
Kyle Kauser all saw action on
the hill for the Panthers. Ed-
wards had three singles and a
double to Paulding attack,
which totaled 15 hits.
Vance also had three sin-
gles with Jarrett Sitton and
Treston Gonzales posting two
singles each. Alex Arellano
recorded a single and a dou-
ble and Cameron Doster
chipped in a double.
In game two, Treston Gon-
zales ripped a single and a
triple while Kauser added a
single and a double to lead
the Paulding attack.
Kauser pitched five innings
to get the win, limiting the
Panthers to three hits while
striking out six.
PAULDING 13 ANTWERP 3
PAULDING 7 ANTWERP 1
Greg Kurtz recorded his
first victory of the summer in
leading the Panthers to a 13-
3 win over Antwerp. Gerod
Harder also pitched for the
Panthers while Joe Buerkle
suffered the loss on the hill
for the Archers.
Kurtz and Harder limited
the blue and white to seven
hits and single runs in the sec-
ond, third and fifth innings.
Paulding scored four times
in the first before adding one
in the third, two in the fourth
and three each in the fifth and
sixth.
Kauser led the way for the
maroon and white with three
singles and a double followed
by Javier Gonzales with two
singles. Guy Harder also
added a single and a triple.
In the second game be-
tween the two squads, the
Panthers used a six-run fourth
to post a 7-1 win.
Gerod Harder and Edwards
limited the Archer hitters to
two hits and a single run in
the first.
Quentin Vance had two sin-
gles and a double for Pauld-
ing with Guy Harder
chipping in a pair of singles.
Paulding scored a single
run in the third as well.
PAULDING 9 CRESTVIEW 4
The maroon and white got
a combined solid effort from
Treston Gonzales, Javier
Gonzales and Damon Egnor
on the hill as the Panthers
recorded a 9-4 win over
Crestview.
Cam Etzler had a single
and a double to lead the
Knight offense, which plated
single runs in the fourth and
sixth along with two in the
fifth.
Paulding got a single run in
the first before adding two
each in the fourth and fifth
and four in the sixth.
Kauser had three singles
and three runs batted in for
Paulding while Vance, Javier
Gonzales, Edwards and Pre-
ston Johanns added two sin-
gles each.
HILLTOP 8 ANTWERP 3
ANTWERP 10 HILLTOP 7
Against Hilltop, the
Archers took game two of
doubleheader action by
recording a 10-7 victory. The
Cadets won the opener of the
twin bill with an 8-3 win.
HICKSVILLE 10 ANTWERP 2
ANTWERP 5 HICKSVILLE 4
Hicksville also won the
first of a pair of games with
the Archers, cruising to a 10-
2 victory. However, the blue
and white rebounded to trim
the Aces 5-4 in the nightcap.
Tyler Messman took the
loss in the opener, allowing
ten hits and one walk with
two strikeouts. Messman also
had a single for the Antwerp
offense and Jeff Coleman
added a double.
Trenton Copsey posted two
singles in game two with
Alex Vail adding a double
and Derek Smalley recording
a single.
Copsey also got the win on
the mound, giving up only
one walk with one strikeout
in two innings of work.
FAIRVIEW 13 PAULDING 2
PAULDING 12 FAIRVIEW 4
Fairview scored four times
each in the third and sixth and
added five more in the fifth to
cruise to a 13-2 win over
Paulding.
The Panthers scored single
runs in the first and second
for a 2-0 lead, but it was all
black and gold after that.
Gerod Harder took the loss,
allowing six hits, two walks
and one earned run in 4-1/3
innings. Kyle Kauser had the
lone hit in the contest for the
maroon and white.
In the second game, the
Panthers plated three runs in
the first and fourth and five in
the second to post a 12-4 win.
Treston Gonzales picked
up the victory, giving up three
hits and three walks while
fanning nine.
Kauser had a single and a
double for Paulding with Tre-
ston Gonzales adding a dou-
ble and three runs batted in.
Quentin Vance had two sin-
gles and Corbin Edwards
posted a double.
PAULDING 13 COLUMBUS
GROVE 1
Javier Gonzales led the Pan-
thers to a 13-1 win over
Columbus Grove, scattering
four hits and three walks with
four strikeouts in a five-in-
ning effort.
Alex Arellano posted two
singles and three runs batted
in with Gerod Harder also
adding three singles. Javier
Gonzales chipped in a single
as well for the Panthers, who
scored four times in the first
and seven in the third en route
to a 13-1 victory.
Ed Gebert/Times Bulletin
Rick Noggle (left), chairman of the Disaster Action Team for
the Paulding County Chapter of the American Red Cross, was
honored June 27 with the Disaster Volunteer Award for his work
in rebuilding the organization’s Disaster Action Team in the
county. The award was presented at the 2013 Volunteer Recog-
nition Banquet at Trinity Friends Church in Van Wert.
Knights of Columbus has donated $26,000 for new ultrasound
machine at Hands of Hope pregnancy center. Chris Bercaw (right)
with the K of C in Paulding presented the check to Malinda Ricker
on June 27 after the organization’s ribbon cutting. The money was
raised by K of C and anonymous donors. The ultrasound machine
will be purchased after the rest of the fundraising is complete. The
group still needs $3,300. For those wanting to still donate, please
make checks payable to Hands Of Hope. Mark ultrasound in memo.
The address is 1030 W. Wayne St. Paulding.
Young golfers place in tourneys
The Northwest Ohio Jr. Golf Association (NWOJGA) held
a golf tournament June 27 at Auglaize Golf Course.
In competition among boys ages 13-14, Brady Stabler of
Payne placed third with 101.
Stabler also placed third in competition on June 25 at Eagle
Rock Golf Club in Defiance. He carded a 103.
A NWOJGA junior tournament was held at Ironwood Golf
Course in Wauseon June 17. Evan Baughman of Payne fin-
ished the day with 114, earning in second place for boys ages
13-14. Also, Paige Rahrig of Payne placed second among girls
with a 116.
Volleyball official classes starting
Are you a sports enthusiast? Would you like to earn some
extra money? Then why not consider becoming an OHSAA
registered volleyball official? Classes will begin in July. Con-
tact Rita at 419-235-9246 for more information.
Register for Kiwanis soccer
PAULDING – Paulding Kiwanis soccer registration deadline
is July 31. The program is for children age 4 through the fifth
grade. Games will be played Saturday mornings Sept. 7-Oct. 12.
The cost is $30.
Registration forms can be downloaded from the Paulding
Carnegie library’s website at www.pauldingcountylibrary.org/soc-
cer.htm. Registration forms are also be available at the library.
Be a Facebook fan
The Progress has a Facebook page as a way for readers to
get more information from its community newspaper. Join our
more than 2,000 fans! Go to facebook.com/pauldingpaper then
click the “Like” button.
Wednesday, July 3, 2013 Paulding County Progress – 11A
love.



comfor ffor



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respect



























Celebrating June birthdays at the Paulding County Senior Center included, front from left -
Kathy Helms, Marie Moore, Lois Thomas; back – Ray Keck, Shirley Workman, and Russell Long.
Others celebrating June birthdays were, from left – Sam Clippinger, Harold Phlipot and
Darlene Johnson.
Among those celebrating birthdays at the Paulding County Senior Center were, front from left
– Norma Jean Beauge, Inella Finnegan (98 years young), Mary Matson; back – Ellen Putnam,
Gloria Breyer, Mary Plum, Dorothy Myers.
