./ / S W K fV

hmns

JANU ARY
1932 v
m m com

Suggestions
R O S IC R U C IA N E M B L E M S Members desiring Rosicrucian emblems may obtain them from Headquart­ ers. T h ey are made of gold, beautifully inlaid with enamel, neat in size, and consist of the triangle surmounted by the Egyptian cross. M en’s style emblem with screw back, $2.00. W om en's style, with patent safety catch pin, $2.25 H O M E S A N C T U M S U P P L IE S R osicrucian C a n d lestick s: Beautifully designed to represent Egyptian col­ umns like those in Egypt and in the Supreme Temple at San Jose, finished in dark red mahogany, mounted on double triangle base. Each will hold regular size candle. Price $2.50 per pair; postage prepaid. S anctum C ross: Design of this cross is like the famous Egyptian Crux Ansata (the looped cross), mounted on double triangle and finished to match the candlesticks, with red stone in the center of the cross. A very beautiful and symbolical ornament. Price $2.50: postage prepaid. S tudent's M em bersh ip A p ron : For those members who wish to wear the typical Rosicrucian triangle lodge apron while performing ceremonies at home, this symbolical device made in the ancient manner and easily tied around the body and containing the Cross and Rose within the triangle, will be found very appropriate. Price $1.50 each; postage prepaid. R osicrucian In cen se: A very delicate perfumed incense, carrying with it the odor and vibrations of the Oriental flowers. M ade especially for us in con­ densed form, so that a very small amount is necessary at one burning. Far superior to any high priced incense on the market. Price $1.00 for a box con­ sisting of twelve large cubes sufficient for many months’ use. postage prepaid by us. C o m p lete Sanctum S et: Includes two candlesticks, the cross, box of in­ cense, and the ritualistic apron, all described above. Special price if complete set is ordered at one time, $6.50: postage prepaid. R O S IC R U C IA N S T A T I O N E R Y Boxes of twenty-four sheets of beautiful blue stationery, broadcloth linen finish, with envelopes to match, club size. Each sheet bears a symbolic Rosi­ crucian emblem. This is fine stationery to use in writing to a friend or acquaint­ ance to show your affiliation with the Order. Price per box $1.25; postage prepaid. A UTO EM BLEM S

M ade especially for your automobile, but can be used anywhere. Made of metal, finished in gold and red in duco enamel. Emblem is identical with the smaller emblem worn on lapels. Easily attached to radiator. Five and onequarter inches high. Price $1.50; postage prepaid. A T T R A C T IV E SE A L S Beautifully printed and embossed gum seals about the size of a twenty-five cent piece in red and gold to be used in sealing envelopes or on stationery. Contains the emblem and name of the Order. Price 50c per hundred, postpaid.

® lie

Eosstcructan Shgest

Coders the W orld The Official, International Rosicrucian Magazine of the World'Wide Rosicrucian Order
V O L IX . JA N U A R Y , 1932 No. 12

Contents
g=. ■ ■ $ T h e T h o u g h t o f th e M o n th .................................. By T h e Imperator T h e A rch E n em y o f M a n k in d By Dr. Arthur B. Bell, F .R .C . G ettin g in H arm on y with the C o s m ic By Bro. J. J. Brown M a n ’s E tern a l Q u est ..........................By Bro. W illiam H. M cKegg T h e C om in g o f S u p er-m an a n d S u per-w om an By H. Spencer Lewis, F .R .C . S e lf-H e a lin g By Frater Frank H. Cooper " E lectric ity " A s E s s e n c e o f th e S o u l ......By Sro. Frances V ejtasa T h e S pirit o f S e r v ic e ................................ By Elrod W a rd , F .R .C . F irst K n ig h ts T em p la r E d ific e .......................................... Illustration A S treet in a M y stic C ity ....................................................Illustration R osicru cian C r e e d ............................................................... C a th ed ra l N o t e s ......................................................................

Subscription to the R osicrucum D igest. Three Dollars per year. Single copies, twenty-five cents each. Entered as Second Class M atter at the Post Office at San Jose, California, under Act of August 24th, 1912. Changes of address must reach us by the tenth of the month preceding date of issue.
PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY THE SUPREME COUNCIL OF

O
p-n-ruT-fj

A M O R C — T H E R O S IC R U C IA N O R D E R
R O S IC R U C IA N PA R K SA N J O S E C A L IF O R N IA

!L _ z

THOUGHT OF THE MONTH
M AKING A NEW START
By THE IMPERATOR

A M not going to speak this month about the customary habit of starting the year by turning over a new leaf. I think that it would be well for most of our members to take the book and throw it away instead of turning over a new leaf and start with an entirely new book or new rec­ ord of life. A new leaf ought to be turned every day and every day of our life should afford us opportunity of improving ourselves and improving con­ ditions around us. As you sit reading this little talk of mine I visualize each one of you in your own home surroundings with an atmos­ phere around you like the setting of a stage for a play. I do not care what size or shape the room may be or how it is furnished. N o matter what it may look like the only difference between your room and any room that can be set on the stage is a matter of foot­ lights. But you have instead of foot­ lights a supreme light coming from above and from all directions that should illuminate you more than foot­ lights, spotlights and sidelights of the most illuminated stage in the world. And just as the stage setting can be The changed while the curtain is down and R osicrucian almost any kind of a room or environ­ D igest ment created hurriedly between acts, so Ja nuary you are master of your present en­ 1932 vironment and can change the condi­

tions around you and make them what you will. You are the master not only of the ship and its course but you are the master of everyone concerned with the equipment and appearance of that ship. Certainly, the beginning of the year is a good time to make a new beginning in any direction. Mankind is always prone to seek some excuse for doing anything of a personal nature or that is out of the ordinary. Now you have one of the best excuses in the world for changing some of your habits, some of your customs, and some of your per­ sonal characteristics. It is the beginning of a new calendar year. M ake a new start along certain lines and see how far you can carry these changes. You will find that the effort is exciting and the results fascinating and profitable. O ne o f the best things that you can put on your calendar for the coming year is the promise to yourself that you will do one kind thing every day. Now that does not mean running out to the street corner and standing and waiting for some crippled person or blind per­ son to come by so that you can help him across the street nor does it mean buying a loaf of bread and taking it to some poor family. It means keeping your eyes and ears open throughout the course of each day, and when there is an opportunity to compliment someone or congratulate or praise someone for something he has done or is about to do, then do so with a smile and with a tone of conviction in your voice.

M ake it your business to give some­ one a little uplift, a little boost, a little joy each day, no matter how you do it. Five cents given to a street urchin or telling your newsboy who sells you the paper to keep the change, will bring a smile and a little joy. Talking kindly to someone around you to whom you generally express a grouch will prob­ ably shock the heavens and convince them that the world is becoming better. Let loose the real self within you and throw yourself in harmony with all the rest of the u niverse b y sp read in g so m e constructive thoughts, some helping thoughts, among those whom you con­ tact occasionally or otherwise between each sunrise. And make up your mind that this year is to be the biggest promotion year you have ever had. A M O R C is planning to make 1932 the greatest year in its history so far as propa­ ganda is concerned. During the past few months we have started many in­ ovations and many improvements, and we have spent more sums of money in trying to h elp o th ers and in ad v an cin g the idea of Rosicrucianism than we ever spent during so-called prosperous

years. W e have realized that because of the depression and general economic conditions more is expected of those who can give and we have added to our facilities for spreading Light, Life, and Love. You should start some propaganda for yourself just as though you were going to build up a new and different reputation among all your friends and acquaintances, or just as though you had moved recently into a new town and have to make yourself known in the most favorable light. T ry to impress everyone with the fact that you are more happy, more optimistic, more hopeful, than you have ever been. Then in the silence and in the privacy of your own life make up your mind that you are going to have your hopes and optimism realized. Go out and fight for your happiness as the Irishman, who said he would have peace even if he had to fight for it. T h e hour is at hand when the new genera­ tion is going to exert itself and show what it wants. You should join them in every locality and make next year the most helpful year in your life and the lives of others.

V

V

V

DEATHLESS
B y E lla W h e e le r W ilco x There lies in the centre of each man's heart A longing and love for the good and pure; And if but an atom, or larger part, I tell you this shall endure— endure— After the body has gone to decay— Y ea, after the world has passed away. T he longer I live and the more I see O f the struggle of souls toward the heights above, T h e stronger this truth comes home to me: T h at the Universe rests on the shoulder of love; A love so limitless, deep, and broad, T h at men have renamed it and called it— God. And nothing that ever was born or evolved, Nothing created by light or force, But deep in its system there lies dissolved A shining drop from the Great Love Source; A shining drop that shall live for aye— T h ou g h kingdoms may perish and stars decay.

The Arch Enemy of Mankind
By D r . A r t h u r B. B e l l , F.R.C.
V H E R E is one quality of thought to which most of us hold tenaciously as though it repre­ sented something of great value and pur­ pose. So strongly in­ trenched does this hab­ it of thought become, that it assumes the role of dictator in our lives, presenting itself in every emergency whether great or small to dominate and mis-direct us into channels which are wholly con­ trary to those which would best serve the true object of our desires. Rarely indeed do westop to consider the real nature of this quality nor the results which invariably mature and flow forth from its pernicious activity. T h e thought in mind is F E A R and its boon com­ panions, worry, doubt, distrust and un­ certainty. It would seem that a careful analysis of this attribute would not be amiss, so let us place this interloper on trial and see what the evidence reveals. If it is a false friend we should not only be fully apprised, but learn how best to deal with it that we may relieve and protect ourselves from its unwar­ ranted dominion. First, we may properly inquire as to whether in entering into F E A R we are ever aided in attaining or accomplishing the fundamental or underlying purpose which represents the goal we wish to reach. Can we think of a single in­ The stance where the result or results have R osicrucian been contributed to by dealing with D igest this thought? Has it added anything to January our state of mind which would afford a feeling of peace, security or confi­ 1932 V V dence? W h en the thing we feared might occur, actually makes its appear­ ance, is it ever that which is needed or required? Does it help us to think and act clearly and resolutely with a firm consciousness of a determination and confidence that we shall succeed? It will not be difficult for you to agree that the answer to each of these ques­ tions is negative. W e well know that thought contains a creative essence and that the crea­ tions thus brought into existence must of necessity agree in nature and char­ acter with the thoughts from which they are formed or from which they proceed. In other words, the fruits of fear will be similar in every respect to the stock and root from which they spring for it cannot be otherwise with­ out transcending the law of creation itself. W e know, too, that we dwell within two states or conditions which are known to all, G O O D and E V IL . Or, putting it in another way, they dwell within us and we know from experi­ ence that this is exactly correct for we perceive that both qualities are in con­ stant operation within our own en­ vironment as well as any and every­ where else we may look and that apparently one is set in opposition to the other. W hichever quality pre­ dominates in expression, will uniformly and unvaryingly bring into manifesta­ tion the kind of results which agree with it and not otherwise. Our familiarity with the effects or products of those thoughts which are destructive, unhappy and undesirable is or should be quite sufficient to enable
S ev en hundred forty

us to readily identify and classify them and thus protect us against their entry into our lives and affairs. Perhaps not enough time and consideration is given to this matter and if such is the case we will do well to ponder over it until the fact become apparent, for we shall not understand the occasion for the coming of our many troublesome prob­ lems nor the means of changing them into more favorable aspects until a clear apprehension is gained. W e believe that God is U N C H A N G ­ IN G L O V E A N D G O O D N ESS. Mind you, in both of these qualities He is U N C H A N G IN G , without shad­ ow of turning. If this is true, then those unhappy conditions or effects which develop in our lives and environ­ ment are not the outcome of these two paramount qualities but must emanate from some other source which we must attribute to evil or that which is not good. Fear is precisely such a quality for it does not by any means relate itself or agree in nature or character with the changeless L O V E and G O O D N E S S of God, being exactly contrary in every particular, having nothing in common with them either in the present, the future or the past. A very comprehensive interpretation of F E A R may be expressed in a very few words, L A C K O F F A IT H IN G O D , for where fear is, you will find no faith. Both cannot occupy the same ground at once. O ne will be subdued as the other comes into prominence according to the choice we may make of that which we shall entertain in the mind. Please take special notice too that there is surely and certainly some­ thing within us by or through which we are able to accept or reject any thought which may enter and present itself for consideration. If you will meditate well upon this point it will disclose some wonderful things to you and show you how it is that through the exercise of choice, which is our inalienable privilege, we may either accept, entertain or dismiss each and every thought which seeks entrance in­ to the consciousness. T h e reason why we do not exercise this privilege more discreetly, is because we are not fully

assured or convinced that some thoughts work to our disadvantage and that others bring about conditions which are profitable, useful, desirable and advantageous. But why is this so? Do we not have experiences each day and hour where­ by this may be properly proven? W e would think it folly to entertain a thought like this: "I will not arise this morning and go about my daily affairs but will rem ain in bed and all will be well.” W e would unhesitatingly reject such a thought, knowing that to act upon it, would without question bring about serious and unhappy conse­ quences. No, we do not permit such a thought to gain our attention to a point where we decide against our better judgment to accept and follow it. But, if we did decide to be governed by this thought, knowing that it might jeopard­ ize our position or business affairs, surely, we would not be surprised if unfavorable reactions occurred. And. who would be to blame? No matter what the consequences might be, could we lay the cause or blame upon an­ other? Fear has the same creative poten­ tialities as the foregoing idea yet we are quite willing to give it a nice com­ fortable birth in our consciousness and permit it to inject itself into many of the decisions which come before us and actually lead us away from the high goal, the one we really seek. Some will say that it is hard not to deal with fear and that it seems im­ possible to lay it aside. T h at is quite true for it has become firmly established and is a dominating power or influence, having become the host, occupying the seat of honor with the reins of govern­ ment in its hands. T h is is so only be­ cause we have not fully and completely recognized its falsity, tyranny and un­ just rule. Instead of being a firm friend, it is an arch enemy which seeks only our destruction and downfall. Surely, such a master, for such it is, should by no means be permitted to rule, direct or guide us. It cannot be any part of U N C H A N G IN G G O O D , for this quality does not and cannot act in such a manner for it can bring to us nothing unlike itself.

If we cannot displace fear and dis­ continue giving place to it, why should we not also say, “Each time I see a flame, I must put my hand in it al­ though I know beforehand that I will be burned. Because I cannot resist this temptation, my hand is burned all the time and I cannot stop it.” W h en we allow fear to dominate, we are being burned again and again but because we do not instantly fe e l th e effect, we are lulled into carelessness and lack of con­ sideration of one of the most destruc­ tive and undesirable conditions with which man has to deal. Let us understand this subject a little more fully. T o begin with, we have seen that fear represents first of all, an absence of faith, truly, faith in God. It subscribes to the idea of independence and separateness from our Creator. It disowns Him as our Fath er who did create us to serve Him and do His will. It suggests that we may obtain posses­ sions, prestige, power, honors and dis­ tinction for self alone and that even if we do fear that these expectations may not be fully realized that just the same we are entitled to them. It also means that we are not fully aware that God is within His creation, within each and every manifested form and that these forms represent His humanity even as He created it, in which H e lives and moves and has His being both out­ wardly and inwardly, wherein He sees, hears and knows all. In contrast to this, we persistently continue to think that self is somehow apart from its Creator and is a capable, dependable and worthy governor of self, all other selfs and of the whole world. Every day and hour of life con­ stantly refutes such an impossible theory. Do we not see that this is but vanity, the very same idea or concep­ tion which was responsible for the fall from Grace of the universal man. Adam? Is it not a pity that we should go on and on holding to this deplorable and unfortunate idea and suffering in­ terminably from the following after The false gods? Let us once and for all be R osicrucian convinced that we are not free souls D igest but servants of the Holy, Loving, January Tender and M erciful God who created us as His own Son in His own image 1932

and likeness, wherein H e is our own true self, even unto this day. If we can but realize this great truth, we shall enter into great humility and willing, profitable service, for only therein may peace, happiness, beneficence and love be found. O ur serving of false masters will cease when we understand from experience how we are unhappily dealt with. If our eyes could but perceive the working of destructive thoughts and if we could instantly feel their effect as when the hand is placed in a flame, certainly we would not be long in de­ posing them and dealing only with those which are designed to be helpful and lead us into all happiness and use­ ful states of consciousness and being. W h ile this discourse deals primarily with fear, the very same conditions apply to all thoughts and qualities of thought which do not correspond with the "U N C H A N G IN G attributes of God. Fear has a decided tendency to in­ habit all constructive activity both men­ tal and physical, preventing us from doing both that of which we are capa­ ble and that which is right, for we have departed from serving he who gives us the very life we express and who in His endless love eternally desires that we return unto Him from the far country into which we have strayed. God has never departed from us for it is unthinkable that He should forsake His own, but we have attempted to de­ part from Him and His U N C H A N G ­ IN G L O V E and only return to Him when we fully discover in pain and dis­ tress that we have been falsely led and are beyond all earthly, material help. It is then and then only through bitter travail that most of us are ready to turn our whole will, heart, and mind to Him and resign ourselves to His mer­ ciful care. God loves each one of us and has done so from eternity and this shall go on eternally without shadow of turning for God is U N C H A N G IN G L O V E . Let us look within and see where and how we fail and not go on blindly groping in the dark by-ways following after the symbols of falsity, misfortune and despair. Look no longer without

for causes but seek within yourself and begin today to make the corrections which lead directly to the cherished goal. W h en we seek without, we shall find nothing but effects which flow forth from the inward cause. M istake them no longer for causes but know them for what they are. Let us not foolishly protest that fear or any other destructive thought is but, perhaps, just a mental indiscretion, innocent of itself

and without power to affect us in any manner. Examine closely and carefully and discern for yourselves the subtle working of these thieves and robbers and close and bolt your mental door against them. Receive unto yourselves the Eternal Host that you may be wholly directed and guided by the U N C H A N G IN G LOVE AND G O O D N E S S of God.

V

V

V

Getting In Harmony With The Cosmic
YOU CAN BRING BIG CHANGES INTO YOUR LIFE QUICKLY AND EASILY By
B ro th e r

J. J.

B ro w n

E are taught in the Holy Scriptures that we should first set our own house in order, and I never realized the importance of this until I took it upon myself to examine my own w ay of living, the conduct of my home life, and found that my house was out of order. It is certainly true that if we expect any benefit from the Cosmic and be­ lieve that there are any blessings held in life for us and which we may an­ ticipate as a result of our pleading and desires, we must first of all get into harmony with the Cosmic. I have found in speaking of this matter with many that there are certain things which every man and woman, young and old, can do to bring about the first stages of Cosmic attunement. First of all, there is the important element of the understanding of Cosmic law. Cast out of your consciousness the belief in fatalities and the ideas that you may have that any power out­ side of yourself or outside of the God

consciousness within you is responsible for any of the conditions in your home life, business life, or around you. It is too easy to believe in fate and too easy to assume that each of us is not re­ sponsible but that someone else or something else external to ourselves is responsible for our wants and our weaknesses. If we understand, first of all, that each successive day is the re­ sult of today's activities and that we are reaping precisely what we sow, or are reaping a reflection of the light we have cast around us, and that God and all of nature is beneficent and willing to give us the very best that they have, we will reach a higher place on our journey toward complete happiness and abundant living. W e cannot have quarrelling in the home or dissension, disagreement, and incompatibility, and still have Cosmic attunement so far as our family and its affairs are concerned. Th ere must be peace and love in the home and among the dwellers therein from the break of dawn in the morning to the ultimate closing of the day. T h ere must be toleration and sympathetic understand­ ing of each other’s requirements. There

must be kindness and gentleness. There must be displayed a sincere apprecia­ tion of what each is doing for the other and what each has done in the way of sacrificing for the other. There must be respect for age and for sex. T here must be a friendliness and a wholesome tenderness made manifest in our conversations, our actions, and even our thinking. T h ere must be a perfect blend of give and take in all of our family relationships. W e must see that the home and family, as a unit, represents an ideal and there must be an ideal to be represented. There should be an expression of apprecia­ tion on the lips of each one, each day, for life itself and for the food and the shelter provided. There should be an attempt to share some of the household blessings with those who may come in contact with the home as friend or stranger. T h e life of each member of the fam­ ily must be adjusted to harmonize with the ideal of the family life. T h e in­ mates of the home must be purged of their sins or evils as the home itself is cleansed daily and weekly and made neat and clean. Each day must see each member more joyful, more con­ tented with life. T his same goodness of heart and spirit must be carried outside of the home into the highways and by-ways so that it becomes contagious and affects those who come in contact with

the members of the household so that there will be no lost opportunity to bring peace and harmony into the lives of others. In the business world those who are dealing with others should see that the Cosmic ideals are established as the fundamentals of the business. Accom­ panying every degree of progressive­ ness, wide-awakeness, and modern sys­ tems in business there should be a universal sense of peace and harmony and a complete separation from all limitations of character or distinction of class. Honest service, honest merchan­ dise, and honest prices with a willing­ ness to give more than is paid for and to do it cheerfully must become the key-note of the one who is employed daily in any occupation or profession. In the social world all petty, per­ sonal elements should be eliminated and only the utmost of peace and kindness should be made manifest. Toleration of the others’ view-points and of the others' problems should be cultivated. Adverse criticism or unkind comments should be avoided. Constructive state­ ments only should be made. Class dis­ tinctions should be broken down through a sense of universal kinship. In this way one will set his own house in order in anticipation of still greater blessings coming from the Cos­ mic and still greater knowledge in­ spired by the God consciousness within.

V

V

V

W A T C H F O R IM P O R T A N T C H A N G ES Each February begins a new year of this magazine. Last February we changed the cover and it has been highly complimented throughout the year. For the last few months artist have been at work making new paintings, not only for the next cover of this magazine but for our new propaganda book that will take the place of "T h e Light of E gyp t." M any new pictures and many new additional features of illustration and design will be used in our literature and this magazine will become more beautiful in its new dress and illustrations and with additional pages for the purpose of giving more read­ ing matter from month to month. W atch for these many important and costly changes in the improvement of our literature.

The R osicrucian D igest Ja nuary

1932

iXoStcrucian Creeb
1. I K N O W there is but one living, true and Infinite G o d , creating and sustaining all things, visible and invisible; whose Essence is diffused throughout the universe, and whose M ind and C o n ­ sciousness constitutes the Soul of M an. 2. I K N O W that the unity of G o d 's creation manifests in three expres­ sions: in the M acrocosm as Light, Life, and Love; in Microcosm, as Soul, ego, and body; in the material sciences and arts, as thesis, synthesis, and antithesis. All of these are symbolized by the Triangle. 3. I K N O W that the Divine W isd om of G o d , as made manifest by the laws of nature, justify our faith in the O m nipotence, O m ni­ presence, Goodness, and Love of the G o d of our existence. 4. I K N O W that when G o d breathes into the body of M an the Breath of Life, M an becomes a Living Soul, a segment inseparable of the Soul of G o d , resident within the mortal body, for various purposes, through successive human incarnations. H ence, in all that is real and vital, all Mankind is a Brotherhood under the Fatherhood of G o d . 5. I K N O W that the flesh alone may err, and mortal mind may sin; and for each error or sin, flesh and mortal mind must com pen­ sate; for M an is born in Soul-Goodness, but in mortal ignorance, and from the ignorance alone must M an be redeem ed and saved. 6. I K N O W that the visible Fraternity of the Rosicrucians spired school for the Illumination of the mortal mind joy of the Soul. Its authority is found in the joyous of the Soul of M an and in the Inspiration and Direction from the Masters, visible and invisible. 7. is an in­ and the response received

I

I K N O W that the H igh Initiates of the Fraternity are representa­ tives of the Invisible Masters of The G re a t W h ite Brotherhood, and are the Servants of G o d .

J>alutem Punctts Criangult!
(T h e Rosicrucians have no blind faiths or unproved beliefs. Through the know­ ledge o f laws and their a b ility to demonstrate them the Rosicrucians know certain fundamental principles which constitute their creed- The fo rego in g statement o f such principles was unanimously adopted at an International Convention o f R os i­ crucians held at the AM O R C Temple, Rosicrucian Park, San Jose. California, dur­ ing the w eek o f July 23rd to 30th, 1930.) A ttractive placards in 2 colors and gold contains the above creed, size 10x14, may be had for fram in g fo r 35c postpaid, address Rosicrucian Supply Bureau, San Jose California.

X/

ft)

----

F I R S T K N IG H T S T E M P L A R E D IF IC E
Built in Gaul by the forefathers of Lord Raymond V I, of Taulouse, who were supporters of the early Rosicrucian activities. Raymond s body was kept here 600 years because of refusal to permit its burial in any church cemetery. (Photograph by The Imperator, Copyright, 1917, by Supreme Grand Lodge, A M O R C .) N ote: P resen ted to our R eaders and Friends with the com plim ents o f the R osicrucian D igest.

Man’s Eternal Quest
By W i l l i a m H. M c K e g g
V H A T which the soul seeks is resolution into being above form” So said Emerson, th e p r o fo u n d e s t o f modern philosophers, therein touching the key-note of all phi­ losophy. T h e great events of mankind, the mistakes, the goodness, the badness, come pitifully from the same cause— man’s blind aspiration to a higher existence: an eternal quest for “being above form” . Disasters, caused by perverted goodness, seem the chief obstacles in his path upward— yet, they are of man’s own making. So long as the material self is clung to with ten­ acious stubborness, so will man have to suffer what his own free choice offers him. “Being above form”— the secret of the ancients: an achievement we all desire; an existence that gives the adept a feeling greater than he could ever ex ­ perience by the deepest of all worldly happiness! A young motion picture actor, an acquaintance of mine, said he could be very absorbed in occult philosophy but would be too afraid of its casting him into a purely mental, instead of a phys­ ical, state of living. He is a very highminded, intelligent young man. W h a t­ ever he does he puts into it every ounce of his ability . “I know,” he further remarked, “that were I to indulge in any esoteric study I’d drop everything else and live in a mental world of my own making. You see, I'm afraid more of myself than the subject.
S ev en hundred

V

V As it was inopportune to point out the flaws in his contention at that mo­ ment, I decided to let the matter drop for the time. Nevertheless, I thought a great deal over what he had said. For what, after all, is man’s present existence if not a purely mental one? It is, of course, our fond belief that all our thoughts, all our delights in the ephemeral pleasures of life, come only from our physical body, from nowhere else. T h en, surely, a corpse ought to continue to feel long after the vital principle has left it! Enlightened minds, while in earthly form, learn one great lesson. T h ey dis­ cover that by attuning the inner mind with the Cosmic, physical existence— during this present incarnation— can be made a miraculous dream. O ur very thoughts come from our Inner Self— a part of God. Therefore, how can any of us claim individuality, and fondly believe that we, as human beings, stand out in contrast against the vast majesty of the universe? O ur very thoughts are given us. As to the origin of his beautiful, mystical poems, W illiam Blake said: “And though I call them mine, I know they are not mine, being of the same opinion with M ilton when he says that the M use visits his slumbers and awakens and governs his song when morn purples the east.” Inspiration is bestowed on all who seek for it. Charlotte Bronte was a simple Y o rk ­ shire woman, who knew nothing of the world beyond the tiny village where she lived with her two sisters. Her novel, “Jane E y re,” astonished the lit­ erary world of London with its force

forty-five

and rugged power. It was commonly believed to be the work of a man. Later, when Miss B ronte’s real identity became known, and other literary men and women got to know her and dis­ covered what an unassuming, unsophis­ ticated, simple little lady she was, they were eager to learn how she could de­ scribe so vividly certain events with which she most certainly had had no personal contact. She declared that when she came to something in her writings, of which she was entirely ignorant, she kept that one subject uppermost in mind as she went to sleep at night. In the morning, she knew all about it— as if a curtain had been raised on a stage, revealing her characters and their acts as she desired to write them. Julia W a rd Howe is said to have composed her historic “Battle Hymn of the Republic” while she beheld a vast vision in a dream during the Civil W a r. On waking, one morning, she found the completed poem on her table at her bedside, written in her own hand­ writing . It is a well known fact that artistic people are more receptive to Cosmic inspiration than, let us say, the average business man. It is very natural. The only way the soul may be reached is through the senses An artist is sensi­ tive to impressions. His mind, like a wireless, responds to each thought wave. Such minds are generally used by the Cosmic Powers as mediums for the enlightenment of mankind. Throughout the ages, artists have striven to reach one goal— to reveal the divine in man by depicting that “Being above form” from which all spring and to which all seek return. T h e early artists painted mystic pictures. W ithou t knowing why, they painted halos and waves of brilliant light around the form of Christ and His M other and His di­ sciples. Surely it was not a physical thought, though it was made manifest through a material medium— namely, a canvas and colors. The T h e wisest of Greek philosophers R osicrucian were Rosicrucians. T h ey went to Egypt D igest to study the Rosicrucian mysteries. January Their knowledge guided their own countrymen. It was the great revelation 1932

they expounded of the divine in man that causted the ancients to create in marble the splendors of this truth! In­ spired sculptors have carved god-like forms, telling mankind that in higher worlds there were men and women far excelling us in bodily perfection and beauty of form. W riters of any worth have always striven to raise their fellow men with their soul-inspiring thoughts. V ictor Hugo did more good in France with his monumental novel “Les M iserables,” than Bonaparte had done with all his military forces. Likewise, Eugene Sue caused many needed re­ forms with the appearance of his “T h e W andering Jew ” and “T h e Mysteries of P aris.” In the same century, Charles Dickens wrought many improvements in E n g­ land in schools and prisons, as did Charles Reade; while W illiam T h ack ­ eray pulled down social shams. At the latter part of the nineteenth century, M arie Corelli and Henry Rider-H ag­ gard appeared. N ot one of Miss C o­ relli’s romances were thoughtlessly written. Each carried an inspiring mes­ sage to the reader. In most of her books, especially those relating to Rosi­ crucian philosophy, there is a mystic quality that spread her fame over the world Rider-H aggard’s famous ro­ mances— “S h e” ; “A yesha” ; “W isdom 's D aughter” and “T h e W o rld ’s Desire” — gave the reader much enlightenment on the mysteries of Life and Death; the Real and Unreal. All the world’s greatest artists have been mystics, profound students of the occult. Y et that did not prevent them from getting the joy and happiness out of their physical incarnation in this world. In fact, once a Cosmic contact has been made, existence on this plane becomes in every respect better and more wonderful! Every worthy teacher, in his own particular field, essays to raise men to loftier thinking; to help him reach that mystic state we are all seeking-— a “be­ ing above form.” Our writers, artists, musicians, sculptors and poets are our real teachers— for the receptive mind gains divine inspiration. It has already been stated that these minds are more

sensitive to Cosmic inspiration than the ordinary person; but that does not im­ ply that the unartistic person can not develop his Inner Self to just such a degree of receptivity as any adept. T h e stronger spiritual contact we make with higher forces, the more crea­ tive we become in our physical exist­ ence; talents we never suspected lay hidden in our mind are uncovered for the benefit of ourself and others! f remember a European banker who had spent all his life, until he was six­ ty-three, in the banking world. H e re­ tired. In order to fill in his days, he began to study occult teachings of great masters. V ery soon he had a compel­ ling urge to paint. He took lessons in art. A t sixty-five he became the crea­ tor of landscape paintings that drew attention from the highest art critics! He declared he felt as if he had en­ tered a new existence, and had never been so happy. It might also be re­ called that W illiam de M organ was seventy; ill in bed, after retiring from the pottery works he owned. T o brighten his days he started to write and finished by producing an outstand­ ing literary novel! W e all desire to create beautiful things. Y et, after all, we simply say the one Great T ru th — that the physical is merely a prison for the spiritual! By V V V

developing our Inner Self we learn many wonderful things about ourselves. A t the revelation of the full soul within us, genius is attained. Then, verily, “the true artist has the planet for his pedestal!" Perhaps the words of Eugene Houssaye best describe the mind that has attained creative power through spir­ itual contact with the Cosmos: “L ’artiste est un dieu tombe qui se souvient d’un temps ou il creait un monde." (A n artist is a fallen god who recalls the time when he created a world.) T h at is the secret of all mankind. W e are ever conscious of our lost glory, our lost God— head. W e have striven through the ages, and still strive, to re­ gain our lost splendor! Y et it is not difficult. There is only one way to regain the things we have lost through our own fault— that is, to awaken the dormant powers within us. O nce we have aroused the Inner Self we can easily become quickly perceptive to inspira­ tion, no matter in what walk of life we are, and, what is more, create inspira­ tion in others; then we learn that our lost Splendor is not so hard to win back; that our goal lies within us— and with our own aspirations we can, while in actual daily life, reach the divinest of all wonders— “a being above form"! V V

W IL L Y O U H E L P O U R D IS T R IB U T IO N W e are anixous to have as many copies of the “Rosicrucian D igest" as possible come into the hands of serious minded persons throughout the world. W e wish those who are students and thinkers, who are searching for the profound laws and principles of life to better their own lives, as well as to assist humanity in its steady progress upward, to read this magazine. So that the new, attractive, I might say beautiful February issue of the “Rosicrucian Digest” with all of its new features may come into many hands, we are offering tw o c o p ie s o f that issue for 40c. Your assistance will be appreciated. If you will send in 40c (not in postage stamps) to the address below, two copies will be sent to you to give to your friends or acquaintances. If you would like to give a six m onths’ subscription to a friend or acquaintance for a New Y ears' gift, send in only $1.00 to the address below, and the magazine will be sent for six months to whomever you suggest. This is an unusual, attractive offer. T ak e advantage of this special offer at this time. Address your communications to R O S IC R U C IA N S U P P L Y B U R E A U , R O S IC R U ­ C IA N PA RK , SA N JO S E , C A L IF O R N IA .

The Coming of Super-man and Super-woman
TH EY A RE IN TH EIR YOUTH N OW , BU T W ILL SOON REACH M A T U R IT Y By H.
S p e n c e r L e w is ,

F.R.C.

H I L E most of the world is looking for­ ward to the dawn of a new cycle when peace will reign throughout the world and business and economic condi­ tions will start upon a new basis, the mystic and the philosopher who have been watching the trend of times and conditions and who know the periods of human evolution are looking forward to the dawn of the day when the coming super-man and super-woman will pass across the in­ definite line from childhood to adult­ hood. T h is day of a new dawn is close at hand and already the young super-man and super-woman in many parts of the world are expressing their new power and unique understanding and molding conditions preparatory to their united usurping of the dominating positions of life. T h e super-man and super-woman of the near future will be those who have within their grasp the reins of leader­ ship and who will control not only their own destinies but the destinies of millions of men and women. There will be no tyrannical autocracy connected with this world-wide domination, and there will be no unreasonable and fan­ The atic display of superiority or an ex­ R osicrucian aggerated ego, but rather a mighty and D igest powerful though sympathetic and peace­ Jan uary ful direction and control of the world 1932 activities.

T h e super-men and super-women of each cycle and each age have been the result of human evolution and of the progress of civilization. In each cycle of the world’s history these super-be­ ings have been qualified to meet the conditions which they were to find and to rule the world as it required ruling. In each cycle, therefore, the super-men and super-women attained a different degree of mastership and exerted a different form of power and leadership, compatible with the nature of existing conditions and supreme in the elements required to assist in the evolution that was taking place. In the earlier cycles of human progress the super-qualities of these Cosmically selected men and women relate to the purely intellectual abilities of the objective faculties of man. T h e super-man and super-woman of those periods were those who could see better, hear better or sense better the objective impressions registered upon their consciousness and interpret them in terms of universal adaptability. It was these beings who sensed the future needs of evolving man based upon a careful observation and under­ standing of his present deficiencies and requirements. T h ey lifted eyes neither high nor low but projected their vision on a level with their present growth, yet they saw distantly in the line of their progress even though they saw neither above nor below. Then came the cycle of super-beings who turned their vision inwardly rather than out­ wardly and who saw the weaknesses

of the inner self and the need for cultural improvement. Then followed the development of man’s egoism, re­ sulting in self aggrandizement and the desire to surround himself with every cultural luxury and comfort. T h e next cycle brought the desire for conquest as a natural result of man’s desire to make his personal name and fame paramount above everything else. However, in this phase of evolu­ tion new lands were discovered, new cities built, new empires established, and this was in accordance with the Cosmic scheme though man knew it not. W e have just finished a cycle where man’s vision has been turned toward intellectual attainment and materialistic scientific knowledge in order that he might take from others that which they possessed but held lightly and thereby monopolized and controlled solely through objective intellectual power, the things that belonged to humanity at large. T h e inevitable result of such a cycle was that of self destruction inas­ much as the power of greed that en­ tered into the plans of those who were leaders in this last cycle did destroy itself and destroyed those who were in­ struments of its activities. Y et the C os­ mic saw that in all of the greedy things that man accomplished during the past cycle there should be a residue of results benefiting everyone when prop­ erly directed and controlled by the new period of super-beings to follow. And now we are on the threshold of this new cycle when these new superbeings are about ready to come into their own. and reconstruct the toppling, rocky, quivering structures and crea­ tions of the hordes of greed of the past cycle. T h e Cosmic has seen that during the past one hundred years or more the foundation should be laid for the great transfer of human control and human direction. M en and women in all lands and in all sections of every State and nation have been gradually prepared and carefully inspired during the past fifty or more years for the new role and new position they will occupy, or which their children will occupy, within the

next few years. T h e unlimited power of wealth and of control of business and economic conditions will be taken from the hands of the greedy and the selfish and transferred to the hands of the altruistic and the sympathetic. T h e new cycle of beings now reach­ ing maturity have had their vision turned from the narrow, personal view­ point, to the broad, universal horizon of international humanity. T h eir educa­ tion and training has been along the lines of Cosmic comprehension and philosophical understanding. Th eir hearts have been inspired with the sympathetic appreciation of the needs of all men and with a desire to see mercy and justice made manifest in every walk of life. These qualities will make them th e su per-m en and super­ women of the new cycle. T h e bigotry of religions, the tyranny of nationalism, the selfishness of economic standards have been supplanted by a broader view-point and a newer and better attunement with human existence. T h e lines of demarcation between creeds and sects, between nations and governments, have been obliterated or softened or interpreted in other expres­ sions. Various and many schools and systems of thought have been spread­ ing their doctrines and their teachings and propounding the higher code of ethics until young and old now living have seen a new light on the horizon indicating the possible dawn of a better day. T h e Rosicrucians have been in­ strumental in the world-wide spread of this newer view-point and wait for the moment to hail the coming of the new day and new cycle. T h e men and women who are now preparing themselves through the proper study and the proper attune­ ment will be the super-men and super­ women ruling and dominating the world’s affairs in the very near future. Already the sky is golden in the re­ flected colors of the rising sun and the bright light of the horizon is emphasiz­ ing the deepness of the shadows and of the darker places. As we view the world today we are impressed perhaps more strongly by the shadows than by the light on the horizon, but he who

has reached the readiness and a proper degree of worthiness to hail the new day knows that as the day comes and the sun rises, the shadows will soften and light will reach even the deepest recesses of human problems. Old tradi­ tions and old conditions will be broken and changed. Old high-ways will be abandoned in favor of newer ones. T h e by-ways w ill b e filled with passers-by and the great parade of progressive super-men and super-women will begin on its onward march to victory through the power of their new knowledge and better understanding and higher per­ sonal development and their training. M ake sure that you are one of these by freeing yourself from the shackles of superstition, doubt, intolerance, bias, and prejudice. Shake off the beliefs and disbeliefs of the past and open your mind like a new book of unwrit­ ten pages to receive the Cosmic know­ ledge that is offered to you freely. Turn your back upon the path you have been treading and face right about and start toward the new dawn. Prepare your children for their place in the new sunlight of the new day by di­ recting their thinking and their observ­ ing and understanding and their com­ prehending along new lines that are fundamentally sound and universally true. Let the heritage of your better understanding become the foundation upon which your children will build

their lives and thereby be ready to fill their individual missions in life under the new regime. V ictory awaits the new and rising generation and none is too old at the present time to share in the inevitable changes that will take place this coming year and the year thereafter and each succeeding year throughout the new cycle. Th e handwriting has appeared on the wall and those who have been mercenary, selfish, greedy, monopolistic, tyrannical and wholly soulless are “trembling in the depths of the abyss and are fearful of the demons,” as the ancient Rosicrucians stated. Th ey see the passing from their control the necessities and economic requirements of life. T h ey see the retroactive effect of their indifference to public appeal and universal requests. But it is too late for them to stem the tide of the great changes taking place and which will continue to modify the man-made laws of this earth until the natural and spiritual laws of the Cosmic are once more re-established and made univer­ sally active. It will be a glorious day when the sun begins to rise high in the firmament and the su per-m en and super-women stand erect in all of their Cosmic glory but with human humbleness of spirit and proclaim the goodness of God and the universal happiness of all beings.

V

V

V

P O S T C A R D V IE W S O F R O S IC R U C IA N P A R K A N D B U IL D IN G S Let us again call your attention to the fact that we have had prepared some very attractive post-card views of the beautiful Shrine on the grounds of the Rosicrucian Park; the new Francis Bacon Memorial Auditorium, which was dedicated at the last Convention; the interior of the beautiful Supreme Lodge Room, where all of the special ceremonies which are mentioned in your lectures are performed; sectional view of Rosicrucian Park; and a view of the Administration Building. These post-cards are exact photographic reproductions. Members, I am sure, will be proud of these photo­ graphs, p rou d of the institution behin d their m em bership. Secure one or two of these view post-cards and send them to your friends or keep some for yourself. T h ey are very artistic in nature and may be secured at the economical price of 5c each, postpaid. T hirty cents will bring an assortment of six. Send remittance and order to R O S I­ C R U C IA N S U P P L Y B U R E A U , SA N JO S E . C A L IF O R N IA . (N o order can be filled for less than four post-cards.)

