SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.

COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 2
Health Department
Independence Day Closures
El Paso, Texas – In observance of Independence Day, the City of El Paso Depart-
ment of Public Health Offices (Including Women, Infants. And Children-WIC
Centers), will be closed on Thursday, July 4, 2013.
In addition:
The Rawlings Pediatric Dental Clinic will be open from Monday, July 1, through
Wednesday, July 3. They will be closed on July 4, and 5. Normal operations
will resume on Tuesday, July 9.
All Immunization Health Centers will be closed on July 4, 5, and 6, but will re-
sume their normal schedule on Monday, July 8.
The 2-1-1 Texas Information and Referral Center will remain operational
24/7.
We ask that you include us in any coverage of closures in the area and ex-
tend our best wishes for a safe and happy Fourth of July to everyone in our
community.
The mission of the El Paso Department of Public Health is to work in part-
nership with people in our community to promote and protect the health of
the borderland. For more information on the programs and services offered
by the Department of Public Health, visit www.EPHealth.com or
call 2-1-1.
Providence Children’s Hospital
Celebrates Ronald McDonald Room
Providence Children’s Hospital cele-
brated the ribbon cutting ceremony
of the Ronald McDonald House at
Providence Children's Hospital this
past Thursday. The room was re-
cently relocated to enhance its visi-
bility and extend the supportive
involvement and services throughout
the community.
The Ronald McDonald Family Room
was created in 2008 at Providence
Children’s Hospital. Its function is to
provide a place for families to relax
amid the stress of having a child in
the hospital and offer a place to re-
group right in Providence Children’s
Hospital, just a few steps away from
their sick child. The room offers
many amenities including refresh-
ments and computer services, while
providing a place for family mem-
bers to rest and be at home, and the
chance to meet and talk to other fam-
ilies going through similar situations.
The Family Room is maintained by
Providence Children’s Hospital with
support from fundraising and private
and corporate donations. The room’s
direct sponsors are the Sierra Provi-
dence Health Network, McDonald’s
and Coca Cola. There are currently
106 Ronald McDonald Family
Rooms throughout the country.
About Providence Children’s Hospi-
tal:
Providence Children’s Hospital is
part of the Sierra Providence Health
Network (SPHN) that includes four
(4) local hospitals, Providence Me-
morial Hospital, Sierra Providence
East Medical Center, Providence
Children’s Hospital and Sierra Med-
ical Center. The Network also offers
a wide range of outpatient services
including five (5) Sierra Providence
TotalCare locations, Sierra Provi-
dence Trawood Emergency Room
Center, (2) Sierra Providence Urgent
Care Centers, Sierra Providence Teen
and Women’s Centers, Wound Care
Centers and Sierra Providence Sleep
Disorders Center. For more informa-
tion on SPHN, please visit
www.sphn.com.
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 3
By Marilynn Preston
Except for the fire-
crackers, I pretty
much like every-
thing associated
with the Fourth of
July.
Lively summer gatherings with
family and friends, a chance to
practice deep breathing and
anger management.
Patriotic parades honoring
brave men and women who
fight for our freedom while
struggling to fend off sexual as-
sault from fellow soldiers.
And let's not forget the July
food fests: the corn roasts, the
watermelon feeds, the sustain-
able, attainable, mostly or-
ganic picnics where all
guests leave their cell-
phones in the car.
This July Fourth I
want to celebrate
your freedom to
create a healthier,
happier lifestyle for
yourself. In the
words of the es-
teemed LL Cool J,
"Stay focused, go
after your
dreams, and
keep moving
toward your
goals."
SET ONE GOAL.
Remember your first KISS?
Keep it simple, stupid. This
summer, set one healthy
lifestyle goal for yourself,
something that's been bouncing
around your brain, something
non-sedentary that interests you
and might make you sweat.
This requires thinking, which
requires stopping all that you
are doing, sitting quietly and
creating a mental picture of
yourself, in the near future, liv-
ing a calmer life that feels
healthier, happier, more satisfy-
ing. Where are you? Who's
with you? What are you doing?
Maybe you're working in a
community garden, growing a
tomato plant with your son, so
he knows they're not meant to
come out of plastic tubes, taste-
free.
Or perhaps your mind's eye
pictures you kite surfing, float-
ing through the air in a blissful,
weightless way that lifts your
spirits and gets your adrenaline
flowing, because that's what
adventure sports do so well.
Or maybe you see yourself
pedaling your bike around a
peaceful little lake, and your
goal for the end of September
is to ride your bike 30 miles in
one day, without it becoming a
near-death experience.
Your summer goal needs to
come from you. A trainer or
coach who sets healthy lifestyle
goals for you is
of limited
value,
long
term,
be-
cause
you
learn much more from what
you say than from what you
hear.
In fitness, as in relationships,
telling another person what to
do is not a clever way to
change behavior. What works
better — according to experts
in behavior modification — is
to set your own goal, own it,
write it down and be very spe-
cific.
GIVE YOURSELF
THE NEXT
THREE MONTHS.
Once you decide on a meaning-
ful goal, give yourself July, Au-
gust and September to make it
happen. Some people can
change overnight. One day
you're eating burgers five times
a week; the next day you fall in
love with kale. Others think
they can't change at all, even
though they keep trying.
Don't try, Yoda told us. Just do.
Three months is long enough to
create a new habit, and short
enough to hold your interest.
Be sure to keep a journal going,
to record your successes and
your setbacks (let 'em go!), and
keep you focused and positive.
SET WEEKLY
GOALS. Once you have
your three-month goal, think
about what you need to do, be-
ginning this week, to move you
in that direction. Start where
you are. Let's say your goal is
to ride your bike 30 miles for a
charity event in September.
Right now, the farthest you can
go is 12 miles. Ride the 12, and
check in with yourself. Re-en-
ergize with water and a snack.
Take a short rest. Get back on,
and see how it feels to go an-
other 10-20 minutes. Play with
your resistance to doing more.
Your weekly goals need
to be S.M.A.R.T.: specific,
measurable, action-oriented, re-
alistic and timelined.
Here's an example of a vague,
useless goal: "I'm going to eat
healthier next week." The
S.M.A.R.T. version, from my
own journal of 1988: "I'm
going to eat a big green salad
for lunch four days this week,
and it'll include organic toma-
toes from the farmer's market,
feta, olives, garbanzos and ca-
pers, dressed with olive oil and
balsamic vinegar. "
Make this July Fourth an ex-
plosive one. Set one big goal
for three months from now, and
create weekly S.M.A.R.T. goals
to get you there. And don't let
anything rain on your parade.
ENERGY EXPRESS-O! TED
TELLS THE TRUTH
“A man has to have goals —
for a day, for a lifetime — and
that was mine, to have people
say, 'There goes Ted Williams,
the greatest hitter who ever
lived.'” — Ted Williams
Marilynn Preston — fitness ex-
pert, well-being coach and
speaker on healthy lifestyle is-
sues — is the creator of Energy
Express, the longest-running
syndicated fitness column in
the country. She has a website,
http://marilynnpreston.com and
welcomes reader questions,
which can be sent to
MyEnergyExpress@aol.com.
COPYRIGHT 2013 ENERGYEXPRESS, LTD.
July 4th Holiday Schedule for
El Paso Parks and Recreation Department
Information – (915) 544-0753
The Administrative Offices for the El Paso
Parks and Recreation Department will be
closed on Thursday, July 4th and will resume
normal operating hours on Monday, July 8,
2013.
All Senior Centers and the Veterans and
Galatzan Recreation Center Day
Cares will be closed on Thursday, July 4, 2013.
All Aquatic Centers will have normal hours of
operation. (Schedule can be viewed at www.el-
pasotexas.gov/parks)
Recreation Centers will be closed on July 4th.
Nations Tobin, 8831 Railroad Drive and Chalio
Acosta, Sports Centers 4321 Delta St. will be
closed on July 4th. All facilities except for
Parks and Recreation Administrative Offices
will resume normal operating hours on Friday,
July 5, 2012.
Go Forth This July: Set One Goal, and Make It Happen
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 4
DWI CRASH VICTIMS
LEND THEIR ‘FACES’ TO
ANTI-DRUNK DRIVING
CAMPAIGN
EL PASO — In an effort to save
lives and prevent roadway crashes
over the extended Fourth of July
weekend, the Texas Department of
Transportation is introducing its
Faces of Drunk Driving safety
campaign to urge motorists to be
smart and drive sober. Like all
holidays, Independence Day ranks
among the deadliest times on our
roadways, and last year was no ex-
ception with 133 alcohol-related
crashes in Texas.
“On average, there is an alcohol-
related traffic crash in Texas every
20 minutes,” said TxDOT Execu-
tive Director Phil Wilson. “Drunk
driving crashes are 100 percent
preventable and so is the pain that
comes with each one.”
Throughout the month of July,
TxDOT will host Faces of Drunk
Driving events across the state at
which safety advocates, law en-
forcement and victims of drunk
driving will share their stories in
front of 1,170 Texas flags, repre-
senting the number of people killed
in alcohol-related crashes in Texas
last year. More than 9,400 people
also were seriously injured in alco-
hol-related crashes in 2012.
Helping TxDOT deliver this sober-
ing message is 9-year-old Xitclalli
“Chilli” Vasquez, who was para-
lyzed from the chest down after
being hit by a drunk driver in Fort
Worth on July 9, 2011 (just three
days before her eighth birthday).
Also sharing their story is the fam-
ily of Aaron Pennywell, 20, who
was killed by a drunk driver two
years ago in Cypress. These sto-
ries, along with those of more than
a dozen others impacted by drunk
driving, can be found at
www.FacesofDrunk-
Driving.com.
“If the possibility of killing your-
self or someone else isn’t a good
enough reason to not drink and
drive, you should know that being
arrested for DWI also has long-
standing, negative consequences,”
Wilson said. “DWI penalties in-
clude jail time, a suspended
driver’s license and as much as
$17,000 or more in fines, legal fees
and other expenses. You and your
family can’t afford it, so be smart
and safe while celebrating the holi-
day.”
Law enforcement around Texas
will conduct a “No Refusal” initia-
tive over the Independence Day
weekend. “No Refusal” operations
allow for suspected drunk drivers
to be pulled over and required by
law to provide police with a breath
or blood sample. Motorists found
to be legally intoxicated (with a
blood or breath alcohol content of
.08 or higher) face arrest and pros-
ecution.
Law enforcement plans crackdown on impaired
driving over busy Fourth of July holiday weekend
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 5
Sponsored by
El Paso County Lions Clubs
Turn in clean used uniforms for a credit slip,
Or donate outgrown uniforms to other students.
Drop off now for 1st choices – vouchers will go 1st:
7620 North Loop & Carolina
10-5 Mon-Fri, Sat 10-4
Contact Luisa (915) 779-7676
Distribution Swap Day
Saturday
July 13, 2013
9am – 11am
Eastlake High School
13000 Emerald Pass Ave., El Paso, Tx 79928
No Guarantees of size or quantity
If you are interested in volunteering please contact 915-203-0346
Check us out on Facebook -
https://www.facebook.com/groups/220693311307218/
School Uniform Swap
10560 North Loop & Horizon
10-5 Mon-Fri, Sat 10-4
Contact (915) 858-0000
490 N Kenazo Ave, Horizon City
10 – 5 Mon – Fri, Sat 10 – 4
Contact Blanca (915) 317-7517
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The El Paso Museum of Archaeology Announces:
Registrations Continue for
Archaeology Camp
9 am to Noon, Tuesdays through Fridays
on the following dates:
For ages 7 to 9 years/
Grades 2 to 4: July 9 to 12
For ages 10 to 12/Grades 5 to 7:
June 25 to 28 and July 23 to 26
Registrations for archaeology day camp at the El Paso
Museum of Archaeology continue for children seven to
twelve years old this summer. Children must have com-
pleted first grade and be at least seven years old. Those
interested should contact the museum as soon as possible
at 915-755-4332; the choice of dates is subject to avail-
ability.
The Franklin Mountains Rotary Club is sponsoring a spe-
cial registration rate for camp this year only, $42.90 for
El Paso Museum of Archaeology members and $54.60
for non-members. Registration is accepted on a first-
come first-served basis as attendance is limited to twelve
students per camp. For information and the camp regis-
tration form contact the museum at 915-755-4332 or
guidamr@elpasotexas.gov.
Archaeology Summer Day Camp is an interactive, hands-
on course held on the museum’s grounds and in the gal-
leries with a field trip to Hueco Tanks State Park for the
10 to 12 year old children and a field trip to the Tigua In-
dian Cultural Center for a museum tour and bead looming
activity for the 7 to 9 year old children. The camp is a
mixture of outdoor and indoor activities including learn-
ing to identify artifacts and then conducting a survey and
a mock excavation. Campers will learn respect and appre-
ciation for prehistoric, historic and contemporary Indian
people.
Archaeology Camp collage, photos courtesy of the El Paso
Museum of Archaeology
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 6
El Paso, Texas – The City of El Paso Parks
and Recreation Department will host a free
instructional workshop on “Gardening
101(Lesson 3): “Plant Propagation” from
4:00 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. on Friday, July 12,
2013 indoors at the Multipurpose Recreation
Center (Dance Room), 9031 Viscount Blvd.
No previous Gardening experience is neces-
sary to attend and the workshop is suitable
for new and experienced gardeners of all
ages interested in learning more about
home-gardening basics in El Paso.
Lessons are often taught by members
of the El Paso County Master Gardeners
which include the topics listed below:
July 12th
4:00-5:30pm
Gardening 101 (Lesson 3)
Plant Propagation
September 13th
4:00-5:30pm
Gardening 101 (Lesson 4)
Getting Ready for Fall Gardening
An RSVP is required for each workshop as
seating is limited to the first 30 participants.
Registration deadline is
Wednesday, July 10, 2013 by calling
Marci Tuck at (915) 541-4020 or by e-mail at
tuckmj@elpasotexas.gov.
www.elpasotexas.gov/parks
Multipurpose
Recreation
Center Hosts
Free Workshop
at 4:00 p.m. on Friday, July 12,
2013 (Deadline to Register
is July 10, 2013)
PICTURE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY
WEDNESDAY
JUL 10
THURSDAY
JUL 4
High: 93º Low: 73º High: 98º Low: 72º High: 100º Low: 73º High: 99º Low: 75º High: 102º Low: 78º
TUESDAY
JUL 9
FRIDAY
JUL 5
SUNDAY
JUL 7
MONDAY
JUL 8
High:94º Low: 76º
SATURDAY
JUL 6
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 7
By: “Doppler” Dave Speelman
A n s w e r : C – 2 5 d a y s .
June of 1980 had the most triple days (for this month) since records
were kept (since 1879). How many days did the temperature hit
100+?
Those Damaging Outflow Winds
A. 12
B. 18
C. 25
D. All 30
Weather Trivia:
Mostly Sunny
Mostly Sunny
Sunny
Breezy
Mostly Sunny
Partly Sunny
Weather 101
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Mostly Sunny
Spotlight E.P.Weather
“Doppler" Dave Speelman is the chief meteorologist at KVIA-TV in El Paso. You can watch his forecasts at 4,
5, 6 and 10 pm on ABC-7 (channel 6 cable). If you would like Doppler Dave to address (explain) any weather
issues you can email him at Dopplerdave@kvia.com.
High: 99º Low: 75º
Mostly Sunny
Thunderstorms not only produce rain and some occasional hail, but also
strong winds. We experience this periodically when thunderstorm develop. The
winds from a few of the stronger storms quickly mixed in some dust and sand
and can contribute to some destruction.
These storms have what we call strong "outflow." This occurs when
thunderstorms begin to weaken and even collapse causing the wind to rush
down to the ground and spread out in all directions.
Various power outages can occur along with some structural damage when we
get these "outflows." El Paso resident Deby Lewis sent me a picture of her
tree being blown down due to the strong winds.
Anytime we get some of these storms, there is always that risk of severe
winds in and around the cells. It can be hard to predict how strong the
winds will get but anytime there is a severe thunderstorm warning, the
potential of wind gusts 58 mph or more is possible.
As we now move into our annual Monsoon season, we always have to be
prepared for these storms and the destructive potential they bring.
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 8
High temperatures and possible rain create threat of more mosquito activity
El Paso, Texas – Officials with the City of El Paso Depart-
ment of Public Health are urging residents to do their part
to prevent West Nile virus infections in the area. The dis-
ease is carried by mosquitoes and can lead to serious ill-
ness and even death. The recent triple digit weather may
bring more people outdoors, especially during times when
mosquitoes are most active, plus forecasted rainfall could
lead to stagnant water that serves as breeding ground for
the insects.
“286 people died of West Nile Virus infection in 2012 across
the United States – with Texas being the hardest hit of all
states. Though it’s often great to be #1 on lists – this isn’t
one of those lists. Even one death, is one too many,
particularly when simple measures can be taken to avoid
becoming bitten and infected,” said Robert Resendes, Pub-
lic Health Director.
So far no confirmed cases of West Nile have been reported
in El Paso for 2013. Last year the Epidemiology Program
recorded 32 cases, with six patients having succumbed to
the disease. In an effort to prevent more infections and loss
of life Department officials are recommending that
residents practice the Four D’s:
• Use insect repellents that contain DEET
• Drain any standing water
• Dress in long, loose and light-colored
clothing and
• Take extra care to use repellent and
protective clothing from Dusk to Dawn.
To report standing water or mosquito
breeding, call Environmental Services
at 3-1-1.
Background:
• West Nile virus can cause serious symptoms in a few
people. About one in 150 people infected will develop se-
vere illness. The severe symptoms can include high fever,
headache, neck stiffness, stupor, disorientation,
• coma, tremors, convulsions, muscle weakness, vision
loss, numbness and paralysis. These symptoms may last
several weeks, and neurological effects may be permanent.
• Milder Symptoms in Some People. Up to 20 percent of the
people who become infected have symptoms such as fever,
headache, and body aches, nausea, vomiting, and some-
times swollen lymph glands or a skin rash on the chest,
stomach and back. Symptoms can last for as short as a
few days, though even healthy people have become sick for
several weeks.
• No Symptoms in Most People. Approximately 80 percent
of people (about 4 out of 5) who are infected with WNV will
not show any symptoms at all.
For more information on West Nile virus, please visit the
Health Department
website: www.elpasotexas.gov/health/westnile.asp
or the CDC at:
http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvbid/westnile/wnv_factSheet.ht
m.
Education
In effort to increase awareness about the disease and ways
the public can protect themselves, the Department has
added a West Nile virus session to the list of presentations
offered by the Speakers Bureau. Local civic and community
organizations can schedule a presentation that will include
background on the disease, prevention methods, as well as
what people can look out for in regards to signs and symp-
toms of infection.
Presentations can be scheduled electronically or via tele-
phone at: http://tinyurl.com/8b6qptx (915) 771-5727
For more information on the programs and services offered
by the Department of Public Health, visit
http://home.elpasotexas.gov/health/index.php or
call 2-1-1.
Residents Urged to Take Precautions
Against West Nile Virus
Donate at Your Local
7-Eleven and Support
Special Olympics
Texas
WHO: Special Olympics Texas (SOTX) – Greater El Paso
area…
WHAT: …invites you to help make a difference in the
lives of athletes in your community. Stop by any local 7-
Eleven convenience store through July 31and make a do-
nation at the cash register. A $1 contribution makes you
a bronze medal donor, a $2 makes you a silver medal
donor and a $3 donation makes you a gold medal donor.
Your donation, no matter how small, will help support
more than 3,000 athletes in the Greater El Paso area.
WHEN: the month of July 2013
WHERE: any of the 84 ALON 7-Eleven stores in the El
Paso area
WHY: Special Olympics Texas (SOTX) is a privately
funded non-profit organization that changes lives through
the power of sport by encouraging and empowering peo-
ple with intellectual disabilities, promoting acceptance for
all, and fostering communities of understanding and re-
spect. SOTX provides continuing opportunities for more
than 44,000 children and adults with intellectual disabili-
ties throughout the Lone Star State to realize their poten-
tial, develop physical fitness, demonstrate courage and
experience joy and friendship. To learn more, visit
www.specialolympicstexas.org or call 800.876.5646. En-
gage with us on: Twitter @SOTexas; fb.com/Spe-
cialOlympicsTX; youtube.com/specialolympicstexas.
Co-Sponsors:
Coca-Cola Refreshments, Food Town, H-E-B Tournament of
Champions
Charitable Trust and the Law Enforcement Torch Run
PHOTO:TEXAS .SPEEDWAYCHARITIES.ORG
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 9
FORT BLISS, TEXAS, June 27,
2013 – Today the United States
Air Force announced Fort Bliss
is the preferred site for reloca-
tion of the Air Force Security
Force Regional Training Cen-
ter.
This training center would con-
solidate six training centers sta-
tioned around the United States
onto Fort Bliss and would
bring 137 active duty and re-
servist Airmen to Fort Bliss in
the current fiscal year. The
training center would also
bring between 8,000 and
10,000 Airmen to Fort Bliss
each year for security forces
training beginning no later than
September of 2015.
“Today’s announcement is an
indicator that Fort Bliss repre-
sents an important installation
for the training of our Force,”
said Major Joe Buccino, Fort
Bliss Public Affairs Officer.
“The Air Force based its deci-
sion on training areas and qual-
ity of facilities and
infrastructure and Fort Bliss
ranks among the best installa-
tions in the Department of De-
fense in those areas.”
Congressman Beto O’Rourke
(TX-16) said, “Today’s an-
nouncement by the Air Force is
another indication that Fort
Bliss is the premier military
post in the nation. Our commu-
nity welcomes the additional
Service Members and Re-
servists. We have worked hard
to make this a community that
has an excellent quality of life
for our Service Members and I
will continue working with
General MacFarland to do
everything we can to promote
the capabilities of Fort Bliss
and the community that sup-
ports it.”
"The news should come as no
surprise to people in El Paso,"
said Congressman Gallego
(TX-23). "Fort Bliss and our
military families are an integral
part of El Paso, so I am pleased
the Air Force has selected Fort
Bliss as the site of this very im-
portant training center. Fort
Bliss is a major economic
driver for our community; this
new addition only increases its
impact. From my place on the
House Armed Services Com-
mittee, I will always advocate
strongly on behalf of our mili-
tary bases and our military
families."
“This is great news,” said Rick
Glancey, Armed Forces Chair,
Greater El Paso Chamber of
Commerce. “It is an example
of how El Paso and Fort Bliss
continue to work to send the
right message about our com-
munity. The lifestyle projects
outside the gate obviously res-
onate as a positive message.
We know that the Navy, Air
Force and Marine Corps are
starting to pick up on the story-
line that the largest mobiliza-
tion site in the Department of
the Defense (DOD) is right
here in El Paso, Texas. As we
look for cost efficiencies in a
tough budget climate, maxi-
mizing resources is critical.”
Glancey added, “When we pro-
vided a community brief to the
Air Force during the decision-
making process, we knew
telling the El Paso story would
only help us climb atop any
list. Not every community of-
fers the DOD an opportunity to
get off a plane at an interna-
tional airport five minutes from
the doorstep of a premier mili-
tary installation. Bottom line,
El Paso is a military town and
Fort Bliss and the regional mil-
itary complex provides every
service the right mix for expe-
ditionary skills training for sus-
tainment and pre-deployment.”
“With this announcement, yes-
terday’s news of the activation
of seven company-sized units,
to include an additional Termi-
nal High Altitude Area Defense
(THAAD) Battery, on Fort
Bliss, and our regional align-
ment with the Central Com-
mand Area of Responsibility,
Fort Bliss is positioned as a
premier training and power
projection platform for the fu-
ture of the United States mili-
tary,” Buccino said.
Fort Bliss top choice for relocation
of Air Force Security Force
Regional Training Center
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 10
El Paso Parks and Recreation Department
Presents
“Melodies at the Park Summer
2013”
July 7th
Veterans Park • 5301 Salem (79924)
Villa Band
July 28th
Blackie Chesher Park • 1100 Zaragosa (79907)
ManJelly Band
August 4th
Grandview Park • 3200 Jefferson (79930)
Locomotion Band
August 18th
Armijo Park • 710 E. Seventh Street (79901)
April Ticket Duo
August 25th
Salvador Rivas Park • 12480 Pebble Hills (79938)
Sobredosis del Sabor
FREE ADMISSION
All Concerts 7:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.