Do you enjoy
this page?
Call the
sponsors on
this page and
tell them!
If you would
like to include
your business
on this page,
Call
419-399-4015
Wednesday, July 3
Barbecue Chicken, Baked Potato, Glazed Carrots, Banana,
Tapioca Pudding, W.W. Bread
Thursday, July 4
Closed Independence Day
Friday, July 5
Country Fried Steak, Mashed Potatoes, Green Beans,
Peaches, Cottage Cheese, Dinner Roll
Monday, July 8
Pork Cutlet/Gravy, Sweet Potato Casserole, Corn, Pears,
W.W. Bread, Peanut butter Cookie
Tuesday, July 9
Cheeseburger, Broccoli Salad, Tomato & Cucumber Salad,
Fruit Cocktail
Wednesday, July 10
Liver & Onions, Mashed Potatoes, Carrots, Watermelon, W.W. Bread,
Sherbet, Liver Alt: Swiss Steak
Thursday, July 11
BBQ Beef Sand., Coleslaw, Bean Salad, Cinnamon Apples
Friday, July 12
Roasted Turkey, Parslied Potatoes, Spanish Green Beans, Mixed
Melon, Dinner Roll, Cake
Monday, July 15
Roasted Chicken, Rice Pilaf, Stewed Tomatoes, Brussel Sprouts,
Tropical Fruit, W.W. Bread
Tuesday, July 16
Beef Goulash, Wax Beans, Apricots, Apple Juice, Garlic Bread
Wednesday, July 17
Tuna Salad with Lettuce & Tomatoes, Potato Rivel Soup,
Fresh Melon, Pudding, Dinner Roll, Crackers
Thursday, July 18
Veal Patty, Oven Browned Potatoes, California Blend,
Banana, W.W. Bread, Cookie
Friday, July 19
Pork Roast, Mashed Potatoes, Creamed Peas, Grape Juice,
Dinner Roll, Fruit Slush
Monday, July 22
Pepper Steak, Rice, Scandanavian Blend, Fruit Compote, Dinner Roll
Tuesday, July 23
Baked Ham, Redskin Potatoes, Spinach, Applesauce,
Sherbet, Cornbread
Wednesday, July 24
Baked Potato with Beef & Cheese, California Blend, Coleslaw,
Cinnamon Peaches, Muffin
Thursday, July 25
Chicken Salad, Shredded Lettuce, Vegetable & Rice Soup, Fresh
Melon, Dinner Roll, Cookie, Crackers
Friday, July 26
Beef Manhattan, Mashed Potatoes, Lima Beans,
Fruit Cup, W.W. Bread, Cake
Monday, July 29
Chicken & Noodles, Mashed Potatoes, Capri Blend Vegetables,
Pinapple Tidbits, Dinner Roll
Tuesday, July 30
Swiss Steak, Mashed Potatoes, Corn, Apple Juice,
Fruit Cobbler, Dinner Roll
Wednesday, July 31
Chicken Patty Sandwich, Pea Salad, Fruit Cup, Perfection Salad
Paulding County Senior Center
401 E. Jackson St., Paulding
Served 11:30 a.m. Mon.–Fri. • Reservations: 419-399-3650
This Menu Is Sponsored
By Ohio Gas.
Professional Chefs Prefer
Cooking With Natural Gas.
GALA MENU
July 2013
Six foods to
lower blood
pressure
For adults under 65, it’s that
upper number in your blood
pressure reading that may be
the best indicator of future
heart problems or even pre-
mature death. A normal read-
ing is around 120/80. If that
first number is 140 or higher,
you have reason for concern.
One safe, effective way to
decrease blood pressure for
all age groups is to eat foods
that work naturally to dilate
blood vessels so the heart
doesn’t have to work so hard.
There are six fabulous foods
which can lower your blood
pressure.
Berries. Just one serving of
blueberries a week can help
cut your risk of high blood
pressure. Blueberries, as well
as raspberries and strawber-
ries, contain natural com-
pounds called anthocyanins
that protect against hyperten-
sion.
Cereal. Having a bowl of
breakfast cereal, especially
whole-grain, high-fiber cere-
als like oatmeal, oat squares,
bran flakes or shredded
wheat, can reduce your
chance of developing high
blood pressure.
Potato. Everyone loves a
baked potato, right? But did
you know that a baked potato
is high in potassium and mag-
nesium, two important miner-
als that can help fight high
blood pressure?
Beet juice. Drinking a glass
of beet juice can lower blood
pressure within just a few
hours.
Got milk? Eating low-fat
dairy products can reduce the
chances of developing hyper-
tension.
Chocolate lovers rejoice!
Eating a one-ounce square of
dark chocolate daily can help
lower blood pressure, espe-
cially in people who already
have hypertension, according
to Harvard researchers who
analyzed 24 chocolate stud-
ies.
These foods according to
studies will help lower blood
pressure which will lead to a
healthier you.
Among those celebrating June wedding anniversaries at the
Paulding County Senior Center were, from left – Jack and
Marie Moore, 64 years, and Chet and Lois Thompson, 59 years.
Others celebrating anniversaries at the Paulding County
Senior Center were, from left – Roy and Mary Jo Phlipot and
Calvin and Dorothy Myers.
M.L. Zehr Construction
The quality of our work speaks for itself and
will remain long after.
Metal Frame Buildings
Pole Barns
Commercial & Residential,
30+ years experience
Free Estimates
25720 Notestine Rd., Woodburn, IN 46797
(260) 433-5628 Mon.-Fri. 6:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
100 East Jackson St., Paulding, Ohio
419-399-4444
www.straleyrealestateinc.com
STRALEY REAL ESTATE
PLEASE CALL
Carolyn Straley @ 419-769-1352 or 419-399-3721,
Matt Straley @ 419-785-5161 or Rudy Straley @ 419-769-8996
for information concerning buying, qualifying for loan or selling
QUALITY CONSTRUCTED BY
JOHN HERZIG. 11833 Road
132 near the Paulding
Hospital. The 2800 sq. ft. 3
bedroom, 3 bath home and a
1200+ sq. ft. attached garage
for vehicle and storage space
has many features for those
who appreciate quality. The lot
measures 2.555 acres with a
pond that's behind the home.
Also, there's more acreage
available. Listing #344
3 BEDROOM 1.5 bath home
basement, attached 24 x 28’
garage and a 12x12 storage
building. Location is in
Paulding on West Perry St.
#351
APARTMENT BUILDI NG has
5 units, 3 up, 2 down. The
tenants pay their own utilities.