The R osicrucian D igest January

1932

Self-Healing
By
F ra te r F ran k H . C oop er

V
LL of the Great M asters of the ancient times ad­ vocated some features of the Golden Rule, and especially that which is expressed in the brief words: ‘‘Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.” T h is in­ junction is not sufficient to enable us to do what we would like to have others do for us, for we must be trained and instructed in the most efficient ways of rendering service that is of a practical nature. T h is has been the aim and ambition of the Rosicrucians. Th ere are thousands of proverbs which come to us from antiquity which constitute a real inspiring creed or code of life, but most of the principles in such a creed are difficult for us to put into practice because we do not have the knowledqe and the ability to carry them out. T h is is what the Rosicrucian Brotherhood is attempting to do and it is being successful in this work in all lands today just as it has been in the past centuries throughout the entire world. O f all the Great Teachers that came to man, none was more illuminated, more divine, and more truly prepared to be the Savior of mankind than Jesus, and yet after a very careful analysis of His doctrines, we find that aside from the purely religious or spiritual ones, there was only one of His principles that was absolutely new to the human race, and which nineteen hundred years of experimentation and test has not disproved or made obsolete. I refer to the principle that we could cleanse our­ selves inwardly as well as outwardly
S ev en hundred fifty-on e

V

V

and cast out devils and become clean and wholesome, free from disease and pain. If we look back over the preceding centuries, as pictured to us in the Old Testam ent of the Holy Bible, we will see that nations of peoples like unto individual family groups were wiped away and taken across the great gap of human existence through pestilence, disease, famine, and other material con­ ditions of flesh, which enslaved men and women. W^e will see that one of the greatest weaknesses of the human race was its constant and continued submission to the effects of disease of the body and mind. Brutal physical strength had been developed to a high degree and in tracing the achievements of mankind back to the remotest peri­ ods, we find there were times when the human mind and the human muscle could cope with enormous p ieces of stone in the erection of monuments that still stand as testaments to the mental and physical prowess of human de­ velopment. Rivers were crossed, moun­ tains were climbed, and civilization de­ veloped out of the cradle of barbarism into the magnificence of Greek and R o­ man architecture. Y et, in all of man s great achievement, he remained en­ slaved by the tyranny of disease. He could neither escape the clutches of the insidiousness that wiped millions from the face of the earth nor could he over­ power his enemy and stand free from any contagion. T h e cause of these physical conditions of the flesh and dis­ orders of the mind were deeply seated within man and not exclusively in his environment. W h en Jesus came among men He found on all sides of Him those who were possessed of devils or

in a frantic mental and physical state as a result of a belief in obsessions, a belief in the practice of Black M agic, in incantation, necromancy, and the Black A rts generally. He found man unhealthy and unwholesome to such an extent in his thinking and in his inner spiritual self that the outer body was susceptible to every contaminating in­ fluence and every form of attack upon the physical strength of the human body, that ill health was far more pre­ valent than perfect health. M any of us are apt to think of Jesus coming to man as a G reat Light re­ vealing salvation in only one sense. It is true, unquestionably, that the great­ est saving grace in the world is that which saves the spiritual part of man from eternal damnation and it is un­ doubtedly true that the real part of man, the spiritual or psychic part, needs far more redemption and regen­ eration from the physical self. But we must also remember that the great mes­ sages of Jesus did reveal to the world for the first time the true principles of health and the maintenance of health, and the curing of disease. It was Jesus who first pointed out to all thinking beings the potency of their thoughts, the power of their spiritual and mental attitudes, and the great power that resides in faith and hope. But we cannot say that Jesus was an advocate of healing by faith or that He promoted the idea that if one had faith in the coming of health, that health would come rather than disease. C er­ tainly, Jesus on many occasions pointed out to us that faith without works was of no value at all. Faith based upon hope and belief may inspire us and en­ courage us, and even urge us to greater deeds in order that we may accomplish the things that originally inspired our hopes. In this manner, faith is a valu­ able asset, but it takes more than mere faith, more than mere confidence in some divine principle to keep us free from disease and wholesome in our physical and spiritual bodies. Jesus pointed out very clearly that if the Divine Power around us was to be The R osicrucian drawn into our bodies to cleanse them and heal them, it must be through a D igest concentration of that power like draw­ January ing to some central part of ourselves a great beam of light and focalizing it 1932

upon that which is in darkness. He taught us how to pray as one of the principal methods for attuning our­ selves with the Divine healing powers of the universe, and at the same time He revealed that through such prayers we placed ourselves in a position of fellowship and companionship with God. Certainly, this was a great rev­ elation to those who could understand His words, and who could associate His doctrines with the marvelous dem­ onstrations He made. If we separate the demonstrations which Jesus made from His doctrines and examine either of them separately, we miss the real power and the real intent of His mis­ sion on earth. Th ere are those who think that since He was able to demon­ strate the healing principles that He taught, that His demonstrations and manifestations of a healing power were unique and independent of His spiritual doctrines. T h ey looked upon Him as others have looked upon Mesmer or some person who has a reputation for being a magnetic healer or divine healer. But Jesus did not intend that we should look upon Him as a person possessing some unique power that none of us possessed, and that this power resident within us like an ac­ cumulated energy in a great storage battery could be used only by those who had it for the benefit of the others. He tried to show each and everyone of us how this same healing, creative power of God was resident within us and could be quickened and awakened through our attunement with God and through our spiritual worthiness. In other words, Jesus taught and demonstrated the art of self-healing rather than the art of healing at the hands of another person. How easily he might have built for Himself a great reputation as G od’s divinely and ex­ clusively appointed agent of healing! But He constantly reminded not only His disciples, who were His special students, but everyone who could listen to His message that even greater things could they do. He took no personal credit for what He did and made it perfectly clear to everyone that the Kingdom of Heaven with all of its health, and beauty, and strength, and power, happiness, and prosperity was

within each of us, and that we, our­ selves, could be the master healers and cure ourselves of all disease. Viewing the matter from this point of view, we see at once that His demonstrations were not for the purpose merely of re­ lieving suffering, but to prove to us that the reliance that man had placed upon material things and upon material means was false. But after nineteen hundred years of unsuccessful con­ tradiction of the principles that Jesus taught, millions of men and women are still placing their reliance in material methods and in material things for the curing of disease. It is true, however, that gradually the world is becoming conscious of the fact that the mind of man with its di­ vine origin and its omnipotent power is capable of far greater mastership over the physical body than even Jesus demonstrated in His brief time among men. W e find that this is becoming so well considered by millions that the re­ liance upon material methods is becom­ ing gradually abandoned in certain countries. T h is change in the thinking of men and women and in the aband­ onment of the old and false systems constitutes a grave concern for the blind leaders of the blind, and those who would have us continue to walk in darkness. On all hands, we hear and see evidence of organized attacks upon any faith we may have in the curative powers of our own spiritual selves. But man is gradually learning that there are conditions about his own body and even in his own environment which are affected by his thoughts and by his attitude toward them. Slowly, he is learning that a man is, after all, what he thinks he is, and that as we think, we are not only in a social sense and in a business way, but in a physical, mental, and spiritual sense. T h e real part of man is not of the flesh and bones, but of the spirit and power of this great spiritual self within us, the dominating mind of man which has no limitations, no restrictions, and no in­ abilities which cannot be developed or quickened, or awakened into instant activity. Here lies the salvation of man as a race and as an individual. In a spiritual sense, the Kingdom of Heaven, the

glory of God, the consciousness of the Father of all of us, the Divinity of our very existence lies within us, and con­ stitutes the real part of our being. T his inner self knows no failure, knows no obstacles, knows no limitations in its power to conceive and to bring into realization that which it conceives. Although the teachings of Jesus in regard to healing are recorded briefly in the Bible, there has come down to us through the ages and through the practices and instructions of H is D i­ sciples and followers a very definite outline of what is to be done by man to purge himself not only of sin but of disease. These principles have been tested and tried for many centuries and they have been evolved into a very complete system of definite instructions. W e find, first of all, that not only is man’s mind capable of having direct control over the weak and negative ele­ ments of all matter which has no mind of its own and is always a subject of mind control, but the mind of man is capable of creating new conditions, either good or bad, in accordance with the harmony of its thoughts. If the mind of man is influenced or charged with thoughts of evil, hatred, anger, envy, or jealousy, it immediately be­ comes inharmonious as an organized power within man and is out of har­ mony with the constructive, beneficent forces of the universe. T h e art of psycho-analysis and the higher principles of psychology reveal /ery distinctly that every disease and every illness and organic abnormality within the human body has its primary cause in the mental attitude or in the product of the mind's thoughts. Before the flesh can take on any condition, either good or bad, it must be contami­ nated by the power of the mind. Flesh in itself is an unreal, negative matter that is powerless to create anything of its own or to have dominion over itself. It constantly reflects and manifests that which is within the body or that which is within the real self. Every chronic condition, every annoying ailment, every new complication, or peculiar physical disorder is the result of some mental qualities held in the mind suffi­ ciently long to produce these outer re­

suits. All the medicine in the world, all the systems of therapeutics united can­ not remove or change a physical condi­ tion of the body so long as the primary cause is maintained and continues to create the undesired conditions. Before any system of healing can be properly applied to the physical part of man, the mental cause and the origin of the condition within the mind of the body m ust be rem o v ed and ob literated . Sometimes it is difficult to trace to their origin many of the complications from which we suffer. O n the other hand, it is often a simple matter to trace a very serious condition to a very recent con­ dition of mind. And, after the cause has been re­ moved by purging and cleansing the mind of any evil thoughts or of any in­ harmonious attitude, we still have the creative, constructive healing power of the mind, which can be applied directly to the rebuilding of new tissues, the creating of new blood, the healing of wounds, the elimination of pains, and the regeneration of the body generally. Each and everyone of us has within our bodies, within our beings, this mighty power for self-healing. Every­ one of the modern as well as the an­ cient systems of drugless healing, men­ tal healing, magnetic healing, and other forms of divine or spiritual heal­ ing are based upon this law of the power of mind. As I have said, this is the great message which Jesus revealed to mankind. It is truly the message of physical salvation and a counterpart of the great message of spiritual salvation. T h e Rosicrucians have long been fa­ miliar with the secret teachings of Jesus and of the G reat M asters who followed Him as His Disciples, Apostles, and Adepts, and who, in the centuries gone by, have perfected and extended the great work of healing. T his organization of Rosicrucians offers you this knowledge along with an astounding amount of knowledge per­ taining to all of the laws of the uni­ verse, and all of the spiritual and nat­ ural laws which affect our beings and our welfare in every phase of life. T h e Rosicrucians teach that from sunrise to sunset and from sunset to sunrise, we must guard our thoughts and guard our attitude toward others. T h e holding of

a single thought of enmity toward any other living individual is a continuous source of poison and contamination to our physical bodies. W e may not be actively envious or outwardly hateful toward another, but may simply hold an inharmonious, unkind, critical, com­ plaining attitude toward someone and this becomes an insidious and danger­ ous source of trouble for our own wel­ fare. W e may in a moment of forget­ fulness utter a critical judgment against another or permit an emotion of anger to express itself and in that moment less harm is done to the other indi­ vidual than is done to our own body and our own being, and like an electric current that is released by the touch of a button and is disseminated instantly throughout an entire building, so a single thought of hatred or jealousy releases within our bodies a flow of poisonous influence that will seep into every cell of the blood, into every cell of the bone and tissue, and cause dis­ ruption and corruption. T h e harmon­ ious relationship of the cells in their constructive and re-creative processes is disturbed by such a mental shock. Cells are instantly broken down, the vibratory rate of others is made inhar­ monious, closely associated groups of active cells are suddenly shattered in their relationship, and dispersed in their contacts, and become destructive cells, bringing disease and serious illness. W h en the conscience of man bothers him he has done some unfair or dis­ honest thing and in the secrecy and privacy o f his own meditations he feels the guiltiness o f his act, he can be sure that the poison and destructive power of this attitude within his being is bringing about a physical condition from which he may suffer and which no diagnosis of a material nature will reveal, and no drug or remedy of a material nature will cure. As soon as anyone of us is out of harmony with the loving, peaceful, tolerant, construc­ tive laws of the universe, we are pos­ sessed of the devil and filled with the spirit of evil and these spirits and devils must be purged from our bodies before the Kingdom of Heaven with all of its health and glorious power can reside in us in perfect fullness.

Therefore, if you suffer from any ill­ ness, let the first step in your processes of self-healing be the ultimate and per­ fect step. Go into the silence and in sincere meditation analyze your mind and your mental attitude and purge it of every dross or evil thought that may have entered it. Transm ute the dross into the purest gold of perfect love. This is the real ancient art of transmu­ tation. It is the spiritual regeneration and means salvation for you. As you purge your mind of all ungodly, un­

holy, and unwholesome thoughts, you will be bathed in the glorious power of perfect health and perfect peace. Daily prayers, daily meditations, and daily purgings will bring you the goal of your desires in all directions. T h is is the real message of the Rosicrucians and is but one of hundreds of messages which it offers to you in exchange for your co-operation in spreading the gos­ pel of physical, material salvation, as well as spiritual salvation.

V

V

V

V

V

“Electricity” As Essence of the Soul
B y F r a n c e s V e jt a s a

V

V

V

S S C IE N C E to be the Dicoverer of God? Out of the dim ages, scarred by the brands of heresy, atheism, and “hell-fire,” its promoters march. Is their sustenance due to intellect merely curious for truth or to a name­ less urge unappeased in its search for self? And may not the discovery of self end for the earth-worn seeker his journey in the revelation of “home” or God— or into whatever the term may evolve? And so laboriously and painstakingly the army presses onward, hoping in the source of the beginning to find the na­ ture and purpose of the end. W h ile the world of passive worshippers remains entranced by gridiron achievements, front page space of stock markets, and the bubbles of teapot domes, those who have been classed as Godless strain al­ ways for the embrace which marks all completion. Through exacting calculations man has worked from the known to the un­ known, from the material to the imma­ terial, from the visible to the invisible,

until now he stands face to face with the Law of Duality, which has for cen­ turies constituted an essential in the architecture of philosophy— good and evil, rest and motion, energy and mat­ ter, or Life— the union of two extremes resulting in creation. At the point where energy and matter unite for manifest creation, science has arrived and discovered philosophy, the more intellectual sister of religion, already waiting. T h e zoologist in tracing down the relentless law of evolution (also a metaphysical truth) discovered by gaz­ ing through a microscope the minutest part of himself and all other animal life— the cell. Having comprehended that protoplasm, the essential substance of which he was composed, was divided into cells, he then sought, and is still seeking, to solve the mystery of the or­ ganization of the cell to which he has attributed a nucleus and other struc­ tures. T h e botanist, investigating the vege­ table kingdom, also arrived at the cell, and found it to be a subdivision of the same “essential substance” of the ani­ mal world— protoplasm, a semi-fluid

albuminous matter, consisting mainly of the four well-known elements: oxygen, carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen. A t this point the zoologist and botanist met and found there already waiting the philosopher, or mental scientist, with his theory that “all is life” and that the smallest cells of ourselves possess intel­ ligence. T h at a cell is capable of hearing may sound far-fetched, and yet does not the modern invention by which the deaf may hear through their fingers and hands imbue this idea with significance? T h e Alexander Graham Bell school in Chicago is putting into practice among its deaf children an electrical device which magnifies the vibrations of the voice and transmits them to the intelli­ gence of its subject through the sensi­ tiveness of the skin of the hand. W ith the study of the cell, the scien­ tist has not finished and has recently equipped himself with a new tool, the ultra-violet ray microscope, by which the cell can be examined without dam­ age to the cell’s life. W h atev er the hidden truth may be, the fact has al­ ready been established that a single cell is capable of existing alone as is demonstrated by single-celled plants and animals. T h e similarity of the simplest animals and the simplest plants has often proved a difficulty in the separation of each for its proper king­ dom. And this has been the cause of the generally accepted view that plants and animals originated together but have developed along different lines. T h e difference in size depends not on the volume of the cell but upon the number of cells— the more highly or­ ganized the animal the greater the n um ber of cells, until in man th e gray matter of the brain alone is said to be composed of over nine billion cells. Having comprehended the complex­ ity of numerous cells, one must remem­ ber that the single celled organism is capable of maintaining this mysterious thing called Life, and through its duality of energy and matter changes The the food it obtains from the air, earth, R osicrucian and otherwise, into the essential protoD igcst plasm which nourishes its cells. And Jan u a ry when cell-life through its combined 1932 powers has become mighty and spe­

cialized, such as is found in the sugarbeet, even the ruling intelligence of all material kingdom— man— comes to its storehouse to feed. M ay it be said then that the cell is a combination of energy and matter and that the union of invisible cell power, not leaving out intelligence, is a ma­ terial manifestation of the highest de­ gree of energy plus matter, or Life! In this specialization in protoplasm man’s consciousness has suddenly been startled at the realization that he un­ known to himself has come into posses­ sion of a very complex and incompre­ hensible network of finely attuned and vibrating flesh wires, which he has named the nervous system and likened its manifestations to that invisible force which has revolutionized his industrial, commercial, and home life— electricity. Somewhere between the creative cell of the nerve and its flowing force a reconciliation must be made. Einstein by tracing different classes of pheno­ mena to a common beginning has linked gravitation with electricity and mag­ netism, and the world at large has sleepily accepted the late reports of medicine and psychology that there flows through the nerves of man an energy, which they have called “E lec­ trical Nerve En ergy” because it pos­ sesses the qualifications of electricity— flowing and vibrating. There is something suggestive relat­ ing to this knowledge and a recent mu­ sical invention of a Russian scientist, — an instrument producing music when a person makes motions with his hands before it, the pitch and volume being controlled and regulated by the position of the hands. In the laboratory the chemist has proved to his analytical mind the im­ mortality of matter. He has burned a candle and by carefully catching all the gases which arose through the flame found by weighing them that in this seeming destruction of matter there was in reality no loss n or gain. T h e weight of the invisible gases was the same as of that which had been the visible and very material object— the candle. T h e candle therefore had not been consumed but merely changed form,— thus verifying the philosophical

truth “There is no death,” and also demonstrating the law of evolution, which constitutes the play of atoms in separating and uniting again to create other forms. T h e scientist has also found that by controlling the combination of atoms as elements he might himself, in a sense, become a creator of things. He has proved that some of the recognized ele­ ments which constitute his protoplasm are found in abundance in air, water, acids, and other matter. B y having acids react with metals he has liberated gases and also formed new compounds, and by, for instance, combining oxygen, the element which forms more than half of his baffling protoplasm, with some metal like iron the result is the common and generally unimpressive creation called rust. Through the magic of play of atoms the chemist has turned coal into gaso­ line, paraffin, alcohol, fats; and corn­ stalks and cobs into rayon, wallboard, paper, sugar. Even at this moment scientists are reported to be coaxing rubber out of the “yellow of a goldenrod." In the findings of the chemist as compared with the zoologist and botan­ ist there exists one important difference and that is that the so-called non-living matter brought into the chemist’s lab­ oratory does not contain protoplasm, al­ though there are present its constituent elements but not in combinations such as would result in the creation of pro­ toplasm. However, in this field is familiar that form of energy which we know so well by the name of electricity. Non-living matter has been divided into molecules

and subdivided into atoms. In the atom are found the electro-positive protons and a number of negatively charged smaller bodies called electrons, which be­ cause of their opposite charge are in constant attraction with their center, the proton. Here, therefore, we again find the law of the meeting of two e x ­ tremes, which in this case has resulted in the creation of the atom. A body containing more than its normal number of electrons is said to be negatively charged, while one from which some of its normal number of electrons have been removed is said to be positively charged. It has been proved that solutions of acids, bases, and salts in water are all conductors of electricity, but while science is certain of the posi­ tive and negative charge within the atom, it is still searching for the source of this power, or the Dynamo in motion. Energy, then, no matter what its phase, or name, or source, is in duality with matter. Sometimes, as if impatient at the feebleness and delay of man, it manifests in brutal force, casting dis­ aster on land and waters; sometimes as if in remorse it humbles itself to the servitude of messenger; speeding breath­ lessly through space and matter; and sometimes in compassion it comes as a gentle wave of music, leaving a caress on the soul of a beloved one. And all this, while man, as if a separate entity, searches about for “himself.” He may be found seeking in ancient cities, long swallowed by the earth; in the desolation of polar ice­ fields; in the mind of an African gorilla: and in the star-glimmered cathedral dome where like a silent priest he watches through the night for a sign of some far-off cry.

LO CA L B O O K D E A L E R S W IL L S E C U R E R O SIC R U C IA N B O O K S F O R Y O U T he interesting volumes of the Rosicrucian Library, such as are advertised in this magazine and elsewhere by the Rosicrucian Supply Bureau, may be obtained through your local book dealer— one of the established dealers of your community. See the dealer and tell him what book or books of the Rosicrucian Library you are interested in seeing before purchasing. H ave him write us and we will arrange to send the books to the dealer, so you may see them locally before purchasing. T h e dealer should write to us directly, and we will arrange with him. O f course, you may A L W A Y S S E C U R E T H E B O O K S D IR E C T L Y from the Rosicrucian Supply Bureau, San Jose, California.

The Spirit of Service
By E l r o d W a r d , F .R .C .
M a s te r , F r a n c is B a c o n Lodge

7
U R IN G the years of our progress through life each one of us makes a few observa­ tions. It becomes quite nat­ ural for us to “take stock,” and in making this analysis, we gen­ erally extend our ob­ servations beyond the limits of our own consciousness, and make at least some observations of those we are constantly associated with, for the reason that we constantly make comparison between others and ourselves. Such observations and such comparisons are good for us and are conducive to our further de­ velopment, provided we make them in the proper spirit. If we observe faults in others for the purpose of assisting those others as well as for the purpose of making a proper comparison between them and ourselves so that we may improve our selves, then we have not wasted our time but have made some advancement. No other reason is justifiable. N o thinker, whether materialist or student of the finer things of life, will deny the fact, that when one begins the study of the M ystical and Occult, one will experience an awakening of some kind and to some extent. T h at is al­ ways the result of such studies. T h at is what the studies are for. Nature has The R osicrucian so designed and constructed our inner selves that when these studies are once D igest begun, once started in earnest, once January taken up with the determination to 1932 solve the riddle of mind, soul, self, ego.

V

V
God, the resulting awakening along these same lines, is as inevitable, as sure, as certain, as the programs of time; and as complete as the interest, attention, devotion and humility of the student who studies them. Any given person may plod along for many years, wondering, guessing, believing and doubting, always unset­ tled in mind, having no well conceived ideas about those things for which he would fight, if necessary; and so long as that attitude of mind is allowed to have possession of the individual, he will continue to plod and guess and wonder and doubt. As long as there is no final determination to solve these riddles, as long as the individual re­ mains in a passive attitude of mind towards the higher and finer things of life, just so long will he remain in com­ plete ignorance of them. But when he determines to wrest from the secret archives of nature, her most valued secrets, her most useful laws and prin­ ciples, her Arcane rules of action, then and then only, will she place within his hand the keys to the kingdom of these hidden things of power and light. T h e lazy mind finds no place in the workshop of Nature. W h en once the studies are begun with a determination “stimulated by every delay,” Laws are understood. Principles are learned, the conscious­ ness is awakened and the soul has made one more step toward the goal which we are all seeking. W h a t is this awakening and how does it affect us? W h a t change has it wrought in us? T h e observation spoken

of reveals the fact that students of the higher and finer things of life may be divided into two general divisions, viz: those in whom there is a desire to serve, and those in whom there is the desire to direct. Both divisions are with us. Fortunately, and it is a law, the first class is greatly in the majority. Thank God for that law. Since the sec­ ond class is so far in the minority, let us dispose of it first. It was stated just now, that there is a class or a division of students of the M ystical things of life in whom there is a desire to direct things. T h ey love to run things. T h ey seem to believe that they have been lead to and through these teachings for the purpose of directing the affairs of the Cosmic on the earth plane. W e see them everywhere. T h ey are in business and in business organizations. T h ey are in Politics and political or­ ganizations. T h ey are in religion and religious organizations. T h ey are in the arts and sciences and in all organiza­ tions where artists and scientists are found. T h ey are there to direct, to run things. T h ey are there to look after the affairs of God in the doings of man. T h ey come in at the eleventh hour— no, they get there at eleven forty-five, and shout a few orders which cause dis­ orders, give a few commands, upset (if possible) the minds of the tireless workers, bluster and filibuster, and de­ part with as little dignity as that with which they enter, leaving behind them in their wake, the elements of destruc­ tion, grief, sorrow, shame, pessimism and gloom. T h ey offer no constructive measures; they support none. T h ey seldom offer a suggestion of a constructive nature. Being always in the minority, they con­ stantly cry “persecution,” and complain that affairs are being run by the “clique.” W e have known them in private life, and we have known them in public life. At home, they are domi­ neering and generally without compas­ sion. In public life they represent the discordant element. T h ey have very naturally missed the beautiful and in­ spiring teachings to be found in our Order, because such teachings beget humility and these people are never

humble. These characteristics are evi­ denced by their exaggerated egotism and their bigoted reaction to others. T h ey love to boast of the great follow­ ing that they have but always fail to demonstrate that following. T h ey are constantly boasting of the great love and respect others have for them and when the evidence of that love and re­ spect is withheld from them, again they cry “persecution.” Th eir fondest hopes are that some day they will hold some important position for the purpose of being able to show the world how great they are, and that through this position they may become famous. T h ey are soon gone and forgotten, and their re­ tirement to oblivion in the prime of their contact with life, they can never charge to their own stupidity, and de­ structive methods of living and think­ ing. Their deeds are not written in the records of men and time: and I fear that their names are not written on the G reater Scroll. W e remember them by the pangs of grief they have caused us and forget them as quickly as possible. But how different is that larger and more numerous division of kindly and loving souls in whose awakening con­ sciousness and humble hearts burn the love of service. T h ey have, indeed, be­ come awakened. Th ey are greatly in the majority. T h ey are the humble and tireless workers in the vineyard of the M asters. T h ey are the ones who have deter­ mined to solve the obscure riddle of Life, Mind, Soul, God, etc. T h ey have a faith, nay a confidence, in the inevi­ table result of their determination. Th eir interest has been aroused. Their attention is thorough, their intentions are sincere, their object pure. Their purpose is noble. T h eir devotion is complete and their humility is as sacred and divine as purity itself. T h ey think. Th ey have well conceived ideas about many things, and while these ideas and principles which they hold dear, may be exalted, purified, refined, evolved, yet these things never can be erased from their consciousness, because they are based upon a revelation of truth to them. Th ey have determined to wrest from the Cosmic Storehouse of W is -

dom, those Arcane Laws and Prin­ ciples and find the answers to them, and mind you, this determination is so interwoven with that spirit of true hu­ mility, that spirit of gratitude as well as that spirit of eternal service to God and man, as well as to the higher self, that this imposing attitude constitutes the very keys to the Kingdom of Life, Light and Love. T h e workshop of Nature becomes the Sanctum of the M ystic. T h e members of this division con­ stitute the proverbial “Salt of the earth,’’ spoken of by the M aster, Jesus. And they never lose their savor, be­ cause the Cosmic vibrations of an eter­ nal service has penetrated both mind and heart. I said they are greatly in the majority— (m ay their number in­ crease!) It is a law. T h ey love to serve, because they have realized, R E A L IZ E D , I say, that the universe of time, space and consciousness was constructed by a mind infinitely greater than their own impotent, objective mind and that this same universe still be­ longs to that same Divine Mind. F u r­ thermore, those who have become truly awakened to the Spirit of true Service, have found the existence in the scheme of things, of Law, Principle, a rule of action which they have no power to annul, but with which they may co­ operate to their everlasting happiness, welfare, and to the great glory of that same Infinite M ind. T h ey K N O W that they have been lead to and through these studies for the purpose of becoming enliqhtened and purified, humble and tireless, not in directing the affairs of the Cosmic, but to assist, help, co-operate with, the Cosmic in the way and in the caDacity directed by the same Cosmic. W e see these also, everywhere. T h ey also, are in the various avenues of business, oolitics, religion, arts and sciences. T h ey are on hand at the appointed hour, they are there when others arrive, and they come in without ostentation, hesiThe tation, or embarrassment. T h ey soothe R o s ic r u c ia n the troubled minds, relieve suffering, D ig e s t relieve embarrassment, adjust all misJa n u a r y understandings, heal the sick, spread 1932 cheer and happiness, enlighten the

ignorant, dispel superstition and leave with as little ceremony and as much dignity as possible, leaving behind them the seeds of construction, joy, happi­ ness, culture, refinement and optimism. T h ey build up with constructive sug­ gestions, and support all others of like nature. Being always on the side of truth, they are never heard to complain. W e have known these also, in private life and we have known them in public life. A t home, they are loved and re­ spected because of their great human understanding and compassion, and in public life their very presence com­ mands respect and admiration. They have found and R E A L IZ E D the beau­ tiful and inspiring teachings of our O r­ der and they love to meditate upon them, because such meditation tends toward perfection and power. These things teach humility and these people are always humble, but never sub­ servient to low principle. All of these mental reactions of a true M ystic are evidenced in kindliness of disposition, loveliness of character, power of per­ sonality and love of the Spirit of Service. T h ey always have a large and loving as well as loyal following and are the last ones to admit of the fact or con­ verse on the subject in any way. T h ey know that evidences of love and respect will not be withheld from them if it is proper that such love and respect should be in evidence. T h ey never, and not one of the true M vstics has ever been known to, seek public approbation. T h ey never dream of holding public office for the purpose of showing the world their greatness, for they know that the greatest of us all are the ones who have become the greatest servants of all. T h ey never have any desire to become famous. Should the plans o f the Cosmic in­ volve them in such a manner that they become well known to many peoples and races of man; should the changing elements in the affairs of civilization draw them into popularity, they enter upon such duties and take part in such affairs in a quiet and dignified, humble and grateful manner, expressing at least to the Cosmic Mind, their own unworthiness of any exalted station and

A S T R E E T IN A M Y S T IC C IT Y
Known as "the oldest street in France," located in ancient Gaul, once the center of Rosicrucian activities. Here was the office of the Archivist of the Brotherhood in the 14th century. (Photograph by The Imperator.) N ote: P resen ted to our Friends and R ea d ers with the com plim ents o f the R osicrucian D igest

Select Any One of These

FR EE

U nto T h e e I G ran t
An ancient manuscript re­ ceived from the Lama of T ibet. A revelation of an­ cient truths.

A T h o u sa n d Y ea rs o f Y esterd a y s
A fascinating and instructive story of reincarnation, re­ vealing many fundamental truths and principles.

M y stics A t P ra y er
A compilation of the var­ ious prayers of renowned mystics, revealing their key to Infinite power.

SPECIAL SUBSCRIPTION OFFER
N Y O N E of the above books will be given A B S O L U T E L Y F R E E , with a six months’ subscription to this magazine, the “Rosicrucian D igest." T o our friends who are not members of the Rosicrucian Brotherhood, here is an opportunity to receive this magazine for six months and at the same time select, free of cost, an interesting book. Any one of these books alone is worth the price of the subscription to the magazine. Just send in your complete name and address with $1.50, the price of a six months' subscription, to the address below. Name the book you want and it will be sent with your first copy of the magazine, without cost. Flere indeed is an unusual opportunity of 2 in 1.— a six months’ subscription to the magazine, and a free, interesting, instructive book, for the cost of just the subscription, or $1.50. T o be entitled to this offer you must address letter and order to the special department number given below. If original order is not addressed as below the free book C A N N O T be granted later. Make out your check or money order to A M O R C F U N D S , and send it to:

Department 8

ROSICRUCIAN

BROTHERHOOD

(A M O RC ) San Jose, California, U . S. A.
(B e sure a n d nam e the b o o k a b o v e that you w ant fr e e .)

desiring absolutely no personal glory of any degree or nature, insisting that all glory belongs to Him whom we are here to serve, and all praise likewise belongs to God and the M asters. Should they ever be called upon to take part in public affairs, and they frequently are, should they ever be placed in a position where public bur­ dens are placed upon their shoulders, and such is often the case, they no more shirk the responsibility or shun the obligation than they object to a life of true service; and during their tenure of office, their deeds are constantly characterized by simple acts of honesty of the most dignified nature, justice of the highest type and an understanding of the matter in hand which at times seems uncanny. T h ey believe, before the altar of their own conscience, that their success in any field, however far fetched, is due, not to their own per­ sonal intelligence and understanding, but to their harmonious and willing co­ operation with the Cosmic and its laws as well as the continuous help they re­ ceive from the Cosmic. All M ystics know that the Cosmic Mind and the Cosmic M asters are highly cognizant of the attitudes and efforts and intentions of all men in whatever walks of life. All M ystics know that the most noble thoughts which the human minds are capable of registering are those of a strictly im­ personal and unselfish nature. And all M ystics know that the most worthy and worth while acts any of us may engage in, are those of a truly unselfish nature; those wherein the greatest serv­ ice is offered and rendered. All these things being true and beyond dispute what is the duty of the average man? In speaking of the aver­ age man, I mean the great body of men and women in the common walks of life, assisting and helping in the business, social and professional walks and activities of our everyday life. W h a t are our general duties in our relations to each other? If service to God is at all worthy, then we can render that service to Him only by rendering a service to man. W h a t must be the nature of that service to man

which would be approved of by, and acceptable to God? T ak e your own business or profession in life— you who read this— and the requirements of a true Rosicrucian Service would demand of you that you execute the duties of that position just as well when you knew that no human eye was looking at you, and would never see the result of your work, as you would if you knew that every interested mind in the world was looking at you and observing care­ fully all of what you are doing and the results of it. In other words, do your work as well all of the time as if you knew that the God of the Universe was standing by and checking up on what you are doing and how you are doing it. All M ystics know that this is the case, and that when the truth of this great fact dawns upon a student of the Laws of Mysticism, he is in­ stantly and at once lifted out of the second division described earlier in this article, and placed in the first division with all the others of that innumerable host of tireless workers in the Vineyard of the M asters. At once, he leaves the small minority of those who desire to rule or ruin, and is placed in that great division of those who desire to serve. All M ystics know that as soon as that state of mind is reached in the evolu­ tion of the soul, all the hosts of heaven, all the Cosmic M asters, all the Cosmic and powerful energies and forces of the universe contrive to advance that soul onwards, who is now on the path to attunement with the Divine Mind. M ore briefly speaking, as soon as the student on the path turns his attention to the higher and finer things, all the higher and finer things of life turn their attention towards the student. Each one will experience a renewing of the mind just as Paul has so well stated in the scriptures. A s soon as a student becomes inspired to co-operate with God, just then God begins to co­ operate with the student. A s soon as the student begins to serve God, just then God begins to serve the student. And all M ystics know that God is truly the greatest servant man can ever know. This is one of the most mystical of all of the laws of life. T h e very

nature of G od’s laws reveal the all im­ portant fact that G od ’s inclination, G od’s desire, if we might use the word, is to serve His children. W e have found from observation and experience, in our private studies as a student in this Order, in our official connection with the Order as well as in our private and business life, that as soon as the student once determines to know the truth about life and applies himself to the studies as given to him in the graded lectures of the Order, and does so with the spirit of service and hu­ mility; then all of the power and all of the intelligence and all of the wisdom of all of the countless workers and M asters in our Order and out of it, contrive and conspire to make a con­ stant and continual success of his life and of everything that he does. And further, that all of this great influence mentioned and suggested above will contrive and conspire to assist him in his efforts to make that compensation to nature which his karmic relationship demands, and all this will be done in perfect harmony with Cosmic Law. W h en God created the Universe and started it on its way through the inter­ minable process of evolution, he or­ dained and set into operation certain laws by which His universe was to be governed, and those laws which have continued to operate, must and will operate until the plan H e conceived has been fully carried out. T h ese laws operate in silence and with a regularity and universality which astonish us. T h e law of service is one of the most potent of them all— a study of the universal scheme discloses the fact that all of these laws constantly operate in a har­ monious relationship to each other. Now since the plan includes the ulti­ mate success and happiness of the in­ dividual, as well as the universal law of service, then our only deduction is that in order to reach this delightful state, it is necessary to constantly hold in mind the attitude of the greatest and most unselfish service to all. The Now let us see if we can reach a R osicrucian satisfactory conclusion as to what con­ D igest stitutes unselfish service in our every January 1932 day life. In the general application of

the law it means to help every form of life whenever and wherever that help is needed. It means to help the helpless. It means to relieve suffering; it means to feed the hungry; it means to heal the sick; it means to spread cheer and optimism; it means to be optimistic. It means to be tolerant, kind, pleasant and smiling. T h e special application of the law must be made by each one of us, upon our own analysis. W e saw a beautiful and inspiring ex­ ample once in a crowded street car during the five o’clock rush when many people, from many walks of life were on their way home. M en and women of all ages, were pushing and crowding each other in their efforts to secure a pleasant seat. A colored man in middle life, whose clothing was nearly covered over with lime and cement in which he had been working, boarded the car and made an effort to work his way through to the forward end of the car. W h ile working his way through the crowd of tired and irritable men and women, we were greatly surprised to see a stylishly dressed young woman take him gently by the sleeve of his dirty coat, and with a smile, she asked this poor tired colored man to take the seat she had been occupying. T his was an act of kindness of the purest sort. T h is was her way of rendering a service. Now, this simple act of kindness was done through a desire to make the homeward journey of this poor, tired, hard working man more endurable. Every one knows that for many a day, there went through the mind of that man many thoughts of deepest grati­ tude and the most sincere respect for that one little act of kindness. His eve­ ning at home was more pleasant, happier. All Rosicrucians know of that beau­ tiful exemplification of the law of un­ selfish service related in one of the old American Rosae Crucis magazines some years ago. In that case a man paid a visit to one of our local lodges, and asked for the privilege of sweeping and cleaning the temple and lodge rooms. T h e privilege was granted to him, and in a surprisingly short time, he reported

that he was through with the duties assigned him. He remained on the premises for a while during the eve­ ning, and it was later learned that he was a high degree student in the O r­ der, and at home in his business life he was the president of one of the banks in his home city. T h a t man de­ lighted in giving a service to those who needed help of some kind. W e might repeat examples of this kind until our repetition would become monotonous. Enough has been said to show what is meant by rendering a service to each other. Now the key-note of such service is sounded only when such service is rendered without reservation of any kind and without any hope or thought of any reward of any nature. Th ere is where the unselfishness of the donor comes in. Do the kindly act, and be on your way. O ther ones and other condi­ tions await the touch of such a hand. It might be well to say to those who are just beginning to feel the urge of a larger life, a greater service, that the privileges of service will become more and more constant as the practice is followed and the ability will become more and more pronounced as we give our best efforts to this sort of work. T hose who have heretofore found time dragging on their hands, those who have found life to be a monoton­ ous succession of uninteresting events and those who have become unhappy by reason of a restlessness within them­ selves. will each and all find, through adopting such a life of service, that satisfaction, that peace of mind, that happiness for which the mind of man is ever searching. If the unemployed of America could and would adopt the plan of giving an unselfish service to every one who could be found who is in need of something of a serviceable nature, and if the idle rich could and would join with these unemployed in such a service, I say to you that within thirty days or less, this deplorable con­ dition of crime, poverty, sickness, igno­ rance and dissatisfaction would be nearly eliminated from our civilization, provided each one would do his or her best work in his or her own sphere and capacity.

A change from the present attitude of mind on the part of the general public is the only change which would be necessary and this change of mind, this change of attitude toward each other would be the easiest thing in the world to adopt if we could only under­ stand the general plan of God as ob­ served in a sincere study of His laws. T h e Rosicrucian Order is in the midst of the world today for the sole purpose of rendering that type of un­ selfish service to all men and women which will be most conducive to happi­ ness, success, health and a general prosperity. T his noble O rder is here with its high ideals of civilization, with its matchless ethics of nobility o f pur­ pose; all for the greatest good of the greatest number. This great school with its unusual teachings and charac­ teristic methods of disseminating them, is your servant; is here for no other purpose than to serve and assist, help and prosper, those who are ready to look beyond the ordinary sensualities of life; and into that realm of cultured thought, into that field of scientific ex­ perimentation, where each and every result proves to the ever expanding consciousness the power and divinity of the human mind. This august fraternity with its great repository of the most profound wisdom has undertaken the Herculean task of doing its part in dispeling the darkness of superstition and ignorance by laying before the sincere student a long and most delightful course of graded lectures. T h a t task is being handled with the most consum­ mate skill by a world wide organiza­ tion which has on its records of mem­ bership the greatest aristocrats of learning the world has ever known. T h e records of these aristocrats of power and culture, who have become the illumined arbiters of the destinies of men and nations, show conclusively, that these men and women have been the greatest servants who have ever graced the earth with their presence. Th eir names have been preserved to us by the unselfish deeds they per­ formed and the lives they lived. T o him who is wandering through the wilderness of doubt, uncertainty.

scepticism and superstition, to the one who seems to be lost in the great con­ fusion resulting from a multiplicity of philosophical and psychological organ­ izations, to the one who thinks he is suffering from a confusion of conflict­ ing complexes and to the ones who are tired of roaming through volumes and courses purporting to teach the ancient wisdom with a modern application for a stipulated sum of money and to that great army of serious and worthy men and women who are ready to add to their already highly developed intel­ lectual natures, that most complete study of true mysticism, a thorough understanding of which, gives them a polish, a finish, a refinement which sat­

isfies their very souls, may we offer the teachings of the Rosicrucian Brotherhood, A M O R C . And may all of those who feel that insatiable urge and longing for under­ standing and power, peace and con­ tentment, travel the path of the true seeker which leads to the outer portals of the shrine of the M asters— T h e A n­ cient and M ystical Order Rosae Crucis — where he will find one of our noble Guardians of the Threshold, who will examine him, and if found worthy, will conduct him, in the Spirit of the Serv­ ice of the M asters, to the Holy Shrine within, where, in due time, he will ex­ perience that most exalted state we call a Peace Profound.

V

V

V

V

V

Cathedral Notes
a „

0
T h e “Cathedral of the Soul” is a Cosmic meeting place for all minds of the most advanced and highly developed spiritual members and workers of the Rosicrucian Fraternity. It is a focal point of Cosmic radiations and thought waves from which radiates vibrations of health, peace, happiness, and inner awakening. Various periods of the day are set aside when many thousands of minds are attuned with the Cathedral of the Soul, and others attuning with the Cathedral at this time will receive the benefit of the vibra­ tions. Those who are not members of the organization may share in this unusual benefit as well as those who are members. T h e book called "Liber 777” describes the periods for various contacts with the Cathedral. Copies will be sent to persons who are not members by addressing their request for this book to librarian S. P. C.. care of A M O R C Teirmle. San Tose. California, enclosing three cents in postage stamps. ( P L E A S E S T A T E W H E T H E R M E M B E R O R N O T — T H IS IS IM P O R T A N T ).