Information
(915) 544-0753 or (915) 252-9031


















Mariachi Cuauhtémoc

Shawver Park 8100 Independence (79907)
Mainstreet Band

J Veterans Park 5301 Salem (79924)
Villa Band

Blackie Chesher Park 1100 Zaragosa (79907)
ManJelly Band

Grandview Park 3200 Jefferson (79930)
Locomotion Band

710 E. Seventh Street (79901)
April Ticket Duo

12480 Pebble Hills (79938)
Sobredosis del Sabor





The El Paso Museum of Archaeology Presents
Wolves: Fact & Fiction
Saturday, July 27, 2013, 2:00 to 3:30 pm, Free Admission
In this family-friendly program, Nancy
Bain, “The Wolf Lady,” presents an inter-
active look at wolves from around the
world with special emphasis on the endan-
gered Mexican wolf. A display of wolf
pelts, skulls, replicas of scat, maps of wolf
territories, information about wolf sanctu-
aries and a free educational handout in-
cluded. Nancy will address topics such as
wolf pack makeup and territory marking,
wolves and the environment, and wolf in-
teraction with dogs, humans and domestic
animals. This program is suitable for chil-
dren as young as six years through adults.
Nancy Bain is a former wolf exhibit vol-
unteer host at the El Paso Zoo. In 2007
she was given the Initiative Award by the
El Paso Zoo which honors the volunteer
who has demonstrated exemplary efforts
in furthering the goals of the El Paso Zoo
program. Nancy belongs to and supports
many wolf organizations and has attended
a number of wolf seminars. Nancy Bain
actively exhibits and speaks about wolves
throughout El Paso including at Hueco
Tanks State Park, Chihuahuan Desert Fi-
esta at Franklin Mountain State Park,
Poppy Fest, El Paso Zoo, TechH2O and at
schools, scout troops and other locations.
She especially encourages children to help
endangered species by working with ani-
mals through zoos, veterinary hospitals,
game, fish and wildlife programs and
other groups. Her interest is in the rein-
troduction and survival of the misunder-
stood Mexican Wolf and the preservation
of all wolves world wide.
Museum Location: El Paso Museum of
Archaeology, 4301 Transmountain Road,
El Paso, Texas 79924 in Northeast El Paso
Information: 915-755-4332;
guidamr@elpasotexas.gov
www.elpasotexas.gov/arch_museum/
Our Mission: The El Paso Museum of
Archaeology is dedicated to the interpreta-
tion of archaeological and anthropological
artifacts through research, exhibits, and
education. We focus on the prehistory
and culture of the El Paso-Juárez region
and the Southwest.
Dakota the Wolf photo courtesy of the Wild Spirit Wolf Sanctuary
Recycling Update:
Recycle Your Phone Books
El Paso, Texas – The City of El Paso Envi-
ronmental Services Department reminds the
public to recycle their obsolete phone books.
On average, we receive two phone books per
year due to the variety of companies publish-
ing telephone directories. To keep phone
books from ending up in the landfill, un-
wanted phone books should be recycled at the
curb in your blue bin or at a Citizen Collec-
tion Station (CCS), also known as drop-off
sites.
The drop-off sites are located at:
• 4501 Hondo Pass
• 2492 Harrison
• 121 Atlantic
• 4200 Delta
• 1034 Pendale
Phone books that are recycled are commonly turned into new
telephone directories, roofing surfaces, insulation materials, gro-
cery bags and other paper products.
The City’s Curbside Recycling Program also accepts these paper
products: paperback and hardback books; empty cardboard egg
cartons; magazines; catalogs; frozen food boxes; junk mail;
newspaper; cereal boxes; envelopes; flattened cardboard boxes;
office paper; and mixed colored paper. You can also recycle met-
als and plastics. Learn more visit: www.RecycleElPaso.org
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 11
Knights of Columbus
sets new record for
charitable contributions
More than $167 million and
70 million hours donated to charity
in 2012
(NEW HAVEN, Conn.) — The
Knights of Columbus set a new
all-time record for charitable do-
nations and service hours in
2012.
The results of the K of C’s An-
nual Survey of Fraternal Activity
for the year ending Dec. 31,
2012, indicate that record
amounts of money and hours —
more than $167.5 million and 70
million hours — were donated
to charitable causes.
The Knights financial contribu-
tion for the year grew by more
than $9.4 million to
$167,549,817. Contributions in-
creased for the 13th consecutive
year.
The number of volunteer service
hours also rose by nearly 64,000
hours from the 2011 total to
70,113,207 hours. At an average
value of $22.14 per service hour
as estimated by Independent
Sector, the value of the Knights’
service hours last year exceeded
$1.55 billion.
Cumulative figures show that
during the past decade the
Knights of Columbus has do-
nated $1.475 billion to charity
and provided more than 673 mil-
lion hours of volunteer service
in support of charitable initia-
tives.
Notable beneficiaries during the
past year included Habitat for
Humanity, Special Olympics,
victims of natural disasters, local
food banks, the economically
disadvantaged and physically
and intellectually disabled per-
sons. Scholarships and educa-
tional support, as well as a
variety of church and commu-
nity projects were also promi-
nent among the many initiatives
sponsored by local K of C coun-
cils.
The survey found that there
were more than 420,000 K of C
blood donations during 2012.
The Knights of Columbus was
among the first groups to recruit
blood donors, with formal ef-
forts dating back to 1937.
“Throughout its 131 years, the
Knights of Columbus has always
practiced charity as its first prin-
ciple,” said Supreme Knight
Carl Anderson. “With so many
people enduring great hardship,
the Knights of Columbus is
happy to help provide solutions
to real people’s problems
through this great outpouring of
charity by our members over the
past year.”
The Knights of Columbus was
founded by Father Michael J.
McGivney, a New Haven parish
priest, in 1882. It has grown into
the world’s largest lay Catholic
organization, with more than 1.8
million members throughout
North and Central America, the
Philippines, the Caribbean and
Poland.
Salute To Union
FORT BLISS, Texas— In commemoration of the sign-
ing of the Declaration of Independence, Team Bliss Of-
ficials and Fort Bliss Soldiers, will conduct a 50-gun
Salute to the Union Ceremony at 9 a.m., Wednesday,
July 3, 2013.
The event will take place at 1st Armored Division Pa-
rade Field in front of Division Headquarters.
The 4th Brigade Combat Team, 1st Armored
Division, will provide the Color Guard. The 212th Fires
Brigade, will provide the salute battery, consisting of
five, 75-millimeter-pack howitzers. The “pack 75’s” will
fire a 50-gun salute during the ceremony and flag
bearers will present the flags of the 50-United States.
The 1st Armored Division and Fort Bliss Com-
manding General, Maj. Gen. Sean MacFarland, will
host the Salute to the Union. Additionally, installation
officials, unit commanders and local dignitaries are ex-
pected to attend.
The 1st Armored Division Band will play throughout the
Salute to the Union.
All area residents, veterans, veteran’s organizations,
military retirees, family members and general public
are invited to Fort Bliss to see this patriotic, spectacu-
lar and colorful event. This event is FREE and open the
public.
The New Mexico Department of
Health reminds residents this summer
that it is important to take steps to stay
safe from the potentially damaging ef-
fects of the sun. Overexposure to ul-
traviolet rays causes not only
sunburns and premature aging, but
greatly increases your chances of de-
veloping skin cancer.
An estimated 400 cases of the most
deadly skin cancer, melanoma, will be
diagnosed in New Mexico in 2013.
Even as rates for the most common
cancers in the United States - breast,
colorectal, lung, and prostate - have
declined, melanoma rates rose 50 per-
cent nationwide between 1992 and
2010.
“New Mexicans have an increased
risk for developing skin cancer be-
cause of our low latitude and higher
altitude”, said New Mexico's Depart-
ment of Health Secretary Retta Ward,
M.P.H. “When going outside over the
4th of July holiday, make sure to pro-
tect your skin and eyes by using pro-
tective clothing, hats, sunglasses and
sunscreen on a daily basis.”
The sun’s rays are strongest between
the hours of 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.
When looking for a sunscreen, make
sure it has a Sun Protective Factor
(SPF) of at least 15. According to new
FDA regulations, sunscreen products
that protect against all types of sun
damage will be labeled "Broad Spec-
trum" and "SPF 15+". For those prod-
ucts that are not broad spectrum and
have the SPF of 2 to 14, it will be la-
beled with the warning, "This product
has been shown only to prevent sun-
burn, not skin cancer or early aging."
Remember, sunscreen wears off so
reapply it at least every two hours
throughout the day to increase the
amount of protection for your skin.
Sunscreen alone does not offer ade-
quate protection for your skin. Long
sleeved shirts, wide brimmed hats,
and pants or long dresses are great ex-
amples of protective clothing. Though
everybody is at risk for skin cancer,
those who have fair skin, light colored
eyes, and blonde or red hair are at
higher risk because the sun‘s UV rays
affect their skin differently than oth-
ers.
If you feel that that you are at risk for
skin cancer, or notice any skin lesions,
it is important to see a health care pro-
fessional.
Symptoms to look for include:
· Oddly shaped, colored or
changing moles
· Unusual white, reddish
or brown patches that feel
different than the skin
around them (can be hard,
scaly, rough or crusted)
· Pinkish red or flesh-col-
ored raised areas that feel
unusual (hard, scaly, ulcer-
ated or rough)
· A sore that doesn’t heal
The New Mexico Department of
Health also supports sun safety educa-
tion for elementary-school-aged chil-
dren and encourages schools and
communities to identify strategies to
provide increased protection for chil-
dren and adults alike. Strategies may
include providing shade structures or
trees where children play and allow-
ing students to wear protective cloth-
ing like hats, sunglasses and
long-sleeved shirts and pants when
outside at school.
For more information on preventing
skin cancer, visit the Department’s
Comprehensive Cancer Program on-
line at www.cancernm.org.
Precautions Necessary to
Prevent Skin Cancer
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 12




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911 S. Cchoa
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4431 uelLa
342-0087 79903
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nawk|ns
1300 Pawklns
394-8031 79923
Montana
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Leo Cance||are
630 Wallenburg
384-9848 79912
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Sun 6:00 AM-9:00 AM 1:00 ÞM-S:00 ÞM
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Marty kobb|ns
11600 vlsLa uel
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833-7436 79936
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Sat 11:00 AM-2:00 ÞM 3:00 ÞM-6:00 ÞM
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Sat 11:00 AM-2:00 ÞM 3:00 ÞM-6:00 ÞM
Memor|a|
3231 Copper
363-4683 79930
Cop|a Q
Copper
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M-1h S:00 AM-12:30 ÞM 1:00 ÞM-4:00 ÞM 7:00 ÞM-10:00 ÞM
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Sat 11:00 AM-2:00 ÞM 3:00 ÞM-6:00 ÞM
Þat C'kourke
901 n. vlrglnla SL.
333-8318 79902
Montana
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8100
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860-2349 79907
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Veterans
3301 Salem
821-0142 79924
Iar
Northeast
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Enjoy the City’s heated indoor year-round pools!
AQUATIC CENTER SCHEDULES
June 8, 2013 – August 18, 2013
Schedules are subject to change based on
utilization, availability of certified lifeguards,
or
unexpected maintenance.
Swimming: It’s a Life Preserver
STAY FIT ALL YEAR LONG!
For information call: 915-544-3556
www.elpasotexas.gov/parks/aquatics.asp
Sharon Mosley
Last-minute pack rats, beware. Traveling in
style does not have to be an oxymoron.
While many of us love to schlep on our ratty
jeans and T-shirts for a plane ride, there are
lots of ways to look great while seeing the
sights this summer. But it does take a little
bit of planning before you hit the tarmac.
Whether you're flying off to an adventure in
Italy or rolling down the road to rendezvous
with college girlfriends, here are some tips
to packing it in in style:
—First of all, choose your
luggage carefully. This is more im-
portant than most of us realize: With new
airline regulations about carry-on luggage,
having lightweight but heavy duty portable
roller cases and totes are critical. Tip: Black
does go with everything, but hot pink is
easy to spot at the airport carousel. And an-
other tip: Pack makeup in a small zippered
bag that can double as a clutch for
evenings out.
—Make a list. Yes, it may take a little
more time than just throwing in what you
wore last week into a suitcase, but thinking
through what you will be doing on your trip
will pay off, and you don't want be stuck
slogging through sand in stilettos at the
beachfront clam shack. Start at least a few
weeks ahead if possible, so you can fill in
the blanks if you need to.
—Think double duty. This is a
no-brainer, but I do have friends who think
they have to wear something different
everyday, complete with matching acces-
sories.
Whew. That is just too much to pack, right?
Instead, think about ways the same item
can be worn different ways: a slinky tunic
dress can be worn over a swimsuit and
dressed up for cocktails, or a cardigan
sweater can be worn buttoned up for a
daytrip ex-
ploring an-
cient ruins
and left open
over a
camisole for
dinner at
night.
—Mix and
match. The best advice I have is to
choose two colors, and plan your travel
wardrobe around them — then add accent
color with accessories. Black and white is
usually my go-to travel combo accessorized
with red or turquoise shoes and jewelry. A
bold-colored handbag or tote is also an-
other great way to add some style factor to
your wardrobe.
—Go for wrinkle-free fab-
rics. I love linen, but I usually leave these
clothes behind when I travel. Instead, I like
to pack cotton-nylon blends of T-shirts and
pants and tissue-weight cotton skirts that
are easy to roll up and wear right out of the
duffel bag. Soft knits are perfect for a long
plane or car ride. Loose-fitting cotton or jer-
sey tank dresses and tunics also make
great travel companions.
—Add accessories. Freshen up
those mix and match pieces that you double
up on wearing during your vacation with
extra accessories that will transform your
outfits. Try an oversized scarf that you can
use as a shawl at night and perhaps a swim-
suit coverup during the day. One statement
necklace or cuff bracelet will also give your
travel wardrobe a style boost as will a head
wrap scarf — another big trend this sum-
mer. An oversized tote can double as a
beach bag. And packable hats are a must-
have for sun protection.
—Travel in flats. Flip flops may be
your go-to shoes for travel, but standing in
the security lines at the airport barefooted
is not my idea of fun. Instead, I wear sheer
socks and tuxedo-style flats that are easy
to slip on and off. For dressed up occa-
sions, I like to substitute metallic thong
sandals for flip-flops. Canvas slip-on es-
padrilles are another favorite. And yes, I al-
ways pack my Nikes for hikes and long
walks.
Sharon Mosley is a former fashion
editor of the Arkansas Gazette in
Little Rock and executive director of
the Fashion Editors and Reporters
Association.
COPYRIGHT 2013 CREATORS.COM
Easy, breezy mix and match pieces are the key to
packing a travel wardrobe in style this summer.
Photograph from H&M's summer collection.
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 14
the Savage truth on Money by terry Savage
The markets had a temper
tantrum. A big one. Fed Chair-
man Bernanke's comments last week
were widely anticipated. And, in fact, his
remarks were far more moderate than
many expected. Some had feared the Fed
would start pulling back immediately,
buying fewer bonds, creating less new
money and credit in the banking system.
Instead, the Fed chairman praised the
economic growth path of the economy
and said that later this year it seemed
likely that the economy could grow on its
own, with less help from the Fed. Think
of it this way: If you had a relative in in-
tensive care for weeks, barely able to
breathe on his own, and finally the doctor
came out and said the patient had turned
the corner and was ready to be moved
out of intensive care, you'd be cheering.
A recovery is always good news, how-
ever long it takes to get there.
But like a toddler that is used to getting
its way by screaming, the "smart money"
let out a collective yelp. No more atten-
tion from the Fed, less money moving
into the system, seemed like very bad
news.
Never mind that there is a vast difference
between "tapering" (which the Fed said it
would do as it provides slightly less new
credit) and "tightening" (which means
withdrawing credit and sucking it out of
the economy). And never mind that the
Fed's five-year money creation spree
hadn't really triggered a strong economic
recovery. A good portion of that money
just moved into the stock market, push-
ing prices higher.
When the market falls, there are always
pundits ready with explanations. But the
Fed's action wasn't really a surprise. And
the concerns over a China slowdown and
problems in their credit system were
nothing really new. Ditto the commen-
taries about Greece and the Euro. All that
bad news was around for months as the
U.S. stock market made new highs. As if
a switch were flipped, the sellers piled on
— with more and more excuses for why
the stock market sold off.
One of the first things I learned as a
young floor trader is that the market is
ruled by two uncertain commodities:
money and emo-
tion. And when
money moves
emotionally, you
have to stand back
and let the market take its course. Over
the long run, the market is ruled by fun-
damentals — but you never want to take
action in the midst of this kind of emo-
tional move. Investment success comes
from disciplining yourself to take the
long-run view. (I'd be willing to bet that
Warren Buffet wasn't selling into the de-
cline, and maybe was even buying some
bargains.)
Your only other choice is to become a
trader, which means you have to be right
three times: when to get in, when to get
out and when to get back in again! But
you must decide in advance which you
are — trader or investor. Learning on the
job can be an expensive lesson.
So here we are with the popular averages
up in double digits year-to-date. Despite
the selloff, the Dow Jones Industrial Av-
erage is up nearly 18 percent from a year
ago. If you were kicking yourself for not
being more invested as the market made
a series of daily new highs, then this is
your chance. Remember, it was only a
couple of weeks ago that you were wish-
ing you had invested more.
But you're probably worried about kick-
ing yourself in the coming months if you
stay with stocks and they decline even
more. Well, what's your alternative? You
could put the cash in a money market
fund. But don't delude yourself that ris-
ing interest rates in the 10-year Treasury
bond market will translate into higher
short-term yields on money funds and
CDs. The banks aren't about to pass that
gift along until they've made more
money on the spread.
So, your only alternative is bonds, which
at this point are significantly more dan-
gerous than stocks. Remember, when in-
terest rates rise, bond prices fall. So if
you own individual bonds or bond funds,
the market value of your investments will
decline sharply in a rising rate environ-
ment. The longer the maturity of the
bond, the larger the drop in price.
Sure, you can hold those bonds to matu-
rity and avoid taking the loss — but
you'll
still be stuck with lower
yields. And if you need to withdraw cash
for expenses, or required minimum dis-
tributions, you'll be faced with taking a
loss that could be equally as large as the
loss on your stock investments.
Think of it this way: The whole
world is awash in cash. The Japanese
central bank is printing like crazy, to
make the yen cheaper and its exports
more attractive. The European Cen-
tral Bank has demonstrated that it
will create credit to rescue its sys-
tem, or at least the significant parts
of it. And China is faced with the
tough decision of reining in credit
and facing a middle class rebellion or
allowing credit to move back into its
system.
The governments of the world have
learned the lessons of austerity and de-
pression. No central banker, least of all
Ben Bernanke, wants to preside over an
economy that is swirling down the drain.
When push comes to shove, they will
print. Count on it. And don't be fooled by
the tantrums of a market that doesn't get
all it wants at the exact moment it wants
it! Even 2-year-olds can only carry on a
tantrum for a limited amount of time.
And that's The Savage Truth.
P.S. — If you followed this logic, then
this might be a time to take another look
at a mutual fund that invests in a diversi-
fied portfolio of dividend-paying gold
mining companies. Those stocks have
been hit harder than bullion, which itself
has taken quite a nosedive. This would
be a speculative position, and appropriate
only for a small portion of your risk capi-
tal, and only for those who have real pa-
tience and self-discipline.
Terry Savage is a registered investment
adviser and is on the board of the
Chicago Mercantile Exchange. She ap-
pears weekly on WMAQ-Channel 5's
4:30 p.m. newscast, and can be reached
at www.terrysavage.com. She is the au-
thor of the new book, "The New Savage
Number: How Much Money Do You Re-
ally Need to Retire?"
COPYRIGHT 2013 TERRYSAVAGE PRODUCTIONS
W
h
a
t
’s

N
e
x
t
?
What Happened?
SuStainable living by Shawn Dell Joyce
Cost of Food
We Americans complain bitterly about the rising cost of food. Most
Americans don't realize just how good we really have it in the land of
plenty. In other countries where people make much less money, they
spend a much higher percentage of their income on food.
Wealthier industrialized nations spend a small percentage of their
weekly budgets on food. According to the Economic Research Serv-
ice, part of the U.S.D.A., we spend only 5.7 percent of our total house-
hold budget on food. In the U.K. and Denmark, people spend between
up to 10 percent compared to people in less developed nations who
spend from 40 to 50 percent. Azerbaijan tops the chart at 50.4 percent.
In their delicious book, "Hungry Planet: What the World Eats," pho-
tographer Peter Menzel and writer Faith D'Aluisio document the
weekly food budgets of twenty-four international families in full-color
photos. A family of eight in Guatemala spends 573 quetzales (equiva-
lent of $75.70) in groceries each week. The average yearly income is
around $4,000, making groceries the highest expense for most fami-
lies. Most families grow a good portion of what they eat and barter
with the excess.
Meanwhile, back in the states, a family of five can spend a whopping
$242.48 per week on groceries out of an average income of $35K per
person. While the cost sounds much greater, compared to income and
other expenses, Americans eat the cheapest food in the world and lots
of it.
We humans need about 2,000 calories per day to survive. We've
moved from an average of 2,358 kcal available per person in 1965, to
2,803 kcal in 1999, to a projected of 2,940 in 2015, according to the
World Health Organization. But not everyone has equal access to the
"all you can eat" buffet. In developing countries, only 2,681 kcals
were available per day, while industrialized countries had 3,380 kcals
available per day in 1999.Continues on page 20
Food is still cheap in the U.S. compared to the rest of the world.
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 15
wellnewS by Scott laFee
MarS anD venuS by John gray
'tween 12 anD 20 by Dr. robert wallace
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Had Enough With Brother's Daughter
Dear John, My divorced brother,
"Ted," has moved in across the street
from me. He's always getting into trou-
ble, but I've always stuck by him because
I felt sorry for him.
Ted has four children who all live with
him. His oldest daughter, who is 14, has
problems, too. She is a liar, and he lets
her get away with anything. I've had my
fill of her, and I told Ted this. Now we
aren't talking. Although I'd love to sal-
vage the relationship, my husband says
enough already. What should I do? —
Tired of the Lies in Dayton, Ohio
Dear Tired,
Your brother is the guardian to his under-
age children, including this daughter. If
he asks your opinion of what he should
do about the girl, by all means, give it to
him, but recognize that it is his decision
as to what to do with the information you
provide, if he decides to do anything at
all.
If he asks you to babysit his children, do
so with the clear understanding that there
are ground rules to be followed while
you are in charge. Otherwise, pass on any
situation that makes you uncomfortable.
Only you can define the relationship you
have with your brother. The sooner you
do so, the better it will be for both of
you.
Dear John, I met a wonderful guy
who recently ended a two-year relation-
ship. How can I be sure this is not just a
rebound affair with me? —Concerned in
Hot Springs, Ark.
Dear Concerned, Rebounds occur
when time has not been given to grieve
the loss of a relationship. Unfortunately,
most men have a habit of jumping into
one relationship before resolving past re-
lationships. For most of these men, their
initial instinct is to "solve their prob-
lems," but they don't realize that they
must first get in touch with their feelings
in order to do this.
Here are telltale signs that your new part-
ner may be rebounding: He is rushing
you to get too serious too soon, or he
compares you to his ex-girlfriend. If this
is what you are experiencing, do yourself
a favor and take things slowly. A lifelong
friendship is more satisfying than love on
the rebound, so heed the signs.
2013 John Gray's Mars Venus Advice.
Distributed by Creators Syndicate. John
Gray is the author of "Men Are from
Mars, Women Are from Venus." If you
have a question, write John in care of
this newspaper, or by email at:
www.marsvenus.com. All questions are
kept anonymous, and will be
paraphrased.
COPYRIGHT 2013 CREATORS.COM
They Don't Want to Be
Seen Together
DR. WALLACE: This letter is for all the girls who are dating
guys on the sly. Don't do it. Last year I started dating Lance, but he
didn't want anyone to know that we were going out. Because of that,
we could never be seen in public. Instead of going to movies and nice
restaurants, we wound up watching videos at his grandmother's house
and eating at drive-thru, fast-food joints. The reason he gave for our
"secret" romance was that he was a football player and all the guys on
the team would tease him if they knew he was dating. We went to-
gether for over four months when he decided to call it off. I guess he
got tired of watching videos and eating junk food. As far as I know, he
still isn't going out with anyone (but who can tell?).