Location is on North Williams
Street in Paulding. #340
3 BEDROOM 1 1/2 bath home
in Paulding with new central
air & heat, easy care low
maintenance exterior and a
24x30' modern garage. #328
3 OR 4 BEDROOM, 2 bath
home with lots of rooms,
basement and a 30x65'
garage/storage building
located in Paulding. #339
3 BEDROOM, 1 1/2 baths,
attached garage and a stor-
age shed out back located in
Paulding. #347
1131 EMERALD ROAD,
Paulding- 3 bedroom 2 bath
home 13 years of age with 1500
feet of living area, equipped
kitchen and central air. #316
3 BEDROOM, 1 1/2 bath
home, fireplace, attached
garage and a 16x24' storage
building, all on 1.5 shaded
acres. Location is west of
Antwerp. #325
NEW LISTING: 10.33 Acres,
a 3 bedroom 2 bath home,
one-acre pond, and a full
basement with a 3rd bath-
room's plumbing roughed in,
the exterior walls studded,
insulated and wiring roughed
in. The pond can be viewed
thru the large windows of the
great room, which has a
wood-burning fireplace. The
home is total electric, has
forced air heat and central air
and extra electric service for
a future outside building or
other uses. The kitchen
range, dryer and fireplace
have piping for propane gas
if desired. The front yard is
huge as the home is situated
toward the rear of the partial-
ly wooded site. Located on
Road 176 in the Antwerp
School District. #353
3 BEDROOM one story
home and attached
garage, located on Helen
Street in Paulding. #330
3 BEDROOM 2 bath L
shaped home that's in very
good condition with an
attached garage at each
end. Location is on a cor-
ner lot in Latty. #346
"A FRAME" 2 bedrooms
up, 1 down, large attached
24x40' garage and large
rear yard. #345
2 BUILDING SITES; a 2.296
acre parcel and a 1.928 acre
parcel near the Paulding
Hospital. #348 & #349
BUI LDI NG SI TE (108’ x
132’) on the NE Corner of
Perry and Coupland
Streets in Paulding. #350
FOLTZ REALTY
Donald K. Foltz, II - Broker: 106 N. Williams St. Paulding
www.foltzrealty.com • 419-399-2347
REALTORS: Tim Boss 419-769-0823, Maurie Wannemacher 419-769-9090
Christine Hartman 419-506-1017
#2832 NEW LIST-
ING!! 5383 Rd. 87
Haviland: Beautiful
home on 3.15 acre w/
1/2 acre pond, 3 BR.,
2 1/2 Bath, finished
basement, 54' x 36'
Morton building and
all nicely landscaped.
Call Maurie
#2827 495 E. Perry
St. Paulding: 3.04
acre lot on 127S. City
water & sewer tap
available. $49,000
Call Tim
#2831 NEW LIST-
ING!! 5788 SR 500
Payne: Very nice
home. Many features
including carpeting,
roof, siding and cup-
boards less than 5
yrs. old. 3 BR, 1 BA,
attached 24' x 24'
garage & 12' x 16'
utility building. Call
Maurie $79,900
#2819 REDUCED!
401 W. Canal St.
Antwerp: Nice 3 Br, 2
Ba, brick & vinyl sided
home with 2 car at-
tached garage on a
corner lot in Antwerp.
City water and sani-
tary sewer on a crawl
space. Call Don
$79,900
#2811 REDUCED! 235
E. Merrin St. Payne: 2
Car detached garage.
ALL REMODELED 3
Br., 1 3/4 Ba home.
New floor covering,
laminate and carpeting,
new metal roof, vinyl
siding and water heater
in 2012. Windows re-
placed and new en-
trance doors. Must see!
Call Maurie $45,900
Seller Open To Offer!
#2823 215 S. Main
St. Payne: Motivated
Seller Open To Offer!
All modern 5 BR., 2
BA beautiful home.
Utility basement, all
natural woodwork,
fireplace and attached
garage. $114,900 Call
Maurie
CHECK OUR NEW WEBSITE @ foltzrealty.com
#1584 2.78 Acres, lg.
pond, up-ground pool,
outbuilding, 3 bdrm, 2
bath, C/A, family room,
newer roof & windows,
$132,000! South of
Melrose. Call Sandra/
Tamyra 506-1015
#1572 Newer 3 bdrm, 2
bath, C/A, newer roof &
patio door, $89,000. 805
Meadowbrook Dr., Pldg.
Call Don Gorrell 419-
399-7699
To see nice color pictures & interior shots of properties offered
by Gorrell Bros. go to: www.gorrellbros-paulding.com
Multiple Listing
Service
Call Gorrell’s to get your home sold TODAY!
#1574... Lg. 3-4 bdrm.
home, garage, original
hardwood flooring, make
offer, 303 N. Williams,
Paulding, $85,000 Call
Don 419-399-7699
NEW LISTING #1582...
Must see, 3 bdrm. home
w/ many updates, 12091
Maple Ave., Paulding.
$77,000. Call Don
Gorrell 419-399-7699
#1578 “Pristine” inside
& out!! 3 bdrm, 2 bath,
C/A, stainless steel appli-
ances, new kitchen
w/Kraft Maid cabinets,
Paulding. $132,000 Call
Sandra/ Tamyra 419-
506-1015.
#1580 3 bdrm, 2 bath,
1,380 sq. ft., family
room, newer countertop,
sink & appliances, shop
space off garage.
Paulding. $89,900. Call
Sandra/ Tamyra 419-
506-1015
#1556 PRICED TO
MOVE!! MOTIVATED
SELLER!! REDUCED
$16,000!! - 4 bedroom,
2 bath, formal dining,
basement, ptly. finished,
C/A, big outbuilding,
Rural Paulding. $89,900.
Call Sandra/ Tamyra
419-506-1015
#1530 Appealing 3
bdrm, 2 bath home, fam-
ily room built in 2007,
new roof, newer furnace
& C/A, updated kitchen,
realtor owned, Call Don
Gorrell 399-7699
New Listing #1583 320
W. Caroline, Paulding.
4,304 sq. ft. building w/ 4
overhead doors, rest-
room & office space,
security system. $79,900
.... Call Joe Den Herder
#1585... NEW LISTING
- Immaculate 3 bdrm, 2
bath, w/ 3-season Florida
room. Professionally
landscaped, newer roof
& flooring throughout.
Must see. 817 Meadow-
brook Dr., Paulding. Call
Don 419-399-7699
S & S SANITATION
Serving Northwest Ohio
Roll-off containers available, Commercial
and Residential Clean-up
1-888-596-3805
41c9
Tri-County Roofing and Home Improvement,
Inc, one of the largest roofing contractors in NW
Ohio, is recruiting for top talent in the roofing in-
dustry. Locally owned and operated, Tri-County
Roofing and Home Improvement, Inc has been
in business for over 18 years. We are currently
looking for Service & Repair Technician and
Roofers to service the Paulding, Defiance,
Williams, Putnam, and Van Wert County areas.
Roofer applicants must have at least 5 years of
roofing experience with a professional roofing
contractor. Material knowledge needs to include,
Asphalt shingles and low slope roofing
(EPDM/TPO), Steel roofing experience is pre-
ferred. Service and Repair Technician requires
at least 10 years of experience with a commer-
cial or residential roofing contractor. Material
knowledge needs to include Asphalt shingles,
Steel roofing, and low slope roofing (EPDM/TPO).
All applicants must have a valid driver's license.
Tri-County Roofing and Home Improvement, Inc
is a drug free workplace. If interested in applying
please call 419-399-7668.
HELP WANTED
45c2
The Crescent-News
is looking for a
Motor Route Driver
for the Oakwood/
Melrose area
Pick up is in Defiance
$1,200 - $1,300/mo
NO COLLECTIONS
For Interview,
Call Greg
419-784-5441 x251
44c2
$ $ $ $
www.BeeGeeRealty.com
BEE GEE REALTY &
AUCTION CO., LTD
122 N Washington St.,
Van Wert, OH 45891
This is a spacious ranch home featuring three bedrooms and two
bathrooms. You’ll like the two car garage and low monthly payments
possible at today’s interest rates available to qualified buyers. Call
Dale Butler at 419-203-5717
A great buy is available on this ranch home that has a new reduced
price of only $49,900. It has 3 bedrooms, 2 baths and an attached
garage. It is well insulated and has a low electric budget. Call Bob
Gamble @ 419-238-5555.