5 3

■E

HE special contacts on the part of thousands of members and many hun­ dreds of strangers dur­ ing the past two months, and especially during the holiday season, has been very wonderful and in­ spiring. More and more The the Cathedral of the Soul is appealing Rosicrucian to men and women everywhere and D igest much good is being derived from the January regular contacts as outlined in the spe­ cial book described above. 1932

There will be no special Cathedral contacts during the next sixty days un­ less a few are announced in the next issue of this magazine. Do not forget to call the attention of your friends or acquaintances who are ill to the fact that they may share in the benefits of the Cathedral period as freely as any of our members. Do not hesitate to take your own personal prob­ lems into the Cathedral and be inspired with the proper answers and solutions. It is by persistently trying to reach the Cathedral or at least get in contact with

its vibrations and inspirations that suc­ cess in this regard is achieved. But whether you sense your contact with the Cathedral or not, keep all Cathedral periods, and your attempt to attune yourself raises you higher and higher throughout the whole of each successive period and you will find yourself in better physical, mental, and spiritual condition after each attempt. M ake the Cathedral your spiritual home for periods of meditation and con­ templation. S P E C IA L S E S S I O N S H ereafter there will be special ses­ sions of the Cathedral every Tuesday evening. Grand M aster Dean has arranged to call together the members of the various grades of study, including the most advanced workers, for a special spiritual meeting in the Supreme Lodge every Tuesday evening at 7:30. A t pre­ cisely 8:00 o’clock each Tuesday eve­ ning these members and special workers will begin a series of contacts with our members generally throughout the en­ tire organization and with the C athed­ ral. All of our members are invited to participate in these contacts by sitting in a relaxed and quiet receptive attitude wherever they may be for fifteen min­ utes beginning at 8:00, Pacific Standard Time, each Tuesday evening. By looking at the time schedule in your Cathedral of the Soul pamphlet known as “Liber 7 7 7 ” you will be able to figure the time for your part of the country. Those living in the eastern sec­

tion of North America will find that 8:00, Pacific Tim e, is equivalent to 11:00 in the evening. T hose living in central states will find that it is 10:00 o’clock. T h ose living in the mountain or western states will find that it is 9:00 o ’clock, those in Europe along the western fron­ tier of the continent will find that it is noon time of Tuesday, while those in Holland and parts of Germany, and Italy will find that it is 11:00 o’clock in the morning of Tuesday. Those in the W estern W orld , Australia, New Z e a ­ land, China, Japan, and other countries will be able to determine the time by making an inquiry locally as to the dif­ ference in time between their country and the Pacific coast of America or by consulting the time table in book “7 7 7 .” Those who are anxious to have the highest spiritual contacts possible or who are anxious to have healing vibra­ tions and strength to meet trials and tribulations will find these Tuesday eve­ ning periods very helpful. No doubt those who try to reach this high spiritual assembly in the temple on Tuesday evening from 8:00 to 8:15 or any time during the session from 7:30 to 9:00 o’clock, will hear the beautiful mu­ sic and sense the psychic conditions ex­ isting in the beautiful Supreme Lodge located here at Rosicrucian Park. Grand M aster Dean will be glad to receive brief letters from those who make the contact, telling him their im­ pressions and some of these letters will be read to the members assembled here each Tuesday evening.

T H E R O S IC R U C IA N O R IE N T A L A N D E G Y P T IA N M U SEU M O ver a period of years, we have been collecting unusual relics, and have established here at the Grand Lodge, an Oriental and Egyptian Museum. Most of the relics on display in the Museum have not only general historical importance but particular his­ torical value to Rosicrucians. M any of the relics were the property of famous Rosi­ crucians. T his Museum is open every day to both members and the public. There are no admission charges. W e ask for co-operation in making it now. If you have any unusual relics that you would care to donate or loan to the Museum, please communicate directly with the name and address below. W e are particularly anxious to have Oriental and Egyptian pieces, and especially those pieces that are interesting and have an authentic history. Your contribution may be either a small piece or a large one. Everyone is welcome to enjoy this attractive feature of Rosicrucian Park. Address your communications to D IR E C T O R M U SE U M , R O S IC R U C IA N PA RK, SA N JO S E , C A L IF O R N IA .

Jtlp g fe at draper
W ith T h eir Key to Infinite Power!
Surprising, Inspiring, Instructive

T h e first complete compilation of the famous prayers of the renowned mystics and adepts of all the ages.

By MANY CIHLAR, F. R. C., Austrian Philosopher and Mystic
T h e book "M ystics at P rayer” explains in simple language the reason of prayer, how to pray, and the Cosmic laws involved. You come to learn the real efficacy of prayer and its full beauty dawns upon you. W hatev er your religious beliefs, this book makes your prayers the application not of words, but of helpful, divine principles. Y ou will learn the infinite power of prayer. Prayer is man’s rightful heritage. It is the direct means of mans' communion with the infinite force of divinity. "M ystics at P rayer” is well bound, embossed in gold, printed on $ art paper in two colors, with deckled edge and tipped pages, sent anywhere, postpaid ............................................. ........................

Send Remittance and Order direct to ROSICRUCIAN SUPPLY BUREAU
R o s ic r u c ia n P a r k S a n Jo se , C a lif o r n ia

PRIV A TE IN STRU CTIO N S A T HOME The Rosicrucians Offer You Their Personal Service Interesting Free Book Explains
Those who are interested in studying the complete instructions contained in the entire Rosicrucian system and who cannot find it convenient to attend a lodge or study group of the organization in their own district, or who live where there is no estab­ lished branch of the organization, may have the benefit of these instructions and all of the personal service of the organization in the privacy of their own homes. After many years of development of a special system for home study and after the organization of many departments of special personal help, thousands of men and women in every walk of life in all parts of the world, are finding peace and happiness, fulfillment of their desires and powers, through the special private help offered by the organization to every sincere seeker. If you would like to know more about this personal service and its benefits and the wonderful instruction that is offered to those who are seeking for it, write a letter addressed to: "Librarian S . P. C., care of A M O R C Temple. San Jose, California,” and an interesting free book and other literature will be gladly sent to you by mail.

The R osicrucian D ig e s t January

1932

(Those who are Rosicrucian students are now receiving these instructions)

THE PURPOSES OF

THE RO SICRUCIAN ORDER
The Rosicrucian Order, having existed in all civilized lands for many centuries, is a non­ sectarian, fraternal body of men and women devoted to the investigation, study, and practical application of natural and spiritual laws. T h e purpose of the organization is to enable all to live in harmony with the creative, constructive. Cosmic forces for the attainment of health, happi­ ness, and Peace. T h e Order is internationally known as A M O R C (an abbreviation), and the A M O R C in America, and all other lands, constitutes the only form of Rosicrucian activities united in one body having representation in the international Rosicrucian congresses. T h e A M O R C does not sell its teachings, but gives them freely to all affiliated members, together with many other benefits. Inquirers seeking to know the history, purposes, and practical benefits of Rosicrucian asso­ ciation, are invited to send for the free book, “T h e Light of Egypt.” Address, Librarian, S. P. C., care of

AMORC
ROSICRUCIAN PARK

TEMPLE
SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA U. S. A
RADIO STATION 6KZ)

(CABLE ADDRESS: "A M O R C O "

Directory of the JS[orth American Jurisdiction
(Including the United States, Dominion of Canada, Alaska, Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, N ic­ aragua, Costa Rica, Republic of Panama, the W e st Indies, Lower California, and all land under the protection of the United States of America.) H. S P E N C E R L E W I S , F . R. C., Ph. D ........................... Imperatorfor North America R A LPH M. L E W I S , F. R. C __________________ SupremeSecretary for North America C H A R L E S D A N A D E A N , F . R. C .......................... -Grand Master Director of Correspondence A. L E O N B A T C H E L O R , F. R. C ................................................ DR. A R T H U R B. B E L L , F . R. C.......................................... Director oftheW elfare Department H A R R Y L. S H IB L E Y , F . R. C ........ D irector of Editorial Department .

T h e fo llo w in g p rin cip al b ra n ch es a r e D istrict H ea d q u a rteres o f A M O R C
New Y ork City: A F R A M E R IC A N Chapter of A M O R C 125 W est 130th St., L. Baynard W hitney, F.R .C ., Master. Boston, Mass.: Mass. Lodge, Mrs. M arie Clemens, S.R .C ., Master, Lodge Building, 739 Boylston Street. Pittsburgh, Pa.: Penn. First Lodge, Dr. Charles D. Green, K.R.C., Master, 610 Arch St., N. S., Pitts­ burgh, c-o A M O R C . Hartford, Conn.: Isis Lodge, A M O R C , M r. W . B. Andrews, Master, B ox 54, South W indsor, Conn. Tampa, Florida: Florida Lodge, Mrs. Frances Crescenzi, S ec­ retary, 3420 10th St. San Frandaco, Calif.: Francis Bacon Lodge, M r. Elrod W ard , K.R.C., Master, A M O R C Temple, 1655 Polk S treet Los Angeles, Calif.: Hermes Lodge, Nos. 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, and 46, A M O R C T E M P L E , 3 1 6 ^ W e st Pico Street, Dr. J. C. Guidero, M aster. Inquiry Office and Secretary, Suite 813, New Orpheum Theatre Building. San Jose, Calif.: E gypt Lodge No. 7, Mr. A. Leon Batchelor. K. R. C., Master, Rosicrucian Park. Chicago, 111.: Chicago Chapter No. 9., O . D. O'Delius. Master. Offices and Reading room (open daily and evenings), Auditorium Hotel (Club Room No. 4) 430 South Michigan Ave. (Telephone Harrison 5000). Philadelphia, Penna.: Delta Lodge No. 1, A M O R C . Stanley K. Taylor, K .R .C., Secretary 5215 Ridge Ave.

(Directory Continued on Next Page)

Portland, Oregon: Portland Chapter, Clara G. Anderson, S.R.C ., Master, 424 Clay Street.
Scd ttlp XXZdsheZ

Washington, D . C. : Official Representatives: R. N . Trezise, 3418 17th St. N . W .: Virgil McComas, 4707 Connecticut Avenue, N. W . San Antonio, Texas T e x as Lodge, Mrs. C. W anblom, S. R. C., Master, 1133 So. Laredo St.

A M O R C Chapter, M ary A. Huey, Master, 301 Haight Bldg., Second Ave and Pine St., Telephone Main 9941.

OTHER AMERICAN BRANCHES
Chartered Branches and Groups of A M O R C will be found in most large cities and towns of North America. Address of local representatives given on request.

PRINCIPAL CANADIAN BRANCHES
Vancouver, B. C.: Canadian Grand Lodge, Dr. J. B . d a r k , K. R . C., Grand M aster, A M O R C Temple, 560 Granville Street. M ontreal, Quebec: A M O R C , English Division, Albert E . Poad, K. R. C., M aster Apt. No. 4, 1431 M ackay Street. Montreal, Quebec: Societe d etude d’A M O R C (French Section). E . G. Clossey, K. R. C., Master, 3839 Berri Street. Verdun, Quebec: Mr. R. A. Williamson, M aster 3809 W e ll­ ington Street. Winnipeg, M an.: A. G. Gaillard, P . O . B ox 681. Lashbum, Sask.: M r. V . W illiam Potten, M aster, P. O . Box 104. New Westminster, B . C.: M r. A. H. P. Mathew, Master, 1313 7th Ave. Victoria, B . C.: Secretary, A M O R C , B ox 14. Edmonton, A lta.: M r. James Qem ents, K. R. C., M aster 9533 Jasper Avenue, E .

SPANISH-AMERICAN SECTION
T his Jurisdiction includes all the Spanish-speaking Countries of the New W orld. Its Supreme Council and Head Office are located at San Juan, Puerto Rico, having local Representatives in all the principal cities of these stated Countries. Hon. Manuel Rodriguez Serra, F . R. C., Supreme Grand M aster, P. O . Box 702, San Juan, Puerto Rico. Armando Font de la Jara, F . R. C., Secretary General, P. O . B ox 36, San Juan, Puerto Rico. T h e name and address of other Officers and Branch Secretaries cannot be given general pub­ licity, but may be obtained for any information or special purposes, through the Head Office at San Juan, Puerto Rico. ALL C O R R E S P O N D E N C E S H O U L D B E A D D R E S S E D T O T H E S E C R E T A R Y G E N E R A L

A F E W OF TH E FOREIGN JURISDICTIONS
India: T he Supreme Council, A M O R C , Calcutta, India. Scandinavian Countries: T he A M O R C Grand Lodge of Denmark, Carli Anderson, S. R. C., Grand Secretary, Manogade 13th Strand, Copenhagen, Den­ mark. France: Dr. H. Gruter, F. R. C., Grand Master, Nice. Mile. Jeanne Guesdon, S. R. C.. Corres­ ponding Secretary for the Grand Lodge (A M O R C ) of France, 56 Rue Gambetta, Villeneuve Saint Georges, (Seine 6 O ise). Austria: M r. M any Cihlar, K. R. C. Grossekreter der A M O R C . Laxenburgerstr, 75/9, Vienna, X . China and Russia: T h e United Grand Lodge of China and Russia, 8/18 Kvakazasaya St., Harbin, ManEngland: T h e A M O R C Grand Lodge of Great Britlan, M r. Raymund Andrea, K .R .C., Grand Master 41 Berkely Road, Bishopton, Bristol, England. Dutch East Indies: W . J. Visser, Grand M aster, Bodjong 135, Semarang, Java. Egypt: T he Grand Orient of A M O R C , House of the Temple, M r. A. Ramayvelim, F.R .C ., Grand Secretary, 7, Rue Talkha, Heliopolis. Africa: T h e Grand Lodge of the Gold Coast, A M O R C . M r. Stephen H. Addo, Grand Master, P. O . Box 424, Accra, Gold Coast, W est A frica. Costa Rica: W illiam T . Lindo, F . R. C., Grand Master, P. O . B ox 521, Limon, Republic of Costa Rica, C. A.

The n . • Rostcructan churia D igest Australia:
J

1932

'

T h e Grand Council of Australia, M r. S. Kowron, F.R .C ., Grand M aster "Sandhurst,” 52 Fletcher St., Bondi, Sydney, N .S .W .

The addresses of other foreign Grand Lodges and secretaries will be furnished on application.

“Lemuria —the Lost Continent of the Pacific”
■ < % > —

The Submerged Land of Mystics!
1
Beneath the rolling, restless seas lie the mysteries of forgotten civilizations. Swept by the tides, half buried in the sands, worn awray by terrific pressure are the remnants of a culture little known to our age today. W here the mighty Pacific now rolls in a majestic sweep of thousands of miles, there was once a vast continent. This land w’as known as Lemuria, and its people as Lemurians. Science has gradually pieced together the evidences of this lost race, and in this book you will find the most astounding, enthralling chapters you have ever read. How these people came to be swept from the face of the earth, except for survivors who have living descendants today, is explained.

The Magic Dwellers of Mt. Shasta
9

Fanned by the cool breezes of the Pacific and crowned by a cap of snow is California's mystery mountain, Mt. Shasta. It is not unlike other towering peaks of splendor on the famed Pacific coast except that it is shrouded with tales of weird happenings. It is said that a strange people live in seclusion somewhere on the mountain; that they practice unusual rites. It is said that they seem pos­ sessed of great wealth, for they have much gold; and, too, it is said that they exclude themselves from others. These people are the living descendants of the Lemurians. Do you know how they came there, when their forbears perished centuries ago with the submersion of the continent of Lemuria? W ould you like to know' the truths which they concealed from a merely curious world?

Latest Mystical Book Sensation
Every indication is that this book will live up to its an­ ticipated reputation of being the m ystical b o o k sensation of the year. This book contains truths which are much stranger than fiction. It is profusely illustrated with maps, charts, and symbols. It is a book you can never forget because of its intriguing mystery; its instruction, and its unusual subject matter. The book is well-printed, wellbound and is eco n o m ica lly p riced at $2.50 postpaid. Send your order and remittance direct to the address below or ask y ou r loca l b o o k d ea ler to get it for you.

C an You Interpret These Strange C a rvin g s?

W h a t A n cient Story Do These R e v e a l?

ROSICRUCIAN SUPPLY BUREAU
(A M O RC ) San Jose, California, U . S. A.

p r in t e d

in

THE

R O SICR U C IA N

PR ESS.

u . s . a . SAN JO S E ,

C ALIFO RN IA

*/ *> ,

%

&oStnuctan Hifjtatp
be The following books are recommended because of the special knowledge they found in our teachings and not available elsewhere.
V olu m e I.

contain, not to

R osicru cian Q uestions an d A n sw ers an d C o m p lete H istory o f the O rder.

The story of the Rosicrucian ideals, traditions, activities, and accomplishments is told interestingly inthis book,andthe scores of questions form a small encyclopaedia of knowledge. Over 300 pages, printed on fine book paper, bound in green silk, and stamped in gold. Price $2.50 per copy, postpaid.

V olu m e II.

R osicru cian P rinciples fo r the H o m e a n d B usiness.

A very practical book dealing with the solution of health, financial, and business problems in the home and office. W ell printed and bound in red silk, stamped with gold. Price $2.25 per copy, postpaid.

V olu m e III.

T h e M ystical L ife o f ]esus.

A rare account of the Cosmic preparation, birth, secret studies, mission, crucifixion, and later life of the Great Master, from the records of the Essene and Rosicrucian Brotherhoods. A book that is demanded in foreign lands as the most talked about revelation of Jesus ever made. O ver 300 pages, beautifully illustrated, bound in purple silk, stamped in gold. Price $2.90 per copy, postpaid.

V olu m e V.

“ U nto T h e e I G ran t . . ."

A strange book prepared from a secret manuscript found in the monastery of Tibet. It is filled with the most sublime teachings of the ancient Masters of the Far East. The book has had many editions. W ell printed with leatherette cover. Price $1.50 per copy, postpaid.

V olu m e V I.

A T h o u san d Y ears o f Y esterd a y s.

A beautiful story of reincarnation and mystic lessons. This unusual book has been translated and sold inmanylanguages and is universally endorsed. W ell printed with flexible cover. Price 85 cents per copy, postpaid.

V olum e V II.

S e lf M astery an d F a te . W ith the C y cles o f L ife.

A new and astounding system of determining your fortunate and unfortunate hours, weeks, months, and years throughout your life. N o mathematics required. Better than any system of numerology or astrology. Bound in silk, stamped with gold, Price $2.50 per copy, postpaid.

V olu m e V III.

T h e R osicrucian M anual.

Most complete outline of the rules, regulations, and operation of lodges and student work of the Order, with many in­ teresting articles, biographies, explanations, and complete Dictionary of Rosicrucian terms and words. V ery completely illustrated. A necessity to every student who wishes to progress rapidly, and a guide to all seekers. W ell printed and bound in silk, stamped with gold. Price $2.30 per copy postpaid.

V olu m e X L

M an sion s o f the S o u l , T h e C osm ic C on cep tion .
W ell illust­

T he complete doctrines of reincarnation explained. This book makes reincarnation easily understood. rated, bound in silk, stamped in gold, extra large. Price $2.50 per copy, postpaid.

Send all orders for books, with remittances, direct to A M O R C S U P P L Y B U R E A U , Rosicrucian Park, San J ose, Calif.

|

c
i

3
$ ^

Suggestions;
R O S IC R U C IA N E M B L E M S Members desiring Rosicrucian emblems may obtain them from Headquarters. T h ey are made of gold, beautifully inlaid with enamel, neat in size, and consist of the triangle surmounted by the Egyptian cross. M en ’s style emblem with screw back. $2.00. W om en's style, with patent safety catch pin, $2.25. H O M E SA N C T U M S U P P L IE S R osicru cian C a n d lestick s: Beautifully designed to represent Egyptian columns like those in Egypt and in the Supreme Temple at San Jose. finished in dark red mahogany, mounted on double triangle base. Each will hold regular size candle. Price $2.50 per pair; postage prepaid. Sanctum C ross: Design of this cross is like the famous Egyptian Crux Ansata (the looped cross), mounted on double triangle and finished to match the candlesticks, with red stone in the center of the cross. A very beautiful and symbolical ornament. Price $2.50; postage prepaid. Student's M em bersh ip A p ro n : For those members who wish to wear the typical Rosicrucian triangle lodge apron while performing ceremonies at home, this symbolical device made in the ancient manner and easily tied around the body and containing the Cross and Rose within the triangle, will be found very appropriate. Price $1.50 each: postage prepaid. R osicrucian In cen se: A very delicate perfumed incense, carrying with it the odor and vibrations of the Oriental flowers. M ade especially for us in condensed form, so that a very small amount is necessary at one burning. Far superior to any high priced incense on the market. Price $.65 for a box consisting of twelve large cubes sufficient for many months' use. postage prep aid by us. C o m p lete Sanctum S et: Includes two candlesticks, the cross, box of incense, and the ritualistic apron, all described above. Special price if complete set is ordered at one time. $6.50; postage prepaid. R O S IC R U C IA N S T A T I O N E R Y Boxes of twenty-four sheets of beautiful blue stationery, broadcloth linen finish, with envelopes to match, club size. Each sheet bears a symbolic Rosicrucian emblem. T his is fine stationery to use in writing to a friend or acquaintance to show your affiliation with the Order. Price per box $1.25: postage prepaid. A U TO EM BLEM S Made especially for your automobile, but can be used anywhere. Made of solid Art Brass {Burnished, with Red Metal Rose. Emblem is identical with the smaller emblem worn on lapels. Easily attached to radiator. Five and onequarter inches high. Price $1.50: postage prepaid. A T T R A C T IV E SE A L S Beautifully printed and embossed gum seals about the size of a twenty-five cent piece in red and gold to be used in sealing envelopes or on stationery. Contains the emblem and name of the Order. Price 50c per hundred, postpaid.

J
J

($

(P
‘j) (? | K *

f D

| v % d ) ($ J ^ y ^ y (L

J

5) (? < ? \ A * }

(P

J y y d ) (t, J 3 y 3 ($

*)) (? o a J f j) (P ^
a

J

(P
^ | A I 1

j)

^ | y Y (L < )) J Y Y

(P
| Si fc ^

Jl

(

'T H E IS L E O F T H E D E A D ’’
This is the most famous of all of the paintings by the mystic, A. B O C K L IN . It is a companion to " T H E S A C R E D G R O V E . published in December, 1931, issue. This island is located in the Aegean Sea, and it is claimed that the Master K-H was born here centuries ago and lived here again in the 19th century. (P resen ted with the com plim ents o f the R O S 1C R U C IA N D IG E S T )

P E R P E T U A T IN G T H E O R I G IN A L

R O S IC R U C IA N

T E A C H IN G S

The Cosmic Way For You!
The Rosicrucians Invite You
R E you seeking for that knowledge which will open up a new world to your consciousness, and reveal a path that leads to personal power? II so, you are cordially invited to accept this kind offer of the Rosicrucian Brotherhood. For hundreds of years the organization has opened wide its por­ tals to all sincere seekers for the wisdom of ancient and modern times. They have preserved this wisdom for those who in sincerity desire the benefits that come from harmonious attunement with the Cosmic creative forces, and from inspirational guidance. Through their system of personal development and helpfulness the Rosicrucians have maintained their position as an outstanding companion to thousands of men and women. T h ey have taught them to C H A N G E the C O U R S E O F T H E IR L IV E S , and to start their lives over again toward a definite goal of H A P P IN E S S and P E R S O N A L A C H I E V E ­ M E N T . T h e dreams of the human mind are capable of fulfillment. Your de­ sires, if worthy. C A N B E R E A L IZ E D through the knowledge and application of fundamental Cosmic laws.

PRIVATE INSTRUCTIONS AT HOME Interesting FREE BOOK Explains
You may study the helpful instructions of the Rosicrucian system in the privacy cf your own home. W e suggest that you address the Librarian below, and ask for a free copy of the fascinating book, "T h e Light of E gyp t." It will explain how, after many years of development, a special system FO R H O M E S T U D Y has been evolved by the organization, how the many departments of the organization for special personal help may be used by you; it will explain how these practical heme Rosicrucian studies are sent to thousands of men and women in every walk of life in all parts of the world, and how through them these students are finding peace, happiness, and the fulfillment of their desires. Make use of this special, private help that the Rosicrucians N O W O F F E R Y O U . T h e instructions and teachings you will receive will be of unlimited help and inspiration. lust address a letter, asking for the book, to:

Address: Librarian S.P.C. Rosicrucian Brotherhood

1

Rosicrucian Park San Jose, California

(Those who are Rosicrucian Students are now receiving these instructions)

[

T/

-r

ROSICRUCIAN D IG EST
C O V E R S THE W O R L D
TH E O F F IC IA L , OF TH E I N T F R N A T IO N A L W O R L D -W ID E R O S IC R U C IA N M A G A Z IN E R O S IC R U C IA N ORD ER

Vol. X

F E B R U A R Y , 1932 C O N T E N T S

N o .T

Isle of the Dead ........................ . Frontispiece The Thought of the Month By The Im perator Purposeful Life By Ralph M . Lewis, F.R .C . Sanctum Musings— The Freethinker Mysticism of the W e s t C oast N a tive .... By Frater G e o rg e H . G riffe n C athed ral N otes ..... .......................... Pages from the Past W h a t O ccurs after D eath? By H . Spencer Lewis, Ph. D., F.R .C . Solitude.............. By G o rdon A . Glennie, F.R .C . Possessed of an Evil By H . Sp en cer Lewis, Im perator Spirit ................. Pra ye r............................... By Frater G ordon P. Langdon The M ystery of the Shape of the Earth ............................................... By Profoundus XII The Principle of A ttu n em e n t.............. By Dr. Arthur B. Bell, F.R .C . The Alchem ist .................. Illustration
Subscription to the R o sicru cian D igest, T h re e D ollars per year. Single copies tw enty-five cen ts each. En tered as Second Class M a tter at the Past O ffice at San Jo se , C a li­ forn ia, under A ct of A ugust 2-fth. 1912. Changes of address must reach us by tenth of the m onth preceding date of issue. Pu blish ed M o n th ly bv the Suprem e C ouncil of

r

ST Y M A R T IN

T H E R O S IC R U C IA N O R D E R — A M O R C
R O S IC R U C IA N PA RK SA N IO S E , C A L IF O R N IA

The

THOUGHT OF THE MONTH
REA CH IN G THE ROOF
By T H E IM P E R A T O R

O T long ago a con­ tractor started to build a home in the suburbs of this city, and I was in­ terested in watch­ ing the care with which he con­ structed the foun­ dation. It appeared to me that a very fine and attractive home was to be built on the con­ crete walls which he planned and con­ structed so carefully. Shortly thereafter I met the contrac­ tor at a luncheon and asked him how his newhouse was progressing, and was astonished to hear him say that he was just completing the roof. " W h y .’ said I. "you have reached the roof very quickly." " Y e s ," replied the contractor, "you know when some persons build, they plan a roof that is very close to the ground and does not take much time or much effort to build up from the foundation to the roof. I could not help pondering over his rather philosophical statement because it contained a whole bookful of thought. Undoubtedly, one of the reasons why The so many persons in the world today R o s ic r u c ia n have not achieved a higher or greater D ig est place in life is that they have too easily F ebru ary reached the roof. In all of their plans, in all of their considerations, desires 1932

and ambitions, they visualized a roof that was very close to the foundation, and after their structure was completed and the roof in place, their building was lowly, humble, insignificant and probably insufficient to represent their true possibilities in life. Truly one can dream too vaguely, too ambitiously, or too magnificently, and place the roof of one’s contemplated structure far beyond feasible heights, but it is very seldom that the ones who do this fail to reach an impressive height in their desire to reach the roof. Th ey may fail to fulfill their plans, but in their attempts to do so they often rise far beyond those who are ultraconservative and too careful. O f the two classes of individuals, the one who is extremely conservative or pessimistic, doubtful, skeptical, reserved and hesi­ tating is the loser in life's great game. He starts out with limitations self-im ­ posed, and it is seldom that he reaches beyond those limitations. T h e one who is overambitious and who seems to hitch his wagon to a star and who thinks the sky is the limit and that nothing is beyond his capabilities is more apt to achieve success and at least accomplish something magnificent than those who are self-restrained. I have heard economists and some of the most eminent financiers in Amer­ ica say that the only way that young married couples or young persons in­ dividually ever accumulate vast material holdings or become possessed of real material wealth is by getting into debt

and by assuming large contracts and obligations, and then being forced to meet them. T h ey say that more homes have been acquired by young couples who have plunged themselves into the obligation of paying for a beautiful home than by those who attempted to save for it and buy such a home when sufficient funds were at hand. However true this may be, I do know that the man or woman who mentally conceives and plans a great structure or career in life and determines to make good in these plans is the one who generally succeeds in doing so. T h e greater the ambition, the greater the enthusiasm and the desire to make good. T h e higher and more lofty the goal, the more determination is exerted to reach it. Commonplace obstacles that deter and disparage the individual who is attempting to reach only a mediocre place mean nothing to the one who has a great plan or an enor­ mous idea to work out. Resorting again to the illustration of the building of a home, we can see that th e m an w h o plans to build o n ly a four-room bungalow, twelve by four­ teen feet in height, and build it quickly with a limited amount of money and time, will become greatly discouraged in his efforts to complete such a build­ ing if the day he starts to lay the foun­ dation the rain pours upon the ground and continues to do so for a number of days until the ground is wet and soggy. And if, after the rain is over, a few days of snow and freezing temperature come, and after this a period of cold and cloudy weather, he will surely abandon his plans of going to work to start his home. If, then, he meets with a few disappointments in securing the right material or the right amount of capital, he will probably be discour­ aged completely, and permanently aban­ don the whole enterprise. Such a person in planning a small and limited structure expects to com­ plete it within a very short time and have it over with. A ny obstacles that delay the matter for weeks or months are equivalent to obstacles which pre­ vent him from achieving his end alto­ gether. W ith the man who is planning a structure that is to take years to complete and which he knows will have

to be carried on through all kinds of weather and through divers conditions and circumstances, the obstacles that delay him a few weeks or a few months at a time seem inconsequential in com­ parison to the time that he knows must be spent to eventually realize his de­ sires, and he is, therefore, unaffected by them to any serious degree. I remember well the plans for our own organization when it became apparent that I would have to work out most of the details for the development of the Rosicrucian activities in America for the new cycle under my direction. I might have given much thought to the possible delays, the inevitable dis­ appointments, and the personal prob­ lems that would confront me. C on­ sidering these, I might easily have arranged to construct an organization that would have had a good foundation but a roof not too high above that foundation. But instead of doing this, I allowed my mentally created struc­ ture to tower into the skies to enor­ mous heights and I raised the roof of the structure so high that from where I stood in the picture I could not see where it was nor what it looked like. In fact, I never felt sure that there was a roof upon this mental structure or that a roof was even necessary, for it seemed to me that the only thing to consider was the making of the founda­ tion so strong and the walls so sup­ ported that story after story could be added to the building in its rising heights without limit and without fear of collapse or weakness. T h e plans seemed to be beyond reason, and many were the serious warnings given to me that I was un­ dertaking too great a work, too great a structure to be accomplished in a life­ time, or by any moderate sized group of individuals. Every possible or po­ tential obstacle was carefully pointed out to me. As months and years passed, most of these obstacles made their appearance in due form and due time. Every predicted interference and hun­ dreds unsuspected by even the most wise of builders likewise presented themselves. But since the work was an enormous one, the task a magnificent one and the structure so bewildering

in all of its dimensions, the obstacles, difficulties, problems and delays were taken merely as a matter of course and really spared us all in our efforts. W h a t the structure is today is a re­ sult of the great plans. W h eth er these plans will all be realized in my lifetime or not is immaterial. T h e very great­ ness of the work has carried us on in its ponderous and overwhelming vast­ ness. W e are also hopelessly entangled in the scheme of things and we have no more fear of the ultimate being attained than we have of our long and carefully layed foundation crumbling away. True, we have not reached the roof and it is not our ambition to reach the roof rapidly. T h e roof is still so far beyond us that we can only think of the work we have to do on each rising level of each new section of height accomplished in our work. How different is all of this to the conservative, limited plan of those who hesitate and fear to build and plan magnificently! It is only through the broadness of vision, through the un­ limited heights of our ambitions and the very greatness of our ideals that we really lift ourselves up and beyond the commonplace. T h e Rosicrucian or­ ganization in America is planned to b e

in its present cycle just what it has been in each of its previous cycles in this and other lands; namely, an un­ usual, distinctive, magnificent structure of unlimited and unrestricted heights of attainment. It must not only battle its way in attempting to rise above the pull and influence of earthly matters as it reaches up into the heights of glory, but it must push its way through the clouds that gather in the heights above the earth and often darken and obscure the heavens beyond. It means work and sacrifice and a steadfastness of faith, as well as a determination to bear the burden of the cross until the heights are rea ch ed , and then raise that cross upon the very pinnacle. T o those thousands of members and readers who have expressed their joy and pride of being associated with the work of this kind, let me urge that in their own lives they plan with the greater vision in mind and with the illimitable heights as the true domain of their creating, and in this way find the joy of reaching out and beyond the average and the commonplace into the unique and the exceptional. Do not be in such a hurry to reach the roof of the structure that you will plan it to o c lo se to the earth.

V

V

V

V

V

W IL L Y O U H E L P IN T H IS G O O D W O R K ? For several years the Rosicrucian Order, A M O R C , has been donating hundreds of books and several thousand magazines monthly to public libraries throughout the entire world, to hospitals, also to prisons and other public institutions. T he entire burden of this expense has fallen upon the organization, and the Order has gladly met it, feeling it was part of its obligation to carry on the work. Because of our radio programs and other activities, the public has come to accept the fact that we gladly present libraries and institutions with books and magazines, and that has resulted in a greater demand for these things— a demand almost greater than we could meet; and we now ask you to help us in this work. W ill you make a contribution, whatever you feel you possibly can, towards the funds so that other libraries, other institutions throughout the -world, may receive books and magazines ? In other words, will you help the organization in carrying on this w ork? Your contribution, no matter how small in amount, will be appreciated. You may send it to Rosicrucian Order, A M O R C , Extension Department. W e are asking for this special assistance so that this unusually good -work can continue.

The R o s ic r u c ia n D ig e s t F ebru ary 1932

B y R a l p h M . L e w is , F .R .C . V V V of our living today that they can recall the necessity of working from sunrise to sunset. M ost of the present genera­ tion can recall twelve and fourteenhour days of mill and farm. An indi­ vidual who was occupied with duties twelve hours of the day, nevertheless, definitely established on some day dur­ ing the week a period for play. T his was intended for play in the full sense of its meaning. A sport or hobby was participated in, not to prevent the time from becoming monotonous but because actual amusement was desired. T h e re­ sult of such participation was a real mental tonic, a stimulant that carried the individual through the subsequent week with a renewed vigor. Perhaps if that same individual could have sched­ uled his affairs so as to devote more time to his hobby or sport, his appetite for it would soon have been jaded. Our present eight-hour system of labor and the contemplated six-hour day afford in the average instance four or five hours' additional time which must be occupied. Those features which appeal to the senses in physical pleasure are soon exhausted. T h e con­ stant repetition of any act eventually produces monotony. Thus, outer attrac­ tions intended to avoid monotony actu­ ally contribute to it, eventually. Real play is intended as a relaxation and that only. Occupation of the mind to one who needs to resort to external things to obtain it is the greatest labor man can impose upon himself. T h e men and women who in our modern world are compelled to go the highly accele­ rated pace of business or industry find that their objective brain consciousness must be concentrated intently on all the

F we stop to real­ ize the variety of the forms of enter­ tainment, the de­ vices, systems and means intended to occupy the human mind, we are apt to think that the fun­ damental purpose of life is play, or to pass time. T h e fads and fancies of the moment, common to us and to be seen displayed for sale in the leading emporiums throughout the world, are but transient. A year, even six months from now, many will be non­ existent. so fickle is the superlative de­ sires of man. However, a multitude of new ones will supplant those that exist, and they will intrigue and appeal for a brief period also. In most instances, the devices purchased or the methods re­ sorted to are not intended to bring a lasting sense of satisfaction. The player, for an example, does not ex­ pect a feeling of exuberance nor does he really intend in some instances to produce a state of mental relaxation. M ost of the devotees to the modern fancies and fads find dissipation, nerv­ ous disorders, and financial embarrass­ ment to be the ultimate result of their devotions. A moment’s contemplation soon convinces us that there is a fine but definite distinction between play and the occupation of the mind. Taking into consideration our pres­ ent civilization under normal times, we find in this age of mechanization a larger amount of unoccupied time. It is not so far back in the memory of some
S ev en

impressions of the senses. T h ey must be keenly, physically alert— their eyes, ears, senses of feeling, tasting and smelling, must function perfectly. Their nervous system must be highly keyed and respond instantly. Upon the close of the day and their return to their abodes, there is the ultimate reaction to be expected. T h eir senses have been trained to register every impression and their objective consciousness to handle hourly a mass of complex impressions, assembling and reassembling them. T h e human nervous system has been raised to a degree of high sensitivity, increas­ ing year after year, until there can be no relaxation without the loss of con­ sciousness. During the process of sleep there is a temporary suspension of this objective consciousness; but when awake and this consciousness is not occupied, this objective consciousness permits them in a subtle way to realize the nervous tension they are under. It produces unrest, monotony, distraction, ill ease, and the constant desire to re­ sort to diversions. T hese diversions, pleasing for the moment, satisfying for a time, soon be­ come habits. As habits are fixed and established, they no longer occupy the consciousness of the brain— they be­ come a routine. Then the devotee of external pleasure is compelled to flitter from one pastime to another always with the hope that one will be more fascinating than the other and more lasting in its satisfaction. There is but one avoidance of this dread condition of mental unrest— the dedication of the mind to a fixed purpose in life if one intends his life to be purposeful. Then every act entered into contributes toward reaching the final objective. There is a cause, and every act is to fulfill that cause. If your present occupation is not your ideal one in life, but merely a means of livelihood, then in the time not occupied in routine work, prepare yourself for your true place or niche in the workaday world. If you are merely The a human machine with no other object R o s ic r u c ia n in life than to live, you will go the way D ig es t F ebru ary V V V

of all machinery. You will wear out while running and disintegrate while not running. T h e individual who visions his place in the Cosmic scheme lays out his entire plan of life systematically— his goal is his incentive; he never tires of aiming for it; it ever is appealing, alluring and satisfying. Th ere is noth­ ing that gratifies like creating toward a definite end because with each act or thought, we are placing a segment in place toward the erection of some com­ plete structure. T h is individual purpose of life, one becomes conscious of from within, not from without. B y looking around us we cannot determine what our purpose in life should be. T h e paths that we see others travel, perhaps would not be the one we should travel. T h ey might be contrary to our nature, our charac­ ter and abilities. Your natural ten­ dencies, your loves, your desires, the things that appeal from within are the things that should form your ideal in life and should be the purpose for which you live— the goal toward which you should travel. H esitate for a moment, what is the mad race of life about? Are you paint­ ing a picture of life by your actions, by your way and mode of living? You are, but are you in it? W h en your cycle here is closed, would you be proud of the picture that would be shown of your life from cradle to grave, or would you want to blot out the per­ sonality in the scene because of its ugliness, because of its lack of contribu­ tion to something finer or better? W ould you stand out in the scene of your life as a mighty light that shone far ahead into the future? Have you ever thought why you are living at all and what the purpose is? Remember that even the simplest tool has a reason for its ex­ istence; what is yours? Have a purpose in life and you need not seek outside, exterior ways and means to absorb your time, to appease your senses or to occupy your mind. T h e bringing into fulfillment of that purpose will assure you a more lasting happiness than any illusive, illusionary appeal to the outer you.