I'm now dating a guy who treats me like a human being. He is proud
to show me off in public, and I've already had dinner in a few of our
nicer restaurants. Girls, if a guy wants you to be his "big secret," don't
go along with it, whatever the reason. Getting dumped by Lance and
being found by Chad has changed my life from darkness to sunshine.
—Felicia, San Antonio, Tex.
FELICIA: It's not only the guys who hide the fact that they are
dating. Please read the following letter from Jordan:
DR. WALLACE: I'm 18 and recently graduated from high
school and was lucky to get a job at a supermarket. One of the girls
who works there became interested in me and I returned the favor. The
only problem is that she doesn't want me to tell anyone that we are
going out, and she said that all of our dates have got to be in other
nearby towns. She doesn't want anyone in Geneva to know that she's
dating. I asked her if she was going with someone else and she said
no. I asked her if she was embarrassed to be seen with me and she said
no. I don't get it. I'm not a bad-looking guy and have been on many
dates, and she's a rather attractive young lady. I'm going to go out with
her, but I wonder if you have ever had another person write to you
with a similar problem. —Jordan, Geneva, Ill.
JORDAN: Please read the previous letter from Felicia — and
learn from it. When people don't want to be seen together, there usu-
ally is some unusual reason why.
YOU JUST CAN'T WIN
DR. WALLACE: My parents are happily married, but they do
get into heated arguments, often over very small things. And they both
want me to choose sides. When I do, the other parent gets mad at me.
I'm in a no-win situation. Help! —In the Middle, Bloomington, Ill.
IN THE MIDDLE: Next time you notice an argument brew-
ing, leave the area. Go to your room, outside or anywhere your parents
can't use you as a playing piece in their game. Never choose sides. As
you have found out, you just can't win if you do.
Dr. Robert Wallace welcomes questions from readers. Although he is
unable to reply to all of them individually, he will answer as many as
possible in this column. Email him at rwallace@galesburg.net.
COPYRIGHT 2013 CREATORS.COM
The Organ Trail
Social media is all about sharing, right? A campaign on
Facebook proved as much, boosting the number of people
registered as organ donors 21-fold in a single day. The ef-
fort, which took place in May of last year, suggests social
networks like Facebook or Twitter may be an effective tool
for boosting medical donor lists.
Researchers at Johns Hopkins University studied the
Facebook campaign, which essentially offered an easy
way for users to share their organ donor status with
friends and link to donor registries. They recently pub-
lished their findings in the American Journal of Transplan-
tation.
"The short-term response was incredibly dramatic, unlike
anything we had ever seen before in campaigns to in-
crease the organ donation rate," said study leader Andrew
M. Cameron.
"At the end of two weeks, the number of new organ
donors was still climbing at twice the normal rate. If we
can harness that excitement in the long term, then we can
really start to move the needle on the big picture. The
need for donor organs vastly outpaces the available sup-
ply, and this could be a way to change that equation."
Despite repeated efforts, the number of organ donors has
remained relatively static over the past 20 years, while the
number of people waiting for transplants has increased
10-fold. There are more than 118,000 people currently on
waiting lists in the United States for kidneys, livers and
other organs. It's estimated that between 5,000 and
10,000 people die in the United States every year with or-
gans suitable for transplant but unused because they had
not consented to be donors.
By looking at data from Facebook and online motor vehi-
cle registration websites, the researchers found that on
May 1, 2012, the day the initiative began, 57,451 Face-
book users updated their profiles to share their organ
donor status. There were 13,012 new official online donor
registrations on the first day, representing a 21.2-fold in-
crease over the average daily registration rate of 616 na-
tionwide.
Décor Score by roSe bennett gilbert
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 16
everyDay cheapSkate by Mary hunt
$25,000-per-Person
Dinner Is Hard to
Swallow
I don't consider myself a complete stranger to
high-priced gourmet fare. After all, I did
enjoy a lovely $100-per-person meal once.
But even that experience in my semi-impres-
sive culinary repertoire did not prepare me to
handle gracefully the idea of a 10-course din-
ner complete with a price tag of $25,000 per
person. And it wasn't a political fundraiser.
Just a fancy meal in an exotic location —
Bangkok, Thailand.
Sure, this gastronomic extravaganza included
the very best in Cristal champagne, foie gras,
truffles, Kobe beef, Beluga caviar, Belon oys-
ters and mousseline of pattes rouges' crayfish
with morel mushroom infusion, but come on!
Twenty-five grand per person — a price that
does not include tax or gratuity or airfare?
I don't think I could do that even if I were so
rich $25,000 would be mere pennies as com-
pared to my vast net worth. There are some
things I simply would not be able to get out of
my mind, like:
— $25,000 could feed a four-person family in
the U.S. for 3.7 years.
— $25,000 could feed 100 children in a Third
World country for 2.36 years.
— $25,000 could pay for a new Ford Fusion,
with $ 2,700 left for gasoline.
— $25,000 would cover all costs for four
months at the most expensive college in the
U.S., Sarah Lawrence College, or the entire
cost for 4.1 students to get their AA degrees
from any number of U.S. community col-
leges.
— $25,000 would just about cover all of the
costs to provide two deep wells fitted with
hand pumps to provide up to 5,600 gallons of
safe water per day to benefit as many as 600
people in an impoverished community in
Africa where children have no choice but to
walk long distances to find water that is often
dirty and disease-ridden.
I could keep going with this, pointing out that
$25,000 would pay for much needed replace-
ment windows and a roof for friends of mine
who've been out of work for too long, but I'll
refrain. And I'll try not to get all worked up
that the tax and tip alone for a party of two at
the extravagant event in Bangkok would
boost the tab by at least another $15,000.
Continues on page 21
Wallpaper? What If She and He Disagree?
Q: I really love jazzy wallpaper! The problem
is, I'm married to an architect who thinks all sur-
faces should only be white, black or (maybe) ce-
ment-gray. We have struggled over this for so long
I've run out of pro-wallpaper arguments — unless
you have a new insight.
A: It may be cliche, but something comes over
ordinary people when they become architects:
They turn quite serious, especially about keeping
the faith in certain "tasteful" colors and patterns.
That pretty much translates to white, black, gray
and, just maybe, geometric patterns, definitely no
flowers.
I may risk enraging the AIAs who will
accuse me of stereotyping but having
once been married to an architect, I
know whereof I speak. And that said, my
best advice is to give up the fight, at least in
the "public" rooms of your home. Save your wall-
paper for your personal habitat: your bath, dress-
ing room, home office — anywhere no one will
see and — heaven forbid! — mistake it for your
architect husband's taste.
This anti-wall-pattern thing has been going on
since before the turn of the 20th century, when
Victoriana raged and pattern-on-pattern-on-pattern
was in vogue. The reaction was extreme, giving
birth to the International School of Less-Is-More,
and wallpaper has been rather a wallflower ever
since.
That's a shame. Personally, I love the fun and
freshness of patterned walls. Who could resist the
riot of stylish flowers that run rampant on this
wall! "Parisian Poppies" is from Stacy Garcia (sta-
cygarcia.com), a designer not
known for in-
troverted pat-
terns and
colors.
Here,
the
wallpa-
per adds
frisson, and
fast-forwards
what is essen-
tially a tradi-
tional room, with
its classic furniture
and hand some ar-
chitectural set-
ting.
Imagine
how
sober-
sided the
room
would look
without
that
wonderful, improbable vertical garden!
Rose Bennett Gilbert is the co-author of
"Manhattan Style" and six other books
on interior design.
COPYRIGHT 2013 CREATORS.COM
Wall flowers that definitely aren't!
Vibrant wallpaper takes a tradi-
tional room far out of the ordi-
nary. Photo: Courtesy Stacy
Garcia.
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 17
Water is the prevalent element of
the skies now, and the new moon in
Cancer embodies the deep emotion,
intuition and sensitivity of this ele-
ment. The new moon mixes in nurtur-
ing qualities that are inherent to
Cancer. Relationships and arrange-
ments that start this week will be in-
fused with a feeling of protection. To
some it may seem as though destiny
is being carried out and nothing can
stop what is meant to be.
ARIES (March 21-April 19). You can't
go on an adventure with another per-
son without feeling somewhat respon-
sible for him or her. To you,
togetherness means watching out for
each other. Assuming this high level of
responsibility for your fellow humans
will lead to heroics. Many will look up
to you and follow your ways.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20). Your sign
rules the appetite, and yours will be
particularly strong this week — and
not just for food, but for other things
that make life decadent. There is a
danger of overindulgence. Too much
of a good thing ruins the goodness of
the thing. You'll have to remind your-
self to think from your head instead of
your appetites.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21). Your con-
versational skills are needed, espe-
cially in groups that are not as
outgoing as you are. You'll get invited
to social gatherings, dinners and the
like because you're well admired, but
also because the host knows that
you're the perfect one to break the ice
and get the party started.
CANCER (June 22-July 22). Some
days you feel invincible, but this week
you're humbler and more realistic than
that. We are all limited people in a
world that will test our limits over and
over. You're ready for trials, optimistic
that you'll either win or learn valuable
lessons that will help you win the next
time. Your serious approach helps you
prepare.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). You'll be put in
charge. As the leader, you'll deal with
both delightful and difficult personali-
ties. Passive-aggressive people will be
among them. These types are experts
at not taking responsibility for their ac-
tions. You may be tempted to call them
out, but don't be surprised if they hide
behind lame excuses like "I forgot."
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). Some peo-
ple enjoy thinking that anything can
happen. You'd rather have a good idea
about something that is likely. It may
feel like you've skipped over the edge
of your groove and are now in an inse-
cure, unpredictable place. Don't try to
get back into the same pattern,
though. That groove was in danger of
becoming a rut.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). People ad-
mire and fear your drive, which is in
high gear at the top of the week. Cau-
tion: You'll only be able to keep your
energy up if you take good care of
yourself. Why wait until you're worn
out and feeling fragile to give yourself
a lift? Give kindness, relaxation and
treats to yourself all along the way.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). One
beautiful feature is all you need to be
a great beauty. One talent is all you
need to be successful. You could fret
over flaws and obsess about what you
perceive as shortcomings, but seeing
the problems in yourself and others is
really a waste of time. Happiness is
focusing on what you do well.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21).
One of the best things you can do for
your own creative spirit is to allow
yourself to fail. Expecting greatness at
every turn will only be discouraging in
the end. Instead, drop the demands.
Be less critical. Focus on enjoying
yourself, learning more and getting
out of your own way.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). You
have behaved honorably in a situa-
tion, but you are too modest to men-
tion this to anyone but your nearest
and dearest. Great choice. People see
who you really are. You don't have to
tell them. Your stellar character radi-
ates in everything you do. Only un-
trustworthy people talk about how
good they are all the time.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). No one
is great at everything. Most humans
excel at a handful of endeavors and
specialize in one or two. That's why it's
so important to know what you are re-
ally good at and what you could hap-
pily spend a great deal of your life
pursuing. This week, you'll experiment
and explore in a quest to find your
thing.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). Why
keep an old fight alive? There's so
much going on in your world now that
you may not even remember why you
were mad. But just because you drop
the grudge doesn't mean you'll return
to the relationship. Your energy is bet-
ter used building a bright tomorrow
you can move toward.
THIS WEEK'S BIRTHDAYS: Making
a difference is more important to you
than ever as you realize that lasting
legacies are not built in a few years,
but in decades. You'll get busy! The fi-
nancial boost you get in the next six
weeks helps, but ultimately, it's your
resourcefulness that will carry you
through. Guided by your principles,
you'll continue past a number of road-
blocks in September and October. A
special relationship ignites your cre-
ativity in August. November brings
fresh work. Children figure into De-
cember plans.
ACROSS
1 Costs
5 Austen heroine
9 Bouillabaisse
13 Major land mass
14 Holiday season, briefly
15 Task
16 Riga native
17 Select with care
19 Attorney's concern
20 UN Secretary General
21 Peddled
22 Mexican money
24 Table scrap
25 A-one
29 Black
33 ___ de France
34 Fungi spore cases
35 Kind of tree
36 Spanish snack
38 Football's Dawson
39 Author of boys' books
40 Legendary king of Thebes
41 Muscle protein
43 Word with blood or conduct
44 For fear that
45 Operate for profit
47 ___ polloi
49 Noted Hollywood director
50 Road workers
53 Untruth
55 Culture medium
58 Solver's strategy
60 Broadway musical
61 Desert plant
62 Clotho, for one
63 Sponsorship
64 Sacred
65 Pair
66 Pre-Easter period
DOWN
1 Soft mineral
2 On the briny
3 Smithereens
4 Lustrous fabric
5 Blow up
6 Three years hence
7 Lawman's backup
8 Inquire
9 Classroom activity
10 Helped oneself
11 Celtic
12 Gardener's target
15 Scorch
18 Red dye root
23 American saint
25 Burst of light
26 God of Islam
27 Female relative
28 Divine Comedy author
30 Traveler's equipment
31 Patrick or Ryan
32 Wimp
33 Comprising: abbr.
35 Bearlike mammal
37 Passionately
42 Uncouth
45 Sagacious
46 Dental surface
48 Heraldic band
50 Egyptian god
51 Jason's mythological ship
52 Small flask
53 Battle
54 Roman letter
56 Ugandan dictator
57 Remainder
59 Postal abbreviation
By Holiday Mathis
Cancer New Moon
week 7/04 - 7/10
DEAR ABBY: My wife and
I have been married 14 years.
During that time her mother has
called every single day.
Initially, I was OK
with it because we were living
in Florida and she was in Iowa.
However, since we moved back
to Iowa to be near her (we live
three miles apart), she contin-
ues to call nightly. Sometimes
she'll call during dinner or dur-
ing our "couple's time" after the
kids are asleep. I have ex-
pressed my dissatisfaction with
this, particularly because my
wife and MIL see each other
and talk throughout the day.
Am I out of line to
ask for family/couple time dur-
ing which no outside calls come
in, or am I being unreasonable?
This is a touchy subject, and I
don't know how to resolve it to
everyone's satisfaction. --
BOTHERED IN THE HAWK-
EYE STATE
DEAR BOTHERED: With
whom is this a touchy subject?
Your wife? Her mother? The
two of them? Considering that
your mother-in-law lives close
by and that she and your wife
talk during the day, they appear
to be excessively dependent
upon each other.
As a partner in your
marriage, you have the right to
a quiet family dinner and pri-
vate time with your spouse. If
your wife can't bring herself to
get that message across to her
mother, then YOU should set a
time after which "Mama"
should refrain from calling un-
less it's an emergency.
**
DEAR ABBY: After years of
traveling overseas, I have fi-
nally found a wonderful way of
getting rid of unwanted foreign
coins the banks won't exchange.
Please let your readers know
they can put their leftover coins
to good use by mailing them to
UNICEF'S Change for Good
program. -- PAT IN COL-
ORADO
DEAR PAT: I'm glad you
wrote because so many people
travel outside the country dur-
ing the summer months.
Readers, when travel-
ers return from an international
vacation, many are shocked to
find that banks change only for-
eign paper currency back into
U.S. money, so they are left
with pockets full of coins that
can't be spent. UNICEF'S
Change for Good program
(which is supported by some
airlines) collects donated coins
and uses the money to support
disaster relief programs world-
wide, as well as programs bene-
fiting children in areas that
include education, water and
sanitation, HIV/AIDS and child
protection.
Those interested in
participating in this worthwhile
effort should send their coins
to: U.S. Fund for UNICEF,
ATTN: Change for Good Pro-
gram, 125 Maiden Lane, New
York, N.Y. 10038.
**
DEAR ABBY: My husband
and I disagree about privacy.
He believes he should have the
password to my email and
Facebook accounts. I have
nothing to hide, but I think I'm
entitled to my privacy. Can you
settle this for us? -- PRIVATE
IN BATTLE CREEK
DEAR PRIVATE: Probably
not. Everyone is entitled to pri-
vacy, and being private doesn't
necessarily mean you have
something to hide. Your hus-
band may want to look at your
postings because he doesn't
completely trust you. Or he
may have no interests of his
own. No third party can settle
this tug-of-war with so little in-
formation about what else may
be going on in your relation-
ship.
**
TO MY READERS: Happy
Fourth of July, everyone!
**
Dear Abby is written by Abigail
Van Buren, also known as
Jeanne Phillips, and was
founded by her mother, Pauline
Phillips. Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or P.O.
Box 69440, Los Angeles,
CA 90069.
COPYRIGHT 2013 UNIVERSAL UCLICK
DEAR ABBY by Abigail Van Buren
MOTHER-IN-LAW'S NIGHTLY CALLS
INVADE COUPLE'S PRIVATE TIME
Missing Links
travel anD aDventure
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 18
Small New York Museums Recall Significant Pieces of History
By Victor Block
Standing on a half-acre bog that
encircles a dilapidated 19th-
century stone cottage, I couldn't
help but think about my recent
visit to Ireland. The vegetation
and even the rocks scattered
about the site were identical to
those I recalled. Then the sight
of towering skyscrapers and the
sound of honking automobile
horns rather than the bleating of
sheep startled me back to real-
ity.
In fact I was at the Irish Hunger
Memorial in New York City, a
compact space that provides a
moving recollection of the
Great Irish Potato Famine. Be-
tween 1845 and 1852, this hor-
rific event caused nearly a
million deaths and forced mil-
lions more to emigrate to the
United States, many of them to
New York.
The memorial includes stones
from all 32 of Ireland's coun-
ties, native limestone that was
created more than 300 million
years ago, and more than 100
pertinent quotations from let-
ters, poems, songs and other
sources. The two-room cottage
was donated by a family whose
ancestors had occupied the
same site in County Mayo since
1820.
The Irish Hunger Memorial re-
lates the story of families who
faced tragedy in Ireland and
found renewal in their adopted
country. I discovered it during a
quest for smaller, often-over-
looked museums in New York
City that present chapters of
American history as varied as
they are intriguing.
The lives of other immigrants
who became part of the wave
that transformed the United
States into the world's melting
pot come to life in a nonde-
script five-story brick building
that from 1863 to 1936 served
as home to more than 7,000 im-
migrants. Detailed research into
their lives has enabled histori-
cal interpreters at the Lower
East Side Tenement Museum to
dramatize and humanize their
stories as no statistics can do.
Hallways are dank and dark,
but peeling wallpaper and
cracked plaster are still visible.
Stepping into a tiny 325-
square-foot apartment, I
learned that when it was occu-
pied in the late 19th century by
the German-Jewish Gumpertz
family — Natalie, her shoe-
maker husband and four chil-
dren — it lacked heat, running
water and bathroom facilities.
By the time Adolfo and Rosario
Baldizzi from Palermo, Italy,
moved into the building
decades later, running cold
water and a sink, which dou-
bled as a tub for weekly family
baths, must have seemed like a
luxury. Hearing a recording
made by their daughter
Josephine of her recollections
of growing up in the flat added
to my sense of knowing the
Baldizzis through sharing some
of their most intimate stories.
The New York City Fire Mu-
seum occupies a renovated fire-
house built in 1904, and its
collection of paraphernalia
dates from when New York was
still a colony up to today. A
horse-drawn steam engine and
a pumper that required 40 men
to operate prompted me to
wonder why the entire city
never burned to the ground.
The stovepipe helmets used in
the early to mid-1800s resem-
ble headwear that Abraham
Lincoln might have worn. Early
20th-century breathing gear
looks like a diver's helmet at-
tached to a "breathing bag"
worn on the chest.
Another small institution, the
Museum of Chinese in Amer-
ica, recounts a big story — that
of the influx of Chinese into the
United States that coincided
with the flood of immigrants
from Eastern Europe. Many
were men who came to help
build the transcontinental rail-
road and toil at other sweat-in-
ducing jobs, sending most of
their money to their families
back home.
Continues on next page
An interpreter at the Tenement Museum in New York City
shows visitors what life was like for early immigrants to
the United States. Photo courtesy of Victor Block.
A steam fire
engine is one
of the
artifacts on
display
at the New
York City
Fire
Museum.
Photo
courtesy
of the
New York
City Fire
Museum.
Military aircraft are on display at the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum in New York City,
which has as its centerpiece the USS Intrepid. Photo courtesy of the intrepid Sea, Air and
Space Museum.
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 19
everyDay cheapSkate by Mary hunt
Continued from page 18
Along with a collection of
more than 65,000 artifacts, doc-
uments, newspapers, photo-
graphs and other items, the
story is told by means of oral
histories, walking tours and
film festivals. Two exhibits
running through September cel-
ebrate Chinese-American fash-
ion designers who have made
their mark in New York and the
recent revolution in style
among women in China. A col-
orful costume from the Chinese
opera contrasts with outfits
from the China National Silk
Museum, which demonstrates
one reason why Shanghai came
to be known as "the Paris of the
East."
Very different styles of
women's attire, including bead-
decorated moccasins, are on
display at the National Museum
of the American Indian. It's fit-
ting that the location in the cen-
tury-old Alexander Hamilton
Custom House adjoins an open
space that served as the site of
an Indian trading area during
Colonial times.
The displays present the culture
and traditions of native peoples
throughout the Western Hemi-
sphere from their earliest his-
tory to the present day. Among
the more treasured items are an
exquisite Olmec jade head be-
lieved to have been carved as
early as 900 B.C. and a magnif-
icent Crow warrior's robe.
An exhibit titled "Circle of
Dance" demonstrates the im-
portance that music and move-
ment have played in the
cultural and social lives of na-
tive peoples. Each dance is rep-
resented by a mannequin
dressed in appropriate regalia
and posed in a distinctive posi-
tion, while a video displays the
movements and plays the music
integral to each performance.
More interesting to a group of
middle-school students who
were sharing my time at the
museum was information about
the use of animal intestines and
bladders to store liquids.
"Yuck" and "gross" were
among the more polite reac-
tions to the explanation that I
heard.
While hardly of gourmet qual-
ity, food that was served to
crew members on a World War
II aircraft carrier probably re-
ceived a more welcome reac-
tion. The story is told with
menus, photographs and other
reminders of the challenge of
feeding 3,000 sailors aboard
the USS Intrepid.
Today the ship is permanently
docked at a pier on the Hudson
River and serves as the center-
piece of the Intrepid Sea, Air
and Space Museum. Nearly
two dozen aircraft are parked
on the Flight Deck, while the
Gallery Deck includes the
Ready Room, where pilots re-
ceived their final pre-mission
briefings.
Videos highlight major chap-
ters in the ship's history, and in-
teractive exhibits offer
opportunities to experience a
flight simulator, transmit Morse
code messages and clamber
aboard a helicopter. Most
poignant to me was the
"Kamikaze" exhibit, a multime-
dia experience that includes
smoke and flame effects to
bring to life the day the Intrepid
was struck by two Japanese
suicide planes.
At the opposite end of the size
scale is a museum that hardly
warrants the name but is
closely associated with what
many people picture when they
think of New York. While I
walked quickly past the more
technical exhibits at the Sky-
scraper Museum, scale models
of the three tallest buildings in
the world — in Dubai, Taiwan
and Shanghai — caught my at-
tention.
I was also mesmerized by two
hand-carved miniature wooden
models of downtown and mid-
town Manhattan. Imagine a
4.7-inch-tall Empire State
Building and 10 Lilliputian city
blocks that can fit in the palm
of your hand. My conclusion:
Even little things in New York
City can make a big impres-
sion.
WHEN YOU GO
Irish hunger memorial
and Skyscraper museum:
www.bpca.ny.gov.
the tenement museum:
www.tenement.org
the new York City Fire
museum: www.nycfiremu-
seum.org
museum of Chinese in
America:
www.mocanyc.org
national museum of the
American Indian:
www.nmai.si.edu
Intrepid Sea, Air and
Space museum:
www.intrepidmuseum.org
Victor Block is a freelance
writer. COPYRIGHT 2013 CREATORS.COM
Small New York Museums...
photo: www.tenement.org
A Shred of Purpose
for Phone Books
Yesterday I found a surprise on the front porch
— a dutifully delivered telephone book, com-
plete with Yellow Pages and the old familiar
"white" ones, too, a term I used advisedly as
that color is anything but white.
Am I the only one who thought telephone
books went out with VCRs? Apparently they
have not because someone out there is spending
a ton of money to produce and deliver them.
Which begs the question, "What to do with a
perfectly good telephone book?" Today's first
tipster begs to answer.