618 PLAINFIELD DR., PAYNE, OH
6801 ROAD 47, PAYNE, OH
Service Manager
Archbold Equipment Co. has an
opening for a full-time Service Man-
ager at our Ottawa Store. Person
should be a capable leader to super-
vise all shop and field mechanics in-
cluding making shop assignments,
monitoring standards of performance
and work output to satisfy customer
service needs. We offer competitive
salary and benefits. Send resume to
Archbold Equipment Co., P.O. Box
181, Archbold OH 43502 or e-mail to
denny.shannon@archboldequip-
mentco.com.
45c2
DISPATCHER
Hornish Bros. Inc. in Defiance, Ohio
is looking for a person to work in its
dispatch department. Qualified appli-
cant should be proficient in computer
use, be able to listen well, think under
pressure and have excellent verbal
skills and be available to work any
shift. Experience preferred. Please
e-mail your resume to Steve Corbitt
at stevec@hornishbros. com. EOE.
45c2
LEGALS
LEGALS
LEGALS
SHERIFF’S SALE
OF REAL ESTATE
General Code, Section
11681 Revise Code,
Section 2329.26
THE STATE OF
OHIO, PAULDING
COUNTY:
THE HUNTINGTON
NATIONAL BANK,
SUCCESSOR BY
MERGER TO SKY
BANK, Plaintiff,
vs.
ROBERT R. PERKINS,
JR., ET AL., Defen-
dants,
Case No. CI 11 189.
Pursuant to an Order of
Sale in the above enti-
tled action, I will offer
for sale at public auc-
tion, at the East door of
the Courthouse in the
Village of Paulding, in
the above named
County, on Thursday,
the 25th day of July,
2013 at 10:00 o’clock
A.M., the real estate lo-
cated at:
10313 US 24 (Road
424), Cecil, Ohio
45821
Parcel Number: 14-
10S-012-05
Said premises appraised
at One Hundred Sev-
enty-four Thousand and
No/100 ($174,000.00)
Dollars and cannot be
sold for less than two-
thirds of that amount.
The appraisal of this
property was completed
without an interior in-
spection. Neither the
Sheriff’s Office nor the
appraisers are responsi-
ble for the condition of
the property at the time
the purchaser takes pos-
session.
TERMS OF SALE:
Ten percent down on
day of the sale and bal-
ance before deed is to
be issued.
Sheriff Jason K. Landers
Paulding County, Ohio
pauldingohsheriff.com
Robert H. Young, At-
torney for Plaintiff 43c3
RESOLUTION
1278-13
Resolution 1278-13 was
passed by Paulding Vil-
lage Council on June
17, 2013, and goes into
effect from and after the
earliest period allowed
by law. The summary of
this legislation is as fol-
lows:
A RESOLUTION AU-
THORIZING THE AD-
VERTISMENT FOR
BIDS FOR THE SALE
OF THE "BARNES
HOTEL" PROPERTY
LOCATED IN THE
VILLAGE OF
PAULDING, OHIO.
Copies of the full text of
this legislation may be
obtained at the Finance
Director's Office, 116
South Main Street, be-
tween the hours of 8:00
a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
Monday through Friday.
Melissa S. Tope,
Finance Director 44c2
RESOLUTION
1279-13
Resolution 1279-13 was
passed by Paulding Vil-
lage Council on June
17, 2013, and goes into
effect and shall be in
force immediately. The
summary of this legisla-
tion is as follows:
RESOLUTION DE-
CLARING IT NECES-
SARY TO LEVY A
TAX IN EXCESS OF
THE TEN MILL LIMI-
TATION (RECRE-
ATION/POOL), AND
DECLARING AN
EMERGENCY.
Copies of the full text of
this legislation may be
obtained at the Finance
Director's Office, 116
South Main Street, be-
tween the hours of 8:00
a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
Monday through Friday.
Melissa S. Tope,
Finance Director 44c2
RESOLUTION
1280-13
Resolution 1280-13 was
passed by Paulding Vil-
lage Council on June
17, 2013, and goes into
effect and shall be in
force immediately. The
summary of this legisla-
tion is as follows:
RESOLUTION DE-
CLARING IT NECES-
SARY TO LEVY A
TAX IN EXCESS OF
THE TEN MILL LIMI-
TATION (FIRE), AND
DECLARING AN
EMERGENCY.
Copies of the full text of
this legislation may be
obtained at the Finance
Director's Office, 116
South Main Street, be-
tween the hours of 8:00
a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
Monday through Friday.
Melissa S. Tope,
Finance Director 44c2
RESOLUTION
1281-13
Resolution 1281-13 was
passed by Paulding Vil-
lage Council on June
17, 2013, and goes into
effect and shall be in
force immediately. The
summary of this legisla-
tion is as follows:
RESOLUTION DE-
CLARING IT NECES-
SARY TO LEVY A
TAX IN EXCESS OF
THE TEN MILL LIMI-
TATION (CURRENT
EXPENSES/STREET
LIGHTING), AND DE-
CLARING AN EMER-
GENCY.
Copies of the full text of
this legislation may be
obtained at the Finance
Director's Office, 116
South Main Street, be-
tween the hours of 8:00
a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
Monday through Friday.
Melissa S. Tope,
Finance Director 44c2
LEGAL NOTICE
The Village of Paulding
will be accepting sealed
bids for the sale of the
following described real
estate, to-wit:
Inlot Number One Hun-
dred Eighty-nine (189)
in the Original Plat of
the Village of Paulding,
Paulding County, Ohio,
save and except the
Northwest Quarter (lA)
of said Lot; more partic-
ularly described as fol-
lows:
Beginning at the North-
west corner of said Inlot
Number One Hundred
Eighty-nine (189), run-
ning thence East on the
North line of said Lot,
Sixty-six (66) feet;
thence South on a line
parallel with the West
line of said Lot, Thirty-
three (33) feet; thence
West on a line parallel
with the aforesaid North
line, Sixty-six (66) feet;
thence South on a line
parallel with the West
line of said lot, Thirty-
three (33) feet; thence
West on a line parallel
with the aforesaid North
line, Sixty-Six feet (66)
to the West line of said
Lot; thence North on
said West line, Thirty-
three (33) feet to the
place of beginning.
Together with all the ap-
purtenances and heredi-
taments thereunto
belonging.
Parcel No.: 30-24S-064-
00
The real estate being
sold is the former
"Barnes Hotel" property
and is located at 110
South Williams Street,
Paulding, Ohio.
All sealed bids must be
must be identified as
"BID FOR BARNES
HOTEL PROPERTY"
and received by the Fi-
nance Director, Village
of Paulding, 116 South
Main Street, Paulding,
Ohio 45879 by 12:00
P.M. (Noon) on
Wednesday, August 7,
2013, at which time
they will be opened and
read.
The real estate is to be
sold and conveyed to
the highest bidder by
quit claim deed on the
following terms:
Bids must be in a mini-
mum amount of
$8,000.00.
Ten percent (10%) of
the purchase price to be
deposited with the bid
by certified check, and
the balance to be paid to
the Finance Director of
the Village of Paulding
within thirty (30) days
after the acceptance of
the bid by the Council
of the Village.
The successful bidder
for the property must
agree, in writing, to
comply with all ordi-
nances of the Village of
Paulding, Ohio, that
pertain to possible uses
for said real estate.
The Village of Paulding
reserves the right to ac-
cept or reject any and all
bids.
Please contact Harry
Wiebe, Village Admin-
istrator, at 419-399-
2806 with any
questions. 44c5
SHERIFF’S SALE
OF REAL ESTATE
General Code, Section
11681 Revise Code,
Section 2329.26
THE STATE OF
OHIO, PAULDING
COUNTY:
THE SHERWOOD
STATE BANK, Plain-
tiff,
vs.