1932

V

V

Sanctum Musings
THE FREETHINKER
V / E R to and fro swings the pendu­ lum of civilization. It never returns quite to its starting point, but ever swings wider and wider, encompass­ ing a greater area with each outward sw in g . A s we travel backward in history, we finally arrive at the scene of the piercing of the veil. W e find man groping out of the shadows of sav­ agery; we see the first tendency toward self-expression. It is evident that the light of the soul is kindling the outer mind of man. There is a spark, a flame. Rude structures of shelter give rise to grace and beauty in the evolution of architecture. Visual and sound harmony are felt and expressed in the crude be­ ginnings of art and music. T h e pendulum of civilization has moved slightly— its first motion. T h e area it embraces is limited as yet, limited as is the consciousness of man. M an ’s mind is the motivating energy behind the pendulum of civilization; man’s mind acts as a magnetic force whose polarity constantly oscillates from positive to negative. As man in his thinking becomes more positive, progressive, he pushes outward the boundaries and limitations of the physi­ cal world. V V T h e pendulum is repulsed, and swings in a vast, outward curve. W e find the area of progress embracing every field of thought and endeavor of man. If man becomes negative in his thinking, intolerant, prejudiced, and ignorant, he attracts again to himself the pendulum. A s it swings with a great force toward him, the field it cir­ cumscribes becomes less and less until finally it vanishes. T h e field represent­ ing civilization with all its advantages, its attributes, and its refinements dis­ appears. A t times the pendulum of civilization has rebounded toward man so rapidly that it has not only closed up the space between him and the world of greater wisdom, but it has even swept him from the face of the earth. W e find such a period existing during the time of Copernicus, when the pendulum had swung outward from man but a trifle, and civilization was exceedingly limited — as limited as was man and his think­ ing. Copernicus, the great astronomer, dared offer the world a new cosmologi­ cal theory. He dared declare the thought that the earth was not the center of the universe; furthermore, that it was not stationary. T w o counts were charged against Copernicus for such a declaration: First, it was said that he indirectly be­ littled the profundity of the importance of man. If the earth was not the center of the universe, then it was an implica­ tion that there were other worlds of equal or greater extent, and that per-

Nine

haps they, also, were inhabited. It would be possible, then, that this earth was not alone G od ’s chosen realm for man. T h is reasoning made man truly seem insignificant in the plan of the universe. T h e Church contended that it was sacrilegious, that the theory was opposed to the literal translation of sacred literature and the doctrines of Theology. T h e second charge confront­ ing Copernicus was his audacity of pitting his individual mind and intelli­ gence against the accepted creeds and dictates of the Church and doctrines of the day. ‘‘Dare he," they said, ‘‘imply that the illustrious ones of the secular belief be wrong?” T h e fact that he had experimented alone in his laboratory was in itself heretical. It was schisma­ tic. He branded himself by his re­ searches as different, distinct in his views, from the mass or, if you wish, society. O f still greater importance, his views were considered sacrilegious in the sense that he dared explore the uni­ verse. M an, they claimed, had become so egotistical as to permit his thoughts to leave the immediate realm of his affairs and roam the universe. W h a t right had man to ponder upon the Cos­ mic plan? T o attempt to fathom the Infinite? T o question the prophets or doubt the literal translation of sacred literature and its orthodox conception of the creation of the universe? Man was, by virtue of his birth, so they de­ clared, damned to the acceptance of the order of things as he found them. T o attempt to improve upon things, upon traditions, or upon the interpretation of natural laws, was to be in league with the Satanic forces of the universe. Such a person, be he termed philosopher or not, was considered a menace to the welfare of man. He jeopardized hu­ manity by placing it in an affronting attitude before divinity. Such a picture as just described is one of the Middle Ages. It is true, similar conditions existed before, but this will do to prove a point. Free thought was generally suppressed at The R o s ic r u c ia n the time; it was not indulged in except by the courageous. Even the cour­ D ig est ageous were obliged to seclude them­ F ebru ary selves for fear of detection in their 1932 studies and practices in pursuit of

knowledge. Conviction, even suspicion, meant diabolical torture. It was thought that by torture, the soul of the evil­ doer would do penance for humanity, and that would appease the anger of God. T h ese early freethinkers did not decry or denounce the known and established natural laws which were true and of which few were generally known. T h eir studies and researches were intended to make man further ac­ quainted with the laws of the macro­ cosm and the microcosm. It was their object to amplify the knowledge which man already had. T h ey also held it a duty to purge absolute truths from the myths and superstitions which were commonly associated with them. These students, these freethinkers, were charged with the corruption of the pub­ lic mind. T h ese thinkers dared to oppose the view of the mass; they dared to urge them to climb out of the mental rut in which they were and to seek beyond themselves and throw off the shackles of the traditions around them. All of the knowledge which society did have of the arts and sciences and which was true and absolute, regardless of its source, was regarded by these freethinkers as worthy, and they em­ braced it as being unalterable and de­ pendable, but they wished to go still further. Secular societies were formed — organizations whose members met in secret conclaves and delved into the mysteries of the universe and gave to mankind glorifying truths which were always, of course, established but not before known to man. Each profound revelation meant a sacrifice of life. All who dared to introduce the new, by that very act were obliged to denounce the old which might have been wrong, and suffered accordingly for their con­ tributions to humanity. T h e pendulum has swung again. It has swung outward. It embraces a larger territory than ever before. Civil­ ization has expanded. W e have an­ other age, the age of today. W e pro­ fess to be progressive; we advocate education and all of its departments of specialization. Still, every real free­ thinker who rediscovers some Infinite laws which disprove old theories or dis­ rupt established customs and beliefs, is
T en

subject to mental torture as severe as, if not more so, than the physical tor­ ture of his predecessors. He must go through a mental purgatory— a condi­ tion of scoff, inference of insanity, ridi­ cule, and rebuff— until eventually, by the force of material circumstances and the sheer persuasion of logic, his magni­ ficent contribution is accepted. Y et, because of the declared liber­ alism of the day, there is a throng of self-styled freethinkers. It seems to be the spirit of the day to term themself a freethinker, perhaps because they glory in the freedom they have in labeling themselves as they wish without physi­ cal punishment. But how extremely dif­ ferent are these freethinkers from those in the past! How different are their concepts of what free thought really is! T h e first sign of distinction between these modern, so-called freethinkers, and the genuine, sincere freethinker of the past is the evident intolerance dis­ played on the part of the freethinker of today— intolerance which in reality is the extreme opposite of the true vir­ tue of free thought. Those freethinkers of today hold that every theory, decla­ ration, statement, or concept held or made by another is either wrong in comparison with their own, or cannot be accepted by them because of the fact that it was made by another in­ stead of by them. Even well-founded and well-known natural laws which may be tried and proven to one’s own satisfaction and conviction and which may be presented in a logical, rational way by a school of thought, are de­ nounced by these freethinkers (unless they happen to be associated with that school of thought) merely because it does not conform with their own opinion. It is not because they wish to be exclusive and independent in their thinking and action, because if that were the case, they would become re­ cluses and take themselves away to the mountain tops or to the desert islands and stay there alone with their own impressions and thoughts and form their own ideas, never to be troubled or bothered by the concepts of others. But they are different from that. T h ey are not only constantly agitating for their own opinions, denouncing orthodoxy, and raising the hue and cry for free

thought on the part of the individual, but they are also wanting humanity as a whole to accept their idea of what free thought is, and thereby creating a new form of orthodoxy. In reality, their concepts of free thought, if allowed to be built up by them, would become a new orthodoxy of its own. T h eir con­ stant cry is, “I accept no concept but my own. I am an opponent of ortho­ doxy.” Their view is as fanatical as the views held by the mass of the past. T h e true freethinker does not com­ bat orthodoxy if the orthodoxy consists of irrefutable knowledge and definite, established laws. He admits of them; he cannot help admitting of them if he is rational and just. But the popular freethinker of today is not willing to accept the elements of genuine know­ ledge of all sects and regulate them to fit his personal concepts; he is not pre­ pared to measure the weight of the theorems presented. He denounces them all, holds only to his own views and claims that that is free thought. It is very true that man is master of his own consciousness, and in that sense he is a free agent. He has the choice of rejection or acceptance of any proffered knowledge or any information he gains through experience. T h at is the God-given privilege of freedom of thought. It makes man, ‘‘the measure of all things.” Man may wrongly con­ ceive, his interpretations may be erron­ eous, but if he is willing to accept established laws and truths and attempt to weigh them and understand them, he must be commended for that, even if he makes a mistake. But lo! the fool who titles himself a modern freethinker and rejects all but his own perceptions not only sins against himself, but against Divinity as well. W h a t is the distinction between real free thought and initiative free thought? True free thought means the Divine privilege of liberty in choice of thought— the right to assume and accept or reject all opinions. Thus one can take the golden grains of knowledge from the vials of experience that are in the laboratory of time, and from them he may compound even greater elements using his con­ cepts as the formula.

Free thought does not mean the de­ nouncing of all truths and established laws and facts merely because they are not of your own experience or origin of thought. T h ere can be no thought so free or so original, even if it be Di­ vinely inspired, that it does not find its reflection in the established laws of the universe. An original thought that could not find its counterpart in the ex­ isting laws and principles of the uni­ verse already in existence, would be a Divine Creation and certainly not within the limits of man. Inspiration, after all, is merely a new visualization of that which is— an assembling of existing things into a new

pattern. T h e freethinker is free, un­ bound, unlimited only in his selection of the path that he chooses to tread in search of knowledge. H e is not free to deny that which is known, or to de­ clare himself free of those laws which do exist and must be recognized by him. A ny philosophy that pits itself against the actual and the existing, no matter what realization it produces, is but an illusion. Beware, pseudo free­ thinker, that your attempt to shirk the responsibilities and recognition of es­ tablished truths does not put you far outside the pale comprehension of all wisdom.

W E T H A N K A LL O U R M E M B E R S
T h e Imperator, the Grand Master, Supreme Secretary, and every other officer and employee at headquarters wishes to thank every member for the wonderful Christmas and New Y ear cards, letters, and tokens sent to them. It is impossible to answer each one in person and so this method is used to express our appreciation.

Mysticism of the West Coast Native
By F r a t e r G e o r g e H. G r i f f e n
H E R E is a parable of India concern­ ing the opinions of a certain number of wise, blind men. Each of them, up­ on encountering an elephant, ex­ p r e s s e d h i ms e l f loudly and em­ p h a t ic a lly . O n e declared it was a wall because, in his groping, he had happened to feel the rough side of the pachyderm; another stated that it was a snake, judging from the contour of the animal’s trunk. A ll of them had their say, and all were both right and wrong.T h ey relied solely upon the sense of touch, by virtue of the fact that sight was denied them. So it is with many of us. W h en a The topic is mentioned we bring to it cer­ R o s ic r u c ia n tain opinions, biassed or otherwise. D ig e s t These foregone conclusions we either F ebru ary keep to ourselves, remaining silent, or we speak out our views. If we seek 1932 light, we listen, learn, and interpret. Sometimes our interpretations are warped, and our comprehension of a subject suffers therefrom. It has been necessary for the writer to delve into the life, habits, religion, and mythology of the native of the W e s t Coast of North America. W h ile seeking material of a specific nature, it was unavoidable that certain facts should be unearthed which apparently had but little value. Like one of the blind men, hereinbefore mentioned, this data has been observed, commented upon, and mentally stored for future use. It is the purpose of this brief ar­ ticle to present to the student of mys­ ticism definite information concerning the so-called Indian who, at one time, lived within sight of the Pacific Ocean, occupying territory from the mouth of the Columbia River to the frozen bor­ ders of Eskimo or Innuit Land. Th ese natives today are but miser­ able remnants of an ancient and glori­ ous race. T h ey were decadent when Lewis and Clark first visited their set­ tlements; their sun had set when CapT tvelve

tain G ray discovered and explored the mouth of the Columbia. Steeped in fetishism, ridden by shamans or medi­ cine men, who wielded enormous power over them spiritually, they were never­ theless a splendid people physically. W h en the white man attempted to civi­ lize them, the results were disastrous to the native. Space does not permit to deal with each of the component na­ tions, of which there were several. Be­ cause of their insular location, the H aid a of th e Queen C h a rlo tte Islands o ffer an interesting example. Rightfully has this warrior race of sailors been called the Children of the Sun. T h ey differed radically from the Indians of the Plains, being in no way like them in any respect. O ne of the chief articles of wealth among the Haida was the "copper". These ob­ jects of shield-like forms of virgin copper, beaten thin and with tapered edges, were called “tau-scho-ass". T h e significance of the appelation will be more startling when one has a mental picture of the article. Measuring about two feet long and about half as wide, it was shaped like a buckler, only it was never used as a mode of defense in fighting. T h e plate, in its lower half, was dented to form a letter T , or a tau cross. W h ere these symbols of wealth came from, not even the native appeared to know. T h is may have been wisdom on his part for he was a shrewd trader. But the question is this: W h a t did the sign upon the "copper” signify? T h e plate was reversed, in some cases spe­ cial lodges were erected in which they were placed. T h e Haida were firm believers in re­ incarnation. A great many of their songs, especially the lullabies, indicate this. These crooning melodies were sung principally to the off-spring of noble families by female slaves who attended them. W h o originally taught them this philosophy? Numbers play, and have played, an important part in symbology, as every

Rosicrucian is aware. W h y , then, did the early W e s t Coast native always use seven wedges, either of wood or bone, to split his logs for the purpose of mak­ ing boards? Seven were used, no more and no less. These were driven in one at a time by means of a stone hammer. During certain ceremonies, it was necessary for the individual to get in touch with the subtle forces of nature. T o do so he would journey alone into the forest to remain for four days. During that p eriod n o fo o d w as par­ taken of by him, and personal cleanli­ ness had to be as perfect as possible. From whence came this custom orig­ inally, and why exactly four days? Sickness rarely troubled the native. It was a case of the survival of the fittest, but there were occasions when a chief, or a noble, became ill. Failing all other methods, a system of breathing was re­ sorted to in an endeavor to banish the disease. T h e shaman was the doctor. Using a tube, either the radius or ulna bone from the wing of an eagle, he breathed into the mouth or nostrils of his patient. W h eth er suggestion or otherwise accomplished a cure, no scientific records state. But there is a principle hidden in the method. W h ere did the native derive this from? E xtant among the Haida songs and myths were many stories woven about a diety of more than ordinary powers. T h is assertion applies also to the other adjacent nations, the only difference being that the personage was called by various names. It is remarkable how closely he resembled the Sun God of the M ayas and the Aztecs. W ithou t a doubt, he visited this Earth and was known, in almost every instance, as a benefactor of mankind. T h e Great Raven totems of the aborigines of the Queen Charlotte Islands were erected to his honour. Some of the legends in­ dicate that he was born of a virgin, others that he had his origin in a drop of pure water. Knowing these facts, did the Haida and their closely related neighbors possess an avatar?

R O S IC R U C IA N B O O K S IN SP A N IS H Volumes of the Rosicrucian Library as listed on the back cover of this magazine are procurable from the Rosicrucian Supply Bureau at the economical price of $1.60, postpaid.

•itfAiTAi?^:?7Ti//\ o2W ?tf?^.-V L T7^Y tY A l!T r\rT?"oi

H <
T h e "Cathedral of the Soul" is a Cosmic meeting place for all minds of the most advanced and highly developed spiritual members and workers of the Rosicrucian Fraternity. It is a focal point of Cosmic radiations and thought waves from which radiates vibrations of health, peace, happiness, and inner awakening. Various periods of the day are set aside when many thousands of minds are attuned with the Cathedral of the Soul, and others attuning ’with the Cathedral at this time will receive the benefit of the vibra­ tions. T h ose who are not members of the organization may share in this unusual benefit as well as those who are members. T he book called "Liber 777" describes the periods for various contacts with the Cathedral. Copies will be sent to persons who are not members by addressing their request for this book to librarian S. P. C., care of A M O R C Temple. San Tose. California, enclosing three cents in postage stamps. ( P L E A S E S T A T E W H E T H E R M E M B E R O R N O T — T H IS IS IM P O R T A N T ).

SJ,

H E special contacts of November 25 and December 24 were certainly mar­ velous in their re­ sults. In fact, the contacts just pre­ ceding November 25 and Christmas day were 'the most wonderful of all of our united efforts ___________________ since the work of the Cathedral of the Soul was started under the present cycle. It was a pleasure for our Su ­ preme officers to be in touch with thou­ sands of members in this and then later The to read of the experiences of those who R osicrucian made such contacts. D igest For the coming months we wish to F e b ru a ry announce that the special class contact conducted by Grand M aster, Charles 1932

Dean, every Tuesday evening, will be continued because of the wonderful results reported in this connection. Every Tuesday evening at eight o’clock a contact is started among the members assembled in the Supreme Temple in San Jose. For fifteen minutes, begin­ ning at eight o’clock these members reach out to all who are attuned with them or who may be trying to attune with them. If you live anywhere in or near San Jose be sure and come to the Temple every Tuesday evening and partake in the beautiful spiritual medi­ tations of the Cathedral conducted by Brother Dean. As stated previously, this 8:00 o’clock to 8:15 period on Tuesday nights is equivalent to 11:00 to 11:15 in eastern parts of the United States and you can easily determine what the time is in your city by securing information from

(Continued on Page 34)

Pag es from the Past

0.
Each month w ill appear excerpts from the w ritin gs o f famous thinkers and teachers o f the past. T h is w ill give our readers an opportunity of know ing these minds through the presentation o f w ritin gs which ty p ify their thoughts. T h is month we present a thesis by Paracelsus on faith. Paracelsus, the student and scientist, was born Dec­ ember 17, 1493; entered transition September 23. 1541. M any of the fundamentals of a l­ chemy. surgery and medicine were taught him by his father. H e studied further as a monk in the convent o f St. Andrew. A t the age o f sixteen he entered the U n iversity o f Basel, Switzerland. H e traveled extensively throughout the East learning much o f the Oriental philosophies and literature. H e was initiated in the m ystery schools o f the O ri­ ent. H e later became professor o f medicine
•Illltlllllll I M 111M 111111• I •

■ a
in the U n iversity o f Basel. H e taught, how­ ever, in an unorthodox manner, that is, he did not prescribe to the customs and manner of teaching of his adopted science. He became known as a prominent healer and was accorded recognition throughout all o f Europe. H e made enemies o f his colleagues because he went beyond the limits o f the prescribed medical know ledge and used some of the wisdom gained from his association with the Rosicrucians and m ys­ tery schools o f the East. H e was attacked from all angles— his morals, his concepts, and even physically. T he w orld today, how­ ever, is beginning to appreciate his con­ tribution to medicine and pharmacy. R o s i­ crucian students, however, have long appre­ ciated his knowledge o f the infinite laws and inner workings o f man.

E G A R D I N G t he true and the false faith, Paracelsus says: " It is not a faith in the exist­ ence of a historical Jesus Christ that has the power to save mankind from evil, but a faith in the Supreme Power (Go d), through which the man Jesus was enabled to act. T h e former ‘faith’ is merely a belief and a result of education; the latter is a faith belonging to the con­ stitution of man. Christ does not say that if we believe in His personal power to accomplish wonderful things we would be enabled to throw mountains into the ocean; but He spoke of our own faith, meaning the divine power of God in man, that may act through our­ selves as much as it acted through Christ, if we become like Him. T h is power comes from God and returns to

Him; and if one man cures another in the name of Christ, he cures him by the power of God. and by his own faith. T h at power becomes active in and through him by his faith, and not out of gratitude for his professed belief, or the belief of the patient that Christ once existed upon the earth. "T h e power of the true faith extends as far as the power of God. M an can accomplish nothing by his own power of faith. If we did not have faith in our ability to walk, we would not be able to walk. If we accomplish any­ thing whatever, faith accomplishes it through us. "F aith does not come from man, and no man can create faith; but faith is a power coming from God. Its germ is laid within man, and may be cultivated or neglected by him; it may be used by him for good or for evil, but it only acts effectively when it is strong and pure— not weakened by doubt, and not dispersed by secondary considerations. He who wants to employ it must have

p JW U U j

(Continued on Page 27)

What Occurs After Death?
A DISCOURSE GIVEN IN THE FRAN CIS BACON AUDITORIUM , ROSICRUCIAN PARK, BY H. SPENCER LEW IS, Ph. D., F.R.C.
N f the discourse pre­ ceding this one, on miracles of the mind, we touched upon the duality of m a n ’s e x is te n c e . W e explained the fact that man was at all times dual in nature, but not dual in consciousness except when he was in a perfectly normal, living state in his normal, physical body. We pointed out that the moment the brain consciousness or the physical conscious­ ness of the physical body was inhibited or made dormant or suspended by acci­ dent, injury, drugs or any other cause, man was then of one consciousness, a Divine, psychic consciousness. Now we have the question as to what occurs after death. Some might say when reading this, "M y , what a cheerful subject," and I say, "Y e s, it is rather cheerful." And, after all, the more we understand about so-called death, the more we know about what occurs at the great moment transition takes place. The R osicrucian D igest F e b ru a ry 1932 In twenty-five years of talking with individuals who have been in sorrow and grief over some transition that has just occurred, or who are sick and an­ ticipate that transition may be close at hand, I have found that their great anxiety, their great worry, their great depression concerning transition or so-called death is due to their fear of it. T o the average individual, it is one of the two great mysterious events in life. It is a fact that we know more about death or transition or what occurs thereafter than we know about what occurs before birth. T h ere is more of the greatest chemical, physiological, magnetic, pathological, scientific my­ stery connected with birth than there is with any other pathological process known to nature. W e have delved in­ to the mysteries of what happens after we leave this plane, but science has been able to tell little about what occurs before life comes to this plane. T h e average person attempts very little to understand the mysteries of socalled transition and is greatly misled and misinformed. W e hear, for in­ stance. in all of the Christian churches and in most other churches a constant repetition of the statement that there is no death. It would seem to be a slogan of the Christian Church and it would seem to be the key-note to a hopeful message that these churches and re­ ligions want to establish in the minds of the populace and individuals. It would seem to be the one silver or golden note that makes man or woman here on earth accept the situations as they come, battle on against all ob­ stacles and fight for all that is worth while,— this one grand and glorious statement that ‘there is no death.’

And yet while this very same slogan may be written in gold letters and pre­ sented with a band of ribbon in the church and may be recited in the rituals, there are songs that are sung in the same churches that speak of death and the fear of it, and your preparation for it. T h ere is a funeral ritual that paints a picture of death as the most horrify­ ing condition. T h ere is everything around us and about us in these churches to remind us of the terrible­ ness of death, and yet we are told there is no death. T o the mystic, neither of these state­ ments that death is terrible or there is no death is true nor does he speak of these things in such a manner. T h ere is no death to some things and some parts of man, but there is nothing ter­ rible, nothing mysterious about it. W e speak of the immortality of the soul or hear it spoken of in rituals and doc­ trines as though that were the only part of man that continued to exist after so-called death— after transition; and yet I would like to make plain to you in a few words at this time, and perhaps in more words at some other time in another discourse, the fact that the body, the physical part of man is no more subject to death, annihilation, than is the immortal soul and spirit of man. All that man is composed of, physi­ cally, is of the dust of the earth, from the food he eats, the water he drinks, the air he breathes, and the physical part of man is truly the chemical ele­ ments of the earth. A t transition these elements return to earth and whether the body is cremated and the ashes de­ posited in the soil, or whether the body, itself, is deposited in the soil, the physi­ cal elements of the physical part of man continue to live, for every test and every demonstration shows that the fundamental laws of cohesion and adhesion do exist. T h ere is a retroac­ tive action going on. Th ere is a chemi­ cal action going on. Th ere is every kind of action going on in that physical body that there was ever going on in it when alive. It may be a reverse action. Th ese elements return to earth and they become once again the sim­ plest elements from which they came and they help to form new life— new

vegetation on the earth plane. T h ey begin again a new cycle and we can easily and truthfully and beautifully think of the physical elements of our body as contributing to some of the beautiful vegetation, the flowers and other forms of life that nature evolves from the simplest elements in filling the earth with life. T h ere is no death to the physical part of man’s body; but aside from this point, which is only incidental in my talk tonight, 1 want to speak of what occurs at the moment of transition and thereafter. First of all, from this mo­ ment on, let me say that I do not want to use the word ‘death.’ I prefer to use the word ‘transition’; and hope the day will come when our newspapers and magazines will stop using the word, ‘‘death." W e pick up the Sunday paper and read an editorial, perhaps a religious editorial; it may have the very subject of ‘‘T h ere is no death," and then we turn to the news columns and find a list of persons who died or that death has taken this one or that one. T o be consistent, this word should be elimi­ nated. T h e majority of the people belong to a church or organization that holds to the principle that the real part of man is immortal; therefore, the word ‘death’ should be eliminated, and I will eliminate it now during the rest of my discourse. A fter all, what d o e s occur at transi­ tion? It is merely a change. I spoke in my last address of what you could observe in the unconscious body that is still living. I said if you had ever looked upon a person who was in a faint or unconscious from drugs or anesthetic, you would find there is a normal body with all of the normal activities to maintain life and that all that was missing was a form of brain consciousness. I said that the Divine or mental consciousness, the mind con­ sciousness of the real inner self was intact, uninjured, unchanged by the outer change that had taken place. All the outer change had done, whether by injury, accident or anesthetic, drugs, or temporary indisposition by faint from weakness, was to close the eyes against seeing, (although the eyelids may be open) shut the ears against hearing,

the nose against smelling, the tongue against tasting, and fingers against feeling. W ith these five faculties shut off from making any impressions and con­ veying any intelligence and being able to send forth any intelligence, the brain consciousness o f the individual was closed like a book, temporarily. In­ wardly, however, the Divine conscious­ ness, that is, the consciousness of God, was maintaining its state of activity. It was keeping the heart beating to the proper rhythm; it was keeping the lungs breathing; it was keeping the various other organs of the body functioning with their rhythm; in fact, so keen is that consciousness that if that uncon­ scious body was taken from a warm room into a cold room, the temperature of the body would automatically change to meet the conditions in the new room, and any other disturbance would be met. If the arms were violently exer­ cised by some apparatus or by someone doing it, the heart would beat faster to make up for the exercise. There is a knowledge and mind control and con­ sciousness guarding and protecting that unconscious body despite the fact that the outer consciousness sleeps. Now, I pointed out that this socalled unconscious state of the person was only temporary. A t transition we have the same situation, but it remains permanent. Transition is nothing more or less, physically and pathologically, than the separation of the two forms of consciousness. But in the case of transition, the Divine consciousness withdraws itself from the body instead of remaining and this leaves the brain consciousness incapable of any further activity. And so we have the soul of man, the mind consciousness, the Di­ vine, immortal consciousness in man, withdrawing at the time of transition. True, disease may have been respons­ ible and we find transition an abnormal condition, an injured body, but we have found in many cases, and the physi­ cians and coroners find everyday, the bodies of those where transition has The occurred without the slightest injury, R osicrucian with no sign of disease, where the heart D ig est just stopped and the great separation F eb ru a ry has taken place. Now after we look at 1932 this physical body that is left after this

change, we find it is a perfectly normal creation; that is, if disease or accident has not injured it. W e find it has all of its parts; it has the necessary blood; it has all of the elements necessary for a living body, but there is no life. T h ere is no action. W e find the blood standing still and because there is no combustion taking place in the system, no heat is being manufactured, and the temperature of the blood is lowered. T h e blood becomes cold and by stand­ ing still it coagulates; the physical body simply becomes inactive by degrees, moment by moment because the great controlling intelligence has left. T h is brings us to the point of the very wonderful and beautiful statement in Genesis where it is said that man was formed from out of the dust of the earth; brought together from all of the elements of the physical earth, those things needed to make the physical body. T h e body was formed and there was breathed into it the breath of life, and man became a living soul. You see in that brief statement the duality of man,— how the physical part may be formed perfectly, but no matter how perfectly the body may be formed and how well proportioned, it is only a body of clay until the breath of life, soul, enters and makes it a living soul. Th ey say that for 66c, you can find in a pharmacy shop all the chemical elements that compose man's body; but that only makes the physical body. W e cannot make the real part of man out of the chemical elements. You could not take a physical body after transition no matter how well preserved, even though the eyelashes were still on the eyelids, and turn it into a living b o d y by any chemical process. It takes more than electricity as some scientists have tried to figure out, and it takes more than oxygen. Look at those cases where transition is close at hand and the per­ son’s outer consciousness has already closed its pages. W h en a person is in a so-called state of coma, he is brought oxygen; he has oxygen added to his system, but the most it has ever done is to encourage or strengthen the weak­ ened heart a little for one or two days

(Continued on Page 24)

Solitude
By G o r d o n A . G l e n n i e , F .R .C .
A A A perpetually pander to companionship. It is a very strange imperfection. Man is sometimes measured by the company he keeps; so is he sometimes measured by his endurance of solitude. T o a mystic the term, solitude, is ambiguous. It is generally conceded by the mun­ dane as a state of loneliness, or per­ haps a condition adapted for viewing sinister fancies. But beyond the outer veil of isolation there is no solitude in this sense of the term. T h e object of companionship is not to elude solitude. This is a fault so adamant in present society. Solitude has been sacrificed for companionship regardless of the fact that each has its place. W ithout companionship there would be no society, and this, as well as solitude, is a necessity to mankind. Companionship advances a foundation for intellectual union. It is a vehicle for the interchange of ideas and ex­ pression, but it also has very definite limitations. Beneath the crust of society and all our domestic relations, lies a depth wherein these properties themselves are lost. W e can go so far in our con­ stant contact with friends and com­ panions— then we reach a point of saturation. W e become mentally ex­ hausted, ideas are lacking, and we fail to entertain. W eariness and lethargy are evident, and sheer fatigue compels us to sever our contact and rejuvenate the body and mind with solitude or sleep. Undoubtedly many persons would acquire more lasting friendships

N TISTH EN ES answered the ques­ tion as to what he had gained from philosophy, by re­ plying, “to be able to endure my own company.’’ M any of us may be at variance with the teachings of the renowned cynic but n e v e r t h e l e s s this commentary exemplifies an interesting theory. T o obtain a true perspective of the vicissi­ tude of things one must appreciate the attributes of solitude. T h e homogeneity of mankind, and the Oneness from which we all are reflected make us somewhat immune from social isolation. But, to quote Bacon, “Little do men perceive what solitude is . . . a crowd is not company, faces are but a gallery of pictures, and talk but a tinkling of symbols where there is no love.” However much or little a student may acquire from the Rosicrucian teachings he at least perceives the sig­ nificance of solitude. W e may canvas archives, or search dusty libraries of antiquity— we shall always find that from the echoes of solitude came wis­ dom, understanding, ideas, and abund­ ant desires. But today we are not so prone to seek solitude. T h e whirl of materialism and the rapidity of changes have lessened our hours of seclusion. There is a popular fallacy that we must
N in eteen

'O '

|VnjLnjj

if discretion were applied to their con­ tacts. Before the era of telephones and modern transportation facilities many individuals, particularly those of pro­ gressive inclinations, were greatly in­ debted to the distances that separated them from their friends. W e do not decry the privileges which science has advanced, but we might ask ourselves whether we are using them with dis­ cretion. Beyond a certain period, continuous contact with other persons becomes a decided strain upon the mental and physical vitality. W e have only to mingle with crowds to witness this de­ vitalizing effect. Owing to the versatile nature of the mind it demands solitude of objective and subjective qualities. If it is deprived of this freedom the intel­ lect is suppressed; expressions become garbed with platitudes instead of orig­ inality, and the inner consciousness is not revealed in its true perspective. T h is inference may be a paradox to those unlearned in solitude, but only analysis will establish the assertion. Thousands of persons would verge on the abyss of insanity if they were deprived of companionship for three days in a week. T h ey must always have someone to share their conscious hours. W h en conversation is at a premium the theatre or other entertain­ ment is a refuge. Th eir minds must be continually active, but they cannot do it alone and be happy. Solitude is to them a nightmare because they have feared it rather than loved it, and henceforth they encounter the limita­ tions of companionship. It requires systematized intelligence to amuse one­ self, and when this quality is lacking or undirected we seek to be amused rather than to amuse. W e must remember that it is within the limitations of society that mankind manifests all that the mundane world may perceive. But it is b ey o n d the limitations of society that mankind cre­ ates the foundation of that which shall be revealed to the world. Conversation The Rosicrucian is an experiment, and actions are the affinity of premeditated or spontaneous Digest desires. These two properties reveal February our outward expression of understand­ ing, but their inception is ordained 1932

within the vital precincts of solitude, which, as an essential part of our de­ velopment, must be assimilated with other phrases of evolution. T h e ancient civilization had a re­ markable appreciation of the solitude. Likewise all the world’s greatest masters in art and science, commerce and in­ dustry. T h ey were guilty of seeking the sequestered nooks of nature to escape temporarily the contact o f humanity. H ear Emerson, who says ‘‘I have seen many a philosopher whose world is large enough for only one person.’’ W h eth er or not this fragment savours of egoism, it is evident that such philos­ ophers prefer their mono-world to the frequent flow of panegyrics and inco­ herent exertions so prevalent in modern society. It would be impractical, of course, to insinuate that we should approach the other extreme and entirely disassociate ourselves from ordinary human contact. T h ere is a vast difference between the lives of hermits and those of persons continually seeking companionship and entertainment. In all things we under­ take there must be a balance and re­ ciprocity if we desire success. Solitude is not a Utopia wherein fancies are meant to prevail upon our capricious desires. N either is it a limbo solely for pacifying the qualms of con­ science, or suffering the vengeance of Nemesis. It is a definite realm wherein the powers of unmanifest creation await the intuitive faculties of mankind. W e shall always hear arguments that this abstractedness provokes scepticism, but is not that a trait common to all man­ kind? Tru ly we are manifesting on a material plane, and it is difficult to act on so called abstract laws without being influenced by material persuasions. But man will never appreciate the higher values until he looks beyond the pale of materialism. T h e laboratories of science have contributed to the search which mankind is making for truth, but not alone will scientific skill reward our efforts. W e must extract a few leaves from the book of Solitude; submit our thoughts and problems to the under­ standing Silence; then act upon that which is revealed from within.

Twenty

“Possessed of A n Evil
THIS IS THE ASTONISHING VERDICT RENDERED IN ENGLAND RECENTLY. IT SEEMS INCREDIBLE.
By H. S p e n c e r L ew is, I m p e r a t o r

V
O U L D you think it possible that in this day and year of advanced thought a jury of men sup­ posed to be intelli­ gent and rational could come to­ gether in a civ­ ilized country and agree that another human being, edu­ cated like them­ selves and holding a similar position in their own vicinity, had been “possessed of an evil spirit?’’ Y et this very thing has happened, and it is one of the most surprising commentaries on the advancement of human thought that has ever appeared in public print. Personally, we should regret that this thing has occurred in England, a country so close to us in so many ways and generally recognized as highly advanced in culture and intellect. A t first thought it would seem that such a verdict should have been found in some so-called pagan country, and yet, even that thought is unfair, because we are learning day by day that in the socalled pagan countries there is less superstition and less ignorance regard­ ing natural laws than in the so-called cultured and advanced countries. Certainly, we are justified in what we have been saying officially in our teachings and in our magazines for the past twenty years regarding the need for a better understanding of natural and Cosmic law. T h e incident that I am about to describe goes hand in hand with the intelligence displayed by those
T iventy-one

V

V
American ignoramuses who still believe in b la c k m agic and who try to injure the work of constructive organizations or altruistic individuals by making the claim that the success or progress of the latter is due to the practice of b lack m agic. Intelligent men and women rise from their seats in any auditorium where such statements are made on a public platform and walk out into God's fresh air, relieved at the change from such a depressing atmosphere, and, in­ variably, there is not only resentment in their minds, but pity in their hearts. T o think that anyone will try to boost his own stature or elevate his own posi­ tion in the minds of others by resorting to such false and ignorant ideas of the dark ages! M ost of the speakers who try to de­ fame others with such charges do not seem to realize that the real secret of their failure to build up a following or to increase the activities of their indi­ vidual organizations is due to the fact that they are constantly attempting to injure other organizations, constantly criticizing and defaming. T h ey do not seem to realize that the intelligent men and women of today will judge a leader or a representative of an organization or group of people by the good will and tolerance expressed toward others. In the face of their criticisms and ignor­ ant comments they assist other organ­ izations in growing and becoming more successful. T h e same situation existed in E n g­ land, undoubtedly, or we could not have had this strange verdict rendered in October of 1931 in Oldham.

Let me briefly present the story to you so that you may have a picture of the ignorance that still exists in civ­ ilized lands, and which we and many other similar organizations are attempt­ ing to combat and to evolve into cor­ rect comprehension and understanding. First of all, it appears that the man who is charged with having been pos­ sessed of an evil spirit was the Rev­ erend F . W . C. W oo llett. He was a man sixty years of age and was V icar of St. Thom as’ Church, Leesfield, N ear Oldham, England. He had been married twenty-four years and had a grown son and daughter. He began his career with the church in 1906 as a lay reader, and from ev id en ce sent to us it appears that the man had a very brilliant mind and was given to long periods of study and writing, and that like many authors or brilliant men in the clergy, as well as in other pro­ fessions, he was given to periods of despondency and discouragement, and was typically temperamental, as they say of artists or of a gen ius. O ther comments sent to us indicate that at times he aroused the antipathy of other clergymen by his vigorous statements, by his popular preachments and by his intellectual mastership. It appears also that because of his modernistic views and because of his rational stand on many subjects, some orthodox followers of churches made the statement that he appeared to be either insane or irra­ tional. T h e worst evidence brought against the man under oath was that he was unkind to his wife and children at times, and was often annoyed at their actions, or claimed to be, and insisted that he be left alone, or that they leave him and permit him to work out his life alone. O f course, we cannot get at the real facts of the matter through studying the official ev id en ce p resen ted to the jury because the coroner ad­ mitted in his remarks at the inquiry that he desired to protect the widow and children, and did not want to bring any evidence before the jury that would The make it appear that there had de­ Rosicrucian veloped any degree of insanity in the Digest clergyman because this might become February a slur on the wife and children; and (therefore, he preferred to exclude all 1932

documentary and testamentary evidence along certain lines and permit only evi­ dence of one kind to be written into the records. T h e evidence, therefore, dealt with his actions in his family life and not with his actions as a clergyman. All statements that might tend to show rivalry on the part of other clergymen, or jealousy, or envy, or anything of this kind, were apparently excluded from the hearing. T h e whole evidence submitted tended to paint a picture of a man who, from morning until night and from night un­ til morning, was in one continuous spell of bad temper, anger, cruelty and viciou sn ess tow ard his w ife an d chil­ dren. Typical of this sort of evidence was the repeated statement that he thrashed his children or attempted to thrash his wife, and that he kept them on a bread-and-w ater diet until he finally drove them from his home, and that on two occasions in his past life he had attempted to commit suicide. O n the other hand, the evidence show­ ing his brilliancy of thought and his devotion to study and writings, which would indicate that he could not have alw ay s been in a bad temper, nor al­ ways cruel, nor always irrational, was not permitted to be presented, or at least does not appear in the records which we have seen. W e have known of many geniuses and temperamental minds that have sought isolation, privacy and quietness without being called insane. And we have heard of many very temperamental persons who have wanted to break up their home life and separate themselves from the annoyance of companions in order to carry out their strange dreams and unusual careers. I think that if we were to go through the population of the civilized countries of the occidental world today and select all persons of such peculiar temperaments as this, we would find a vast army, and we would find many among them who preferred transition or so-called d e a th , even by suicide, than go on living under the unsatisfactory surroundings of their home life or of their contact with asso­ ciates and friends. Such minds are not norm al to the highest degree and are viewing life wrongly, and are certainly

strange in many ways, but you cannot call them absolutely insane, and most certainly, you would not say that they were "possessed of evil spirits.” However, it appears that the Rev­ erend W oollett did commit suicide. E v i­ dently there was much whispering about the unkind criticisms made of him and his work by those that might be con­ sidered rivals or envious of his career. However, regardless of what may have been the cause of his suicide, he did take his own life into his hands, and as the natural result of this, a coroner made an inquiry and presented his findings to a jury, limiting his evidence, as stated above, and asking for their verdict. Now let us see who was on the jury. W e find that there were two Church­ wardens, a school-master, a choir­ master and members of the choir. You would consider these persons as above the average in intellect, and certainly typical of modern civilization. T h e only criticism that we could make of this jury is that there were too many on that jury that were connected with the church, and instead of this tempering their thoughts with the love and kind­ ness of the great Saviour of men, whom their church adored, may have been responsible for their biased view-point. A fter listening to the evidence re­ garding Reverend W o o lle tt’s life, this jury of modern intellects representing institutions of religious and scholastic training, rendered this official verdict: "In our opinion th e d e c e a s e d a t tim es mas p o s s e s s e d o f an evil spirit, an d w e a re o f the opinion that a t th e tim e o f his d ea th he w as o f unsoun d m ind a n d h a d been so on d ifferen t occasions d u r­ ing the last fe w m o n th s " You would think that such an opinion would have caused the coroner to raise his hands in protest, but in­ stead the coroner stated afterw ards to the newspapers that he agreed thor­ oughly with every word of the verdict. He even said that the jury was com­ posed of sound clergymen and that they had done their duty. Furthermore, we read in the E v en in g C h ron icle, pub­ lished in the locality of the hearing, that the coroner had been invited by the jury to attend the services the fol­ lowing Sunday in the very church

where Reverend W oo llett had preached, and that they felt quite satisfied with the wonderful verdict they had rendered. Perhaps the most astonishing state­ ment connected with this whole affair is that made by the pastor of another church in the same city who was per­ sonally acquainted with Reverend W oollett, and who said to the reporter of the E v en in g C h ron icle: "T h e verdict is certainly very unusual, but there is a body of opinion, particularly amongst those who have worked in foreign countries— China, for example— which still very strongly believes in Devil pos­ sessions.” T h e lesson to be learned from this incident is that with all of our boasted advancement, and all of our claim for culture and evolution of thought, there are still many among us, often holding high positions as instructors and guides in our educational and spiritual de­ velopment, who are filled with super­ stitious beliefs and who are just as primitive and ignorant in their under­ standing of Cosmic and natural laws as any of the so-called pagans of the darkest spots on earth. How different all of this might have been. Think of the manner in which you and any of us acting as mystics or Rosicrucians, or sympathetic stu­ dents of human nature, would have closed the last chapter of this strange man’s life. Realizing the Karmic con­ dition he had brought upon himself by many of his acts while living, and realiz­ ing the still greater suffering he had brought upon himself by taking his life into his own hands, we would have seen to it that this poor, misguided soul would have been buried in peace and quiet with no notoriety, and cer­ tainly with no criticism or comment that would have made him an out­ standing freak of human belief through­ out the world. T h e mere fact that he had been a clergyman, and had de­ voted his life or some portion of it in trying to help others, should have war­ ranted clergymen to have allowed his passing without all of this publicity and without the world-wide criticism that has come upon the people of this one part of England for arriving at such a barbaric decision.

W hat Occurs A fter D eath?
( C ontinu ed from P a g e 18)

more, but transition has always been inevitable. M an has found no substi­ tute for that Divine substance when once it begins to leave or once it has gone. But of this dual man, the mater­ ialistic schools put all the emphasis on the physical part o f man, that part which is so largely water. F o r instance, after cremation and extreme heat when all moisture is drawn out you have only a few pounds— that which can chemically be bought for 66c— and which from every point of view, is nothing more than a gathering-up of the elements you may have in the garden of your homes. T h at, the materialistic schools point out, is th e g r e a t m an. And it studies minutely every one of these lit­ tle cells, and gets excited over the fact that they have found that one of the little cells of the nail in the finger is similar to the fibrous cell of a plant in the garden. It gets excited over the fact that plant life has many of the elements that are in our bodies. And yet the child doesn't get excited over such a discovery. H e simply says, “Mama, Papa, if we must eat to live and eating keeps us alive, then my body must be formed by some of the meal and mush and milk and things of that kind that I eat; and if I go out in the oat field, I will find some of the things that keep me alive." And it would be true. A little child doesn’t get excited over that discovery, but science does. T h e view-point instead of being broad is narrow. T h a t is the way to look at the ma­ terial part of man and see nothing. But the other side is reached by these schools of mystics, metaphysicians, and philosophers who say that is not the real part of man. T h e inner intelligence of man, that, which, according to the Bible, is called the living soul is the real you . W e note in that statement The that man becomes a living soul in a livR o s ic r u c ia n ing body. So at transition we find the D ig es t two dualities being separated, broken F ebru ary down into two distinct entities— the 1932 physical body and the soul.