SHRED BED. Whether for cushioning
a package or lining an animal's bed, shredded
phone book paper produces a nice soft shred. A
great new use for clean but outdated or unused
phone books. — Linda, Texas
AUTOMATIC BONUS. For on-
line bill paying, we use a credit card to pay for
everything. We use the points to get gift cards
and travel or cash to pay toward the card. It's
like getting an extra bonus. We schedule the
card to be paid in full monthly, so no worries on
interest charges. — Kathleen, Oregon
SAVING LIKE MAD. My hus-
band and I take the money we save using
coupons at the grocery store and place it in our
"mad money" container. We also add any spare
change to the container, too. It is amazing how
it adds up when you actually save this money.
Our mad money has funded weekend getaways,
special purchases and savings for a grandchild's
education. — Jan, email
ALL-PURPOSE ALOE. Instead
of buying lotions and
creams, after-sun,
sunburn remedies or
expen-
sive
products for facial complexions, I buy 100 per-
cent pure aloe vera. It is all-natural (check the
ingredient list to make sure there's only one in-
gredient), and it smooths, soothes and heals
skin quickly. Aloe vera works wonders, and I
only have to buy one product for multiple is-
sues. If you can't find it at your favorite stores,
look for it at a health food store. — Valerie,
Connecticut
WINE WITH A PURPOSE.
I've found that an empty wine bottle works
wonders for my neglected plants. Filled with
water and shoved upside-down into the dirt, it's
like watering — only different. My plants suck
the water out of the bottles at their own individ-
ual rate, and that's helped me reduce my plant
maintenance to once a week. I have several
tomato plants in my backyard garden that like
this method, too. And emptying a wine bottle is
a bunch more fun for me than going to the store
and buying glass watering globes for $5. My
"glass globes" come with wine in them and,
when empty, hydrate my plants. It's a win-win
situation. — Kim, Montana
SNEAKY MOM. I trick my picky
children into eating the bread "heels" by turning
them inside out in a sandwich. My girls are
none the wiser. It's worked like a charm for
years. — Shayna, email
STUCK-ON GUM RE-
MOVAL. A dampened fabric softener
sheet works wonders in removing sticking
items like gum from the inside of a clothes
dryer. — Tracy, email
Would you like to send a tip to Mary? You can
email her at mary@everydaycheapskate.com,
or write to Everyday Cheapskate, P.O. Box
2099, Cypress, CA 90630. Include your
first and last name and state. Mary
Hunt is the founder of www.Debt-
ProofLiving.com and author of 23
books, including her 2013 release
"Cheaper, Better, Faster: Over
2,000 Tips and Tricks to Save You Time
and Money
Every Day."
COPYRIGHT 2013 CREATORS.COM
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 20
Continued from page 14
Marion Nestle, author of "Food Politics: How the Food Industry
Influences Nutrition and Health" writes, "Here we have the great
irony of modern nutrition: At a time when hundreds of millions of
people do not have enough to eat, hundreds of millions more are
eating too much and are overweight or obese. Today ... more peo-
ple are overweight than underweight."
In the U.S., 72 percent of men and 70 percent of women are over-
weight. Cheaper food does not translate into healthier food. In fact,
our current agricultural policy is to subsidize corn to the point
where it is ridiculously cheap and ubiquitous in our food system.
So cheap that we even burn it as fuel for our automobiles, a crime
against humanity when you consider all starving people that could
be fed.
Corn is one of the cheapest food additives and the single-most
highly subsidized crop in the world. This mountain of cheap corn
is primarily used in processed foods. Corn and corn syrup products
as sweeteners can be found in almost every product on supermar-
ket shelves, and are primary ingredients in most fast foods. That
makes processed foods much cheaper than whole, natural and nu-
tritious foods. Plus, they don't spoil as quickly as fresh produce,
and taste better to humans already evolutionarily inclined toward
sweet and fatty flavors.
Looking back at our Guatemalan family cited above, their weekly
diet consisted mainly of rice and beans, potatoes and vegetables
from their garden. Meat was added to a meal less than once a
week. While the American family ate mostly processed foods like
canned soups, frozen meals, packaged cookies, cakes, crackers and
lots of meat. Another major difference is cooking. Guatemalans eat
every meal at home and one person spends most of her time cook-
ing, preparing and purchasing ingredients for meals. Americans eat
one out of three meals at home.
How can we curb our national eating
disorder?
--Eat local! When we eat what is grown in our own re-
gion we eat healthier and at the peak of freshness. This is bet-
ter four our health and the environment, as well as boosting
the local economy.
--Grow your own food! Victory gardens helped
our grandparents survive the wars and Great Depression. Save
money at the grocery store by skipping the imported produce
and processed food.
--Eat lower on the food chain! Meat is a threat
to our health and environment. Treat it as a condiment and
purchase locally raised meats from farms you trust.
Shawn Dell Joyce is an award-winning columnist and founder of
the Wallkill River School in Orange County, N.Y. You can contact
her at ShawnDellJoyce@gmail.com.
COPYRIGHT 2013 CREATORS.COM
Cost of Food...
liFelong health by Dr. DaviD lipSchitz
History of Vitamin B-12 and Pernicious Anemia
Before medical researchers
found a cure, pernicious ane-
mia was a universally fatal dis-
ease that caused overwhelming
fatigue and breathlessness with
even the slightest movement.
The body does not develop
enough red blood cells to carry
oxygen because the digestive
system can't properly absorb
vitamin B-12 from food.
Unraveling the cause of the
disease was one of the greatest
medical detective stories of the
20th century.
The first breakthrough oc-
curred in the early 1920s when
Drs. George Whipple, George
Minot and William Murphy
showed that feeding a half-
pound of raw liver daily to pa-
tients with pernicious anemia
led to a cure within two weeks.
In 1934, the three researchers
were awarded the Nobel Prize
for the breakthrough. In subse-
quent years, scientists at Merck
laboratories identified and puri-
fied vitamin B-12 from livers.
At the same time, Dr. William
Castle showed that to be ab-
sorbed, B-12 must interact with
a substance in gastric juice. He
called B-12 the "extrinsic fac-
tor" and the substance in gas-
tric juice "intrinsic factor."
Among healthy people, only
vegans who eat no animal
products whatsoever develop
B-12 deficiency. In most perni-
cious anemia cases, deficiency
is caused by an abnormality of
the lining of the stomach that
impairs intrinsic factor produc-
tion.
We now know that B-12 is es-
sential for the normal function
of DNA. Deficiency of the vi-
tamin impairs the ability of
cells to divide. The most rap-
idly dividing cells are found in
the skin, hair follicles and lin-
ing of the gastrointestinal tract,
where cells are constantly
being replaced, and in bone
marrow, where red blood cells
are made. While effects of B-
12 deficiency on the skin and
bowel are minimal, an inability
of the bone marrow to produce
red cells causes pernicious ane-
mia. The vitamin also plays an
important role in the central
nervous system and is essential
for the production of the
myelin that forms the protec-
tive sheath surrounding nerve
cells.
Today, we are able to diagnose
pernicious anemia merely by
measuring B-12 levels in the
blood. Treatment involves the
injection of B-12, which rap-
idly corrects the anemia; the
patient immediately feels more
pep, and the profound fatigue
miraculously subsides.
While pernicious anemia is
rare, as much 20 percent of the
population over the age of 70
has vitamin B-12 levels that are
either deficient or at the lower
limit of the normal range. The
cause is atrophy of the lining of
the stomach that leads to inade-
quate intrinsic factor produc-
tion. While the B-12 levels are
not low enough to result in
anemia, significant abnormali-
ties of the entire nervous sys-
tem frequently occur. An
inability to maintain normal
myelin production causes dam-
age to nerve sheaths and abnor-
malities in nerve function. This
leads to weakness, gait prob-
lems and abnormal sensations.
Vitamin B-12 deficiency af-
fects memory. A study pub-
lished in the journal Neurology
showed that low B-12 levels
caused shrinking of the brain,
as well as significant declines
in cognitive function. Low B-
12 affects many aspects of me-
tabolism, one of the most
important being the overpro-
duction of homocysteine,
which researchers believe leads
to brain abnormalities. There is
evidence that inappropriately
high levels of homocysteine
account for 8 percent of the
memory declines seen with ad-
vancing age.
Because deficiency is so com-
mon, B-12 levels should be
checked every few years. And
in anyone with memory loss,
B-12 and homocysteine levels
should be assessed.
Occasionally, low B-12 may be
the only cause of memory loss.
Continues on next page
Dr. David Lipschitz
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 21
a greener view by JeFF rugg
Continued from page 20...Treatment with B-12 sometimes
corrects memory problems completely or improves function in
those who have memory loss from another cause. More com-
monly a deficiency will exacerbate Alzheimer's disease or
other causes of declines in cognition.
Low B-12 is corrected by taking a 1,000-microgram capsule
daily that can be bought at any drug store. Even if no intrinsic
factor is present, sufficient B-12 will diffuse into the body be-
cause the amount in the capsule is 500 times higher than that
in a normal diet.
Nothing is more important than identifying a cause of signifi-
cant illness that is so readily treated. And because memory
loss is so ubiquitous, it would be wise to make sure that your
B-12 is adequate at age 60 and take a supplement if deficient.
Dr. David Lipschitz is the author of the book "Breaking the
Rules of Aging." More information is available at:
DrDavidHealth.com.
COPYRIGHT 2013 CREATORS.COM
Continued from page 16
Instead, I'm going to be grateful that we live in a country where we are
free to do with our money as we please even if that means dropping a
load on something as fleeting as a 10-course meal.
Mary Hunt is the founder of www.DebtProofLiving.com and author of 23
books, including her 2012 release, "7 Money Rules for Life." You can
email her at mary@everydaycheapskate.com, or write to Everyday
Cheapskate, P.O. Box 2099, Cypress, CA 90630.
COPYRIGHT 2013 CREATORS.COM
Vitamin B-12...
Spider Mites, Wind
and Pussy Willow
Q: I have a Colorado spruce that is turning yellow-
ish-gray on the needles toward the inside of the tree.
Should I fertilize now?
A: Probably not. The problem is most
likely caused by spider mites. These pests are
very small (only about the
size of a period at the end of this sen-
tence). The damage they do can be extensive
because they reproduce quickly and abun-
dantly. To see if you have them, check
if the dead and dying needles are
clinging to the tree with a spi-
der web. Shake a branch or two over a white or
black sheet of paper and look for tiny moving
dots (with a magnifying glass if necessary).
Mites suck out the green color of the leaf on many
kinds of plants. The mite population explodes in the
summer. If you see a plant turning a color it should-
n't be, checking the plant for mites is a good first
step.
If the tree has mites, you can get rid of a lot of them
by spraying with a vigorous blast of water from the
hose. The blue cast on the new needles can be
washed off, so be careful spraying the new growth.
Insecticides usually don't kill mites, so check the la-
bels of products before using them to see if mites are
on the label.
Q: On the end of my tree's branches all of the
leaves seem to be eaten by insects, but I can't find
any bugs and don't know how to treat them.
A: A few weeks ago there were windstorms over
much of the country. Many trees are still growing
new leaves on the ends of the branches. These leaves
are very susceptible to damage in windstorms. De-
pending on the direction of the wind and the protec-
tion the tree had from other trees and from
buildings, not all branches will show damage.
Most of the damaged leaves have
stayed on the tree but have dead
sections or tattered edges. The dead
sections are dry and brittle and are
falling out, leaving holes that look like they
have been chewed on. Until
you can identify a pest, don't
spray. The tattered leaves will remain all year
but are not harmful to the tree.
Q: My friend put a bunch of pussy
willow branches in a vase back in the spring. Most
of them have rooted. I have never seen anything like
this. Can they be planted directly into the garden? I
have never seen an actual pussy willow plant. How
big do they get and what kind of care do they need?
A: Aren't you lucky. This happens every once in a
while on pussy willow and some other shrub
branches that are occasionally brought in for spring
color. Pussy willow plants are a drab green in the
summer, drab yellow in the fall and have no winter
interest, so they don't make great landscape plants.
They grow to about eight or ten feet tall and can
make a good screen in full sun locations that get a
good amount of water.
The can be grown as single trunk plants, but are usu-
ally grown as multi trunked shrubs. If you can keep
them watered in a sunny spot this summer, plant the
stems in the ground at least a foot apart. If it would
be difficult to keep them watered for the next couple
of months, then you can plant them into a flowerpot
with standard potting soil and then move them to the
landscape in the fall.
Email questions to Jeff Rugg at
info@greenerview.com.
COPYRIGHT 2013 CREATORS.COM
$25,000-per-Person Dinner...
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 22
Last week, over 48,200 people
descended upon the City of An-
gels to attend the largest video
game convention on the planet!
Dubbed E3 (Electronic Enter-
tainment Expo), this exclusive
event is attended by video
game industry professionals,
investor analysts, various
media and retailers from 102
different countries around the
world. Although the main focus
centers on video games, this
show also features gaming pe-
ripherals, computer hardware
and software, multimedia de-
vices and cell phone technol-
ogy.
If you're wondering what all the
fuss is about, consider the fact
that 58 percent of all Americans
play video games and that each
American household has an av-
erage of two gamers. When you
add that 51 percent of U.S.
households own a dedicated
gaming console and that the av-
erage age of gamers is 30 years
old, the result is an entertain-
ment industry that has a nearly
unlimited earning potential. But
enough with the statistics. Let's
get on the highlights of the
show!
Both Microsoft and Sony
showcased their upcoming
next-generation consoles to the
delight of attendees. Mi-
crosoft's Xbox One comes with
an advanced version of its mo-
tion-sensing Kinect technology
as well as built-in DVR, and it
will be released this November
for $499. Sony's PlayStation 4
console is highlighted as a mul-
timedia device with cloud tech-
nology that will be released this
Holiday season for $399.
My favorite Xbox One exclu-
sive title is the epic action
game, "Ryse: Son of Rome."
This gorgeous action-packed
adventure puts players in con-
trol of a powerful ancient
Roman soldier at the forefront
of battle against legions of
human and supernatural ene-
mies. Free-flowing combos and
brutal finishing moves plus the
ability to create formations and
command fellow soldiers round
out the impressive features.
Sony's Steampunk-inspired ac-
tion-shooter, "The Order:
1886," gives players the oppor-
tunity to guide a mysterious
character through an alternate
version of Victorian England.
With game play that focuses on
the use of powerful futuristic
weaponry against a deadly in-
human force, this title will
surely offer players a decidedly
different experience than mod-
ern military shooters.
UbiSoft once again combines
modern and ancient-era game
play with "Assassin's Creed IV:
Black Flag" on modern and
next-gen consoles. In addition
to traditional stealth and action-
oriented game play, it's possible
to command a 17-century pirate
ship to fight against and hijack
other ships as well as attack
forts and land bases.
Square Enix also offers an ex-
cellent stealth experience with
the re-imagining of the popular
series, "Thief," for the PC and
next-gen consoles This open-
world first person game lets
players control a master brig-
and called Garrett as he investi-
gates and disrupts corruption in
a pre-industrial city. Among the
highlights are a handy bow
with multiple arrow attach-
ments, advanced sneaking ca-
pabilities and various puzzles.
Towering over the online com-
petition was the ultra-stylish
military shooter, "Titanfall," by
Electronic Arts. This third-per-
son action game puts players in
command of a futuristic soldier
who fights on foot and can also
jump into a two-story tall me-
chanical beast to inflict massive
damage on enemies! It's both
visually and technologically
impressive and will only be
available on Xbox 360, Xbox
One and the PS4.
B.J. Blazkowicz is back and
ready to destroy the Nazis in
Bethesda's frantic first-person
shooter, "Wolfenstein: The New
Order" for next-gen consoles
and the PC. Set in an alternate
version of 1960s Europe where
Germany won WWII, this
game pits players against tech-
nologically advanced robots
and ubersoldiers with a wide
variety of standard and futuris-
tic weaponry.
Another impressive first-person
shooter is Activision's online
title, "Destiny," for current and
next-gen consoles. This unusual
game combines a story-driven
focus with cooperative, com-
petitive and social activities to
offer a unique experience. Play-
ers can combine their forces or
go it alone to fight enemies, un-
cover unique weapons and gain
useful new powers.
505 Games introduces "Payday
2," which is a heist-oriented
game where players are chal-
lenged rather than coddled. As
one of four classes participating
in high-stakes heists, promising
thieves must infiltrate various
institutions and steal valuables
while keeping the law at bay.
This realistic game lets players
customize everything from
weaponry to masks to special
abilities, but they must make
tough decisions since it's im-
possible to unlock every item.
Speaking of a difficult chal-
lenge, "Dark Souls 2" from
Namco Bandai is reminiscent
of old-school titles where play-
ers can expect to fail frequently.
Even though this medieval ac-
tion game can be frustrating,
the reward for success is unpar-
alleled! While the previous in-
carnation was only available on
the PS3, the sequel will punish
players on the PC, PS3, and
Xbox 360 for years to come.
Batman returns for another epic
outing in the Warner Bros pre-
quel, "Batman Arkham Ori-
gins," for current gen consoles
and the PC. Although young
and inexperienced, Batman is
forced to overcome several
character-defining moments in
his path to becoming the Dark
Knight. Thankfully, his combat
skills are as highly advanced as
his gadgets, which help him to
explore an expanded version of
Gotham City and overcome its
challenges.
SOE is known for creating
high-quality MMO games, and
the free-to-play PC title,
"Dragon's Prophet" is no ex-
ception! This fun title lets play-
ers roam a fantasy-based land
on foot or flying on the back of
a scaly beast while fighting
menacing enemies and recruit-
ing various dragons into their
arsenal. I also like how line-of-
sight plays an important role in
the game because it stresses
skill over button spamming.
If technology is your forte, then
"Black Gold" by Snail Games
is right up your alley! In this
PC-exclusive MMO game,
players choose to ally them-
selves with either a fantasy-
based team that values nature
and magic or a Steampunk le-
gion that combines extensive
use of gears and steam power
with advanced technology.
Both sides are at war with each
other over a valuable power
source as they undertake dy-
namic quests and open-world
player vs. player combat.
Not everyone wants to slay en-
emies in a virtual realm, so Dis-
ney has created an engaging
interactive musical game called
"Fantasia: Music Evolved" for
the Xbox Kinect. Both young
and old gamers alike will surely
enjoy using arm and body mo-
tions to control and remix over
30 songs from various artists.
Part of the fun of is unlocking
and expanding an underwater
kingdom that is hauntingly
beautiful and ever changing.
One of the most impressive
technologies on display was the
Qualcomm's Snapdragon
processor. Sure it's extremely
powerful and offers high defini-
tion visuals, but the interesting
feature is the HD audio. Cell
phones that incorporate the
Snapdragon 800 processor can
provide impressive 7.1 sur-
round sound on nearly any
headphones, which is great for
movies and totally awesome for
games. I found the headphone
7.1 audio to be nearly identical
to a 7.1 home theater after hear-
ing a side-by-side comparison.
COPYRIGHT 2013 CREATORS.COM.
"Assassin's Creed IV: Black Flag"
E3 Video Game Convention Invades Los Angeles
"Fantasia: Music Evolved"
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 23
Free Public
Museum Tour
Saturday, July 20, 2013
2:00 to 3:00 pm
Small groups and individuals are invited to ex-
plore the El Paso Museum of Archaeology gal-
leries with our Curator, George Maloof, III.
Large groups can schedule their own free tour
on another day by calling 915-755-4332.
Visitors learn about the prehistoric people of El
Paso and Mexico. They’ll take a journey
through 14,000 years of El Paso’s Indian her-
itage including the Paleoindians, Archaic
hunter-gatherers, Pit Dweller-Horticulturalists,
Pueblo, Manso, Piro, Suma, Tigua and
Mescalero Apache. The museum’s galleries
also include Casas Grandes culture and the an-
cient city of Paquime in Chihuahua, and the
major regions of ancient Mexico – West, Cen-
tral, North and Maya.
Reservations are not necessary but contact the
museum with the number of people in your
group if you plan to attend at 915-755-4332 or
guidamr@elpasotexas.gov.
Museum Location: El Paso Museum of Archae-
ology, 4301 Transmountain Road, El Paso,
Texas 79924 in Northeast El Paso
Information: 915-755-4332;
guidamr@elpasotexas.gov
www.elpasotexas.gov/arch_museum/
Group viewing diorama of Mescalero Apache Moun-
tain Spirit Dancers courtesy of the El Paso Museum
of Archaeology
Free Admission
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 24
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 25
Prepare now for the most dangerous holiday for companion animals
By Gina Spadafori
Universal Uclick
I love the Fourth of July. I love the picnics and
parades, and especially the fireworks. But I love
my pets, too, so I usually stay home.
My cats live indoors, so I don’t worry
about them running off in fear, and my backyard
is double-fenced, so I don’t worry about my
dogs bolting when let outside, either. But I know
I would spend the evening worrying if I left
them alone, and with good reason: Pet-advocacy
groups warn that more pets are lost or killed, in-
jured or panicked on this day than on any other.
Even if your pet is not the nervous
type, it is a good idea to think twice before head-
ing out the evening of July 4, or at least to take
some precautions. Here are some tips:
Line up some chemical calm. If you
know your pet looks for a place to hide and
shiver at the neighborhood’s first noise, call your
veterinarian in advance to get a medication to
keep him calm. While you are at it, ask if your
vet is available for after-hours emergencies, and
if not, get the location and phone number of the
nearest emergency clinic. You never know if you
will need it. One usually calm dog I know
jumped through a sliding-glass door after fire-
crackers went off in the yard behind him. Fortu-
nately, his owners knew where to take him, and
he got the prompt care he needed to save his life.
Set up a safe room. For truly terri-
fied pets, it’s not a bad idea to
secure them in a quiet
room, or a crate if
they’re used to
one. Syn-
thetic
pheromone sprays — Feliway for cats, Adaptil
for dogs, both available at pet stores — mimic
the natural substances that calm anxious pets,
and help many pets over the rough spots. Cloth-
ing that “hugs” your pet, such as Thundershirts,
has also been shown to help. And many people
have used the homeopathic Rescue Remedy on
their pets; a few drops in drinking water may
help.
Keep your pets secure. Make sure
all your pets are safely confined and provided
with plenty of fresh, cool water (nervous animals
drink lots of water). Bring outside pets in-
side, at least into the garage. Allow
your cat no access to the outside, and
be sure keep your dog on leash out-
side, even in your own yard if
you’re not sure about your fenc-
ing. Frightened dogs have been
known to go over — or even
through — fences that would
normally hold them. And cats are
often the targets of cruel
pranksters, some of whom enjoy
terrorizing animals with fire-
works.
Prepare for the worst. Make sure
your pet is wearing a collar with ID tags. When
animal-control agencies are closed, there’s no
way for your pet to be traced to you unless you
have made sure your phone number is also on
that collar. And if you don’t have time to get
your pet microchipped, get it done before next
year’s fireworks.
Know what to do if you lose your
pet. Start looking as soon as you discover your
pet is missing. Cover your neighborhood with
fliers and check with veterinarians, emergency
clinics and shelters. When dealing with shelters,
remember that a phone call is not enough. Shel-
ter staff cannot remember every animal in the
place, and may not be able to recognize your pet
from your description even if they have seen it.
It is important to check in person at least every
other day.
With so much to worry about, I feel a
lot better staying home. Besides, I live close
enough to my city’s fireworks show that I can
get a pretty good view without leaving my pets
alone.
Leave your party animal at home, and stay with him if you can. The Fourth of July is a risky
day for cats and dogs.
PET-SAFE ON THE FOURTH OF JULY
Keep Pets Safe
During 4th of July
Festivities
El Paso, Texas – The City of El Paso En-
vironmental Services Department re-
minds the public to take a few
precautions as they prepare for 4th of
July festivities to ensure the safety of
their furry friends.
Every year, Environmental Services is in-
undated with calls about lost pets and its
Animal Services Shelter is filled with
dogs and cats as a result of Independ-
ence Day celebrations. Loud noises from
fireworks may frighten pets that have a
heightened sense of hearing. As a result,
these pets may feel anxious, chew
through leashes, dig under fences and
even run into traffic to escape the
sounds.
Environmental Services urges pet own-
ers to plan ahead this holiday to prevent
their pets from running away, ending up
lost or at the Animal Services shelter.