LORI FLEMING aka
LORI FLEMING-
HODGE, ET AL., De-
fendants,
Case No. CI 13 037.
Pursuant to an Order of
Sale in the above enti-
tled action, I will offer
for sale at public auc-
tion, at the East door of
the Courthouse in the
Village of Paulding, in
the above named
County, on Thursday,
the 8th day of August,
2013 at 10:10 o’clock
A.M., the real estate lo-
cated at:
17836 Road 218, Cecil,
Ohio 45821
Parcel Number: 16-
14S-008-00
Said premises appraised
at Fifteen Thousand and
No/100 ($15,000.00)
Dollars and cannot be
sold for less than two-
thirds of that amount.
The appraisal of this
property was completed
without an interior in-
spection. Neither the
Sheriff’s Office nor the
appraisers are responsi-
ble for the condition of
the property at the time
the purchaser takes pos-
session.
TERMS OF SALE:
Ten percent down on
day of the sale and bal-
ance before deed is to
be issued.
Sheriff Jason K. Landers
Paulding County, Ohio
pauldingohsheriff.com
James K. Weaner, At-
torney for Plaintiff 44c3
SHERIFF’S SALE
OF REAL ESTATE
General Code, Section
11681 Revise Code,
Section 2329.26
THE STATE OF
OHIO, PAULDING
COUNTY:
M&T BANK, Plaintiff,
vs.
MILTON COWANS,
SR., ET AL., Defen-
dants,
Case No. CI 13 042.
Pursuant to an Order of
Sale in the above enti-
tled action, I will offer
for sale at public auc-
tion, at the East door of
the Courthouse in the
Village of Paulding, in
the above named
County, on Thursday,
the 8th day of August,
2013 at 10:15 o’clock
A.M., the real estate lo-
cated at:
824 West Jackson
Street, Paulding, Ohio
45879
Parcel Number: 30-
40S-012-00
Said premises appraised
at Forty-two Thousand
and No/100 ($42,000.00)
Dollars and cannot be
sold for less than two-
thirds of that amount.
The appraisal of this
property was completed
without an interior in-
spection. Neither the
Sheriff’s Office nor the
appraisers are responsi-
ble for the condition of
the property at the time
the purchaser takes pos-
session.
TERMS OF SALE:
Ten percent down on
day of the sale and bal-
ance before deed is to
be issued. 44c3
Sheriff Jason K. Landers
Paulding County, Ohio
pauldingohsheriff.com
Melissa N. Meinhart,
Attorney for Plaintiff
12A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, July 3, 2013
PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD
QUICKLY...EASILY...
JUST PHONE 419-399-4015
MAPLE TABLE 48” ROUND
plus leaf, six chairs. Excel-
lent condition $150. Oak
piano bench $100. 419-399-
3835 45p1
KIMBALL SPINET PIANO -
great condition, great sound,
taken great care of. Must see
to appreciate. Call Maurie at
419-769-9090 44c2
$125 QUEEN PILLOWTOP
MATTRESS SET. New in
plastic, can deliver 260-493-
0805. 45p4
YEARS AGO ANTIQUE
MALL, 108 W. Main Street,
Van Wert (419) 238-3362,
30+ Dealers. Closed Tues-
days. Buy & Sell. 27ctf
HARTZOG LUMBER and
supply 419-399-4941. Free
estimate for roofing of all
kind. See or call Rex. 45ctf
THE COMPUTER DEPOT
OF ANTWERP - Offering full
range of computer sales, serv-
ice and repair needs. Call 419-
258-0015 today! 44p4
P&H MASONRY RESTORA-
TION & REPAIR Specialist.
Foundation, basement and
chimney repair or replace.
Fully insured, Free Estimates
419-438-2101. 34ctf
AL GRIFFITHS CONSTRUC
TION: Windows, light electrical,
drywall, siding, doors and
more. Call Al for your repair or
contruction needs. 419-506-
2102 51ctf
3 BEDROOMS, 2 BATHS,
IN THE COUNTRY NEAR
GROVER HILL; $550
month. Call 419-587-3384
45c2
EFFICIENCY APARTMENT
for rent in Paulding. $275
month. Call 419-771-9450.
45c1
NICE 1 BEDROOM APART-
MENT - walking distance to
downtown Payne. 1st month’s
rent plus deposit. 419-263-
4700 or 419-786-0991 44c2
2 BDRM. APARTMENTS
FOR RENT in Paulding and
Defiance. Please call Jodi at
419-399-2419 for more details.
43ctf
RENT TO OWN - 320 W.
WAYNE, PAULDING. 3 bed-
room. $3,000 down payment.
Payments approximately $689
monthly including taxes and
insurance. Call Jodi at 419-
399-2419 for more info. 44c3
2 BDRM. GROUND LEVEL
apartment - 1 mile west of
Antwerp. Quiet country set-
ting, laundry facility included
in rent. 260-385-8799. 41ctf
IN PAULDING - Whispering
Pines - 2 bdrm. Call 419-
506-2102, 419-670-4024 or
419-399-2419 8ctf
PAULDING STORAGE CEN-
TER: Now renting storage
units. Different sizes available.
Call 419-399-2419 for info.18ctf
NOW LEASING: ONE &
TWO BEDROOM APART-
MENTS. Deposit & lease re-
quired. No pets. Please call
Straley Apts. at 419-399-
4444 or 419-399-3721 35ctf
PAULDING MINI STORAGE
UNITS. Located at south
side of Paulding on US 127.
Various sizes. Please call
419-399-4444 or 419-399-
3721 20ctf
REPLACING FOOTER AND
FOUNDATION - basement
repair floor leveling, roofing,
cement work. Call Mike Miner
419-596-3018 42p9
PART-TIME FARM HELP - in-
cludes mowing & some garden
work. Flexible hours. PO Box
180W, Paulding, OH 4587945p1
DRIVERS, CDL-A: DEDI-
CATED ACCOUNT. Get home
2-3 times weekly! The Best
Pay, Equipment, Benefits &
More! Roll with the best @ US
Xpress: 866-293-9006 44p3
R&R EMPLOYMENT/R&R
MEDICAL STAFFING NOW
HIRING - Packaging; Mainte-
nance Technician with Electri-
cal Background for 2nd/3rd
shifts; RN; LPN. Apply online
www.rremployment.com or call
419-232-2008 44c2
A 39-YEAR ESTABLISHED
RESIDENTIAL/COMMER-
CIAL/INDUSTRIAL electrical
contractor is seeking an experi-
enced Electrician. Successful
candidates should meet the fol-
lowing requirments: -Thorough
understanding of electrical/elec-
tronic theory and practices; in-
cluding excellent troubleshooting
and problem solving skills. -Min-
imum of 10 years experience in
Commercial/Industrial electrical.
-Excellent communication skills
-Ability to read building
plans/wiring diagrams -Experi-
ence in industrial controls and
automation a plus. Compensa-
tion based on qualifications
listed above and experience.
Please forward your resume,
along with employer references
to: PO BOX 180K, Paulding, OH
45879 43c3
DRIVER/YARD POSITION,
LOCAL CLASS A CDL, DE-
LIVERY DRIVER NEEDED.