Note through all the years of time, with all the ancient methods of burial and all the ancient methods of caring for those at transition, all sacred rituals and writings say that to dust man doth return. T h ey expect the return of the physical part of man to its original source. T h ere is nothing horrifying or mysterious about it— that the physical body of man should go back to the source from which it came. W e should have no difficulty in seeeing, rationally, the wisdom, of that principle, as well as the great fundamental law that the invisible part of man returns to its orig­ inal source. S o at transition we find the physical part and the spiritual part separated, each going to its original source from whence it came, separat­ ing from each other moment by mo­ ment, hour by hour, until the whole universe is between them. N ow we are particularly interested in what occurs after this separation has taken place. W e have, in recent years, comparatively speaking, a number of schools to explain the possibility and probability of what occurs after transi­ tion. W e have foremost among the schools one which attempts to claim the greatest teachings— the Spiritualis­ tic School. T h is system claims that the soul or spirit of man, being immortal, ascends into a heavenly or Divine and spiritual world where it continues to live with its consciousness and person­ ality and that it is not only conscious of itself, but conscious of the attend­ ance of others around it. Conscious of the identity of those still remaining here, and not only capable of com­ municating and talking to those around it, but can talk and communicate with those who are still on this earth plane. T h ey go further and state that these disembodied or spiritual bodies are capable of returning here momentarily, temporarily, or upon call and request of those on the earth plane. These are the claims set forth by that school. Th ere are other schools claiming the same fundamental proposition that the soul or spirit of man ascends to a spir­ itual kingdom. T h at it waits in an un-

conscious state for an ultimate Judg­ ment day when these souls will be en­ livened with others and physical bodies will be called from the graves. In this new day and new kingdom, the good and the evil doers will be judged. There are other schools that claim that after the soul ascends to a heavenly or spiritual world, it dwells in an unconscious or semi-conscious state and that it never returns again to the earth. T h ere are other schools of thought in the Orient, with millions of followers that hold that after the spirit ascends to Heaven, it remains in a sus­ pended, conscious state until some other time when it is absorbed into the consciousness of God, and loses its identity entirely by becoming a part of God again. So we have these different thoughts, and you will note that most of these systems are highly speculative. It is one thing sure that the average teacher or preacher who is expounding any one of these systems or philosophies has never been there and is not talking from first hand knowledge. It is highly speculative. A great many of these sys­ tems are based on the statements in H oly or sacred writings. Some from the Christian Bible; some from the writings of Buddha, and Confucius, some from Zoroaster, and some from writings going further back than any of these. Even opposing schools will use the same Biblical quotations to prove their contentions, by giving a different translation or interpretation to the same statement. You, as a seeker, you as a student, must form your own conclusions when you come face to face with opposing, contending, and the differing state­ ments of all of these systems. V ery few agree on any one point. You find with any of these systems of thought their ideas are based on speculation, and your opinion and your conclusion is just as good as anyone else’s. T h ere are, however, some things known that occur after transition or at the moment of transition by those who have been on the borderline and yet did not cross over it and who have come back to tell us of their experiences. Those people have the most reliable information we

can have. It is to be noted that the statements of those who have been tem­ porarily on the borderline of transition, who have been walking, let us say, the Great Path to the Great Gate, and then came back and did not pass through— the statements of these persons from various parts of the world agree, whereas statements from those who have never had such experiences are speculative and do not agree. Y es, we have a mass of information from those who have claimed to go to the spirit world and are giving mes­ sages through mediums and automatic writing and spirit photography and in­ spirational talks, etc; but from the thou­ sands and thousands of books written under such influence, it is interesting to note that the reports of what is going on in the spirit world do not agree. Sometimes they are quite amusing. I remember reading one not long ago, re­ ported through a medium, who said he was still laying bricks in building houses. He had been a bricklayer here on this earth plane and therefore could think of no other important trade. O thers make reports on all sorts of things. There are statements from those stating that in Heaven one passes the time leisurely away and there is no work and no effort. O thers tell us that they know each other and speak to each other. Some say they have mar­ riages and that even children are born. Sometimes they say there are big build­ ings up there. I could go on and re­ peat the many, many statements, the contradictory statements; they all dis­ agree. But from those that have been on the borderline, the reports are alike. In one case an electrician was not expected to live for more than twentyeight hours. He had been shocked by high voltage. He was taken to the hospital in an unconscious state, be­ lieving to have passed through transi­ tion; he was covered over with a sheet; the door was closed; the doctor notified the undertaker to take his body to the morgue, and in every way he was con­ sidered to be lifeless. Suddenly they began to feel a little warmth, showing indication of life, and startling the nurses.

And there is the statement of a wom­ an, believed to have passed through transition for twenty-four hours, deeply religious in an orthodox sense, in a Methodist sense, if you please, and having no tolerance for any other view­ point than that which was prescribed by her church. H er report after she came back was like that of the elec­ trician. Then take the philosopher, and take the little girl in the M ontreal Hospital, just able to talk and describe in a chil­ dish way what she experienced. She never heard of such an experience be­ fore, had no idea of what Heaven was like, yet her report was identical with all the others. And what do they re­ port? There is first a great lightening of the body. T h a t seems to be the first outstanding thing that impresses them. Long before they are willing to let the nurse or doctor know something pe­ culiar is going on, they begin to sense they are not lying as heavily. A t first they think it is imagination; then they begin to sense a warmth and the light­ ness begins to feel as though they could spring from the bed and nothing could keep them from it. T h e room that was only a few feet away, begins to look as though it were many, many feet away. It is not that their eyesight becomes blurred as they still recognize certain persons, and witnesses show that to the last moment they were able to recog­ nize their presence. It is not a blurred eyesight, but a matter of Fourth D i­ mension. T h ey are beginning to sense themselves in a world that has another dimension that they have never sensed before. T h ey begin to feel that they are existing in the Fourth Dimension. None of them except the philosopher knows anything about the Fourth D i­ mension. Then the voices of those that were talking together, began to get further away until it sounded as though they were off at the end of the hall. T h is was a great moment with them because of the closing-out of physical The n ‘ • impressions. Eventually they could see K o s tcr u c ia n nothing but themselves. T h ey see them­ D ig e s t selves lying on the bed. T h ey see their F ebru ary physical bodies, not from their own eyes, but from another sense of vision. 1932

T h ey say they seem to be six or seven feet away and above themselves, look­ ing down on their own physical bodies, and between them and the physical body, there seems to extend a haze. O ne described it as an aura, another like the silver thread spoken of in a religious writing. Another described it as being similar to the umbilical cord, only not so solid. T h e fact is that they see something between themselves and the physical body, and they feel the separation gradually taking place. I have seen about a hundred letters in the last twenty years from those who felt they did not desire to go back to the physi­ cal body to stop the separation, except that there is this one feeling, and that of sorrow for those who are weeping, and they sense that sorrow. T h ey feel they must go back to relieve the sor­ row, but as for themselves, the light­ ness, the sense of great space and the sense of music so intangible that they can hardly hear it but is a pleasant sound to the ear, the freedom from all pain, is a relief and is an impelling urge to let the separation continue. Bear in mind the man with a leg cut off, who looked down upon himself and saw the mutilated body, but the part rising above had all of its parts, and no pain. T here was absolute freedom from all suffering and that is why there is no desire to go back into the physical body again. There seems to be a dual power— one trying to hold them to the physical body and one drawing them away, and so they waver in that state. Finally, in the case of those who made the reports, they are drawn back into the physical body. T h ey feel them­ selves cramped, shut in and crushed, and immediately the physical actions and powers begin to come back, they begin to feel warm instead of the cool­ ing sensation, they begin to feel heavy and weighted down as though there was a load on their chest. It is hard for them to breathe. T h e eyelids are hard to open and yet they gradually do, and that is the first sign to the doctor that they are coming back; they begin to see the eyelids quiver. Th ey see a struggle. Sometimes it is one, two, or three days before they are able

to speak. T h ey know all that is going on about them, but the body is so heavy and cramped. T h ey know some­ thing must be done to relieve the suf­ fering and weeping of the beloved ones. T h a t is their picture of the border­ line condition and they not only all agree, but give us the most understand­ able report. Here is a great story, a great picture. W h a t a wonderful thing life is and yet how painless and how beautiful transition can be. Because my time is limited, I cannot go on and tell you what occurs after what their statements indicate, but I would have you think over in the mean­ time, whenever you have a few mo­ V V V

ments, these things again. T h e light­ ness of the body, the expanding space, and the beauty of the haze surrounding them. T h e ability of seeing themselves, showing the dual consciousness, show­ ing that the Divine consciousness can be independent of the physical body. Sometime you will understand more about it. I think in the future it will be well to have a discourse on the sub­ ject of “W h y are Some Earthbound?” and explain why some persons feel that they cannot get away, and must stay here in the physical body. So with these few words to think about, I be­ lieve you will be able to build up an idea of what transition is like. V V

Pages from T he Past
( C ontinued from P a g e 15)

only o n e object in view. Diseases may be caused and cured by faith, and if men knew the power of faith they would have more faith and less super­ stition. W e have no right to call a disease incurable; we have only the right to say that we cannot cure it. A physician who trusts only in his own science will accomplish little, but he who has faith in the power of God acting through him, and who employs that power intelligently, will accomplish much. “If any one thinks that he can cure a disease or accomplish anything else, merely because he believes that he is able to accomplish it, he believes in a superstition; but if he believes that he can perform such a thing, because he is conscious of having the power to do so, he will then be able to accomplish it by the power of the true faith. Such a faith is knowledge and gives power. True faith is spiritual consciousness, but a belief based upon mere opinions and creeds is the product of ignorance, and is superstitution. “T h e body which we receive from our parents, and which is built up from the nutriments it draws directly and indirectly from the earth, has no spir­ itual powers, for wisdom and virtue, faith, hope, and charity, do not grow

from the earth. T h ey are not the prod­ ucts of man’s physical organization, but the attributes of another invisible and glorified body, whose germs are laid within man. T h e physical body changes and dies, the glorified body is eternal. This eternal man is the real man, and is not generated by his earthly parents. He does not draw nutriment from the earth, but from the eternal invisible source from which he originated. Nevertheless the two bodies are one, and man may be compared to a tree, drawing his nutriments from the earth, and from the surrounding air. T h e roots extend into the earth, and seek their nutriment in the dark, but the leaves receive their nutriment from the light. T h e temporal body is the house of the eternal, and we should therefore take care of it, because he who destroys the temporal body destroys the house of the eternal, and although the eternal man is invisible, he exists nevertheless, and will become visible in time, just as a child in its mother’s womb is invisible before it is born, but after its birth it may be seen by all but those who are blind; and as everything returns after a while to the source from whence it came, so the body returns to the earth and the spirit to heaven or hell."

ITS RATIONAL USE
By F r a t e r G o r d o n P. L a n g d o n
V M U L T IT U D E of changes occur dur­ ing man’s normal period o f earthly expression to alter his ideas of and his attitude in and towards prayer. A t the birth of a child, the ego or p s y c h i c Being emerges from a certain stage of pure spiritual de­ velopment and begins anew its func­ tioning in a physical body. Spiritual growth though probably not retrograde, at this time subsides from its activities and becomes dormant. All the energies and activities of the child, as well as its training and habits induced by sug­ gestive surroundings and the influence of other persons, tend from this time toward, first, physical growth, second, mental development and third, material acquisitions. Sooner or later, the time varying greatly with individuals, the physical so to speak, has overtaken the spiritual development so that a state of balance or saturation occurs. T h e psychic part of the person's dual nature again stirs and makes an appeal for growth and recognition. Usually this change is dur­ ing youth, most often during the third septenary period. An awakening takes place, a realization of the Divine Power The in and about is manifest, evidence of Rosicrucian abundance of things, both material and Digest celestial, is felt and the first cry goes February out for Cosmic help. T h is cry or appeal we call prayer. 1932 V V From this time on the person, after experiencing the bewilderment and confusion of physical activities, finds it convenient, even advantageous, to appeal through prayer for Divine aid and to give thanks to God for bless­ ings, such as protection, direction and the providing of things material. Growth continues, as up and over the mountains of joy, of health and of suc­ cess and down and through the valleys of sorrow, of sickness and of discour­ agement the individual pursues the evanescent and often obscured purpose of Life. Earnest reflection upon the part of my readers, will enable us to agree that all persons do pray, and I will consent when you qualify my statement, by saying that prayer develops into almost infinite varieties of form and purpose. Some will pray loudly, some secretly, maybe in groups or singly, perhaps with understanding or in confusion, with faith or in despair, for things needed or those unnecessary, some prostrate or kneeling, others with heads bowed or erect, selfishly or in the in­ terests of others; finally prayers may be said for others, prompted by love or they may be withheld, as is custo­ mary in certain religious bodies, until pecuniary compensation is offered by the one desiring Divine assistance. Now let us examine further into the power of prayer and determine how best we may employ its efficiency and avoid any confusion or the obtaining of unpleasant or undesirable results. In the Synoptics we find, M atthew 21-22, and M ark 11-24, with almost the same

words in both places, as follows: “ W h a ts o e v e r y e d e s ir e , w hen y e p r a y , b eliev e that you receiv e it, a n d you sh all h a v e it.” T h e meaning of this appears free from complications and capable of being applied in our every­ day affairs. It is. Y et you may find as I have and still do, that in demon­ strating results in accordance with its instructions there are two difficulties. T h e first, being a real danger, requires either a guard rail or a warning signal to reduce the hazard of its negotiation. T h e second, being a grade, steeper than it at first appears, makes neces­ sary the careful use of the mental gears and perhaps also, if the seeker be in­ experienced, a friendly life from some­ one who has traversed that part of the Path before. Let us analyze first the danger to which I have just alluded. T h e phrase, " W h a ts o e v e r y e d e s ir e ,” when applied literally, as is our Occidental custom, to temporal and material affairs, is likely to be construed too widely, be­ coming a detriment instead of a bless­ ing to its recipient. W e may desire many things, some or all of which would not be conducive either to spir­ itual or bodily growth and progress. It seems incongruous that we should employ our finite, mental faculties to decide and to suggest to the Infinite Cosmic what it should do in our be­ half or what things we prefer to have showered upon us as blessings. Suppose that I desire that a painful headache be stopped, so that I may be able to fulfill a social obligation as promised. By carefully following the instructions as propounded in this quotation, the desire may be fulfilled but in stopping the headache, I have rendered inopera­ tive the warning signal which nature is so patiently applying to advise me that I need rest or sleep or that the digestive equipment should not be overtaxed with an excess of rich food. T h e psychologist, especially the in­ structor in so-called practical psy­ chology, is fond of quoting this verse from the Bible and urging its appli­ cation as a means of obtaining material things. Let us agree that the results sought may be accomplished or that

the things desired may be obtained in this way. I have several times proven it, demonstrating results, only to find later that I have invited into my life’s plan something not consistent with the Cosmic plan and schedule, with which I must harmonize and function as an integral part. As an example of this kind, may I warn all who are inter­ ested, that an expensive piece of prop­ erty may thus be acquired, the main­ tenance of which may prove a great and unnecessary financial burden. Now we have considered the hazard that may be encountered, let us apply the safeguard. In M atthew 6-33, we find this promise: " S e e k y e first the kin g d om o f G o d a n d his rig h teou sn ess an d all th ese things shall b e a d d e d unto y ou ." If we shall cease the indulgence in and the accumulation of the gross material things and purely physical affairs, sublimating our desires, elevat­ ing our vision until our ambition to obtain is for the eternal and spiritual blessings only, then our desires will be fully protected and the material things which are needed will surely be pro­ vided. Do you perceive that here we are admonished to invite into our lives only the spiritual things, thus avoiding the probability that in our seeking ma­ terial wealth, we may obtain conditions inharmonious with the Divine plan? Shall we now for a few moments apply our thoughts to the other diffi­ culty that is liable to be encountered, the steep grade that, as I have sug­ gested, requires careful use of the gears? It is the idea expressed by the words, B eliev e that you receiv e it. N o­ tice that this condition comes before the final words, an d y e sh all h a v e it, which guarantee delivery. A complete and truthful acceptance of the results sought, a realization of it as already provided, received and accepted, must occur in the consciousness of the peti­ tioner ere the actual manifest demon­ stration does take place. Faith is the expectation of the fulfilment of a desire. H ere we encounter the steep grade that tests the quality and quantity of our faith and find whether or not we have strengthened and harmonized our men­ tal processes so we can avoid digressing

into the byways of doubt and discour­ agement. Combining, therefore, the thoughts of these two promises, we have the following: W h en you pray, desire the things of the kingdom of God and their right-use-ness, believe that you receive them, actually accept them and commence to use and to en­ joy them, then you will awaken, hap­ pily into the realization that you have them. Then the other promise, relative to secular affairs, seems to naturally fulfill, for most of our desires for things of this world wall have shriveled into nothingness and disappeared and the ones enduring will have been abund­ antly satisfied. Let us go a step further. Even as it has been found of unquestionable value in business and in manufacture to em­ ploy efficiency experts to detect faulty methods and to suggest improvements, so may we, if we will industriously and assiduously apply ourselves to this problem, eliminate methods of prayer that are of doubtful fecundity. An obstacle to the progress of many of us will appear through having been influenced, even established in our ways of invoking Divine assistance as pre­ scribed by custom or by creed, instead of using the Divinity inherent in our­ selves, the dormant but potential intui­ tive faculties provided for our guidance into realms away, beyond and above worldly interests or suggestions. Guatama Buddha must have been in close attunement with the Divine Mind when he admonished his followers to resist desires. Had we not better make of our prayers acknowledgments and appreciations, thanksgiving and rejoic­ ing, eliminating our own personal re­ quests and desires? One other angle of the subject of prayer, one of momentous import and a decisive factor in our progress is K ar­ ma. W h en , as often occurs in solving life’s perplexing enigmas, I am inclined to implore Divine aid for selfish pur­ poses, some influence impels me to cease the unnecessary struggle, and if The at home, to raise my eyes to the simple R o s ic r u c ia n Rosicrucian motto hanging in my study, D ig est “Cosmic Law Fulfills.” I trust that I F ebru ary may not appear to be facetious, when I write that cause will produce its effect, 1932

Universal laws will continue to func­ tion and to produce results, even though we implore God to transcend them through special dispensation. In­ fluences in our lives that are beyond our understanding, do occur daily. W e contact persons or conditions, maybe producing pleasure or gain or perhaps produ cin g instead, what we will con­ strue to be loss or discomfiture. It is the law of Karma in operation, affecting our affairs, rewarding us for sincere efforts, for loving thoughts and kindly deeds or causing us to atone for some error and to overcome and correct it. Some of my readers, after consider­ ing the foregoing paragraph, might construe it to mean that if effects must follow causes, therefore results are beyond control and the possibility of improvement through prayer or personal effort would be rendered useless and ineffectual. Such an interpretation would be fatalistic and inconsistent with the whole thought of this writing. A perusal of the Scriptures and espe­ cially a study of the esoteric teachings of Jesus, will bring us assurance and the promise that acts of retribution may be annulled, faults, failures and short­ comings forgiven and punishment eter­ nally prevented, if through penitence we are able to express propitiation and a reconciliation or harmonizing with Divine Laws and Precepts. One of our prominent human quali­ ties is impatience and we are inclined to express this attitude when awaiting Cosmic aid. Conceive, if possible, of God's Laws as universally and eter­ nally operative, realizing that the measurement which we know as time is only a man-made institution. History relates that John Bunyan was confined in an English jail for twelve years. It is reasonable to suppose that he prayed often for release. But not until the completion of his immortal Pilgrim’s Progress were the doors opened and his freedom obtained. N o one, not even he, knew the details of his Karmic obligation but we can be certain that the Law of Compensation was in force and being fulfilled. In our human relations it often happens that cleverness or deception yield, at least a temporary advantage.
T hirty

Happily, the opposite to this must be our attitude in prayer, wherein we seek to contact the only Power and Pres­ ence in the universe, realizing that no sham, pretence or concealing, is of any avail and that strict honesty only is effective. A very human tendency, one whose influence is so personal and subtle that little is thought or said or written about it, is that of appealing to God for assistance when in an emergency of adversity or distress, then when an answer occurs, perhaps in the form of relief or assistance from an unexpected source, to forget the Divine origin of every good and perfect gift and in arrogant conceit, lose the humbleness, take on a proud manner and give to the personal self an unearned credit for the ensuing success or prosperity. In concluding these thoughts, it is my earnest belief that those in need of V V

the help here offered, will realize its value and accept it. Prayer is a Spiritual Consciousness, an attunement with the Universal Mind and inasmuch as we each are dual in our characteristics, being neither Spiritual nor Physical, but both, it is an attainment, not only practicable, but well worth the effort of discipline to our mental faculties, forming the habit of being almost continuously in prayer, even while writing, speaking or doing any form of labor. Indeed, with­ out abusing the truth, it may be said that we can continue prayer through our hours of repose, for upon retiring we whisper prayers of thankfulness and appreciation for the blessings of the day that is ending and as sleep renders the voluntary faculties inactive, the thought habits will continue to function and will subconsciously create for us the very conditions that we have praised and appreciated. V

OUR N EW C O V ER Undoubtedly our members will be pleased to see the new cover on this issue of the magazine. Last February we introduced a new cover that has been more widely commented upon than any cover we have ever used. T h e present cover like that of last year is a result of a painting made by the Imperator specially for this purpose. The 1931 cover depicted the mystics at midnight in their meditations and mystical contempla­ tions awaiting the coming of the new day. T he cover for this year represents the sunrise period in Oriental lands when the mystics begin their daily activities and it represents the birth of a new day symbolically and materially. T he year 1932 is to be the beginning of a new period and a new life in many ways for many people throughout the world and this is why this theme is illustrated. W e would like to call your attention also to the many new designs throughout the magazine and to the additional number of pages of reading matter and pictures. It is our desire to continue to make this magazine the most popular of mystical publications in America and your support throughout the past two years in comments, suggestions and assistance in having this magazine in every public library inNorth America is responsible for our efforts in enlarging and improving the magazine and we would be glad to have your comments in regard to these changes. Incidently, our former propaganda book called, "T h e Light of E gypt," is being aban­ doned and an entirely new book with a new title is being prepared and illustrated wnth a cover design made by the Imperator in the form of a very beautiful mystical picture which will be worthy of framing. W e have found that the continuous im­ provement of our literature with the addition of pictures and a higher grade of printing with an additional appeal to the aesthetic, cultural tastes of the people we are reaching with our work is helping to spread the ideas and ideals or beauty and elegance along with the sacredness and goodness of our teachings and principles. M any other features are being added to our work in keeping with these ideas and from time to time we will announce these additional features so that all of our members may become familiar with them. W hen the new propaganda book that is to take the place of "T h e Light of E gyp t” is ready it will be announced in this magazine. It will probably be in circulation by the time the March issue of the"Rosicrucian Digest" is ready to be printed.— E ditors.

T h e Mystery of the Shape of the Earth
DO W E LIVE INSIDE OR OUTSIDE OF A LARGE CELL ?
By P r o f u n d u s XII V
O R the past twelve or fifteen years we have tried to call the attention of our m em bers to many of the muted points in the vari­ ous fields of science and have tried to encourage a broad vision of many of the larger problems of life so that each one of our students may widen his understanding of the fundamentals of all of the principles in­ volved. Among the most interesting of life’s mysteries is that pertaining to our ex­ istence on this earth in a purely cos­ mological sense. As in other cases, where we are attempting to widen the understanding of life’s problems and broaden the student’s view-point, we have presented not only the teachings and u nderstan ding o f th e R osicrucians but the teachings and understanding of the philosophers and scientists of other schools and systems that are contrary to our teachings in order that the real student may understand both sides or the opposite side of the problem. In case of cosmogony, or the study of the The earth and the universe, we have pur­ R osicrucian posefully supplemented our regular Digest graded lectures with long extracts and February many paragraphs composing special supplementary lectures dealing with 1932

V

V
this subject, and taken from many sources. During the past fifteen years these special magazine articles or lectures dealing with the shape o f the earth and our relationship to the earth have aroused intense interest, and occasion­ ally we have been asked whether we, as Rosicrucians, had a d o p te d o n e view­ point or the other as the definite and correct understanding. In each and every case we have tried to make it plain to our members that the whole matter is still unsettled and unproved and that there is considerable mystery in this subject which we hope to solve in the next few years. O f the various view-points that we have presented probably the most unique, is that which is known as C el­ lular Cosmogony, which name was given to it by the well-known philos­ opher “Koresh.” W h en we first intro­ duced this Cellular Cosmogony into our separate supplementary lectures we announced in the lodges where the lec­ tures were given verbally and with illustration on black boards that M r. Koresh had derived his interpretation of the cosmogony from the ancient sou rces and had been the last of many eminent men to test the principles of it in a scien­ tific manner and thereby added to the cumulative evidence to support it. M r. Koresh published a book many years ago dealing with the matter based upon other books dealing with the same sub­ ject published in Europe. W e have, for
T1xirty~two

instance, a book published in Germany by a scientist by the name of Neupert which revealed the illusions of the Copernican system of cosmogony and gives very logical reasons for the belief that the earth is a cell and that all hu­ man existence and all of nature as we observe it exists on the inside of this cell rather than on the outside of it. O ne of the very positive statements contained in Neupert’s book is that "everything visible to us is to be found inside this enormous ball or shell.” Neupert, who is reported as a Rosi­ crucian of Augsburg, claims in his book to have been the discoverer of this C el­ lular Cosmogony and the illustrations and pictures in his book are wholly dif­ ferent from those adopted by Koresh after he had made some investigations of his own, and we have had the benefit of later investigations made by some French scientists and others of the Rosi­ crucian organization in other parts of the world. M any eminent astronomers have frankly admitted in statements which we have in their own precise words that our present cosmogony as taught in the schools and colleges is very doubtful and contains many ab­ surdities and unexplainable mysteries. However, there are still some unsolved mysteries in the Cellular Cosmogony and our students are advised in reading these supplementary lectures taken from various sources inside and outside of our organization that they should not form a positive conclusion one way or the other but keep their minds open and realize that there is something wrong somewhere in our knowledge of the cos­ mogony of the universe and that prob­ ably some day newer revelations and discoveries will reveal a wholly different cosmogony from either the Copernican, or that which is called the Cellular C os­ mogony. Fundamentally, the Rosicrucians were interested in Germany in the Cellular Cosmogony long before either Neupert or Koresh prepared their books, because if the earth is a sphere upon the outside of which we live then it is the only ex­ ception in the whole of the universal scheme of things, for from the smallest living thing to the largest all life is con­

tained within a cell and not on the out­ side of it. Those who look upon the Cellular Cosmogony as an unacceptable explanation because they say it leaves the outside of the cell an incomprehensi­ ble mystery seem to forget that if we really live on the outside of the earth then the idea of unlimited space around that shell is a greater and more incom­ prehensible mystery than knowing noth­ ing of the outside of the shell while liv­ ing on the inside of it. O ne of the principal objectives of the Rosicrucian teachings is to provoke thought or to provoke thinking and while the Rosicrucian teachings contain a vast amount of definite, positive know­ ledge which constitutes its regular graded lectures based upon all available sources of knowledge, there is still a large field of speculative knowledge which has not been proved either true or untrue and this speculative knowledge is contained in separate lectures or lessons sent to lodges or groups of our members for supplementary reading at different times in order to provoke analytical thinking. M ost of these lectures are called "Rosicrucian Analytical Discus­ sions.” Others, like the Cosmology, are issued under the subject titles. Such matter is taken from every available book, record, writing, or manuscript or lecture by any person who has given the subject thought and careful study. In this way the system used in universities or colleges for supplementary reading and study is carried out in order to make the Rosicrucian system of instruction and mental development as rounded and complete as possible. New books issued weekly and month­ ly in Europe or America are purchased by our Research Department and care­ fully read and analyzed in the hope of finding new light upon disputed points or new view-points upon old questions and whenever something of interest to our students is found it is presented in some of our supplementary lectures or in a magazine article, or otherwise not as a part of the definite graded instruc­ tions of the Rosicrucian work but as a part of the entire system of home study and reading.

In looking at N eupert’s claims which he sets forth as his discovery of Cosmic optics we are struck with the fact that he was surrounded by many who had been discussing the mystery of the earth’s cosmogony for many years and in fact he plainly intimates that many had written on this subject and that very many had refused to accept the Copernican theory of the earth’s form and the statement that we lived on the outside of the earth. T h e Copernican system was wholly a theory, as he ad­ mitted himself, and as every great as­ tronomer or cosmologist admits today. Neupert makes this interesting state­

ment regarding his Cellular Cosmogony: “T h e more the reader studies the argu­ ments of the author for a cosmos within a hollow sphere, the less able will he be to disregard their overwhelming con­ vincing nature.” Certainly, life is filled with mysteries unsolved and unknown and all of the knowledge which we have, even though it requires thousands upon thousands of volumes to contain it briefly, is but a small fraction of the wonderful know­ ledge and important revelations held just beyond the veil and awaiting the con­ tinued explorations into that domain called the arcane.

V

V

V

Cathedral Contacts
( C ontinued from P a g e 14)

either the W estern Union or the Postal Telegraph Companies in your city. Every Sunday evening at the first evening period the officers in San Jose will conduct special contacts through­ out the months of January and February. On February 14 at 5:30 in the after­ noon the Imperator will conduct in San Jose a special Cathedral contact in cele­ bration of the Egyptian initiation that was held in Luxor, Egypt, on February 14, 1929. T h e Imperator will be in the Amenhotep Shrine in Rosicrucian Park built in memory of that initiation, for ten minutes beginning at 5:30, on F eb ­

ruary 14 and through the Cathedral will send to all attuned to it a special blessing and contact for health and strength as well as peace. Do not neglect to keep this period. W e are still hearing from thousands of persons who are making these Cathedral contacts or keeping the periods for personal benefit on various occasions and their reports are highly enthusiastic and indicative of the great possibilities that are offered through this wonderful method. Remember members and new members may have these beneficial contact periods.

E A S T E R N R O S IC R U C IA N R A D IO B R O A D C A S T W e are pleased to announce that a mystical, inspiring Rosicrucian program will be broadcast over radio station W P G , in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Tune in on this large station every Thursday evening at 8:30 to 9:00 P.M ., Eastern Standard Time, starting with February 4th. 1932, and continuing every Thursday thereafter up to and including February7 25th. Be sure to have as many of your friends and acquaintances as you can tune in on their own sets, or listen with you over yours, to this unusual program of inspiring music and the period of meditation and contact conducted over this program. It is an exclusive Rosicrucian, A M O R C feature. W e know you will be pleased with the w'ork the Order is doing over the air, and we want your co-operation by listening to the program and letting the station know of your approval of it, and by having everyone you possibly can tune in on it. T his station operates on a frequency of eleven hundred (1100) kilocycles.

The R o s ic r u c ia n D ig est F ebru ary

1932

T/ie Principle of Attunement
By D r . A r t h u r B. B e l l , F.R.C.

V
M O N G the Princi­ ples with which we deal extensively in our lectures and discussions, o n e which offers a most interesting subject for consideration is t h a t o f A T ­ TUN EM EN T. A clear and accurate conception of its meaning, purpose and requirements is of the greatest possible importance for it is a fundamental or basic factor in working out many of our experi­ ments and in adjusting ourselves to the many laws and principles in which we are deeply interested. If we are unable to attain success in our experiments we may be sure that we are not in atunement with principles through which the desired results may be reached. This may mean one of two things or possibly both. First, that our understanding of the laws themselves is faulty. Second, we may not have reached that state or stage of development ne­ cessary to the full and proper application of the factors which the laws require of us. It should be perfectly clear to all that the novice may not expect to accomplish at once that which it has required many weeks, months or even years of patient, painstaking study and practice on the part of another. In this statement we have a partial glimpse of the meaning of attunement for it will be seen that the prime requisites in­ volved are careful study, patient prac­ tice and actual application, all of which comprehends preparation. In this man­ ner we are truly perfecting within our own consciousness the various phases of attunement.

V

V
T h e purpose of study is, of course, to gain understanding. W e are well aware, however, that understanding is of little value unless it be put into effect and made a part of our daily lives wherein we find ourselves making defi­ nite application of the conditions which are part and parcel of the understand­ ing thus gained for this is but an essen­ tial part of the rules of procedure which must be followed. W e may find it a very simple matter to succeed in conducting the experiment with the match in a bowl of water and yet when we come to deal with the subject of projection, we may fail dis­ mally although we may have tried faithfully and over some period of time. This simply means that we are not attuned with the requirements of the law whereby the gaining of the de­ sired results is possible. W e may not say that the law does not always re­ spond when properly actuated, but it does mean that the student does not yet fully understand the important and vital preparation imperative to the rais­ ing of the level of the consciousness to that state or standard required by the law itself. It should ever be borne in mind that the spiritual realm is above the material and that the laws which operate and prevail in both have their own special and distinct requirements and will not and cannot respond unless these de­ mands are met with exactness and completeness. Neither should it be overlooked that as we approach the spiritual, we are leaving behind the material even though they dwell one within the other even as do light and darkness. This means that no formula, system or method will avail anything unless the consciousness is evolved to a

point intent phase again

where it agrees in motive and with each and every element or of the law to be actuated. Here appears the factor of attunement.

T h e weekly lessons carry the student on from point to point slowly but care­ fully with this very condition upper­ most in mind. T h e raising of the con­ sciousness cannot be accomplished by the mere reading of the valuable and carefully prepared instructions which reach us weekly. W e may even commit them to memory so that they may be repeated verbatim and yet avail us n othin g for in this m an ner w e h a v e but added to our fund of knowledge unless it should be that we have begun to put these instructions to work by making them part of our daily lives. In other words, knowledge is of little practical value unless it is used, applied in deal­ ing with the problems and conditions which arise and affect us in many and varying ways. It is often stated that thought cre­ ates. How much consideration have you given this statement? Just what does it mean to you and what use are you making of this Principle? If thought is creative, then thoughts be­ come things or conditions. Y es, even our most serious and distressing prob­ lems evolve from the matrix of our thoughts. Surely we cannot think that because thoughts objectify themselves that the principle of choosing our thoughts is only useful in times of urgent need and stress when by enter­ ing into the approved attitude or state of devotion to the demands of a given law that w e m ay su d d en ly set a s id e o r overcome all of the difficulties and problems which we perceive are affect­ ing us. It is a far more serious matter than this and the chances are that if we have not recognized the facts which appertain in the process of consciously choosing and directing our thoughts daily and hourly, we will make a flat failure of our attempt at sudden re­ adjustment. The R o s ic r u c ia n D ig e st F ebru ary Certainly we are aware that when the mind is permitted to become filled with hatred, resentment, anger, fear, jealousy, ill-will and many similar quali­ ties of thought, that we are actually creating conditions of a wholly destruc­

1932

tive nature which will be in complete harmony with the mental concepts from which they emanate and will objectify themselves in or upon our bodies or within our environment. A fter we have thoughtlessly or wilfully given our­ selves over to such dissipation we need not be at all surprised if the process of setting them aside resists us unless we reach a determination to cease en­ tertaining more profitable qualities of thought which are unchanging in their dissemination of good. W h en we hold to that which is in opposition to our own welfare and that of all others, we are not attuning with spiritual law but detuning, drifting further and further away from the changeless attributes of God which flow forth endlessly in a unity of goodness, love and mercy. W e cannot devote ourselves to the bearing of false witness, that is, in speak­ ing or thinking unkindly, unfairly, un­ justly or selfishly and hope to attune ourselves with higher spiritual laws. In fact, such a course precludes it. W e need not think that a sinful, mortal con­ sciousness can break through and enter into these states of attunement which re­ quire unfeigned love and goodness, for this cannot be. T h e doors are closed and bolted and may not be taken by storm, persuasion or deception. Yet, do they yield to the gentle touch of purity, meekness, love, grace and goodness. T h e consciousness is comparable to a measuring stick upon which many de­ grees are recorded. As we subdue, set aside and overcome the many unprofit­ able phases of our material existence and expression, we advance toward the cherished goal and our whole being re­ sponds to the change thus effected. It is well to remember that even though evil is subdued and rendered somewhat in­ active, that we have not destroyed it or cast it from us never to return. W e dwell continually within both good and evil and to whichever we adhere, by that are we dominated. O nly our Heav­ enly Father can separate these qualities and when this shall be no man knoweth. Attunement with the divine is, therefore, a matter of eternal striving through an earnest, persistent effort to live daily and hourly within the ideals, the laws and principles we wish to express and actuate.

“T H E A L C H E M IS T "
A famous painting by the well-known mystic painter, C. S P IT Z W E G . Rosicrucian alchemists o f the middle ages. It depicts one of the German

(P resen ted with the com plim ents o f the R O S IC R U C IA N D I G E S T )

I

t
I
)\ Y (b J) ^ y & (Jj

The Prayers of The Mystics
The Real Use of Prayer Explained !
The book “M ystics at Prayer' explains in simple language the reason of prayer, how to pray, and the Cosmic laws involved. You come to learn the real efficacy of prayer and its full beauty dawns upon you. W hatever your religious beliefs, this book makes your prayers the application not of words, but of helpful, divine principles. You will learn the infinite power of prayer. Prayer is man’s rightful heritage. It is the direct means of man’s communication with the infinite force of divinity. Unfortunately, although much has been said about the need of prayer, little has been said about the way to pray. Prayer need not be merely a ritual or ceremony any longer, but a vital factor in man’s well being. T h e knowledge of the divine principles of prayer is clearly set forth in the book “M ystics at P rayer.”

1

I
\
( < ,

( < ,

K

j
Y c) (L J (f Jj y Y d) I, J if j, $ v < 3

Out of the Temples and Grottos To You—Come the Words Used by the Mystics for Unfoldment
W h a t words, what laws, principles, or key was used by the mystics and adepts of all the ages, that seemed to give them mastery of self and their surroundings? This is the question that has been asked by thousands who have noted these mystics enduring untold hardships and inhuman ordeals, but who in a few moments of prayer seem to be revitalized in physical energy and imbued with new fervor. W h a t did prayer offer the sages, mystics, and masters that the mass did not receive— were they the chosen few? Not at all— the mystics knew the Cosmic laws of prayer. T h ey knew how and when to pray. In their prayers is the key to their unfoldment and to the power that every man and woman may reveive through prayer. “M ystics at P rayer” is the careful selection of the chosen prayers of the mystics, the particular ones that reveal their understanding of divine principles. There are over 100 of them. T h e name and a brief biographical sketch of each mystic is given with a cross index.

|
if J (t,

MANY CIHLAR, F.R.C.
A ustrian P h ilo so p h er, M y stic an d R osicru cian G ra n d M a ster A T T R A C T IV E , A R T IS T I C — “M ystics at P rayer’’ is well bound, with deckled edge and tipped pages, sent anywhere, stamped in gold, printed on art paper in two colors (£ 1 A A postpaid for O N L Y .........................................................................

ROSICRUCIAN SUPPLY BUREAU
(A M O R C ) San Jo se , :: :: California, U .S .A .

THE PURPOSES OF

TH E
The men and spiritual creative,

ROSICRUCIAN

ORDER

Rosicrucian Order, existing in all civilized lands, is a non-sectarian, fraternal body of women devoted to the investigation, study, and practical application of natural and laws. The purpose of the organization is to enable all to live in harmony with the constructive, Cosmic forces for the attainment of health, happiness, and Peace.

T he Order is internationally known as A M O R C (an abbreviation), and the A M O R C in America, and all other lands, constitutes the only form of Rosicrucian activities united in one body having representation in the international Rosicrucian congresses. T he A M O R C does not sell its teachings, but gives them freely to all affiliated members, together with many other benefits. Inquirers seeking to know the history, purposes, and practical benefits that they may re­ ceive from Rosicrucian association, are invited to send for the free book, "T h e Light of Egypt." Address, Librarian, S. P. C., care of

AMORC
R O S IC R U C IA N P A R K

TEMPLE
SA N JO S E , C A L IF O R N IA , U .S.A .
R A D IO S T A T IO N 6K Z)

(C A B L E A D D R E S S : - A M O R C ”

Officials of the Jfforth American Jurisdiction
(Including the United States, Dominion of Canada, Alaska, Mexico, Guatemala,Honduras, N ic­ aragua, Costa Rica, Republic of Panama, the W est Indies.Lower California, and all land under the protection of the United States of America.) H. S P E N C E R L E W IS , F.R.C ., Ph. D ...........................................................................................Imperator RA LPH M. L E W IS , F.R .C .,...... ...................... .................................................................... Supreme Secretary C H A R L E S D A N A D E A N , F.R .C .,...........................................................................National Grand Master A. L E O N B A T C H E L O R , F .R .C ..................................................... Director of Correspondence DR. A R T H U R B. B E L L , F .R .C .,............................. . Director of the W elfare Department H A R R Y L. S H IB L E Y , F.R .C ., Director of Editorial Department

T h e fo llo w in g prin cipal bran ch es are D istrict H ea d q u a rters o f A M O R C
New York City: A F R A M E R IC A N Chapter of A M O R C , 125 W est 130th St., L. Baynard W hitney, F.R.C ., Master. Boston, Mass: Mass. Lodge, Mrs. Marie Clemens, S.R .C . Master, Lodge Building, 739 Boylston Street. Pittsburgh, Pa.: Penn. First Lodge, Dr. Charles D. Green. K .R .C ., Master, 610 Arch St., N. S., Pitts­ burgh, c-o A M O R C . Hartford, Conn.: Isis Lodge, A M O R C , Mr. W . B. Andross, Master. Box 54, South W indsor, Conn. Tampa, Florida: Florida Lodge, Mrs. Frances Crescenzi, Sec­ retary, 3420 10th St. San Francisco, Calif.: Francis Bacon Lodge. Mr. Elrod W ard, K.R.C., Master. A M O R C Temple 1655 Polk Street. Los Angeles, Calif.: Hermes Lodge, Nos. 41, 42, 43. 44, 45 and 46, A M O R C T E M P L E , 3 1 6 ^ W e st Pico Street, Dr. J. C. Guidero, Master. Inquiry Office and Secretary. Suite 813, New O rpheum Theatre Building. San Jose, Calif. Grand Lodge Session for all members, Tues­ day evenings, 7:30 to 8:30 P.M . Chicago. 111.: Chicago Chapter No. 9., O . D. O Delius, Master. Offices and Reading Room (open daily and evenings). Auditorium Hotel (Club Room No. 4) 430 South Michigan Ave. (Telephone Harrison 5000). Philadelphia, Penna.: Delta Lodge No. 1. A M O R C , Stanley K. Taylor, K.R.C., Secretary, 5215 Ridge Ave.

(D ire cto ry C ontinued on N ext Page)

Portland, Oregon: Portland Chapter, Clara G. Anderson, S.R.C , Master, 424 Clay Street. Seattle, Wash.: A M O R C Chapter, M ary A. Huey, Master, 301 Haight Bldg., Second Ave. and Pine St., Telephone Main 994!