Holiday safety tips for pet owners:
•Do not take pets to firework displays;
•Keep pets inside your home during
Fourth of July celebrations;
•If you cannot keep your pet indoors,
make sure they are supervised and pro-
vide extra security outside so that they
cannot escape;
•Make sure your pets are wearing I.D.
tags and that they have a microchip so
that if they do become lost, they can be
quickly identified and reunited with you;
and
• If your pet is seriously distressed by
loud noises, consult with a veterinarian
for suggestions and calming medica-
tions.
If your pet goes missing during the holi-
day period, visit the Animal Services
shelter website at http://home.elpa-
sotexas.gov/environmental-
services/animal-services/index
.php to check for your pet or you may
visit the shelter at 5001 Fred Wilson
Road.
29
34
36
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 27
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 28
What Does the Color of
Your Door Say About You?
MAUMEE, OHIO – Are you
an introvert with an orange
front door? If so, you’re send-
ing mixed messages to your
friends and neighbors. Accord-
ing to national color expert
Kate Smith, you should try to
match the color of your entry
door with your personality to
give guests a “preview” of the
owner inside the home.
“An entry door painted a bold
shade of orange says ‘I’m
friendly, fun-loving and enjoy
getting together with people’ so
that’s the color for an extrovert
and perhaps not the best choice
for someone who has a more
reserved personality,” says
Smith, president and chief color
maven of Sensational Color.
“Since the front door is the key
feature on a house that offers
homeowners the most flexibil-
ity in color choice, this is a
good place for people to let
their personality shine
through.”
Smith suggests homeowners
purchase smooth, paintable
doors for their homes so they
can select and add the color that
best reflects their personality. “I
love Classic-Craft® Canvas
Collection® fiberglass entry
doors from Therma-Tru,” says
Smith. “You can paint these
doors any hue you wish to ex-
press yourself while quickly
adding a colorful accent to your
home.”
According to Smith, here’s a
look at what different paint col-
ors on entry doors of the home
say about the occupants inside:
◦Red --- tells the world to
“look at me!” This bright color
says I’m not afraid of standing
out or saying what’s on my
mind.
◦ White --- says that I pre-
fer things that are organized,
neat and clean. Even if my
home isn’t always this way, I
wish it were!
◦ Green --- tells the world
that you have traditional values
and enjoy being a member of
the community.
◦ Black --- says I’m consis-
tent, conservative and reserved
in my manner as well as my ap-
proach to color. With a black
door I’m saying my design
style is timeless rather than
trendy.
◦ Blue – tells people you are
naturally at ease in most situa-
tions and people are attracted to
your easygoing personality.
◦ Yellow--- says you have
a personality similar to green,
but a bit less traditional. You’re
most likely a leader or organ-
izer of a group.
◦ Purple --- reveals a “free
spirited” person who is com-
fortable taking risks, thinking
differently and dreaming big.
“Homeowners should remem-
ber they don’t always have to
go ‘bright and bold’ with color
on their front doors to make a
positive impression,” says
Smith. “Muted colors like sage
green, colonial blue and copper
sunset are all striking colors
that enhance a home while
showing your true colors.
“In my mind, the really terrific
thing about having a paintable
front door is the ability to
change your door’s color over
time.
Continues on page 34
Classic Craft Canvas - Red with Savannah glass
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 29
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 30
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 31
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SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 33
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 34
Continued from page 29
You may start out with a conservative black door but transition
over the years to more of a hunter green or ocean blue. Having
the ability to paint your entry door allows you to update your
home’s exterior while sharing your evolving personality with
the neighborhood!”
For more details on exterior colors on the home, visit
http://www.thermatru.com
What Does the Color of Your
Door Say About You?....
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Slip Your Rooms Into
Something Cool for
Summer
By Rose Bennett Gilbert
Q: My grandmother still
switches her house from winter
to summer. She puts on white
slipcovers and takes down the
heavy draperies. It's a lot of
work, but the house does feel
refreshed and cooler. My
grandmother is from the Old
Country. Do people still make
seasonal changes? Not my gen-
eration.
A: We have Willis Haviland
Carrier to thank for that. He
who invented air conditioning
has lightened the seasonal load
for housekeepers ever since.
Actually, Carrier called it his
"Apparatus for Treating Air,"
when he patented his splendid
invention in l906 (soon after
winning a master's in engineer-
ing at Cornell University). That
"apparatus" not only lets all of
us live in year-round comfort
today, it has made home life
possible at all in extreme areas
like Florida, Houston and Ari-
zona.
Still, there's something to be
said for decorating cool, too.
Even in these days of "all-sea-
son" fabrics, doesn't it give us a
spiritual lift to switch our per-
sonal wardrobes from dark and
thick and winter-cozy to whites
and pastels, crisp linens and
summer-fresh gauzy sheers?
Visual air conditioning works
the same magic in our homes.
The living room we show here
is cool in every sense of the
word. And no wonder: It's de-
signed by Mariette Himes
Gomez (www.mariettehimes-
gomez.com, one of the most
applauded interior designers in
the U.S.
That she is also an architect
(who trained with the likes of
Edward Durell Stone) is easy to
see in her clean lines, calm col-
ors and the classic style of her
furniture, which, by the way, is
available through Hickory
Chair Furniture Co., an Ameri-
can classic since 1911 (hicko-
rychair.com).
Summer-izing ideas to be
gained from this room: light
colors, uncluttered surfaces and
uncomplicated window treat-
ments. Slick and shine, as on
the tabletops, effectively lowers
the visual temperature, too.
Q: What's cooking in today's
kitchens?
A: Open floor plans. Sleek
styling. The isolated work is-
land — it's all business, all on
one level and not at all about
coziness and kibitzers, let alone
kids doing homework while
you cook.
Continues on next page
Summertime, and the livin' is cool, calm and collectible — the furniture is from Hickory Chair, de-
signed by Mariette Himes Gomez. Photo: Courtesy Hickory chair.
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 35
Continued from page 34
As seen — and reported by New
York kitchen expert/author/blogger
Leslie Clagett, the "modern"
kitchen island floats alone, seat-
less, in the middle of the floor.
That's the news from Living
Kitchen 2013, the trend-forward
trade show that happens every two
years in Cologne. This year, some
160 exhibitors showed off their
furniture, design ideas and some
way-out technology that may soon
be showing up on this side of the
globe, Leslie told the New York
Chapter of the IFDA (International
Furnishings and Design Assn.,
ifda.com).
Innovations to watch for — or
watch out for: the independent
work island, ("Go sit in the next
room while I cook".) Hidden cook-
tops. (push a button to raise or
lower to suit your cooking height.)
Articulated faucets that dispense
chilled water with/without carbon-
ation. Smart counters that offer
recipe advice — set out whatever
ingredients you have and it will
suggest dishes that combine them
(see Intel's "OASIS" — Object-
Aware Situated Interactive Sys-
tem). Dare leave the ice cream out,
and OASIS will warn that it's
melting.
Also in the works: in-refrigerator
cameras that look around and tell
what you're running out of. As if
we really need another device
that's programmed to be a nag!
Rose Bennett Gilbert is the author
of "Manhattan Style" and
six other books on interior design.
COPYRIGHT 2013 CREATORS.COM
Extra! Extra!
By Rose Bennett Gilbert
Q: My husband is retiring after a long career in newspaper journalism
(his paper downsized, and he says he's not interested in doing "E-news").
I am redoing his home office and want to commemorate his 25 years as a
"real" editor. I read the column where you mentioned wallpapering with
newspaper clippings. How does that work? (I'm not very crafty).
A: Do I have a scoop for you, hot off the presses! One of the oldest
wallpaper manufacturers in the U.S. is making design news these days:
the American Classics Collection from York Wallcovering
(yorkwall.com) includes "Headline News," a pattern in black-and-white
to be read allover.
Your husband should feel Extra! Extra! special in his new home office
surrounded by banner headlines and breaking stories. Best news for you:
The wallpaper comes pre-pasted, making it a cinch for even the unhandy
to dip-and-press into place. It's also washable and strippable, so you can
peel it off and start again when it's time for the next edition.
COPYRIGHT 2013 CREATORS.COM
Décor Score...
Wallpaper Makes News!
These walls really do talk! Read all about it, floor-to-
ceiling, on wallpaper that makes design headlines.
Photo: Courtesy York Wallcoverings.
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 36
Putting Heart and Soul Into Your Home
Q: I don't even know how to
phrase my question about deco-
rating. Our home is comfort-
able enough, but it's lacking
something. Call it personality
or maybe attitude. I just don't
feel like it's welcoming, not
even to us who live here.
Maybe I need an analyst, not a
decorator?
A: An "attitude adjustment" is
what I'd suggest. For you, not
the house.
When you think of homes in
which you truly feel "at-home,"
what do you think of first?
Probably not the color scheme
or wallpaper, furniture or ac-
cessories. What makes a home
memorable is an elusive quality
that radiates from the home-
owners themselves.
Fashion designer Donna Karan
calls it "soul." Cultural critic
and curator Karen Lehrman
Bloch calls it "deep beauty." In
her new book, "The Inspired
Home" (due out in September
from Harper Design, Harper-
Collins.com), the author de-
fines deep beauty as "a home so
authentic and elegant it has the
capacity to touch us not just
emotionally, but spiritually."
Leaf through the book, which
visits "soulful" homes around
the world (including Donna
Karan's, who wrote its fore-
word), and it's easy to see what
the author means. Just not so
easy to translate it into one's
own home. So Lehrman Bloch
offers five guidelines to help
you create "deep beauty" under
your own roof.
—Learn to "feel visu-
ally." Let yourself be emo-
tionally touched by the sofa
you choose, inspired by the art
you hang, she advises.
—Forget perfection. Na-
ture is not perfect, Lehrman
Bloch points out. It's the imper-
fections - of an object, fabric,
or person that often "make
them real to our brains."
—Edit, edit, edit. "Our
brains actually prefer minimal-
ism," the author says. But re-
member, minimalism doesn't
have to feel austere or soul-
less.
—Create good flow. By
which she means, add that ele-
ment of surprise that "infuses
us with energy and optimism."
—Cultivate true ele-
gance. Neither staid nor
stuffy nor tradition-bound, true
elegance feels both fresh and
grounded, innovative and
grand. "And it can have an im-
mediate effect on our psyches,"
the author promises. "We can't
help ourselves: Elegance breeds
elegance."
Q: Does your hometown need
a facelift?
A: Benjamin Moore is waiting
to hear from you. The giant
paint company has announced a
nationwide initiative called
"Main Street Matters," which is
designed to revitalize commu-
nities across North America,
Vote by June 30 on which 20
American and Canadian com-
munities will get a professional
paint makeover by Benjamin
Moore and members of the
Painting and Decorating Con-
tractors of America. There are
more than 100 cities in the run-
ning;
cast your vote at paintwhatmat-
ters.com.
Benjamin Moore is partnering
with a slew of other organiza-
tions, including local Chambers
of Commerce and Brad Pitt's
initiative, Make It Right.
According to the Benjamin
Moore press announcement,
work will begin this summer,
and by the end of the coming
year, all 20 of the winning
Main Streets should be spruced
up and sparkling.
Color us impressed.
Rose Bennett Gilbert is the au-
thor of "Manhattan Style" and
six other books on
interior design.
COPYRIGHT 2013 CREATORS.COM
By Rose Bennett Gilbert
The luxe, calm dining room of designer, boutique owner Catherine Weyeneth Bezencon nourishes
both body and soul in her 'deeply beautiful' home in the Rhone Alpes region of France.
Photo: Courtesy HarperCollins, "The Inspired Home."
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 37
The Livin' Is Easy as all Outdoors
By Rose Bennett Gilbert
Q: We need a bigger house —
our daughter and her husband
are coming back to live with us.
Instead of moving, we are
thinking about adding a deck
out back to gain more family
living space. Our climate is rel-
atively mild all year 'round, so
we can use the outdoors for
nearly eight months out of the
year. Is this a crazy idea?
A: If so, there are a lot of other
families who are just as crazy
about finding more living space
outdoors.
A recent survey by IFDA (In-
ternational Furnishing and De-
sign Assn.) showed that more
than one third of their members
(35 percent) believe that the
trend to outdoor living will
only continue to grow between
now and 2020. But it has to be
low-maintenance living, they
say — nobody much wants to
deal with traditional amenities
like swimming pools or hot
tubs — both earned thumbs-
down from 44.9 percent of
IFDA's members.
By contrast, nearly half these
design industry professionals
turned green thumbs up on gar-
dening and landscaping, low-
maintenance landscaping and
vegetable gardening, that is.
And here's a number that will
especially interest you: more
than a quarter of the designers
surveyed see Americans doing
more and more of their enter-
taining in the Great Outdoors.
So you are right in step, plan-
ning to develop more al fresco
living space. You can make it
low-maintenance, too, by using
some of the remarkable high-
tech materials that are now
available on the outdoor mar-
ket.
For example, the comfortably
furnished pergola we show here
is constructed of PVC wrapped
over a core of structural alu-
minum. The PVC itself is made
— are you ready? - from recy-
cled materials like plastic bags,
the kind you get with your gro-
ceries and home-delivered
newspapers.
The manufacturer, Trex
(trex.com), claims to be the
world's largest recycler of plas-
tic bags. They are also the
world's largest manufacturer of
what they call "high-perfor-
mance, wood-alternative" deck-
ing and railings warranteed not
to crack, peel, chip, scratch or
blister, at least, for the next 20
years.
More good news: The pergolas
come in DIY kits and a choice
of nine new colors, so you can
be as trend-forward as you are
environmentally sound. De-
pending on size, the kits run be-
tween $4,300 and $13,500, not
a bad bottom line for eight
months' extra living space.
Q: What else old now comes
in new colors?
A: Formica, the plastic lami-
nate that's been around so long
it's become the generic name
for the entire category of imita-
tion materials.
Celebrating its 100th year on
the world's countertops and
elsewhere, Formica has intro-
duced a new palette of bright
colors — including oranges,
reds and blues — in
four subtle patterns by Abbott
Miller of the design studio Pen-
tagram.
After aping naturals like wood
grain and stone for the past
century or so, the new collec-
tion is not imitation anything,
it's real Formica (formica.com).
Rose Bennett Gilbert is the co-
author of "Manhattan Style'
and six other books on
interior design.
COPYRIGHT 2013 CREATORS.COM
Get out! Add more al fresco living space like this DIY pergola, made of recycables like yesterday's plastic bags. Photo courtesy Trex.
PHOTO BY FORMICA.COM
WE BUY FURNITURE
• Moving/ Downsizing?
• Don’t know what to do with so much furniture?
• Your furniture doesn’t fit in your new home?
Give us a call
915.727.3177
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 38
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 39
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 42
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Runtime 102 min
MPAA Rating G
Starring Billy Crystal, John Good-
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P. Hayes, Dave Foley, Charlie Day,
Alfred Molina, Tyler Labine,
Nathan Fillion, Aubrey Plaza,
Bobby Moynihan, Noah Johnston,
Julia Sweeney, Bonnie Hunt, John
Krasinski, Bill Hader, Beth Behrs,
Bob Peterson, John Ratzenberger
Genre Comedy, Adventure, Fan-
tasy, Animated
Synopsis Ever since he was a kid monster, Mike Wazowski
(Billy Crystal) has dreamed of becoming a Scarer. To make his
dream a reality, he enrolls at Monsters University. During his
first semester, he meets Sulley (John Goodman), a natural-born
Scarer. Sulley and Mike engage in a fierce rivalry that ultimately
gets them both kicked out of MU's elite Scare Program. To make
things right, Mike and Sulley -- along with a bunch of misfit
monsters -- will have to learn to work together.
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Open Nationwide 06/21/13
Runtime 115 min
MPAA Rating PG-13 for Intense
Frightening Zombie Seq, Disturbing
Images, Violence.
Starring Brad Pitt, Mireille Enos,
James Badge Dale, Daniella Kertesz,
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Genre: Action/Adventure SciFi/Fantasy
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he is to save the world from annihilation
and become the symbol of hope for all
mankind.
Starring: Henry Cavill, Diane Lane, Amy
Adams, Russell Crowe, Michael Shannon, Kevin Costner,
Christopher Meloni, Jadin Gould, Laurence Fishburne, Dylan
Sprayberry
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Open Nationwide 06/28/13
Runtime 116 min
MPAA Rating R for Some Vio-
lence, Pervasive Language,
Strong Crude Content.
Starring Sandra Bullock,
Melissa McCarthy
Genre Comedy
Synopsis FBI Special Agent
Sarah Ashburn (Sandra Bullock)
is a methodical investigator with
a longstanding reputation for ex-
cellence -- and arrogance. In
contrast, crude, hot-tempered de-
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(Melissa McCarthy) goes with
her gut instinct and street smarts to remove criminals from the
streets of Boston. Though neither woman has ever had a partner --
or a friend -- they must join forces to capture a drug lord. In the
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MPAA Rating PG for Rude Humor, Mild Action.
Starring Steve Carell, Kristen Wiig, Benjamin Bratt, Miranda Cosgrove, Russell
Brand, Steve Coogan, Ken Jeong, Elsie Fisher, Dana Gaier, Moises Arias,
Nasim Pedrad, Kristen Schaal, Pierre Coffin
Genre Comedy, Animated
Synopsis Now that Gru (Steve Carell) has forsaken a life of crime to raise Margo,
Agnes and Edith, he's trying to figure out how to provide for his new family. As he
struggles with his responsibilities as a father, the Anti-Villain League -- an organ-
ization dedicated to fighting evil -- comes calling. The AVL sends Gru on a mis-
sion to capture the perpetrator of a spectacular heist, for who would be better
than the world's greatest ex-villain to capture the individual who seeks to usurp
his power.
WHITE HOUSE DOWN
Open Nationwide 06/28/13
Runtime 137 min
MPAA Rating PG-13 for Seq of Intense Ac-
tion Violence, Intense Gunfire and Explo-
sions, A Brief Sexual Image, Some
Language.
Genre Action, Thriller
Synopsis Capitol police officer John Cale
(Channing Tatum) has just been denied his
dream job of protecting President James
Sawyer (Jamie Foxx) as a member of the Se-
cret Service. Not wanting to disappoint his
young daughter with the bad news, Cale
takes her on a tour of the White House.
While he and his daughter are there, a heavily armed paramilitary group at-
tacks and seizes control. As the nation's government dissolves in chaos,
only Cale can save his
daughter, the presi-
dent and the country.
KEVIN HART:
LET ME
EXPLAIN
Open Nationwide 07/03/13
Runtime 75 min
MPAA Rating R for Pervasive
Language, Sexual References.
Starring Kevin Hart
Genre Comedy
Synopsis Comic Kevin Hart per-
forms in concert.
Distributor Lions Gate Films
Official Website http://letmeexplainmovie.com/
THE LONE RANGER
Open Nationwide
07/03/13
Runtime 135 min
MPAA Rating PG-13 for
Seq of Intense Action Vi-
olence, Some Suggestive
Material.
Starring Johnny Depp,
Armie Hammer, Tom
Wilkinson, William
Fichtner, Barry Pepper,
James Badge Dale, Ruth
Wilson, Helena Bonham
Carter
Genre Western, Adven-
ture, Action
Synopsis Fate brings to-
gether Native American
spirit warrior Tonto
(Johnny Depp) and white
lawman John Reid (Armie Hammer) to join forces in the never-
ending battle against corruption and greed.