Duties include delivery to cus-
tomers, loading and unloading
truck. Must be able to lift
100lbs. Starting pay $15 per
hour. Full benefit package in-
cluded. Must apply in person
at Midwest Tile and Concrete
Products, Inc. 4309 Webster
Rd., Woodburn, In 46797 45c2
COINS, ANTIQUES, OLD
KNIVES, postcards, OLD
toys, jewelry, watches,
stamps, estates. Austin White
419-399-3353 43p7
ESTATE SALE - ROAD 105,
CECIL. Appliances - still in
house, extra wide lift chair.
Everything must go. July 4th
- 7th; 9am - 4pm. 45p1
FRIDAY, JULY 5TH; 8AM-
5PM. Baby items, toys,
household, misc. MOORE’S,
828 E. WAYNE ST., PAULD-
ING 45p1
Estate Sale. 613 EAST OF
BROUGHTON. JULY 2 & 3,
5 & 6; 9-4:30. Vintage items
include 5 piece bdrm suite,
end tables, phone bench,
Minnesota A treadle sewing
machine & more, tvs, lamps,
microwave, lots more. 45p1
JULY 5-6; 9-5. Lots of junior
clothes. Shoes, household,
misc. CORNER OF BRICE-
TON RD. & 613. 45p1
Huge multi-party sale.
THURS. & FRI. JULY 4 & 5;
9-6. BAKE SALE FOR
BROUGHTON REDNECK
JAMBOREE. See featured
ad for sale R. Dobbelaere res-
idence. 17315 RD. 108
PAULDING. 45k1
Estate tag sale. JULY 12-13;
8-5. 13926 SR 114, HAVI-
LAND, one mi. west of US
127 45p2
WED., JULY 3, THURS.,
JULY 4 8AM-5PM AT 516 N.
WILLIAMS ST., PAULDING.
(TRAUSCH RESIDENCE)
Lots of things for everyone!!!!
Boys size 12 - XL men’s.
Girl’s newborn - women’s
size 12. Misc. items. 44p2
NEW ITEMS - BREAKING
NEWS, WEB EXCLUSIVES,
READ NEWS ITEMS BE-
FORE THEY’RE PUB-
LISHED IN THE
NEWSPAPER! Unlimited ac-
cess to the Progress website
www.progressnewspaper.org
is free to subscribers. Call
419-399-4015 or email sub-
scription @progressnewspa-
per.org for password. ctf
KITTENS - ASSORTED
COLORS. 419-594-3411 44k2
MOBILE HOME ON 3
ACRES, east of Continental.
$29,900, $1,000 down, $325
month. 419-670-5107 45ctf
CHARTER BUS TOURS
JULY 11—Mansfield & Ohio
State Reformatory + Lunch
and Kingwood gardens--$99;
Aug. 1—Collingswood Fam-
ily in Shipshewana--$99. Call
for new fliers: Evelyn’s Ex-
cursions 419-737-2055 877-
771-4401 Ivah
L o t h a me r —3 3 9 - 2 3 8 6
www.evelynsexcursions.com
45c2
FOR SALE
SERVICES
ANTIQUES
FOR RENT
HELP WANTED
WORK WANTED
WANTED TO BUY
FREE
GARAGE SALES
MOBILE HOME AND
LOT FOR SALE
TRAVEL
THE PAULDING COUNTY
PROGRESS
P.O. Box 180, Paulding • 419-399-4015
www.progressnewspaper.org
419-399-4015
www.progressnewspaper.org
THE PAULDING COUNTY
PROGRESS
419-399-4015
www.progressnewspaper.org
419-399-4015
www.progressnewspaper.org
419-399-4015
www.progressnewspaper.org
The Classifieds Can Help!
The Times
Call now to place an ad.
555-0000 419-399-4015
419-399-4015
THE PAULDING COUNTY
PROGRESS
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PROGRESS
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PROGRESS
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PROGRESS
P.O. Box 180, Paulding • 419-399-4015
www.progressnewspaper.org
P.O. Box 180, Paulding • 419-399-4015
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THE PAULDING COUNTY
PROGRESS
P.O. Box 180, Paulding • 419-399-4015
www.progressnewspaper.org
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PROGRESS
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PROGRESS
The Classifieds Can Help!
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Get your search moving by
driving your car shopping
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THE
PAULDING COUNTY
PROGRESS
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PROGRESS
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PROGRESS
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419-399-4015
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The Paulding County
Progress
The Paulding County
Progress
"HUGE MULTI-PARTY"
GARAGE SALE
Thursday & Friday
July 4th & 5th – 9-6
Lots of Clothing: Boys & Girls 3-
5; Mens; Jrs. 3-12; Womens: Sm-
XXXL; Scrubs; Glassware; kitchen
items, Tupperware, Home decor;
Home-made crafts; Gag Gifts;
Toys, Nic-nacs, Hens & Chickens;
and Lots of Misc. Items. Also:
Bake Sale for the Broughton
Redneck Jamboree.
R. Dobbelaere Residence: Just
North of Baughman Tile Mill &
Woodbridge Camprounds.
You don't want miss it.
45p1
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LEGALS
SHERIFF’S SALE
OF REAL ESTATE
General Code, Section
11681 Revise Code,
Section 2329.26
THE STATE OF
OHIO, PAULDING
COUNTY:
FIFTH THIRD MORT-
GAGE COMPANY,
Plaintiff,
vs.
BRIAN R. LUMP-
KINS, ET AL., Defen-
dants,
Case No. CI 13 051.
Pursuant to an Order of
Sale in the above enti-
tled action, I will offer
for sale at public auc-
tion, at the East door of
the Courthouse in the
Village of Paulding, in
the above named
County, on Thursday,
the 8th day of August,
2013 at 10:05 o’clock
A.M., the real estate lo-
cated at:
18472 County Road
1027, Defiance, Ohio
43512
Parcel Number: 01-
03B-010-00
Said premises appraised
at Sixty Thousand and
No/100 ($60,000.00)
Dollars and cannot be
sold for less than two-
thirds of that amount.
The appraisal of this
property was completed
without an interior in-
spection. Neither the
Sheriff’s Office nor the
appraisers are responsi-
ble for the condition of
the property at the time
the purchaser takes pos-
session.
TERMS OF SALE:
Ten percent down on
day of the sale and bal-
ance before deed is to
be issued.
Sheriff Jason K. Landers
Paulding County, Ohio
pauldingohsheriff.com
Charles V. Gasior, At-
torney for Plaintiff 44c3
SHERIFF’S SALE
OF REAL ESTATE
General Code, Section
11681 Revise Code,
Section 2329.26
THE STATE OF
OHIO, PAULDING
COUNTY:
BANK OF AMERICA,
N.A. SUCCESSOR
BY
MERGER TO BAC
HOME LOANS
SERVICING, LP,
FKA COUNTRY-
WIDE HOME LOANS
SERVICING, LP,
Plaintiff,
vs.
STELLA J. JONES, ET
AL., Defendants,
Case No. CI 12 197.
Pursuant to an Order of
Sale in the above enti-
tled action, I will offer
for sale at public auc-
tion, at the East door of
the Courthouse in the
Village of Paulding, in
the above named
County, on Thursday,
the 8th day of August,
2013 at 10:00 o’clock
A.M., the real estate lo-
cated at:
333 West Wayne Street,
Paulding, Ohio 45879
Parcel Number: 30-
14S-045-00
Said premises appraised
at Forty-five Thousand
and No/100
($45,000.00) Dollars
and cannot be sold for
less than two-thirds of
that amount.
The appraisal of this
property was completed
without an interior in-
spection. Neither the
Sheriff’s Office nor the
appraisers are responsi-
ble for the condition of
the property at the time
the purchaser takes pos-
session.