Washington, D. C.: Official Representatives: R. N. Trezise, 3418 17th St., N. W .: Virgil McComas, 4707 Connecticut Avenue, N .W . San Antonio, Texas T exas Lodge, Mrs. C. W anblom, S.R.C., Master, 1133 So. Laredo St.

Other Chartered Chapters and Lodges of the Rosicrucian Order (A M O R C ) will be found in most large cities and towns of North America. Address of local representatives given on request.

P R I N C I P A L C A N A D IA N B R A N C H E S
Vancouver, B. C.: Canadian Grand Lodge, Dr. J. B. Clark, K.R.C.. Grand Master. A M O R C Temple, 560 Granville Street. Montreal, Quebec: A M O R C , English Division, Albert E . Poad. K.R.C., Master, Apt. No. 4, 1431 M ackay St. Montreal, Quebec: Societe d’etude d'A M O R C (French Section). E . G. Clossey. K.R.C.. Master, 3839 Berri St. Verdun, Quebec: Mr. R. A. Williamson. Master, 3809 W e ll­ ington Street. Winnipeg, Man.: S. S. Bergmann, 301B Enderton Bfk. Portage Ave. Lashburn, Sask.: Mr. V . W illiam Potten. Master. P. O. Box 104. New Westminster, B. C.: Mr. A. H. P. Mathew, Master 1313 7th Ave. Victoria, B. C.: Secretary, A M O R C , Box 14. Edmonton, Alta.: Mr. James Clements. K.R.C., Master 9533 Jasper Avenue, E.

S P A N I S H - A M E R I C A N S E C T IO N
This jurisdiction includes all the Spanish-speaking Countries of the New W orld. Its Supreme Council and Head Office are located at San Jaun. Puerto Rico, having local Representatives in all the principal cities o f these stated Countries. Hon. Manuel Rodriguez Serra, F.R .C ., Supreme Grand Master, P. O. Box 702. San Juan, Puerto Rico. Armando Font de la Jara, F.R.C ., Secretary General, P. O. Box 36, San Juan, Puerto Rico. T h e name and address of other Officers and Branch Secretaries cannot be given general pub­ licity, but may be obtained for any information or special purposes, through the Head O ffice at San Juan, Puerto Rico. A LL C O R R E S P O N D E N C E SH O U L D B E A D D R E S S E D T O T H E S E C R E T A R Y G E N E R A L

A FEW

O F T H E F O R E I G N JU R IS D IC T IO N S
England: The A M O R C Grand Ladge of Great Britian, Mr. Raymund Andrea, K.R.C., Grand Master 41 Berkely Road, Bishopton, Bristol, Eng. Dutch and East Indies: W . J. Visser, Grand Master, Bodjong 135 Semarang. Java. Egypt: The Grand Orient of A M O R C , House of the Temple, M. A. Ramayvelim. F.R.C .. Grand Secretary.7, Rue Talkha, Heliopolis. Africa: The Grand Lodge of the Gold Coast AM ORC. Mr. Stephen H. Addo, Grand Master, P. O. Box 424, Accra, Gold Coast. W est Africa. Costa Rica: W illiam T . Lindo, F.R.C., Grand Master, P. O. Box 521. Limon, Republic of Costa Rica. C. A. T h e ad d resses o f other foreign G rand L o d g es and secretaries will be furn ished on application.

India: The Supreme Council. A M O R C , Calcutta, India. Scandinavian Countries: The A M O R C Grand Lodge of Denmark. Carli Anderson, S. R. C.. Grand Secretary, Manogade 13th Strand. Copenhagen, Den­ mark. France: Dr. H. Gruter, F.R .C ., Grand Master, Nice. Mile. Jeanne Guesdon, S.R .C ., Corresponding Secretary for the Grand Lodge (A M O R C ) of France, 56 Rue Gambetta, Villeneuve Saint Georges, Seine & O ise). Austria: Mr. M any Chilar, K.R.C., Grossekreter der A M O R C . Laxenburgerstr, 75/9, Vienna, X . China and Russia: The United Grand Lodge of China and Rus­ sia, 8/18 Kvakazasaya St., Harbin. M an­ churia. Australia: T he Grand Council of Australia, M. S. Kowron, F.R .C ., Grand Master, "Sandhurst,” 52 Fletcher St., Bondi, Sydney, N .S .W .

“ Lemuria —the Lost Continent of the Pacific”
♦ ♦ ♦

The Submerged Land oi Mystics!
Beneath the rolling, restless seas lie the mysteries of forgotten civilizations. Swept by the tides, half buried in the sands, worn away by terrific pressure are the remnants of a culture little known to our age today. W here the mighty Pacific now rolls in a majestic sweep of thousands of miles, there was once a vast continent. This land was known as Lemuria, and its people as Lemurians. Science has gradually pieced together the evidences of this lost race, and in this book you will find the most astounding, enthralling chapters you have ever read. How these people came to be swept from the face of the earth, except for survivors who have living descendants today, is explained.

The Magic Dwellers of Mt. Shasta
Fanned by the cool breezes of the Pacific and crowned by a cap of snow is California's mystery mountain, Alt. Shasta. It is not unlike other towering peaks of splendor on the famed Pacific coast except that it is shrouded with tales of weird happenings. It is said that a strange people live in seclusion somewhere on the mountain: that they practice unusual rites. It is said that they seem pos­ sessed of great wealth, for they have much gold; and, too, it is said that they exclude themselves from others. These people are the living descendants of the Lemurians.

o e © &6 > © 1 « I7 a• < s >

Do you know how they came there, when their forbears perished centuries ago with the submersion of the continent of Lemuria? W ould you like to know the truths which they concealed from a merely curious world?

Latest Mystical Book Sensation
Every indication is that this book will live up to its an­ ticipated reputation of being the m ystical b o o k sensation of the year. This book contains truths which are much stranger than fiction. It is profusely illustrated with maps, charts, and symbols. It is a book you can never forget because of its intriguing mystery; its instruction, and its unusual subject matter. T h e book is well-printed, wellbound and is eco n o m ica lly p riced at $2.50 postpaid. Send your order and remittance direct to the address below or ask your loca l b o o k d ea ler to get it for you.

C a n You Interpret These Strange C a rvin g s?

W h a t A n cient Story Do These R e v e a l?

ROSICRUCIAN SUPPLY BUREAU
(A M O RC) San Jose, California, U . S. A.

THE

P R I N T E D IN U . 8 . A . R O SIC R U C IA N P R E S S . 8A N JO S E .

C A LIFO R N IA

2< «4| | S & > 9

Rosicrucian lUhrarp
The following books are recom m ended because of the special knowledge they contain, not to be found in our teachings and not available elsewhere. Volume I. R O S IC R U C IA N Q U E S T IO N S A N D A N S W E R S A N D C O M P L E T E H IS T O R Y O F T H E O R D E R . The story of the Rosicrucian ideals, traditions, activities, and accomplishments is told interestingly in this book, and the scores of questions form a small encyclopaedia of knowledge. Over 300 pages, printed on fine book paper, bound in green silk, and stamped in gold. Price $2.50 per copy, postpaid. Volume II. R O S IC R U C IA N P R IN C IP L E S FO R T H E H O M E A N D B U S IN E S S .

A very practical book dealing with the solution of health, financial, and business problems in the home and office. W ell printed and bound in red silk, stamped with gold. Price $2.25 per copy, postpaid. Volume III. T H E M Y S T IC A L LIF E O F J E S U S .

A rare account of the Cosmic preparation, birth, secret studies, mission, crucifixion, and later life of the Great Master, from the records of the Essene and Rosicrucian Brotherhoods. A book that is demanded in foreign lands as the most talked about revelation of Jesus ever made. O ver 300 pages, beautifully illustrated, bound in purple silk, stamped in gold. Price $2.90 per copy, postpaid. Volume V. " U N T O T H E E I G R A N T . . .”

A strange book prepared from a secret manuscript found in the monastery of Tibet. It is filled with the most sublime teachings of the ancient M asters of the Far East. T he book has had many editions. W ell printed with leatherette cover. Price $1.50 per copy, postpaid. Volume VI. A T H O U SA N D Y E A R S O F YESTERD AYS.

A beautiful story of reincarnation and mystic lessons. This unusual book has been translated and sold in many languages and universally endorsed. W ell printed and bound w'ith attractive cover. Price 85c per copy, postpaid. Volume VII. SELF M A ST E R Y AND FA TE, W IT H T H E C Y C L E S O F LIFE.

A new and astounding system of determining your fortunate and unfortunate hours, weeks, months, and years throughout your life. No mathematics required. Better than any system of numerology or astrology. Bound in silk, stamped with gold. Price $2.50 per copy, postpaid. Volume V III. THE R O S IC R U C IA N M AN UAL.

Most complete outline of the rules, regulations, and operations of lodges and student work of the Order, with many interesting articles, biographies, explanations, and complete Dictionary of Rosicrucian terms and words. V ery completely illustrated. A necessity to every student who wishes to progress rapidly, and a guide to all seekers. W ell printed and bound in silk, stamped with gold. Price $2.30 per copy, postpaid. Volume X I. M A N S IO N S O F T H E S O U L , T H E C O S M I C C O N C E P T IO N . W ell

The complete doctrines of reincarnation explained. T his book makes reincarnation easily understood. illustrated, bound in silk, stamped in gold, extra large. Price $2.50 per copy, postpaid.

Send all orders for books, with remittances, direct to A M O R C SLIPP L Y BL1REALI. Rosicrucian Park. San Jose, Calif.

Suggestions
ROSICRUCIAN EM BLEM S Members desiring Rosicrucian emblems may obtain them from H eadquart­ ers. T h ey are made of gold, beautifully inlaid with enamel, neat in size, and consist of the triangle surmounted by the Egyptian cross. M en ’s style emblem with screw back, $2.00. W om en's style, with patent safety catch pin, $2.25. HOME SAN CTUM SUPPLIES R osicru cian C a n d lestick s: Beautifully designed to represent Egyptian col­ umns like those in Egypt and in the Supreme Temple at San Jose, finished in dark red mahogany, mounted on double triangle base. Each will hold regular size candle. Price $2.50 per pair; postage prepaid. S anctum C ro ss: Design of this cross is like the famous Egyptian Crux Ansata (the looped cross), mounted on double triangle and finished to match the candlesticks, with red stone in the center of the cross. A very beautiful and symbolical ornament. Price $2.50; postage prepaid. Student's M em b ersh ip A p ron : For those members who wish to wear the typical Rosicrucian triangle lodge apron while performing ceremonies at home, this symbolical device made in the ancient manner and easily tied around the body and containing the Cross and Rose within the triangle, will be found very appropriate. Price $1.50 each; postage prepaid. R osicru cian In cen se: A very delicate perfumed incense, carrying with it the odor and vibrations of the Oriental flowers. M ade especially for us in con­ densed form, so that a very small amount is necessary at one burning. Far superior to any high priced incense on the market. Price $.65 for a box con­ sisting of twelve large cubes sufficient for many months’ use. postage prepaid by us. C o m p lete Sanctum S et: Includes two candlesticks, the cross, box of in­ cense, and the ritualistic apron, all described above. Special price if complete set is ordered atone time, $6.50; postage prepaid. ROSICRUCIAN ST A T IO N E R Y Boxes of twenty-four sheets of beautiful blue stationery, broadcloth linen finish, with envelopes to match, club size. Each sheet bears a symbolic Rosicrucian emblem. T h is is fine stationery to use in writing to a friend or acquaintance to show your affiliation with the Order. Price per box $1.25; postage prepaid. AUTO EMBLEMS Made especially for your automobile, but can be used anywhere. Made of solid Art Brass Burnished, with Red M etal Rose. Emblem is identical with the smaller emblem worn on lapels. Easily attached to radiator. Five and onequarter inches high. Price $1.50: postage prepaid. A T T R A C T IV E SEALS Beautifully printed and embossed gum seals about the size of a twenty-five cent piece in red and gold to be used in sealing envelopes or on stationery. Contains the emblem and name of the Order. Price 50c per hund/ed, postpaid.

i3^£p<Q=5<(?= = > ?Q ^(Ps* C ^ (p ^ =s<(F=1<Q=s<CP!,?C ^<J^<^(p^Q ==«Cr^(^(?;a'5Q^C7^C^<j^Cb=«<^

^ f g 1 )] (f5 5) £ k * J. (P ^ ^ d > ^

t

n m >fli'Wia\

A M E N H O T E P IV , P H A R A O H O F E G Y P T
T his youthful ruler became the great organizer of the M ystic Brotherhood of Egypt in the years 1365-1350 B.C. He is the beloved Great M aster of the Rosicrucian Order. He is often referred to in histories as AKH E N A T E N and IK H N A T U N .— (C om plim ents o f T h e R osicrucian D igest.)

P E R P E T U A T IN G T H E O R I G I N A L

R O S IC R U C IA N

T E A C H IN G S

f

The Cosmic Way For You!
The Rosicrucians Invite You
R E you seeking for that knowledge which will open up a new world to your consciousness, and reveal a path that leads to personal power? If so, you are cordially invited to accept this kind offer of the Rosicrucian Brotherhood. For hundreds of years the organization has opened wide its por­ tals to all sincere seekers for the wisdom of ancient and modern times. Th ey have preserved this wisdom for those who in sincerity desire the benefits that come from harmonious attunement with the Cosmic creative forces, and from inspirational guidance. Through their system of personal development and helpfulness the Rosicrucians have maintained their position as an outstanding companion to thousands of men and women. T h ey have taught them to C H A N G E the C O U R S E O F T H E IR L IV E S , and to start their lives over again toward a definite goal of H A P P IN E S S and P E R S O N A L A C H I E V E ­ M E N T . T h e dreams of the human mind are capable of fulfillment. Your de­ sires, if worthy, C A N B E R E A L IZ E D through the knowledge and application of fundamental Cosmic laws.

PRIVATE INSTRUCTIONS AT HOME Interesting FREE BOOK Explains
You may study the helpful instructions of the Rosicrucian system in the privacy of your own home. W e suggest that you address the Librarian below, and ask for a free copy of the fascinating book, “T he Light of E gyp t." It will explain how, after many years of development, a special system F O R H O M E S T U D Y has been evolved by the organization, how the many departments of the organization for special personal help may be used by you; it will explain hew these practical home Rosicrucian studies are sent to thousands of men and women in every walk of life in all parts of the world, and how through them these students are finding peace, happiness, and the fulfillment of their desires. M ake use of this special, private help that the Rosicrucians N O W O F F E R Y O U . T he instructions and teachings you will receive will be of unlimited help and inspiration. Just address a letter, asking for the book, to:

Address: Librarian S.P.O. Rosicrucian Brotherhood

Rosicrucian Park San Jose, California

(Those who are Rosicrucian Students are now receiving these instructions)

ROSICRUCIAN DIGEST
C O V ER S THE W O R LD
TH E O F F IC IA L , IN T E R N A T I O N A L R O S IC R U C IA N M A G A Z IN E O F T H E W O R L D W ID E RO STC RU C TA N O R D E R

Vol. X

M ARCH,

1932

N o. 2

C O N T E N T S A M E N H O T E P IV ....................................... The Thought of the Month The Psychology of Fear C athed ral C ontacts C re a tin g a N ew C a re e r Sanctum By H . Spencer Lewis, Ph. D., F.R .C . . . By Frater Jam es R itter Frontispiece .... By The Im perator

By Ralph M . Lewis, F.R .C .

Is There Life on M a rs ?

Musings ...................................................... ........

Pages from the Past............. ............................................... The N ew Year's C eleb ratio n By The Suprem e Secretary M y Brother's K ee p e r or Executioner?.................. Lost in the W ilderness C om e to O ur Next C onvention . By The Im perator

By A . Leon Batchelor, F.R .C . By The Convention Secreta ry Illustration

Francis Bacon Auditorium

Su b scrip tio n to the R o sicru cian D igest, T h ree D ollars per year. Single copies tw en ty'fiv e cents each. Entered as Second Class M a tter at the Post O ffice at San Jo se , C ali­ fornia , under A c t of A ugust 2 4 th , 1912. Changes of address must reach us by tenth of the month preceding date of issue. Pu blished M o n th ly bv the Suprem e C oun cil of

T H E R O S IC R U C IA N O R D E R — A M O R C
R O S IC R U C IA N PA RK SA N JO S E . C A U F O R N IA

E R E we are at the close of another Rosicrucian year and almost on the border line of a new one. W e p re su m e that most of our m em b ers kn ow that because the Rosicrucian organ­ ization is interna­ tional and oper­ ates in so many lands, among so many different nations of persons, with a great variation in language, habits and traditions, we in the New W orld have adopted the Old W orld idea about the birth of each new year. In fact, a majority of the human beings throughout the world still follow the ancient idea of a new year beginning at the spring equinox in M arch, and only in the W estern W orld do we find a small portion of the earth's population following the modern and inconsistent idea that January 1st is the beginning of a new year. It is in M arch that the winter days are brought to an end and the spring season commences. It is in March that the earth begins to blossom again with all of her beauty and starts anew with a cycle of existence. Consistent, thereThe R o s ic r u c ia n fore, with our members in foreign D ig e st lands, we take the day when the sun M arch enters the sign of Aries in the heavenly 1932 zodiac as the first day of the new year.

T his day varies a little each year, and for the year 1932 we find that the sun goes into the Aries on Sunday. M arch 20. Taking the standard of time in Greenwich, England, where all inter­ national time is standardized, we find that the sun makes its entrance into Aries late in the day. This, however, is equivalent to 2:44 P .M .. Sunday a ft­ ernoon, Eastern Standard Tim e of North America, or 11:44 A .M ., Pacific Standard Tim e, on Sunday, M arch 20. It has been customary for the Im­ perator of each jurisdiction to issue an annual proclamation declaring the day on which the new year begins for his district, and so I am hereby proclaim­ ing Sunday, M arch 20, as the begin­ ning of the Rosicrucian New Y ear for the North American jurisdiction. This means that throughout the week of March 20 to 26 all lodges of our North American jurisdiction will hold their formal, annual New Y e a r feast and celebration, accompanied by the instal­ lation of new officers and the appoint­ ment of special titles and honors upon worthy members who have distin­ guished themselves in the service of the organization. Usually. Thursday night of the week is selected for such cere­ monies. but all members of every estab­ lished lodge or chapter should make inquiry at once as to the precise day and hour when this important and beautiful, symbolic ceremony will take place: and I trust that no member of any lodge or chapter where such cere­ mony is held will be absent this year.

Among the smaller groups and with our members who are studying at home alone and not in contact with any groups, the occasion may be properly sanctified in accordance with the in­ structions that will be found elsewhere in this issue of the Digest. T h e important point for us to keep in mind is the fact that on Sunday, M arch 20, next, the Rosicrucian year of 3285 will begin. T h is means it is the three thousand two hundred eightyfifth year since the Rosicrucian Light was first definitely established in the lives of men and women as a universal lesson. Naturally, it means a new year of new opportunities and a new year for greater growth and greater develop­ ment on the part of each individual member and on the part of the or­ ganization as a whole. T h e past year has been filled with unsettled conditions and with many dis­ appointments and bitter trials. Still, our records show that the interest in Rosicrucianism reached more minds and more hearts in the past twelve months than in any previous year of our W e s t­ ern W orld activities. T h e organization has had its trials and tests and has had to take its share of the unrest and un­ happy conditions surrounding the lives of its members. But while others talked of depression and talked fearfully and doubtfully of any immediate brightness or relief, the organization has kept the faith, held its head high, looked out beyond the present horizon, and at the same time, extended a helping hand to those who had fallen by the wayside

tired and weary, and helped them to go on and on along the straight path that leads over the hills and over the plains and beyond the horizon to the coming day. Somewhere in the new year that will begin on M arch 20, there is a day that will be the happiest day in the lives of many, for it will mark the final termina­ tion of the present unsettled conditions and the zenith of adjustment and new happiness and peace for millions. It is our duty, therefore, to straighten up our bodies, lift up our minds and hearts, seek G od’s protection of re­ newed strength and vigor and carry on. It is not only our privilege to use the knowledge which our organization gives us to help us overcome all the obstacles and reach a higher place in life, but it is our duty to apply these principles to help those whose vision is narrow or short, and whose faith has been lost and who are trembling in the fears of disappointment and illusionment. Let the new year be an awakening, a rebirth, a regenerative period for you. M ake it show results in your life! M ake it serve you. W h en this new year comes to a close next M arch, I know that thousands of you will find it to have been the happiest year in your lives. Y ou can make that true and make that demonstration in your life by beginning now to stick rigidly to your determination, to be the master of your fate and the captain of your ship of life. T h e organization stands ready to show you how, and all it asks is that you apply the principles and you will reap the proper reward.

V

V

V

V

V

A RARE T R E A T Formerly the organization published a magazine entitled, "T h e Rosae Crucis.” T he numbers contained unusually instructive articles. W e have a great many of these helpful copies left. W e are offering them at the special price of 4 copies for 60c. Each magazine is very large, and contains many pages of an inspiring nature. An investment of 60c will give you helpful, interesting reading for several weeks. W e will select the assortment for you, and you will be pleased. Send your remittance of 60c to Rosicrucian Supply Bureau, San Jose, California.

'O '
p-n/uvrj

The Psychology of Fear
(Its Generation and Conquest) By R a l p h M. L e w is , F.R.C.
H E psychological analysis of fear, as far as its physi­ cal reactions are concerned,is mere­ ly a matter of close observation and examination. T h e results occur with such unifor­ mity of manifesta­ tion as to permit a definite conclu­ sion as to its effects on the human. W h en we try to de­ termine the probable cause of fear, how­ ever, we are confronting the intangible, and our conclusions are, at their best, theoretical. T h e following theory is offered with the hope that the reader will test its presumptions and further substantiate them. Fear is not the result of the known, but purely of the unknown. O ne can not fear the known obviously for the reason that that which we know, are conscious of, and perceive, is of the N O W , and is acceptable, or not. In other words, things which we know are of the present, because we perceive them— they are in our consciousness. Therefore, that which we know we may either like or dislike, but not fear. It is only when we associate the un­ known with the known that we have a The condition susceptible to fear. For an R osicrucian example: D igest If you have found it necessary to March pass a dwelling daily in whose court­ yard there was a large, ferocious dog. 1932 you would know of the dog, and also know of its ferocious propensities. Th ese known things you would not fear. If you but analyze for a moment your reactions, what you could fear, however, is the probable attack at some time by the dog, and its outcome. T h e element of your fear would be primar­ ily based on the unknown; not the known. W h a t you know is associated with comprehension, and fear is never related with understanding. Further­ more, knowledge is a state of con­ sciousness. You know a thing through your sense perceptions. You can say you have an apple because you can see, taste, feel, and smell to prove that you have it. Fear is never a state of objective consciousness due to actual sense impressions. Let us again resort to our previous example.— T h e fear of a bite from the ferocious dog would not be the consequence of actual sensations received from any of your faculties such as feeling, hearing, or smelling. T h e fear would be an anticipation of actual consciousness of being bitten. T o further explain, your fear would be the reality of being bitten. At this point we arrive at a definite conclusion, and that is that fear is not the absence of reasoning. T h is conclusion perhaps seems inconsistent with the instances of fearstricken cases you can recall. Undoubtedly, those who were pos­ sessed of fear seemed in their reason­ ing devoid of any rationalism in com­ parison to your own conclusions. T h at, you will find, was not a denotation of lack of reasoning, but merely a dia­

Fear, however, as far as its results metrically opposed process to your own. T h e mind which dwells in the state of are concerned, is the perversion of this fear reasons deductively; that is, from procedure, a rather extremity, if you given points forward to a probable please, of imagination, because fear is conclusion. Deductive reasoning is that entirely dependent upon imagination. form of reasoning that collates par­ Fear is also dependent upon reasoning, ticular instances and progresses to an as we have shown,— upon that form of inference or general conclusion. reasoning known as deductive, and will If we may resort again to our ex­ ever be found associated with it. ample of the ferocious dog and the W e have concluded as to what fear passer-by;— the passer-by, through rec­ is dependent upon, but what as to its ollection of an actual previous experi­ nature? Briefly, and in a general sense, ence of being bitten by a dog, or other one may say it is an emotion. T h at is animal, and by recalling the experiences too inexplicit, as emotions themselves of others, can easily visualize what it are so infinitely separated in their re­ would mean to be bitten. H e takes the actions on the human as to give no elements of the known from his mem­ thorough understanding of fear. An ory like materials, and tries to assemble emotion is the perturbation, or excite­ them into a structure he does not know. ment of the mind. It is the result of W h a t he does n ot kn ow , in this ex­ certain stimulus to the brain and pro­ ample, is the experience of being bitten duces distinct physical reactions. Thus, by this dog at this time, but he infers hate, fear, love, and courage are all or imagines, if you please, that condi­ clearly emotions, but their subsequent tion. Fear, then, is not a reverse pro­ reactions are quite different. cess from a result to a cause, but from Let us proceed with an analysis of a cause to a probable imaginary con­ fear to determine its nature from the clusion. Fear must always be of the stand-point of the mental condition it future. It can never be of the present. produces. A t first we will find slight F ear is always of something that can variation in its nature from any other be. not which is. Fear, therefore, is of emotion, as said. It is only in the physi­ probable circumstances, not of things. cal reaction that the differences of emo­ Fear may resolve itself about things, tions are noticeable. A composite pic­ but in a final analysis is not of them. ture, developed in the objective mind, T h is method o f deductive reasoning the brain consciousness, produced by is, however, very necessary to us in deductive reasoning, or imagination, many ways. It is a virtue that perhaps may be very realistic. It can be so com­ accounts more for the advancement of plete in its details as to vie with an man than any other inherent privilege actual picture drawn from memory. he has. It permits man to project his You know how realistic dreams may thought into the future. Through de­ be at the time you are in a dream state. ductive reasoning man may reap what Your response to the circumstances is he has sown in experience; by assembl­ equivalent to your sensitivity to actuali­ ing the actual and known he constructs ties of your awakened state. premises as to the unknown. M an can Let us suppose that the passer-by, in plan only on the foundation of what our example, was obliged to walk by he has already learned. T h ere is no the courtyard of the ferocious dog more secure a method of penetrating daily. Each time he approached the the veil of the future than with the fence the dog would snarl, bark, lunge sword of wisdom sharpened by the at the gate, giving every indication of experience of the past. T h is procedure desiring to attack the passer-by. T h e of deductive reasoning is commonly passerby would observe that the gate appreciated by us in the form of im­ was not securely fastened, and each agination. It is a fascinating system of time the dog jumped against it the mental transmutation. W e go into the hinges became more loosened. It is not past and take from the memory events, difficult for you, as you read this, to and bring them to the present in our imagine what the passer-by would eas­ consciousness, and from them we plan ily conclude by a process of deductive that which probably never existed, but reasoning; namely, that sometime when what we wish to exist in the future. he passed the hinges might finally

break loose with the impact, and the beast would charge him, inflicting seri­ ous wounds on his face, and up-thrown arms. T h is picture would develop more completely with each passing of the gate. Every experience with such a possible incident would be recalled, and immediately would be fitted into the mental picture, unconsciously on the part of the passer-by. This mental pic­ ture would enlarge itself. Newspaper items pertaining to attacks of dogs on people, would have a fascination for the reader, and would be firmly im­ pressed upon the memory. Later they would be recalled to add to the growing image in the mind. T h e imaginary con­ clusion, or the fear, would become larger and larger, from the impressions heard, read, and seen. T h e daily inci­ dent of the dog's barking and display of teeth would be trivial compared to the anticipated, imagined, ultimate attack. In fact, eventually the known condition of the dog and his nature would not nearly so disturb the passer­ by as reflection on the picture he had built in his own consciousness by de­ ductive reasoning. T h e subconscious mind, the dormant mind, if you prefer that term, would be bombarded by the suggestions built up in his conscious mind. T h e subconscious mind, as well as the objective mind, would become inhibited by the magnified picture; neither would function normally. T h e inhibitions of the objective or brain consciousness would result in partial paralysis of its ordinary activities. T h e brain functioning would become abnor­ mal. W e find fear at this point dis­ tinctly affecting the physical attributes, and as before said, fear from now on differs from other emotions. Note these outstanding evidences of fear partially paralyzing the functioning of the brain: Changes in blood circulation; Contraction of blood vessels; Intense pallor of cheeks; Lowered temperature; Increase of heart pulsations; Breathing becomes labored; Effect of gland actions— cold per­ The spiration; mouth becomes dry due to R osicrucian failure of saliva glands; D igest Lack of muscular control resulting in M a rch trembling, creeping of flesh, dropping of jaw — sometimes utter prostration. 1932

W e can easily discern from this that certain plexuses of the brain effecting muscular control, the glands, and blood circulation are interfered with. This interference may reach the point where the body is functioning so abnormally as to result in the loss of consciousness. T h e victim of fear is unable to exercise his will to the extent of controlling his objective faculties. T o summarize, it appears that the na­ ture o f his fear is a false concept, or imaginary picture evolved from a limited form of reasoning. Fear is the product of only one form of reasoning, deduc­ tive; that is, from actual, collated inci­ dents to probable, imaginery, specula­ tive conclusions. W e have found further, its mental consequences of the objective. T h e physical effects are ab­ normal functionings of muscles, nerves, and glands. W e may deviate from fear, and use courage, as an example, to substantiate our premises. From an ethical view-point, courage is worthy of approbation. But it, like fear, is not an inherent characteristic, but purely an emotional reaction to certain psychological processes of the mind. Courage is devoid of imagina­ tion. Courage is a resolution to resist the present. Courage is a resignation to the known, and the concurrent effort to grapple with it. W e are never forced to display courage except when con­ fronted with actualities. Future possi­ bilities, as we have shown, may or may not, depending on circumstances, excite fear, but never will they generate cour­ age. W e find the state of courage is essentially, in its nature, defensive. T h e contributing factors which actuate cour­ age are those which have a tendency to upset the status quo of the indi­ vidual mentally, or physically. W e may use this homely example to illustrate: Parents who return to their home at midnight in a suburban district to find the upper portion in flames, and realize that a young child is fast asleep in one of the upper rooms. T h ey are faced with actualities and conclusions that are not probable, but apparent. The conclusion is seen in the present, as an actuality; imagination or deductive reasoning n eed not build a picture, for their sense perceptions register the manifestation of an actual occurrence.
(C on tin u ed on P a g e 66)

T h e "Cathedral of the Soul” is a Cosmic meeting place for all minds of the most advanced and highly developed spiritual members and workers of the Rosicrucian Fraternity. It is a focal point of Cosmic radiations and thought waves from which radiate vibrations of health, peace, happiness, and inner awakening. Various periods of the day are set aside when many thousands of minds are attunded with the Cathedral of the Soul, and others attuning with the Cathedral at this time will receive the benefit of the vibra­ tions. Those wT ho are not members of the organization may share in this unusual benefit as well as those who are members. T he book called "Liber 777" describes the periods for various contacts with the Cathedral. Copies will be sent to persons who are not members by addressing their request for this book to librarian S. P. C., care of A M O R C Temple, San Jose, California, enclosing three cents in postage stamps. (P lea se state w hether m em ber or not— this is im portant.)

•B

E M B E R S and our friends who are not members everywhere are all invited to partici­ pate in the con­ tacts with the Cathedral for the benefits to be de­ rived and for the spiritual uplift that will come to them perhaps in no other way. T h ose who have never learned the value of such contacts would do well to get the Cathedral Book, N o. 777, as mentioned on this page, and follow the daily periods as outlined therein. T h e special periods for the coming weeks are as follows:

On Thursday, February 25, a special ceremony will be conducted by the Im­ perator during the last Cathedral period of the day, for the purpose of quicken­ ing the psychic consciousness of all who are in contact with the Cathedral. During M arch there will be similar periods of special improvement on the 6th, 13th, 20th, and 27th during the first and last Cathedral periods of each of these days, conducted by the Im­ perator, for the quickening of the psy­ chic consciousness. Those members who have been tak­ ing advantage of the regular Tuesday evening spiritual services conducted by the Grand M aster in the Supreme Grand Lodge in San Jose will find that each Tuesday evening affords an excel( C on clu ded on P a g e 63)

'O '
pJUUVj

A DISCOURSE GIVEN IN THE FRANCIS BACON AUDITORIUM , ROSICRUCIAN PARK By H. S p e n c e r L e w is , Ph. D., F.R.C.
V H E topic chosen for tonight’s dis­ course is that of creating a new ca­ reer. It is very likely that at the present time, with the new year just before us and an old year that has just passed, that many are thinking of starting a new career. I imagine that throughout the nation today there are many thousands of men and women sitting around the family round-table looking at the pile of debts before them— whether those debts are physical in form in the way of notations on paper or mental— and are also looking at the small purse and feeling rather depressed and blue, that they are ask­ ing each other, the man and wife, whether it is not possible to start a new career. I know that in my own personal mail there are many requests each month from persons who seek to get some special advice here from the chief ex­ ecutives, hoping that they will learn of something or hear of something un­ usual. T h e question they ask is, “Do you think that at my age, do you think in my business or field and The with my limitations and obligations and R osicrucian responsibilities, it is possible to start a D igest new career?" So many also want to March move, thinking that is the solution of the problem. W e even receive tele­ 1932 V V grams stating, “I am moving; change my mail address. I am leaving Chicago to go to Baltim ore." T h e next one says, " I am leaving Baltimore to go to C hicago." T h e next one is, " I am go­ ing from Jacksonville, Florida, to St. Louis"; and so it goes, each one feeling, as the old proverb says, ‘that the grass is just a little greener on the other side of the fence.’ T h ey feel that merely a change in location may bring them opportunities, or there may be oppor­ tunities of which they can take advan­ tage, but the general cry and desire seems to be to change to a new career. So many feel that they have ex­ hausted the possibilities in their occupa­ tion. So many feel, because of age, they have reached that point where the employer or foreman or those execu­ tives who have charge of the employ­ ment, will some day say, “John or Jim, you have reached the point where you are too old for us; we must have new blood." According to what we learned in the last few years, this age limit has been gradually lowering. It is not a wholesome, encouraging thing for the married man to think of, nor the mar­ ried woman either. Th ere was a time, if you recall, some of you, when it was said that at forty a man should chloro­ form himself, but it seems now that they have decided to let him live, but let him starve. It would seem that even a man of thirty-five must begin to think of some sort of exercise or some form of rejuvenation for fear of old age creeping upon him some night. He is so close to the borderline. It is no

Fifty

wonder men and women are beginning to wonder whether they had better look for some other field. Th ere are some lines of industries, some lines of occupation, that do not set an age limit. Personally, I agree with those chief executives in all fields of activities that say that age is an asset, if that age has been accompanied with experience. A fter all, the young trained man with all of his technical training and all of his pep cannot al­ ways compete with the man of ex­ perience. A few days ago I was visiting one of my friends here in town and, while sitting at his desk, 1 noticed that on a little scratch pad there was a notation he had written. I happened to read it. I am going to tell you the proverb that he wrote. T h e proverb, he probably was going to use in his business, which is advertising. He said that “ Pep with­ out purpose is piffle." It is easy to re­ member that. T h e three p’s that form a literation help us to remember; and the truth is astounding. T h ey talk about the college youth being pepped up with all sorts of exer­ cises and cereal foods, but the pep usually has no purpose and is just piffle. It reminds me of a story about a steamboat on the Mississippi. Th e captain of that boat wanted to have a very impressive whistle; so he put an enormous steam whistle on it, all out of proportion. T h ey say when it was com­ ing down the stream, and he pulled the strap and blew that whistle, it let out so much steam the boat started go­ ing backwards; and because it had a 24-inch whistle and only a 16-inch boiler, every time she was ready to start and he blew the whistle, it had no steam left so had to wait for more steam in order to start. T h a t is also pep without purpose, typifying the average man of today. Usually the man from college rushes into the city or town, into the offices of the various firms, into the employment department, throws down his hat and says, “I want a jo b .” W ith all his pep and vim and vigor, like the steamboat, it looks as though he were going to get somewhere. He is no more fitted,

perhaps for the business world than a child, but he is full of mistaken ideas regarding that which too many business people have figured out as an asset— vim and pep. Then, the man with long years of experience and judgment who could not get out and do a tap-dance in the middle of the floor to a tune on a harmonica, and who could not run up and down stairs like the young ones, is let out because he did not have the pep and vim of the young men. Some of the occupations and profes­ sions are over-crowded until there is nothing left in that profession or occu­ pation. W h y , even the shoe peddler has competition and cannot make as much money in fixing shoes or selling them, along with his little business, as he could before; and so it is in almost all lines of business. M achinery has come in and relieved a great many, but even beyond this there is the desire in the hearts of men and women today, as there never was in any age or period, for a change. T h at is due to two things: Modern psychology and modern systems of self-analysis. Modern meth­ ods of psycho-analysis have, in the first place, enabled men and women to discover that they are in the wrong occupations, wrong professions, or in the wrong nitch in life. It may be a social nitch; it may not be a business nitch. In the second place, our highly efficient business methods have created newer opportunities that are not over­ crowded and are lucrative and in­ teresting. There are thousands, perhaps mil­ lions, of men and women tonight who can look back over their past lives, the past years of occupation, toil, and in­ dustry, and all look forward a few years and see that unless a change is made very soon, they will fail in life or they will not have the success in life that they should have. You know, it used to take more years to find out that the man who was preaching on Sunday would have made a better plumber. Usually he was the last to find it out. T h e congregation, or the people to whom he owed money, dis­ covered it long before he did; and they usually found that the average plumber would make a better preacher. It hap­ pened sometimes that young men or

women went into the business world and were complete failures before it dawned on them that perhaps the par­ ents had not selected the right pro­ fession or occupation for them. Today, with our methods of analysis, with all of the specialized magazines that enable us to pick out quickly and easily our real qualifications, persons need not be misfits. M any ask, “A re there really new opportunities?" Constantly, I hear of men and women who have set out and created for themselves a new career— a new profession they have gone into — a new, trained occupation. M any things in our highly specialized lives today offer opportunities for new lines of occupation. W e are in the electrical age, let us say, and that field, alone, is still so young and so small compared to what it will be, that it is hardly more than in the infant stage. W e have no idea nor can we have any conception today of what the electrical possibilities of the future and even of the present will afford in the way of new trades, new occupations, new specialized efforts, affording men and women of all types an opportunity 'to make a good living. T h e same is true of many other things. If we are in the electrical age now, we are just entering it, and on top of it is coming the air age, so to speak. T h e air age is going to open up in all its possibilities. But, aside from that, we are coming into many other forms of living that open up new and greater opportunities for the persons who are careful and analytical and dis­ cover them, for most of them must be discovered and created. E arly in my first contact with the Rosicrucian teachings, as a young man, I was impressed with the fact that the only openings that are really worth while in life are the ones that the in­ dividual creates for himself. I remem­ ber being impressed with that idea and wrote an article for the “Success" magazine, as it was called at that time, about twenty-eight years ago, and The R osicrucian headed the article, “Creating Your Own Opportunities.” T h e proverb then was D igest very popular, as it is still with many M a rch people, “ Hark and listen for oppor­ 1932

tunity when it knocks, for it knocks only once." But I want to tell you that you may be asleep when that knock comes, and yet you cannot stay awake, waiting for it, and I have not much sympathy for one who does. O ne per­ son might say to another, “You stay at home and watch, and if a fellow comes to the door and leaves a card with ‘Opportunity’ on it, you let me know, and I am going down town and look for him.” Between the two of them, the opportunity is apt to be found. I have noticed that the one who follows our suggestions, the one who goes out and creates the oppor­ tunities, is the one who makes what the other people will say afterwards, a soft berth for himself. He puts himself into such a nitch, one that he, himself, has created, and he fits in it so well, like a missing piece that is out of a crazy cut puzzle, that only one piece will fit, and if he fits— his physical and mental abilities— he will find he is the only one who can squeeze into it, and it takes some difficulty to squeeze him out. O thers might say, “It is pretty soft for you." But it is these things, created in this manner, that constitute a successful career in life. Now, I am not going to foolishly quote John D. Rockefeller, and say that perhaps the first time he saw an oil can he said to himself, “I am going to make myself look like an oil can; so I will make a nitch and fit into it.” John D. Rockefeller and the whole family created a nitch, and for years have filled that nitch. T h e time has gone when they were the richest. T h at never was their real nitch or they would never have moved out. A t the present time Henry Ford is in that nitch. It is not his real nitch, either. It is only a temporary one that goes along with his real nitch. Th ere are some people who are successful who have no worldly title, but who are go­ ing along just the same, filling the same position safely and with sureness for the rest of their lives, as long as they are capable, physically and mentally. Now what will you do to begin this creating of a career? T h e first thing you should do is to say to yourself
(C on tin u ed on P a g e 71)

Is There Life On Mars ?
TH IS FASCINATIN G QUESTION BRINGS US TO THE CONSIDERATION OF M AN Y IN TERESTIN G PRINCIPLES.
B y F r a t e r Ja m e s R i t t e r

V
T is not known p r e c is e ly w h en man first gave consideration to the possibility of l i f e on o t h e r planets than the earth; but it must have been very early in his con­ sciousness, for we find in the earliest records of man’s speculative thoughts a consideration o f the possi­ bility of life being different and in many forms on the various planets. Long before the invention of the telescope made it possible for man to have even a vague idea as to the form and nature of the planets, or whether they were actually planets or not, he seemed to have some very definite idea of the very conditions that were later proven to be correct through the tele­ scopic observations and scientific in­ vestigations. T h is fact has been one of the great puzzles of science, for it is impossible for the materialistic mind to comprehend how men of seemingly primitive education and enlightenment and devoid of the facilities of modern scientific observation could develop so much knowledge about conditions so far distant from them. T h e only explanation intimated in any of the ancient writings is to the effect that the ancients were in touch with those who had lived or were liv-

V

V
ing on these distant planets, and through this contact were able to se­ cure first-hand information. T h is sounds rather fantastic, of course, but while we may feel that such an explanation should be rejected, we are forced to hesitate in rejecting the explanation when we come face to face with many of the surprising facts contained in the ancient writings. If one is inclined to feel that such an explanation as being in contact with a dweller on the planet, M ars, is incon­ ceivable, incomprehensible, or improb­ able, then what is to be said in any attempt to explain how these ancient writers became so familiar with little details and casual facts about M ars, Venus, Jupiter, and the other planets, long before science could even be sure that these planets were planets and not mere stars? It would seem that if either explanation is difficult to accept, our preference would be in accepting the one that there was some form of interspace communication or interplane­ tary communication. A fter all, what kind o f a universe do most of us have in mind when we think of the universe as God's great creation? A fter we read the First Chapter of Genesis, we are apt to think that all of it refers to the creation of the planet, the Earth, upon which we live. If that impression reflects the true facts, then God did not create M ars, or Jupiter, or any of the other planets, but only the stars and perhaps the comets. It is plain to be seen that some of the Scriptural writers, whose thoughts are

(3 )
p-/WUV/j

)L z

reflected in the Book of Genesis, had little or no conception of the rest of the universe. Th ere is constant reference in such writings to the creation of the earth, whereas the correct view-point should be of G od’s creation of the universe, including all of the planets. Is there any reason for us to assume that the other planets were not created identically as was the Earth? E very­ thing that we can observe of the other planets through the telescope and the rays of the spectrum indicates that in all material qualities and in all physical properties, these other planets are much like the earth and exist for almost the same purpose as the earth, if not for the same, identical purpose. W h y , then, should all thoughts of creation be cen­ tered around this one planet which is not even the largest or the most im­ portant of the planets from a universal view-point? If at the time of the creation of the universe by God, life was eventually established on this planet, we have reason to believe that life had been previously established on the other planets or was established on them after it had been established on the earth. If this is so, then life on these other planets may be thousands of years older than life on this planet, and we know that the earth has been in ex­ istence and filled with living men and living creatures for hundreds of thou­ sands of years, if not many millions of years. W h ile it is thought that some of the other planets, such as M ars and the moon, give indications that from our present knowledge and point of view, life would seem to be impossible on them, we must remember two things: First, that we are judging solely from our present earthly point o f view, and we are comparing conditions on these other planets with our own con­ ditions. W e may think that the planet M ars is too hot for any living beings to endure life there, but this view-point is only a reflection of our limited know­ ledge gained by using our earthly ex­ istence as a standard. It is very possi­ The R osicrucian ble that the Eskimos, living in the northernmost and coldest parts of our D igest earth, can have no conception of the M a rch possibility of human beings living at 1932 the equator where the heat would be

so terrifically high and so destructive. From the Eskim os’ point of view, life would be unbearable under such con­ ditions, and, undoubtedly, those un­ educated savages, living in the most ex­ tremely heated portions of the tropics, will doubt the possibility of anyone being able to live in a climate so ex ­ tremely cold as the North Pole, if you are successful in picturing to them what such coldness actually is. Secondly, we must bear in mind that the creatures living on such a planet as M ars, may have been designed and created by God to be capable o f en­ during such heat and such conditions, and they may, therefore, be a very different type of beings from those liv­ ing on the planet, Earth. In the next place, the planet, M ars, may now be an abandoned planet and may have had its days of conditions similar to our own in the many cen­ turies that are passed, and the present inhabitants of M ars, if any, may have gradually evolved to a state where they could stand the heat that is generally ascribed to the planet. M ars. In other words, they may have begun their ca­ reer as human beings much like our­ selves and as the planet increased in heat, the nature of their beings may have changed. It is also possible that the planet. M ars, is a younger planet than our own and is still in the process of being formed, realizing that it takes hundreds of thousands of years for a planet to be highly evolved. In this case, the present inhabitants of M ars may be primitive beings who are slowly evolving to a state where they will be able to meet the conditions of tempera­ ture and climate now being established on M ars, and M ars, itself, may some day be a planet like the earth with similar beings inhabiting it and with similar vegetation. A s for the moon, the same possibili­ ties are true. If the moon is so ex­ tremely cold, as science says it is, it may be that it has attained this cold­ ness after hundreds of years of warmth and vegetation like our own planet, and it may be inhabited now by a race o f beings who have gradually accus­ tomed themselves to the changing tem­ perature and who may now be a dif­ ferent race from any found on this planet.

