Contemporary Digital andVisual Culture In Context

Cityscape and New Media

An introduction to cityscape Paco González / radarq.net Carla Melgar / cali2copio.net July 2013, CIEE Sevilla

An introduction to cityscape

What is a cityscape? The urban landscape of a city.

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A cityscape is the urban equivalent of a landscape. In urban design the terms refer to the configuration of built forms and interstitial space. In the visual arts a cityscape (urban landscape) is an artistic representation, such as a painting, drawing, print or photograph, of the physical aspects of a city or urban area.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cityscape

Flagellation of Christ (probably 1455–1460) - Piero della Francesca

Children's Games (1560), Pieter Bruegel the Elder

View of Delft by Johannes Vermeer 1660-1661

View of the entrance to the Arsenal (c. 1732), Canaletto

Bal du moulin de la Galette (1876), Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Rue de Paris, temps de pluie. (1877), Gustave Caillebotte

Charing Cross Bridge (1899), Claude Monet

Oudezijds Achterburgwal, Amsterdam (c. 1890–1900), George Hendrik Breitner

Nighthawks (1942), Edward Hopper

Clouds and skyline (1957), Ernst Haas

Gran Via (1977-1990), Antonio López

Cityscape (2009), Brian Whelan

Cinema City

Try to imagine this city

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James and Karla Murray

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Iwan Baan

Kalla Katayla

Landscape history. A cultural construction of the territory.

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Landscape

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Landscape comprises the visible features of an area of land, including the physical elements of landforms such as (ice-capped) mountains, hills, water bodies such as rivers, lakes, ponds and the sea, living elements of land cover including indigenous vegetation, human elements including different forms of land use, buildings and structures, and transitory elements such as lighting and weather conditions.

Combining both their physical origins and the cultural overlay of human presence, often created over millennia, landscapes reflect the living synthesis of people and place vital to local and national identity. Landscapes, their character and quality, help define the self image of a region, its sense of place that differentiates it from other regions. It is the dynamic backdrop to people’s lives.

More recent geographers have addressed the subjective attributes of a place within humanistic geography thus crossing the bridge between the objective and the subjective assessment of an area. The popular conception of the landscape that is reflected in dictionaries conveys a particular and a general meaning; the particular referring to an area of the Earth's surface and the general meaning being that which can be seen by an observer.

Cultural landscapes

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Cultural Landscapes have been defined by the World Heritage Committee as distinct geographical areas or properties uniquely "..represent[ing] the combined work of nature and of man..".

The World Heritage Committee has identified and adopted three categories of cultural landscape, ranging from (1) those landscapes most deliberately 'shaped' by people, through (2) full range of 'combined' works, to (3) those least evidently 'shaped' by people (yet highly valued): 1.- "a landscape designed and created intentionally by man"; 2.- an "organically evolved landscape" which may be a "relict (or fossil) landscape" or a"continuing landscape"; 3.- an "associative cultural landscape" which may be valued because of the "religious, artistic or cultural associations of the natural element"

Ruhrs’s Cultural Park

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Try to imagine people’s stories

Stephan Kalla Katayla Zirwes

Stephan Zirwes

Stephan Zirwes

Stephan Zirwes

Stephan Zirwes

An easy example

James and Karla Murray

James and Karla Murray

James and Karla Murray

James and Karla Murray

James and Karla Murray

Urbanized world and the cities networks.

Europe - NASA

What is a city?

New York City / es.wikipedia.org

Favela Rocinha. Sao Paulo. Brasil / CC by Leszek Wasilewski es.wikipedia.org

By Christopher Gielen

Tower of Babel - Bruegel / thegatesofdamascus

“What is a bridge? Asked the falsely naive Julio Cortázar. And he answer himself: a person crossing the bridge. What is a city? A place where a lot of people interact. A public space, open and protected. A place which is a material and social fact, a producer of meaning. A concentration of meeting nodes. [At first thougth we can consider the opposite but] Streets and public spaces, the collective spaces, are first in a city. Only then will become buildings and roads (…).” -Jordi Borja. La Ciudad Conquistada

Backlight - Casc Antic - Barcelona / CC by-sa Notarivs

Barcelona - The Eixample / CC-by kelp

Barcelona - Google Maps / © Google

Barcelona - Google Maps / © Google

Europe - NASA

Europe - NASA

Apollo 8 - NASA

Earth at night - NASA

World of Facebook - good.is

Urbanized world

Urbanized

How is new media changing the cities?

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Jeffrey Inaba. Volume #24 Counterculture

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77

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From the square to networks

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© FourSquare

© 2010 Europa Technologies US Dept. of State Geography

Citizens as digital practitioners

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Las dinámicas de red permiten y estimulan la participación y la colaboración online con un impacto directo en lo que podríamos denominar el ámbito offline y los espacios presenciales, tanto en su diseño como en las dinámicas que en estos se pueden establecer. De la confluencia de lo digital y lo presencial se descubren y se provocan oportunidades donde el aprendizaje ocupa el centro de la actividad social en el entramado urbano.

Cita del taller #urbanedu: entorno digital y aprendizaje urbano Paco González y Enric Senabre

La Commune
raspouteam.org

Paris s’invente une image de ville propre et policée pour mieux oublier certains épisodes de son histoire agitée. En 1871, pendant plus de deux mois, la ville se donne un gouvernement populaire, une armée civile et démocratique, expérimente la démocratie directe, et entreprend des réformes sociales. Le Paris insurgé est aussi accueillant pour les étrangers, qu’ils soient italiens, polonais ou algériens… Encore un trait qui l’oppose au Paris de 2011.

Museum of London
museumoflondon.org.uk

No text because of flash.

15M BIFI visualization
15m.bifi.es

The study carried out constitutes a unique opportunity to get enough of real time statistical data. Other mass-tracking events such as large sport events, tend to be too concentrated in a few hours and some processes for which large statistics can be obtained, are usually of slow variation. A social phenomenon like the 15M movement is an excellent opportunity to understand network formation processes and its spreading dynamics.

Why cityscape?

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Answers?

Contemporary Digital andVisual Culture In Context
Cityscape and New Media
An introduction to cityscape CC by-sa-nc Paco González / radarq.net Carla Melgar / cali2copio.net Except atributed content. July 2013, CIEE Sevilla