TERMS OF SALE:
Ten percent down on
day of the sale and bal-
ance before deed is to
be issued. 44c3
Sheriff Jason K. Landers
Paulding County, Ohio
pauldingohsheriff.com
James L. Sassano, At-
torney for Plaintiff
SHERIFF’S SALE
OF REAL ESTATE
General Code, Section
11681 Revise Code,
Section 2329.26
THE STATE OF
OHIO, PAULDING
COUNTY:
R E S I D E N T I A L
CREDIT SOLUTIONS,
Plaintiff,
vs.
TIMOTHY J. FIFER,
ET AL., Defendants,
Case No. CI 12 188.
Pursuant to an Order of
Sale in the above enti-
tled action, I will offer
for sale at public auc-
tion, at the East door of
the Courthouse in the
Village of Paulding, in
the above named
County, on Thursday,
the 15th day of August,
2013 at 10:20 o’clock
A.M., the real estate lo-
cated at:
112 Ash Street, Payne,
Ohio 45880
Parcel Number: 19-
06S-005-00
Said premises appraised
at Twenty-one Thou-
sand and No/100
($21,000.00) Dollars
and cannot be sold for
less than two-thirds of
that amount.
The appraisal of this
property was completed
without an interior in-
spection. Neither the
Sheriff’s Office nor the
appraisers are responsi-
ble for the condition of
the property at the time
the purchaser takes pos-
session.
TERMS OF SALE:
Ten percent down on
day of the sale and bal-
ance before deed is to
be issued. 45c3
Sheriff Jason K. Landers
Paulding County, Ohio
pauldingohsheriff.com
Matthew C. Gladwell,
Attorney for Plaintiff
SHERIFF’S SALE
OF REAL ESTATE
General Code, Section
11681 Revise Code,
Section 2329.26
THE STATE OF
OHIO, PAULDING
COUNTY:
BAC HOME LOAN
SERVICING, LP fka
COUNTRYWI DE
HOME LOANS
SERVICING LP, Plain-
tiff,
vs.
ERNEST C.
CRUTCHFIELD, ET
AL., Defendants,
Case No. CI 11 088.
Pursuant to an Order of
Sale in the above enti-
tled action, I will offer
for sale at public auc-
tion, at the East door of
the Courthouse in the
Village of Paulding, in
the above named
County, on Thursday,
the 15th day of August,
2013 at 10:15 o’clock
A.M., the real estate lo-
cated at:
610 Lewis Street, Latty,
Ohio 45855
Parcel Number: 29-03-
006-00 and 29-03-007-
00
Said premises appraised
at Thirty Thousand and
No/100 ($30,000.00)
Dollars and cannot be
sold for less than two-
thirds of that amount.
The appraisal of this
property was completed
without an interior in-
spection. Neither the
Sheriff’s Office nor the
appraisers are responsi-
ble for the condition of
the property at the time
the purchaser takes pos-
session.
TERMS OF SALE:
Ten percent down on
day of the sale and bal-
ance before deed is to
be issued. 45c3
Sheriff Jason K. Landers
Paulding County, Ohio
pauldingohsheriff.com
Maria T. Williams,
Attorney for Plaintiff
SHERIFF’S SALE
OF REAL ESTATE
General Code, Section
11681 Revise Code,
Section 2329.26
THE STATE OF OHIO,
PAULDING COUNTY:
NATIONSTAR MORT-
GAGE, Plaintiff,
vs.
RICHARD F. PACK,
ET AL., Defendants,
Case No. CI 13 033.
Pursuant to an Order of
Sale in the above enti-
tled action, I will offer
for sale at public auc-
tion, at the East door of
the Courthouse in the
Village of Paulding, in
the above named
County, on Thursday,
the 15th day of August,
2013 at 10:10 o’clock
A.M., the real estate lo-
cated at:
119 Woodland Drive,
Antwerp, Ohio 45813
Parcel Number: 12-
20S-010-00 and 12-
20S-011-00
Said premises appraised
at Sixty-six Thousand
and No/100
($66,000.00) Dollars
and cannot be sold for
less than two-thirds of
that amount.
The appraisal of this
property was completed
without an interior in-
spection. Neither the
Sheriff’s Office nor the
appraisers are responsi-
ble for the condition of
the property at the time
the purchaser takes pos-
session. 45c3
TERMS OF SALE:
Ten percent down on
day of the sale and bal-
ance before deed is to
be issued.
Sheriff Jason K. Landers
Paulding County, Ohio
pauldingohsheriff.com
Melissa N. Hamble,
Attorney for Plaintiff
SHERIFF’S SALE
OF REAL ESTATE
General Code, Section
11681 Revise Code,
Section 2329.26
THE STATE OF OHIO,
PAULDING COUNTY:
FIFTH THIRD MORT-
GAGE, Plaintiff,
vs.
TRUDY E. RATH, ET
AL., Defendants,
Case No. CI 13 095.
Pursuant to an Order of
Sale in the above entitled
action, I will offer for
sale at public auction, at
the East door of the
Courthouse in the Vil-
lage of Paulding, in the
above named County, on
Thursday, the 15th day
of August, 2013 at 10:05
o’clock A.M., the real
estate located at:
4422 Road 192,
Antwerp, Ohio 45813
Parcel Number: 11-22S-
022-00
Said premises appraised
at Forty-five Thousand
and No/100
($45,000.00) Dollars and
cannot be sold for less
than two-thirds of that
amount.
The appraisal of this
property was completed
without an interior in-
spection. Neither the
Sheriff’s Office nor the
appraisers are responsi-
ble for the condition of
the property at the time
the purchaser takes pos-
session. 45c3
TERMS OF SALE: Ten
percent down on day of
the sale and balance be-
fore deed is to be issued.
Sheriff Jason K. Landers
Paulding County, Ohio
pauldingohsheriff.com
Melissa N. Hamble,
Attorney for Plaintiff
SHERIFF’S SALE
OF REAL ESTATE
General Code, Section
11681 Revise Code,
Section 2329.26
THE STATE OF OHIO,
PAULDING COUNTY:
BANK OF AMERICA,
N.A. SUCCESSOR
BY MERGER TO BAC
HOME LOANS SERV-
ICING LP
fka COUNTRYWIDE
HOME LOANS SERV-
ICING, LP, Plaintiff,
vs.
LYNN P. WELLS, III,
ET AL., Defendants,
Case No. CI 12 144.
Pursuant to an Order of
Sale in the above entitled
action, I will offer for
sale at public auction, at
the East door of the
Courthouse in the Vil-
lage of Paulding, in the
above named County, on
Thursday, the 15th day
of August, 2013 at 10:00
o’clock A.M., the real
estate located at:
10488 Road 1, Antwerp,
Ohio 45813
Parcel Number: 17-18S-
004-00
Said premises appraised
at Sixty-three Thousand
and No/100
($63,000.00) Dollars and
cannot be sold for less
than two-thirds of that
amount.
The appraisal of this
property was completed
without an interior in-
spection. Neither the
Sheriff’s Office nor the
appraisers are responsi-
ble for the condition of
the property at the time
the purchaser takes pos-
session. 45c3
TERMS OF SALE: Ten
percent down on day of
the sale and balance be-
fore deed is to be issued.
Sheriff Jason K. Landers
Paulding County, Ohio
pauldingohsheriff.com
Colette S. Carr, Attor-
ney for Plaintiff
Wednesday, July 3, 2013 Paulding County Progress - 13A
14A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, July 3, 2013
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ATTENTION
Paulding County Hospital will be purging our
medical records on Thursday, July 11th and Fri-
day July 12th. All adult records before January
1, 2006 will be properly destroyed. If you want
your medical records a photo ID is required for
record retrieval. (NOTE: you will be receiving
your ORIGINAL record so please make sure
you keep them in a safe location so they will not
be lost or damaged. PCH will not have copies of
these records).