O r it may be that the moon is a new planet, comparatively speaking, and while now cold, it may be slowly evolving to a temperature like our own earth, and some day living creatures may appear upon it along with vege­ tation. A s for the other planets, the same arguments may be true. T h e important thing for us to keep in mind is that we should not view these problems from our earthly posi­ tion, nor take the stand that civilization here or the races of man on this earth are the highest type, or the standard type, or any type, in fact, to be used for comparison. If we are going to speculate at all, why should we not think that this planet is tbe youngest of all the planets and that life on this earth is in the earliest stages of evolution. From this point of view, mankind on the earth may represent the most primitive form of human evolution. On the other hand, human life on the other planets may be so much older and so much more evolved than our own that no comparison is possible. O ne of the big problems that faces us in considering this subject is the fact that we are prone to look upon ourselves as representing the highest stage in human evolution. W h a t right have we, for instance, to think that man, as we find him in the most civi­ lized parts of the earth today, is even a shadow of what he is to become? By what standard and by what rule of measurement can we possibly justify the opinion that we, as civilized beings, have evolved to anywhere near the standard that God intends man to attain. T h e argument that it is stated in the Bible that man was created in G od ’s image, and therefore, we must be like unto God and as nearly perfect as it is possible to make man, is absolutely inadequate to meet our speculative or hypothetical questions. Taking the statement in the Bible as literally true, and not as allegorical, we would have to admit then that the primitive crea­ tures that existed on this earth planet hundreds of thousands of years ago and who were coarse and uncouth, un­ attractive, and almost beast-like in form, were perfect images of God. If this is

so, then we would have to admit that man's evolution since then, making him more upright in stature, less beast-like, more refined, cultured, and attractive in appearance, and more powerful in in­ tellect, has resulted in a race of beings which is now higher than the image of God. Such an idea is absurd, of course. W e can only look upon the Biblical statement of man’s being created in G od’s image as being symbolical or prophetic in the sense that when God created the human species. H e created it as an idea or ideal to be evolved and to eventually attain a likeness unto His own image. T h is is the more rational view-point to take, and explains how and why the races of man have evolved and perfected in form and na­ ture since primitive man first came upon the earth. T h is at once brings us face to face with the question as to whether man has reached in this twentieth century A. D. any resemblance to the high ideal that God had in mind and how we are justified in looking upon the present races of human beings as being any­ where near the degree of evolution that man may yet attain. T h e time may come hundreds of thousands of years from now when hu­ man beings on this earth will look upon pictures and statues of our present cultured civilization as typical of a primitive race of beings so low in evolu­ tion as to be considered as belonging to the first and earliest form of human life. In that case, ages of civilizations and evolution lie before us, and this long process of evolution may easily carry us from this planet to other planets where the evolution will be perfected. Undoubtedly, the present unrest and extremely radical changes that are tak­ ing place in man's thinking and living represents another and newer stage of evolution, and out of this will come a new empire, or a new race, or a new standard of human beings and human activity. There have been hundreds of such definite stages of evolutionary progress in the past. Th ere is no way to indicate whether there will be two more such stages or two million more. T h ere is nothing to indicate that man’s entire course of evolution will be

limited to his experiences on this one planet or whether certain stages of evolution will take him from one planet to another, just as the progress of the pupil through school takes him from one class room to another, for, after all, our experiences here on the earth constitute a schooling, and our evolu­ tion is in accordance with the lessons learned. Something o f this great possibility of continuous evolution and further exist­ ence on other planets must have been revealed to the ancients in a very defi­ nite way. It may well be that the great master minds of the past centuries, who attained such wonderful intellectual and spiritual development, have passed from this class room of experience here on this earth and have gone to another planet or to a higher class room for higher instruction and higher evolution. W ith this possibility in mind we can picture the other planets, including the many that have not yet been discovered by man's observations, as being peopled by more highly evolved races of beings V V

than those here on this earth. And just as the great mystics and master minds of the past centuries were able to communicate their ideas from one nation to another, or from one people to another, or from one individual to another, telepathically, psychically, or mentally, so these master minds and highly evolved beings who have pro­ gressed to other planets may be able to communicate telepathically with the most highly attuned minds here on this earth and describe the nature of condi­ tions on their planets, and thus reveal facts that science could not discover through physical observations. Certainly, the whole subject is worthy of meditation and contemplation, not only from the mystical point of view, but from the scientific point of view, if once we get away from the idea that man today in the most civilized parts of the earth has attained the highest degree of development or that he is anywhere near that point in his evolu­ tion where he can look upon himself as even approaching such a high standard as “the image of G od .” V

“LET US DISCUSS I T in your home”
%
ROSICRUCIAN FORUM
A PRIVATE PUVOCATION FOR TNI MIMftn Of AMORC, TUI ROSICRUCIAN ORDER

W ould you like to be present at the Round T able Con­ ferences of the Imperator and Class Masters? A t these special sessions the foremost questions of many students are answered. T h e Rosicrucian view-point on many sub­ jects is explained, such as these— Cosmic illumination, re­ incarnation of sex, causes of psychic inharmony, fear of death. Impossible, you say — but you can h a v e the dis­ cussions at home— through the Rosicrucian Forum. These subjects taken down in shorthand are published in the "Forum ,” and are brought to you. Your home or study becomes a conference room with the Supreme Staff gathered about you.

f

Send For Trial Copy
See for yourself the helpfulness of the Rosicrucian Forum. Send for a sample copy today. T h e subjects read as they are given in a conversational, personal style. It is as though you had asked a question /'VIVTT \ 7 and were directly receiving the reply. T o V JlN L X read the Rosicrucian Forum is to want it. ^ Send 30c (not in stamps) to the address below and be prepared for a treat.

««■»»««

The R osicrucian D igest M a rch 1932

Thirty-tw o pages of solid reading matter. Private for mem­ bers only. $1.75 for a year. Y early index to subjects free.

THE ROSICRUCIAN FORUM
SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA, U .S.A .

|

SANCTUM MUSINGS
SPIRITU A LITY

§

would appear that spirituality is an award offered for loyalty or de­ votion to a re­ ligious sect. From the pulpits of the land are extolled the virtues of vari­ ous creeds and dogmas. T h e per­ suasive presenta­ tion of the tenets should suffice to compel acceptance. But, in addition, there is offered an inducement— the state of spirituality. It is plainly stated or definitely inferred that if one will conform not alone to the spirit of the sectarian decrees, but to the absolute literal interpretation of the words, “He shall be aw arded.” This compensation for adherence shall be spirituality. G reat care is given to properly explain and present the creed. Every effort to enforce it is made. But what of the object, the end — spirituality— that which one is to re­ ceive? Unfortunately, it is left unex­ plained; nor does it receive proper laudation. If it is found necessary to persuade allegiance to a creed by the promise of reward, then that reward should be made more magnificent, allur­ ing, and gratifying than the means to obtain it. It is true that to an extent, a mental picture of spirituality is developed in the mind of the creedist. Can, then, the
Fifty^seven

T

picture of spirituality definitely or in­ definitely painted in the consciousness of a class of religious creedists be accepted as a true state of spirituality for all men and women alike? Is it not a fact that the myriads of religious de­ nominations today have built up theo­ logical and ecclesiastical rules and laws termed creeds? Furthermore, are not their creeds supposedly based on the sayings of prophets? Is it not easily determinable that these creeds differ from one an ­ other? Is not the state to be attained and which is called spirituality differ­ ently defined by each? Even in the instance of those sects who recognize the same prophets, do they not hold out to their adherents a state of spir­ ituality, differing in nature from the others? Then, is spirituality an abso­ lute state to all men alike, or are there different types of spirituality? W ould it not appear from this confusion that before one would consider the acquisi­ tion of spirituality, he would be of necessity obliged to consider the par­ ticular type of spirituality he desired? Some might declare that the various religious creeds are merely rigid rules of right living, which if conformed with, bring about goodness; therefore, goodness, when attained, and no matter through what method, would be spir­ ituality. T h is offers the premise that goodness is spirituality. It seems to establish a unity of the nature of spir­ ituality by all roads of proper conduct leading to it. But upon further consider­

ation, may we not question the premise that one who is good is also spiritual? It is, undoubtedly, commonly accepted that virtue or goodness is one with spirituality. T h eir meaning is commonly related. W e speak of or proudly point to an individual who has restrained his passions and controlled his emotions, and conformed to society’s dictates as a good man or woman. W e feel cer­ tain that he or she must be of a spir­ itual nature— that nature of spirituality that the religious creeds instruct us as being obtainable through right living. Goodness, however, is not an abso­ lute state of living. Goodness is not an actual, mental, physical, or psychic con­ dition; no one can define goodness within the limits of universal rules. It is merely an arbitrary, relative state. If, at this moment, you were obliged to draft rules, which to you would repre­ sent that which would mean virtue or the state of being good, do you believe the draft would meet the requirements o f others? Those rules might be the dictates of your conscience; it would perhaps constitute the conception held by you since your youth, still they would be wrong— not erroneous to you, but to millions of others. Even your neighbor when examining your pre­ pared moral and ethical code would, undoubtedly, wish to add or subtract a point, it would represent to him abso­ lute goodness. Thus we find groups of persons liv­ ing their lives according to standards of goodness. Some of these standards are legislated by governments, others are the origin of sacred religious tradi­ tions. T h e important factor to be con­ sidered is that th ey d iffe r . T h e O rien­ tal may live a life of religious devotion to a creed descended from yore. He believes he has attained the virtue re­ quired of him. He is respected as a good man by religious brothers. T o you, his conduct would appear perhaps licentious; and, in turn, your conduct would, undoubtedly, be abhorred by the Oriental. T h ere is, then, no uni­ versal standard that all men can appre­ ciate alike as being virtue or goodness. The If that is so, then goodness cannot R osicrucian be spirituality, and we are brought D igest back to our original point of confusion. M a rch Having degrees of goodness, there would logically be degrees of spiritu­ 1932

ality. Goodness is not of Divinity or the Infinite, but of man. T h is perhaps may seem an impious declaration, but let us further consider. W ith ou t entering into a discussion of environment, we will admit that un­ fortunately in most instances man’s thinking and living are affected by environment. Climatic conditions, busi­ ness customs, religious beliefs, national pride, social influence, all exert a pres­ sure on man's conduct toward his fellowmen. Society, which is composed of mankind, finds it advantageous to make no radical departure from the conven­ tions laid down by habit and custom. Unconsciously, man restricts himself to the limitations of custom. It is from these customs in every land that a great portion of the laws of the courts originates. Accepted rules of behavior are established. W h a t are these rules? T h ey are definite provisions that set forth what society will consider a violation of her time-honored cus­ toms. O ne who lives in accordance with these provisions is considered good; if the rules observed are a moral code, he is virtuous; if they be ethical, he is considered acting with due pro­ priety. T h ey are mainly concerned not with the ultimate welfare of the indi­ vidual, but with his conduct toward the other members of society. It is considered that improper con­ duct by an individual, of a moral na­ ture, for an example, would ultimately have a detrimental influence on society. So he is restricted from personal in­ dulgence, whatever its nature. These standards o f goodness, ethics, morals and conventions as established by man, from his different interpretations of sacred literature, or brought about by custom, concern themselves in reality with the relation of exoteric man with his fellowmen. T h ey obviously have no effect on his soul, contrary to the gen­ eral conception that they do. W ill you not agree with me that one may rigidly abide by the conventions of society, ethics o f business, and the moral code of a religious sect, and be considered good, yet not be spiritual? T o call man spiritual because he be recognized as good, is to admit of differing degrees of spirituality. W e have seen that there is no single stand­ ard of goodness, but a multiplicity of

them, and these standards of goodness regulate, therefore, not man’s spiritual self, but his conduct with and toward man. Does not, however, spirituality still seem to you to mean a single state of attainment? W e have seen, so far, a variety of states of spirituality offered as an ultimate goal by various religious sects or philosophical movements, each in turn differing from another. T o each body of persons, of course, having the same concept, it is a single state to them. But if we can find other groups of persons having a different concept of the spirituality to be attained through their religious devotions, then logically we are still faced with the question— is, or is there not, a single state of spirituality? A famous logician once said it merely requires the appearance of one white crow to prove that all crows are not black, and that is the sit­ uation at this point of our discourse. W e have been considering the states of conduct of man as associated with or equivalent to spirituality. Now let us analyze spirituality as to its nature. W e can readily see that in its nature it is distinctly opposite to any con­ dition of man which may be the prod­ uct of his exoteric or physical nature. Spirituality is of the soul— a condition which is of the essence of God. Briefly, spirituality means to us a state attained in whatever manner we may please, which is of the spirit of God. T o be of the spirit of God is to be in communion with Him. It would mean to have an inner comprehension of the Infinite In­ telligence residing within you to sense the Divine union of soul and body. W e can readily comprehend that true spirituality, therefore, in its nature must be alike to all men. If it is a state of God, it must be uniform. Since spirituality is of the spirit of God, it is of the absolute, non-divisible, and of one nature. It is not what man does in his living that determines his spiritual­ ity, but in his ability to go within and commune with his soul. M an may con­ form to man’s code of righteousness and be recognized as good, and yet be a spiritual failure, never having the ex­ perience of spiritual attunement. It is likewise true that one who is able to commune with God through the med­ ium of his Soul Consciousness will, un­

doubtedly, act justly toward his fellowmen. T h e wisdom of his Soul, the con­ sciousness of God would direct his hu­ man conduct far from the path of wrong-doing; that is, wrong-doing in the Infinite sense. It is quite probable, however, that the conduct of one who is truly spiritual would not be accepted at all times as proper by his fellowmen. M any are the mystics and Avatars and martyrs who have suffered death because their manner of living and thinking was called sinful; yet time has proven they were highly spiritual withal. Spirituality is a state we come to know from the dictates of the soul through a close communion and asso­ ciation with the Infinite Consciousness of God. Th ere are no outer steps that lead to such a state. Creeds, sects, and schools cannot directly prescribe a standard code that will lead man to spirituality. T o objectively attempt to outline the path to God is to attempt to measure infinity with the yardstick. How can the material mind of man pat­ tern God? God is within man, and man can know him only through going within and contacting his inner self. Is it also not appropriate to say that man cannot obtain complete, permanent spir­ ituality here on this plane? Further­ more, is it not wrong for any religious or philosophical movement to attempt to teach man to acquire permanent spirit­ uality here? M an, we all recognize, is of a dual nature— material, physical, and with all the attributes necessary for the com­ plete functioning of that nature on this material plane of existence. He is also imbued with a soul, giving him an in­ ner intelligence, a mind which directs involuntarily the life force which is in him. It is man’s obligation to Divinity to, as nearly as possible, maintain a Cosmic harmonium or balance between these two. T o deny either is to vio­ late a Cosmic decree. M an had naught to do with the D i­ vine principles establishing the forma­ tion of his body. Therefore, the laws of procreation or those natural laws gov­ erning the functioning of his body can ­ not be negated by man. It must be rec­ ognized as the manifestation of In­ finite principles on a material plane, and therefore, the body should be kept
( C on clu ded on P a g e 74)

5 E z = : : = = : § = § : E E
jjj

Each month there w ill appear excerpts from the w ritin gs o f famous thinkers and teachers o f the past. This w ill give our readers an opportunity o f know ing these minds through the presentation o f w ritin gs which ty p ify their thoughts. T h is month we have selected portions o f a dialogue from one o f Balzac's novels which convey his m ystical view-point. H onore De Balzac, the famous French novelist and mystic, was born in Tours, France, M ay 20, 1799. H e was schooled in the common French schools until nine and then he was placed by his parents under the tutorship o f a royal teacher. H e le ft his tutor at seventeen, contrary to his parents wishes, they endeavoring to compel him to enter the legal profession which apparently he abhorred. H e fin a lly retired to a garret where on a m eager income he nearly starved. It was w hile in this garret that some o f his greatest lite ra ry contributions w ere made. H e worked, liv in g on small rations, as long as sixteen hour stretches, daily, w ith m erely a little relaxation between. H e seemed to have read but little in the latter part o f his life : therefore, must have read much in his youth. H is lack o f appreciation o f the value o f money caused him much embarrassment and he vacillated from riches to poverty. A s a biographer says, in part, o f his lite ra ry works, " H e seemed accustomed to create in a fashion which is not so much o f the actual w orld as o f some other, possible but not
*

: i = jj : = = § E E E = E E E
s

= = :

H e fin a lly became very weak, constitutionally, due to his impoverished condition and overw ork and entered transition, August 17, 1850. Some who w ere his pallbearers are now considered renowned geniuses, such as, Victor H u go and Alexan d er Dumas.

E E =

6 ................... F MATERIAL science be the end and object o f hu­ man effort, tell me, both of you, would s o c ie t ie s — th o s e great centers where men con­ g r e g a te — w o u ld they perpetually be dispersed? If civilization were the object of our Species, would intelligence perish? W ould it continue purely individual? T h e grandeur of all nations that were truly great was based on exceptions; when the exception ceased their power died. If such were the End-all, Prophets, Seers, and M es­ sengers of God would have lent their hand to Science rather than have given The it to Belief. Surely they would have R osicrucian quickened your brains sooner than have D igest touched your hearts! But no; one and M a rch all they came to lead the nations back to God; they proclaimed the sacred Path 1932

-...............

a

in simple words that showed the way to heaven; all were wrapped in love and faith, all were inspired by that W O R D which hovers above the inhabitants of earth, enfolding them, inspiriting them, uplifting them; none were prompted by any human interest. Y our great gen­ iuses, your poets, your kings, your learned men are engulfed with their cities; while the names of these good pastors of humanity, ever blessed, have survived all cataclysms. * * * “W h en you call God a Creator, you dwarf Him. H e did not create, as you think He did, plants or animals or stars. Could H e proceed by a variety of means? M ust H e not act by unity of composition? M oreover, He gave forth principles to be developed, according to His universal law, at the will of the surroundings in which they were placed. H ence a single substance and motion, a single plant, a single animal, but cor­ relations everywhere. In fact, all affini­ ties are linked together by contiguous similitudes; the life of the worlds is drawn toward the centers by famished

aspiration, as you are drawn by hunger to seek food. “T o give you an example o f affinities linked to similitudes (a secondary law on which the creations of your thought are based), music, that celestial art, is the working out of this principle; for is it not a complement of sounds harmon­ ized by number? Is not sound a modi­ fication of air, compressed, diluted, echoed? Y ou know the composition of air,— oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon. A s you cannot obtain sound from the void, it is plain that music and the human voice are the result o f organized chemi­ cal substances, which put themselves in unison with the same substances pre­ pared within you by your thought, co­ ordinated by means of light, the great nourisher of your globe. Have you ever meditated on the masses of nitre de­ posited by the snow, have you ever ob­ served a thunderstorm and seen the plants breathing in from the air about them the metal it contains, without con­ cluding that the sun has fused and dis­ tributed the subtle essence which nour­ ishes all things here below? * * * “Can God abase himself to you? Is it not for you to rise to Him? If human reason finds the ladder of its own strength too weak to bring God down to it, is it not evident that you must find some other path to reach Him? T h a t Path is in ourselves. T h e Seer and the Believer find eyes within their souls more piercing far than eyes that probe the things on earth,— they see the Dawn. H ear this truth: Y ou r science, let it be ever so exact, your medita­ tions, however bold, your noblest lights, are Clouds. Above, above is the Sanctu­ ary whence the true Light flows. * * * “W e have also admitted that M atter and Spirit are two creations which do not comprehend each other; that the spiritual world is formed of infinite re­ lations to which the finite material world has given rise; that if no one on earth is able to identify himself by the power of his spirit with the great-whole of terres­ trial creations, still less is he able to rise to the knowledge of the relations which

the spirit perceives between these crea­ tions. “W e might end the argument here in one word, by denying you the faculty of comprehending God, just as you deny to the pebbles of the fiord the faculties of counting and of seeing each other. How do you know that the stones themselves do not deny the existence of man, though man makes use of them to build his houses? T h ere is one fact that appals you,— the Infinite; if you feel it within you, why will you not admit the consequences? Can the finite have a p e r fe c t knowledge of the infinite? If you cannot perceive those relations which, according to your own admission, are infinite, how can you grasp a sense of the far-off end to which they are con­ verging? O rder, the revelation of which is one of your needs, being infinite, can your limited reason apprehend it? Do not ask why man does not comprehend that which he is able to perceive, for he is equally able to perceive that which he does not comprehend. If I prove to you that your mind ignores that which lies within its compass, will you grant that it is impossible for it to conceive what­ ever is beyond it? T h is being so. am I not justified in saying to you: ‘O ne of the two propositions under which God is annihilated before the tribunal of our reason must be true, the other is false. Inasmuch as creation exists, you feel the necessity of an end, and that end should be good, should it not? Now, if M atter terminates in man by intelligence, why are you not satisfied to believe that the end of human intelligence is the Light of the higher spheres, where alone an intuition of that God who seems to you so insoluble a problem is obtained? T h e species which are beneath you have no conception o f the universe, and you have; why should there not be other species above you more intelligent than your own? M an ought to be better in­ formed than he is about himself before he spends his strength in measuring God. Before attacking the stars that light us, and the higher certainties, ought he not to understand the certain­ ties which are actually about him?’ ”

T h e New Y e a r’s Celebration
ALL MEMBERS SHOULD PA RTIC IPA TE IN TH IS AN N IV ERSA RY FEA ST
By T h e S u p r e m e S e c r e t a r y
ARCH 20, has O n Tuesday evening, M arch 22, at been decreed by eight o ’clock, Pacific Standard Time, or the Imperator as eleven o ’clock, Pacific Standard Tim e, the official date the New Y ea r symbolical feast will be in North America conducted in the Supreme Tem ple by for the birth of the Grand M aster and will last for one th e R o s ic r u c ia n hour. O ur home study members are, year 3285. O ur therefore, advised to arrange to be in their individual sanctums or in their members are ad ­ vised to read his little group sanctums or meeting places where there are groups of eight or ten comments in this or more members on Tuesday evening, regard in his ar­ ticle dealing with M arch 22, beginning at an hour that is the Thought of equal to eight o ’clock, Pacific Standard the Month in this issue. Tim e. Members living in foreign dis­ tricts may go into their sanctums at It is my duty to advise all members whatever hour of the day is equivalent how they may participate in the sym­ to this same time in California. bolical feast that is held each year on the occasion of the New Y ear anni­ All such members are advised to versary. arrange beforehand to have in their F or those members who are con­ sanctum three forms of food, in order nected with Lodges, the celebration that they may take part in the symboli­ will take place in their Lodge temples cal feast. T h is food is, first, a form of some time during the week beginning bread or muffin composed principally of M arch 20, the precise date and hour corn; second, some salted nuts in order being set by the M aster of their Lodge. that the element of salt may be present; In all Chapters and Groups a similar third, some unfermented grape juice or celebration will be held at some hour wine, representing the juice of the during the week, beginning M arch 20, grape. T h e symbolical feast is always selected by the M aster of the Chapter represented by the use of com , salt, or Group, and all members will be noti­ and wine. During the course of the fied when to be present. hour devoted to this celebration at home, the members are advised to sit Those of our members who are stu­ dents at home and who are not con­ in concentration or attunement with the Supreme Lodge and the highest officers nected with any local Group or Chap­ ter may proceed to take advantage of and members assembled here and to the special services that will be con­ meditate upon the spiritual significance ducted by the Grand Lodge in C ali­ of a new year of activities and a com­ The ing period of twelve months of oppor­ R osicrucian fornia under the direction of Grand tunity to serve God and man and to M aster Dean. T h e manner in which D igest these home study members may par­ improve oneself. A fter twenty minutes M a rch ticipate in this nation-wide celebration o f such meditation and contemplation, the members should eat a little of the 1932 is as follows:

M

com bread or muffin, a few of the salted nuts, and drink a small glass of the grape juice, as partaking of a sym­ bolical feast. T h is should be followed by a prayer of thankfulness to God for all of the Cosmic blessings bestowed upon the individual, and for life itself, and for nourishment and health and the opportunities to work and worship. A fter the prayer the members should continue their contact with the Supreme Lodge, sitting in a relaxed condition and in meditation holding themselves receptive to the vibrations and contacts being sent forth from the Supreme Temple by the officers and members assembled there. It will help our members in their meditation if they read the article by the Imperator in this issue in the de­ partment called ‘‘T h e Thought of the M onth," and if they will also think of the many changes and improvements that have come into their lives since they joined the organization and of the many possibilities that lie before them in the future months and years. T h e members should also think of the fact that all over the world there are other Rosicrucians assembled in their homes at a similar hour or period of the day, uniting in a world-wide hour of spiritual contemplation and V V

peace. T h e very thought of this is stimulating and inspiring. T o contem­ plate that in these days of unrest and adjustment, with all of the problems that face individuals and nations of in­ dividuals, there are those who can cease their mundane, material thinking and activities to relax and attune them­ selves spiritually with thousands upon thousands of others is a magnificent picture to visualize and a marvelous condition with which to become attuned. Likewise, we implore that in all Lodges and in all temples of the Order here in North America and in foreign lands the officers and members assem­ bled will have in mind the many thou­ sands of members sitting quietly in their individual sanctums at home in attunement with them and that these large assemblies of members in the north and the south; the east and the west, in modern lands and ancient lands; in new temples and old; among races of all kinds and all colors, send forth their kindest thoughts and spir­ itual benedictions to our members in every part of the new world. Thus the thoughts of Peace, Light, Life, and Love, will encircle the globe on the occasion of this New Y ear celebration. V

Cathedral Contacts
( C ontinu ed [com P a g e 49)

lent opportunity for psychic develop­ ment for peace, health, and strength. Those who are strangers will also find it to their advantage to make the contact, if they wish, but all members are urged to do so. T h is special spir­ itual ceremony held in the Supreme Temple, begins at eight o ’clock, each Tuesday evening. Pacific Standard Tim e. T h a t means eleven o ’clock, Eastern Standard Tim e, and ten o’clock and nine o ’clock in the central parts of the United States. M any members, as well as the highest officers, will be sitting in silence and spiritual attune­

ment with you from 8:00 to 8:15 on these occasions. Our members are urged to speak of the Cathedral of the Soul to all who are not members, and especially to those who show the slightest interest in the work of the organization, for these spir­ itual contact periods will help all who need them and will demonstrate the working of some of the laws that are so beautifully taught in our studies. T h e Grand M aster, Brother Charles Dana Dean, will be glad to hear from those members who make contact with his class and who wish to express briefly their experience.

My Brother’s K eeper or Executioner ?
God May Have Ordained That W e Should Protect Each Other But The American Constitution Guarantees Us Some Rights and Privileges.
By T h e I m p e r a t o r

V
E are back on the fighting line again in regard to medi­ cal liberty and other human rights and priv­ ileges. W e do not be­ lieve that certain c o n s t it u t i o n a l guarantees can be set aside by any group of persons a r b it r a r il y a n d with an autocracy that makes old world tyranny look like childhood d iplom acy. W e have just received some news­ papers from the city of Fitchburg, M assachusetts. Across the whole of the front page of one of the papers we read this maddening declaration, “Com­ pulsory V accin ation Ordered to Check Sm allpox.” A s we read the subheads under this great headline, we learn, first, that all the residents of the city of Fitchburg have been ordered to become subject to immunization by the Board of H ealth. Further, we read that this drastic action was taken after some physicians 7 7 ,£ had diagnosed ten cases of illness in R o s ic r u c ia n ac^i0^ n9 communities as being cases of smallpox. l^ tg est W h en we get down to the meat of M arch the matter in the small type, we find 1932 the real unconstitutional, un-American

V

V
facts. W e find that the order for com­ pulsory vaccination of every inhabitant of the city of Fitchburg was adopted by the Board o f H ealth on the morn­ ing of January 13, 1932, as a result of a meeting which the mayor of the city had with a number of physicians in the city hall. It appears that one of the physicians, representing the State D e­ partment, is a lle g e d to h a v e d ecla red that this arbitrary and autocratic posi­ tion was taken on the recommendation and advice of one of the physicians connected with the hospital; and these two physicians united in declaring, acco rd in g to th e n ew sp a p er account, that there should be absolutely no ex ­ emptions in regard to this compulsory vaccination “except in cases where the life of the patient might be involved.” If vaccination is such a harmless, innocen t sim ple little thing, unworthy of the layman’s investigation, why is it considered dangerous to any human life, and why should there be any excep­ tions because the life of a patient might be involved? W e have all b een led to believe that one vaccination was almost enough for a lifetime, and we have been told re­ cently that vaccination should be re­ peated every seven years. W e were beginning to believe that the next rec­ ommendation would be that everyone should be vaccinated every two years. O ne vaccination in a lifetime is cer-

tainly not good business for physicians. V accination every seven years makes a pretty fair situation for the business of curing those who are sick. V accination every two years ought to be a real joy to these practitioners. But, we read in these newspaper accounts from F itch ­ burg that one of the physicians who urged this city-wide compulsory vac­ cination now declares that, “babies just born and people ninety years old should all be included,” and we are jolted in our expectations when we find that vaccination every two years is not sufficient, but that “children vaccinated as late as a month ago should be re­ vaccinated.” If vaccination is any good at all, it ought to last more than a month espe­ cially when we have been told that it would last a lifetime or at least seven years. W h a t is the truth o f it, any­ way? Is the time coming when com­ pulsory vaccination will be an afterdinner pastime each day or an early morning preparation for the day’s work, as cleaning the teeth and shining the shoes? And, since when can two or three, or a hundred, men of any professional classification or any political or other classification come together and arbi­ trarily decide that every American citi­ zen within a certain district must sub­ mit to one kind of medical treatment whether he desires it or not? If this is not autocracy and tyranny, and a viola­ tion of our constitutional rights, then I am greatly mistaken. W h a t will happen to the individual who refuses to submit to such dictator­ ship? W h a t will happen to young men or old men, young women or old wom­ en who say that they are American citizens, and under the constitution are guaranteed certain rights and priv­ ileges, among them the pursuit of life and happiness, and who refuse to sub­ mit to any form o f torture, pain or manipulation that will endanger their health, happiness, peace or content­ ment? W ill such persons be forcibly ejected from the city? Can they be put upon trains or trucks and railroaded out of town? W ill they be ostracized and sent into another state, or perhaps exported out of America to some S i­ berian plain or mountain top?

O ur only advice to the many who have telegraphed us and written us about this situation is, if you have money enough and an attorney who will try to fight this matter, then take a firm stand and refuse to be vaccin­ ated. If you haven’t the attorney or the money, or you are fearful of losing your position and your income, then submit to this compulsory vaccination. T h e only real remedy that you have left is to rise in all of your collective power and exercise your rights in pass­ ing laws to prevent this sort of tyranny. W h o knows whether there are ten cases of smallpox in any community or not? O nly the physicians who examine these persons and then isolate them and put them where other physicians or persons of competent authority cannot examine them or discover the real facts. W h o knows whether such ten cases are dangerous to the rest of the com­ munity or not? O nly those who take the attitude that they are the high and mighty dictators of human conduct. It is time that something is done about this sort o f thing, for it breaks out in all p arts of the country every so often. Compulsory vaccination leads to many forms o f illness in many cases, and it leads to further examinations and further treatments and further business for physicians. W e dare say that if the free vaccination of citizens ended in nothing more than the few minutes attention that was given to each pa­ tient, there would be a sudden decrease in the cry for more vaccinations. It is time that the citizenship of America or any other country where such things as this may be possible, take a stand against it and see that laws are passed preventing any medical board or any group of individuals, representing any system of therapeu­ tics, from dictating compulsory submis­ sion to any one form of practice. If we cannot do this, then we are laughing at the American flag and making a joke of our national liberty. Either we are free citizens or we are serfs and slaves; and it is about time that the American people decide not only in connection with this form of medical autocracy, but in other forms of political dictation, whether we are free citizens under a flag and symbol that guarantees us liberty or not.

F ear
(C on tin u ed from P a g e 48)

In other words, the parents would be conscious of actual existing circum­ stances. W e recall that in fear we are not actually conscious of a condition through our senses, but merely formu­ late one in our mind. Courage is gen­ erated immediately in the minds of the parents in the illustration above. It is not a state brought about to meet some condition of the future whether that future be six months, or three minutes, but courage is a condition of the im­ mediate N O W . Courage does not enter into anticipation of events, but a meet­ ing of those already at hand. T h e parents of our illustration would, un­ doubtedly, wish to rush into the flames to rescue the child at once. T h e parents wish to protect the child against severe burns. T h e whole display of courage is to maintain the present status of the child’s physical welfare. Courage in its physical reactions clearly shows the attempt of the sub­ jective mind to maintain automatically the stability of the functions of the body, so that the individual can persist in his attempts, whatever they may be. A person under the sway of extreme courage is more subjective, than objec­ tive. T h e objective faculties of the mind are entirely governed by the dominat­ ing thought of the subjective. Courage is, from a psychological point of view, a temporary state of self-hypnosis. T h e subject is almost devoid of sensations such has pain until afterward in a state of relaxation. W e may say, therefore, that courage should not be in all in­ stances heralded as a virtue, nor should fear under all circumstances be de­ spised. Both are born of our mental processes and depend upon the physi­ cal and psychological nature of an in­ dividual. Let us reiterate these laws: Courage is ever of the N O W . W e cannot be courageous about that which is not as yet. Fear cannot be of that which is, but must always be of that The which is not. R osicrucian ★ ★ ★ D igest W e have propounded the problem of M a rch fear. Have we a solution for it? Let us work with the same element as we 1932

understand generates fear in our attempt to find the conquest of it. T o return to the nucleus of our discussion o f the cause of fear; that is, the mental picture produced by deductive reason­ ing:— T h e passer-by of our early illus­ tration who had built in his conscious­ ness the picture of an attack upon his person by the ferocious dog,— How may he check this growing picture, and increasing fear? T o tell him to disre­ gard it is absurd. You can not displace with a few words a picture that is so vivid in the consciousness that the per­ son can actually realize the things that he imagines. Perhaps the suggestion is made that one should will away the inhibition of fear. T h a t is only speak­ ing in generalities, as we might reason­ ably reply, and what do you mean by ‘will aw ay’? It is true that we will find our con­ quest of fear in the will, but in what manner of its use? It is best to digress for the moment from the main issue to arrive at a brief understanding of what the will is. Let us start with the accepted definition of will as the power of conscious, deliberate action, or the faculty of the rational mind (objective mind) to make a choice o f its ends of action. T h is means, then, to will a thing is to focus your brain conscious­ ness upon the performance of some specific action to direct all of your faculties towards an ultimate end. T o further define, we might say that the will to do a thing is to concentrate your mental energies towards a certain objective. W e see in all this one prime factor, and that is that before we can will this, or that, we must first arrive at a decision. Decisions are the results of reasoning. W e are not always con­ scious of the processes of our reason­ ing, which finally result in a decision. W e may draw from memory, or pres­ ent impressions, and from these two form conclusions which result in a de­ cision. W e have progressed far enough along this line to give us material to continue with our main issue. W e find that will, then, is the objective decision to act, A F T E R R E A S O N IN G . But,

if you recall, we found that fear was also due to a specific type o f reasoning known as deductive. How, you might logically ask, can will then assist to eliminate fear, as it is commonly sup­ posed to do, if it also is the result of reasoning? Can, you might ask, reason­ ing oppose itself? It is necessary to realize, however, that will permits the use of all of the various forms of reasoning before it makes a decision, and enacts it. Fear, however, is the result of one form of reasoning; therefore, it is an unbalanced process. Let us explain: If the passer-by o f our illustration were to enter into the process of inductive, as well as deductive reasoning, his mental picture would immediately change. H e would set up a counter picture in his mind and would mitigate the one established by his imagination. He would return to a rational state of mind, and would build up a courage or resistance to actualities which would easily offset the anticipated conclusion, or the generated fear. Suppose, to get down to homely illustrations, that he said to himself, "H ere is the dog, ferocious in nature, who resents my passing though he does not resent others. W h a t are the reas­ ons? I, carrying a large walking stick when I pass, alw ays shake it at the dog to intimidate it. T h e dog, un­ doubtedly, thinks I intend to force an entry with that stick, or perhaps strike him. T h e known facts, then, are the ferocity of the dog, my carrying of a walking stick, and my shaking it at him. Going backward from the inci­ dents through the process o f inductive reasoning I can understand why the dog will act as he does toward me.” T h is reasoning of the passer-by is in­ ductive from results to the cause. It is a backward process. T h e passer-by would, by the time he had reached such a conclusion as above from inductive reasoning, have created in his own mind a counter picture which would have clearly altered his previous, imaginary one. T h e next step would then be for him to further exercise his will to the extent of concentrating and holding uppermost in his consciousness this pic­ ture of the opposite reasoning, and to

act accordingly. W henever he felt fearful and analyzed his fear and realized he had a picture brought about solely by deductive reasoning, he would immediately will himself to use his other processes of reasoning to bring him to a normal, rational state. His condition then will not be one of either courage, or fear. T h e first step, and the most import­ ant in the conquest of fear, we have found, therefore, is syllogistical reason­ ing. In common vernacular, don’t let yourself be possessed of deductive reasoning alone; don’t be swayed by imagination only. Argue with yourself pro and con. W h en you do this your mental picture becomes balanced, and you cannot be in a state of fear. Syllo­ gistical reasoning means to use all of your forms of reasoning as we ordi­ narily do hourly, whether we are con­ scious of it, or not. Stop and hesitate a moment in this reading. Think of how, during the day, you go backward in your thinking into your memory, and then project your thoughts forward in anticipation o f future events in the realm of imagination, and then at the same time you are always conscious of things occurring at the moment through your sense perceptions. W h en you do syllogistical reasoning before permitting a thought picture to occupy your mind, that picture will be logical, at least as logical as your experiences and intelli­ gence can possibly make it. T h e conquest of fear, like all other conquests, means a battle. W h en you will yourself to reason logically, or syllogistically, you are entering into a contest with a mental picture formed by fear. You have a mental ordeal to go through. F ear in its support, as we have found, calls upon the memory of sensation to assist it. T h a t is, you vividly recall all incidents and associa­ tions of the past that may be in any way related to your imaginery picture, or the fear you have in your mind. W e have shown in the instance of the passer-by how he would recall from his memory all the sensations he had of actually being bitten, or pains simi­ lar to bites. T h ese things colored his anticipation of the future bite. It helped him to get a wrong realization, to build up a fear. T o offset that he would need to will to reason logically as explained.