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 43
2D EPIC (PG) Running Time: 125 minutes
9:45am | 12:35pm|3:25pm |6:15 pm | 9:05 pm
2D IRON MAN 3 (PG13)Running Time: 144
minutes 10:45am| 1:50pm | 4:45pm |7:45 pm
| 10:40 pm
*2D MAN OF STEEL (PG13)
Running Time: 163 minutes
| 12:05 pm | 3:35 pm | 7:05 pm | 10:30 pm
*AFTER EARTH (PG13)
Running Time: 120 minutes
| 11:00 am | 1:45 pm | 4:30 pm
*D-BOX THE LONE RANGER (PG)
Running Time: 159 minutes
| 10:15 am | 1:45 pm | 5:15 pm | 8:40 pm
*LLANERO SOLITARIO (DOBLADA) EN
ESPANOL (PG13)Running Time: 159 min-
utes 10:45 am | 2:10 pm | 5:35 pm | 9:00 pm
ASALTO AL PODER (SUBTITULADA)
(PG13)Running Time: 141 minutes
| 7:10 pm | 10:15 pm
FAST & FURIOUS 6 (PG13)Running Time:
148 minutes 9:45 am | 12:50 pm | 4:00 pm |
7:15 pm | 10:15 pm
*KEVIN HART: LET ME EXPLAIN (R)
Running Time: 85 minutes 10:50 am | 1:00
pm | 3:15 pm | 5:30 pm | 7:45 pm | 10:00 pm
*NOW YOU SEE ME (PG13)Running Time:
120 minutes 9:45 am | 12:10 pm | 2:45 pm |
5:25 pm | 7:55 pm | 10:25 pm
*THE EAST (PG13)Running Time: 126 min-
utes 10:35 am | 1:25 pm | 4:15 pm | 7:05 pm
| 10:00 pm
*THE INTERNSHIP (PG13)Running Time:
139 minutes 10:55 am | 1:45 pm | 4:40 pm |
7:30 pm | 10:25 pm
*THE LONE RANGER (PG13)
Running Time: 159 minutes
| 10:15 am | 11:00 am | 12:30 pm | 1:45 pm |
2:30 pm | 3:55pm | 5:15pm | 6:05pm | 7:15
pm | 8:40 pm | 9:15 pm | 10:40 pm
*WHITE HOUSE DOWN (PG13)
Running Time: 141 minutes 10:00 am | 11:00
am | 1:05 pm | 2:05 pm | 4:15 pm | 5:15 pm |
7:20 pm | 8:20 pm | 10:35 pm
EAST POINTE
MOVIES 12
I-10 & Lee Trevino
Schedule good for
Friday July 5th
PREMIERE MONTWOOD 7
Schedule good for 7 /3 - 7 /11
2D THE CROODS(PG)11:30am | 4:45 pm | 9:50 pm
3D JURASSIC PARK (PG13)| 12:00 pm | 2:50 pm |
5:30 pm | 8:45 pm
3D THE CROODS (PG) 2:10 pm | 7:15 pm
AFTER EARTH (PG13)Running Time: 110 minutes
| 11:20 am | 2:00 pm | 4:25 pm | 6:50 pm | 9:20 pm
OLYMPUS HAS FALLEN (R)11:15 am | 1:50 pm |
4:30 pm | 7:05 pm | 9:45 pm
PAIN & GAIN (R)12:35 pm | 3:35 pm | 6:35 pm |
9:30 pm
SCARY MOVIE 5 (PG13)12:00pm | 2:30pm | 5:10
pm | 7:40 pm | 10:00 pm
THE HANGOVER: PART III (R)| 11:45 am | 2:20 pm
10:00 pm
2200 n. Yarbrough
Premiere Cinemas
6101 Gateway West S.15
2D G.I. JOE RETALIATION(111min) PG13
| 11:20a | 4:25p | 9:30p
2D OZ THE GREAT AND POWERFUL(131min) PG
| 1:30p | 6:50p
2D THE CROODS(98min) PG
| 11:00a | 1:20p | 3:40p | 6:15p | 8:45p
3D G.I. JOE RETALIATION(111min) PG13
| 1:50p | 7:00p
3D JURASSIC PARK(127min) PG13 11:35a | 6:30p
3D OZ THE GREAT AND POWERFUL(131min)
PG 2:40p | 9:20p
3D THE CROODS(98min) PG 12:00p | 2:20p |
4:50p | 7:15p | 9:35p
AFTER EARTH(100min) PG13
| 11:50a | 2:15p | 5:00p | 7:35p | 9:55p
EVIL DEAD (2013)(91min) R
| 11:30a | 2:10p | 5:10p | 7:30p | 9:40p
HANGOVER 3(100min) R
| 11:15a | 1:35p | 4:10p | 6:55p | 9:15p
IDENTITY THIEF(111min) R
| 11:10a | 1:40p | 4:30p | 7:10p | 9:50p
OBLIVION(124min)PG1312:10p|3:20p|6:40p | 9:25p
OLYMPUS HAS FALLEN(120min) R
| 11:25a | 2:00p | 4:40p | 7:20p | 10:00p
PAIN AND GAIN(130min) R 12:20p | 3:10p
| 6:20p | 9:10p
SCARY MOVIE V(85min)PG13 11:05a| 4:20p | 9:45p
Schedule good for 7/03- 7/11
CINEMARK CIELO VISTA
Gateway West Blvd/Cielo Vista Mall
CINEMARK 14 - EL PASO
West side of El Paso at Mesa & I-10
Las Palmas i-10 @ Zaragosa
Despicable Me 2
pg98 mins
Spanish Dubbed
2:10pm | 8:30pm
Spanish Digital
Dubbed 11:00am |
5:20pm | 11:30pm
9:40am | 11:40am
12:50pm | 2:50pm
4:00pm | 6:00pm |
7:10pm | 9:10pm
Digital Cinema
9:00am | 10:20am
12:10pm | 1:30pm
3:20pm | 4:40pm |
6:30pm | 7:50pm |
9:40pm | 10:50pm
| 11:50pm
The Lone Ranger
pg-13149 mins
12:00pm | 3:40pm
7:20pm | 11:00pm
Digital Cinema
9:20am | 10:40am
1:15pm | 2:35pm |
5:00pm | 6:20pm |
8:10pm | 9:00pm |
10:00pm | 11:45pm
Kevin Hart: Let Me
Explain r75 mins
Digital Cinema
9:10am | 11:30am
2:00pm | 4:20pm |
7:00pm | 9:20pm |
11:40pm
The Heat r116 mins
Digital Cinema
9:55am | 11:25am
1:00pm | 2:45pm |
4:10pm | 5:50pm |
7:30pm | 9:05pm |
10:40pm | 11:55pm
Monsters Univer-
sity g102 mins
10:05am | 11:50am
1:10pm | 3:00pm |
4:30pm | 6:40pm |
9:50pmDigital Cin-
ema 9:15am |
10:50a 12:30pm |
1:55pm 3:50pm |
5:10pm | 8:20pm |
11:25pm
White House Down
pg-13131 mins
Digital Cinema
10:55am | 2:25pm
6:05pm | 7:40pm |
9:20pm | 10:55pm
World War Z
pg-13115 mins
12:20pm | 3:30pm
7:05pm | 10:10pm
Digital Cinema
10:30am | 1:50pm
5:15p 8:40p 11:35p
Man of Steel
pg-13143 mins
9:05am | 10:20pm
Digital Cinema
12:55pm | 4:20pm
| 7:45pm
This Is the End
r107 mins
Digital Cinema
1:25pm | 10:35pm
Now You See Me
pg-13116 mins
Digital Cinema
11:00pm
Fast & Furious 6
pg-13128 mins
Digital Cinema
10:15am | 7:25pm
Schedule good for Friday July 5th
TINSELTOWN
Despicable Me 2
pg98 mins9:30am |
12:30pm | 1:30pm |
3:30pm | 6:30pm |
7:30pm | 9:30pm
Digital Cinema
10:30am | 11:30am |
2:30pm | 4:30pm |
5:30p 8:30p 10:30pm
The Lone Ranger
pg-13149 mins
11:00am | 3:00pm |
7:00pm | 10:45pm
Digital Cinema
12:00pm | 4:00pm |
8:00pm | 11:25pm
Kevin Hart: Let Me
Explainr75 minsDigital
Cinema 9:00am |
11:25am | 2:45pm |
5:45p 8:20p 11:00pm
The Heatr116 mins
Digital Cinema
10:00am | 1:10pm |
4:25pm | 7:45pm |
8:15p 10:40p 11:20pm
Monsters University
g102 mins10:15am |
1:15pm | 4:15pm |
7:15pm | 10:15pm
Digital Cinema 9:15am
10:55am | 12:15pm |
2:05pm | 3:15pm |
5:10p 6:15p 9:15pm
White House Down
pg-13131 mins
Digital Cinema
11:45am | 3:20pm |
6:45pm | 10:20pm
World War Z
pg-13115 mins
9:35am | 4:05pm |
10:35pmDigital Cinema
12:50pm | 7:20pm
Man of Steel
pg-13143 mins
3:10pm | 10:25pm
Digital Cinema
11:35am | 6:50pm
This Is the End
r107 minsDigital Cin-
ema 9:20am | 3:40pm
| 10:10pm
Now You See Me
pg-13116 mins
Digital Cinema
12:25pm | 7:05pm
Schedule good for Friday July 5th
Despicable Me 2
PG98 Mins10:00am |
11:30am | 1:00pm |
2:30pm | 4:00pm |
5:30pm | 7:00pm |
8:30pm | 10:00pm
Digital Cinema10:30am
| 12:30pm | 1:30pm
| 3:30pm | 4:30pm |
6:30pm | 7:30pm |
9:30pm | 10:30pm
The Heat R116 Mins
Digital Cinema10:25am
11:25am | 1:25pm |
2:25pm | 4:25pm |
5:25pm | 7:25pm |
8:25pm | 10:25pm
Monsters University
G102 Mins11:00am |
12:00pm | 2:00pm |
5:00pm | 6:00pm |
8:00pmDigital Cinema
10:00am | 1:00pm |
3:00pm | 4:00pm |
7:00pm | 9:00pm |
10:00pm
World War Z PG-13
115 Mins 11:45am |
2:45pm | 5:45pm |
8:45pm Digital Cinema
10:45am | 1:45pm |
4:45pm 7:45pm
10:45pm
This Is the End
R107 Mins Digital Cin-
ema
10:15am | 1:15pm |
4:15pm | 7:15pm |
10:15pm
The Purge R85 Mins
Digital Cinema
10:20am | 1:20pm |
4:20pm | 7:20pm |
10:20pm
Before Midnight
R108 Mins
Digital Cinema
1:35pm | 7:35pm
The Hangover Part III
R100 Mins
Digital Cinema
10:35am | 4:35pm |
10:35pm
Schedule good for Friday July 5th
Schedule good for 7/5
DESPICABLE ME 2, 2D (PG)
10:15 | 11:00 | 12:00 | 1:40 | 2:40
| 4:20 | 5:20 | 7:00 | 8:00 | 9:40 |
10:40 | 12:15am
DESPICABLE ME 2, 3D (PG)
11:30 | 2:10 | 4:50 | 7:30 | 10:10
KEVIN HART - LET ME EX-
PLAIN (R)11:00 | 1:05 | 4:00 |
7:00 | 9:05 | 12:00am
LONE RANGER, THE (PG13)
11:00 | 12:30 | 2:20 | 4:00 | 6:00 |
7:20 | 9:20 | 10:40 | 11:40
MAN OF STEEL 2D (PG13)
11:00 | 12:15 | 3:30 | 5:20 | 7:00 |
10:30
MONSTERS UNIVERSITY 2D
(G)10:00 | 11:00 | 12:40 | 1:40 |
3:20 | 4:20 | 6:00 | 7:00 | 8:50 |
10:00
MONSTERS UNIVERSITY 3D
(G)11:30 | 2:10 | 4:50 | 7:30 |
10:10
THE HEAT (R)
11:00 | 1:20 | 2:10 | 4:10 | 5:00 |
7:00 | 8:00 | 9:50 | 12:00am
WHITE HOUSE DOWN (PG13)
12:00 | 2:15 | 4:05 | 7:10 | 8:35 |
10:15 | 12:00am
WORLD WAR Z,2D (PG13)
11:00 | 1:50 | 4:40 | 7:30 | 10:20
WORLD WAR Z,3D (PG13)
10:00 | 1:20 | 4:10 | 7:00 | 9:50
Now Showing
ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL
DRIFT
Open Limited 07/01/13
Runtime 87 min
MPAA Rating PG for
Mild Rude Humor, Ac-
tion/Peril.
Starring Ray Romano,
Queen Latifah, Denis
Leary, John Leguizamo,
Chris Wedge, Josh Peck,
Jeremy Renner, Jennifer
Lopez, Seann William
Scott
Genre Comedy, Adven-
ture, Animated
Synopsis Manny, Diego,
and Sid embark upon
their greatest adventure
after cataclysm sets an entire continent adrift. Separated from the
rest of the herd, they use an iceberg as a makeshift ship, which
launches them on an epic seafaring quest. Manny and the gang
are challenged like never before to become heroes and do the im-
possible, as they encounter exotic sea creatures, explore a brave
new world, and battle ruthless pirates. Scrat's reunion with his
beloved but cursed acorn catapults him to places no prehistoric
squirrel has gone before.
$00l00fß 1008lf08 ª $¢0lll¶0l ll F808
4.8¨ K â¨
ß0 lß80fll0ß 08l0.
ß0 0f08ll0ßl00ll90f¶ 08l0.
80800f00@0K0l0ll0f808.00M
¢. 888.737.2812 l. 203.438.1206
Monoay, [uly 1, 2013 7:08:58 PM TXSLP_GRD0705-0711rev1
Friday-Yhursday, july 5-11, 2013
Revised Ad #1
GROWN UPS 2 (PG13) Thu. 7:00 9:30
PACIFIC RIM (PG13) Thu. 10:00
DESPICABLE ME 2 (PG) 11:45 2:10 4:35 7:40 10:10
(12:35); Thu. 11:45 2:10 4:35 7:40
DESPICABLE ME 2 IN 3D (PG) Fri.-Thu. 11:15 1:45 4:05
THE LONE RANGER (PG13) 11:30 12:30 3:05 3:45 7:00
10:15 (12:40)
THE HEAT (R) 11:05 1:50 4:35 7:10 7:35 10:00 10:25
(12:45); Thu. 11:05 1:50 4:35 7:10 7:35 10:00
WHITE HOUSE DOWN (PG13) 12:05 3:10 6:15 7:00 9:30
10:05 (12:25); Thu. 12:05 3:10 6:15 9:30
MONSTERS UNIVERSITY (G) 11:10 1:40 4:20 6:55 9:35
(12:05)
MONSTERS UNIVERSITY 3D (G) Fri.-Thu. 11:40 2:15
4:50
WORLD WAR Z (PG13) 11:00 1:45 4:30 7:10 9:55 (12:30)
MAN OF STEEL (PG13) Fri.-Thu. 1:00 4:15 7:25 10:30
THIS IS THE END (R) Fri.-Thu. 7:45 10:20
TIMES FOR JULY 5 - JULY 11
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 44
If you want your upcoming event listed in SPOTLIGHT’S Out & About section, please send all your relevant data
by e-mail to: editorial@spotlightepnews.com
Out & About
Calendar of upcoming events for el paso/ Southern new mexico are
from July 4th - 11th, 2013
NORTHEAST/
CENTRAL
El Paso Diablos Base-
ball - The American Associa-
tion minor league team’s 2013
season runs through Aug. 25 at
Cohen Stadium in Northeast El
Paso. Tickets: $8 box seats; $7
general admission; free for ages
4 and younger. July 4 tickets
are $10 box seats; $9 general
admission (July 4 games sell
out fast). Information: 755-
2000 or diablos.com.
To get there: take the Patriot
Freeway to the Diana exit.
From Loop 375, turn south on
Kenworthy.
• July 2-5: Laredo Lemurs. In-
dependence Day fireworks are
July 3-5. Children’s Miracle
Network Night is Wednesday,
July 3. Tickets purchased via
the foundation benefit Chil-
dren’s Miracle Network.
• July 6-9: Grand Prairie Air
Hogs
‘All My Sons’ — El Paso
Playhouse, 2501 Montana, be-
gins its 50th anniversary season
with the Arthur Miller play
July 5-27. Directed by Aaron
Hernandez. Showtimes are 8
p.m. Friday and Saturday and 2
p.m. Sunday. Tickets: $10 ($8
seniors, $7 military/students
with ID; $5 students under 18).
Information: 532-1317, elpaso-
playhouse.com.
The story centers on the Keller
Family and tells of the family’s
struggles to come to terms with
the possible death of their eld-
est son and with a terrible se-
cret that could threaten to
change their lives forever. Each
act takes place in a different era
of U.S. history, beginning in the
1930s.
Summer Repertory —
El Paso Community College
Performer’s Studio presents its
2013 Summer Repertory Sea-
son shows during the summer
months at the Transmountain
Campus Forum Theatre on
Hwy 54 (Diana exit). Showtime
is 8 p.m. Thursday through Sat-
urday, 2:30 p.m. Sunday. Pro-
ceeds benefit EPCC
Performance Studies student
scholarships. Tickets: $15 gen-
eral admission; $10 non-EPCC
students; $7 EPCC students/se-
niors. Box office open at 6 p.m.
(1 p.m. for matinees) on show
dates. Information: 831-5056,
637-4029 or epcc.edu.
July 3-7 and 11-14: “A
Funny Thing Happened on
The Way to The Forum,”
Tony-winning musical with
music and lyrics by Stephen
Sondheim, book by Burt
Shevelove and Larry Gelbart.
Directed by Elizabeth Ann
Gaidry. A slave seeks to win his
freedom by finding a way to get
his master the girl of his
dreams.
‘Viva El Paso!’ — The
summertime pageant returns to
McKelligon Canyon Amphithe-
atre for its 36th season 8:30
p.m. Fridays and Saturdays,
through Aug. 10, offering an
array of multicolored costumes,
electrifying musical production
numbers, and legendary charac-
ters. The outdoor musical ex-
travaganza highlights the four
major cultures of the region,
through drama, song and dance,
that have called El Paso home:
Native American, Spanish Con-
quistadors, Mexican and West-
ern American. Director is Jaime
Barba of UTEP Department of
Theatre and Dance.
Tickets:$18- $24 and $18 ($4
off children ages 2-12; $2 off
military and seniors 65 and
older). Group discounts avail-
able for groups of 20 by calling
231-1100, ext. 5. Information:
elpasolive.com.
Dinners served 6:30 to 7:30
p.m.; must be purchased in ad-
vance. by noon Friday the
weekend of the event.
A Spanish-language perform-
ance is Sunday, July 21 and
Aug. 4.
Melodies at the Park
— El Paso Parks and Recre-
ation’s free outdoor music con-
certs are 7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
selected Sunday at various city
parks. Information: 544-0753
or elpasotexas.gov/parks. July
7: Villa at Veterans Park 5301
Salem.
Children’s Miracle
Network Night — The
annual game benefiting El Paso
Children’s Hospital (a Children
Miracle Network Hospital) is
Wednesday, July 3, at Cohen
Stadium in Northeast El Paso.
Gates open at 6 p.m. for pre-
game events followed by the
Diablos vs. Laredo Lemurs and
post-game fireworks. Advance
discount tickets available: $7
box seats; $6 general admission
(available from the University
Medical Foundation). Tickets
purchased via the foundation
benefit Children’s Miracle Net-
work. Information: 521-7229,
ext. 3029 or umcfoundationel-
paso.org/diablos.
The event also includes the
Most Patriotic Baby Contest for
ages 5 and younger, 6 to 7:30
p.m. Contestants must check in
by 5:30 p.m.; open only to
those purchasing game tickets.
‘Pop Goes the Fort’ —
El Paso Symphony Orchestra,
conducted by the orchestra’s
new director Bohuslav Rattay,
will perform patriotic and
Broadway pops music 7:30
p.m. Thursday, July 4, at Fort
Bliss’s Biggs Park. Fireworks
display follows. Hosted by
Bliss’s MWR. Lawn chairs wel-
come; no pets, coolers, glass
containers or alcohol permitted.
MWR will have vendors selling
food, drinks and beer. Admis-
sion is free and the public is
welcome. Information: 532-
3776 or epso.org.
Selections include E.T., Star
Wars Medley, Cole Porter’s
Night and Day, Gould’s Ameri-
can Salute, Anderson’s Blue
Tango, Belle of the Ball and
Buglers Holiday. The concert
will culminate with
Tchaikovsky’s 1812 Overture
and Stars and Stripes Forever
with a 25-minute laser light
show in salute of the soldiers of
Fort Bliss and others who
served in the Armed Forces.
EASTSIDE
East Side 4th of July
Parade — Anyone can join
the 34th annual Independence
Day “People’s Parade” spon-
sored by El Paso Del Norte
Lions Club, beginning at 9 a.m.
Thursday, July 4, starting at
Hanks High School, 2001 Lee
Trevino (at Montwood) and
travels to Yarbrough then north
on Album to Album Park. with
floats, marching units, antique
cars, horses and bicycles are
among the entries. Sponsor-
ships and donations welcome.
Information: 731-1549 or 204-
5206.
This year’s Grand Marshal is
World War II-era Army veteran
Arthur Leeser, and Desert
Storm Army Chief Warrant Of-
ficer 4 (Ret.) Scott Stevens.
MISSION
VALLEY
Leopoldo Cavazos Jr.
Memorial Run — The
5K run and 1-mile run walk is
7:30 a.m. Saturday, July 6, at
Ascarate Park, 6900 Delta, ($1
entrance fee per vehicle into
park). Registration: $20 in ad-
vance ($25 on race day). Teams
of 10 or more (by June 29) are
$15 per member. Online regis-
tration at raceadventuresunlim-
ited.com.
Packet pickup is noon to 6
p.m. Friday, July 5, at Up and
Running, 1475 George Dieter,
and 6:30 to 7:45 a.m. on race
day at the starting line.
Trophies to top male and fe-
male runner in the 5K and to
largest team, and medals to top
three male and female runners
in each age category. Refresh-
ments after race for all partici-
pants.
Under The Sun Tour
— Gin Blossoms, Smash
Mouth, Vertical Horizon, Sugar
Ray and Fastball perform
Thursday, July 4, at the So-
corro Entertainment Center,
11200 Santos Sanchez (off So-
corro Road, 4.5 miles southeast
of Loop 375). Admission is free
for ages 18 and older; $10 for
under 18. Information: 860-
7777 or speakingrockentertain-
ment.com.
Baile Homenaje a Jose
Luis Garcia — The bene-
fit performance veteran local
charro singer Jose Luis is 7
p.m. Wednesday, July 3, at El
Paso County Coliseum, with El
Chapo De Sinaloa and Los
Kumbia Kings. Proceeds help
cover Luis’s hospital and other
expenses. Tickets: $40 (Ticket-
master); VIP tables available
for $750.
Patriotic Celebration
— El Paso Wind Symphony’s
annual Independence Day per-
formance of patriotic music is
7:30 p.m. Thursday, July 4, at
the Chamizal National Memo-
rial amphitheater. The concert
also will introduce the sym-
phony’s new music director,
Conductor Bohuslav Rattay.
A fireworks show follows the
concert. Presented by the Mu-
seum and Cultural Affairs De-
partment of the City of El Paso.
Admission is free. Information:
541-4481, 532-7273 or elpa-
soartsandculture.org.
DOWNTOWN/
WESTSIDE
Ardovino’s Fourth of
July — Ardovino’s Desert
Crossing, One Ardovino Drive
in Sunland Park, will have an
Independence Day celebration
Thursday, July 4, with live
performance by The Vibe. Also
features drink and food spe-
cials, and a great view of area
fireworks displays. Reserva-
tions strongly encouraged. In-
formation: (575) 589-0653, ext.
3 or ardovinos.com.
Fourth of July Family
Festival — Harvest Chris-
tian Center, 1345 New Harvest
Pl. (off Helen of Troy at North-
western) invites the public to its
Independence Day celebration
5-9 p.m .Thursday, July 4,
with carnival rides, music and
fireworks. Admission is free.
Information: hccelpaso.com.
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SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 45
West Side Independ-
ence Day Parade — The
Rotary Club of El Paso’s an-
nual Independence Day parade
begins at 9 a.m. Thursday,
July 4, at Western Hills
Church, 530 Thunderbird. The
2.6-mile parade route will go
from the church down Shadow
Mountain, then up Mesa to
Coronado High School. Infor-
mation: rotarywestelpaso.org.
Fee for entries is $45 ($10
non-profits). Prizes are $1,000
for Best Entry, $500 for Most
Patriotic and $250 for Best De-
sign. To sign up, contact Joanne
Latimer at 581-3333 or westel-
pasorotary@elp.rr.com.
Rim Area Neighbor-
hood parade — The 16th
annual neighborhood parade is
10 a.m. Thursday, July 4,
along Rim Road. Interested par-
ticipants should meet at the cor-
ner of Kerby and Rim at 9:45
a.m. with decorated bikes,
scooters, pets and more. Every-
one is welcome. Patriotic cos-
tume contest held. The 2013
parade Grand Marshal will be
Dr. Richard Teschner. Informa-
tion: Bob Brannon, 545-2935.
‘La Parada’ — The in-
door/outdoor monthly music
series is 8 p.m. Friday, July 5,
at the San Carlos Building, 501
Texas. Admission: $5, ages 18
and older welcome. Informa-
tion: facebook/laparadaep.com.
La Parada is an ongoing
music, art and social party held
the first Friday of the month.
Dean & Dale Tour—
The Surf punk guitarist
Laramie Dean and drummer
Jimmie Dale (son of guitar leg-
end Dick Dale) perform at 8
p.m. Saturday, July 6 with
guests Hardship Anchors and
Los Santanicos at Tricky Falls,
209 S. El Paso. Tickets: $10.
Information: 351-9909 or trick-
yfalls.com.
Downtown Artist and
Farmers Market — The
City of El Paso Museums and
Cultural Affairs Department’s
market for area artists are Sat-
urdays in the Union Plaza Dis-
trict along Anthony Street.
Hours are 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Space for about 53 artists avail-
able each month. Information:
541-4942.
‘In The Heights’ —
UTEP Dinner Theatre closes its
season with the Tony-winning
musical by Lin-Manuel Mi-
randa July 5-21. Showtime is 7
p.m. Wednesday through Satur-
day, with dinner matinee at
1:30 p.m. Sunday, July 7, and
non-dinner matinees at 2:30
p.m. Sunday, July 14 and 21.
Tickets: $45 Friday and Satur-
day; $40 Wednesday, Thursday
and Sunday dinner matinees;
$26 non-dinner matinees ($2
discount for all tickets for
UTEP faculty/staff/ alumni as-
sociation members; group of 20
or more; ages 4-12; non UTEP-
students, military; $10 discount
for UTEP students). Informa-
tion: 747-6060.
Winning four Tonys for 2008,
including Best Musical and
Best Original Score, this urban
musical explores three days in
the lives of New York City’s
Dominican-American Washing-
ton Heights neighborhood,
where the “coffee from the cor-
ner bodega is light and sweet,
the windows are always open
and the breeze carries the
rhythm of three generations of
music.”
Farmer’s Market at
Ardovino’s Desert
Crossing — The 12th an-
nual market runs 7:30 a.m. to
noon Saturdays. This “produc-
ers only” market runs through
mid-October and features qual-
ity farmers, backyard gardeners
and artisans such as organic and
pesticide-free vegetables, lo-
cally-made goat cheeses, natu-
ral free range chickens and
eggs, native plants for home
and yard, fresh-baked breads
and salsas. Only products
grown directly from the pro-
ducer allowed. Information:
(575) 589-0653, ext. 3.
Arabesque 2013 —
Snake Charmer and the Belly
Dancer’s 4th annual gala per-
formance featuring Sharon Ki-
hara and Amaya at 7 p.m.
Saturday, July 6, at Scottish
Rite Temple Theatre, 301 Mis-
souri. Tickets: $15. Informa-
tion: 691-1938 or
snakecharmerandthebelly-
dancer.com.
Both performers will host
workshops Saturday and Sun-
day, July 6-7.
Workshops by Amaya are
“Gypsy Hips on Fire” 9 to
10:30 a.m. and “Star Power” 2
to 3:30 p.m. Saturday. Cost:
$50 each ($90 for both).
Workshops by Kihara are “On
Bated Breath” 10:45 a.m. to
1:45 p.m. Saturday, and “More
Power to You” 9 a.m. to noon
and “Drum Solo” 1 to 3 p.m.
Sunday. Cost: $65 each ($160
for all three):
Japanese Tanabata
Festival — Japanese Crepe
house, 910 E. Reed, Suite E,
hosts its annual family festival
4 to 9 p.m. Sunday, July 7,
with traditional Tanabata cus-
tom of making origami paper
ornaments on bamboo
branches, along with cultural
crafts for kids, Obon dancing,
food, games and music. Admis-
sion is free. Information: 760-
8977 or on facebook at
JapaneseCrepeHouse.
Dancing in the City —
The City of El Paso Museums
and Cultural Affairs Depart-
ment and Conventions and Vis-
itors Bureau present the 4th
annual outdoor dance concerts
8 to 10 p.m. Saturdays at Arts
Festival Plaza, featuring local
and regional performers. Dance
lessons are 7 to 8 p.m. Admis-
sion is free; no outside food or
drinks. Information: 541-4895.
July 6: Sorry About Your Sis-
ter (rockabilly).
Fourth of July Run —
Up and Running, hosts the 7th
annual 5K run/walk 7:04 a.m.
Thursday, July 4, beginning at
Up and Running in the Rudolph
Shopping Plaza, 3233 N. Mesa.
Proceeds benefit Run El Paso
Club. Registration: $20 through
July 2; $25 July 3-4. Informa-
tion: Chris Rowley, 478-5663.
Online registration at racead-
venturesunlimited.com.
Packet pick-up is 11 a.m. to 6
p.m. Wednesday, July 3, and 6
to 6:45 a.m. race day at Up and
Running.
Trophies to top three male and
female overall winners and top
three male and females in age
categories. All runners receive
patriotic tie-dyed t-shirt; sports
drinks, watermelon and hot
dogs after the race.
Alfresco! Fridays —
The 11th season of free outdoor
concerts are 6 p.m. Fridays at
Arts Festival Plaza (between El
Paso Museum of Art and Plaza
Theatre). Presented by the El
Paso Convention and Perform-
ing Arts Centers and the El
Paso Convention and Visitors
Bureau. No outside food or
beverages, or pets allowed. In-
formation: 534-0665 or alfres-
cofridays.com. July 5: Aztec
Zodiac (jazz/funk).
SOUTHERN
NEW MExICO
La Viña Country Pic-
nic — The winery in La
Union, N.M. will host its an-
nual picnic 11:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Thursday, July 4, featuring en-
tertainment by Live By Re-
quest. Food, water, soda, wine
and wine margaritas for sale,
tents and tables set up, croquet,
badminton and a water slide.
Attendees may bring their own
picnic and lawn chairs (no
coolers or pets). Information:
(575) 882-7632 or lavinawin-
ery.com. The winery is at 4201
S. NM Highway 28, one mile
north of Vinton Road.
Continues on next page
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 46
Mescalero Apache
Ceremonial & Rodeo
— The Mescalero Reservation
will host daily Indian dances
and rodeo performances Thurs-
day through Sunday, July 4-7,
on the Mescalero Rodeo
Grounds, in Mescalero, N.M.
Native dances, arts and crafts
and food vendors featured
daily. Main gate opens at 10
a.m. with dances 11:30 a.m. to
7 p.m. Rodeo performances at
1:30 p.m. Admission: $5 for
non-natives. Information: (575)
464-4494.
The annual parade is Saturday
at 10 a.m. with a dance at dusk
at Inn of the Mountain Gods.
Las Cruces Independ-
ence Day celebrations
— The city’s annual Electric
Light Parade and 4th of July
Celebration are July 3-4, with
the annual Electric Light Pa-
rade, Street Fest and fireworks
display. Admission to all events
is free. Information: (575) 541-
2200 or las-cruces.org.
The Electric Light Parade is 9
p.m. Wednesday, beginning at
City Hall, 700 N. Main, down
Water Street to North Main and
Picacho.
The Street Fest is 4 p.m.
Thursday, at Meerscheidt Cen-
ter Complex, 1605 Hadley,
with food and beverage ven-
dors, and live music by The
Family Stone at 6 p.m. and Av-
erage White Band at 7:30 p.m.
The annual Fireworks begins
at 9 p.m. Thursday, followed by
jazz artists Spyro Gyra in con-
cert at 10 p.m.
No pets allowed.
Mesilla Independence
Day — An evening of live
music and fireworks at 9 p.m.
Thursday, July 4, at the his-
toric old Mesilla Plaza in cele-
bration of Independence Day.
Bring a lawn chair. Admission
is free. Information: (575) 524-
3262, ext. 116 or mesilla-
nm.us.
The town’s fireworks display
will be launched from the field
located on Calle de Mercado,
accessed from Avenida de
Mesilla. Spectators may bring
folding chairs for their conven-
ience. No pets and no alcohol
allowed.
Alamogordo Inde-
pendence Day Parade
— The annual Independence
Day Parade is 10 a.m. Thurs-
day, July 4, on 10th Street and
Oregon, ending at New York
Street, in Alamogordo, N.M.
The annual fireworks display is
around 9 p.m., shot from the
New Mexico Museum of Space
History (weather permitting).
Information: (575) 439-4142.
Artesia Independence
Day events — Artesia N.
M. hosts its Forth of July cele-
bration Thursday, July 4, with
sports and family activities, in-
cluding the Firecracker Golf
Scramble, 47th annual DOES
Parade, a concert by Madison
Rising and Sons of Thunder
fireworks extravaganza. Infor-
mation: (575) 746-2744, or
artesiachamber.com.
Carrizozo BBQ and
Fireworks — The village
of Carrizozo’s annual fireworks
display at dusk Thursday, July
4, at Valle Del Sol, 6634 US
380. with deep pit brisket bar-
beque served 5 to 8 p.m. Pro-
ceeds benefit the Carrizozo
Christmas Luminaria Fund.
Dinner tickets: $7 in advance;
$8 at the gate; available at Car-
rizozo Mountain Hardware,
Carrizozo Market and the Car-
rizozo and Ruidoso Chambers
of Commerce. Admission free
for fireworks. Information:
(575) 430-4248.
Cloudcroft Independ-
ence Day — The Village of
Cloudcroft, N.M. celebrates In-
dependence Day with Family
Fun Games Saturday and Sun-
day, July 6-7, at Zenith Park,
including a pie auction on Sun-
day. Admission is free. Infor-
mation: (575) 682-2733,
1-866-874-4447 or
cloudcroft.net.
• The Fourth of July parade at 2
p.m. Thursday, July 4, on
Hwy 82 and Burro.
• Open-air melodramas of “Big
Bad (or A Hairy Tale)” by the
Cloudcroft Light Opera Com-
pany are 7:30 p.m. Friday and
Saturday, July 5-6, in the
Zenith Park Pavilion. Admis-
sion is free.
Silver City Independ-
ence Day — The annual pa-
rade is 10 a.m. Thursday, July
4, along Bullard Street. The an-
nual Ice Cream Social and cake
walk is 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thurs-
day, July 4, at the Silver City
Museum parking lot with hot
and cool treats, free historic
games and live entertainment.
Information: (575) 538-3785 or
silvercity.org.
Socorro Independence
Day — The City of Socorro,
N.M. will host the 21st annual
celebration 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.
Thursday, July 4, on the New
Mexico Tech campus near the
Macey Center, One Olive Lane,
featuring New Mexico bands,
NM Tech’s famous fireworks
display at around 9:30 p.m.,
children’s activities, a barbeque
and vendor and snack booths.
Admission is free. Information:
nmtpas.org.
Headliners Al Hurricane and
Al Hurricane, Jr. perform at 6
p.m. with continuous music and
El Gringo, the Clan Tynker, So-
corro Community Band, Doug
Figgs and the Cowboy Way,
Suavecito, martial art demon-
strations and more.
Elephant Butte Inde-
pendence Day — Ele-
phant Butte Lake State Park’s
Independence Day fireworks
are 9 p.m. Saturday, July 6.
The display is launched from
Rattlesnake Island in the lake,
and can be viewed from the
beach or on a boat. Admission
fees waived 6 to 9 p.m. that
day. Information: (575) 744-
5923.
Smokey Bear Stam-
pede — The 57th annual cel-
ebration is July 4-7 in Capitan,
about 20 miles north of Rui-
doso. Rodeos begin at 7 p.m.
each night, with nightly dances
are 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. on the fair-
grounds. Fireworks follow July
4 rodeo performance. Admis-
sion:$10; $5 for dance. Infor-
mation: (575) 354-2202.
The annual Smokey Bear
Stampede Parade is 10 a.m.
Thursday, July 4, on Bear Blvd.
Roswell UFO Festival
2013 — The annual celebra-
tion, marking the 66th anniver-
sary of the 1947 “UFO crash”
near Roswell, is Thursday
through Sunday, July 4-7, at
the Roswell Convention and
Visitors Center and other loca-
tions in Roswell, N.M. The
four-day event features guest
speakers, celebrity appearances
authors, vendors, live entertain-
ment, family-friendly activities
and carnivals, as well as cos-
tume contests for adults, chil-
dren and pets. Most events are
free; nominal charge for UFO
Museum admission. Informa-
tion: 1-800-822-3545 or ufofes-
tivalroswell.com.
The Lettermen — The
vocal group celebrates more
than 50 years of hits at 8 p.m.
Friday, July 5, at the Spencer
Theater for Performing Arts,
Airport Hwy 220 in Alto, N.M.
(about 12 miles north of down-
town Ruidoso). The Lettermen
have accumulated nine gold al-
bums for hits like “The Way
You Look Tonight,” “When I
Fall In Love,” “Put Your Head
on My Shoulder” and more.
Tickets: $76 and $79. Informa-
tion: (575) 336-4800, (888)
818-7872 or
spencertheater.com.
Inn of the Mountain Gods
Resort and Casino —
Mescalero, N.M. Shows begin
at 8 p.m. Age 21 and older ad-
mitted. Tickets sold through
Ticketmaster; prices listed do
not include service charge. In-
formation: 1-877-277-5677 or
innofthemountaingods.com.
• Baby Bash with
guest MC Magic — The
hip hop artists perform Friday,
July 5, with Royal T, Lil Ban-
dit and Mr. Sancho. Baby Bash
is know for his mega rap hits
like “Suga Suga,” “Cyclone,”
“Baby I’m Back (featuring
Akon) and more. Tickets: $20-
$65.
• Highwaymen Tribute Show
— The music tribute to the out-
law country supergroup is 1
p.m. Sunday, July 7. Tickets:
$50. Continues on page 49
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 47
!


1he clLy of Caracas, wlLh lLs chaos, crowds and lnnaLe urban elemenLs, has
nurLured Lhe creaLlvlLy of four youngsLers who needed Lo volce Lhelr
emoLlons and feellngs as Lhey were looklng Lo overcome Lhe economlc and
pollLlc obsLacles ln Lhelr LranslLlon Lo adulLhood. ln Lhls scenarlo, LaLln
Crammy wlnnlng rock band vlnlLCvL8SuS declded Lo add a Lhrllllng
chapLer Lo Lhe hlsLory of rock muslc ln Lhelr naLlve venezuela.
8odrlgo Consalves (vocals and CulLar), Adrlán Salas (8ass and backlng
vocals), !uan vlcLor 8ellsarlo (8ass backlng vocals) and Mangan Crlando
MarLlnez (urums) formed vlnlLCvL8SuS back ln 2006. 1haL same year, Lhe
band won Lhe 'new 8ands lesL' wlLh a surprlslng and capLlvaLlng
slgnaLure sound LhaL fused classlc rock wlLh modern rhyLhms.
ln 2007, vlnlLCvL8SuS released Lhe debuL album 'Ll ula esPoy' !"#$%&'()'
*+,'-%&., whlch earned recognlLlon from speclallzed medla LhaL labeled Lhe
band as 'Lhe greaLesL new group ln venezuelan 8ock Loday'. 1hls Cu was
produced by Lhe renowned 8udy Þaglluca and Lhe flrsL slngle
ºulrecLo al Crano" !/0*'*#'*+,'/+%),. hlL Lhe alrwaves ln venezuela and was
even lncluded ln Lhe offlclal soundLrack of Lhe movle
'Þuras !oylLas' !1,%*'2,3,4). whlle slngle hlLs 'uos SecreLos' !"3#'
5,67,*).8 'nada numero 2' !1#*'9:.and 'Acelera' !5;,,$'<;. landed 1op 1en
poslLlons ln Lhe radlo charLs.
Cne year laLer, vlnlLCvL8SuS Loured Spaln ln supporL of Lhe dlglLal release
of 'Ll ula es Poy', whlch reached l1unes' leaLured new ArLlsLs -Lurope
SecLlon, and rocked Madrld, 8llbao and 8arcelona. uurlng Lhelr vlslL ln
8arcelona Lhe band also recorded Lhe vldeo of hlL slngle 'Cocalna'!/#6%(=,..
ln 2009, Lhe four-plece acL Loured Lhe u.S. and shared Lhe sLage wlLh LaLln
Clam 8ock legends 8abasonlcos aL LA's nokla 1heaLer. vlnlLCvL8SuS also
played Lhe legendary SxSW lesLlval ln AusLln, 1exas, and played ln Lhe clLy
of Mlaml. 8ack ln venezuela, LhaL same year Lhe group headllned
Lhe fesLlval 'Þor Ll Medlo ue LaCalle' performlng before a 6,000-
audlence, and conLrlbuLed Lo 'Alza Lu voz' an AmnesLy lnLernaLlonal Cu.
ln CcLober 2010, vlnlLCvL8SuS rocked Lhe legendary Þolledro de
Caracas, one of Lhe mosL legendary concerL venues ln norLhern SouLh
Amerlca. 1here, Lhey shared Lhe sLage wlLh nlne lnch nalls as parL of
nln's LlghLs ln 1he Sky 1our. lL was also ln 2010 LhaL Lhe group klcked off
Lhe recordlng process of Lhe follow up Lo Lhelr promlslng debuL album.
'Sl no nos MaLa' !>?'>*'-#,)=@*'A(44'<). came ouL LhaL same year and recelved
one LaLln Crammy nomlnaLlon for '8esL 8ock Album'-LaLln Amerlcan
legends CusLavo CeraLl and Andres Calamaro were also nomlnaLed ln LhaL
same caLegory. 1he flrsL slngles, 'Llámame y uesaparezco' !/%44'%=$'>@44'B,'
C#=,., '!uega 8len 1us CarLas' !D4%&'E#07'/%7$)'/%7,?044&. and 'Amnesla
lnvocada' !>=F#G,$'HI=,)(%. cllmbed Lo Lhe Lop of Lhe naLlonal charLs. 1he
band also Loured venezuela, Lhe u.S., Colombla and Mexlco ln supporL of
Lhls new release.
2012 album 'Camble de nombre' !>'/+%=J,$'K&'1%I,. sold over 13,000
coples, recelved a nomlnaLlon Lo Lhe 2012 LaLln Crammy Award for '8esL
8ock Album', and won ln Lhe caLegory '8esL Þackaglng' along wlLh
deslgner MASA. 1hls album also provlded Lhe band wlLh 2 Þepsl Muslc
Awards Lhls year. llrsL slngles off Lhe album were '?unque",
'1u Amblclon' !E#07'HIB(*(#=. and 'Ares.'
WlLh an lnnovaLlve fuslon of hypnoLlc beaLs, poLenL bass llnes, sharp and
flerce rlffs, and hearLfelL and deflanL lyrlcs-sung by Lhe rebelllous volce of
fronL man 8odrlgo Consalves, vlnlLCvL8SuS conLlnues Lo brlng venezuelan
rock muslc Lo a whole new level.

"#$#%&"'()*)!&$%#$'!
www.vlnlloversus.com
lacebook.com/vlnlloversus
1wlLLer.com/vlnlloversus
lnsLagram: [vlnlloversus
!
!
The El Paso Playhouse presents
50 years of live community theater
El Paso, Texas – The El Paso
Playhouse will enter its 50th
Season, starting July 5, 2013
and running through May 31,
2014. Throughout the season we
will feature familiar and not-so
familiar plays, talented local ac-
tors, students, artists, technicians
and theater lovers who have
made the Playhouse the longest,
performing community theater in
the El Paso area.
The El Paso Playhouse is proud
to kick-off our Golden Anniver-
sary on July 5th with Arthur
Miller’s renowned classic All My
Sons, directed by local resident
Aaron Hernandez. Miller’s sad
Post-World War II drama con-
tains both American family val-
ues and patriotism while
concealing secrets that can de-
stroy the “American Dream”.
Miller’s drama received the New
York Drama Critics Circle Award
for Best Play in 1947.
“The El Paso Playhouse, the little
community theater that could,
turns 50. Heck, that's as old as
the Rolling Stones! Who, by the
way, won't be playing here on
their "50 & Counting" tour.
Sigh.” – Doug Pullen,
El Paso Times
Located at 2501 Montana Avenue
- Opening nights offer a recep-
tion with free finger foods and
desserts to our patrons with the
purchase of a ticket. Ticket prices
are as follows: $10 for general
admission, $8, seniors (62+), $7,
students and military, and groups
of ten or more, $7 each. Show-
times are Fridays and Saturdays
at 8 PM and Sunday matinees at
2 PM.
The El Paso Playhouse:
The El Paso Playhouse is a com-
munity theatre that provides en-
tertainment and educational
experiences to a diverse multicul-
tural population through the high
quality production of plays and
theatrical events. The Playhouse
provides a venue for artists, tech-
nicians, patrons and community
members to participate in the
arts through regularly scheduled
season productions, children’s
performances and holiday per-
formances. We have lived off of
the participation of our volun-
teers, patrons and on-going sup-
port from the community over the
past half a century.
********
50th Season Anniversary of the
El Paso Playhouse: "All My
Sons" by Arthur Miller July 5-
27, 2013 Directed Aaron Hernan-
dez "All In The Timing" by
David Ives August 2-4,
2013 Directed by Robert
Slack "Odd Couple" (Female
Version) Aug 16-Sept 7,
2013 Directed by Darci
Georges "Night of the Living
Dead" by Lori Allen Ohm
Sept 27-Oct 27, 2013 Directed
by Moy Hinojos Special Per-
formance on Oct 31 "Beyond
Therapy" by Christopher Durang
November 8-30, 2013 Directed
by Kevin Mullin "The Best
Christmas Pageant Ever" by Bar-
bara Robinson
Dec 6-22, 2013 Directed by
Rachel Mullins "Spider's Web"
by Agatha Christie January 3-
25, 2014 Directed by Alexander
Wright "Three Viewings" by Jef-
frey Hatcher Jan 31-Feb 2,
2014 Directed by Ivan San-
dlin "Almost, Maine" by John
Cariani Feb 14-March 8,
2014 Directed by Corey
Dlask "Dial ‘M’ for Murder" by
Fredrick Knott March 28-April
19, 2014 Directed by Erika
Moeller "Deathtrap" by Ira
Levin May 9-31, 2014 Directed
by Vanessa Keyser
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 48
DJ Spotlight | Quintino
Quintino is one of the true DJ’s
with a lifelong passion for dance
music and on the verge of becom-
ing one of the leading forces in
the global music scene today. His
high profile work with the likes of
Tiësto and Afrojack has made him
a household name and his excel-
lent DJ sets across the globe
have made his position a highly
respected name in the scene.
Quintino was born in Den Helder
in 1985. He started DJing at the
age of 15. When he was only 18,
he was discovered by Laidback
Luke, Quintino started to take his
stature as a DJ and producer be-
yond the normal club scene, play-
ing landmark gigs and high profile
festivals. Highlights include per-
forming at Mansion and LIV in
Miami, Pacha in New York, XS in
Las Vegas and multiple tours in
Europe and Asia. A life-changing
break came in 2009 when he re-
leased a remix of Cidinho &
Doca’s ‘Rap Das Armas’, which
became a worldwide summer an-
them and notched over 10 million
YouTube views. That same year
Quintino released the singles
‘Heaven’ and ‘You Can’t Deny’
and made clear he will be around
to stay as an artist as well.
When Afrojack initiated a team of
aspiring DJs and producers for his
imprint Wall Recordings in 2011, it
didn’t take long for him to ap-
proach his long-time DJ friend
Quintino for a musical collabora-
tion. Afrojack and Quintino live up
to their reputation as creators of
crowd pleasing records with
their first collaborative re-
lease; ‘Selecta’. Quickly
followed by the second
single, ‘Raider’ – both
on Wall Recordings.
In the summer of
2011, Quintino de-
cided to join
forces with San-
dro Silva and
continued his
ascent into
the Dutch
Dance Music
elite with the
release of
‘Epic’ on Tiësto’s ‘Musical
Freedom’ label. The sin-
gle topped
DMC’s
Buz-
zchart, en-
tered the
top five of
the Beatport
Top 100 and
hit the #1
position of
the Dutch charts. Smashing
clubs, ‘Epic’ was quickly added
to the record cases of Tiësto
and the Swedish House Mafia.
The following months, ‘Epic’ re-
mained at the top of the charts,
selling enough copies to gain plat-
inum status in the Netherlands.
Quintino demonstrated that he
thinks big in everything he deliv-
ers. He kept up the pace after the
massive success of ‘Epic’ and re-
turned on Musical Freedom and
Wall Recordings. In January 2012
Tiësto presented ‘We Gonna
Rock’ on his label as Quintino’s
follow up for ‘Epic’. ‘The One and
Only’ appeared on Afrojack’s im-
print as well as a new collabora-
tion with MOTI, called ‘Circuits’.
In between producing and releas-
ing songs, Quintino keeps per-
forming worldwide with an
estimate of 250 gigs a year reaf-
firming many future successes for
him.
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 49
P
IC
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S
F
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IL
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Nightlife calendar
July 9th
Daughn Gibson - Me Moan
Editors - The Weight Of Your Love
Hebronix - Unreal
Letlive - Blackest Beautiful
Like Moths To Flames - An Eye For An Eye
Maps - Vicissitude
Mount Eerie - Live in Bloomington, September 30th, 2011
Octopus Project - Fever Forms
Preservation Hall Jazz Band - That's It!
Robert Pollard - Honey Locust Honky Tonk
Scud Mountain Boys - Do You Love The Sun
Skylar Grey - Don't Look Down
Thundercat - Apocalypse
Music Releases
July 20th
Holy Ghost @Lowbrow Palace
July 26th
Duke Dumont
@lowbrow Palace
August 1st
Sun City Music Festival @Ascarate Park
August 22nd
Simian Mobile Disco @Lowbrow Palace
Continued from page 46
Tailgate 2013 — The annual outdoor concert series in
Alamogordo, N.M., raises funds for the Flickinger Center.
Concerts begin at 8 p.m. on various Saturdays throughout the
summer in the upper parking lot at the New Mexico Museum
of Space History. Patrons should bring their own food, lawn
chair and beverages. Gates open 6:45 to 7:45 p.m. Weekly
spaces available for $40 on limited basis. Walk-up admission:
$15. Information: (575) 437-2202. Online reservations at
flickingercenter.com. July 6: 24/7 Blues Band. Tailgate theme
is “Red, White and Blues”
Party in the Plaza — The midtown shopping event in
Ruidoso, N.M. is 6 to 9 p.m. Saturday, July 6, in Timesquare
Plaza, 2501 Sudderth. Admission is free. Information: rui-
dosonow.com.
‘Venus in Fur’ — Lo-fi Productions presents the erotic
drama by David Ives, at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, June 28-
July 13, at the NMSU Readers Theatre (across the parking lot
from University Barnes & Noble) in Las Cruces. Directed by
Michael Wise. Admission: $7. Information: (575) 650-3496.
A beleaguered playwright/director is desperate to find an ac-
tress to play Vanda, the female lead in his adaptation of the
classic sadomasochistic tale ”Venus in Fur.” Into his empty au-
dition room walks a vulgar and equally desperate actress —
oddly enough, named Vanda. As the two work through the
script, they blur the line between play and reality, entering into
an increasingly serious game of submission and domination
that only one of them can win.
Independence Day Run — The City of Las Cruces’
annual 8K run and 1-mile fun run is 6 a.m. Thursday, July 4,
on the Triviz multi-purpose path in Las Cruces. Registration
begins at 6 a.m. with fun run at 6:40 a.m. and 8K at 7 a.m.
Entry fee: $15 (by June 29) for 8K; $20 on race day. Fun Run
fee: $10. Information: (575) 541-2550. Registration forms
available online at las-cruces.org (under Parks and Recreation
Department Special Events).
T-shirts awarded to all participants; plaques given to each age
category winner for the 8K Run and to the 1st place overall fe-
male/male for the Fun Run.
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 50
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 51
Golf
IT’S GOOD FOR YOUR GAME
Insider
By T.J. TOMASI
GOLF SPOKEN HERE
ASK THE PRO
Keep thy width
Many elements of the golf swing create power.
The length, the speed and the solidness of con-
tact are three, but also on the list is one you don’t
hear much about: width. When you extend your
hands as far as possible away from the center of
rotation during the swing, you increase the me-
chanical advantage of the system, and that spells
more power.
The key for maximum width is to make sure
your lead arm is fully extended away from your
upper swing center located about halfway down
your sternum (breast bone), just below your
throat. This extension not only maximizes the
length of the lever (visualize a wrecking ball
with a long arm), but also encourages center con-
tact at impact by preserving the radius during
your swing. If you strike the ball a quarter of an
inch off-center, you can lose about 10 percent in
distance, a power failure that can be nothing but
bad.
To create and then maintain width, first arrive at
the top of your swing with your hands as far
away from the center of your chest as you can.
Next, you must start down by shifting your
weight to your front foot. If you simply swivel
your shoulders toward the ball, your width is
lost.
The last step in your width-maintenance program
is to do nothing. And this is by far the hardest
thing to do.
Annika Sorenstam was one of the longest driv-
ers on the LPGA Tour. Here she shows why. She
has turned her hips about half as much as her
shoulders, causing a body torque that will be
turned into clubhead speed at impact. Also notice
how straight her left arm is while she keeps her
hands as far away as possible from the center of
her chest. This maximum width keeps all the other
power moves in sync.
In contrast to Annika, here I’m posing in the
all-too-common position of those who mistak-
enly collapse their lead arm and allow their
hands to approach their head. I have arc length
without arc width. By sacrificing width for
length, I will never maximize my power.
Give yourself a good talking-to
Usually, a brain injury is a bad
thing, but not always. I reported
before about the real-life expe-
rience of 42-year-old Jason
Padgett, who was kicked in the
head during a mugging and, as
a result, is now a geometry ge-
nius who sees his world in
mathematical formulas. Padgett
had no previous background in
geometry. He’s a college
dropout who recently worked
in a futon store.
And then there is the strange
case of Leanne Rowe, who
after a car accident, awoke
speaking with a French accent.
She is Australian. Rowe has a
rare condition called Foreign
Accent Syndrome, of which
there are only about 100 known
cases, including an English
woman speaking cockney Eng-
lish with a Chinese accent. It
must sound like golf announcer
Nick Faldo when he gets ex-
cited.
The point is that talking with
accents that don’t fit is stressful
for those with the condition,
making it difficult for them to
take themselves seriously. But
on the bright side, it is possible
to use this “out-of-context ef-
fect” when it comes to your
self-talk in golf.
For example, when you catch
yourself in “nega-talk,” change
your accent. Use a
Southern drawl, or
make your internal
voice sound like Babu,
the Pakistani restaura-
teur Jerry Seinfeld inad-
vertently had deported
in one episode of “Sein-
feld.” Who can stay
mad when your Babu
voice says, “You are a
very bad bad golfer,
Jerry, very bad.”
Whichever foreign accent you
use, soon your nega-talk will
become so ridiculous that you
can’t take yourself seriously,
and once you do that, your self-
talk is no longer a threat, no
matter what the content. The
good thing about this interven-
tion is that you don’t have to
suffer an accident to acquire a
Chinese accent with a cockney
twang.
THE GOLF DOCTOR
Bling swing
I remember when Arnold
Schwarzenegger paid $750,000 for
Jack Kennedy’s old canvas carry bag
containing some rusty clubs. When a
member of the news media asked
how he could pay that much, he said
it was “chump change.” I found out
months later that the deal included a
dozen 1954 golf balls, but still,
$750,000 is boffo dinero.
So what should we call the mere
$75,000 Jack Nicholson recently paid
for a 14-club platinum-and-gold set
from high-end Japanese manufacturer
Honma? How about “small potatoes,”
for the biggest spud in the patch.
BIRDIES AND BOGEYS
ABOUT THE WRITER
Dr. t.J. tomasi is
a teaching pro-
fessional in port
St. Lucie, Fla.
Visit hiswebsite
at
tomasigolf.com.
Where to hold
bench press bar
Q: I know you recommend the bench press as a golf work-
out, but I’m not sure how to hold the bar. Does it matter?
— B.M.
A: Yes, it matters. First let me clarify my advice. What I
said was that if you had only 20 minutes to work out, the
two best exercises are the squat for the lower body and the
bench press for the upper.
The biggest mistake is spreading your hands too far apart
on the bar. This brings into play the shoulder muscles, but
at a bad angle, so you risk injury. Unless you’re very expe-
rienced, space your hands so they line up under your
shoulders.
(To Ask the Pro a question about golf, email him at:
pblion@aol.com.)
Bail
out
To play a shot away from
trouble to a “safe” part of
the course.
“You could set Merion up to
where 10 over par would win,
and you could set Merion up
where 10 under would win.”
— Jim Furyk
QUOTE OF THE WEEK
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 52
Best players use
selective amnesia
Great players such as Jack Nicklaus,
Tom Watson and Hale Irwin have
learned the secret to golf: Golf is
not played the way it’s learned.
Once you’ve learned your golf
swing, you’ve got to forget it and go
play a target game called “golf.”
One of the major reasons golf is so
hard is that golfers are thinking
about their right elbow, their weight
shift or what their hands are doing
while they swing. They’re trying to
remember everything in the half-
second it takes to make a down-
swing. So great players employ
what I call “selective amnesia” —
they are great at forgetting.
Tiger Woods describes his early
training with mental coach Jay
Brunza, training that shaped Tiger
into one of the most dominant ath-
letes in history, this way: “It (mental
focus training) helped me under-
stand a different part of my creativ-
ity. I know I was there, but I don’t
remember the golf shots.”
Brunza explains: “The athlete in the
peak performance zone is in a
heightened state of awareness and
absorbed focus … letting the per-
formance happen rather than think-
ing about and helping the
performance happen.”
This mental power technique was
present early in Tiger’s career, but
now, when it really counts, Tiger is
making the same mistake as any
weekend hacker. For example, he
blamed his collapse in the last PGA
Championship on thinking too little
about swing mechanics — yes, too
little.
“I went ahead and played by feel,”
Tiger said. “It cost me the whole
round.”
This is the voice of a player mired
in swing mechanics, a player who
has to think about every detail of his
swing because he doesn’t own it
yet. Tiger’s game comes and goes
because it isn’t “his game.” He’s
playing “conscious golf.”
Why is that not good? Research
shows that the downswing is so fast
no one can react soon enough to
make accurate, conscious adjust-
ments. Manipulators are doomed to
mistime their manipulation.
Compare his current cascade of ma-
nipulation to what Tiger was think-
ing about in 2000, when he was the
most dominant golfer ever:
“I get so entrenched in the moment
that my subconscious takes over. I
remember walking into the shot,
then I don’t remember anything
until I see the ball leave. … I get out
of the way because of the training.”
This blackout period is the ultimate
in hyper-focus, when your con-
scious mind is sealed up during exe-
cution and the swing is handed over
to your unconscious competence.
Recently, Tiger has started to return
to form. His shots are better, but
under maximum pressure, his brain-
running is mediocre. The success of
his journey from dominant to dor-
mant and back again depends, not
on swing mechanics, but on how
well he runs his brain.
TEEING OFF
Mr. Nice Guy
Rocco Mediate, speaking on the Golf Channel, told viewers about
the time (2009) he asked Tiger to autograph a pin sheet plus a
photo of the two of them from the momentous playoff when Tiger
beat him for the U.S. Open title. He got the autograph, but with no
inscription and no signature on the pin sheet, so, according to
Rocco, he threw them both in the trashcan.
“That tells the story,” Mediate said. “Why wouldn’t he … sign my
pin sheet, so I could put the damn thing on my wall and say, ‘I al-
most got the guy that day”?
BIRDIES AND BOGEYS
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 53
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Golfer gets the support
he needs
A team of engineering students at California
Polytechnic State University has designed a
golf device that allows a disabled player
with limited leg movement to produce a bal-
anced golf swing. Now it just needs a man-
ufacturer.
The device was designed around the needs of
Dr. Joshua Pate, a professor at James Madison
University and avid golfer, who has cerebral
palsy that limits his lower-body mobility. Pate
took up the game as a teenager and plays with
his left hand while supporting himself with a
crutch in his right hand.
What the students came up with is “a de-
vice that physically supports a golfer while
walking from a golf cart to his ball, and
stabilizes him while swinging a golf club.”
Their fascinating study chronicles the entire
process of development from initial brain-
storming, to materials and their assembly, plus
it provides the blueprints for someone who
wants to build the device or have it built. The
materials cost an estimated total of $550, and
the aid is fully adjustable.
The team concludes: “The result of this project
is a fully functioning crutch seat … to help Dr.
Josh Pate better enjoy playing the game of
golf. Hopefully the success of this project will
encourage others with similar difficulties to
pick up the game and start playing.”
DON’T MISS IT
My prediction that 9 under
would be the winning score
at this year’s U.S. Open
was right. Yes, I know that
1 over actually won, but if
someone had shot 9 under,
he would have won, so
using my best government
“under oath” spin, I told the
truth. At worst, I misspoke.
But as wrong as my predic-
tion was, I enjoyed watch-
ing a skilled ball striker like
Justin Rose win the tourna-
ment instead of a bomb-
and-gouger who hits it like
a popcorn machine, then
blasts it out of the gunk,
hits four trees, gets a free
drop, and makes a 30-
footer.
Insider Takeaway:
Although it’s been
more than 30
years since a
major was played there,
you still can’t abuse
Merion, even at 6,996
yards. The average score
during the championship
ended up being 74.54.
GOLF BY THE NUMBERS
Winning at
Merion
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 54
NEXT
UP...
SPRINT CUP
CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS NATIONWIDE SERIES
Race: Coke Zero 400
Where: Daytona International Speedway
When: Saturday, 7:30 p.m. (ET)
TV: TNT
2012 Winner: Tony Stewart (right)
Race: Firecracker 250
Where: Daytona International Speedway
When: Friday, 7:30 p.m. (ET)
TV: ESPN
2012 Winner: Kurt Busch
Race: American Ethanol 200
Where: Iowa Speedway
When: July 13, 8:30 p.m. (ET)
TV: SPEED
2012 Winner: Timothy Peters
Matt Kenseth uses late rally to win
Quaker State 400 at Kentucky Speedway
Recent NASCAR history has shown that if Matt
Kenseth is put in position to win a race late in the
going, the odds are pretty good that he’ll deliver.
He did just that in Sunday’s rain-de-
layed Quaker State 400 at Kentucky Speedway.
His crew chief, Jason Ratcliff, took a gamble by
not taking tires on their final pit stop. The move
put Kenseth out front for the restart, and he drove
away from the field to score his 28th career
Sprint Cup victory and his league-leading fourth
of 2013.
In his winner’s interview, Kenseth
praised Ratcliff for the bold strategy, calling it a
“great call.”
“It was the only one that gave us a
chance to win the race,” he said.
A strategy decision was about the only
thing that could derail Jimmie Johnson and his
No. 48 Chevrolet. They were the class of the field
as Johnson dominated much of the race, leading
182 laps.
But a Lap 243 caution flag for Brian
Vickers’ crash sent the leaders to pit road, and
Ratcliff elected to go with a gas-only stop, which
put his driver in the lead, but at a disadvantage to
Johnson and the other competitors, who took
gasoline and either two or four fresh tires.
On the restart, Johnson, who took two
tires, spun entering Turn One. He wound up
changing four tires and raced his way from the
back of the pack to finish ninth, while Kenseth
used the aerodynamic advantage of the clean air
out front to hold off Jamie McMurray and Clint
Bowyer for the victory.
Afterward, Johnson told reporters that
Kenseth didn’t handle the fateful restart accord-
ing to the rules.
“The No. 20 [Kenseth] broke the pace
car speed, which you aren’t supposed to, but,
[NASCAR officials] aren’t calling guys on that,
so I need to start trying that in the future,” said
Johnson, who also has questioned NASCAR’s of-
ficiating of restarts in recent races at Dover and
Michigan.
Kenseth said he did nothing wrong.
“I have no idea what happened or what
happened to [Johnson] or what I possibly could
have done to upset him,” he said. “I think you
can look through data and see I didn’t slow
down.”
But Kenseth said he understands John-
son’s dismay over the situation.
“I certainly didn’t feel like I did any-
thing wrong from where I was, but after dominat-
ing all day and you have a problem at the end ... I
imagine it’s frustrating.
“We’ve been there, too.”
Kenseth also pointed out in his win-
ner’s interview that Johnson and his No. 48
Chevrolet are going to be stiff competition over
the second half of the season, including the 10-
race, season-ending Chase for the Sprint Cup.
That means Kenseth and his crew won’t be able
to rest on the laurels of their four wins to date.
“We know we have to continue to get
better,” he said. “We are really, really good, but
you always have to continue to get better.
“Hopefully, we’ll be running how
we’re running, or even get better, and going into
the Chase, hopefully we can give [Johnson’s
team] a run for their money.
“That’s what the plan is.”
Sprint Cup driver Matt Kenseth, right, and crew chief Jason Ratcliff celebrate their win
in the Quaker State 400.
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Kenseth drives away from the field to win
the Quaker State 400 at Kentucky Speed-
way.
Points leader Jimmie
Johnson works the
Chase for the Sprint
Cup formula to his
advantage
Despite his late-race troubles at Ken-
tucky Speedway, five-time Sprint Cup
champion Jimmie Johnson is atop the
points standings as nASCAr’s pre-
mier circuit heads back to Daytona In-
ternational Speedway this week for
the traditional start of the second half
of the season.
But under the new points for-
mula, including the Chase format,
being the points leader at this stage
of the season isn’t quite the same as
it was back in the day when the se-
ries championship was determined by
a season-long formula in which all
races counted equally toward the title.
now, as the Cup drivers get
ready for the Coke Zero 400 at Day-
tona, the more important thing cham-
pionship-wise is that there are nine
races left to run before the start of the
10-race Chase to the championship.
After the end of the “regular
season” at richmond International
raceway on Sept. 7, the points will
be reset, with the Chase contenders
all starting with only their bonus
points for winning regular-season
races separating them in the stand-
ings. For the top 10 drivers, each reg-
ular-season win is worth three points.
For the two wild-card Chase drivers,
no bonus points are available.
Continues on page 56
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 55
By Christopher A. Randazzo
Final C6 Corvette goes out in style
At the same time all the excite-
ment is brewing about the all-
new 2014 Corvette Stingray, or
the C7 for it being the seventh
generation in the car’s colorful
history, Chevrolet is bidding
farewell to the C6 Corvette in a
big way. Not only is this model
year Corvette the final year for
this generation, it’s also special
in that it celebrates 60 years of
America’s favorite sports car.
To mark the celebration,
Chevrolet is offering a 60th An-
niversary Design package that
includes an Arctic White exte-
rior and Blue Diamond leather-
wrapped interior with suede
accents. Full racing strips in
Pearl Silver Blue are optional.
Also special for this year is the
debut of the 427 Convertible
Collector Edition. This adds the
Corvette Z06’s powerful 505 hp
7.0 liter V8 engine (427 cubic
inches, hence the name) to the
convertible body style. This is
the first time a Z06 has gone
topless.
For 2013, the ultimate C6
Corvette, the ZR1, continues
on. Dishing out 638 hp and 604
lb-ft of torque from its 6.2 liter
supercharged V8, the ZR1
holds bragging rights as being
the most powerful production
Corvette built by Chevy.
For my last hurrah in a C6
Corvette, GM sent me a white
Corvette Grand Sport Coupe.
The Grand Sport has the mean,
aggressive look of the Z06 –
but the powerplant of the base
Corvette.
Under the hood of all base and
Grand Sport Corvettes lies the
LS3 engine – a 6.2 liter V8 that
makes 430 horsepower with the
standard exhaust system or 436
horsepower with the optional
exhaust system. If you like the
sound of a high-powered ma-
chine, opt for the latter – it
changes the exhaust note of the
engine from a growl to a roar
when you romp on the gas.
The tester was fitted with the
optional exhaust as well as the
six-speed automatic transmis-
sion with paddle shifters. As
with all base and Grand Sport
coupes, the Corvette features a
standard removable roof panel.
Just undoing three simple
latches lets you enjoy the open-
air driving experience.
Slide in the seat of this Ameri-
can icon, push the green lighted
‘start’ button and the wonderful
orchestra of eight cylinders
beating in perfect rhythm will
exit out of the four chrome ex-
haust pipes.
Continues on next page
TV analyst Kyle Petty set off a furious debate last week when
he said during an interview on Speed’s NASCAR RaceHub pro-
gram that Danica Patrick is “still not a race car driver.”
Petty said his father, NASCAR’s all-time win leader
Richard Petty, has long pointed out that there is a difference be-
tween people who can drive fast and those who are race drivers,
the difference being that race drivers have the superior skills
and instincts needed to maximize the performance of their cars
and win more than their share of races.
Petty said Patrick “can go fast, but she can’t race. I
think she’s come a long way, but she’s still not a race-car driver.
And I don’t think she’s ever going to be a race-car driver.”
Patrick, like most drivers who have come to the Cup
series from open-wheel Indy car-style racing, has struggled for
the most part this season. Other than a strong eighth-place run
in the Daytona 500, she’s finished outside the top 10 every
week and has an average finish of 25.6.
Interestingly, Petty, an eight-time winner on the Cup
circuit as a driver, also said he wasn’t in the great race-driver
category.
“I was not a great driver, and I’ll be the first to admit
it,” he said. “I was a journeyman driver.”
Patrick, speaking to reporters at Kentucky, didn’t
seem too insulted by Petty’s comments.
“It’s a little bit funny, but the most important thing to
me is that I can keep my team happy, that we’re moving in the
right direction, that [sponsor] GoDaddy is happy and that when
you walk out of the garage or walk around the track and meet a
little girl that wants to grow up to be like you, then you’re doing
something right,” she said. “Those are the things that feel
right.”
Patrick did acknowledge that racing Cup cars is a
challenge for drivers not used to that type of car. “This is my
second full year in NASCAR and it’s in the Cup Series, so it’s
definitely jumping in the deep end on some level,” she said.
“You talk about the [learning] curve and the curve is different
for everybody.
“I think at times on some level I think I am ahead of it
and at times I feel like I am behind it.”
NOTEBOOK
Danica Patrick
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Kyle Petty sets off furious
debate regarding Danica
Patrick
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 56
C6 Corvette...
Continued from page 55
The automatic transmission re-
moves some of the driver in-
volvement in driving the
Corvette but the paddle shifters
located behind the steering
wheel will bring out the Mario
Andretti in you if you so desire.
Performance from the pushrod
LS3 engine is very impressive;
especially when you consider
that many think of it as out-
dated technology. But with it,
the Corvette can accelerate to
60 mph in 4 seconds flat, tackle
the ¼ mile in 12.5 seconds and
keep on going until it reaches a
top speed of 182 mph – all
while being able to achieve 25
mpg on the highway.
But the Corvette isn’t just about
power. Take the car through
some curves and twisty roads,
and the Vette will feel like it’s
on rails. Meaty tires (18”s up
front, 19”s out back) keep the
car sticking to the pavement
like glue. Stopping power is
equally impressive.
And while the Corvette is a
fast, powerful machine that
handles like a race car, in town
driving is easy, comfortable and
very enjoyable.
Production of the C6 Corvette
ended on February 28 when a
Corvette 427 rolled off the pro-
duction line. Since its debut in
2005, 215,000 C6 Corvettes
have been built.
While it’s sad to see a great car
like the C6 Corvette go, it’s al-
ways an exciting time when a
new Corvette awaits on the
horizon. The new C7 Corvette
will be available sometime in
the second half of 2013. Mean-
while the last of the C6
Corvettes are still available at
dealers.
By The Numbers:
2013 Chevrolet Corvette Grand Sport
Base Price: $56,000.00
Price as Tested: $70,610.00
Layout: front-engine / rear-wheel drive
Engine: 6.2 liter LS3 V8
Transmission: 6 - speed automatic
Horsepower: 436 hp
Torque: 428 ft-lbs
EPA Fuel Economy: 15 city / 25 highway mpg
[Visit me at www.carsbycar.blogspot.com or email me at
autocran@gmail.com]
Continued from page 54
That system creates an interest-
ing scenario for drivers like
Johnson, whose No. 48 team at
Hendrick Motorsports has be-
come the circuit’s best at work-
ing the Chase formula to its
advantage.
With 131 points to
spare in their quest to remain in
the top 10 and make the Chase,
they are at a point in the season
where they can turn their atten-
tion to the Chase. Instead of
having to worry about earning
maximum points each week,
Johnson can take a chance and
race for wins, as he did on June
16 at Michigan International
Speedway, when he pushed his
tires past the limit in a late-race
bid to run down eventual win-
ner Greg Biffle. He wound up
blowing a tire and finishing
28th, but in the big picture, it
didn’t make that much differ-
ence, as all he needs to do is
finish 10th to make the cut for
the Chase. What will help him
most in the Chase is the bonus
points, and he has nine already
for his wins at Daytona, Mar-
tinsville and Pocono.
But for many of his
competitors, the next nine
weeks will be pressure-packed,
as Johnson told reporters last
week during his regular media
appearance at Kentucky Speed-
way.
“I looked around
10th (place) and how tight that
is,” he said. “If you’re on that
eighth- to 14th-place bubble
right there, it’s getting really
tense right now and it will over
these next 10 weeks.
Continues on next page
Jimmie Johnson...
Sprint Cup points leader Jimmie Johnson leads a
group of cars during the Quaker State 400 at Kentucky
Speedway.
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SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 57
Jimmie Johnson...
Continued from page 56
“Life is pretty comfortable up where we are. We can
still squander away the position we are in and have trouble. But
fortunately, with those three wins, we should be in great shape.”
As a bonus, the upcoming race at New Hampshire
Motor Speedway offers Johnson and his team a chance to tune
their car for the Chase, as the circuit returns there for the second
Chase race, on Sept. 22.
“We want to leave there knowing we’ve had a good
race because, obviously, we come back and race there in the
Chase,” he said.
Johnson’s points position also means he and his team
are able to save all four of their allotted test dates for tracks in
the Chase, whereas teams on the Chase bubble likely will decide
to test at some of the tracks hosting races late in the regular sea-
son.
“Teams have been very smart about reserving test ses-
sions and as we get closer to the Chase, I think you’ll see a lot of
teams in that eighth- to 14th- or eighth- to 12th- range using
those test sessions to make sure they have good finishes and col-
lect a lot of points,” he said. “The last I heard was that we’re still
sitting on [test dates], and hopefully will use them on all Chase
tracks.”
NUMERICALLY
SPEAKING
Laps led by Tony
Stewart in the
past 17 Sprint
Cup races at Daytona Interna-
tional Speedway, the most of
any driver.
Laps led by Carl Edwards
in the past 17 Cup races
at Daytona International
Speedway.
Points separating Jeff Gor-
don, 12th in Sprint Cup
points, and Joey Logano,
who holds the 10th position,
which is the final spot guaran-
teed a Chase berth at the end of
the 26-race regular season.
Drivers who have
started all 17 Sprint
Cup races this sea-
son.
548
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31
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM JULY 04, 2013 PAGE 58
Kentucky still bad
luck for Hamlin
Denny Hamlin’s run
of bad luck continued at Ken-
tucky Speedway as two flat
tires, one of which sent him
crashing into the wall, left him
with a 35th-place finish and
only slim hopes of making the
cut for the Chase.
Heading into this
weekend’s Coke Zero 400 at
Daytona International Speed-
way, Hamlin’s hopes for a wild-
card Chase berth depend on
him getting multiple wins in the
next nine races and wiping out
a 104-point deficit to 20th-
place Ricky Stenhouse Jr. To be
eligible for a wild-card berth, a
driver has to be in the top 20 at
the end of the 26-race regular
season.
Hamlin, who already
has missed four races this sea-
son with a back injury, com-
plained of an aching head after
his crash on Sunday, but vowed
to continue racing.
“We’re just going to
try to win races and that’s what
my job is for the rest of the year
... is to try to win and do the
best I can for my sponsors and
my team,” he said.
Hamlin’s first blown
tire caused more problems for
pole-sitter Dale Earnhardt Jr.
than it did for Hamlin.
Earnhardt ran over
the casing from Hamlin’s tire
and damaged the front end of
his No. 88 Chevrolet. After fin-
ishing 12th, he praised his team
for hanging in and working to
patch up his car as best they
could.
“The guys did a good
job on pit road all day long
working on it and trying to fix
everything,” he said. “I’m not
sure we got everything back
where it is supposed to be, but
we did well enough to get a de-
cent finish out of it.
“They deserve a lot
of credit today.”
Denny Hamlin finished 35th in the Quaker State 400.
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1. Jimmie Johnson, 610
2. Carl Edwards, 572
3. Clint Bowyer, 569
4. Kevin Harvick, 544
5. Matt Kenseth, 528
6. Dale Earnhardt Jr., 512
7. Kyle Busch, 500
8. Martin Truex Jr., 490
9. Greg Biffle, 489
10. Joey Logano, 479

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