Medical Records Purge
x No Purge for current physician patients.
x If you were born January 1, 1994 or later,
your records will be kept due to different
retention guidelines for minors.
x Birth/Death Certificates are not included in
the purge. These are kept permanently.
1035 West Wayne St.
Paulding, OH 45879
419-399-4080
www.pauldingcountyhospital.com
To make arrangements to re-
trieve your records please con-
tact the appropriate department
by July 10th.
For physician records please
contact your physician’s office.
Medical Records: 419-399-1172
Physical Therapy: 419-399-1725
Radiology: 419-399-1131
Home Health: 419-399-1160
Communities have challenges in attracting a new business
WBESC board reviews legislation correspondence
According to Paulding County
Economic Development office,
when a business is looking for a
community in which to locate, some
of the questions they may ask of the
community are:
Will the state offer low interest
loans?
Do you have enough water/sewer
supply for my business?
What is the land cost or will the
village be willing to donate the
land?
Do you have a dependable rail-
road next to where I want my busi-
ness?
How close is the interstate high-
way?
Do you have the population al-
ready in place to support my busi-
ness in your town?
Do you have an empty building
large enough to accommodate our
needs?
Do you offer incentives for me to
locate there?
Do you have educational dollars
to train employees for the skills that
I will need?
Will the village/township grant
my business any tax abatement for
locating in that area?
What is the noise level limit in
that area?
Will the school work with us?
How close is an airport?
One may ask, “What are the an-
swers to each of these questions?”
Paulding County Economic Devel-
opment (PCED) tries as best they
can to help each business locate
here, but to answer these questions,
PCED needs to know:
How many new jobs will the new
business create?
What type of business is it and
will it fit well into the desired loca-
tion?
Are there enough unemployed
people in our community to support
the new business’s need without
hurting the other industries?
If new skills are needed, can local
vocational schools and colleges pro-
vide training?
There are incentives to aid new
businesses and expansions in the
county, but each village and/or town-
ship and local school districts will
have to make the decision first if they
are willing to give a business any
abatements.
When a business seeks answers so
they can make a judgment on whether
they want to establish a business here,
PCED director Tony Langham drives
them around the entire county, going
to each village to see what area ap-
peals to them. They discuss the county
profile and talk with industries in the
county to find out if the area is busi-
ness friendly and about the local work
ethic.
Investors in a prospective business
want to know what the taxes will be
on their project and what incentives
we may have to offer. To answer this,
PCED is in contact with many of the
following: village councils; township
trustees; local schools; county offi-
cials such as auditor, treasurer,
recorder, engineer and county com-
missioners; Revolving Loan Commit-
tee; Tax Incentive Review Council;
Community Improvement Corpora-
tions (CICs) and Maumee Valley
Planning Organization. These are all
key players in making a project hap-
pen.
“It is the opinion of the PCED
board that all the organizations and
elected officials listed above do work
together to improve employment op-
portunities in our county. It takes
teamwork,” stated Randy Derck,
PCED board president.
For further information, call PCED
at 419-399-8282 or email them at
pced@bright.net. Check out their
website at www.pced.net.
PAULDING – The Western
Buckeye ESC Governing
Board held its regular meeting
Wednesday, June 26 at the
Paulding ESC office.
Superintendent Brian Gerber
discussed Amended Substitute
H.B. 59 as passed by the Ohio
Senate, which is the Biennial
State Operating Budget.
Gerber also updated the
board on the legislation known
as Obamacare and its impact on
the ESC with possible penalties.
“I have written letters to Sen-
ator Portman, Congressman
Latta and President Obama
about this poorly conceived leg-
islation and received letters
back from all three leaders. Sen-
ator Portman and Congressman
Latta agree, but obviously Pres-
ident Obama does not,” Gerber
said.
Senator Portman in his letter
stated, “The health care system
is broken and unfortunately, the
new law does not address the
basic cost and challenges that
the nation faces. It represents a
missed opportunity to actually
lower costs and bring real re-
form. Instead, the bill increases
costs and places a greater bur-
den on patients, businesses, and
states. It is a costly big govern-
ment approach that leads to
higher health care costs, large
tax increases, higher premiums,
and fewer jobs. It eliminates the
ability and responsibility of in-
dividuals to manage their health
care. That is why I agree with
you and believe we must pursue
commonsense solutions to
transform health care and
achieve meaningful reforms
that do not lead to government
dependence and skyrocketing
debt.”
Congressman Latta stated in
his letter, “Since the passage of
PPACA, the American people
have found that costs will go up
not down, and many patients
will not be able to keep the cov-
erage they currently have. With
the Court’s ruling, we now
know this is a massive tax in-
crease on the middle class tax-
payers and small businesses.
American businesses, which
have struggled during the reces-
sion, will not be able to create
jobs that we so desperately need
right now due to the higher
taxes and burdensome regula-
tions this law imposes.”
President Obama replied in
saying, “I am confident we will
emerge from these tough times
stronger than before with a re-
newed promise of a better future
for all.”
“I was pleased that all three
leaders responded,” Gerber
said. “However, Senator Port-
man and Congressman Latta in-
cluded specific detail in their
letters. President Obama only
supplied a statement without
any specific detail or long range
plan.”
In consent items, the board
approved:
• the following resignations,
effective at the end of the 2012-
13 school year – Shelly Billman,
Ava Burkheimer, Karri Diehl,
Travis Hammer, James Johnson,
Tina Kennedy and Erin Lichty.
• the retirement resignation
of Barbara Runyon.
• adjusting contract days for
the 2013-14 school year for San-
dra Freeman, 120 days; Rebecca
Mayer, 169 days; Michelle
Davis, 169 days.
• extending a classified con-
tract to Lora Market as an Allen
County ESC paraprofessional
for the 2013-14 school year,
salary and benefits as presented.
• out-of-state travel for Cathy
Ruiz for the PTAC conference.
• amended FY13 and FY14
appropriations for Western
Buckeye ESC as presented.
• FY14 service contracts
with Antwerp Local, Crestview
Local, Lincolnview Local,
PARC Lane Training Center,
Paulding Exempted Village,
Thomas Edison Center, Wayne
Trace Local and Delphos City
schools.
• the FY14 service agree-
ment between Western Buckeye
ESC and the Northwest Ohio
Area Computer Services Coop-
erative (NOACSC) as pre-
sented.
• an agreement with SORSA
for property and liability insur-
ance through June 30, 2014, in
the amount of $8,664.
• employing Jill Welch as ad-
ministrative assistant at Thomas
Edison effective Aug. 1. Con-
tract for 192 days at $304 per
day.
• employing Tillman Karl as
Thomas Edison supervisor ef-
fective Sept. 1. Contract for 40
days at $341 per day.
The next regular meeting will
be at 6 p.m. Wednesday, July 10
in the Van Wert ESC office.
THE PAULDING COUNTY PROGRESS GOES TO IDAHO – The Wilhelm sisters, Ros, Paulette,
Jan and Ellen, recently traveled to Fred and Judy Wilhelm’s home in Idaho for a family vacation.
Their source for exclusive Paulding County news? The Paulding County Progress! Are you
headed to some distant, exotic destination? Take the Progress along with your camera and send
a photo and a little information about your trip to progress@progressnewspaper.org.

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