Thus the w arfare continues between logic and the memory of sensations. A continual determined battle on your part strengthens the will, and makes each contest much easier for you. If one resigns to fear each time it arises his will becomes so weakened that he is robbed of his privilege of syllogistical reasoning until finally it is impossible for him to withhold his deductive reas­ oning from running away with itself. Practice these suggestions as theories at first, if you will, and you will even­ tually admit to yourself that they are facts. T h e conquest of fear is easily possible with every normal person. ★ * ★ It never has been established as a fact that fear may be transmitted from parent to offspring. In other words, inherited. W e have shown, I believe, that fear is due to a unilateral process of reasoning, and reasoning is a faculty of the objective or brain consciousness of man. T h e peculiarities of the brain functioning, as every pathologist will agree upon, are not inherited. Insanity, as pathologists or professors of eu­ genics point out, is in herited. But its particular form of manifestation may differ with each generation. T h e above is merely used as an analogy; not that we mean to infer that fear in its gen­ eral manifestation is a form of insanity. T h e contributory causes that result in fear, however, can be and are inherited. In other words, fear as the result of a cause cannot be inherited, but the cause which can produce fear can be inherited. Nervous disabilities, where one can not co-ordinate his various faculties and subject them to his will,

are the foundations for fear. Nervous disabilities due, in themselves, to dis­ ease of the body can be transmitted. Th ere are numerous diseases resulting in such disabilities. T h e child inheriting a disease affecting the nervous system or its plexuses is apt to be a continuous subject of fear. His consciousness will continuously be inhibited with an im­ aginary picture, and he cannot conquer it in the way we have suggested. His remedy must be of a physiological na­ ture, not a psychological one. Such a person is extremely handicapped in his attempt to conquer fear from the mental angle. H e must start from its cause,— the physical disability. Such persons are subject to hallucinations and fanati­ cisms. They dwell entirely in an im­ aginary world, and are never able to fully appreciate the sense perceptions of the moment. T h eir imagination, to use common vernacular, runs riot. Th ey dwell continually in a state of reality; never in actuality. However, the average person as far as this affliction of fear is concerned is normal mentally and physically, and needs only treat himself psychologically to conquer it. T o conquer fear, pit logic against memory o f sensation. Reason inductively, as well as deduc­ tively. U se your will to analyze the mental picture on the horizon of your consciousness. Perhaps the layman uses the best term, after all, when he says, "Forget it." If your fear were an actual con­ dition you could not cast it aside, but since fears are not actualities, but only anticipations, exercise your syllogistical reasoning and cast them aside by the process proposed.

R E IN C A R N A T IO N Another edition of the fascinating story, “A Thousand Y ears of Yesterdays,” dealing with reincarnation is now off the press. T his book in fiction form contains many prin­ ciples and profound laws of metaphysics. It now has been handsomely bound, and the price is still O N L Y 85c. It can be gotten from the Rosicrucian Supply Bureau, San Jose, California.

R O S IC R U C IA N R A D IO P R O G R A M S

The R osicrucian D igest M a rch 1932

W atch this magazine carefully for announcements of the mystical Rosicrucian broad­ casts from leading national stations. Our program over W P G , Atlantic City, discontinues on Thursday, February 25, 8:30 to 9:00 P. M., Eastern Tim e. Our program still continues over K N X , Hollywood, every W ednesday night, but changes to the new hours of 8:30 to 9:00 P. M., Pacific Coast Time. W atch for other broadcasts in other sections of the country.

Lost
7

inthe Wilderness
V V O ccasionally he can look up and glimpse the light, but aside from giving him slight hope it only goes to prove more conclusively that he is still in the dark. Listen! “A voice crying in the W il­ derness,” a cry for help, a plea for guidance; we hear the call and make haste to give assistance, but alas! W e find opposition and resistance. Our offer to guide the individual is either refused outright, or criticized, belittled and cast aside. I am speaking of the wilderness of mental confusion through which we all have to go— that enorm­ ous expanse through which our paths lie, through inhibitions, repressions, complexes, fear, vanity, ignorance and superstition on to the goal of attune­ ment, to a realization o f the Truth. W e attempt to point out the way but are met with rebuff, and so, we come to understand that the one crying for help does not really want guidance; he only wants company. Curiousl T h is wilderness of the mind, but more curious the actions of those minds lost in that wilderness. Only the keen observer from the distant mountaintop can see its vastness. T h e poor soul fighting his way through its center has no concept beyond his distorted vision. O ne of the greatest problems of all is to help the one who does not know he is lost. He admits the possibility of others becoming confused, but he! Never. H e’s right; says so himself. Is he not a traveler of many years, and a deep student of the Path? Y es, he is, we must admit— but alas, we observe he only travels in circles.

By A. L e o n B a t c h e l o r , F.R.C.

N all Rosicrucian work the ultimate end is to lead the student member to know himself bet­ ter and to lead him toward the [oal of perfection. study of life, reduced to a com­ mon basis, is a study of Truth. Truth is attribute God, hence all stu dy o f Truth is a stu d y of God. God iseverywhere and as we proceed through our Rosicrucian work, we fin­ ally realize that an infinite spark of the Divine is within each one of U S, in fact, we are a part of the W h ole, not separate from the All, not separate from God, but a part of God. Our personality is an outpicturing of God's thought or idea and our thoughts are G od ’s thoughts. Volumes could be written on this subject— some claim it leads to con­ fusion— on the contrary it leads to sim­ plicity. M an in his everyday work strives to put himself forward in place of God— he fails— or refuses to ack­ nowledge the God within, and here is where man's troubles start. T h ey could end here, but not as long as man con­ tinues to usurp God in his own think­ ing or mind. Daily correspondence from our mem­ bers clearly reveals the constant resist­ ance on the part of many. Case after case shows a knowing or unknowing act of man that leads him deeper and deeper into the forest of Darkness.

sar

A study of this mental wilderness leads to a study of psychology. P sy ­ cho-, meaning the soul; -ology, a science or a study and discourse of— hence, a study or discourse of the soul. Mind is only an attribute of the soul, but to study mind thoroughly, we must of necessity include the soul. Mind, we are told, functions objectively and subjectively, and a close observation re­ veals that many, not all, of man's troubles can be greatly relieved by be­ ginning with these phases of the mind. T h e first type of ‘wilderness wan­ derer,* and by far the most common, is the complex victim. This class presents the most difficult problem. Th ey are almost hopeless; they shout for help but prevent you from giving it. T h ey are cases for the patent psycho-analyst — a year's hard work for the most effi­ cient of psychologists— and yet these same persons can, by following the Rosicrucian instructions, cure them­ selves, adjust their own concept of life and reorientate their thinking. Psycho-analyzing is so large an un­ dertaking that I would hesitate to enter into a discussion of the subject, so I will only endeavor to present some thoughts gathered from observation. V an ity — here is the cause of many difficulties; it takes many forms and is expressed in nearly everyone in some form from birth to transition. It is the primary cause of adult infantilism. In child life it is expressed in such phrases as, “M y papa is bigger than yours," “M y brother can whip your brother," “M y doll can talk and yours can 't," and “I can skate faster than you can "; and in adult life it is clearly observed in snobbishness and braggadocia in such phrases as “ I'm a personal friend of the President," “I purchase my clothes at the most exclusive shop in tow n," or in milder form as, “Y ou p o o r dear, I hope some day you, too, will be able to see Europe,” or perhaps, “I've been a student of this work for years and years; you can ’t tell me anything." You will easily recognize these and other similar statements and know them for what they are. A common experi­ The ence of our Membership Committee is R osicrucian to receive a letter from an inquirer D igest saying, “Oh, yes, I ’ve studied with all M a rch the great teachers, and don’t want to bother with your Neophyte work; give 1932

me your advanced instructions." It re­ quires diplomacy and tact to success­ fully point out to these persons that the advanced work can only be given to those who have humbled themselves as Neophytes. T h is latter phrase indi­ cates the superiority complex, a phase of vanity. T h is thornbush in the W ilderness, ‘V a n ity ,’ prevents the true expression of the God within, and causes man to think he alone is to be given credit for his successes and that the Cosmic played no part in his affairs— poor soul, what trials and experiences are still coming to him before his lessons are learned. W e see it all, and we weep and pray that the Cosmic will be lenient. T h e next one crying for help is of opposite nature— no vanity, no feeling of superiority— on the contrary, an ex­ pression of inferiority, introspective­ ness, contractiveness, a poor little worm of the dust, self-conscious, negative and a feeling that everyone in the world is against him, h e’s completely whipped and full of self-pity. “Poor me," he says, “I try so hard and I never suc­ ceed." W e feel sorry, but set to work to rescue this soul from the depths into which it has fallen. These are but two extremes, but not by any means, the only types. There are many more classifications and many variations to be considered. Each one is an individual case of its own. Each trait must be uncovered, classified and correctly placed. T h e combinations of the many traits make up the problem to be solved. A t this point the question arises— W h a t has this to do with me; and what part does it play in my Rosicru­ cian work?— Simply this: By bringing before you some of the unusual cases, you can be forwarned and thus protect yourself from ever falling into the habit of incorrect thinking. T o think correctly, one’s thoughts and concepts of life must be balanced, and, incorrect thinking is a definite sign that the con­ cept of life is unbalanced. It is an indi­ cation that the thinker is a mental wan­ derer in the wilderness, and, more is the pity he does not know he is lost. W h a t can be done? T h a t is the next logical question. T h e answer is simple.

Help the lost one to know his oneness with his God— the God within himself. How? T h a t question cannot be an­ swered quite so easily; but it must be done if ever the problem is to be solved. Anything less than a realization of the oneness of God is just that much less than a permanent solution. All of man’s trouble can be laid at the door of misunderstanding and his conscious or unconscious endeavor to supplant God in his thinking and acting. All things for which man craves are just ways and means by which the Cosmic keeps him forever striving and moving forward until the time comes for a realization of the truth to come to him. T o the ancients the rising sun sym­ bolized the Dawn of Hope forever re­ minding man that without Hope all urge to progress is gone.

M an ’s mind is an attribute of the soul — something that we all have, but know so very little of; it can lead us on, or it can stop our progress— it is intricate and intriguing, fascinating to follow, and interesting to observe— a channel through which a great and heavenly peace may come or mental pande­ monium. In the Rosicrucian work you are led and directed, instructed and guided ever and ever forward through the mental wilderness toward the goal of Illumination and realization of your oneness with God. Y ou will know your mind as one with the All and the bless­ ings of the Cosmic will abide with thee. In future issues of the Rosicrucian Digest we will deal more specifically with various phases of the mind and learn how to recognize and correct them.

V

V

V

Creating a New Career
(C ontinued [rom P a g e 52)

what your good wife would say to you: "Joh n , what else can you do?” T h at is a logical question. You cannot begin to create something without having some idea in mind first. You want to know before you start whether or not what you have chosen will suit you. Find out what else you can do other than what you are doing now. First, find out why your present position is not paying you well, or why you are out of a position, and how you liked it when you had it. Now, it is foolish for any man to say that he can plug along through life and make a success in any line that he does not like. He may get his salary, and he may, in ex­ change for the salary, give what he is forced to give, but that is neither pro­ ductive for the man nor for the firm. T h at man is sure to be one of the first to be laid off. Unless that man or woman is in an occupation that is most interesting, and the work so nice or so to the liking of the individual that he could even work at it for a few minutes or hours overtime without thinking of the overtime pay, or is constantly think­ ing how to improve it or take on more work without thinking of asking for an increase, he is not doing his best.

If you have a position that goes against your grain from morning to night, you are not in the right position, and that is one good reason for making a change and a good reason for changing to some different occupation. On the other hand, if you are of the type where all work is boresome and the mere fact that your alarm clock gets you out of bed and makes you go to work is annoying— if you are of that type, then this analysis will not help you. There are some like that. Th ey wish every day was Sunday so they could sleep a little longer in the morn­ ing. T h ey go to work with that atti­ tude. T h ey do not say the job is dis­ tasteful; it is passable; they have not given it much thought. T h e minute the man is seeking to improve his position and begins to look upon himself as being a victim of uni­ versal circumstances, it is like the man who got out of step in the parade and said all of the rest of the parade was wrong and he was right. W e may later find this man, a highly expressive and versatile speaker, standing on a soap box, in the park, talking on a new sociology, merely because he cannot

adjust himself to conditions. He wants to adjust conditions before he improves himself. H e is apt to think that he does not need any changing, but con­ ditions around him do. O n the other hand, the man who feels that the business he is in is one that is not just for him, tries to adjust himself. H e will let the business stand as it is, looking upon the system, the line he is in, as an established thing that would only change by the evolu­ tion of the component parts in it. O nly after all the employees, only after all the consumers, the capitalists, and everybody and everything connected with it gradually evolve, will it change. T h e average person who is just dis­ satisfied because the line he is in is distasteful, but knows he can do better and can do something more productive, something more fitting to the ultimate consumer— is the person who can be helped. Th ere is nothing wrong with the business or the employers, nothing wrong with the opportunities of that business, and nothing wrong with the system back of it. T h e only thing that is wrong is the man himself and his re­ lation to it. It may be a piano factory. This man, who is restless, tones or tunes pianos all day long. He never does any of the wood carving, or strings any of the wiring, or assembles any of the parts; he does not even hear the piano played when it is being demonstrated for a buyer. A ll he hears all day long is his playing on a few notes to see if the felt pads need toning or tuning; and he tones one after another all day long. He never had the satisfaction of building one of them, never had the satisfaction of selling one. Such a man may become tired. He may say, “I am qualified for something better than this.” But he will not condemn the factory; he will only condemn his in­ dividual relationship with the system, with the factory, with the work he is doing. He says, “I am qualified for something better.” W h a t else can he do? T o o many men have only one The training, one profession. If they are R o s ic r u c ia n bookkeepers or accountants they know just that and nothing else; or the man D ig es t tkat tones pianos may never have M arch thought of taking up some other busi1932 ness.

O ther fields of work, other than the one you are in, have a certain handicap, but not a definite, continuous handicap, not one that cannot be re­ moved. T h ere are hundreds of schools ready to help you take up a new course of study. Some of these courses of study at home are from such schools as the Columbia University of New Y ork or University of California. T h e Rosi­ crucian system also trains the mind, develops latent talent and awakens in­ terest in various fields of endeavor that will help you to improve your­ self, and you are studying under a great school. T h ere are many schools, not only international correspondence schools, but others as well. I know a man seventy years of age, who gradu­ ated from the Blackstone Institute of Law, worked for six months in a lawyer's office, passed the bar examina­ tion, and now practices law. I have known young married women, while taking care of a baby, to study law and graduate and be admitted to the bar to practice; in fact, I know of two cases. It can be done and is being done. It is not too late. N o matter if they say in the economic and business world that forty is the age limit, there is one thing about it— education sets no limit on it. N o matter how old you are, if you can read and understand what you read, you can still lift yourself up out of the rut you are in. T h e principal thing of starting a new career, after you have determined what you want to do, is to visualize yourself in that position, or as a worker in some factory, some line of business. T h e thing in working it out is to begin with the use of the mind power in creating the hope. You may decide upon going into this or that business. T h e best way to do this is to begin by visualizing yourself in the very position you have chosen. Do not visualize yourself sit­ ting at a desk, in a factory, or visualize the pay envelope, but visualize yourself as a component part of that particular industry, of that particular business, as an executive, not merely as an employer or foreman. Think of yourself as one who is constantly adding to that know­ ledge, to the growth and development, as though you were fitting yourself into the entire picture, not as an em-

ployer, but as a director; not as chief of the board of directors that meets once a month or so, but as one of those directors who represents the field of activity. Keep visualizing yourself as a necessary part of the new growth, the new development of that line of busi­ ness you wish to get into. Then, in addition to this, every day go out and make contact with those who are in it. D on’t just call on the heads of the or­ ganization you want to reach, or the vice-president, or the manager. Find out who are the principal employees in that business; try to meet them, or one of them at the club or where he goes to lunch. T ry to reach him, talk to him; say frankly, “ I understand you are working for such and such a firm, or such and such a line of business.” Ask him what he has to say about that business; how it is getting along. D on’t talk position to him: talk the business to him. G et some information about the history; how it is going, whether any new improvements are contemplated. Ask him, "D o you know of any im­ provements in your firm that could be made? A re they working on some?” I remember one time I went to visit the Borden Condensed M ilk Factory at Randolph, New Y ork. I went up with the chief officer of the milk company at Randolph. Randolph is occupied solely by the employees of the Borden Condensed M ilk Company. It is a co­ operative plan, and they even have their own theater. I found, in talking to one of the employees, that he had been working for three years on a factory improvement. H e said, "Y o u know the Borden Condensed Milk Company has a factory full of ma­ chinery, and if any of us employees have an idea how to improve it, we are given two or three weeks, if necessary, to go to the factory and they let us work out our ideas, and if our idea works out, we get $5,000, plus our regular salary while working it out. T h at encourages us. T h ey have a rec­ ord of twenty-eight inventions in the past year. I don’t know how much for p reced in g y ears. O n e girl figured out a quicker way of pasting the labels on the cans and she got $5,000. It cost $9,000 to improve the machinery, but

it saved thousands of dollars a year. Th ere is still one thing everybody in the factory would like to do, and we cannot solve it. T h e man who can find a quicker way of closing up the cases around the cans gets $5,000. W e have not been able to make a single im­ provement on its present method. I have an idea how it should be done, but not how it can be done." Later on, when I was shown through the factory, I understood the problem. A year from that I was telling a man out of employment to hobnob with the people he wanted to work for and find out if there was any one department that was weak because the firm had not been able to find a specialized man to fit into it. Then I recalled my past experience at Randolph. I said to the man, " I will tell you where $5,000 is waiting for you if you can work out a way of closing wooden cases more quickly, and I described it to him. He secured a permit, and within three months he worked it out and that man is now in charge of that department. T h at man wanted to get in a position where he could use tools and work around machinery, but if he just stood around waiting for the position, he would have been a failure. He showed the Borden Milk Company that although they did not need him now they would need him tomorrow, because he was what they needed. T h a t is the only way you can do. Get acquainted with the new line, with the people, and then try and see where you might fit in. T h is little system can be extended to fit any of your problems, any position, new course, you are seeking to make. First visualize, creating it in your mind until it is a real thing, then go out in the world in a definite way and find the nitch that is a duplicate of the one you have visualized. If you have been visualizing correctly, you can start a new career for yourself. Start out with the thought of developing new ideas, new lines, new life, laying aside all of your wrong habits and doubts that have tended to hold you down in the past. B egin with n ew faith a n d n ew co n ­ fid en ce and you will find your new career, regardless of your age and conditions.

Sanctum Musings
(C on tin u ed from P a g e 59)

in the most excellent condition. M an is, therefore, obliged to conform to all natural and physical laws which con­ trol health. It is equally obligatory on man to recognize the soul within him. H e must permit it to express itself. He must occasionally find solitude, and there alone with himself, his ego, a t­ tune with the mind within, and allow it to direct his outer self and to show him the path he is to follow on this plane. T o be solely of a spiritual n a­ ture would mean to be continuously in a psychic state or a constant commun­ ion with the essence of God: it would mean the complete denial of the physi­ cal by dwelling entirely in the spiritual realm. T h ere are philosophies and religions advocating such practices— asceticism is one of these. An ascetic is required to negate the functions of the body, to suppress the physical side of man, to consider it unworthy of attention. Such an unbalanced religion results in dis­ ease of mind and body because it is a violation of Cosmic laws. M an is pos­ sessed of a body because, as we have seen, it is necessary to him on this plane. Perhaps it is best to say that man is here in a dual form because the consciousness of God is to be clad in a physical form for a purpose that man does not yet fully understand. If man were to constantly dwell in the consciousness of God, or be in a spir­ itual state, would God have given him body and an objective consciousness or brain? W h a t man should hope for is frequent spiritual contact so that with the knowledge received, he may temper his objective reasoning by displaying compassion and justice, and prevent re­ version to bestiality. Spirituality as comprehended by the individual cannot be communicated or taught to another. T h e frequency of The spiritual communion or contact is en­ R osicrucian tirely dependent upon the evolution of D igest the personality on this plane. O ne’s un­ M a rch derstanding of Infinite W isdom is with­ in the limitations of his individual ap­ 1932

preciation of that W isdom . Our plane of consciousness determines our inter­ pretation of Infinite W isdom . Each being is unlike in Infinite understand­ ing. None can teach spirituality, as it is of the Infinite and not of the Finite. T h e only external means of assisting man in spiritual attainment is to in­ struct him in the method of his own self-unfoldment. It is not within the province of any school to tell man how to commune with God. T h a t is the Divine privilege of individual accomp­ lishment. Philosophical or r e l i g i o u s schools can only show man the way to prepare himself. T h ey can present such studies and exercises as will awaken the psychic forces in man and permit an influx of the Cosmic wisdom through him, and through this wisdom he may know how, individually, to reach spiritual heights. If we may use an analogy— a gym­ nastic instructor can only direct man how to physically develop himself so as to acquire muscular strength; the instructor cannot tell him how through­ out his life to use the strength de­ veloped. T h e individual one acquir­ ing physical strength, must, himself, make the decision as to how and when to use it. Rosicrucianism is an example of the true mysticism we have been discussing — it instructs man to prepare himself to know God, to attain spirituality by the development of his latent psychic fac­ ulties. Let us summarize the outstand­ ing points of our discourse: Goodness in itself is not spirituality. T h ere are no creeds for the attain­ ment of spirituality. Spirituality is an individual appreci­ ation of the spirit of God in man. M an cannot be permanently of a spiritual nature on this plane. Spirituality cannot be taught because its interpretation depends upon the evo­ lution of the individual. A method of prep aration can assist man to attain frequently the state of spirituality.

Come T o Our Next Convention
IT W ILL BE THE M OST ENJOYABLE VACATIO N YOU HAVE EVER HAD
By T h e C o n v e n t io n C h a ir m a n

V
T last the date for the next Conven­ tion has been set. Hundreds of let­ ters have been coming to us ask­ ing when the C on­ vention will be held so that plans can be made for coming to this wonderful period of contact with headquarters. In accordance with the suggestions of hundreds who were here last year, we have decided to have the opening session of the Convention on Sunday evening, July 10, and the closing ses­ sion on Saturday evening, July 16. Hundreds of our members believe that by confining the Convention to one week instead of spreading it from the middle of one week to the middle of the other, it will be more convenient to the hundreds who come. However, we have also followed the suggestion of the members and have decided to hold three sessions each day, instead of two. In addition to these official sessions in the big, new, Francis Bacon Auditorium, right in the grounds of Rosicrucian Park, there will be the many group meetings, council meetings, and interviews held between the official sessions, so that every hour of the day from sunrise until midnight will see our members busy and happy, and being benefited by the hundreds of features that we are planning.

V

V
T h is will, undoubtedly, be the largest Convention we have ever held, because the success of last year’s many new features and the unusual facilities of the large auditorium have caused our members to talk a great deal about the benefits of the Convention and to praise it highly, and we know that fully a thousand of our members are planning to come out here next summer. Just think of the wonderful vacation that lies in store for you. Millions of persons throughout various parts of the United States have planned to some day come to California for a vacation. T h ey have wanted to see its hills and valleys, its wonderful ocean and beaches, its flowers and sunshine, and its scenic beauties and places of his­ torical interest. T o come to a country where everything is so different and so unique is like visiting a foreign nation. T o do this, however, without knowing anyone where you are going or without having any friends or kindred to help make the time enjoyable, is always a deterent factor. In the case of our members, however, they can come to a new world of beauties and find here friends and Brothers and Sisters an x­ ious to entertain them and keep them happy the whole time they are with us. You will find here a warm welcome and cordial companionship for each hour of the day. W h eth er you stop at the large hotels, the smaller ones, or at auto camps or boarding houses, you will find other Rosicrucians around you from the time you arise in the morning and eat your breakfast until you retire

late at night. In fact, you will begin to meet them on the trains and the highways on your westward journey. You will be acquainted with them and laugh with them and will be enjoying the Golden W e s t before you reach Rosi­ crucian Park. And then what glorious friendships! W h a t hours of mutual understanding, sympathetic advice, and interesting conversations! T h e ride from any Eastern city or from any part of the Midwest to C ali­ fornia and back is a wonderful experi­ ence in itself — comfortable trains, scenic highways, pleasant weather, con­ stant change of interest, long periods of rest, and an opportunity to study human nature. Then there is the great state of C ali­ fornia with its remnants of an old em­ pire replete with Spanish color, Spanish traditions, and Spanish landmarks— the spirit of fiesta is everywhere— town after town and city after city planning to hold parades, celebrations, flower ex ­ hibits, musical festivals, outings and gala ceremonies; the valleys with their wonderful fruit and vegetables that are preserved and sent to all parts of the world as the finest produce for the table; flowers galore in every color and in hundreds of species that you have never seen; magnificent modern stores of every kind, specialty shops, theatres, cafeterias, and places of amusement that vie with each other in giving more entertainment and more beautiful music than the best places in the East; automobile rides over hills and down rolling slopes of highways, like coast­ ing for miles along glass covered roads; balmy air, picturesque villages, beach resorts, W estern life with its rodeos and cowboy exhibits, along with ultra­ modern and fashionable features found only in the metropolitan cities of the world. V V

A s hundreds of our members have said when ending their visits here, you, too, will say that it was like a dream come true. A few weeks in the para­ dise of beauty and pleasure, along with the contact with the Supreme officers and the benefit from the lectures and lessons, will repay you for your time and trouble in coming to the Golden W e s t next July. Bring your children with you and we will see that they are well cared for, for they will be safe and will enjoy the scenery and great lessons to be learned from journeying to the W e st. It is a cultural advantage that you owe to them as well as to yourself. W rite to me, Convention Chairman, care of A M O R C Temple, San Jose, California, for any information you may desire. W rite and let me know if you are coming and whether you want to come by train, by automobile, or by steamship through the Panama Canal. D o not consult any tourist or ticket agency until you receive advice from me, for we can tell you of the most economical ways to come to this C on­ vention and how you can make your entire trip one of pleasure, safety, and economy. But set aside at least two weeks of next July for your summer vacation m California. (N ote the picture which accompanies this issue of the Rosicrucian Digest, showing the interior of the Francis Bacon Auditorium during one of its enthusiastic sessions. Picture yourself in that audience, listening to the Im­ perator and the other Supreme officers lecturing and demonstrating the prin­ ciples of our work. You will never for­ get the hours you spent in this wonder­ ful auditorium.) V

R O S IC R U C IA N B O O K R E P R E S E N T A T IV E S

The R osicrucian D igest M a rch 1932

W ould you like to be an agent for the monthly magazine, “T h e Rosicrucian Digest?” in their communities because of the variety of all types of minds. If you wish to know more Extension Department, San Jose, California, S E N T A T IV E IN S T R U C T IO N S .

various Rosicrucian publications and its M any persons have found this profitable Rosicrucian publications which appeal to about this plan, write to the Rosicrucian and ask for complete B O O K R E P R E ­

FR A N C IS BACON A U D I T O R I U M . SAN JOSE, C ALIFO RN IA
T his shows a typical Sunday evening audience in the Hall where the annual Rosicrucian Convention fills the place to capacity. ( C om plim ents o f the R osicrucian D igest.)

The

“Spoken Word”
ROSICRUCIAN ORAL INSTRUCTION BY THE IMPERATOR !

10 IN C H S T A N D A R D R E C O R D There never has been any force at the disposal o f man like the power o f the spoken word. A s Rosicrucians, you can appreciate, therefore, the advantage o f proper oral guid­ ance by the Im perator. The Im perator w ill 2 S ID E S — 2 S U B JE C T S direct you in the proper pronunciation and intonation of the vow el sounds given in your lectures. He w ill address you in your sanctum and open your w eekly convocations w ith a m ystical invocation. He w ill direct your Cathedral contacts w ith an expla­ nation o f preparation and establish the correct vib ratory conditions by the use o f certain vowels. W e believe there can be no more personal contact established in a m aterial w ay between the members and the Im perator than in this unique method.

A REAL TREAT FOR YOU
W e have been fortunate in having the Im perator record these subjects. E v e r}’ member, no m atter where located, may now participate in these personal instructions. Look at the subjects o f each record: R F m R n I i S A N C T U M IN V O C A T IO N P R E P A R A T IO N F O R C A T H E D R A L C O N T A C T S

R F r n R n \u

? ___e x e r c i s e i n v o w e l s o u n d s l M Y S T |C A L B R E A T H IN G W IT H V O W E L S O U N D S

There is a subject on each side. These records can be used at every w eekly sanc­ tum session; at every contact you wish to make with the Cathedral. Start a library o f voice o f the highest officers o f the Order. The inspiration, benefit, and pleasure you w ill derive from these records w ill repay you many times the small cost.

THIS ATTRACTIVE PRICE
Each record is the latest w ax type; a fu ll ten inch, double-side standard record, packed in a special protective carton, post paid. You m ay pur­ chase one record or the set o f two. Send your order today for this unusual treat.

TW O

REC O RD S—

F O U R S ID E S

S IN G L E

R E C O R D S (2 sides)

ROSICRUCIAN SUPPLY BUREAU
San Jo s e :: C alifornia

$ J 2 5

THE PURPOSES OF

THE
The men and spiritual creative,

ROSICRUCIAN

ORDER

Rosicrucian Order, existing in all civilized lands, is a non-sectarian, fraternal body of women devoted to the investigation, study, and practical application of natural and laws. The purpose of the organization is to enable all to live in harmony with the constructive, Cosmic forces for the attainment of health, happiness, and Peace.

The Order is internationally known as A M O R C (an abbreviation), and the A M O R C in America, and all other lands, constitutes the only form of Rosicrucian activities united in one body having representation in the international Rosicrucian congresses. T h e A M O R C does not sell its teachings, but gives them freely to all affiliated members, together with many other benefits. Inquirers seeking to know the history, purposes, and practical benefits that they may re­ ceive from Rosicrucian association, are invited to send for the free book. “T h e Light of E gyp t." Address, Librarian. S. P. C., care of

AMORC
ROSICRUCIAN PARK
(C A B L E A D D RESS:

TEMPLE
S A N J O S E . C A L I F O R N I A . U.S.A.
R A D IO S T A T IO N 6K Z )

••A M O R C ”

Officials o f the J\[orth Am erican Jurisdiction
(Including the United States, Dominion of Canada, Alaska, Mexico, Guatemala.Honduras. N ic­ aragua, Costa Rica, Republic of Panama, the W e st Indies,Lower California, and all land under the protection of the United States of America.) H. S P E N C E R L E W IS . F.R.C ., Ph. D ................... Imperator RA LP H M. L E W IS , F.R .C .,............................................................. .................................... Supreme Secretary C H A R L E S D A N A D E A N , F .R .C ..............................................................................National Grand Master A. L E O N B A T C H E L O R , F .R .C .,................................................ Director of Correspondence DR. A R T H U R B. B E L L , F .R .C ..................................................Director of the W elfare Department H A R R Y L. S H IB L E Y , F .R .C ., Director of Editorial Department

T h e fo llo w in g p rin cipal bran ch es are D istrict H ea d q u a rters o f A M O R C
New York City: A F R A M E R IC A N Chapter of A M O R C , 125 W e st 130th St.. L. Baynard W hitney, F.R .C ., Master. Boston, Mass: Mass. Lodge, Mrs. M arie Clemens, S.R.C , Master, Lodge Building, 739 Boylston Street. Pittsburgh, Pa.: Penn. First Lodge, Dr. Charles D. Green, K .R .C ., Master, 610 Arch St., N. S., Pitts­ burgh, c-o A M O R C . H artford, Conn.: Isis Lodge, A M O R C , Mr. W . B. Andross, Master. Box 54, South W indsor, Conn. Tampa, Florida: Florida Lodge, Mrs. Frances Crescenzi, Sec­ retary, 3420 10th St. San Francisco, Calif.: Francis Bacon Lodge, Mr. Elrod W ard, K.R.C., Master, A M O R C Temple 1655 Polk Street. Los Angeles, Calif.: Hermes Lodge. Nos. 41, 42. 43. 44, 45 and 46, A M O R C T E M P L E , 31 6]/2 W e st Pico Street, Dr. J. C. Guidero, M aster. Inquiry Office and Secretary, Suite 813, New Orpheum Theatre Building. San Jose, Calif. Grand Lodge Session for all members, T u es­ day evenings, 7:30 to 8:30 P.M . Chicago. 111.: Chicago Chapter No. 9., O . D. O'Delius, Master. Offices and Reading Room (open daily and evenings), Auditorium Hotel (Club Room No. 4) 430 South Michigan Ave. (Telephone Harrison 5000). Philadelphia, Penna.: Delta Lodge No. 1, A M O R C . Stanley K. T aylor, K .R.C., Secretary, 5215 Ridge Ave.

(D irecto ry Continued on N ext Page)

Portland, Oregon: Portland Chapter, Clara G. Anderson. S.R.C. Master, 424 Clay Street. Seattle, W ash.: A M O R C Chapter, M ary A. Huey, Master. 301 Haight Bldg., Second Ave. and Pine St., Telephone Main 9941.

Washington, D . C.: Official Representatives: R. N. Trezise, 3418 17th St., N. W .: V irgil McComas, 4707 Connecticut Avenue, N .W . San Antonio, Texas T e x as Lodge, Mrs. C. W anblotn, S.R.C.. M aster, 1133 So. Laredo St.

Other Chartered Chapters and Lodges of the Rosicrucian Order (A M O R C ) will be found in most large cities and towns of North America. Address of local representatives given on request.

PRINCIPAL C ANADIAN B R A N C H ES
Vancouver, B. C.: Canadian Grand Lodge, Dr. J. B. Clark, K.R.C., Grand Master. A M O R C Temple. 560 Granville Street. M ontreal, Quebec: A M O R C . English Division, Albert E . Poad. K.R.C.. Master, Apt. No. 4, 1431 M ackay St. M ontreal, Quebec: Societe d'etude d’A M O R C (French Section). E . G. Clossey, K.R.C., Master, 3839 Bcrri St. Verdun, Quebec: Mr. R. A. Williamson, Master, 3809 W e ll­ ington Street. W innipeg, M an.: S. S. Bergmann, 301B Enderton Blk. Portage Ave. Lashburn, Sask.: Mr. V . W illiam Potten, Master, P. O. Box 104. New Westminster, B. C.: M r. A. H. P. Mathew. Master 1313 7th Ave. Victoria, B. C.: Secretary, A M O R C , Box 14. Edmonton, A lta.: Mr. James Clements, K.R.C., Master 9533 Jasper Avenue, E.

SPAN ISH -AM ERICAN SECTIO N
T his jurisdiction includes all the Spanish-speaking Countries of the New W orld. Its Supreme Council and Head Office are located at San Jaun, Puerto Rico, having local Representatives in all the principal cities of these stated Countries. Hon. Manuel Rodriguez Serra, F.R .C ., Supreme Grand Master, P. O . Box 702, San Juan, Puerto Rico. Armando Font de la Jara, F.R.C., Secretary General, P. O. Box 36. San Juan. Puerto Rico. T h e name and address of other Officers and Branch Secretaries cannot be given general pub­ licity, but may be obtained for any information or special purposes, through the Head O ffice at San Juan. Puerto Rico. ALL C O R R E S P O N D E N C E S H O U L D B E A D D R E S S E D T O T H E S E C R E T A R Y G E N E R A L A F E W OF TH E FO R EIG N JURISDICTION S India: England: The Supreme Council. A M O R C , Calcutta, T he A M O R C Grand Ladge of India. Mr. Raymund Andrea, K.R.C., Scandinavian Countries: 41 Berkely Road, Bishopton, T h e A M O R C Grand Lodge of Denmark, Dutch and East Indies: Carli Anderson, S. R. C., Grand Secretary, W . J. Visser, Grand Master, Manogade 13th Strand, Copenhagen, Den­ Semarang, Java. mark. France: Dr. H. Gruter, F.R .C ., Grand Master, Nice. Mile. Jeanne Guesdon, S.R .C ., Corresponding Secretary for the Grand Lodge (A M O R C ) of France, 56 Rue Gambetta, Villeneuve Saint Georges, Seine £> O ise). Austria: Mr. M any Chilar, K .R .C., Grossekreter der A M O R C . Laxenburgerstr, 75/9, Vienna, X . China and Russia: T h e United Grand Lodge of China and Rus­ sia, 8/18 Kvakazasaya St., Harbin, M an­ churia. Australia: T h e Grand Council of Australia, M . S. Kowron, F.R .C ., Grand Master, "Sandhurst," 52 Fletcher St., Bondi, Sydney, N .S .W .
E gypt:

Great Britian, Grand Master Bristol, Eng. Bodjong 135

T he Grand Orient of A M O R C . House of the Temple, M. A. Rainayvelim, F.R .C ., Grand Secretary,7, Rue Talkha. Heliopolis. A frica: T he Grand Lodge of the Gold Coast AM ORC. Mr. Stephen H. Addo, Grand Master, P. O . Box 424, Accra, Gold Coast, W est A frica. Costa Rica: W illiam T . Lindo, F.R .C ., Grand Master, P. O . B ox 521, Limon, Republic of Costa Rica, C. A. T h e a d d resses o f other foreign G ran d L o d g es an d secretaries will b e furn ished on application.

“ Lemuria —the Lost Continent of the Pacific”
< t> ♦ ♦

The Submerged Land oi Mystics!
1 Beneath the rolling, restless seas lie the mysteries of forgotten civilizations. Swept by the tides, half buried in the sands, worn away by terrific pressure are the remnants of a culture little known to our age today. W here the mighty Pacific now rolls in a majestic sweep of thousands of miles, there was once a vast continent. This land was known as Lemuria, and its people as Lemurians. Science has gradually pieced together the evidences of this lost race, and in this book you will find the most astounding, enthralling chapters you have ever read. How these people came to be swept from the face of the earth, except for survivors who have living descendants today, is explained.

The Magic Dwellers of Mt. Shasta
Fanned by the cool breezes of the Pacific and crowned by a cap of snow is California's mystery mountain, Mt. Shasta. It is not unlike other towering peaks of splendor on the famed Pacific coast except that it is shrouded with tales of weird happenings. It is said that a strange people live in seclusion somewhere on the mountain: that they practice unusual rites. It is said that they seem pos­ sessed of great wealth, for they have much gold; and, too, it is said that they exclude themselves from others. These people are the living descendants of the Lemurians.

C © ©©© s u e

D o you know how they came there, when their forbears perished centuries ago with the submersion of the continent of Lemuria? W ould you like to know the truths which they concealed from a merely curious world?

Latest Mystical Book Sensation
E very indication is that this book will live up to its an­ ticipated reputation of being the m ystical b o o k sensation of the year. This book contains truths which are much stranger than fiction. It is profusely illustrated with maps, charts, and symbols. It is a book you can never forget because of its intriguing mystery; its instruction, and its unusual subject matter. T h e book is well-printed, wellbound and is econ om ically p riced at $2.50 postpaid. Send your order and remittance direct to the address below or ask y ou r loca l b o o k dea ler to get it for you.

C a n You Interpret These Strange C a rv in g s?

W h at A ncient Story Do These R eveal?

ROSICRUCIAN SUPPLY BUREAU
(AM O RC) San Jose, California, U . S. A.

THE

P R I N T E D IN U . S . A . R O SIC R U C IA N P R E S S . SA N J O S E .

C A LIFO R N IA

M M

moSicructan Hibrarp
Tm
The following books are recom m ended because of fhe special knowledge fhey confain, nof fo be found in our teachings and not available elsewhere. Volume I. R O S IC R U C IA N Q U E S T IO N S A N D A N S W E R S A N D C O M P L E T E H IS T O R Y O F T H E O R D E R .

The story of the Rosicrucian ideals, traditions, activities, and accomplishments is told interestingly in this book, and the scores of questions form a small encyclopaedia of knowledge. O ver 300 pages, printed on fine book paper, bound in green silk, and stamped in gold. Price $2.50 per copy, postpaid. Volume II. R O S IC R U C IA N P R IN C IP L E S F O R T H E H O M E A N D B U S IN E S S .

A very practical book dealing with the solution of health, financial, and business problems in the home and office. W ell printed and bound in red silk, stamped with gold. Price $2.25 per copy, postpaid.

r 4fcJV

Volume

T H E M Y S T IC A L L IF E O F J E S U S .

A rare account of the Cosmic preparation, birth, secret studies, mission, crucifixion, and later life of the Great Master, from the records of the Essene and Rosicrucian Brotherhoods.A book that isdemanded in foreign lands as the most talked about revelation of Jesus ever made. O ver 300 pages, beautifully illustrated, bound in purple silk, stamped in gold. Price $2.90 per copy, postpaid. Volume V. "U N T O TH EE I G R A N T . .

M

A strange book prepared from a secret manuscript found in the monastery of Tibet. It is filled with the most sublime teachings of the ancient M asters of the Far East. The book has had many editions. W ell printed with leatherette cover. Price $1.50 per copy, postpaid. Volume VI. A T H O U SA N D YEARS O F YESTERD AYS.

A beautiful story of reincarnation and mystic lessons. This unusual book has been translated and sold in many languages and universally endorsed. W ell printed and bound with attractive cover. Price S5c per copy, postpaid. Volume V II. SELF M A ST E R Y A N D FA T E, W I T H T H E C Y C L E S O F LIFE.

Y ta @
L

A new and astounding system of determining your fortunate and unfortunate hours, weeks, months, and years throughout your life. No mathematics required. Better than any system of numerology or astrology. Bound in silk, stamped with gold. Price $2.50 per copy, postpaid. Volume V III. T H E R O S IC R U C IA N M A N U A L . Most complete outline of the rules, regulations, and operations of lodges and student work of the Order, with many interesting articles, biographies, explanations, and complete Dictionary of Rosicrucian terms and words. V ery completely illustrated. A necessity to every student who wishes to progress rapidly, and a guide to all seekers. W ell printed and bound in silk, stamped with gold. Price $2.30 per copy, postpaid. Volume X I. M A N S IO N S O F THE SO U L, TH E C O S M IC C O N C E P T IO N . W ell

The complete doctrines of reincarnation explained. This book makes reincarnation easily understood, illustrated, bound in silk, stamped in gold, extra large. Price $2.50 per copy, postpaid.

if A jv

m m
*g y "

Send all orders for books, with remittances, direct to A M O R C SLIPP L Y B U R E A U , Rosicrucian Park, San Jose. Calif.

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful