1 For the Student

At Home ...

THIS MONTH’S SUGGESTION
T h e Secret of Success
Cf The fundamental law of success is order. Systematic arrange­ ment of your thoughts, your plans and your acts, assures you against lost time. The greatest genius is at a disadvantage if he is compelled to search for his implements, pen, or brush when inspired. The student is equally striving against odds, if his monographs or lessons arc haphazardly filed, requiring a shuffling of pages, a sorting of manuscripts, each time a point, principle, law, or fact is sought. There is no greater torment than the tantalizing thought that you possess the needed information, but
S T U D E N T ’S LESSO N B IN D E R
A ccom m odates a year’s m onographs. Is durable and attractive. H as a handy reference index.

lust cannot locate it. There is no wisdom so useless as that just beyond recall. W h y not begin today to file your monographs methodically? W e have prepared a specially made, serviceable It is very attractive, and It con­ and attractive lesson binder for this purpose. This special binder will accommodate a year’s monographs. stamped in gold with the symbol and name of the Order. for quick reference, and is made of durable material.

Price $1. 00 ea.
O n ly # 2 .5 0 for a lot of three.

tains an index form for indexing the subjects of your monographs

R O SIC R U C IA N SU PPLY B U R E A U
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AN H IS T O R IC R O SIC R U C IA N M E E T IN G
T h e above photograph depicts one of the many im portant scientific sessions of the M anchester, E ngland, R osicrucian lodge, established about 1860 by D r. Joseph Jordan and others, including the editor of one of England s well known new spapers. T h e activities of this very old and highly respected R osicru cian body w ere reported in the M a n c h e s te r C o u r ier and other publications from time to time and especially the scientific sessions of January and Febru ary , 1866, and of O ctober, 1867. M any of the F ratres w ho appear in the above picture are well known in the E nglish scientific and educational fields. T h e historic data associated with this picture has been furnished to T h e R o sic ru c ia n D ig est through the arch ives of an eminent R osicru cian antiquarian. — C o u r te s y o f T h e R o sic ru c ia n D ig est.

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m P E R P E T U A T IN G TH E O R IG IN A L R O S IC IiU C IA N T E A C H IN G S

THE COSMIC W A Y FOR Y O U !

A

T he Rosicrucians Invite You
R E you seeking for that knowledge which will open up a new world to your ^ consciousness, and reveal a path that leads to personal power? If so, you are cordially invited to accept this kind offer of the Rosicrucian Brotherhood.

For hundreds of years the organization has opened wide its portals to all sincere seekers for the wisdom of ancient and modern times. They have preserved this wisdom for those who in sincerity desire the benefits that come from harmonious attunement with the Cosmic creative forces, and from inspirational guidance. Through their system of personal development and helpfulness the Rosicrucians have maintained their position as an outstanding companion to thousands of men and women. They have taught them to C H A N G E the C O U R S E O F T H E I R L I V E S . and to start their lives over again toward a definite goal of F I A P P I N E S S and P E R S O N A L A C H I E V E M E N T . T h e dreams of the h uman mind are capable of fulfillment. ^ our desires, if worthy, C A N B E R E A L I Z E D through the knowl­ edge and application of fundamental Cosmic laws.

PRIVATE IN STR U C TIO N S AT H O M E Interesting F R E E B O O K Explains
Y o u m ay study the h e lp fu l instructions of (lie R o sicrucia n system in the privacy of your ow n home. W e suggest that you address the L ib ra ria n below, and ask for a free copy of the fascinating book. " T h e Secret H eritag e.’ It w ill e xp la in how. after m any years of development, a special system F O R H O M E S T U D ’V has been evolved b y the organization, how the many departments of the organization for special personal help m ay be used by you; it w ill e xp la in how these practical home R osicru cia n studies are sent to thousands of men and wom en in every w a lk of life in a ll parts of the w orld, and how through them these students are finding peace, happiness, and the fulfillm ent of their desires. M a k e use of this special, private help that the R osicrucians N O W O F F E R ^ O U . T h e instructions and teachings you w ill receive w ill be of unlim ited help and inspiration. Just address a letter, asking for the book, to;

Address: L ib rarian S. P. C. Rosicrucian Brotherhood

W k

Rosie rucian

Park

San Jose, California, U. S. A.

(Those who ore Rosicrucian Students are now receiving these instructions.)

E £H n H E 5 ? i$

a & ia

ROSICRUCIAN DIGEST
1030251501
C O VERS THE W O R LD
T H E O F F IC IA L , IN T E R N A T IO N A L R O S IC R U C IA N M A G A ­ Z IN E O F T H E W O R L D -W ID E R O S IC R U C IA N O R D E R

Vol. X III

J A N U A R Y , 1936 C O N T E N T S

N o, 12 Page

An Historic Rosicrucian M eeting (Frontispiece).... 441 The Thought of the M onth: Talking Through Space 444 Rosicrucian Principles in Business............................. 445 C ath ed ral C ontacts Divine M ystery Oblivion .................................................. 448 ................................................... 451 ...................... 457

Pages from the Past: John Fiske

................................................................... 460 ....... 462 466 470 477 S T . M A -R T JN

A n cient Symbolism .................................................... 461 Summaries of Science Analyzing Your M ental Tendencies Sanctum Musings: The Sole Reality . M ystery Temple (Illu stra tio n )

Subscription to T h e Rosicrucian D igest, T hree Dollars per year. Single copies tw enty-five cents each. E ntered as Second Class M atter at the P ost Office at San Jose, California, under the A ct o f August 24th, 1912. Changes o f address must reach us by the tenth o f the month preceding date o f issue. Statements made in this publication are not the official ex­ pressions o f the organization or its officers unless stated to be official communications. Published M onthly by the Supreme Council of

T H E R O S IC R U C IA N O R D E R — A M O R C
R O S IC R U C IA N P A R K SAN JOSE, C A L IF O R N IA

THOUGHT OF THE MONTH
TALKING THRO UGH SPACE

THE

U C H is being said t h e s e d a y s in newspapers a n d magazines rega rd ­ ing science’s inva­ sion of the fields of metaphysics and psychology to the extent of partially admitting that tel­ epathy and clairaudience are prob­ ably natural and feasible. It is not so many years ago that the subject of telepathy was limited to discussion among research workers in private for­ ums devoted to a field of thought just outside of the scientific circles, and the subject of clairaudience like that of clairvoyance was left to the occultist and mystic as something that was purely theoretical or imaginary. Science has been gradually led to a consideration of the real facts about telepathy through the development of certain scientific principles revealed in the study of n a ­ ture's fundamental laws. E v en the de­ velopment of radio or wireless telegraph has had its influence upon the more ca re ­ ful consideration of the possibilities of telepathy. W h a t is interesting to note in co n ­ nection with the month of January is that it was on M o n d ay , January 7, in the year 1927, that the first human voice talked from America to London, or spoke through space over a great dis­ The Rosicrucian tance. Centuries ago it would have been considered phenomena] if anyone Digest could have stood upon a raised platform January or on the side of a mountain and a d ­ dressed an audience of ten or fifteen 193 6

thousand by so amplifying the power and quality of his voice that it would have reached hundreds of thousands of feet. It is not many years ago when emi­ nent speakers boasted of the fact that their loud and thunderous voices were able to fill huge auditoriums in which five or six hundred persons might be congregated. T h e n came the develop­ ment of radio and telephone pointing the w ay to the possibility of man speak­ ing to audiences of five, ten, twenty, or a hundred million people at one time. B u t it w as at 8 :44 E astern Standard T im e on the morning of January 7, 1927, that the human voice speaking in N ew Y o r k C ity was heard in London with the words passing through space by means of radio-telephony. T h e words, “ Hello, L o nd o n,” were heard distinctly and surprisingly in the city far across the sea. Since then almost every hour of the day and night finds business communications transmitted by spoken words of the human voice pass­ ing to and fro from points in Europe to points in America. T o the same degree that man has gradually and masterfully conquered space in regard to radio mes­ sages and radio’s use in transmitting the human voice and pictures, so will man gradually find and p erfect within him­ self the ability to transmit sounds and pictures from any one point to another regardless of time or space. T h e month of January is interest­ ing f o r other important historical events such as the establishment o f the O lympic G am es in G reece in about 1458 B. C., and the great world-wide cataclysm or flood called N o ah 's flood which is recorded to have occurred in
F ou r H un dred F o rty -fo u r

4051 B. C., and the conversion o f St. Paul. But of the greatest significance to the development of man and his future unfoldment and mastership is his in­ creasing ability to extend his conscious­ ness into space and to bring his thoughts into the consciousness of others in dis­ tant places or in isolated localities where other means of communication could not or would not reach. Rapidly are we learning that the co n ­ sciousness of each individual is but a part of the consciousness of the whole universe, and that only in a limited physical and material sense are the children of G o d — all living creatures— completely separated or isolated. T h e consciousness of G od and the consciousness of man are one and the same, but this consciousness is part of the inner man, and not of the outer, worldly self. W h e n man comes to real­

ize the possibilities of his dual existence as a spiritual and material being, he will become not only richer in the possession of a new-found world, but he will pro­ ceed to develop and unfold in a manner that will make him a new creature. It may have been in w hat we now call January when G od first breathed into m an’s physical body made of the dust of the earth a spiritual body called the soul, and at that time man was created dual. From thence onward man has centered his thoughts upon the glorifica­ tion of the dust of the earth as person­ ified in his physical being, and has neg ­ lected wholly the spiritual master with­ in. A s man gradually devotes his thought and attention to the expansion, development, training, and activity of this inner self, he will find that he is master over all of the barriers or limita­ tions of physical existence.

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Rosicrucian Principles in Business
By
F r a t e r H a rv e y M ile s ,

F. R. C.

O M E of the prob­ lems that seem to confront many of the R o s i c r u c i a n students and other students of mys­ tical law are: How can we use these t e a c h i n g s in a b u s i n e s s way? How can we apply Cosmic principles to gain m a t e r i a l happi­ ness? H ow can we approach the Divine M ind with financial problems? H o w can we present to the M a ste rs and to those illuminated ones who encourage us to develop our spiritual natures and eliminate our material desires, wants, wishes, and the unrealities of the physi­ cal world, our business and financial worries and difficulties and not encroach on their dignity and not incur the wrath of G od and the Cosmic laws?
F ou r H un dred F o rty -fiv e

E v e ry Rosicrucian member who has carefully studied the fundamental teach­ ings has learned that man is a counter­ part of G od, and that the only real G od he can ever know is the G o d within his breast, or the G o d of his heart. T h e r e ­ fore, it behooves each student of G od and nature to get as closely acquainted with this G o d of his heart as soon as he possibly can and keep up an intimate re­ lationship with this inner, immortal self. T h e more familiar he becomes with his inner self, the nearer will he be to the Cosmic M in d and the more thoroughly will he understand when we say: “C o n ­ tact the Cosmic for help and guidance.” T h e Divine M ind is alw ays present and is infusing your very being constantly. T h e difficulty you have in contacting the Cosmic lies within yourself, because you are always looking beyond yourself — beyond the G o d of your heart for wisdom and enlightenment, for advice and for knowledge of a Cosmic nature.

W h e n people enter the business world, they do so for one purpose; that is, to obtain happiness and achieve some degree of recognition in the community in which they live. T h e y desire a home and all the comforts of home life. T h e y aspire to a high state of social standing. T h e ir one o bject is to gain everything th ey possibly can in business that will give them the ultimate of success while they live in this material world, and we can see no reason why every individual with such aspirations should not have their wishes fulfilled; and he will so long as he cooperates with the Cosmic Laws and the Divine M ind, of which he is a part. But when he neglects his duty and rejects the impulses of the inner self and harkens not to the voice of his conscience, his unfortunate Karma be­ gins, and gradually the individual who was fortunate and successful in busi­ ness begins to lose power. H e has financial reverses, his credit standing is lowered, his prestige in the community begins to wane, his health begins to fail, and finally he finds himself on the rock of destruction among the multitude of unfortunates, wondering how and w hy he got there. T h e question is: “H o w can we use these laws and alw ays be on the safe side, and always conform to the divine principle?’’ T h e r e is an ancient custom found in all the old Rosicrucian records called “T h e L aw of A M R A . ’’ T h is law b e ­ came a sacred doctrine w i t h the E gy ptian people, and later with the Jews in their religious practices. It was finally adopted by branches of the Christian church. It was originally a mystical law and the Rosicrucians still hold it to be a mystical law, although many modern forms o f religion have turned it into a purely material law. T h e law of A M R A is this: If you pray to G o d or petition the M aste rs for an y special help in sickness, worry, trial, tribulation, or poverty, and your prayer or petition is answrered, you are obligated to make compensation The not alone by a prayer of thankfulness, Rosicrucian but by passing along to others some Digest portion of the blessing you have re­ January ceived. If you have asked for an im­ 1936 provement in your health, relief from

some pain or suffering, the gift of some material things, or help in your business and social position, then, according to the law of A M R A , you should tithe yourself either by setting aside a small amount of money, or of some material element, which can be used to make some other person happy or at P eace with the world. Unless this is done each time you receive a blessing through the Cosmic, you cannot rightfully petition in the future for any other blessing. Undoubtedly, you want to know how you can use some of the laws of con­ centration and thought direction and the control of the occult forces in accomp­ lishing your desired results, and I must say that our lessons are replete with these laws and principles, and little of the esoteric studies may be given in this manner. However, we will try to e x ­ plain to you just how effectively you can apply some of the mystical teachings that are being received weekly by our members. F irst, one must realize that around his body is a magnetic, vibratory energy, subtle but powerfully effective, and can be directed by his thoughts. T h is energy is either positive or negative, depending entirely on the nature of the individual and the strength of the W I L L of the person. It also depends on the activities, the thoughts, the natural inclinations, the acts, and the general life one is lead­ ing. If one is kind, lovable, tolerant, friendly, and if his mind is always up­ lifting, this energy around the body is P O S I T I V E and of a C O N S T R U C ­ T I V E nature. If one expresses intoler­ ance, is mean, selfish, lewd, coarse, wicked, and is dominated by hatred and unfriendliness, this energy is N E G A ­ T I V E and D E S T R U C T I V E . It is not only destructive to the individual, but also to his family and those who are de­ pendent upon him for the jo y and hap­ piness that should predominate in every home. T h e secret of using this energy in business lies in his ability to harbor constructive, uplifting, inspiring thoughts. T h e s e thoughts are dynamic radiations of power, and they envelop all who come within a few feet of your presence. Every one who enters your house, your room, your office, or your
F ou r Hundred. F orty -six

workshop, is affected by your thought vibrations, and the energy leaving your body and consciousness is either making a favorable impression upon your client or is causing him to repel any proposi­ tion you wish to make. Y o u r vibrations are distasteful and repulsive if they are N E G A T I V E , or they are appealing and attractive if P O S I T I V E . B y the power of your W I L L you can increase the effect of this energy and inspire your patrons to have confidence in you and accept what you have to offer in the w ay of business proposi­ tions. T h e thought vibrations leaving your mind constantly bombard the re­ ceptive, auric field around the pur­ chaser, and he will yield to your wishes under the pressure of a power that seems unfathomable to the uninitiated, and mysterious and mystical to those who would seem to understand. E ven after your patrons have left your place of business, there remains an indelible impression on their consciousness, and if you were not successful in impressing your client with the particular business deal at once, you may rest assured that eventually the purchaser for your w ares will return, and success will ultimately be yours. If yours is a business that involves a great deal of financing and the trans­ actions are large and of such a nature that the business could not be concluded

in one day, when you retire in the eve­ ning, keep the transaction well fixed in your mind. V isualize the deal just the w ay you would have it. C reate the com­ plete transaction mentally. S e e that the entire business proposition is favorable to all concerned, the buyer as well as the seller. V isualize happiness for every person who will be affected by the transaction, and see smiling faces and jo y predominating in the lives of every individual you wish to contact with your vibrations. T h e n , with this attitude in mind, turn the entire business deal over to the subjective mind and go to sleep full of confidence that if it is right with God and the Cosmic, of which you are a part, your wishes will be granted. But do not forget the L aw of A M R A . Jam es Allen gave us the complete law when he said: “M in d is the M a ste r-P o w e r that molds and makes, A nd M a n is M ind, and evermore he takes T h e T o o l of T h o u g h t, and, shaping w h at he wills, Brings forth a thousand joys, a thou­ sand ills:— “ H e thinks in secret, and it comes to pass: Environment is but his looking-glass."

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F ou r H undred F o rty -sev en

T h e "Cathedral of the Soul” Is a Cosmic meeting place for all minds of the most advanced and highly developed spiritual members and workers of the Rosicrucian Fraternity. It is a focal point of Cosmic radiations and thought waves from which radiate vibrations of health, peace, happiness, and inner awakening. Various periods of the day are set aside when many thousands of minds are attuned with the Cathedral of the Soul, and others attuning with the Cathedral at this time will receive the benefit of the vibrations. Those who are not members of the organization may share in the unusual benefit as well as those who are members. T he book called "Liber 777" describes the periods for various contacts with the Cathedral. Copies will be sent to persons who are not members by addressing their request for this book to Friar S. P. C., care of A M O R C Temple, San Jose, California, enclosing three cents in postage stamps. (P le se state w hether m em ber or not— this is im portant.) L

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CHANGES IN RELIGIOUS THOUGHT
HROUGHOUT the world today there is a very evi­ dent, pronounced tendency on the part of the mass of people to revise and modify their religious activities and p a r t i c u l a r l y their forms of re­ The l i g i o u s devotion. Rosicrucian In addition to the Digest fact that m a n y January new or religious movements are being formed, particularly in Europe, many of 1936 the oldest of the sectarian religions are gradually making modifications in their creeds and doctrines and in their gen­ eral attitudes toward the problems of life. In the W e s t e r n W o r l d and particu­ larly in the United States, these changes do not attract the attention that they are attracting in foreign lands or in other countries where one or two ancient religions have been dominant factors and fixed institutions. In those countries the slightest modification in creed, doctrine, or worldly activities e x ­ cites interest. In fact, in the United State s a n d some parts of Europe,
F o u r H undred F orty -eig h t

changes in religious creeds and doc­ trines have been so frequent in the past fifty years that even the newspapers sometimes fail to comment on some of the newer changes recently made. But the great effect of these changes is be­ coming manifest in the increasing in­ terest on the part of younger people and those of intermediate age, who have lost interest in religious matters in the past ten years or more and have wandered from their churches. O n e of the most keen analyzers of the matter has said that the deplorable ab­ sences from churches in the past ten years or the reduction in the number of those persons who regularly attend the fixed meetings of the churches should not have been taken as an indication that the public was becoming less inter­ ested in religion or less religious in its interior nature. H e has said, and many of the religious congresses have agreed with him, that the absence from church in most cases has been due to two things: first, an indifferent attitude to ­ ward the old orthodox principles which they believe were too narrow, and sec­ ondly, a protest against the church’s in­ sistence upon certain principles which do not fit the consciousness of the people of today. In either case the neg ­ lect of the church on the part of a por­ tion of the public is more of a protest against the lack of sympathetic under­ standing on the part o f the churches than anything else. T h e term “sympathetic understand­ ing” should not be taken to mean that the churches have become less inter­ ested in the personal problems of the in­ dividual members, or less sympathetic in the sorrows and griefs that constant­ ly come before them. T h e very reverse of this is probably true. Clergymen, ministers, priests, rabbis, and all persons connected officially with the churches today in the W e s t e r n W o r l d are doing more in a sympathetic, kindly, construc­ tive manner to help their parishioners to meet their daily problems and to e x ­ tend sympathetic understanding to them than at any other time perhaps in the history of the church. O n e of the in­ dications of this fact is that a great ma­ jority of churches, especially of the Protestant denominations, have added healing clinics to their regular activities
Four H undred Forty-n in e

in an attempt not only to carry out the healing work of Jesus the Christ and exemplify it, but to add some practical activities to the schedule a n d thus render a real personal service to many who could not afford such treatment through any other source, or principally to those who have not been healed by any other method but whose religious nature enables them to attune them­ selves with metaphysical and spiritual principles. T h e modern church of today has be­ come a more broadened institution than at any other time since its establishment particularly in the W e s t e r n W o r ld . T h e farther east we go the more limited and orthodox are the preachings and activi­ ties of the various churches. If one stops to consider the enormous change that has taken place in the con­ sciousness of the church and the con­ sciousness of its people in regard to an understanding of heaven and hell, one will see at once what great strides of development and unfoldment the church has passed through. It was commonly said fifty to a hundred years ago that the churches of the more orthodox na­ ture preached more “hell fire and brim­ ston e” sermons than any other kind. T o d a y it is notable that very few of the orthodox churches and certainly very few of those that have broadened in their scope deal with either heaven or hell in the materialistic manner with which these places or conditions were dealt years ago. A n o ther change has been in the nature a n d character ascribed to God. T h e frowning, scold­ ing, wrathful, jealous G od of the past century has been supplanted by a lov­ ing, forgiving, sympathetic, understand­ ing and happy F a th e r of all children. T h e idea that G o d may have at times tempted man to do evil to see if he would yield and then punish him for yielding, is rapidly giving w ay to the idea that man tempts himself or that the artificial, temporal, transitory things that he has created as pleasures for the flesh tempt him into his evil w ays and that he falls into his own web or into the trap he has set for himself and others and that G od extends him every opportunity to redeem himself. T h e r e was a time not many years ago and running far back into the early period of the church

when the phrase in the L o rd ’s P rayer, “Lead me not into temptation” was em­ phasized in every repetition of the pray­ er with apprehension, fear, and sincere pleading. T o d a y the phase is puzzling to all who use the prayer, for they feel intuitively and inwardly t h a t the thought in that phrase is not correct and is not consistent with the nature of God. T h e average person religiously inclined feels that it is a reflection upon the goodness, mercy, and kindness and fatherhood of G o d that insinuates that H e at any time deliberately leads His children into temptation. T h i s is ce r­ tainly indicative of the changing atti­ tude in the hearts and consciousness of millions of people. P erhaps one o f the other great changes is that which is expressed in the idea that G o d is not only omni­ potent and omnipresent and that His spirit reaches everywhere, but that H e can be worshipped at any time and any place. T h e old idea that only beneath the towering spires of a great cathedral or within the dark and cloistered parts of a huge structure, or only on the marble steps of a glorified alter will be found the real presence of God, has given w ay to the idea that one can com­ mune with G o d on the hillsides, or in the valley, on the open sea, or in the privacy of the home, and that where the consciousness is uplifted to God, there G o d can be contacted, a n d in this thought of the upliftment of the co n­ sciousness, there is a continually in­ creasing comprehension of the fact that the upliftment is not a matter of ascend ­ ing to heaven to contact G od but to lift oneself above the commonplace things, sordid things, and particularly the ma­ terial interests of life. T o many thou­ sands o f persons the idea has trans­ muted itself into the belief that prayers offered in the center of a great and cost­

ly cathedral are more or less surrounded by materialistic influences and that the confining, oppressive effects and atmos­ phere of the costly material structure tend to keep the mind and conscious­ ness from expanding into the great Cosmic space where the consciousness of G od is sure to be found. In the development of the idea that God may be reached in holy com­ munion, in a purely mental and spiritual atmosphere devoid of materialistic in­ closures and grandeur, has come the beautiful idea that one may build a stately cathedral for oneself in the spiritual world created out of the mental and religious elements of o n e’s nature. T h e Cathedral of the Soul, a sublime and transcendent holy place above the level of the material things of life, has become a real cathedral in the lives of many thousands who find it an ideal place for the concentration of their thoughts during their sacred worship. If you as a member of the organiza­ tion or a friend of the Rosicrucian ideals have not experienced the joy and happi­ ness, the real inspiring and invigorating sense that comes to t h e inner self through worship in this ethereal cathe­ dral, then you most certainly are miss­ ing some of the spiritual values of life. B y sending for a copy o f the free pamphlet, L iber 777, describing this non-sectarian and unlimited cathedral, you will be brought face to face with an opportunity that may quicken and awaken the search of your soul. Send for such a pamphlet today and unite in the Cathedra] contact periods when thousands of devoted ones in all parts of the world are united in combining their spiritual thoughts in communion with G od regardless of creed, national­ ity, doctrines, or other differences and limitations.

T he Rosicrucian Digest January 1936
F o u r H un dred F ifty

c Divine iMystery
THE INFINITE MIND BEHIND ALL CREATION By
F r a t e r W illia m V

H.
V

M cK eg g, F. V

R. C.

H E entire universe is a creation o f M ind. Sin ce we claim t h a t all life, a l l existence of a n y worth, lies in the Beyond, and that the hope of man is to attain u n t o that other world, why do we strive, seemingly in vain, to drag the exist­ ence of that higher plane down to our earthly level? If, on the other hand, we start out with the hypothesis that the earth is the highest plane of being, we confine our senses within a very minute groove: as scientists who refuse to b e ­ lieve in things they cannot see, or prove. “ In research, we seek for definite proof of a cau se," they declare. “T o do so, our mind is quite free from all obstacles such as religious superstition and dog­ m a." And since the m ajority refuse to permit any “ D ivine" plan of thought to have had a hand in the universe, or even in their own researches, they are, by placing such limits of definite reasoning in their own way, forced to seek T ru th within the very bonds they wish to avoid. From where I write I can see the gilded, globular domes of t h e Griffith Observatory which crowns the H o lly ­
Fou r H un dred F ifty -on e

wood hills. O n M a y 15, 1935, it w as opened to the public. Inside it are the latest instruments to aid m an ’s further study of the heavens, with D r. D in smore Alter, a Fellow of t h e R oy al A stronom ical S o c i e t y , as director. W it h in its halls are s u c h things as a huge model of the moon, as we imagine it to be; a 12-inch telescope; a P la n e­ tarium — a new instrument which pro­ jects a moving picture of the visible uni­ verse on the hemispherical dome of the O bservatory. All this is for man to s e e k out the M in d behind creation. F o r Science to ­ day is proving there is a M ind behind the outer form of the world. A M ind thinking thoughts too vast and too ma­ jestic for blind humanity to grasp; but a M in d that manifests for our advance­ ment in all created works. T h i s Infinite M in d is the Divine M y s ­ tery. Love — G oodness — B eau ty — T ru th . Called by many, G o d. It is the Enigm a no o n e knows. T h e E tern al Pow er of Supreme Love, hidden, unless sought for, from sight and understand­ ing. Y e t by reaching a Sp ark of this P ow er within us, may we not also reach its Source, and thus solve the M y ste ry over which the milleniums have argued and fought? “G reater is he that is in you, than he that is in the w orld," said St. John, who knew what modern scientists are only now beginning to contemplate. T h e in­

ner man is the T r u e M an . T h e outer man is his shadow, subject to change and dissolution. T o know the T r u e M a n is to gain admission to the Inner C ircle of humanity. Nothing worth doing is easy. It means work and study and labor. Doubt is the chief stumbling block of the be­ ginner on the P ath to wisdom in devel­ oping his Inner Self. A t that period he expects too many outer revelations, fre­ quent signs and wonders. T h o u g h he may not sense much exteriorly, the T r u e M a n within is often profoundly stirred. G oing back to mystics, we find they asserted that by losing all sense of ob­ jective things, by giving freedom to our Inner Self, we are able to contact the real, inner world of wonder, hidden from us by our physical senses. T h e greatest philosophers of the past have affirmed this. All, they said, can attain unto great mystical heights, even to solving the Divine M y stery — as did Blaise Pascal, who, after experiencing outwardly his overwhelming illumina­ tion du coeur, while reading St. John, wrote in ecstatic style these soul-searing cries: “ From about half past ten in the eveninq until round half after midnight— F I R E ! G od of Abraham, G od of Isaac, G od of Jacob, n o t the God of philo­ sophers or sages. Certainly! Certainly — feeling — sight — joy — peace. . . . F orgo tten by the world, and at one with G od. . . . W h a t grandeur of the human soul— ‘Righteous F ather, the world has never known T h e e , but I know T h e e . ’— Joy, joy, joy — tears of jo y I am separated from myself! M a y I not be thus separated f r o m myself eternally! . . . . Sw eet, entire renunciation. En tire submission to Jesus Christ and to my Guide. Eternally in jo y for a day of labor on earth. Let us not forget T h y teachings! A m en .” T h is oddly written rhapsody is but a portion of the strange parchment mes­ sage P ascal kept hidden from all eyes while he lived. A fte r transition it was The Rosicrucian found next his heart. H e regarded it as too sacred to show others, hinting as it Digest did at a mystic event most of us hope January for, but very few attain; an event that is the full birth o f the T r u e M an , when 1936

the Divine M y s te ry is revealed in all Its Splendor and Glory! M a n y declared t h i s ecstatic eulogy proved Pascal to have been mad. A conclusion he possibly foresaw, t h e reason why he kept his secret to himself. Surely insanity could never be attrib­ uted to the author of the Lettres P ro­ vinciates, and the P ensees. Y e t t h e charge of madness was laid against him when his sister eventually made public his divine secret. M ad ness has b e e n imputed to all great men and women. Blake w a s deemed “m ad” for his visions. Balzac was regarded as “unbalanced” because his philosophical novels revealed the Spirit Pow er behind t h e world and within man. M o ses was thought to be “ insane” after his mystic communions with Jehovah. And the multitude had only one conclusion to hurl at the M a s te r Jesus— “T h o u hast a demon!” T h e prophets of old sought to learn the mystery of the universe through Cosmic Consciousness. O r what Plato, and others as great, named the Common M ind. Records in the Old Testam en t, and in numerous manuscripts written in the sublimest words by mystics of all nations and creeds, clearly reveal to us that man has ever sought one end— to receive an influx of the Divine Breath, to return to his original state of divinity. O n e most practical lesson is given us by all Illuminated minds— that the outer form hides the inner spirit. “T h e written W o r d is only an instrument wherewith the Spirit leads,” Jacob Boehme wrote. “T h e Spirit must be alive in the literal form. W it h o u t this there can be no divine teachers, but only teachers of letters, only reciters of stories.” Quoting mystic philosophers offers occasion for materialists to say we can­ not adhere to practical men and every­ day events. “Y o u cannot explain these things,” they maintain. “Y o u have no proofs to show us. R ath er talk of science, astronomy — such works we understand and c a n substantiate by concrete proofs.” S o most of us fondly believe.......... But are we able to prove how light travels at its incredible speed, and how it takes only eight and one-half minutes to come to us f r o m the sun, across a
F o u r H undred F ifty -tw o

distance of ninety-two million miles? A re we able to discuss with sound logic the giant star Antares, which is said to be four hundred million miles in dia­ meter, and why some stars have a tem­ perature of five to ten times the heat of the sun? W h y , for instance, are some of the chief stars hidden from our telescopic sight by vaporous clouds, like veils hid­ ing a holy of holies? Scientists state that the centre star of all lies within the clouds of the M ilky W a y — that ring of light extending around the universe of stars in which millions of suns are said to whirl and swim. If we could, f o r one moment, penetrate the mysterious Sc o r p io -S a g ittarius region we could find out m a n y n e w T ru th s, perhaps coming across Pascal's "point qui remplit tou t" T o w ard the end of his days, after a lifetime’s study of t h e Hidden M y s ­ teries, G eorges Clemenceau w r o t e down , in Au Soir de la P en see, the co n ­ clusions he had come to. “W e hear of stellar s t r e a m s and galaxies and, as if overwhelmed in tempests of flaming oceans, we are lost at the outer edge of our M ilk y W a y , which, amid the luminous encounters of its innumerable suns, perhaps conceals the enigma of a superior Cosmic C o n ­ ception. . . . T h e activity of the atom is not less marvellous t h a n that of the M ilk y W a y . T h e story o f a grain of sand is as important as that of A n tares — as is the adventure of a flower, the adventure of a world, or of a thought.” Before seeking to find a solution to the M y ste ry in the distant heavens, each man ought to know himself. A s yet he knows so little that the world re­ ceived a shock when P ro fesso r R obert A. Millikan started to speak of Cosmic Rays. T he G reat Design, edited by F ran cis M ason, is a book all self-thinking people should read. It contains various articles by our foremost men of science on va­ rious branches o f research. E a c h piece is of tremendous interest; not so much for the erudition contained therein, but for the one dominating T ru th each scientist stresses in summing up his

“ It is a universe, in my belief,” said R obert G ran t Aitken, former D irector of the Lick O bservatory, “ with thought and more than thought within it; a uni­ verse that is the expression o f the

thought o f an immanent infinite Spirit."
“W h e n there is creation, there is pur­ pose. W h e n there has once been pur­ pose, there may be a continuation of purpose, or a recurrence of purpose. S o also if there was o n c e creation there m ay be a continuation or a fresh crea­ tion. Eliminate purpose, and there is no

creation and no beginning to the physi­ cal universe." — ( A . S . Eve, M c G ill U n i­
versity, M o n tre a l.) Again, from the same book: “ R a d ia ­ tion can be fully described in the sym­ bolic language of mathematics, a n d though our mind can only form partial and imperfect pictures of it, we k n o w that in it and behind it there are reason and order." — (Jam e s Arnold Crow ther, Professor of Physics, University o f R ead in g .) W h a t the world is eagerly accepting today, it derided as madness less than a century ago, w h e n B alzac alluded to similar thoughts, gleaned from his occult studies.

"T ou t ici-bas n'existe que par le m ouvement et le nom bre " — Everything
on earth exists only by motion a n d number.

"L e m ouvement est en quelque sorte le nom bre agissant" — M otion is, so to
speak, number in action.

"II est un nom bre que Vimpur ne franchit pas, le nom bre ou la creation est fin ie’’— T h e r e is a number beyond
which the impure cannot pass; the num­ ber which is the limit of creation.

"L'univers est don e la variete dan Vunite. L e m ouvem ent est le moyen, le nom bre est le resultat. L a fin est le retour d e toutes choses a Vunite qui est D ieu" — T h e universe is the U n it in
variety. M otion is the means; number, the result. T h e end is the return of all things to the Unit, which is God. W e might do well to regard P la t o ’s statement in his P haedru s on the F irst M ovem ent. A lso his doctrine of the F a ll of M a n from a divine state, and his insistence that all kn ow ledge lies within man, that the fosterings of memory and

treatise: that there is a Suprem e M ind behind all U niversal L ife.
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imagination unlock the doors leading to the inner world of light. A ncient bibles r e f e r to Light as E n erg y . E n e rg y creates. Light gives life. O u r creations, our thoughts, are the results of transmissions of Cosmic Light. A n expansion o f consciousness be­ stows on the seeker a Universal knowl­ edge, in which reside the Past, Present and Future of all things. O u r ideas spring from distorted use of this grander consciousness. Electrons are directed by M ind and form matter. T h e G reek for form also means idea. O u r own mode o f thinking brings about results. T h u s M in d is all-powerful. T o M in d and to Radiation space does not exist. W e are able to gaze at one star then, in the fraction of a second, at another billions of miles distance. Y e t our M ind receives both impressions instantly. T h e microcosmic being of man holds the solution of the Hidden M ysteries! “ M in d can be expanded to an y e x ­ tent. It is as wide and as boundless as cosmical space. But it is with a feeling of humiliation, chagrin, discomfiture and dismay that I have to confess that I have no trace of an idea what it is. I cannot begin to think about it. M a tte r could not have been formed even into atoms without preceding thought-forms. T h is because atoms possess forms and as many as there are chemical elements — phases of matter. Circles, squares, triangles, expressed in matter could not be without antecedent symbols or pat­ terns in M in d .” ( W ithin T he M ind M aze, Larkin) T h is has been the knowledge of every mystic. It cannot be sidetracked, or avoided. It overwhelms t h e human brain w i t h its inevitable presence and truth. W e cannot work at something un­ known. W e evolve, but we follow a Pattern, a Design. W e could not evolve into chaos, or out of it, since the world of spirit a l o n e actuates our everyday existence, and our existence f o r all The eternity. Rosicrucian W e are entering the G re a t A g e of Digest the world, when man will reach heights January in Art, Religion and Scien ce never be­ fore attained. It will be a period for the 1936

Superman to appear, in which we shall learn the secrets of our individual exist­ ence on earth. “ I want to teach man t h e sense of their existence, which is the superman, the lightning out of the dark cloud— m an.” T h u s spake Nietzsche. Beyond the fact that the G erman philosopher claimed to be the first to know the proper w ay out of blind life, we might one and all agree that, were he alive to­ day, he would see humanity in general stepping out o f its “dark cloud.” H e who surrenders himself to the T r u e M a n becomes master of Life and Nature. T h e world and nature do not overcome him, he rules them. “T h e r e is a voice which sets at naught the law of Nature, wrote Pascal. W h ic h probably led K an t to say: “ It sounds at first sing­ ular, but is none the less certain, that the understanding does not derive its laws from nature, but prescribes them to N a tu re .” M a n belongs to three worlds: his spirit comes from God, his soul from the constellation of astral elements, h i s body from the earth. In order therefore to discover the in­ finite world within, m an’s job, presum­ ably, is to overcome the earth, his outerself. B y overcoming such evil traits as G reed, E n v y and Selfishness, and work­ ing for the entire brotherhood of man­ kind, we find it easier to conquer the in­ fluence of the planets and the stars. In entering the world of the spirit we are again reaching our Original State. It does not mean flittering aw ay from earthly life. It helps us to use earthly life. If we choose to ignore form, we harm the spirit. Submitting to form as a medium for spirit, we attain Cosmic contact and are used by Cosmic P ow ­ ers as a fit channel for the W is d o m and E n e rg y needed in t h e continual up­ lifting of the human race. T h is is the essence of T r u e A stro ­ logy. T h e misguided all but worship the planetary system and the elements, be­ cause they have control over external nature. A strology is a v e r y ancient science, employed reverently by t h e highly spirited Druids. T r u e initiates studied only the inner planetary world of man; to them, A strology w a s a
F ou r H un dred F ifty -fo u r

sight. W i t h it we can see into all spiritual, not a material, science, such as is made of it today by the un­ things — from the centre outwardly. T h e refo re, may not t h e source of initiated. Fou rth Dimensional pow er rest within “T h e re is in man," Albertus M ag n u s the Spiritual S p ark of the T r u e M a n ? states in one of his numerous manu­ scripts on man and the macrocosm, “a Consequently, if the Fou rth D im en­ double spring of action, namely, nature sion refers to microcosmic magnitude, to and the will; and nature for its part is the infinite infinitesmal in us, are we ruled by the stars, while the will is free; starting off at the right end by studying but unless it result it is swept along by the planets and the stars as things nature a n d b e c o m e s mechanical.” actually outside ourselves? (M agic and E xperim ental Science, by “ U ndoubtedly our eye does not see a Lynn Thorndike, Ph. D .) great m a n y things w h i c h exist,” Abel is the spiritual man, Cain the O uspensky tells us, in A N ew M odel o f material self. O r, M ind behind the uni­ the U niverse. “ But if in the fourth verse. T h e killing o f Abel symbolizes dimension we see without t h e aid of the ultimate decision of man in regard such an imperfect instrument, we should to his Fall, when he foresook the spirit be bound to see much more, that is, to for the form . T h e church of Abel was see what is invisible for us now and to similarly destroyed by t h e church of see everything without that net of il­ Cain, when it was forced on mankind lusions which veils the whole world as being the s o l e idea of religious from us and makes its outward aspect heights. T h e outer church, like the out­ very unlike w hat it really is.” er man, was accepted for the true inner In the ancient continents of Lemuria realm. and Atlantis mankind still possessed a W e need our churches for w hat they “third” eye— what we allude to now as are— earthly temples in which to com­ “the mind’s ey e.” T h is “third” eye mune, the symbol of the Inner Tem ple, enabled them to put to use their fourth wherein the Divine F ire may enter in dimensional faculty. all its supernal glory. A place where “T h o u g h the number of people was man may come to T r u e life in mortality. formerly much less, they nevertheless Herein we h a v e the allegory of the filled the world more than is the case Blood and B o d y of Christ. today. F o r a man, then, was not only “ E a t of the word of the Lord and you confined to the space which was given will issue from the earthly man and rest to him as the field of his body and his in the kingdom of heaven; live in the activity, he reached beyond: his career new man and then the old one will be led beyond the field of his corporeal dead for the sake of the new .” position and into new space, and this T h e Christ-man consumes his ma­ other space, in which his career unfold­ terial body in the Divine F ire of his re­ ed itself, also belonged to the man, so generated self. T h e Everlasting water that the man grew as it w ere out of of life is the continual influx of Cosmic space and into time. Such a man did not Consciousness. T h e church symbolical­ need to hurry in order to possess distant ly offers this mystical truth in H o ly space, he filled out that space from Communion. where he was, and even though he rest­ W h y has it been usual to close our ed in comfort, he filled out that space eyes during prayer? M y stic teachers and at the proper moment would cer­ taught all neophytes that the inner sight tainly be brought there. H e could re­ of the T ru e M a n is the only real sight. main waiting in time, concealed until M oses could not behold the face of G od the proper moment. In the proper because his knowledge and enlighten­ moment he would certainly be th ere." ment were but reflections of Divine (T h e Human F ace, by M a x Picard .) W isd o m . His spiritual self could not W o r ld l y knowledge is of things we see itself, save with the inner sight. see. T r u e knowledge can never be T o d a y we talk much of the Fourth learnt by mere physical sight and mun­ Dimension, though it remains still a dane understanding. T o seek the other mystery. It is the vision of our inner life, the Inner W o r ld , man has but to
Fou r H undred F ifty -fiv e

study himself. W e can follow an out­ line of steps for our advancement, to set our feet firmly on the Path, but none may g a i n inner wisdom except it be born within, since Cosmic Conscious­ ness comes only from the Divine M y s ­ tery. (Jo h n 6 : 6 3 - 6 6 ) “W h y is it,’’ O uspensky further asks us, “that people do not understand that they are only shadows, only silhouettes, of themselves, and t h a t the whole of life is only a shadow, only a silhouette, of some other life?" O n November 4, 1930, at Cambridge University, Sir James Jeans delivered what is known as the R ede Lecture. In it he discussed the destiny of the human race, o u r present standing of science and the meaning of the universe. H e maintained that it does not work on anthropomorphic, or on mechanical lines, but on lines that are purely ma­ thematical. H e gave his conception of the U niverse as “ a world o f pure

thought
M an kind is fascinated by the mystery of the universe. In 1920, t h e M o u n t W il s o n observatory h a d a 100-inch telescope. T h e world heard of it and gasped. Five years ago, a new telescope was being prepared for the California Institute of T e ch n o lo g y , at Pasadena, with a 200-in ch aperture. Another gasp shook the world. Som e stars are so v a s t in size that hundreds of thousands of earths could be packed inside each one; while the larger stars contain room for millions o f millions of earths. T r y in g to visualize the distance between t h e m in space stuns the poor little human thinker! A wireless signal will girdle the earth in the seventh o f a second. If t h e r e w e r e means of communications, we could send and get a message from M a r s in a few minutes. But it would take 2 8 0 million years to g e t a reply from those distant nebulae! T h o u g h there are some 3 0 ,0 0 0 mil­ lion stars surrounding t h e sun, our “blindness” lets us see only 6,00 0. W e

are too “blind” to see m ore than one star in five million! “T h e y are so remote,” s t a t e s Sir James Jeans, “ t h a t light travelling at 1 86 ,0 0 0 miles every second, takes 140 million years to travel from them to us. W e see them not as they are, but as they w e r e inconceivable ages before man appeared on e arth .” T h e new star, N ova Pictoris, which flared up into existence in the southern hemisphere in 1925, seems to have split in two. T h o u g h t h i s catastrophe occured 5 0 0 years ago, the light rays sent across space reached earth only re­ cently! I can see t h e gilded domes of t h e Griffith O bservatory. It is in t h i s “T h e a tre of the U niverse” that scien­ tists of the present day will expand m an’s mind with results achieved from experiments of the heavenly bodies. Y e t — despite all latest devised instruments — are we a b l e to tell whether worlds beyond us really exist, or are only ghostly pictures of planets long passed out o f existence, imprinted on the im­ measurable abyss of Space? W e do not know— we do not k n o w . . . B u t the D aw n of t h e N e w A g e is once again to flame on the horizon of our intellect. T h e world is to become young again. It has gone through ages o f torment and conflict. Its period o f rejuvenation, of rebirth, is nearly com­ plete. O n c e more the stars must rest between our eyes. T h e constellation in man will illuminate the darkness within him; the Light of a grander conscious­ ness will give forth the mighty music of the spheres in the vast, unexplored halls o f his own being, so that supreme hap­ piness will spring from each mortal on earth. In all our seeking , let us seek for the M in d that is behind the universe— the Divine M y s t e r y within us that longs for our seeking. In that search alone lies our regeneration, our further advance­ ment in Cosmic evolution.

The Rosicrucian Digest January 1936

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JOHN FISKE
E E E § § E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E Each month we w ill present excerpts from the w ritin gs o f famous thinkers and teachers o f the past. These w ill give our readers an opportunity o f know ing their lives through the presentation o f those w ritin gs which ty p ify their thoughts. Occasionally such w ritin gs w ill be presented through the translation or interpretations o f other eminent authors o f the past. John Fiske, the Am erican historian and philosopher, was born in H artford, Connecticut, on March 30. 1842. H e did not begin college very early in life and before entering he was w id ely read in E nglish literature, history, and ancient and modern languages. A fte r graduating at H arvard he continued to study languages and philosophy. H e had a great love fo r the latter subject. H e prepared him self fo r law— went tw o years to H arvard L a w School, and upon his graduation opened an office in Boston. But most o f his time was devoted to w ritin g fo r various periodicals. In 1869 he gave a course o f lectures at H arvard on the positive philosophy and delivered some th irty-five lectures on the doctrine o f evolution, which he afterward expanded and which became the "O utlines o f Cosmic P h ilo so p h y." Because o f the lucidity o f his style, he contributed much to Am erica's know ledge o f Darwin and Spencer. Perhaps his greatest contribution in the field o f literature was his demonstration that religion and the doctrine o f evolution were not, as believed, incompatible. H e died in Gloucester. Massachusetts, on July 4, 1901. H e spent the m a jority o f his life in Cambridge. W e find that his philosophy follow s m ainly along m ystical and metaphysical lines— that is, although his subject or topic may be o f physical nature, the trend 13 tow ard the mystical. Below w e b rin g you some excerpts from his w orks which we feel certain w ill prove most interesting to you.

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R E G A R D S the sig n ifica n ce o f M a n ’s position in the universe, this g r a d u a l elimina­ tion of strife is a fact of utterly un­ p a r a l l e l e d g ran ­ deur. W o r d s ca n ­ not do justice to s u c h a f a c t . It m e a n s that the ________________ wholesale destruc­ tion of life, which has heretofore characterized evolution ever since life began, and through which the higher forms of organic existence have been produced, must presently come to an end in the case of the chief of G o d ’s creatures. It means that the universal struggle for existence, having
F o u r H un dred F i[ty -sev en

S

succeeded in bringing forth that con­ summate product of creative energy, the Human Soul, has done its work and will presently cease. In the lower regions of organic life it must go on, but as a de­ termining factor in the highest work of evolution it will disappear. T h e action o f natura] selection upon M a n has long since been essentially diminished through the operation of social conditions. F o r in all grades of civilization above the lowest, “ there are so many kinds of superiorities which severally enable men to survive, not­ withstanding accompanying inferior­ ities, that natural selection cannot by it­ self rectify any particular unfitness.” In a race of inferior animals any m aladjust­ ment is quickly removed by natural selection, because, owing to the uni­ versal slaughter, the highest complete­

ness of life possible to a given grade of organization is required for the mere maintenance of life. But under the con­ ditions surrounding human develop­ ment it is otherwise. T h e r e is a wide interval between the highest and lowest degrees of completeness of living that are compatible with maintenance of life. H ence the wicked flourish. V ic e is but slowly eliminated, because mankind has so many other qualities, beside the bad ones, which enable it to subsist and achieve progress in spite o f them, that natural selection— which always works through death— cannot come into play. T h e improvement o f civilized man goes on mainly through processes of direct adaptation. T h e principle in accordance with which the gloved hand of the dandy becomes white and soft while the hand of the labouring man grows brown and tough is the main principle at work in the improvement of Humanity. O u r intellectual faculties, our passions and prejudices, our tastes and habits, b e ­ come strengthened by use and w eak ­ ened by disuse, just as the blacksmith’s arm grows strong and the horse turned out to pasture becomes unfit for work. T h is law of use and disuse has been of immense importance throughout the whole evolution of organic life. W i t h M a n it has come to be paramount. If now we contrast the civilized man intellectually and morally with the sav­ age, we find that, along with his vast increase of cerebral surface, he has an immensely greater power of represent­ ing in imagination objects and relations not present to the senses. T h is is the fundamental intellectual difference b e ­ tween civilized men and savages. T h e power of imagination, or ideal repre­ sentation, underlies the wrhole of science and art, and it is closely connected with the ability to work hard and submit to present discomfort for the sake of a distant reward. It is also closely con­ nected with the development of the sympathetic feelings. T h e better we can imagine objects and relations not pres­ ent to sense, the more readily w e can sympathize with other people. H a lf the cruelty in the world is the direct result The Rosicrucian of stupid incapacity to put o n e’s self in the other m an’s place. S o closely inter­ Digest related are our intellectual and moral January natures that the development of sym­ pathy is very considerably determined 1936

by increasing width and variety of e x ­ perience. F rom the simplest form of sympathy, such as the painful thrill felt on seeing some one in a dangerous posi­ tion, up to the elaborate complication of altruistic feelings involved in the notion o f abstract justice, the development is very largely a development of the repre­ sentative faculty. T h e very same causes, therefore, deeply grounded in the nature of industrial civilization, which have developed science and art, have also had a distinct tendency to encourage the growth of the sym­ pathetic emotions. But, as already observed, these emo­ tions are still too feebly developed, even in the highest races of men. W e have made more progress in intelligence than in kindness. F o r thousands of genera­ tions, and until very recent times, one of the chief occupations of men has been to plunder, bruise, and kill one another. T h e selfish and ugly passions which are primordial— which have the incalculable strength of inheritance from the time when animal consciousness began— have had but little opportunity to grow weak from disuse. T h e tender and un­ selfish feelings, which are a later pro­ duct of evolution, have too seldom been allowed to grow strong from exercise. A n d the whims and prejudices of the primeval militant barbarism are slow in dying out from the midst of peaceful industrial civilization. T h e coarser forms of cruelty are disappearing, and the butchery of men has greatly diminished. B u t most people apply to industrial pur­ suits a notion of antagonism derived from ages of w arfare, and seek in all manner of w ays to cheat or overreach one another. And as in more barbarous times the hero was he who had slain his tens of thousands, so now the man who has made wealth b y overreaching his neighbours is not uncommonly spoken o f in terms which imply approval. T h o u g h gentlemen, moreover, no longer assail one another with knives and clubs, they still inflict wounds with cruel words and sneers. T h o u g h the free­ thinker is no longer chained to a stake and burned, people still tell lies about him, and do their best to starve him by hurting his reputation. T h e virtues of forbearance and self-control are still in a very rudimentary state, and of mutual
F o u r H undred F ifty -eig h t

helpfulness there is far too little among men. Nevertheless in all these respects some improvement has been made, along with the diminution of w arfare, and by the time w arfa re has not merely ceased from the earth but has come to be the dimly remembered phantom of a remote past, the development of the sympathetic side of human nature will doubtless become prodigious. T h e mani­ festation of selfish and hateful feelings will be more and more sternly repressed by public opinion, and such feelings will become weakened by disuse, while the sympathetic feelings will increase in strength as the sphere for their exercise is enlarged. A s thus at length we see what human progress means. It means throwing off the brute-inheritance,— gradually throwing it off through ages of struggle that are by and by to make struggle needless. M a n is slowly pass­ ing from a primitive social state in which he was little better than a brute, toward an ultimate social state in which his character shall have become so trans­ formed that nothing of the brute can be detected in it. T h e ape and the tiger in human nature will become extinct. T heolo gy has had much to say about original sin. T h is original sin is neither more nor less than the brute-inheritance which every man carries with him, and the process of evolution is an advance toward true salvation. F resh value is thus added to human life. T h e modern prophet, employing the methods of science, may again proclaim that the kingdom of heaven is a t hand. W o r k ye, therefore, early and late, to prepare its coming.

T he M essage o f Christianity
N o w what is this message of the modern prophet but pure Christianity? — not the mass of theological doctrine ingeniously piled up by Justin M a r ty r and Tertullian and Clement and A t h ­ anasius and Augustine, but the real and essential Christianity w h i c h came, fraught with good tidings to men, from the very lips of Jesus and Paul! W h e n did St. P a u l’s conception of the two men within him that warred against each other, the appetites of our brute nature and the God-given yearning for
Fou r H un dred F ifty-n in e

a higher life,— when did this grand con­ ception ever have so much significance as now? W h e n have we ever before held such a clew to the meaning of C hrist in the Sermon on the M ount? “Blessed are the meek, for they shall in­ herit the earth." In the cruel strife of centuries has it not often seemed as if the earth were to be rather the prize of the hardest heart and the strongest fist? T o many men these words of C hrist have been as foolishness and as a stum­ bling-block, and the ethics of the S e r ­ mon on the M o u n t have been openly derided as too good for this world. In that wonderful picture of modern life which is the greatest work of one of the great seers of our time, V ic to r H ugo gives a concrete illustration of the work­ ing of C h rist’s methods. In the saint­ like career of Bishop M yriel, and in the transformation which his example works in the character of the hardened outlaw Jean V a lje a n , we have a most powerful commentary on the Sermon on the M ount. B y some critics who could ex ­ press their views freely about “Les M ise ra b le s” while hesitating to impugn directly the authority of the N e w T e s t a ­ ment, M onseigneur Bienvenu was un­ sparingly ridiculed as a man of impos­ sible goodness, and as a milksop and fool withal. B u t I think V ic to r H u go understood the capabilities of human nature, and its real dignity, much better than these scoffers. In a low stage of c i v i l i z a t i o n M onseigneur Bienvenu would have had small chance of reach ­ ing middle life. C hrist himself, we re­ member, was crucified between two thieves. It is none the less true that when once the degree of civilization is such as to allow this highest type of character, distinguished b y its meekness and kindness, to take root and thrive, its methods are incomparable in their potency. T h e M a s te r knew full well that the time was not yet ripe,— that he brought not peace, but sword. But he preached nevertheless that gospel of great jo y which is by and by to be real­ ized by toiling Humanity, and he an ­ nounced ethical principles fit for the time that is coming. T h e great original­ ity of his teaching, and the feature that has chiefly given it power in the world, lay in the distinctness with which he
(C on tin u ed on P a g e 476)

Oblivion
CAN LIFE’S REALITIES BE DROWNED IN ALCOHOL? By M a d e l e i n e L e w is
L C O H O L I S M is an escape for the man who requires a co m p en sato ry m e c h a n i s m to cover up his in­ ability to become adjusted to real­ ity. A drinker, it is said, is w eak— but does his w eakn e s s lie in his fon d n ess for drink? I do not think the typical “boozer” drinks be­ cause he wants to, but rather, because he c a n ’t meet an emotional problem; he is seeking compensation for some lack in his own personality. N o man can long feel that he is in­ adequate to life and that his existence is unworthy without rebelling. O n e real value drink has to the man who has re­ belled is that of stimulating him— bring­ ing an elevation of spirits — drowning “sorrow s” (m erely problem s he is un­ able to [a ce like a m an), and freeing his mind from an xiety — that anxiety which encouraged the drink! E xcluding the man who is made intoxicated by his friends as the carrying out of a jest, other forms o f drinking all can be con­ tributed to that desire to escape ad just­ ment to reality. A man goes into the The Rosicrucian business world and finds he is not a good business man and that he cannot Digest attain self-worthwhileness; he substi­ January tutes that attainment with a steady a t­ tack on the whiskey bottle! T h e drunk­ 1936 ard comes to use as his explanation of his alcoholism a chain of circumstances BLA M ED ON SO M E O N E ELSE, rather than frankly admit he is unable to face his problems and must escape reality by the “drink route.” T o fight the conflict within himself does not oc­ cur to the drunkard. T H I S is where the real weakness lies, no doubt, for it is so very much easier for the weak man to form the habit of drink than to turn to the intricate alternative. W illiam James wrote with unerring discernment: “T h e reason for craving alcohol is that it is an anaesthetic. It ob­ literates a part of the field of con­ sciousness and abolishes collateral trains of thought.” A n d isn’t James right? Even though alcohol might afford T E M P O R A R Y relief or escape from reality, it slackens the higher, more complicated mental functions and takes aw ay man's cool power of reasoning. It S U B M E R G E S

the better self.
If man drinks as a substitute, w hy does he not find some legitimate means of giving the rebellious desires an op­ portunity to expend themselves and their stimulated energies in the quest of an improving outlet? M a n C A N do without drink; man can C O N Q U E R drink. F irst of all, he should have the right belief. B y that I mean renuncia­ tion of all that he knows at his sober times to be wrong, together with an understanding of the fundamental prin­ ciples guiding us in life— and in society. Resolution comes second, and resolution
F o u r H un dred S ixty

would come as a natural result of right B E L I E F . Following B E L I E F and R E ­ S O L U T IO N would come conduct. This, too, would follow the above in natural sequence — forbidding him to conduct himself other than in a manner which would uplift him — and in the end gain for him the things he sought to compensate for in his drink. T h is would mean what Benjam in interprets or de­ fines as the “right means of subsistence" — (th e giving up of the wrong and the finding of a right method.) And, lastly, there is the right effort — the right effort by which man works energetically to overcome his faults (meaning those which have pulled him down to drink and not the habit of drinking itself) and develop his good qualities. If he will do this he will not find it necessary to seek a compensatory or substitutive method of activity.

In devising a solution to the problem it is important to guard against selfdeception as to the C A U S E of drink­ ing— making no weak mental apologies to oneself— and then seek to analyze the forces involved. T h e drinker should keep the solution or situation free from self-pity and emotion throughout. H e should look at the problem O B J E C ­ T IV E L Y . A fte r analyzing himself and finding the E X A C T reason or reasons for his drinking of alcohol, the “b oozer” should find a N E W outlet and persistently undertake to make something B E T T E R o f himself— rise to the point where he has sufficient S E L F - R E S P E C T for himself not to find it necessary to drink as a substitute for the things he T H I N K S he can not be, but which I think he truly just R E F U S E S T O B E . S 1#

ANCIENT SYMBOLISM
v

[« •

Man, when conscious of an eternal truth, has ever sym bolized It so that the human consciousness could forever have realization o f it. Nations, languages and customs have changed, but these ancient designs continue to illum inate mankind with their m ystic light. F o r those who are seeking light, each month we w ill reproduce a symbol or symbols, w ith their ancient meaning.

THE W R EA T H A N D T O R C H

The wreath and torch generally repre­ sent death and victory. Usually, how­ ever, the inverted flameless torch is em blem atic of death and the laurel of victory. Very many of the early converts to C hristianity were from among the socalled pagans. Their early training in­ fluenced their ideas afte r conversion. They were fam iliar with many of the emblems of the G reeks and used them with new ideas in their religion. These emblems are from the early G reeks. W e do not know of any two emblems which are more expressive of their significance than these two. The early Christians used the symbol to d e ­ pict life and peace, death and victory through Jesus, the C h rist. Since that time the torch and wreath have been used separately to convey many other meanings.

Fou r H undred S ix ty -o n e

SUMMARIES «/ OF SCIENCE

Each hour o f the day finds the men o f science cloistered in laboratories without ostentation, in vestigatin g nature's m ysteries and extending the boundaries of knowledge. T h e w orld at large, although profiting by th eir labors, oftentim es is deprived o f the pleasure o f review in g their work, since general periodicals and publications announce only those sensational discoveries which appeal to the popular im agination. I t is w ith pleasure, therefore, that we afford our readers a m onthly summary o f some o f these scientific researches, and b rie fly relate them to the Rosicrucian philosophy and doctrines. T o the Science Journal, unless otherwise specified, we give fu ll credit fo r all m atter which appears in quotations.

Is the Earth’s Center Cooling?

T W A S considered, up to about two c e n t u r i e s ago, neither w i s e nor tactful to publicly voice the opinion that our earth, in fact the universe, had existence be­ yond 20 0 0 B. C. T h is arbitrary age was e s t a b l i s h e d upon an interpre­ tation of Scripture, and any questioning of the soundness of that conventional idea w as to put oneself in the position of challenging the word of God. O n ly in scientific circles were the facts of nature looked upon in their true light, and the incon­ The Rosicrucian sistencies between evident realities and traditional ideas discussed freely; but Digest then scientists were all thought to be January either atheists or agents of the evil forces, and from whom most any start­ 1936

ling opposition to the accepted doctrines was to be expected but never to be be­ lieved. T h e intelligent thinker could never reconcile vestiges of civilizations and culture which gave every appear­ ance of having had existence for several thousands of years, with the conven­ tional age of the earth. Ruins of cities visible on the su rface which were identi­ fied with incidents in the Bible were found by archeologists to have beneath them foundations of two or three other cities one below the other, antedating the visible one by thousands of years. Furthermore, scientific expeditions e x ­ cavated well-preserved skeletal remains of man in strata formations which indis­ putably were formed thousands of years prior to 2 0 0 0 B. C. O n ce, however, religion was forced to admit by the weight of authority that the earth’s age far exceeded the con­ jectures of Biblical interpreters, imagi­ nation ran rampant and the opposite ex ­ treme in unscientific circles was reached.
F o u r H un dred S ix ty -tw o

Popular magazines and even new s­ papers ventured the opinion that the earth in all probability was the parent of our immediate universe, that it hurled from its mass all of our m ajor planets, even the sun itself. T h e o ries and hy­ potheses were offered in explanation of how this was accomplished, and though all of it made most highly interesting reading, it was also highly unscientific. However, even science speculated, tak­ ing the known upon which to base her suppositions of the unknown. In the 19th century gravity was considered by science the greatest terrestrial force. Everything concerning the earth— its position, speed, composition and con­ stancy— was attributed to it. T h e e x ­ planations were satisfying until within the last fifty years when new develop­ ments and discoveries revealed that other forces were responsible for much formerly associated with gravity. T h is, of course, was disconcerting, requiring further investigation along new lines, and resulted in a new theory for the origin of the earth and its nature. T h is new theory was elucidated by the emi­ nent Professor Bailey W illis before the Pacific Division of the American A s s o ­ ciation for the Advancement of Scien ce recently. T h e following is an excerpt from this most interesting address which w e b e ­ lieve Rosicrucian students and their friends will find instructive: “In the meantime our knowledge of conditions in the interior of the earth has grown apace. T h o s e swift and penetrating scouts, the elastic waves from earthquake shocks, bring word of the conditions they have encountered in coursing through the depths or in traversing an outer shell. From them we learn that the going is good a n y ­ where between the surface and a depth of 1,770 miles ( 2 ,8 5 0 k m ). Rocks to that depth are highly elastic. B ut be­ yond is something different. T h e y can not get through the central sphere, the substance of which is inelastic. “W e have no word to describe a state of matter which is characterized by inelasticity except we say fluid. B ut the core of the earth— for that is what the sphere in question is— is so dense and so stiff that ‘fluid’ conveys a false notion of mobility. T h e material is
Four H undred S ix ty -th rec

nearly as heavy as lead, probably flows much less easily and is supposed to co n­ sist chiefly of nickel, iron and other heavy elements. T h e inelastic condi­ tion of such substances is attributable, so far as our experience goes, only to melting, and a molten condition under the enormous pressure of the interior requires very high temperature. Hence we may conclude that the core is very hot. “ H o w did the core become so hot? H ere we begin to speculate less surely, and the paths of thought diverge b ack ­ wards as well as forwards. If we in­ cline to follow the astronomers and mathematical physicists, who argue that the globe once passed through a com­ pletely molten condition, w e may recog­ nize in the molten core of the earth a residual body which has never cooled. O r, if we think, as Chamberlin did, that the globe was solid from the beginning of its growth as a planet, we may reason that the interior has become heated by compression by gravity or that it has grown hotter through the disintegration of radioactive elements. “T h e assumption that the globe was once wholly molten is still generally a c ­ cepted, though it is no longer so im­ perative as it seemed to be before radio­ active heating was recognized. It ap­ peared to get a setback when L. H. Adam s suggested that an y crust which had formed by cooling of the surface must sink into the lighter melt and a c ­ cumulate in the depths, so that the globe would solidify from within outward. B ut even so, the depth to which blocks of crust might sink would be limited by still heavier, though molten layers, and the core might become enclosed in a solid shell, as it now is. I see no cogent objection to that view, although I do think C ham berlin’s analysis o f the con­ ditions attending the separation of the earth from the sun was more complete and accurate than that which leads astronomers to infer a molten globe in lieu of the solid one that he conceived. But that is another question. T h e molten core may be a residual molten body, en­ closed in an outer shell that is thick enough to have prevented the escape of heat, or it may have been so supplied with heat by compression and feeble radioactivity that any escaping energy

was replaced and the body has not been cooled. “O n the other hand, if the globe a s­ sembled by the gathering of sun~dust according to C ham berlin’s planetesimal hypothesis, the core presumably co n ­ sisted of heavy elements, among which radium and other radioactive substances would be expected to occur. W h a t e v e r its initial size might have been and how­ ever small the proportion o f heat gen­ erators, the temperature of the central body would be raised after it had be­ come sufficiently mantled to prevent escape of heat as fast as it accumulated, and a molten condition would eventual­ ly ensue. It appears from the estimates of Holmes, Joly and Jeffries that the two thousand million years which the solid earth surely counts would have afforded quite sufficient time to melt the core. A n y such calculation is, of course, a guess, for we can assume such a pro­ portion of radioactive elements as will nicely have done the work, or we can assume less favorable conditions. T h e essential fact is that the melting can be attributed entirely to radioactivity with­ out postulating improbabilities. “W h a t e v e r the past may have been, I regard it as probable that the melting process has not ceased in the interior. T h e reason for thinking that it continues is the sharpness of the boundary that separates the core from the elastic shell which surrounds it. E arth q u ak e waves of the elastic type locate the limit to which they can penetrate and beyond which they fade aw ay into the inelastic core within 12 to 20 miles ( 2 0 to 30 k m ). T h a t is to say, they fix the radius of the core within 1 per cent. Inside of that very thin transition shell is a molten sphere. O utside of it is the mantle of highly elastic, solid rock. T h e latter is no doubt hot, but not melted. T h e con­ dition can not be a stable one. T h e dy­ namic core is either losing or gaining heat, is either shrinking or increasing in diameter.

continued remelting of sunken blocks would in time solidify an outer shell, while the interior would cool very slow­ ly. W e may be observing a stage of that process. “ O n the other hand, if the globe had a smaller molten core originally or had initially been entirely solid but co n­ tained a small proportion of radioactive elements, the continued generation of heat would melt it from within outward. It is not necessary to suppose the heat­ ing elements uniformly distributed. F o ci o f energy would develop local bodies which would eventually coalesce. A molten interior, such as we observe, would result.”

Migrating Continents
T h o u g h at times we are confronted with experiences such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions a n d tidal waves, which prove the unstability of mother earth, our faith in the earth ’s security is not shaken, for these catastrophies are of minor consequence in comparison with the passivity of the majority of our glo be’s surface in our lifetime. It is dif­ ficult for us to conceive our earth as having been at one time a molten mass, rhythmically rolling without spray or lash, fogged in gasses, a substance de­ void of life or solids. It even stretches the imagination to visualize walls of glistening blue white ice hundreds of feet high and several thousand miles wide ceaselessly moving southward, crushing into an impalpable form all that resisted it, and plow-like gouging new courses for rivers, routing out basins for stupendous lakes; yet about us are evidences of these occurrences. In the heart o f the city o f Los Angeles, California, in the center of a square block of park surrounded by modern buildings and thoroughfares upon which travel thousands of motor cars daily, is located the famous La B rea asphalt pits. It is declared from these pits have been removed within the last few years more fossilized remains of prehistoric animals than from any other place in the world. From these natural pools of asphalt have been taken skele­ tal remains o f saber-tooth tigers, dire wolves, elephants, extinct species of
F o u r H un dred S ixty-fou r

The Rosicrucian Digest January 1936

“T o explain this actual condition there are the two distinct lines of inference already suggested. Startin g with a molten earth we may imagine the blocks of crust sinking to a certain depth, re­ melting there and thus absorbing heat. Continued formation of the crust and

antelope, camel, bison and horses. All of which became bogged in this glue­ like mass. D rawn by the helplessness of the larger beasts which were fran­ tically trying to free themselves, others in their greed plunged in to devour the victims, and in the ensuing struggle themselves were drawn downward to be preserved from the Pleistocene A g e until today. A s we peer down into these pits and examine the preserved frag ­ ments of flora and fauna taken from them, and which today in their natural state are either extinct or only exist in a section of the world that is extremely different in climate, topography and vegetation, we reflect upon what this region, now a great city, must have been like fifty thousand years ago when these things flourished, when this site was their natural habitat. It seems incon­ ceivable that such great changes could have taken place, that the very clods of oily black, nearly pure asphalt, which we weigh in our hand, were there for five hundred centuries and witnessed a transformation which we can only sur­ mise. Ancient civilizations, as we know of them, seem by comparison only yesterday. W i t h all of these proofs, yet there are those who today vehemently deny that at some past time there existed conti­ nents now not visible to the eye, as great if not greater than some of ours today, or that those now existing could ever cease to be. T h e y base their con­ tentions upon the fact that in the written records of man or in his memory no such thing has ever occurred. W h a t a pitiful argument! T h e written records of man and even the memory o f man is but a tick of the clock that measures the time of the earth’s existence. W h a t has happened before, we can only surmise; and what may happen in a future fur­ ther off than the past, challenges our most exaggerated speculations. T h a t such great catastrophies did o c­ cur and are not beyond recurrence, only the mentally blind cannot see. Science today has found unmistakable evidence of migration of continents and is proving that our present land surface is due to such movements eons ago. W e bring to you below an excerpt from a discussion of this subject written
Fou r H undred S ix ty F iv e

by G eorge W . M u n ro of Purdue U n i­ versity and which concurs with the Rosicrucian opinion of this matter. “Continental migration is an episode to be compared with a volcanic eruption or m ajor lava flow. Its occasion is an unusual combination of accumulated thermal potential energy and w orld­ wide catastrophe. T h a t it has occurred not more than twice in two thousand million years entitles it to be classified as rare; we may not look for another continental scattering soon. “T h o u g h much time has elapsed since the Atlantic O cean was formed, we still should be able to discern some evidence of such a world-shaking event. T h r e e items of such corroborative support are offered: ( 1 ) T h e mid-Atlantic swell; ( 2 ) the Pacific foredeeps; ( 3 ) the G ulf of M ex ico . “T h e crystalline rock material of the earth crust is brittle; very brittle, as any stone mason's hammer will show. M oreover, earth movements have sh at­ tered the most of it to bits at one time or another, as can be directly observed in the marble and granite of our great buildings. T h i s clearly indicates that the fracture of a continent would be a t­ tended by vast crumbling. O f course, this crumbled material, being specifical­ ly lighter than the magma into which it tumbled, would form a swell or ridge in the A tlantic O c e a n bottom following the general line of fracture. T h a t there is such a swell in mid-Atlantic through­ out its extent is corroborative evidence of the migration and of its episodal na­ ture. “ If the continental masses moved over the Pacific area, riding down blocks of ocean bottom, it might reason­ ably be expected that as the continental motion ceased, the down-going blocks would be caught and jammed in places forming deep holes in the ocean bed. T h e foredeeps of the Pacific constitute precisely such a system, as might be expected. “T h e central position o f the midA tlantic swell indicates approximately equal masses of land in each of the traveling continents or an earlier stop­ page of the American side. T h e general absence of foredeeps off the American
(C on tin u ed on P a g e 476)

oAnalyzing T our SMental Tendencies
DO YOU THOROUGHLY UNDERSTAND THE NATURE OF YOUR COMPLEXES?
By T
he

Im perator V V their surroundings, through the ob­ stacles which their view-point creates and through the effect this has upon the use and application of their inner abilities. It may seem surprising to a great many to know that in a large majority of cases where we suspect that an in­ dividual is suffering from a sense of superiority, or a belief in his or her superiority, actually there is an inner sense on the part of the individual of his or her presumed inferiority, and the opposite is true also. In other words, the general idea re­ garding inferiority and superiority is quite erroneous, and because of this very few persons are able to properly assist others in overcoming these ten­ dencies. T h e r e are two causes which are gen­ erally responsible for most of the mental states we observe in other persons, and which we call inferiority and superior­ ity; one of these causes is suppressed desires, and the other is a broken or en ­ larged spirit. L et us take the example of a young woman born in humble circumstances, or with parents who were poor, or who abandoned her or left her at an early age, and who thereafter was raised in
F o u r H undred S ixty-six

V

S I read the m any letters that come to me from per­ sons seeking help in analyzing their personal affairs in life, and as I care­ fully s t u d y the l e t t e r s that are sent to us to be used as a basis of discussion in our Forum, and later p r i n t e d in our Forum magazine, I am aw are of the fact that a great many persons are suf­ fering from one complex or another, and do not realize this, and therefore make no attempt to overcome the diffi­ culty. Individuals seem to have the ability to recognize in another person any outer manifestations of inferiority complex, or superiority complex; but these same per­ sons seem to be unable to diagnose this condition in themselves. It is indeed un­ fortunate when an individual is suffer­ The ing from a mental state that is colored Rosicrucian by a sense of inferiority or superiority. Digest I use the word suffering very properly, January for such persons do suffer through the view-point they have of life, and of 1936

an asylum or by fond relatives who were also poor or in intermediate cir­ cumstances. T h ro u gh o u t her early childhood she is constantly reminded of the fact that she cannot have and can ­ not enjoy all of the things which other children of her age enjoy. If she is raised in an asylum for girls, she is taught by every impression registered upon her mind that she is inferior to the average child throughout the world in­ asmuch as, first of all, she does not have residence in the home of her parents, does not have the love and assistance of both parents, does not have the freedom of going and coming that the average child has, and does not have the cloth­ ing and playthings, the recreations, the indulgences and the contacts with cul­ ture and refinement which other children enjoy. T h ro u gh o u t her youth she learns to be subservient to the will of others. She learns to hold her own ideas, de­ sires, and wishes in abeyance and to submit to the routine life outlined for all the children around her. If she is not raised in an asylum, but in the home of a very poor family, she is impressed day by day in many w ays of the fact that she cannot have the same clothing, the same privileges, the same pleasures and indulgences that the neighbor's children have. B y the time this girl is a young woman she has learned in many bitter w ays that she is different from others inasmuch as she lacks the opportunities that others have, and lacks the background, the inherited qualities and attainments which other children enjoy. All of this will impress the young woman with a growing conviction of her inferiority. A t first she may feel that her inferiority is solely of exterior things, and that the inner self is the equal of any other person. S h e may feel that only in worldly possessions, or in special mental attributes or attain­ ments, education or refinements is she lacking or inferior, but gradually it dawns upon her that her outer worldly inferiority is due to some important de­ gree of personal inferiority. Sh e begins to believe in those secret, private mo­ ments of personal meditation that the poverty of her parents and the inferior life they led was due to their inferior mental abilities. T h e n she concludes
Four H un dred S ix ty -sev en

that since she inherited the blood and mental tendencies of her parents she, too, has probably inherited the basic in­ feriority of her parents, and that this added to the inferiority of her present environment, social position, incomplete education, and constant suppression of desires has made her an inferior being inwardly as well as outwardly. V e r y few of us can fully appreciate the ag on y and mental suffering of a per­ son young or old who reaches these conclusions and becomes convinced of his personal inferiority. It is so basic, so fundamental, so deep-rooted, that taking such a young woman and placing her in a better environment and giving her better clothes, money to spend, a t­ tractive companions, and the many un­ usual opportunities, will not quickly or completely change the inner habits of thinking and the established sense of inferiority. In many cases the very fact that others are trying to help her by giving her better clothing, or money, or opportunities to advance herself, b e ­ comes an additional indication of her true inferiority. V e r y often such per­ sons resent the helpful interest on the part of others for that very reason. T h e y resent having anyone show such an interest as might be interpreted as pity, for this would become a positive proclamation of her inferiority. All that I have said regarding a young woman applies equally to the life of a young man. Somewhere in the early years of the life of both such a young man and such a young woman, there comes the opportunity of running aw ay from all who know them and a desire to change the unhappy conditions. It may strike the normal person as peculiar, but it is a fact that when these young people decide to run aw ay from their present environment because of this inferiority com plex, they just as often choose a road or pathw ay in life that goes down­ ward as one that goes upward. I have talked with young women who have made such a change, and they have frankly said, “ I was born a nobody, I have been a nobody all my life, I have no background, no basis or foundation for anything but an inferior life, and there is no use pretending and battling with it any longer; I am going to go aw ay to another city and live among

those of my own class.” T h e y often enter into crime, or various forms of sordidness, become indifferent regard­ ing their personal appearance, and their personal habits, choose lower types of persons for companionship, and begin a course that is destined to wreck their entire lives. Su ch young people become despondent, cynical, irreligious, untrust­ worthy, and criminally inclined. Even the young women will scoff at the idea of attempting to be respectable, for they will frankly state that nobody thinks they are respectable, and there is no use in continuing the battle against general opinion. M a n y young men frankly state that throughout their whole youthful lives they have had to battle with the lowest things in life, and they have learned that unless they take advantage of other people, these other people will take advantage of them. T h u s we find one portion of these people suffering from inferiority w ho are on the downward road, and when we meet them in a crisis where they are anxious to have some relief, some help, or be saved from their critical situation, we have a difficult problem to face, and must begin inwardly to change the longestablished opinion of themselves. W h e n the other portion of these suf­ ferers decide to take a higher road in life and lift themselves up, we have an ­ other complexity to deal with that is just as difficult. T h e s e persons begin to pretend that they are better than they believe themselves to be. T h e y hope to hide their inferiority, and to create in the minds o f others an im pression o f equality at least, or some degree of superiority. It is among these persons that we often witness the greatest mani­ festations of the so-called superiority complex. Y o u n g women or young men in this position, will go to great extremes to be well-dressed, and in the attempt to be well-dressed, they will be overdressed. T h e young men will often resort to wearing patent-leather shoes through­ out the day in the belief that an e x ­ cellent appearing foot or an expensive The Rosicrucian pair of shoes will cause others to think that they are particularly neat and su­ Digest perior in their tastes for dress. T h e y January will often wear loud clothing or the e x ­ tremes in styles. M a n y times they copy 1936

some outstanding public character who is known for his or her overdressing. T h e y will attempt to use large words in their conversation, will dabble into v a­ rious fields of thought in order to b e ­ come superficially familiar with certain terminology or historical facts, and then speak of these things in a very impres­ sive manner at every opportunity. V e r y often they will attend the highest grade musicals, concerts, or visit places where they believe they will associate with persons of great culture and refinement. In order to create the impression of equality, at least, these persons will re­ fuse to indulge in many things that the ordinary average normal person a c­ cepts. In going to the theater they will go less often, but when they do go they will insist upon the best seats or the highest price seats in order that others may observe them doing this and think of them as being wealthy. T h e y will re­ fuse to eat in an ordinary restaurant, but will go to a very high-class one even if they have to have just tea and toast, for they hope to be seen going in and out of a better place. T h e y will refuse to go to parties and dances of an ordinary kind, insisting that their tastes are better or higher, and that only in cer­ tain places will they en joy themselves. T h e y speak freely of their contempt for persons who are poor or who are in humble or lowly positions. T h e y even refuse invitations to dinners because they want to create the impression that they have so many engagements and prefer to select only the best places or the best homes. T h e s e persons, there­ fore, create in the minds of the average human being the idea that they are suf­ fering from a superiority complex, w here­ as they are suffering intensely and acutely from a sense of inferiority. T h o s e who misunderstand the prob­ lem and analyze these persons wrongly attempt to remove the superiority from their nature. T h e y like to sa y to such persons, “Y o u think you are better than other people, but the truth of the matter is that you are no better than anyone else.” T h is only convinces the other that his inferiority is something true, and that his pretense at equality is not strong enough to overcome it, and he,
Four H un dred S ixty-eight

therefore, adds to his outer emphasis of superiority. T h e reverse of all of this is also true. Many persons are born with a superior­ ity complex that they have inherited or acquired in their youth, and they realize that it is a detriment to their happiness, and that it breaks friendships, and puts them in a position of criticism with all who notice it. T h e ir superior reactions are just as natural as those who are su f­ fering from inferiority. T h e y cannot help admiring that which is a little better than the ordinary, they cannot help wanting in clothing, food, pastimes, recreations, and study, the things that are just a little bit better than the aver­ age. T h e y cannot help feeling that in their recreation they should take a posi­ tion among the very best, the very high­ est, and the most exclusive. In all their tastes and desires, their first choice is always that which is superior. It is as natural for them to choose this w ay as it is for the long-experienced criminal to seek the dark, shadowy places of life for his idle hours. W h e n there is a de­ sire to overcome these superior ten­ dencies in order to avoid embarrassing other persons, or make others feel un­ comfortable, they will assume an a tti­ tude or nature that is of the very op­ posite. T h e y will try to be very com­ monplace in their clothing; they will go out of their w ay to eat at nominal restaurants, or even the most economical ones. T h e y will choose friends and com­ panions among the commonplace or even less, if they can possibly do so. T h e y will adopt some slang in their

language. T h e y will adopt certain habits which will cover the real desires within. O th ers observing them will say that these persons are inferior, and are e x ­ pressing an inferiority complex. T h e truth is that these persons are suffering from a sense of superiority and are try­ ing to reverse it in the opinion of others. N o w all of this unconscious and co n­ scious thinking on the part of these in­ dividuals suffering from inferiority or superiority, constitute continuous ob­ stacles in the w ay of achievement and attainment. T h e only real help for such persons is metaphysical help at the hands o f one who can discern behind the mask being worn what the real nature is. It is difficult to tell by merely looking at or watching a person whether that person is really suffering from real superiority, or a pretended superiority to hide the inferiority within. T h e mystic, the true student of psychic natures, the analyst o f all human individuals, should do everything within his power to assist a person of this type, but the first step consists of becoming truly acquainted with the real nature of the individual, then winning the confidence to such an extent that the sufferer will really talk of his desires and his suppressions, his ambitions, and his tastes, needs, and re­ quirements, and enable the mystic to help him get started on the true path. T h e whole subject is one that is worthy of the special interest of our Rosicrucian metaphysicians so that they can go out in the world and help per­ sons of this very class.

H A V E Y O U A M EM BERSH IP EMBLEM ?
W h y not wear one of the attractive, small but dignified. Rosicrucian membership emblems and signify your association with this world-wide fraternity? It is quite true that more is required of an individual than an emblem to establish his membership; yet, an emblem is a constant reminder of one’s allegiance, one’s obligation, and one’s ideals. It also indicates one's pride in his affiliation. T h e emblems are made of gold, beautifully inlaid with enamel, and consist of the tri­ angle surmounted by the Egyptian cross. There are two styles— the men’s style consists of the emblem with screw back, $1.85; the women’s style consists of a patent safety catch pin, $2.00. You will be proud to wear them. T h ey may be had from the Rosicrucian Supply Bureau.

Four H undred Sixty-nine

SANCTUM MUSINGS
THE SOLE REALITY
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A T T E N T IO N R E A D E R : The theory propounded in the fo llo w in g article is that the uni­ verse is w ithout m ultiplicity. A ll things are o f one thing. V ariety, form , substance, and ex­ tension are all declared the effects o f the human consciousness. M ore startlin g is the assertion that even the human consciousness is not embodied, that humans, as such, have no existence. The article is offered here because the questions it raises and purports to answer deal w ith absolute metaphysics, and w ill afford the serious reader much opportunity fo r the play o f his reasoning powers.

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B O L T O F light­ ning crashes from the heavens, bu ry­ ing i t s e l f in the receptive e a r t h . W i l d life in the immediate vicinity s c a t t e r s in sheer terror of the start­ ling s o u n d , but men, p r i m i t i v e specimens of the genus homo, who flee or throw them­ selves prone upon the ground, fear more than the sound; they tremble in awe of the mysterious phenomenon. T o these primitive minds, natural phenomenon is not adventitious or mechanical, but teleological. E a ch phenomenon is con­ ceived as having its conscious and wilful cause. T h is conception must have been born early in the minds of men. It un­ doubtedly is a development of the idea that since all change within the scope The of man's control is due to his will, all Rosicrucian manifestations, for which he is not re­ Digest sponsible, must, therefore, be attributed January to conscious causes as well, to thinking, willing, supernatural beings. 1936

From such reasoning sprang P o ly ­ theism. E a c h unlike phenomenon was associated with a distinctly different omnipotent intelligence. Although cen­ turies ago in ancient E g y p t a pharaoh conceived a sole god, and attempted the first unity of all phenomena, under one divine cause and direction, such an ideal was a temporary saltation. M o n o ­ theism did not acquire any firm grip on the human mind until centuries after the pharaoh and his religion had been for­ gotten. Monotheism could have been the prevailing religious influence long before it did, if it were not due to m an’s attempt to compare effects instead of causes. It could have been easily dis­ covered that many causes vary so slight­ ly, that they must have a common rela­ tionship, even though their effects are quite different in nature. Science, as elementary as it was during the days of ancient G reece and Rome, was suffi­ ciently developed to have traced and established such a common factor be­ tween much natural phenomena, which was instead attributed to the will of the gods. In the realm of religion, one of the greatest contributions toward the eventual conclusion that a sole god
F ou r H un dred S ev en ty

directs all the forces and beings of the world and the universe, w as the spec­ ulation as to the reason of causes and their effects. It appears that no matter how strikingly dissimilar all observed phenomena, creatures, or things, man considered the purpose of them as serving his immediate welfare. T h u s everything was to either provide him with the necessities and pleasures of life, or to impose punishment upon him, for his failure to pay respect for the bounties of life. T h e s e purposes o b ­ viously had the same end, and would bring into conflict rival intelligences; if these intelligences had the same char­ acteristics as man, and they were thought to have, man would not have conceived the gods as like himself. Since, however, the different forces of nature endured, and none were appar­ ently abolished, or suppressed, it was finally reasoned that there were not rival intelligences but a single one which was responsible for all. T o d a y , our idea of the world of real­ ity parallels the ancient ideas of divine causes. W e are burdened with the theory of multiplicity. W e live in a world, it is asserted, of an infinite num­ ber of physical causes, which rain upon us all of the realities we perceive. Present day achievements in science mean but the revelation of new causes, and an increasing complexity. T h e causes are becoming as far removed from each other as the realities they create. O u r universe appears to be be­ coming decentralized and chaotic, be­ cause the causes are presented as hav­ ing an order related only to their partic­ ular nature, and estranged from others. M ust this continue until we become hopelessly lost in a maze of causation, or is it possible that we may arrive at a mono-reality as we did with “ theism,” and find satisfaction and peace of mind in the simplicity it affords? C an we not profit by the experience of yesterday and apply the same method that brought to us monotheism? L et us speculate in the hope that such speculations may disclose a w ay to a possible solution. T h e common conception of realities is all that which can be universally per­ ceived. If one could establish the fact that he alone perceived an object and that it was beyond perception by others,
Fou r H un dred S e v en ty -o n e

there would arise within his mind a doubt of its reality. W e deduce that a thing is universally perceived and there­ fore a reality because it has externality. It is apart, separate from our minds and, therefore, capable of being real­ ized by another. T h is idea of externality is caused by the interruption of a sense faculty resulting in the discontinuance of the perception. If we see, for e x ­ ample, before us a chair and then close our eyes and the direct vision of the chair disappears, we do not doubt the existence of a chair perhaps, but we do conclude that it has no reality within us but exists instead apart from us. Since the disappearance of the reality was due to the interruption of the sense of sight, its existence to us, it is reasoned, de­ pends upon sight or we would not be visually conscious of it without that faculty. If it is external, we presume that other beings possessed of the same faculty, normally functioning, can per­ ceive it as well. Som e contend that such reasoning is insufficient to prove the externality of realities. If we visually perceive, they state, a chair and sudden­ ly our vision is obscured, there con­ tinues to exist in our consciousness a mental image of the chair. It may be less distinct, yet it exists after the in­ terruption of the sense o f sight. W e can, of course, they continue, discern between the actual perception of the object and the recollection of it, but even though they continue further, there is a distinction. If a mental picture is retained after the interruption of the sense impressions, it is evident that the suspension of the sense of sight is not sufficient reason for us to consider real­ ity as having externality. T h e crux of their argument being that experiences recollected or imagined may have the appearance of reality equal to sense perceptions, and if so, by w hat right, then, do we declare that reality is solely external? It is to be admitted that recol­ lected and imagined experiences estab­ lish a conscious realism equal to, in many respects, the experiences of the senses. T h e y can produce the same emotional state and compel similar phy­ sical acts, but there is the important fact that when we know we are imagining or recollecting, it is only by being partially conscious of stimuli which we absolute­

ly associate with the sense faculty. W e sit at our fireside recalling vividly an incident of our early life. W e see ch ar­ acters, note their actions, study their dress, all mentally, yet we are partially aware visually of the glow of the embers before us. W e are thus afforded the opportunity of comparison between the two states— objective and subjective. If someone passes between us and the hearth, our perception of the glowing embers is interrupted and there remains either the new perception of the in­ tervening o bject or the recollected one. T h e refo re, we know that there is reality which has its existence, to us, through the medium of the senses even though we have at the time subjective experi­ ences as well. W h a t , it may be asked, of the e x ­ periences of complete subjectivity as, for example, the complete absorption of cogitation when there is no realization of outer surroundings? Such experi­ ences have all the elements of the reali­ ties of sense perception. H o w may they be related to externality? O u r interro­ gators may even go further. T h e y may cite the realism of dreams. Dream ex ­ periences, as are commonly known, may be the antithesis of those of the aw ak ­ ened state. B y what means can we prove the experiences of the awakened state, the true ones; in fact, how can be ascer­ tain which is the awakened state? In the awakened state things have sub­ stance, color, taste, dimension, scent, form, and we react to them; and the state which is the opposite of our co n­ scious one is said to be the sleeping one. However, what of dreams? D o not the realities of dreams have substance, e x ­ tension, and do we not experience the same sensations from them? D oes not our consciousness respond in the state of dream as it does in the awakened state? In other words, does not the e x ­ perience of the dream state appear the natural one at the time? W h e n we dream, we do not know that we are dreaming; in fact, the opposite of it would appear as a dream state. T h e n when either in a dream or awakened The state, the experiences of the particular Rosicrucian state at the time appear the true ones. Digest It may be said that in our awakened January state we can be told that we have just awakened, that the experiences we re­ 1936

collect were not objective for another in our presence did not perceive them, and that we were observed to be asleep. T h is is not conclusive evidence, for the same circumstances can exist in the dream state. In a dream we can cite our experiences to another person of the dream state and the dream character can confirm them. Again in a dream we may recount an experience of our aw ak ­ ened state and the character of the dream could inform us that such were dreams for at the time we were not awake. In other words, in the dream we may be told that the experiences of our awakened state were in fact dreams. W o u l d not such conditions in all prob­ ability have a realism equal to the awakened state? I dream; I see three volumes upon my reading table. I examine them; I note their separate titles and dissimiliar bind­ ings. I observe their edge and feel the asperity of their covers, the unevenness of their texture. I particularly discern that the table is quite bare of all else and that the furnishings of the room are otherwise quite usual. I am said to awaken; I am conscious of the same sur­ roundings. B e fo re me is the identica 1 library table, but upon it are but two of three volumes seen in the dream. I say I know of these two volumes but have never known of the third. I pick up each of the two and carefully inspect each one. T h e y have all the character­ istics of the two of the dream; but was it a dream? Is the state of which I am now conscious of two books the true one, or was it the preceding one of three books? T h e realism of each is equally impressive. But, it might be said, you are now aware of your present state and the state preceding this one also. T h e former, therefore, was a dream. T h a t , again, is not sufficient argument or a substantiation of one state as the aw ak ­ ened one. I could now be dreaming and recollect experiencing at some time three books on my library table, and muse in the dream that in view of the two I now perceive, I must have dreamt that there were only two upon the table. D o not the experiences of the awakened state then seem as a dream to even the one in a dream state? T h e r e is a standard for judging b e­ tween the two states, and the same
F o u r H un dred S ev en ty -tw o

measure proves the externality of the realities of the awakened state. It is this: In the awakened state we can re­ press perceptions, negate our realiza­ tion of realities and continue a realiza­ tion of self. F o r example: I am again in my library. I see the two books upon the table. I hear the murmer of voices in an adjoining room; I smell the deli­ cate odor of incense burning in a con­ tainer within reach of my hand. R e a ch ­ ing out and placing the palm of my hand close to the top of the container, I am conscious of a slight sensation of warmth as the wisp of curling smoke touches the flesh. G radually I eliminate the realities that go to make up the e x ­ perience. I close my eyes; immediately all visual perception is gone. I place heavy pads o f felt upon my ears and I am plunged into silence. N e x t I pinch my nostrils closer together permitting no air to enter, and close my mouth tightly as well. T h e delicate odor and the sense of smell are absent. I with­ draw my hand so that the particular sensation of warmth does not exist. W h a t has become of the experience? Quite obviously it no longer has exist­ ence to me. Tru e, I may retain a general impression of the experience, but I ca n ­ not analyze it in detail. I cannot, for example, at random turn to a page of the mental image book and perceive a word or a single letter there in relation to other characteristics of the entire page. T h e experience I have realized in its completeness is gone because of the interruption of the contributing sense which made it possible. However, self consciousness continues to exist. I know I am thinking, that I am reasoning, that I am aware, that I will myself to co n­ tinue a repression of my senses. O b ­ jectivity is practically dormant, yet I am conscious of subjectivity, of my own being. T h e r e is an awareness of the dual states of my own existence. I can separate myself in consciousness, at least, from external reality. Suppose I now consider the same existence as being of the dream state. W h a t difference exists? If we eliminate the idea of externality in a dream state there would be a hiatus of conscious­ ness, an interval when we would be de­ void of consciousness of self or of other realities. In the dream state conscious­
Fou r H u n dred S ev en ty -th ree

ness of self is alw ays identified with external surroundings. C an you recall dreaming when the dream was not com­ posed of things related or associated with ideas which you acquired in what is said to be the awakened state? Have you ever experienced a dream of self which was not in an environment co n ­ sisting of realities? T h e refo re, dreams persist only when the experiences of the dream are associated with sense im­ pressions. A true duality of conscious­ ness cannot exist in the dream state. W e can be aw are of self in a dream and also external reality B U T we cannot expel the concept of reality and still have a continuation of the dream. A dream is entirely subjective though it may have originally been aroused by objective stimuli. T h e refo re, the sensa­ tions of the dream which appear to have external existence are not truly re­ lated to the sense impressions and any repression of them is but to discontinue entirely the subjective experience. Since the dream state is subjective, a suppres­ sion of it causes a complete gap in co n ­ sciousness and there is neither aw are­ ness of self nor the idea of externality. T h is establishes the fact that actual per­ ception of reality exists only in a state which permits consciousness of self after the interruption o f the objective sense impressions. Such a state then is the true awakened one. It further sub­ stantiates the declaration that reality is external to the idea we have of it. Assuming for the moment from the foregoing that reality has external exist­ ence, it is next necessary to determine whether our sense impressions are homogeneous. W e must examine the senses to ascertain not only the extent of the reality they bring to our co n­ sciousness, but whether each of the sense experiences has a relationship to all others. In other words, what has sight in common with feeling, or hear­ ing with taste? G ranted that the forms of visual things may differ from those heard, what characteristics o f the two contributing senses, of their functioning, or of the end which they serve, are similar? W e begin not by an individual analysis of the realities of a sense facul­ ty themselves, but by grouping them and seeking a common factor. In a co n­ sideration o f the things visually per-

ceived, we find that the contributing cause of the perception is light. All physical realities have their existence in light. T h e lessening of light lessens the determination of their existence. T o us the substance and existence of matter visually perceived is affected by light. A diminishing of light may distort the extension of a visual reality and also appear to alter the nature of its sub­ stance. A s for touch, the world of particulars perceived through the channel of that faculty is always identified with such properties as hard, soft, hot, and cold, and in addition, each of these proper­ ties is accompanied by certain contraries such as smooth and rough, even and un­ even, etc. T h u s every reality of touch is either hard or soft, that is, predomin­ antly so, and is also sensed as being either smooth or rough. T h e conception o f hard or soft immediately arises in the consciousness when the sense of touch is brought into contact with w hat is said to be a reality. T h e conception of such contraries as smooth and rough, is secondary; it follows the former. A t times their sequence is so immediate that they appear to be of the funda­ mental character of the sense of touch. W e touch the surface of a table and simultaneously we realize the sensations of hard and smooth. If we were, how­ ever, to place our hand upon a table top and feel two different planes simul­ taneously even though both were hard, we would say the surface was rough. Roughness or smoothness are variations of the characteristics of hardness and softness. Th u s, for example, let us say a table surface consists of a series of ridges 1/64 of an inch apart. T h e table is said to be rough to the touch. T h e ridges and the depressions between them are both hard to the touch. H o w ­ ever, if we could run our finger contin­ ually along the surface of just one of the ridges, or in just one of the depres­ sions, we would conceive the surface as hard also, but smooth, not rough. T h e idea of roughness occurred from the Tfag perception of a change o f plane of the * . . characteristics of touch. In other words, Kostcructan ^ w hen we place our hand upon the Digest table surface we are conscious simulJamiary taneously of a certain plane that is a 1936 certain level and its limit— its limit be­

ing the drop off to a lower plane or de­ pression, or on the other hand an eleva­ tion to another plane— the combination of the two sensations establishes the idea of roughness or unevenness. W e reiterate, however, that the character­ istics of both planes as in our example of the ridges and the depressions, would be the same, hard to the touch. C o n ­ sequently, the ideas of roughness and smoothness, or even the unevenness, are caused by a realization of a varia­ tion of the order of an essential ch a r­ acteristic of touch, but they are not a variation of the nature of the character­ istic itself. W h e n we feel the dropping from one plane or rising from it to an ­ other, we actually have the sensation of the absence of touch between the two planes and this sensation causes the idea of irregularity or roughness. S u p ­ pose we had fifty 1/8 inch cubes of smooth marble arranged in a row, each separated from the other by 1/16 of an inch. Suppose further that we were blindfolded and the tip of the first finger of the left hand or right hand was firm­ ly pressed upon the surface of one of the marble cubes, and at the same time the second finger of the same hand was pressed upon the surface of another cube. T h e experience would be one first of hardness, then of smoothness. T h e r e would not be a realization of the space between the cubes and therefore, no interruption of the order of the ch ar­ acteristic of touch. If, however, we begin to move our fingers along the row of cubes in either direction, we would become aware of the alternating spaces between and this alternation would cause us to conceive the continuous sur­ face not as smooth but as rough or un­ even because of the intervals when there would be no sensation of touch w hat­ ever. If instead of marble blocks or cubes we had before us a long narrow slab of marble with grooves spaced an inch apart, each grove 1/16 of an inch in width and 1/8 of an inch deep, this would produce the same experience and the idea of roughness. If we moved our finger along the surface, we would be­ come conscious of the change, not of the characteristic that is the hardness of the reality of touch, but its order. However, a different c o n c e p t i o n arises if we sense a complete limit of
F ou r H un dred S ev en ty -fo u r

the characteristic of the reality. Th u s, for example, if we felt the smooth marble cube and immediately around it nothing else. W e stated above that the idea of roughness or unevenness arose from a perception of the hard surfaced cubes and the spaces between them. But there must be a regularity of this irregularity, as incongruous as this term may appear. Let us presume that these cubes of marble were mounted on stakes driven into the ground twenty-five feet apart in a row of considerable length. W e are blindfolded and we place two fingers of either hand upon one of the cubes. It is smooth to the touch. W e move aw ay from the stake and as we do so our fingers are withdrawn from the cube and we are conscious of an absence of the sensation of touch. Finally, after walking twenty feet we again contact another cube and perceive its smooth­ ness. O u r experience under such cir­ cumstances would not cause the idea of unevenness of a surface but rather of detached forms, each cube as being separate and apart from the other and the whole not a part of any single real­ ity. Consequently from this we can understand the changes must be rather regular; that is, each experience of change must be about of equal dura­ tion, if we are to have the idea of a con­ tinuous surface to which can be a s­ signed the terms of rough or uneven. T a s t e has its triple sensations of sweet, bitter, and salty. N othing per­ ceived through the medium of this fac­ ulty is devoid of either one of these three characteristics. T h e characteristic of hearing, that which is to be found in all sounds whatever their nature, whether organized or disorganized, whether of the category of music or noise, is pitch. T h e olefactory sense has its characteristics of fragrance or fetor. All of its realities are identified with them. W e must deduce, and it natural­ ly follows, that the realities of each sense have their group quality. In qual­ ity of sight is light, of hearing it is pitch, and of feeling or touch it is the sensa­ tion of hard and soft, cold and hot. T h e quality of the sense of smell is fragrance and fetor, and of taste it is, as we have said, the triple characteristics of sweet, bitter, and salty. T o some of these qual­ ities we have assigned just one attribute
Four H undred S e v en ty ^ iv e

and to others but four. Y e t even feeling with its characteristic of hard, soft, cold, and hot gives rise to the realization of innumerable forms. T h e question arises, which is the reality, the form, or the quality, and if but one, what causes the idea of the other? Realities are, however, never per­ ceived in their absolute state; that is, a reality is never known only by the qual­ ity of the sense by which it is perceived. W e never, for example, experience the sensation of hardness or heat without rightly or wrongly identifying it with some form of a similar sensation. W e never perceive light without either color or extension; that is, the area which it seems to occupy. T h e variation of the quality of sight which is light, produces forms of two general classifications. T h e first classification is colors, and the second is mass. W h a t appears as white light may be detracted into many colors which become to the eye distinctive realities. From this we know that light has been varied in its passage to our eyes. It has in some physical manner been detracted. V isu al mass is pro­ duced in a similar manner. T h e varia­ tion of light produces the multitude of forms we know as objects of sight. A simply and homely analogy makes this understandable. A s we gaze upon the highly illum­ inated white motion picture screen no form is perceived and there is no inter­ ruption of the projected light beam focused upon it. B u t when the moving film with its gradations of opaqueness passes before the light aperture of the projector, the light waves are inter­ rupted and the variations take on form on the screen. Light then has mass to the eye. W a s form perceived or was the variation of the light interpreted as form? T h e absence of this variation a c ­ counts for the conception of space. W e may visually perceive two objects and say there exists between them space. Light may exist between the two ob ­ jects but without such variations as would cause us to have either the no­ tion of color or mass existing between them. A certain mysterious inference is drawn from the perception of these visual forms. W e think of them as

having dimension, as comprising a cer­ tain area either in comparison to an­ other form or to space. T h u s we say an object has length, breadth, and depth. W e find, therefore, that the variation of the quality of sight which we have said is light, not only causes the notion of form when it is perceived and interpreted but the extent of the variation itself is the cause of still an ­ other notion and that is dimension.

T h e s e dimensions are the limits of real­ ization of the particular o bject per­ ceived. Dimension begins or ends with a perception of form. It begins with the realization of form and ends with a realization of another form or the state which seems devoid of reality. In other words, where a variation has its end or where another begins marks the limit of the form perceived.
( T o b e continued in the F ebru a ry issue)

V

V

V

PAGES FROM T H E PAST
(C on tin u ed from P a g e 459)

conceived a state o f society from which every vestige of strife, and the modes of behaviour adapted to ages of strife, shall be utterly and forever swept away. T h ro u g h misery that has seemed un­ endurable and turmoil that has seemed endless, men have thought on that gracious life and its sublime ideal, and have taken comfort in the sweetly solemn message o f peace on earth and good will to men. I believe that the promise with which I started has now been amply redeemed. I believe it has been fully shown that

so far from degrading Humanity, or putting it on a level with the animal world in general, the doctrine of evolu­ tion shows us distinctly for the first time how the creation and the perfect­ ing of M a n is the goal toward which N atu re s work has been tending from the first. W e can now see clearly that our new knowledge enlarges tenfold the significance of human life, and makes it seem more than ever the chief object of Divine care, the consummate fruition of that creative energy which is manifested throughout the knowable universe.

V

V

V

SUM M ARIES O F SCIENCE
(C on tin u ed from P a g e 465)

shore indicates the former, while the G u lf of M ex ic o and the E a ste r Divide points to a collision stoppage of the American fragment. “A n y one who accepts as reasonable the hypothesis of rapid continental mi­ gration here presented will recognize that the frail isthmus structure connect­ ing the two Americas could never have withstood the hazards of so turbulent a T he Rosicrucian voyage. C learly the notch formed by the G ulf of M ex ic o and the Caribbean Digest Sea was made after the crossing. T h e January most plausible view of such a happening is that the central part of the American 1936

continent encountered an ocean bottom (th e E a ste r Divide) which did not yield and that the inertia of the end was suf­ ficient to ‘break its b a c k .’ “T h e fragments produced by such an impact would move about with much randomness in the boiling magma but would have a general tendency east­ ward with the current. M eanw hile the original angles of the two Americas would be changed and probably their north-south relation as well. In short, in a breakup of such magnitude and complexity anything could happen.”
F ou r H undred S ev en ty -six

M YSTERY TEM PLE
T he above is a view of a large temple partially buried in the steaming jungles of the South Pacific lands. It was of comparatively recent years that it was unearthed and its beauty and splendor revealed. W h at great minds designed it? W h o were its builders? W h at civilization did it serve? W hat culture did it house? _ „ Scenes of this temple are included in the new motion picture produced by A M O R C entitled, Lemuria, the Lost Continent. This motion picture will be exhibited in dozens of cities throughout the United States to the public and Rosicrucians, by members of the National Lecture Board who travel via the Rosicrucian Courier Car. T he Courier Car will begin its third transcontinental tour early in 1936. — C ou rtesy o f T h e R osicrucian D igest.

V

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“L E M U R IA The Lost Continent of the Pacific”
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T he Submerged Land of Mystics
Beneath the rolling, restless seas lie the mysteries of forgotten civilizations. Swept by the tides, half buried in the sands, worn away by terrific pressure are the remnants of a culture little known to our age today. W h e r e the mighty Pacific now rolls in a majestic sweep of thousands of miles, there was once a vast continent. I his land was known as Lemuria, and its people as Lemurians. Science has gradually pieced together the lost race, and in this book you will find the enthralling chapters you have ever read. How to be swept from the face of the earth, except have living descendants today, is explained. evidences of this most astounding, these people came for survivors who

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THE MAGIC D W E L L E R S O F MT. SH ASTA
Fanned by the cool breezes of the Pacific and crowned by a cap of snow is California’s mystery mountain, M t. Shasta. It is not unlike other towering peaks of splendor on the famed Pacific coast except that it is shrouded with tales of weird happenings. It is said that a strange people live in seclusion somewhere on the mountain; that they practice unusual rites. It is said that they seem possessed of great wealth, for they have much gold; and, too, it is said that they exclude themselves from others. I hese people are the living descendants of the Lemurians. Do you know how they came there, when their forbears perished centuries ago with the submersion of the continent of Lemuria? W o u l d you like to know the truths which they con­ cealed from a merely curious world?

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T H E M YSTICAL B O O K SEN SATIO N
1 Iiis C an You
Interpret
book has lived u p to its anticipated reputation of being the
mystical Look sensation ot the year. T h is booh contains truths w hich

These
Strange

Carvings?

are m uch stranger than fiction. It is profusely illustrated w ith maps, charts, and sym bols. It is a booh you can never forget because ol its intriguing m ystery, its instruction, and its u n u su a l subject matter, the booh is w ell-printed, w ell-bound and is now priced at $2.20 postp aid. S end your order a nd remittance direct to tbe address below or ash your focal booh d ealer to get it for you.

W h at Ancient Story Do These Reveal ?

ROSICRUCIAN San Jose, California

SUPPLY BUREAU ( A M O R C' ) U. S. A.

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TH E PU RPO SES OF

THE

ROSICRUCIAN

ORDER

M em ber o f “ F U D O S I” (Federation Universelle des Ordres et Societes Initiatiques)

The Rosicrucian Order, existin g in all civilized lands, is a non-sectarian, fraternal body o f men and women devoted to the investigation, study, and practical application o f natural and spiritual laws. T he purpose o f the organi­ zation is to enable all to live in harmony w ith the creative, constructive, Cosmic forces fo r the attainm ent o f health, happiness, and Peace. T h e Order is internationally known as AM O R C (an abbreviation), and the AM O R C in Am erica, and all other lands, constitutes the on ly form o f R osi­ crucian activities united in one body having representation in the interna­ tional federation. T he AM O R C does not sell its teachings, but gives them free ly to all affilia ted members, togeth er w ith many other benefits. Inqu irers seeking to know the history, purposes, and practical benefits that they may receive from Rosicrucian association, are invited to send for the free book, "T h e Secret H e rita g e ." Address, F ria r S. P. C., care of AM O R C T E M P L E Rosicrucian Park, San Jose, California, U. S. A. (Cable Address: "A M O R C O " Radio Station W 6 H T B )

Officials of the N orth and South Am erican Jurisdictions
(Including the United States, Dominion of Canada, Alaska, Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, E l Salvador, Republic o f Panama, the W est Indies, L o w e r California, and all land under the protection o f the United States o f America. H. S PE N C E R L E W IS , F. R. C., Ph. D .................................................................................................Im perator R A L P H M. L E W IS , F. R. C...................................................................................................Supreme Secretary C LE M E N T B. L E B R U N , F. R. C................................................................................................. Grand Master H A R V E Y M IL E S , F. R. C................................................. Grand Treasurer E T H E L B. W A R D , F. R. C Secretary to Grand Master H A R R Y L . S H IB L E Y , F. R. C ....................... Director o f Publications Junior Order o f Torch Bearers (sponsored bv AM O R C ). F o r complete inform ation as to its aims and benefits address General Secretary, Grand Chapter, Rosicrucian Park, San Jose, California.

T h e follow ing principal branches are District H eadqu arters o f A M O R C
Atlanta, Georgia: Atlanta Chapter No. 650. Dr. James C. O akshette, Master: Nassau Hotel. Meetings 7:30 every Thursday night. San Francisco, California: Francis Bacon Lodge, 1655 Polk Mr. David Mackenzie, Master. Street:

Pittsburg, Pennsylvania: Penn. First Lodge, Dr. Charles D. Green, New York City, New York: M aster; 3787 E ast St. N. S., Pittsburgh, Pa. New Y ork Chapter, Rooms 35-36, 711 8th Reading, Pennsylvania: Ave„ cor. 8th Ave. and 45th Street. Louis Reading Chapter, Mr. Harrison N. Mucher, Riccardi, Master: M argaret Sharpe, Secre­ Master, 144 Clymer St.; Mr. George R. O s­ tary. Inquiry and reading rooms open week man, Secretary. Meeting every Friday, 8:00 days and Sundays, 1 to 8 p. m. p. m., W ashington Hall, 904 W ashington St. Los Angeles, California: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Hermes Lodge, A M O R C Temple. Mr. Ollin Delta Lodge No. 1, A M O R C , S. E . Corner W . Marden, Master. Reading Room and In­ 40th and Brown Sts., 2nd Floor. M r. Albert quiry office open daily, 10 a.m . to 5 p.m ., Courtney, Master. and 7:30 p.m . to 9 p.m . except Sundays. Granada Court, 672 South Lafayette Park Benjamin Franklin C h a p ter o f A M O R C ; Place. W arren C. Aitken, Master: Martha Aitken, Birmingham, Alabama: Secretary, 2203 N. 15th Street. Meetings for Birmingham Chapter of A M O R C . For in­ all members every Sunday, 7:30 p.m ., 1706 formation address M r. Cuyler C. Berry, Rittenhouse Square. Master, 721 So. 85th St. Boston, Massachusetts: Chicago, Illinois: T he M arie Clemens Lodge, Fortunatus J. Chicago Chapter No. 9, Mabel L. Schmidt, Bagocius, Master. Temple and Reading Secretary. Telephone Superior 6881. Read­ Rooms, 739 Boylston St., Telephone Kening Room open afternoons and evenings. more 9398. Sundays 2 to 5 only. 100 E . Ohio St., Room 403-404. Lecture sessions for A LL members Detroit, Michigan: every Tuesday night, 8:00 p. m. Thebes C h ap ter No. 336. Mr. W illiam H. C h ica g o A fra-A m erican C h a p ter No. 10. Hitchman, M aster; Mrs. Pearl Anna T ifft, Robert S. Breckenridge, Master; Aurelia Secretary. Meetings at the Florence Room, Carter, Secretary. Meeting every W ednes­ Fuller Hotel, every Tuesday. 8 p. m. In­ day night at 8 o ’clock, Y . M. C. A., 3763 So. quirers call dial phone No. 1870. W abash Avenue. (D irecto ry Continued on N e x t P a g e )

Portland, Oregon: Portland Chapter. Paul E . Hartson, Master; Telephone E ast 1245. Meetings every Thurs­ day, 8:00 p.m . at 714 S. W . 11th Avenue. Washington, D . C.: Thom as Jefferson Chapter. W illiam V . W hittington, Master. Confederate Memorial Hall, 1322 Vermont Ave. N. W . Meetings every Friday, 8:00 p. m.

Seattle, W ashington: A M O R C Chapter 586. Fred Motter, Master; Mrs. Carolina Henderson, Secretary. 311-14 Lowman Bldg., between 1st and 2nd Aves. on Cherry St. Reading room open week days 11 a. m. to 4:30 p. m. Visitors welcome. Chapter meetings each Friday, 8:00 p. m.

Other Chartered Chapters and Lodges of the Rosicrucian Order (A M O R C ) will be found in most large cities and towns of North America. Address of local representatives given on request.

P R IN C IP A L C A N A D IA N B R A N C H E S
Montreal, Quebec, Canada: Montreal Chapter. Alexandre Chevalier, F. R. C., Master, 210 W est St. James Street. Inquiry office open 10:00 a. m. to 5 p. m. daily; Saturdays 10:00 to 1:00 p.m . Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Mr. Benjamin W . W akelin, Master. Sessions 1st and 3rd Sundays of the month, 7:00 p. m., No. 10 Lansdowne Ave. Edmonton, Alberta: Mr. Alfred H. Holmes, Master, 9533 Jasper Avenue E .

Vancouver, British Columbia: Canadian Grand Lodge, A M O R C . Mr. H. B. Kidd, Master, A M O R C Temple, 878 Horn­ by Street. V ictoria, British Columbia: Victoria Lodge, Mr. A. A. Calderwood, M aster. Inquiry O ffice and Reading Room, 101 Union Bank Bldg. Open week days 10 a. m. to 6 p. m. W innipeg, Manitoba, Canada: Mr. E ly Law, Master, 120 Spence St. (Ph. 33341.) Session for all members every Sun­ day, 2:45 p. m., 304 " B " Enderton Bldg., Portage Ave. and Hargrave St.

SP A N ISH A M E R IC A N S E C T IO N
T h is jurisdiction includes all the Spanish-speaking Countries of the New W orld. Its Supreme Council and Administrative O ffice are located at San Juan, Puerto Rico, having local Represen­ tatives in all the principal cities of these stated Countries. T he name and address of the Officers and Representatives in the jurisdiction will be furnished on application. A ll co rresp o n d en ce sh ou ld b e a d d ressed a s fo llo w s : Secretary General of the Spanish-American Jurisdiction of A M O R C , P. O . Box 36, San Juan, Puerto Rico.

A FEW

O F T H E F O R E IG N

JU R ISD IC T IO N S

Scandinavian Countries: T h e A M O R C Grand Lodge of Denmark. Mr. Arthur Sundstrup, Grand M aster; Carli Anderson, S. R. C., Grand Secretary. M anogade 13th Strand, Copenhagen, Denmark. Sweden: Grand Lodge "Rosenkorset.” Anton Svanlund, F . R. C., Grand Master. Jerusalemsgatan, 6, Malmo. H olland: De Rozekruisers Orde; Groot-Lodge der Nederlanden. J. Coops, Gr. Sect., Hunzestraat 141, Amsterdam. France: Dr. H. Gruter, F. R. C., Grand Master, Nice. Mile Jeanne Guesdon, S.R .C ., Corresponding Secretary for the Grand Lodge (A M O R C ) of France, 56 Rue Gambetta, Villeneuve Saint Georges, (Seine & O ise). Switzerland: A M O R C Grand Lodge. August Reichel, F. R. C., G r. Sect., Riant-Port V evey-Plan. Austria: M r. M any Cihlar, K. R. C., Grossekretar der A M O R C , Laxenburgerstr, 75/9, Vienna, X . China and Russia: T he United Grand Lodge of China and Rus­ sia, 8/18 Kavkazskaya St., Harbin, M an­ churia.
R O S IC R U C IA N P R E S S . L T D .

New Zealand: Auckland Chapter A M O R C . Mr. G. A. Franklin. Master, 317 Victoria Arcade Bids. Queen St., City Auckland. England: The A M O R C Grand Lodge of Great Britain. Mr. Raymund Andrea, K. R. C., Grand Master, 34 Baywater Ave., W estbury Park, Bristol 6. Dutch and East Indies: Dr. W . T h . van Stokkum, Grand Master, W . J. Visser, Secretary-General. Karangtempel 10 Semarang, Java. Egypt: T he Grand Orient of A M O R C , House of the Temple, M. A. Ramayvelim, F. R. C., Grand Secretary, 26, Avenue Ismalia, Heliopolis. Africa: T he Grand Lodge of the Gold Coast, A M O R C . Mr. W illiam Okai, Grand Master, P. O . Box 424 A ccra, Gold Coast, W est Africa. * India: T h e Supreme Council, A M O R C , Calcutta, India. T h e add resses o f o f her foreig n G ran d L o d g es and secretaries will b e fu rn ished on application.
PRINTED IN U . S . A .

A Message from a Master
the wailing of a lost soul from some cavernous LIKE depth, resounds the booming of the Tibetan Temple drums. In the cold dawn of the mountain fastness of the mysterious Himalayas each day for centuries, the heralds have called the mystics to hear the words of wisdom of a great master. In a setting of God's greatest majesty, foreboding peaks and towering cliffs, men have stood with heads hared to listen to golden gems of truth from an unknown source. The precepts of these Temple messages have carried men to great heights. By a combination of strange circumstances, a white man in the sixteenth century brought to light and civilization, these ancient Tibetan writings, appropri­ ately entitled, “Unto Thee I Grant." To you, from these age-old monasteries of the mystical East, comes this message of a master now in modern book form. Without cost, this rare book of illumination is yours for but a five-months’ subscription to this, “The Rosicrucian Digest." But $1.50 w ill bring you this mag­ azine for 5 months, and in addition without price, this book, acknowledged to be one of the finest, oldest and authentic sacred writings. This is an offer very seldom made. Avail your­ self of it now — today. Send sub­ scription and request for gift book to:

HERALDING

< » 0

S AN

The Rosicrucian Digest
JO S E , C A L IFO R N IA , U . S. A .

A G IF T T O Y O U
T h is a u th en tic T ib e ta n w riting is a b s o lu te ly F R E E to y o u . It is n ot a p a m p h le t but a b o u n d b o o k o f 150 p a g e s . R e a d a b o v e f o r fu ll d eta ils.

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Volume II. Volume III.

RgsicrucianLibrary
R O S IC R tjC IA N P R IN C IP L E S FO R T H E H O M E A N D B U SIN E SS. T H E M Y S T IC A L L IF E O F JESUS.

The follow ing books are a few of several recommended because o f the special knowledge they contain, not to be found in our teachings and not available elsewhere. Catalogue of all publica­ tions free upon request.

A very practical book dealing w ith the solution of health, financial, and business problems in the home and office. W ell printed and bound in red silk, stamped w ith gold. Price, $2.00 per copy, postpaid.

A rare account o f the Cosmic preparation, birth, secret studies, mission, crucifixion, and later life o f the Great Master, from the records of the Essene and Rosicrucian Brotherhoods. A book that is demanded in foreign lands as the most talked about revelation o f Jesus ever made. Over 300 pages, beautifully illustrated, bound in purple silk, stamped in gold. Price, $2.25 per copy, postpaid.

Volume V.

“ U NTO TH EE I G R AN T . . ”

A strange book prepared from a secret manuscript found in the monastery o f Tibet. It is filled w ith the most sublime teachings o f the ancient Masters o f the F a r East. The book has had many editions. W ell printed w ith attractive cover. Price, $1.25 per copy, postpaid.

Volume V I.

A TH O U SAND Y E A R S OF YESTERD AYS.

A beautiful story o f reincarnation and mystic lessons. This unusual book has been translated and sold in many languages and universally endorsed. W ell printed and bound w ith attractive cover. Price, 85c per copy, postpaid.

Volume V II.

S E L F M A S T E R Y A N D F A T E , W IT H T H E C Y C L E S O F L IF E .

A new and astounding system o f determ ining your fortunate and unfortunate hours, weeks, months, and years throughout your life. No mathematics required. B etter than any system o f numerology or astrology. Bound in silk, stamped in gold. Price. $2.00 per copy, postpaid.

Volume V III.

T H E R O S IC R U C IA N M A N U A L .

Most complete outline of the rules, regulations, and operations o f lodges and student work o f the Order with many interesting articles, biographies, explanations, and com plete dictionary o f Rosicrucian terms and words. V ery com pletely illustrated. A necessity to every student who wishes to progress rapidly, and a guide to all seekers. W ell printed and bound in silk, stamped w ith gold. Price, $2.00 per copy, postpaid.

Volume X I.

M A N S IO N S O F T H E SOUL, T H E CO SM IC C O N C E P T IO N .
W ell

The complete doctrines o f reincarnation explained. This book makes reincarnation easily understood. illustrated, bound in silk, stamped in gold, extra large. Price, $2.20 per copy, postpaid.

Volume X II.

L E M U R IA — T H E L O S T C O N T IN E N T O F T H E P A C IF IC .

The revelation o f an ancient and long forgotten M ystic civilization. Fascinating and intriguing. Learn how these people came to be swept from the earth. K n o w o f their vast knowledge, much o f which is lost to man­ kind today. W eil printed and bound, illustrated with charts and maps. Price. $2.20 per copy, postpaid.

Volume X U I.

T H E T E C H N IQ U E O F T H E M A S T E R .

The newest and most complete guide fo r attaining the state o f Cosmic Consciousness. It is a masterful work on psychic unfoldment. Price, $1.85 per copy, postpaid.

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Our Suggestion To You PORTRAIT OF GREAT MASTER
(IJ Hven llie most renowned portraits of Jesus Christ and those murals in which He is a central ligure, were executed several centuries after tfie crucifixion. There apparently was never left to posterity Irorn His period any actual representation in art of the physical appearance of the Master. I he various works portraying Him are but the result of llie personal conceptions and idealisms of the artists. 1 hough many artists have claimed their portraits or sculptures o f Ch rist were the result of Divine revelation, tlie works of each in many cases are extremely un like. It is not generally known that some of the early portraits of the Christ were without heard and nimbus. Nearly all artists, in an endeavor to portray llie spiritual nature < > l the Master, have made Him extremely effeminate in facial fines. I hey are further inconsistent by having tfle hands of a delicate, even cameo-like, appearance. Not only the Scriptures, but otber sacred literature sources revea I that 1 iy occupation He was a car­ penter and a fisherman, and His hands, therefore, could not have been as they are depicted. O n e of the most startling new pictorial representations of the Master is the one executed by Dr. I I. Spencer Lewis. His painting is tlie result ol much research into the unknown life o f C hrist. It reveals Him as having a positive, masculine, masterly coun­ tenance, with kind mystic and spiritual characteristics instead of the usual semi-effeminate ones, ft also reveals the Aryan features, ONE TENTH ACTl 'AL SIZE for it is declared He was not a Jew but an Aryan. E a c h portrait is 8 .x 10 inches in
size. T h e y are reproduced on a tine grade of heavy paper. The colored photographs, done in oil, are an excellent color likeness ol the original. W e pay postage on each order.

P R IC E :

Painted. . . .

S t . 50

Plain

$ l.oo

I bis portrait has won considerable acclaim because of its inspir­ ing nature and unique conception. I he hand-colored portraits done in oil are exceptionally beautiful, and yet. economical. I lie black and white reproductions are exactly the same, and less in price. I his portrait is an exact photographic reproduction of the orig­ inal done by the Imperator. which is in the Initiation Chamber of tfie Supreme Temple of the Order in Sa n Jose. Tor size and price read column beneath picture. Send your order and remittance to:

T
R O S I

heR O S I
C R U C 1 A N

C
P A R K

R U C I A N

S

U

P

P L Y
SAN

B U R E A U
CALIFORNIA

JOSE.

D R . E D . B E R T H O L E T , K. R. C.

G ran d M aster o f the jRosicrucian O rder o f Sw itzerland
W e are pleased to present to our members and readers this excellent likeness of our beloved G rand M aster in Sw itzerland. D r B ertholet is an eminent m ystic and instructor in psychology and philosophy. He has been well known in Sw itzerland for m any y ears and m aintains a very large lib rary and clinic in L ausanne on the borders of L ake G en ev a. He is president of the "S o ciete V au d oise d' E tudes P sy ch iq u es." He is also a high officer in the M artinist O rd er and has given m any cordial receptions to members of A M O R C w henever they have visited Lausanne. H e w as elected to his high office in the R osicru cian O rd er several y ears ag o by the members in his jurisdiction and has won the deep love and profound adm iration of all w ho know him. ( C o u r t e s y o f R o sic ru c ia n D ig e s t.)

Was the Secret Knowledge of the Ancient Sages Lost?
A P o p u l a r legend leads many to believe that the secret know ledge o f the ancient sages was lost forever— de­ stroyed, or buried ’neath crumbling walls. T h e Rosicrucians are refuting that fallacy today, just as they have done all through the centuries. In early times there was personal danger in exhibiting to o much know ledge; and danger to the masses when knowledge o f N ature’s laws was revealed ro unscrupulous rulers. Secret fraternities were formed for self-protection and to safeguard the amazing truths that wise men learned— truths about underlying causes, the reasons for much that was not understood—the way to really live serenely, abundantly, successfully. A m ong these early fraternities were the Rosicrucians, known in every land today as A M O R C . Their activi­ ties are devoted to scientific, philosophic and psycho­ logic research and teachings. They are N O T a religious organization. M em bers throughout the world have improved their circumstances by learning how to understand and mas­ ter their own lives— how to discover and use their own innate personal faculties. They find the revealing truths both fascinating and profitable. They are men and women in all walks o f life, o f every nationality and every creed. Many o f the w orld’s greatest thinkers o f past and present have been R osicrucians.

S E A L E D B O O K —F R E E
Would you like to know about the organization, how it functions, h o w to qualify to receive its teachings? Jfyou are willing to spend one hour a week in earnest quest o f astonishing facts; if you are not idly curious, write a letter (not a post card) to the scribe given below. You will receive a free copy o f the privately sealed book— "T h e Secret H eritage.” Address inquiry to Scribe S. P C

THE RO SICRUCIANS
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ROSICRUCIAN DIGEST
COVERS THE WORLD
T H K O F F IC IA L , IN T E R N A T IO N A L R O S IC R U C IA N M A G A ­ Z IN E O F T II E W O R L D -W ID E R O S IC R U C IA N O R D E R

5 OCRATi£«

Vol. XIV

FEBRUARY, 1936

No.l

ARISTOTLE

I Dr. Ed. Ber+holet, K. R. C . (Frontispiece).................. The Thought of the M onth: Honoring Eminent Men 4 The Eternal Q uest .... 6 Love Thy N eighb or 8 C athed ral C ontacts ............................................. 10 Selflessness ................................................ —................ 12 Experience C re a tes Knowledge 13 Rosicrucian N ew Y e a r Proclamation 15 Pages from the Past: Nicolas M alebranche ............ 16 ...... 18 M ental Efficiency A Theory of Earthquakes .... — ____ 21 Summaries of Science .. ........ . . 2 4 An cient Symbolism .......................................... 27 The A n tiqu ity of O u r Teachings ______ 28 Sanctum Musings: The Sole Reality (continued). 32 Strange M t. Shasta (Illustration) ..... . — ....... 37

S T : M A R T IN

Subscription to T he Rosicrucian D igest. T hree Dollars per year. Single copies tw en ty-five cents each. Entered as Second Class M atter at the Post Office at San Jose, California, under the A ct of August 24th. 1912. Changes o f address must reach us by the tenth o f the month preceding date o f issue. Statements made in this publication are not the official ex ­ pressions o f the organization or its officers unless stated to be official communications. Published M onthly by the Supreme Council of

THE ROSICRUCIAN ORDER— AMORC
R O S IC R U C IA N P A R K SAN JOSE. C A L IF O R N IA

THOUGHT OF THE MONTH
H O N O RIN G EMINENT MEN

THE

H E M O N T H of February, although the shortest month of the year, and one which should be long in order to help business men recover from the many h o l i d a y s w h i c h c a m e so close together at the end of the pre­ ceding y e a r , is filled with official and unofficial holidays for the celebra­ tion of the birth and life of eminent men. It is unquestionably true that the average reader of serious matter, or books and pamphlets of an instructive nature, sooner or later find great joy in the reading of biographies, or the analysis of the lives of great men and women of the past. W h e r e v e r you find a home library that is not composed merely of sets of books that have been sold on the subscription plan, or given away with subscriptions to magazines, you will find some biographies. T h e more prolific and enthusiastic is the reader in the home, the more sure you will be to find these books dealing with the lives of men and women. A fte r all, there is no more fascinating pastime and instructive pleasure than that of reading of the experiences of those persons who have contacted life and made something of life in the years T he Rosicrucian of their past. W e do not have to delve into the histories of the lives of the Digest ancient philosophers, nor of ancient February statesmen, rulers, and potentates; we do not even have to delve into the lives of 1936

outstanding characters to find many in­ teresting facts that will create word pictures and images in our mind of an interesting form. T h e more varied or important the life of the individual, the more benefit the biography will be to us as we study it. It is from the lives of great men that we learn how human existence is fraught with possibilities along with temptations, sufferings, and rewards. B y analyzing how others have thought and acted in times of stress or strain, and how they have re­ acted to certain fundamental emotions of life, we will be guided in our thinking and acting. W e discover through the reading of biographies that the human equation is the same in all lands among all races and in all periods of time. By noting the failures of the lives of great men— and the greatest of them have made mistakes that brought about seri­ ous failures at times— we learn what to avoid, and what points in our own a f ­ fairs to strengthen and accentuate. Devoting ourselves to the study of one great character at a time is not hero worship, as some have claimed. T o read but one book on the life of an in­ dividual — even when it is an auto­ biography written by the individual himself — is not sufficient to secure a complete or nearly perfect picture of that person. E v ery author's view-point. including the individual himself, is dif­ ferent. F o r this reason, the proper way to really become acquainted with the life of any interesting character of the past or present is to read several books, a number of them, by different authors, dealing with the same person. F o r instance, we celebrate on the 22nd of F ebru ary the anniversary of W a s h ­
Four

ington’s birthday. Like all other n a­ tional or international heroes, the aver­ age or the popular story of his life is filled with fiction and figments of im­ agination. T h e story told of him in the average school book is far from being true, for it merely idealizes some of the good things he did and presents an imaginary picture of the greater things he should have done. It wholly ignores the errors he made, his weaknesses, and follies. A true analysis of the life of W ashington shows that as a warrior, a strategean in w arfare, and as a great general, he was a failure, for he was greatly lacking in the necessary ele­ ments to become a great general and warrior, and lost far more battles than he won. He should have remained, so far as profession and life's work is con­ cerned, a surveyor. If, however, he wanted to serve his people best, he could have done this as a part-time statesman, but never should have a t­ tempted to glorify himself or protect his nation as a warrior. It so happens, how­ ever, that several of the battles in which he was engaged, and in which he was victorious, were pivotal ones, or crucial ones, and while in and of themselves were hardly worthy of nation-wide a c­ claim, did have a very great effect upon the ultimate results which were being sought by his nation. In his personal, private life, the real facts are consider­ ably different from those that are so popular. Even a visit to his old home in Mount V ern o n immediately takes aw ay fifty per cent of the glory and colorful traditions that have been wrongly as­ sociated with him. Portraits of him by various painters, sculptors, and photo­ graphers show that he was very greatly different in appearance from that shown in the most popular of the idealized por­ traits. But W a s h in g to n was a symbol. He still is a symbol in the minds and hearts of the American people of a great ideal, and it is that symbolized idea that we honor and respect on W a s h in g to n ’s birthday. On the other hand, on the 12th of February we celebrate the anniversary of the birth of Lincoln. Here, too, was a man whose thoughts and deeds have been presented in ideal form for our a d ­ miration, but if we analyze his life we find that long before his transition there
F iv e

were stories about him, charges made against him, and opinions recorded that were far from complimentary. W h i l e we now believe that many of the unkind and critical things said against Lincoln in his lifetime were untrue, and deliber­ ately manufactured by his political enemies, we cannot help but admit that many of the beautiful stories told of him were also manufactured by his friends. But he, too, represented an idea and be­ came a symbol in our American history, and it is Lincoln’s symbol, Lincoln the ideal, that we honor and respect. H is life was filled with lessons for all of us to learn, and out of his struggles and the realization of his ambitions we can find much to emulate. O n the 11 th of F ebru a ry we can also celebrate the birth of T h o m a s Edison. Here we have our national hero in the form of a scientist. T h e records show that much has been credited to him un­ justly, both good and bad. But in the scheme of things he was a symbol representing the ideals of scientific re­ search and invention, and while un­ doubtedly a very great majority of his dreams and invented schemes became failures, a sufficient number of them be­ came successful to revolutionize a large portion of our modern w ay of living. So we honor him and what he accomp­ lished that was good, and for the ideals he held and expressed, and not for his actual life in every intimate manner. It is much like reading a fairytale to read the life of Edison even when it is re­ duced to actual facts, and all of the fiction eliminated. T h e r e is a lesson in persistency, endurance, determination, and glowing faith that each one of us should learn. Among other birthdays that can be celebrated in F eb ru ary is that of H enry W a d s w o r th Longfellow on the 27th, 1807; James Russell Lowell on the 22nd, 1819; and Charles Dickens on the 7th, 1812. And, of course, there are many others whose birthdays are celebrated in this month such as that of Kit M arlo w e on the 6th, G e o rg e D orsey on the same day, and G eo rg e Jean N athan on the 14th. T h e n there is the symbolical holiday on the 14th known as St. V a le n tin e ’s

day, and which, incidentally, is the a n ­ niversary o f the birth of our Supreme Secretary , A ltogether the month is one of celebration and interest because of the diversified memorials it brings to our list. M a n y o f us can make this month of F eb ru ary an outstanding month in our own lives through our accomplishments in the twenty-nine days which this leap y ear allots to it. Beginning on a S a tu r­ day, the month ends on a Saturday. In its four weeks there is ample opportun­ ity to change the entire course of life of an individual and start it upon a

career that is upward and onward, and glorious. T h e whole month can become a memorial holiday in your own life, by the attitude you take toward it and the things you do and accomplish. L ater historians — perhaps only relatives and friends — who may write of your life may refer to F eb ru ary of 1936 as the month in which your life changed from w hat it now is to what you have hoped and prayed for. In this regard you are the sole arbiter and the only captain of the ship. I hope for each one of you that it will truly become a birth month of a new cycle of life.

V

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T h e Eternal Quest
By
F ra te r

W. O.

E ssu m an

H I S questing spirit, this dash for ad ­ ven tu re— the per­ ennial springs of human pilgrimage — is latent in the p sy ch o p la sm of man. E a c h gener­ ation, and in truth each individual as well, t r a n s m u t e s this i n s a t i a b l e quest into c h an ­ nels c o m p a t i b l e with environmental circumstances. And whether we commune with knights questing after the H oly G rail and avenging wrongs of suffering humanity; whether we perish in ravenous seas with children questing Jerusalem-ward to avenge Saracenic outrages against Christian ideals; whether we sail with Columbus amidst an Atlantic of ignor­ ance to discover new worlds; whether we look at the majestic kaleidoscope of Empires rising and falling with the crimson tides of T im e; whether we are transported into eulogies over the crea­ The Rosicrucian tiveness of the human mind, as portrayed in the wonderful galleries of A rt and Digest Invention; whether we read up the February magic story of the Conquerors as they stalk in awful grandeur in the pagean­ 1936

T

try of history; or scale the heights of Helicon with the M uses— we are sure to raise the question mark of the ages, “W h e r e does it all end?” It is too true that very few men live to see their dreams come true. But that has not stemmed the tide of the E ternal Q uest. It is also too true that most of the world's greatest personalities were mocked out of existence on no conse­ crated grounds other than Golgotha. B u t that has not marred the vibrant strains of the music of the Etern al Q uest. T h e eternal quest starts n o ­ where and ends nowhere. It is an in­ tangible heliotropism of the mind of man which will always urge him to grope, however blindly, after the T ru e, the Beautiful and the Sublime. In the wide panorama of life, there is not only the passive struggle of exist­ ence but also the sterner struggle for existence. A nd the history of succeed­ ing ages corroborates to prove the relay of existence. “ C a rry o n ” is the slogan of the eternal quest. From the individual right up to the national homogeny, there is a handing over of the T o rc h to succeeding crusaders of the quest. T h is Darwinism of existence is a fact to which all schools of contemporary thought pay homage.
S ix

And now it is our turn, in the twen­ tieth century of the Christian era, to follow up the trail of the Q u e st from where the illustrious past had left over. W hat a strange gospel to preach in these stirring times. T h e r e is no room for these hallucinations of the mind, many might be tempted to say. But just a little bit of introspection would make you exclaim with one o f the greatest visionaries of our time: ‘‘O h , the bound­ less possibilities of this brave new world!” T h e re is alw ays something to do for the man who knows what to do. There are infinite avenues to the Eldorado which has been the target of human endeavor down the restless stream of the ages. T h e r e is no dearth of opportunity in the inexhaustible ap ­ plications of this questing faculty. In short, any pursuit which satisfies the highest aspirations of the individual is that which leads him to the consumma­ tion of the E ternal Q uest. You may be a clerk wading daily through a wilderness of figures, the exact manipulation of which involves the security of tremendous capital: you may be a teacher knocking into shape, on the anvil of example and precept, the men and women of tomorrow. Y o u may be a farmer upon whose persistent industry and application thousands de­ pend daily for their existence. Y o u might be a salesman, upon whose busi­ ness honesty and integrity impoverished customers might make little savings that might go a long w ay to stay, however temporarily, a domestic collapse— and a V V

thousand other ways in which humans choose to live out this quest of exist­ ence. C all it by whatever name you will— the economy of nature, conservation of energy, indestructibility of matter or compensation— we have all to be con­ vinced that nothing is ever done in vain; that every ounce of honest effort is a step forward in the right direction to­ w ards the realization of the eternal quest. T h e mighty strokes of the editor’s pen, hafting left and right, the lame policies of administrators; the harangue of the orator hissing balm to those who are downcast along the highroad of political repression; the missionary, blowing the bugles of his Christian mes­ sage and “bolstering up the fallen columns” of the regiment of the cross; the reformer denouncing the evils of our social order; the severe moralist sitting in judgment upon the coarse ethics of private and public lives; the agitator calling a halt to the ruthless march of capitalism, exploitation, suppression, and diplomatic ostracism; and the rest of the invisible array of forces that are slowly but surely pulling down the empire of V i c e and Falsehood — these cannot all be in vain. T h e best is yet to be. “ Right will ultimately conquer wrong and har­ mony take the place of all discords.” D eep down in the subterranean gal­ leries of human consciousness, as I have always believed, the katabolic processes for the gradual unfoldment of the human race are daily encroaching upon the frontiers of the Ultimate! V

.0 C H A IN LET T ER S
A M O R C has from time to time strenuously objected to chain letters for any purpose. W e seriously object to any member using chain letters for the purpose of promoting or attempting to promote the activities of A M O R C , because we consider it beneath the dignity of the Order. Furthermore, the post office department of all countries objects to chain letters because of the fact that they unnecessarily clutter up and congest the mail service and interfere with legitimate mailings. If you are solicited by any member to participate in a chain letter campaign, pur­ porting to be for the benefit of A M O R C , please refuse to participate, and destroy the letter you receive, and have no fear of the purported calamity that will befall you if you destroy the chain letter. Such systems of superstition should be stamped out by every intelligent individual and Rosicrucian.
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Seven

Love Thy Neighbor
A T IM E L Y M E S SA G E TO ALL M A N K IN D By F r a t e r W il l ia m V. W h i t t i n g t o n , K. R. C. Master of the Thomas Jefferson Chapter, 'Washington, D. C.
N T H E S E days, no less than in the days of the F o u n ­ der of C hristian­ ity, there is no­ thing more essen­ tial than a true ap­ preciation of the B r o t h e r h o o d of M a n . Such an ap­ p re c ia tio n m ay evolve more during the n ext hundred years than during the nineteen centuries which have just passed. Frequ en tly it requires a great crisis in human affairs to impress a great truth upon the comprehension of mankind. In this regard the crisis of the past few years has been one of the finest things that could have occurred, bringing forces which are cleansing humanity spiritually and ridding it of many of its false teachers and leaders, false systems and doctrines. T h e r e has been much wailing and gnashing of teeth, especial­ ly on the part of those who have been most lacking in fortitude and moral vision. It has been a trying time for all of us, of course; a period of testing. In some cases, troubles have been magni­ T he fied by the inability or refusal of certain Rosicrucian persons or groups to recognize the Digest needs of the entire people and to modi­ February fy their own demands or actions in a c ­ cordance with such needs. 1936 W h e t h e r we will it or not, the con­ sciousness of man is passing through a purging process, one of the greatest in all history. T h is purging and cleansing must continue until humanity has truly mastered its lessons of humility, love, and sacrifice. T h e s e lessons are being learned, slowly but surely, through necessity if nothing else. Humanitarianism, in its highest sense (having its foundation in co-operative effort and in a realization of the inter­ dependence in Spirit of all peoples and all things) is the basis of the new dis­ pensation. W e may as well accustom ourselves to the idea that we are enter­ ing an age where many of the old, established and treasured doctrines or rules of conduct will be obsolete. Humanity has been burdened with a number o f destructive doctrines and traditions which it could very well do without. T h e Supreme Pow er has seen to it that there has alw ays been a pro­ gressive G o o d working in the world. W e must not overlook this fact. Y e t many of the outstanding characteristics of the stage of civilization from which we are now emerging have not been progressive, except in so far as they may have been necessary to teach a lesson. W h a t have been these characteristics? W a r and destruction. Repression and oppression. F e a r and hypocrisy. M a ­ terialism, selfishness, and greed. M e n have had a complex that has prompted
E ig h t

them, under the guise of civilization, to jump at each other's throats with un­ restrained passion, usually for nothing more noble than the desire for acquiring a piece of this little planet called Earth . Is this the most advanced condition of human Society? N o t at all. It is mere­ ly a strange interlude,— a nightmare. Let us have faith enough in the es­ sential goodness of humanity to believe that the ultimate stage of human evolu­ tion must be one of true universal dem­ ocracy, founded upon that much mis­ understood factor called Love. A Society in which all peoples are combined in a unity of thought, purpose, and action. W h e n we refer to that “ factor called Love" there should be no doubt in our minds that we understand what is meant. T h e term is used in its loftiest spiritual meaning, as in the Biblical ad­ monition, “Love thy neighbor as thy Self." T h e idea is made still more clear if we refer to certain other expressions in the Bible. Often we have heard it said that this or that man or woman is or was a “G o d ­ fearing” man or woman. C an it be pos­ sible to be a G o d-fearin g and a G o d loving person at the same time? In the fourth chapter of the first gen­ eral book of John we find these declara­ tions: “If we love one another, G od dwelleth in us, and His love is perfected in us.” “God is love; and he that dwelleth in love dwelleth in God, and G od in him.” “Th e re is no fear in love; but perfect love casteth out fear; because fear hath torment. H e that feareth is not made perfect in love.” “If a man say, I loved G o d, and hateth his brother, he is a liar; for he that loveth not his brother whom he hath seen, how can he love G od whom he hath not seen? And this commandment have we from Him, T h a t he who loveth God love his brother also.” In an earlier portion of the same book of John (in the third chapter) we find: " W h o s o hath this world's good, and seeth his brother have need, and shuteth up his bowels of compassion from him, how dwelleth the love of G o d in him? Let us not love in word, neither in tongue; but in deed and in truth.”
Nine

A better understanding of the part which the human mechanism plays in the universe is becoming apparent. T h e sympathetic kinship of mankind is gain­ ing wider recognition. T h e broader per­ spective will not be achieved, however, so long as we pin our eyes and hearts alone to this E arth . M a n must continue to reach out into the universe and dis­ cover its truths. T h ro u g h the revelation of the omnipotent laws of G od as mani­ fested in nature we gain knowledge. T h ro u g h knowledge we acquire wis­ dom. T h ro u g h wisdom we use our pow­ ers, not in violation of natural laws, but in a wise co-operation. Perhaps it is impossible for us to con­ ceive just how far we may progress within the next few hundred years to­ ward the goal of universal brotherhood — or rather, toward a full realization of the existence of that brotherhood. T h e evolution of the spiritual and creative faculties of man has depended to a very large extent upon the unveil­ ing of the forces of nature. T h e s e forces, even to the smallest fraction of energy reaching the E arth from every part of the universe, some day may be subject to the control of human genius. Trem end ous changes, both in material condition and in spiritual outlook, will occur when the potential genius in every person is given an opportunity to reach a high state of usefulness. It is exalting to consider the possi­ bilities for creative advancement that will be open to subsequent generations. A part of our contemplating may be little but empty dreaming. But in any event a little meditation and quiet re­ flection now and then are good for the soul of any man. In such a moment of meditation we may have the good for­ tune of feeling an attunement with that Spirit which the poet, W o rd s w o r th , de­ fines as impelling “all thinking things, all objects of all thought,” and “W h o s e dwelling is the light of setting suns, And the round ocean and the living air. And the blue sky, and in the mind of m an.” In that moment we may comprehend more clearly the nature of things about us, and (w ho know s?) we may have a fleeting glimpse of the G re a t Plan be­ hind it all.

T h e "Cathedral of the Soul” is a Cosmic meeting place for all minds of the most advanced and highly developed spiritual members and workers of the Rosicrucian Fraternity. It is a focal point of Cosmic radiations and thought waves from which radiate vibrations of health, peace, happiness, and inner awakening. Various periods of the day are set aside when many thousands of minds are attuned with the Cathedral of the Soul, and others attuning with the Cathedral at this time will receive the benefit of the vibrations. Those who are not members of the organization may share in the unusual benefit as well as those who are members. T h e book called "Liber 777” describes the periods for various contacts with the Cathedral. Copies will be sent to persons who are not members by addressing their request for this book to Friar S. P. C., care of A M O R C Temple, San Jose, California, enclosing three cents in postage stamps. (P le a s e state w hether m em ber or not— this is im portant.)
IM lM lltllllllllllM I III IM M IIIII M ill

CATHEDRALS OF THE PAST
ECEN TLY some of our friends have s t a t e d that this special department of our work known as “T h e C athedral of the S o u l” is not a wholly new idea, nor e x c lu siv e ly original with us. T h e y claim that in ancient times the T he same idea was used Rosicrucian somewhere in the Digest Rosicrucian organization, or at least February among some of the mystical philo­ sophers of the M iddle Ages. 1936 W e have never thought of the C ath e­ dral of the Soul as an idea that was so wholly new and original that its coun­ terpart, or even an ex act and perfect form of it could not be found somewhere in the mystical writings and especially in the Rosicrucian teachings and prin­ ciples of the past. W e have always known, for instance, that among the mystical philosophers and Rosicrucian adepts of the higher grades in the past centuries, there were occasions when a large number of them would unite and create mentally and psychically for the time being a great cathedral into which all of them would project their thoughts
T en

and meet in silent communion as in a mental world or spiritual world far above the mundane things of life. W e knew also that many of the Rosicrucian mystics of the past have referred rather indefinitely or vaguely to their Cosmic contacts with other G re a t M a ste rs in a holy place that resembled a cathedral. But at no time in the past history of the Rosicrucians or of mystical philo­ sophers did any organization or group of officers plan a symbolical and alle­ gorical Cathedral of the Soul into which thousands of persons w ere invited to place their minds and hearts in simul­ taneous communion at various fixed periods of the day and night. T h i s was the part of the plan that w as original with us in this country. It is as though in the past centuries various small groups of mystics or oc­ casional triangles of members did agree to meet mentally, despite their distant locations, in a temporary, sacred place in the Cosmic, which we might liken unto a small chapel or a holy grotto where in mental seclusion and spiritual privacy they might contact the minds and souls of one another for temporary understanding and exch ange of ideas; and it is as though we here in America took that little Cosmic chapel and re­ built it into a magnificent cathedral ample to enclose the minds and inner selves of thousands, and opened its doors daily and hourly to the reception of those who were sick or despondent, or perplexed, or in sorrow, and who would be sure to contact at almost any hour of the day or night others who came there in rejoicing, in thankfulness, and in appreciation for Cosmic bless­ ings, and were ready to administer in­ spiration, cheer, and good fellowship to the others. There is hardly any phase of our Rosicrucian activities, the counterpart of which to some degree cannot be found in the teachings and practices of the Rosicrucian mystics of the past, and even of some eminent mystics who were not affiliated with the organization. Truth is eternal, and has never be­ longed to any one sect or classification of individual, and the great truths con­ tained in our teachings and practices may be found in shadowy form or in
Eleven

part, or perhaps just in symbol or in­ expressed thought in the lives and prac­ tices of illuminated characters through all the ages. If you have not set aside a few moments of your daily life to lift your thoughts upwardly and outwardly to a point where you can feel that Cosmic Blessing, that Divine energetic infusion, and that magnificent music of the spheres which we appreciate with the Cathedral of the Soul, then you have missed one of the benedictions of the day, and one of the greatest opportun­ ities of your daily life for relaxation that is tonic, inspiration that is beyond mun­ dane limitations, and joy that is beyond earthly imitation. W h e t h e r or not you are a member of our organization, you are privileged to enjoy the great blessings of the C a th e ­ dral of the Soul. Irrespective o f your religious faith, or t h e creeds and doctrines of the church and religion to which you a r e devoted, you can strengthen and encourage the spiritual side of your nature by allowing it to soar on divine wings to great heights of the transcendental Cosmic Conscious­ ness and there dwell in ecstasy for a few moments. It will cause you to for­ get for a while your earthly trials and tribulations, your material problems, your human ailments, and your personal limitations, weaknesses, and tendencies. Y o u become but a living soul in all of its pureness and undefiled expression. Y o u become what G o d made you and intended you alw ays to be, a living soul in His Divine Image. In the C athedral o f the Soul you will find no creeds or dogmas except those that you take to it as your R o sa r y and guide in life, and you will find that your R osary is symbolical o f all of the spirit­ ual truths. Y o u will find no intolerance, no misunderstandings, no quibblings over non-essential things, but simply the magnificence and subliminal purity of soul. It is like a journey to the un­ known, with the unknown becoming known while the known of the earth is completely forgotten. Y o u will return to your worldly affairs and worldly con­ sciousness encouraged and inspired, happy and at peace with the world. Y o u will have had a taste o f what the

spiritual life must be in the great period that is yet to come. Y o u may sense but dimly, but nevertheless comprehending1y, a bit o f that afterlife when you shall be freed entirely for a time from the physical form and physical obligations. T h e few moments spent in this w ay will bring greater strength and health to the body and mind than hours of sleep and relaxation.

If you have not secured from our or­ ganization the mystical book entitled “Liber 7 7 7 ," be sure to send for it to­ day as suggested in the introductory paragraph at the beginning of this de­ partment. Sh are with us one of the great joys which the ruler of the earth and the decrees of man cannot take from us, and which the trials and tribu­ lations and suffering of the earth can­ not destroy.

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Selflessness
By F ra ter C h ester L a ffer ty
O O N after his en­ trance u p o n the P a t h , the N e o ­ phyte is introduced to the Divine Idea of S e l f l e s s n e s s . During his prog­ ress upward along the w ay of T r u e Light, he will e x ­ perience o n e of three possible re­ actions. First, in the course of his evolution he may become more acutely aw are of the tremendous import of the virtue, and submit his selfhood to the beloved service of God, the Cosmic, and Humanity. Second, he may miss entirely the true meaning of the path, and there­ fore be indifferent to the ideal. T hird , he may recognize the necessity of the virtue, but being still too strongly a t­ tracted to the actualities of the material world forsake the climb to rest on w h at­ ever level he finds himself. T h e N eoph yte who is deeply im­ pressed with the beauty of the Ideal, will immediately express an enthusiastic determination to realize the virtue. H ere he meets with a difficult problem, and that is, a systematic manner of accomp­ The Rosicrucian lishing the task at hand. T h e attain ­ ment of Selflessness is a bitter struggle, Digest and is never completely achieved until February we reach a state o f perfect A t-one-m ent with God. 1936 In outlining a campaign for the acqui­ sition of Selflessness, we should first have a definite understanding of what Selflessness is. And in order to under­ stand a thing thoroughly, we must e x ­ amine it in its duality. Since we are at present on the Negative Plane of C o n ­ sciousness and can more readily grasp the negative duality, we will start from this point and gradually develop a knowledge of the positive. Selfishness, the negative quality of Selflessness, may manifest in many ways, but let us ob­ serve one of its most common forms which seems to have a greater and more direct bearing on our mental attitude, disposition, and general outlook on life. T h e most common and vicious mani­ festation of Selfishness is Self-pity, or the habit of feeling sorry for oneself. It warps the mind, which is our most powerful tool, thereby crippling our ability to help ourselves or others. It narrows our vision so we can not see the whole picture, and we miss so much of the joy and beauty that surrounds us. It distorts our sense of values and our reasoning is not sane, our judgment un­ fair. T h e n come all the ills to which mortal man is heir. T h e personality be­ comes morbid, driving from us those who would help us. T h e more we in­ dulge in Self-pity, the lower the depths of despondency to which we sink. A greater part of the suffering we experi­ ence in this life is brought upon us by living selfishly for self. Compassion for
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self is a curse, while compassion for others who are less fortunate than our­ selves, becomes a baptism in ecstasy. T o impress the truth of this statement upon the consciousness, try this experi­ ment. Start a day by feeling sorry for yourself because someone has a better home than you have, a better position, better health, more appetizing food, nicer clothes, a newer car, more friends, more opportunities, more money, and because they are treated more respect­ fully than you are. A t the end of the day you will have a beautiful case of the miseries that will stay with you for a long time, unless you start the next day by trying to have a sympathetic understanding of another's sorrows and tribulations, and by doing every little bit that you can to relieve ano th er’s

pain and give him inspiration. A t the end of this day you will come to know the reality of happiness and peace, and the meaning of the positive duality—* Selflessness. L et the N eoph yte approach the tech­ nique of Selflessness by systematically eliminating his minor self-pities and sub­ stituting ano ther’s need for compassion, and continue working in this manner until he has finally eliminated his major manifestations of Selfishness. A s he progresses in this line of endeavor he will suddenly become aw are of an in­ crease in knowledge of the Law s and a greater ability to make the Laws work.

4 H e who loses his life fo r my sak e shall find it, and h e w ho would save his life shall lose it.”
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Experience Creates Knowledge
By
S F ra te r

W . C.

P ark er,

F. R. C.

W E peer back through the ages, to the beginning of the h u m a n race, we perceive pre­ historic man co n ­ templating w i t h amazement the en­ vironment in which he had been placed for the acquisition of earthly experi­ ence. T h e r e he stood, or more probably crouched, a strange admixture of awe, hope, and terror, confronted by the problems of life, which must be faced, whether or not he wished it. T h e r e was no alternative. His was to do or die. U nder such circumstances, it is inter­ esting to surmise w hat could have been the first thought that emanated from his embryonic consciousness. H e was devoid of knowledge and there were no schools or colleges to which he might turn for instruction as
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to his proper procedure. T ru e, he pos­ sessed a soul, a brain and five senses, but they had yet to be co-ordinated. If we concede the axiom that “S e lf preservation is the first law of n ature,’’ we may reasonably assume that his initial act was to seek shelter from the distressing atmospheric conditions and the devastating storms that swept the dismal terrain; or perhaps his fear of the ferocious beasts that challenged him at every turn, forced him to take refuge in a rocky crevice or natural cave, where he might pause in comparative safety. T h is opportune haven contained no downy bed to rest his weary limbs and, upon awakening, he did not find a ready supply of hot and cold water; no tub or shower for the matutinal bath; no fleecy towels or toilet articles; no re­ frigerator, replete with tempting viands; no gas range or cooking utensils; no morning newspaper; no books to en­ lighten him; no clothes to drape his shivering figure; not even a Bible to render him comfort.

The

B y no stretch of the imagination could he visualize what are considered the ordinary requirements of modern life and, from sheer indigence, he was com ­ pelled to arouse and depend upon his individual initiative for the mere per­ petuation of his existence. G radually, he learned to walk upon his feet; to touch and feel things with his hands; to smell the fragance of the flowers: to taste the scanty food that came within his reach and to hear w h a t­ ever sounds were evoked as the forces of nature pursued their relentless course. T h e vague comprehension of these occurrences served to develop a mental reaction, and slowly his brain began to function and enable him to recognize and repeat the sensations which a ffo rd ­ ed him the maximum of gratification. From time to time, he devised crude implements to assist him in fishing, hunting, and other projects which came to his attention, including the acquire­ ment of much-needed materials to cover his bruised and naked body. Q uite naturally, his primeval instincts developed into a desire to improve his mode of living. Grim necessity became the mother of invention and converted him into “an eternal question mark.” and, as a result of his patient search for w ays and means to yield him greater pleasure, he eventually stumbled upon the great discovery— fire! H e became interested in the gutteral tones emitted from his throat and con­ trived to express his approval or disgust with an expressive grunt. Little by little, he associated certain sounds with specific objects or events and thus established the foundation of a language, an alphabet, and the meth­ ods o f oral communication now in vogue. In his spare moments, he amused himself by fashioning rough drawings of the animals he encountered, and his various adventures, supplementing these hieroglyphics with marks to represent the various vowel sounds, and in this manner evolved the written word and made possible the preservation of ex -

R osicru cian P f ien“ aj; d .kln owle,d 9 e th a' haf been of such material assistance in the formaD ig est tjon 0 f our present-day civilization. F eb ru a ry Finally, this was climaxed by the in1936 vention of the printing press and the

world-wide dissemination of learning, which has so enhanced our supply of in­ formation as to provide the indolent with an illusory short-cut to knowledge. S tra n g e as it may seem to the un­ thinking novitiate, the wisdom of the ages was not borne to us on the wings of chance. It was not dropped in our laps, like so much manna from heaven, but was garnered through the painstak­ ing efforts and actual experiences of our ancestry, who, by persistent experi­ mentation discovered and proved what we today accept as truths, exemplifying a perfect manifestation o f the Divine purpose to make man the master of his own destiny. It is obvious that this vast fund of knowledge was not particularly accumu­ lated for the elucidation of debating societies nor merely to furnish theses for erudite scientific discussion, but is a sacred heritage that we should accept with reverence and gratitude, with the anticipation that it will inspire us to further experimentation and new ex­ periences, from which we may derive additional knowledge that we can pass on to future generations and thus sus­ tain the significance o f the eternal circle. It is also well to remember that we are the stewards, to whom this dili­ gently-acquired wisdom has been en­ trusted, and for its use or abuse we shall be held to a strict accounting. Furthermore, our responsibility in­ creases in proportion to the abundance accorded us, and the more we receive the greater will be the returns expected from our stewardship. T o idly and selfishly enjoy the mani­ fold blessings with which we are en­ dowed, is contrary to the law of ap­ portionment. If the ancients had been content to accept prevailing conditions, there never would have been any prog­ ress. W e would still be living in caves and eating raw food. It is in conse­ quence of their work that we are pro­ vided the luxuries of today and the Cosmic code of equity exacts a justifi­ able recompense. W e get out of life what we put into it. W e must give freely, if we expect to receive. Giving does not necessarily imply a monetary transaction. It is just as much to our credit to continue the labors of our predecessors and conF ou rteen

tribute increased benefits to those that follow us. W o r k and experiment will bring experience, and experience will create the knowledge that will help us to reveal unto others the path to true happiness. It is our especial privilege to receive each week a masterful monograph, de­ finitely indicating the w ay to real knowledge, through enlightenment, e x ­ periment, and experience. A careful study of these lessons will undeniably prove of lasting benefit, but it needs more than the most compre­ hensive reading to fully convey to us

the higher intelligence we are seeking. It requires the experiments to unfold the cryptic message to our inner con­ sciousness. "K n o w led ge is pow er," but positive knowledge can only be obtained through personal experience. If we make judicious use of knowl­ edge, study the lessons understandingly, faithfully practice the experiments and apply them to our daily lives, and conscientiously perform our duty to our fellowman, we will assuredly pave the w ay to peace, love, harmony, and the attainment of Divine Illumination.

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RO SICRUCIAN N E W Y E A R PRO CLAM A TIO N
T h e Imperator of A M O R C for North and South America has issued his annual New Y ear proclamation decreeing that Friday, March 20, 1936, shall be recognized by all members of the North and South American jurisdiction of the A M O R C as the Rosi­ crucian New Y ear D ay. He calls upon all lodges and chapters within his jurisdiction to hold the usual New Y ear ceremony within twenty-four hours of the date, and since the night preceding M arch 20 is Thursday night upon which so many lodges and chapters hold their regular weekly meetings, it is recommended that the New Y e a r ceremony be held upon Thursday evening, March 19, wherever possible. W h en this is not possible, it should be held on Friday evening, March 20. The approximate moment of the beginning of the New Y ear is 2:00 P. M. Eastern Standard Time on Friday the 20th. This is equivalent to 1:00 Central Standard Time, noon Mountain Standard Tim e, and 11:00 A .M . Pacific Standard Tim e. All members who can visit their local chapter and all members affiliated with lodges are expected to attend this annual sacred feast and symbolic ceremony. Members who are not associated with any local chapter or lodge should spend a few minutes either Thursday or Friday evening, March 19 or 20th, in meditation and contemplation in their sanctums for the purpose of attuning themselves with Fratrcs and Sorores of the Order throughout the world and receive the pleasant vibrations of fraternal greetings, universal love, and Cosmic peace. In all lodges and chapters the new officers, who have been duly elected in accordance with the constitution of the Order, should be installed or officially take their offices, and the fiscal year of the lodge or chapter activities is closed and all annual reports of lodges and chapters should be made as of March 20, 1936. The Supreme Lodge for North and South America, as in other countries, will hold its high ceremony and send forth its good wishes and esoteric benediction on Thursday evening, M arch 20, in the large auditorium at Rosicrucian Park. Members living near Rosicrucian Park at San Jose, or members visiting in the State, are cordially invited to attend the services at Rosicrucian Park on that evening. All national lodge members unaffiliated with any lodge or chapter and who are living within visiting distance of a lodge or chapter, are invited to be the guests of such lodges and chapters and to attend the ceremonies held therein on either Thursday or Friday evening. W rite to the lodge or chapter nearest to you, by referring to the directory in the back of this publication, and learn several weeks in advance on which evening the lodge will hold its New Y ear ceremony and ask for instructions regarding your visit and attendance on that occasion. Members visiting such lodges or chapters must show their membership cards. On this New Y ear D ay the Rosicrucian year 3289 will be born and begin its very important cycle. T h e digits of this number equal 22 which equals 4, representing the square. T his in itself is very significant. R. M. L E W I S , Su prem e S ecretary .

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PA G ES
from the

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NICOLAS MALEBRANCHE
£ • S E E E = £ £ £ £ E E E E E S E £ £ £ £ £ E E Each month w e w ill present excerpts from the w ritin gs o f famous thinkers and teachers o f the past. These w ill give our readers an opportunity o f know ing their lives through the presentation o f those w ritin gs which ty p ify th e ir thoughts. Occasionally such w ritin gs w ill be presented through the translation or interpretations o f other eminent authors o f the past. Our subject this month is N icolas Malebranche. T h e early life o f this m ystic and philosopher, is an exam ple o f how we may be pursuing a w ron g course in life and y e t by a fortunate combination o f circumstances, arouse a dormant desire which eventually lead3 us to success and attainment. It is indeed regrettable when such circumstances do not occur in the life o f one who is fo llo w in g a channel foreign to his interests. Nicolas Malebranche, a French philosopher, was born in Paris, August 6, 1638, and he died October 13, 1715. H e came from a prominent fam ily, was the youngest child o f Nicolas Malebranche. Secretary to Louis X I I I . H e had the advantage o f an excellent education and began his studies at the C ollege o f L a March, later studied th eology at the Sorbonne U niversity. I t was his early intention o f entering the church, but his love o f retirem ent led him to decline a Canonicate in N o tre Dame. W hen still a young man, in fact, 22 years o f age, he entered the congregation o f the o ratory and devoted himself to the study o f ecclesiastical history. H e found it extrem ely difficult, however, to harmonize the various incidents, and was losing interest in his studies, when he came across Descartes’ “ T ra ite de l'H om m e,” which aroused a dormant enthusiasm fo r philosophy. H e h eartily agreed w ith Descartes’ distinction between mind and matter, and considered the only true qualities o f matter, extension and motion, Malebranche is particularly renowned fo r his w ork entitled “ Recherche de la V e rite .” W e b rin g to you below, excerpts from this w ritin g which he entitled “ W h at Is Meant B y Ideas.” I t is grea tly condensed, yet sufficient to show you the depth o f his thoughts and from a philosophical point o f view is today equally as instructive and interesting as when w ritten.
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Q m i i m i i i i i ...................

W HAT IS MEANT BY IDEAS
S U P P O S E that everyone will grant that we p e r c e i v e not the objects that are without us im­ mediately and of th em selv es. W e see the sun, the stars, and infinite other objects with­ out us; and it is not probable that The the soul goes out Rosicrucian of the body, and Digest fetches a walk, as I may say, about the February heavens, to contemplate all the objects therein. ’ • 1936 It sees them not therefore by them­ selves, and the immediate o bject of the mind, when it beholds the sun, for example, is not the sun, but something intimately united to the soul; and that same thing is w hat I call our ‘idea.’ So that by the term idea I mean nothing but that object which is immediate, or next, to the soul in its perception of anything. “ It ought to be well observed that in order to the mind’s perceiving any ob­ je c t it is absolutely necessary the idea of that o bject be actually present to it: which is so certain as not possibly to be doubted of. B ut it is not necessary there should be anything without like to that
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idea; for it often happens that we per­ ceive things which do not exist, and which never were in nature. A n d so a man has frequently in his mind real ideas of things that never were. W h e n a man, for instance, imagines a golden mountain, it is indispensably necessary that the idea of that mountain should be really present in his mind. W h e n a frantic, or a man in a fever or sleep, sees some terrible animal before his eyes, it is certain that the idea of that animal really exists. And yet that mountain of gold and this animal never were in being. "Notwithstanding, men being, as it were, naturally inclined to believe that corporeal objects exist, jud ge of the reality and existence of things quite otherwise than they ought. F o r when they perceive an o bject by w ay o f sense, they will have it most infallibly to exist, though it often happens that there is nothing of it without; they will have, moreover, this object to be ju st the same as they perceive it; which yet never hap­ pens. But as for the idea which neces­ sarily exists, and cannot be otherwise than we see it, they commonly judge, without reflection, that it is nothing at all: as if ideas had not a vast number of properties (as that the idea of a square, for instance, were not very different from that of any n um ber), and did not represent quite different things! W h ic h is not consistent with nothing, since nothing has no property. It is therefore undoubtedly certain that ideas have a most real existence. B u t let us inquire into their nature and their essence, and see what there is in our soul capable of making to her the representations of all things. "W h a te v e r things the soul perceives are only of two sorts, and are either within or without the soul. T h o s e that are within the soul are its own proper thoughts; that is, all its different modi­

fications. F o r b y the words 'thought,' ‘manner o f thinking,' or ‘modifications of the soul,' I mean all those things in general which cannot be in the soul without her perceiving them; such are her own sensations, her imaginations, her pure intellections, or simply her con­ ceptions, as also her passions and na­ tural inclinations. N o w our soul has no need of ideas to perceive all these things, because they are within the soul, or, rather, because they are the very soul itself, in such or such a manner: just as the real rotundity of any body and its motion are nothing but the body figured and translated, a fte r such or such a sort. " B u t as to the things without the soul, we can have no perception of them but by the means of ideas, upon supposition that these things cannot be intimately united to it; and they are of two sorts, Spiritual and M aterial: as to the Spirit­ ual, there is some probability they may be discovered to the soul without ideas, immediately by themselves. F o r though experience certifies us that we cannot by an immediate communication, de­ clare our thoughts to one another, but only by words and other sensible signs whereunto we have annexed our ideas; yet we may say that G od has ordained this kind of economy only for the time of this life, to prevent the disorders that might at present happen if men should understand one another as they pleased. B u t when justice and order shall reign, and we shall be delivered from the captivity of our body, we shall possibly communicate our thoughts by the inti­ mate union o f ourselves, as it is prob­ able the angels may do in heaven. S o that there seems to be no absolute n e c­ essity of admitting ideas for the repre­ senting things of a spiritual nature, since it is possible for them to be seen by themselves, though in a very dark and imperfect manner." □

W E TH A N K Y O U
The officers of the Supreme and Grand Lodge, and the various department heads, take this opportunity of expressing their thanks for the hundreds of Christmas and New Year greetings they have received. It is practically impossible for them to acknowledge these various greetings separately, so they hope each of you who has remembered them, will accept this formal acknowledgment as their appreciation of your thoughtfulness. E d itor "R osicru cian D igest.

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Seventeen

SMental Efficiency
By
F ra te r R o b ert

A.

Sw eeny

O S T of us, once our s c h o o l days a r e co m p le te d , consider that our mental powers are developed as far as they need be. Doubtless they are sufficient for the everyday r u n of affairs. T h e truth, n e v e r t h e l e s s , is that w e hardly tap the enormous re­ sources of energy that G o d has b e ­ stowed upon us. Efficiency is the k ey ­ note of our modern civilization, but our mental rating would be very low if judged as accurately as many other less essential matters. Scientists have long experimented in an endeavor to discover the source o f our mental energy. Som e still believe it to be of a dynamic origin, but the concensus of opinion has it that, in the words of Dr. F ran cis G . Benedict, ‘‘M en tal effort is without significant in­ fluence upon the energy metabolism.” T o put it differently, intense mental effort produces little effect upon the processes by which food is transformed into physical heat and energy. T h e y have also found that an additional T he Rosicrucian supply of food does not produce an in­ crease of mental power. In fact, no Digest special dietary preparation has been February found to have effect upon the ability of the mental worker. . 1936

O u r body receives life and susten­ ance in two w ays: through food and by means of the breath. I f food does not give us this mind energy, and this can be the only logical conclusion of the above mentioned experiments, we are forced to believe that our breath must be its source. T h is does not surprise us, for as Rosicrucians we are fully aw are of the importance of the breath in our daily lives, aside from any dependence upon the oxygen supply. T h e energies necessary for our material body have their counterpart in high vibrating energies which are the driving force of the immaterial processes of the inner self. R egardless of how we receive this energy and of what systems there are to increase it, we are concerned here mainly with the efficient use of that which we already have. It is safe to assume that we start each new day with a certain amount of this energy; each d ay ’s supply depending on how soundly we rested and slept in between. T h ro u g h o u t the day as long as we are conscious our supply of energy is being depleted, w hether we sit idling away the time or spending it in deep thinking. W e can live without food longer than sleep, for the latter is essential in recharging the divine ener­ gies of our body. W e may conserve this energy by proper relaxation. A few moments of deep relaxation several times a day will enable us to work longer hours and
E ighteen

with less fatigue. T h e trouble with most of us is that we relax too much. T h a t is, as far as productive work is con­ cerned, we might just as well have not existed. E x cep t for a few trivial things our mind has not been forced to exert itself. W e are tired, yes, but a nervous tiredness from worry over what we should have done, but persuaded our­ selves we could do just as well tomor­ row. T h e path of least resistance is very enticing. A splendid method of frittering aw ay good energy is lack of proper attention. How many of us try to read or study with one ear cocked toward the radio? It cannot be done with proper justice to either. Concentration on one thing at a time is the prime requisite for good mental efficiency. Our Rosicrucian studies teach us the proper methods of relaxation and con­ centration and doing them correctly is a great step upon the right path. But another matter has yet to be enlarged upon. T h a t is our spare time. R igh t here is the source of most of our trouble, for spare time is one of our most valu­ able possessions. Let us see how w e can make better use of this lost opportunity and what benefits may accrue therefrom. T h e first thought in everyone’s mind is the sub­ ject of hobbies. M a n y members of our Order have Rosicrucianism for a hobby and no better one can be suggested. There are many things that one may do, however, in connection with his R o si­ crucian studies that will not only add interest to the lectures, but at the same time make a great change in o ne’s en­ tire outlook on life. F o r those scientifically inclined a small laboratory may be equipped very reasonably. M icroscopy and astronomy are very popular at the present time, and as various subjects are pursued in the weekly monographs one will be able to experiment for himself. E v en deep study and concentration will not always enable our consciousness to retain knowledge that may be easily absorbed by a few moments of actual experience. T h e courses given at the R o se -C ro ix University are exceptionally beneficial for this reason. A n y one of the arts and sciences may be chosen with equal success, depending
N ineteen

on our own inclinations. B ut do not start with a subject too difficult for your present mental development. A failure at the very beginning will constantly harass your memory, just when success on a new project is about to be consum­ mated. T h e secret of the whole matter lies in one thing. C hoose a subject that is entirely different from your daily vocation or profession. C reate an ideal or goal toward which to work. It will change many times as you progress, but the will is strength­ ened and will help you over the first few rough spots. A llow your imagina­ tion to work and develop. It will lead you into many interesting paths, for broad reading and study are necessary for an efficient mind. T h i s is not for the purpose of learn­ ing a mass of facts and figures that will never be used. P ause often to meditate upon your new information. U se your Rosicrucian knowledge as a background and a focal point, for it will alw ays be a secure footing when you may be in­ clined to soar too high in the clouds of speculation. Suppose we do use our wasted min­ utes in constructive thinking, ju st w hat benefits may we expect? First, of course, will come additional knowledge of various kinds. T h is will broaden our views and cast out ignor­ an ce and bigotry. It will contact those centres of our brain that have been little used, aw akening them to new life. T h e s e areas are so related that strengthening one will stimulate others until one grad­ ually finds that those subjects that at first w ere hard to grasp and understand are becoming easier. T h e s e new fields of research and study will unlock doors of the storehouse of memory until a fter a few months of earnest effort one will find his mind full of ideas that will lead him into new fields of endeavor. It is just a matter of a little will at the beginning. Thin kin g is like running a race. A f te r the initial effort has been prolonged to a certain extent one gets his second wind and is then able to pro­ ceed at full speed. S o many of us quit before we reach the “second w ind” stage. It is not at all unusual for one to dis­ cover some field of endeavor for which he is particularly adapted; generally a

topic that he has been ignorant of thus far. T h is point has been brought out in an address by Dr. W illia m A . W h i t e of W a s h in g to n , D . C . B efo re the American Association for the A d van ce­ ment of Science, he said, in relation to heredity and environment, that “a per­ son may inherit a quality without ever showing any signs of it at all, simply b e­ cause he has never been exposed to the proper stimulus. Assuming that such a characteristic as ability to play the violin were transmitted by heredity, it is understandable that an individual might inherit such an ability but never realize it because he never had a violin to play upon.” H e goes on further to say, “T h i s all means that w hereas our here­ ditary pattern is fixed to a certain e x ­ tent, it is only fixed under condition of life such as we ordinarily meet up with and that entirely different conditions might result in the realization of pos­ sibilities undreamt o f .” W h a t a pity if we should pass through transition with­ out having realized our true mission in life. It may be hard at first to see how good hard honest thinking would aid in lengthening our span of mental life, but some of our scientific authorities are in­

clined to that view. P ro f. W a l t e r R. M iles of Y a l e University answers “y e s” to the question: . . can man through the mental gymnastics and by the con­ tinuance of psychological wakefulness associated with professional or avocational activities insure himself with na­ ture for something in late life better than mere disposing memory or testa­ mentary cap acity ?” H e further states: “T h e study of man in maturity shows that his psychological progress is not bound utterly to the lowest level of his physiological decline. T h ro u g h ap­ propriate training and practice, co n ­ tinued mental elasticity and organized effective control, may extend mental longevity.” T h u s we see that perfect, complete, and balanced reasoning and will a d e­ quately employ all the abilities of mind. W e can conclude with no better thought than that expressed by Prof. John R. M urlin in an address given at Ursinus College: ‘‘T o be cultured one must be critical of life. T o be justly critical one must have confidence in one's own reason, must find pleasure in working out o n e’s own w a y of life and must prize the truth above anything else.”

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SPECIAL IN FO R M A TIO N W A N T ED
During the past ten years many of our members have travelled through Europe, parts of Asia, and even to Egypt and other parts of Africa on private, personal tours for pleasure or business. During those tours they have contacted some of the Rosicrucian archives, temples, private meeting places, or groups of Rosicrucians or officials of the Rosicrucian Order in Europe, or have seen such evidence as has proved to them the long existence and operation in foreign countries of various branches of the Rosicrucian Order. T h ey have written us at times of these contacts and their pleasant and happy experiences. T h e Imperator would now like to have a letter from each and every one of these The members who has ever made such contacts, stating briefly where the contact was made Rosicrucian and the incidents surrounding it. Please address such letters to the Imperator personally. Digest Th is is a very vital and important matter at the present time.— Editor. February iiiiimtiiitiiiiiiiiiiiii mu 0 1936 fl"1
illinium iiiiiiiiiinii i iiMiini n mi mi ■ ii ii iiiinmiii n illinium

T w enty

A Theory of Earthquakes
IS THE CAUSE TO BE FOUND IN COSMIC DISTURBANCES OR SOLELY IN THE EARTH? By
F rater

J.

C. Cook

N T H E spring of 1931, B ailey W i l ­ lis had an article in the N ew Y o r k H e r a l d T rib u n e e n t i t l e d , “A n E a r t h q u a k e An H o u r,” in w h i c h he c l a i m e d that quakes m a n i f e s t s o m e w h e r e or other upon the face of the earth at the rate of one an hour. This, it would seem, makes the quakes almost as common an occurrence as the ordinary storm; and we might naturally conclude from their commonness that seismology would have these mani­ festations fairly well-tabulated after all these years in which M o th er E a rth has been having an hourly ague, and that the science should be able to run up a warning flag with all the conviction of the meteorologist. But if you happen to be a student of seismology you know better. A nd if you have been at it suf­ ficiently long enough you know that seismology is a science “all at sea ," and that you might just as well work with your own theory as with another. Since my first experiences with a quake in Southern California in 1919, I have had a theory of these disturbances
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that is at considerable variance with any the geologists or seismologists hold and, so far as I can find, with that o f any ever held. Regardless, it is a theory that seems tenable and one that seems in line with true science. Also, it is certainly one that gets down to what we might here term the basis of everything— electricity. In brief, it is that quakes originate in the air, dissipate within the earth and are, therefore, but variations of an electrical storm. O r. to put it another way: instead of lightning, we have an electrical mist which condenses upon any conductor on or near the surface of the magnet— the earth. And, in toto, it is against all ideas of crust move­ ments, slippage, and oscillations, or any kind of an impulse that might arise within the earth's crust. It seems amazing how many plain and salient facts in support of an elec­ trical theory have been overlooked by the science in the study of quakes. T h e tomes thereof are truly a mass of evi­ dence therefor. W e pick up any volume. T h e words cry the message and the pictures impress it on our eye— that is, they do so if w e are not awed by the science. A nd we lay aside the book and talk to the man in the street, walk about in the ruins, and the evidence is the same. It seems as though we have

been blind for ages when it comes to quakes. A nd through a little trick that has come to me, I truly believe that one is alw ays somewhat blinded in a quake. B ut before I give you the trick, I had better get on with the theory. It orig­ inates in the air and to get the evidence therefor, we have but to listen to the n a ­ tives of a quake area. M a n y o f the older and more sensitive ones can feel an omi­ nous something in the air prior to a quake; they will tell you they can feel it brewing, just as you can feel a cyclone coming; and here we seem to have a fact, for if it can be felt in the air prior to complete manifestation, it must come through the air or be thereof. A nd upon this point I can add my personal testi­ mony, for I have experienced this ominous feeling. And, furthermore, origination in the air is nothing new. W e have had it since Aristotle. H e held that quakes came from air pockets in the interior, or below the surface of the earth. B u t let us lay aside the origination and look at the pictures and walk about in the evidence. W i t h half an effort we almost invariably see the electrical co n ­ ductor where the damage occurs. T h e street, with its underground pipes, etc., is humped and broken open lengthwise, according to the pattern o f what is underground, while the vacant lots ad­ joining are undisturbed. Railroad tracks in open country are found twisted out of shape and the surrounding terrain is unbroken. B arb wire fences m ay be seen toppled and snaked about while the sod and pasturage is the same as ever. W i t h one-story, flat-roof brick buildings the parapet is often found lying in the street with the four walls o f the building intact; and such p ara­ pets, or fire walls, are found to have had iron brace rods. In a frame dwelling the stove and pots and pans and other conductors dance and rattle and exam ­ ination reveals the woodwork as all un­ disturbed. T h o s e riding in a train are jolted and one going along in an auto is unaware o f the disturbance. A n d in the case of a sign painter laying gold The R osicru cian leaf on a window (which operation is done with a w ater size) the pane o f D ig est glass was suddenly yanked into the F eb ru a ry street, with no other disturbance of the building. A t Inglewood, California, a 1936

frame hotel with a brick front had this front yanked into the street clean, leav­ ing the exposed rooms intact. It is al­ ways a yank or a jerk, as we examine the evidence, and with but very few exceptions always according to manmade layout and visible electrical con­ ductors. In open country we come across the few deviations from man-made lines. T h e long fault (ground fracture) goes snaking across the land for many miles and our geologists point to it as con­ clusive proof of the tilting block theory. T h e y display little models o f earth blocks that have tilted and slipped, etc., and we are duly impressed. B u t upon an examination of fault maps the block theory is not tenable. T h e plane of a block must have three lines and the faults are not after this manner. T h e y just snake across the country and end a t another point; they terminate after the manner of a single line. A nd with this our imagination balks at a block theory. B u t working with an electrical theory our imaginations can easily take hold of the idea of a vein of ore, or some sort of a conductor, beneath the surface and according to the visible fault line. A n d working with this idea, we have m ore food for thought in a considera­ tion of our cyclone areas. T h e twister country is flat and underlaid with oil. T h o se who have been in quakes sw ear the ground rolls like the ocean waves and I, also, held this illusion until I found it out of line with facts. It is true we have the sensation while in the quake, but upon its subsidence it is another story. W e find a queer state of affairs for a terrain that has been rolling. O th er than cleavage breaks, we find the ground intact. G ard ens, orchards, and fields have undisturbed surfaces; not a crack in the soil to be seen. And in California, w here the tilled area is mostly orchard and grove, the ripe fruit remains upon the trees. Just try imagin­ ing Southern California, if you can, thriving as it is if the quakes were really rolling the ground as they mani­ fest. O f course, the soil must move at a break, but rolling is no more than imag­ ination or illusion. B ut we have an e x ­
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planation for it with an electrical theory. W e know our bodies are conductors and the hair thereon more so than the flesh. S o assuming an electrical mist, w e can imagine it condensing upon our bodies and rushing thereon into the n a­ tural magnet— the earth. A nd we know that the strongest may scurry like a rabbit in a quake. As we walk or run the foot makes and breaks contact with the earth and the electricity upon our bodies acts a c ­ cordingly. W i t h each make and break there is a pull or a jerk, which acceler­ ates or holds the foot movement. A nd thus we may have the sensation of the ground rising and falling aw ay — like unto the sensation of stepping down a n ­ other step when we are on a landing in the dark. T h a t our bodies attract w e may also conclude from the illusion of all the scenery vibrating. T h i s would seem to come from the greater amount of hair being upon the head, or because of the lashes and brows bringing about a dis­ turbance of sight. In seismology, they have a recording machine known as a seismograph. T h e practice is to imbed them in the solid rock, and they are operated electrically. T h e y record quivers from thousands of miles away. But the nearby ones went out of commission in the great Sa n Francisco quake. A n d at the American Museum of N atural H istory in N e w York City, we find blasting operations in rock for an addition to the main building were unrecorded b y the instru­ ment therein. So, altogether, the seis­ mograph is not to be relied upon and, though the crust of the earth is m ag­ netic, it would seem as though these machines are picking up something other than earth vibrations. Electrical clocks go out o f commis­ sion in quakes and all in all there is but little to support the theory o f an earth­ quake. O n the contrary, the evidence is mostly for an airquake.

Q u ak es always manifest in their own territories, the same as cyclones, etc. It is mountainous terrain and science claims M o th er E a rth has growing pains at such points, which brings on a case of ague for her occasionally. M aybe she has! I don't know, for I am not up on science. B ut I can imagine that as the mountains are projections they could well be the means of a bankage or condensation that would bring about the mysterious manifestation of a quake. F o r a decade or so I was stumped with this theory of electrical vibrations, because there was no means of getting up an artificial quake and no account­ ing for the illusions. But in con centra­ tion the matter o f illusions became clarified. L ate one night something told me to stand up and hold my torso rigid and vibrate my head. Upon doing so I had all the illusions of the vibrating and dancing scenery in a quake. T h is is the trick mentioned, but do it easily for otherwise it brings on a headache. In hammering at seismology, as I have done with this theory, it may ap­ pear to be very audacious for a layman. A nd it is, if we are awed by the science. B ut the history of material science, in the main and especially this one, may be summed into five words — to d a y ’s bunk is tomorrow ’s junk. Seismology has been a study for many centuries and has taught prob­ ably as many theories. O n e has been discarded for another and the quakes remain as mysterious as ever. T h e reason may be that as the study is unremunerative, too few have been a t­ tracted to it to solve the problems there­ of. B ut the fact we cannot get away from is that the science h a sn ’t a thing to offer the world other than its records and theories; and, after all these years, why, then, should laymen stand in awe of it, or hesitate to tackle the mystery of the quake? A n y o ne well up on elec­ tricity and unfettered by the text books of the science might soon give us a w orkable theory of these devastating manifestations. V V

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Each hour o f the day finds the men o f science cloistered in laboratories without ostentation, in vestigatin g nature's m ysteries and exten din g the boundaries of knowledge. T he w orld at large, although profiting by their labors, oftentim es is deprived o f the pleasure o f review in g their work, since general periodicals and publications announce only those sensational discoveries which appeal to the popular imagination. It is with pleasure, therefore, that we afford our readers a m onthly summary o f some o f these scientific researches, and b riefly relate them to the Rosicrucian philosophy and doctrines. T o the Science Journal, unless otherwise specified, we giv e fu ll credit fo r all m atter which appears in quotations.

Improvement of Memory By Sleep
V I S gratifying to find that general science is now co n ­ firming a scientific principle, k n o w n to the Rosicrucians for a considerable time. E v ery R o si­ crucian who has been a member for even so short an i nt e r va l as one year, is f a mi l i a r with this principle, which science now confirms, for it is contained in the early monographs. T h e principle is the development of memory through direct suggestion to the subjective mind. T he F o r example, it is stated in the R osi­ Rosicrucian crucian monographs that if a parent Digest finds it difficult to impress on the mind February of a child, a definite thought for the betterment of his character, the follow­ 1936 T V V ing method should be used: W h e n the child has retired and is sound asleep, the parent should seat himself or her­ self by the side of the child and in a low tone of voice, not loud enough to awaken the child, repeat over and over again, simply the sentence containing the thought he or she wishes the child to remember. T h e psychological principle is this— T h e subjective mind, ever alert, receives these impressions and retains them. W h e n the child awakens and is objectively conscious, the thought arises in his own outer mind as a self-g ener­ ated suggestion, and coming from with­ in himself, effects a greater impression than if he were to attempt to concen­ trate on what was being said to him. M o st persons find it difficult to concen­ trate. T h e ir objective consciousness vacillates from one sense impression and idea to another and most of them are not retained long enough, or do not register with sufficient intensity to perT w enty-fou r

meate the memory. Suggestion, as a means of improving memory, can also be employed when the subject is in the borderline state, partially awake in other words. A t such a time the objective faculties are nearly dormant and all positive suggestions reach the subjective plane or consciousness without co n ­ flicting with objective sense experiences. For example, years ago, the United States Naval A cadem y tried the experi­ ment of placing radio ear phones on the new men when they retired at night, those who had found it difficult to memorize the M o rse code by sound. W h en they were asleep, instructions and code were transmitted to them, but at an insufficient amplitude to awaken them. A t class session the following morning, these men seemed to readily memorize and grasp the lessons which had been transmitted to them the previ­ ous evening. W e therefore feel that the following experiments of science along these lines will be of particular in­ terest to Rosicrucian students and in fact to anyone who knows of the R o si­ crucian experiments in this field. ‘‘If a person memorizes certain kinds of material perfectly, and goes to sleep immediately afterwards, he will recall more of it, and also re-learn the whole task more economically after a lapse of 24 hours, than if he waits even a few hours before he goes to sleep, according to Dr. H. M . Johnson, professor of psy­ chology of American University, W a s h ­ ington, D . C., who spoke at Cornell University recently. ‘‘Experiments based on different methods, made by Dr. R osa H eine Katz, at the University of Gottingen, and by Joseph F . O ’Brien, graduate student at American University, showed that all the subjects who were studied were better able to recall and also to relearn material that they had learned b y rote and partially forgotten, if they first slept for eight hours and then worked for sixteen hours, than if they distributed their rest and activity in any other w ay during the 24-hour period. ‘‘Dr. Johnson said that the differences in favor of sleeping immediately varied between 2 0 per cent and 30 per cent, according to the subject and the task. One would be justified in offering a bet of 100,000 to one that M r . O ’B rie n ’s
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results were not due to chance. ‘‘T w o explanations have been offered. O n e, which D r. Johnson called the ‘hardening’ hypothesis, pictures the brain as inert during sleep, giving recently received impressions a chance to become ‘set.’ T h e other, called the ‘reverberation’ hypothesis, regards the brain as an active organ even during sleep, and supposes that it goes on re­ peating or ‘reverberating’ recently re­ ceived impressions during the uncon­ scious period. ‘‘D r. Johnson does not regard either hypothesis as satisfactory. T h e ‘hard ­ ening’ hypothesis is cast into doubt by the poor recall of memorized material made by persons who had ‘hard en ed ’ their brains with the equivalent of only one highball. Furthermore, very recent studies on brain waves show that these fluctuations in the electric potential of the brain go on continuously during sleep, though not in their ordinary ‘w akin g ’ patterns. Finally, studies on sleep, conducted by D r. Johnson him­ self several years ago at the M ellon in­ stitute, show that sleepers assume mus­ cular positions which they can maintain only by dint of strenuous brain exertion. ‘‘D r. Johnson offered a third hypo­ thesis, which, however, he did not urge as necessarily correct. H e suggested that the memorized material might ‘re­ verberate’ in the brain, but during the drowsy periods before sleep and during the slow awakening process, and also during the frequent half-wakeful periods during the night which most persons e x ­ perience without realizing or remember­ ing them.”

Is the Universe Expanding?
Comments upon the theory of an e x ­ panding universe alw ays grip the human imagination, because of the magnitude and mystery of the topic. T h is theory, however, is related directly to another, known as the balanced universe. B r ie f ­ ly, the latter hypothesis is, that the only state of being which exists, is the uni­ verse. It is the whole; there is naught external to, or beyond it. I T IS , and there is nothing else. T h i s state of be­ ing includes all substances, gasses, liquids and solids. It also includes the

so-called energies and conditions of the universe is, therefore, the human space. In fact, all of these combined, consciousness. O u r limits of perception constitute a C O S M I C A C T I O N . T h i s create a temporary boundary, but that Cosmic action is conserved, it is never boundary exists to us alone. Science dissipated or lost, but constantly changes and an expanding human consciousness its rapidity. If there is no loss of action, are extending our realization of the e x ­ there can be no contraction of the uni­ tent of the universe. verse, but also there can be no ex p an ­ In conjunction with the above, read sion for there is no addition to its na­ the following interesting comments upon ture. F rom whence did the addition an opinion recently given by Dr. come, as Parmenides so ably put it ce n ­ Z w ick y, who has devoted much thought turies ago? T h is theory recognizes a and time to this subject. compensation or balance, as existing in ‘‘T h a t the earth is near the center of the universe. T h e Cosmic action, the primary nature o f the universe, is said an exploding or expanding universe may be just a false concept built up in the to have a dual polarity, to be both posi­ tive and negative. It functions as a flow mind o f m an,” suggests Professor Fritz Z w ick y . of the California Institute of from a minimum to a maximum, and then reverses itself, establishing a co n ­ T e ch n o lo g y . stant balanced alternation. T h is alter­ ‘‘W h e n scientists interpret the muchnation accounts for the changes which observed red shift of the light from w e perceive as the forms of our earth distant nebulae as proof that the separ­ and of the universe. T h i s change is ate parts of the universe are rushing quite deceiving, it is contended, and aw ay from one another with velocities may give rise to the illusion of an e x ­ as high as 1 5,000 miles a second, they panding universe. A change in a solid are making only one of several possible in the stellar spaces consequently affects interpretations.” D r. Z w ick y , reporting the light radiations of that Cosmic body in T h e P hysical R eview , points out that and may cause it to appear as rapidly while the theory of relativity partially receding from us. It is further contend­ explains the red shift in terms of an e x ­ ed, as a philosophical speculation, that panding universe, the relativity predic­ a thing which in itself is everything, tions are not in accordance with obser­ cannot expand into or assimilate some­ vation in several important respects. thing else. F o r the universe to expand ‘‘T h e red shift o f light from distant there would need be a state or condi­ nebulae is analogous to the lowering of tion into which it could expand. If such the pitch of a sound like that from the a state existed, independent of the uni­ verse, the universe would neither be whistle o f a locomotive speeding from the observer at the crossing. In both unified nor complete. A ccording to this cases the shift is one toward lower fre­ same reasoning, the universe must be without limit, for what would mark its quencies; for the whistle it is sound fre­ quencies: for the expanding universe boundaries? Obviously, any boundaries concept light frequencies are concerned. o f the universe would need be its end, Lower light frequencies make the ob­ that is, where a state or condition of served rays from the distant nebulae nothing existed. However, nothing is more reddened than they really are. the absence of something. It has a pure­ T h e colors are not necessarily red in the ly negative existence. T h e r e is, in fact, observed spectral lines, but merely shift­ no such state as a void. It is merely the ed in the red direction— hence the sorelative opposite of our perception of called red shift. reality. A void neither exists in nor out­ ‘‘In his complex mathematical scien­ side of the universe. If a void has a tific paper, P ro fesso r Z w ick y sets up all definite existence outside of the uni­ the requirements which any explanation verse. our universe as w e know it, is in­ The of the observed red shaft must satisfy complete; for it to be considered unified, Rosicrucian we would need to add to it this void. in order to be acceptable. F o r one thing, Digest the shift ought to come out to be the T h e universe is all, everything, not February property of an y point in space instead merely one state or condition apart from some other. T h e only boundary of of just that particular corner o f the uni­ 1936
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verse around the earth. ‘W e do not want to assume that our earth is just the center of things. T h e relativity e x ­ planation of the red shift satisfies this requirement but so do other theories.’ “In other requirements the relativity explanation does not meet observed conditions, but Professor Z w ick y, in his report, shows how to examine broadly all possible theories and has found sur­ prisingly, that some theories meet all

demands and may be as good as, or better, than, the relativity explanation of the red shift. “T h e selection among the possible alternative theories must be left to checking by observations. Some of these require new developments in astronomical technique such as the in­ stallation o f the new 200-inch telescope at M o u n t Palom ar for the California Institute of T e c h n o lo g y .”

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ANCIENT SYMBOLISM
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Man, when conscious o f an eternal truth, has ever sym bolized it so that the human consciousness could forever have realization o f It. Nations, languages and customs have changed, but these ancient designs continue to illum inate mankind with their m ystic light. F o r those who are seeking ligh t, each month we w ill reproduce a symbol or symbols, w ith their ancient meaning.

CELTIC CROSS
Perhaps one of the oldest symbols o f man, and which still is prom inent today, is the cross, but there are various forms of the cross, many of which had no religious significance, but were purely geom etric or mystical. The most commonly known crosses are the C rux Ansata, fhe looped Egyptian cross, the Tao cross, the Swastica, and the various ecclesiastical forms. O ne of the oddest forms of the cross is that which is illustrated here, known as the A b e rlemno, or C e ltic . The original is form ed of a single slab, seven fe e t in height. If our readers will refer in their local public library, to the subject of “ cross," in any of the leading en­ cyclopedias or H asting's “ Encyclopedia of Religion and Ethics" they will find, therein, some intensely interesting and instructive reading s about the origin and significance of the different forms of the cross.

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T h e Antiquity of Our Teachings
SOME INTERESTING COMMENTS REGARDING THE ORIGIN OF ROSICRUCIANISM By
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Im perator the earliest days, and because in the passage of time the traditional history which had passed on from generation to generation by word of mouth had be­ come colored with symbolism and al­ legory. B u t there was a time when the factual history was carefully noted and preserved, and which we find recorded in various books, manuscripts, and rec­ ords cut in stone and wood, or engraved in metals, or inscribed in symbols upon various forms o f matter. Certain it is that there are books and manuscripts available today which plainly reveal the spiritual foundation of the organization existing prior to the 12th century, and the material form of it definitely in exist­ ence and recorded in the 13th and 14th centuries. O th er organizations of a fraternal, secret, or mystical nature, have tradi­ tional histories also, such as that which traces its origin to the minute details of the building of King S o lom o n ’s Temple. Such traditional histories are not sus­ ceptible of precise proof and concrete recording except in allegories and sym­ bolism. Nor is it necessary for such traditional history to be proved in order to benefit from the spirit of the work as associated with such traditions. M a n y of the modern fraternal organizations of a secret nature who trace their tra­ ditional history far into antiquity ca n ­ not prove any details of their factual
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I R S T of all, I want to say that I am not going to touch upon at this time the origin of the Rosicrucian O rd er as a physical or­ ganization. T h a t subject is one with w h i c h the most eminent historians and writers have d e a l t at g r e a t l engt h w i t h o u t complete agreement. W e have stated in our literature and elsewhere that our organization, like many others, has both a traditional history and a factual his­ tory. T h e traditional history traces the origin of the spirit of Rosicrucianism as a school or system of thought to the mystery schools of E gy pt. It traces the Rosicrucian doctrines, not as man-made dogmas but as fundamental principles of human experience, to the secret teachings of the various mystery schools of the N ear and F a r E a s t in ancient times, and which gradually blended their teachings into one established sy s­ tem of study. W h e n the traditions and T he Rosicrucian fundamental principles were definitely or gradually brought into conformation D ig est with certain ideals and certain doctrinal February principles, it is difficult to state, because of the absence of any printed records of 1936

history beyond the 15th or 16th cen­ turies, and some of them frankly admit that so far as recorded facts are con­ cerned that are definitely related to the traditions, they cannot trace them fur­ ther than the 17th or 18th centuries. The statements on the part of some writers and encyclopedias, and especial­ ly the statements of some present day critics who are not familiar with even a fraction of the facts, attempt to say that the antiquity of Rosicrucianism is wholly mythical and that even its exist­ ence as a concrete organization at an y period of time prior to the past century is unproved and questionable. Even a few of those persons who look upon themselves as Rosicrucian writers have fallen into the error o f accepting the encyclopedic mistakes and have stated in their literature that the Rosicrucian Order had its first world-wide inception and birth with an individual who called himself Christian Rosenkreuz, and who created the Rosicrucian organization some time between the years 1604 and 1616, in Germany. Such persons, of course, have never seen or read scores of books that tell a different story, nor have they ever had in their hands for careful study or even casual examina­ tion genuine Rosicrucian publications printed prior to the year 1604, and which show that even at that time the organization of Rosicrucians had a very wide existence with established prin­ ciples and doctrines, and rules and regu­ lations. T h e y are even ignorant of the fact that the name Christian R o se n ­ kreuz was not the true name of the in­ dividual nor the symbolical name of any one person, but simply the sym­ bolical name of various persons at va­ rious times in the past to whose lot had fallen the right and the authority to issue official manifestoes or decrees in the name of the Order. F o r this reason, we find references to a Christian R o se n ­ kreuz in G erm any in the years 1604 to 1616, and again some time in the 15th century, and again in the 14th century, and earlier, and there are persons living today in foreign lands who have had in the past, and one who now has the right to issue formal manifestoes in the sym ­ bolical name of Christian Rosenkreuz. And it does not always mean that the one who uses the name in this manner
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is necessarily a reincarnation of the person who formerly used that name. T h is peculiar fact is not unique to the Rosicrucian organization. In the M a r tinist O rd er, which has existed for some centuries, the highest secret chief in each period of time has the right to use the symbolical name which has been used by his predecessors. In other fra­ ternal organizations there are certain characters representing the symbolical leader, founder, or idealized character, who bear his symbolical name, and each successful high potentate of the organi­ zation in each part of the world uses that same symbolical name. In a study of the ancient mysteries, we find very often that over a period of many cen ­ turies parts of the rituals were perform­ ed and the candidates initiated “in the name of--------------- ” wherein the name of a great character was used as though he were living at that very time. During all of the periods of activity of the organization, certain rare books w ere prepared and issued, as well as certain manuscripts were prepared on parchment or other durable material in cipher or code or mystical language, and these were hidden in the archives of the order to be revealed at certain times, and to pass on to various new branches or new revivals of the O rd er in order that the fundamental teachings and principles of the organization might be preserved to all posterity, and a uni­ formity of teaching and practice main­ tained. T h o s e critics of the organiza­ tion who contend that this is not so, are absolutely ignorant of the facts, and by their ignorance reveal that they have never had the qualifications which would have enabled them to know the real facts. Prior to the time that F ran cis B a co n invented several special ciphers and secret codes, most of the early manuscripts of Rosicrucianism were prepared in mystical language and in symbols or hieroglyphic marks that had to be interpreted in various ways. R e a l­ izing the danger of mistranslation, B a c o n deliberately invented several secret ciphers and had these published in book form in several books, any one of which did not give the complete cipher or complete instructions for its use. O n e of these appeared to be only a treatise on the value of ciphers and

The R osicru cian

their importance, while other books co n­ tained samples of such ciphers, and still others contained certain codes separated from any text or explanation. Some of these publications printed in London and other parts of E urope in Latin and E n g ­ lish and bearing early 17th century dates, are here in our possession and in the secret archives of our Headquarters. T h e ir validity, authenticity, and true nature are authenticated by some of E urope's principal librarians, or chiefs of secret libraries, and antiquarians who have made a special study of ciphers and codes and know what these special books of B aco n 's were intended to be. Sometimes parts of the B aconian code system were incorporated in the final chapters of a book dealing with an en­ tirely different matter so that if the book were found in a library or indexed a n y ­ where, it would not be considered or recognized as a part of the Baconian code system. W e have also one of these books in our archives. A s for the teachings of the Order, themselves, these, too, were often preserved in book form on parchment paper or other w ater-m arked paper in very limited editions called Libers 1, 2, 3, etc., or Libers M , F , G , etc., or Libers 7 -7 -7 , 3 - 3 -3 , 81, etc. ( T h e term Liber 7 7 7 was one of the most ancient of terms used for books that contained a complete or perfect representation o f some of the principles of the O rder. Sin ce the tri­ angle or the number 3 represented per­ fect creation and the number 7 repre­ sented the triangle on the square, or in other words, the completion of a struc­ ture, the use of 7 three times or as 7, 7, 7, or 7 -7 -7 , represented a p erfect and com plete presentation of a subject, and for this reason certain books that outlined a complete thought on any one of the Rosicrucian principles or a com ­ plete doctrine, or a complete manifesto, or a complete system of practice of any one of its special principles, was called Liber 7 -7 -7 , or B ook 7 -7 -7 . T h a t is the reason why we use this symbolical num­ ber for the title of the book that gives a complete presentation of our department called " T h e Cathedral of the S o u l." ) T a k e , for instance, the work of our Sixth D egree, dealing with a study of the psychic and mystical nature of our human existence, and our body, and all

the vital forces that animate it, the cause of disease and the possible cor­ rection of these causes through mystical and Cosmic help. T h is Sixth D egree of our study contains matter that has never been published in any metaphysical or occult book or set of books, and con­ tains matter that is wholly unique with the Rosicrucian system of instruction. It deals principally, as most of our members know, with the psychic side of our human bodies, and of the psychic centers and psychic nervous system along with the mystical anatomy of the body. N o w as I prepare this article for T h e Rosicrucian D igest. I have before me for reference one of the oldest Rosicru­ cian books, issued in the very early part of the 17th century and printed upon a marvelous quality of handmade paper that is w ater-m arked with the Rosicru­ cian marks. It contains the symbols of the Rosicrucians, and especially the authority of the Militia of the organiza­ tion. and the name and portrait of one of the best known and universally acknowledged Rosicrucian leaders. It deals with the principles of the work of our Sixth Degree, and is beautifully il­ lustrated, especially to reveal the psy­ chic and metaphysical side of our bodies and explains its relationship to Cosmic principles, the influence of music with the musical notes and nerve notes such as our lectures now contain, and all the other fundamentals upon which our Sixth D eg ree work is based. It is doubt­ ful if there is another copy of this book anywhere in America, and it is certain that these so-called critics of R osicru­ cian literature and history have never seen this book and know nothing about it. Y e t its authenticity is certified to by archivists and librarians abroad, and it is further listed in the bibliographies of some of the oldest archives and libraries of Europe, and is the foundation for many of the exercises and principles contained in our present work, especial­ ly in connection with Nous and the use of the breath in breathing exercises, and the radiations of the human aura in other experiments. All of our teachings in the A M O R C today are based upon authentic writings contained in the true Rosicrucian pub­ lications and manuscripts of the past.
T hirty

Digest
F eb ru a ry 1936

These fundamental principles have never been changed in our lessons and lectures since they were first given to me in the years between 1909 and 1916, or in special manuscripts since then. It is true that from time to time we have aug­ mented our lessons in the form in which we present them by the addition of new matter that has come to us in R osicru ­ cian books and manuscripts, and in any matter sent to us by foreign branches of our organization where experiments, tests, and demonstrations have been made for the purpose of keeping our teachings abreast of the times, and by new matter contributed by our own American national board of research and editorial work, composed of men and women engaged in special research in all of the sciences, arts, and practices of the modern times. There are certain landmarks, as they are called, connected with genuine R osi­ crucianism by which the true O rd e r and the true teachings can be instantly recognized by those who are familiar with them, or by those who have made any special study of the history and work of the Rosicrucian organization. These landmarks are not only the few true symbols of the organization, but certain Latin or symbolical terms that are used in connection with the names of certain officers with certain grades of the work and certain phases of the practices, and by certain emblems, cer­ tain formulas, certain notations, phrases, proverbs, and doctrinal statements that are in a definite manner of speech or wording, and which are different from those used in any other organization. And there are certain words and phrases that contain codes or veiled ideas that are not recognized by the casual read­ ers, or understood by the uninitiated. B y these things antiquarians who have studied the history of the O rder, or those who have ever been initiated into the Order, or reached certain high grades of the O rder, easily recognize the genuine organization from an y pre­ tentions. Furthermore, there is a certain circle of Rosicrucian students throughout the world which has reached the highest grades and which constitutes the H ier­

archy of the O rder, the spiritual council, and which acts as advisers and co n ­ servators. T h e s e persons are never known to the public, but are known to a wide number of advanced students and members, and their manner of working and participating in the activi­ ties of the organization is well-known in various lands. Above and beyond this hierarchy are the Supreme Officers throughout the world who are united in a secret circle with a chosen and elected secret chief whose real name is never revealed outside of that secret circle, and whose decrees and manifestoes are acknowledged and acted upon. In this wise the pureness of Rosicrucian teach­ ings is maintained, the genuine manu­ scripts and books are released from time to time through the proper secret channels, and the authenticity of the O rd er and its integrity are preserved. T h e r e are members in America who are part of this hierarchy and who are con­ vinced beyond any question o f doubt and from actual experience and know l­ edge regarding the genuineness and authenticity of the teachings and work of our organization, and the branches of the Rosicrucian O rd er in other lands w herever they have contacted them. T h e y know the genuine from the false, and they, like the members of the Militia, are pledged to preserve the integrity of the O rder, not the person of its chief officers, and in all ages have seen to it that the work of the O rd er goes on and on regardless of the trials and tribula­ tions of the physical part of the or­ ganization. In the past centuries there has never been a lapse o f years when the hier­ arch y of the O rd e r has not been active, when the Supreme Officers in various jurisdictions have not maintained a con­ stant contact with the hierarchy and have kept alive the spirit of the work and protected its archives and secret possessions, even when the O rd e r in certain countries was in periods of public inactivity. All of these facts can be proved by books, manuscripts, and rare records not generally known to the public, but avail­ able to those who would have the proper authority and proper purpose in examining them.

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V
T hirty-one

V

V

SANCTUM MUSINGS
THE SOLE REALITY
(T h is article is continued from last m onth and will be continued in the M arch issue.)

U R analysis so far has been mainly of the faculty of sight. W e found visual experiences composed of three definite character­ istics. First, qual­ ity; second, form; and third, the area of the form or di­ mension. T h e lat­ ter two result from the variation of the former which gives the quality of the sense a primary importance. W e have already determined that each of the other four objective senses has its distinctive qualities as well. T h e y also have their forms. But do they like­ wise all have area or dimension? A nd are their forms and dimensions also the result of the variation of their quality? E xperien ces of touch not only have either the quality of hot or cold, soft­ ness or hardness, with their order of smooth and rough, etc., and their com­ plements of square, round, sharp, and dull, but they have their innumerable The Rosicrucian distinctive forms as well. A transition from one aspect of the quality of touch D ig est to another establishes the notion of a February new form and we can group the changes 1936 to compose one idea. F o r example: T h e

soft petals, sharp thorns, and smooth leaves of a rose are not regarded as in­ dividual forms but group sensations comprising the idea of a single form. Electro-m agnetic impulses may be used as an example of how a variation of the quality of touch produces different ideas of form. Rapidly periodic but mild electrical impulses discharged through an electrode held in the hand titillate and create the idea of softness, whereas an increase in voltage of the current so varies the quality of touch that the prickling causes us to associate with the sensation the notion of hardness and the further inference of sharpness. Realities of the sense of touch also have their limitations. T h e y seem con­ fined to a particular area as do those of sight. Numerous objects to the sense of touch may have the quality of hardness, yet they can cause the idea of difference in dimension. T h i s is not necessarily so much due to a variation in the quality itself, but rather in its order of regu­ larity. F o r example: Suppose a change in the regularity of the quality suddenly conveys to us the idea of roundness where previously the notion had been that of squareness. W e then imagine the end of the previous form and the beginning of another. Both objects, the one that now seems round, and the one
T hirty-tw o

that seemed square, may be hard; the quality has not varied, merely its order. On the other hand, if the experience of roundness and squareness in co n ju n c­ tion with hardness persists, the idea is established from the inferences that there is a unity, the two ideas combine to establish the concept of but one form. For instance: T h e uprights of a ladder may be flat with sharp edges and the rungs round. T o the blind person for the first time feeling the rungs of such a ladder and then the uprights, it seems as though he has perceived individual forms, but if he repeats the process two or three times with the same ladder, the separate impressions are united into the combined idea of a single form. If it is a tall ladder and leans against a house so that he may walk freely behind it and on each side of it. and if he extends his hand and is aware of no sensation of touch, this change from the previous distinct feeling gives rise to the notion of the ladder having definite dimension. In other words, there is a limitation of its perceivable form. S o variation of the quality of touch or its order also estab­ lishes the idea of dimension. All things of taste possess one or more of its qualities of sweet, bitter, and salty. Y e t the realities of taste are far more numerous than three. An analysis of taste forms reveals them to be found­ ed upon a variation of any one of the fundamental three taste qualities or even the combination of all three. T a s t e forms do not have dimension in the sense that they occupy an area. B ut the forms do have w hat we may term m ag­ nitude. which though conceived by us as different from dimension, produces the same effect in our minds. In other words, the forms o f taste have a quanti­ tative nature as well as a qualitative one. T h e y have their magnitude not in the extent of the variation of their form but in an intensity of their quality. F o r example: Let us imagine we were riding in a sound proof compartment of a train, close beside a high stone wall, a wall we shall say about five miles in length. If the train were traveling at a nominal speed, about eight minutes would be re­ quired before the end of the wall would be reached. T h e only means we would have of realizing during that eight minutes that we were not focusing our
Thirty-three

consciousness upon a single portion of the wall, that we were not stationary, would be by observing a succession of slight irregularities in the wall itself. T h e s e minor variations of its quality, its characteristics, would give rise to the idea of the w all’s length. But on the other hand, if we had a wall absolutely the same in surface and we were not able to see the sky or feel the motion of the train, we would have no knowledge of our movement and our conception of the length of the wall would be entirely different. It would appear that we were stationary, looking at one part of the wall, and that suddenly the wall dis­ appeared. T h e length of the wall would be to us about the length of the window of our compartment. A n y difference would merely consist in the length of time we would continue to be conscious o f the wall. T h e difference would not be a variation of the quality but its per­ sistence, or what we shall call magni­ tude. N o w to apply this to taste. Some things are sweet, others nominally so, and still others intensely sweet. T h is is not ascertained by a variation of the form itself in comparison to another form perceived simultaneously, but pure­ ly by comparison of the sensation of the quality with a memory of the past taste forms experienced. F o r instance, we can only ascertain the dimension of a cube when we actually see its limita­ tions; that is, perceive a change in form, the beginning of some other reality. Until this is perceived the form appears as continuous and without end. W i t h a taste form like the analogy of the per­ fect stone wall, no other form need be perceived at the time nor need we real­ ize any limit to the one sensed to have an idea of its magnitude. T h e degree of intensity o f the sense is sufficient. W i t h taste, only the single form need be perceived for us to realize its limit and to establish the idea of its magni­ tude. T h e degree of intensity of the sense impression is sufficient. T h o u g h we say some things visually perceived are large, and others small, such ideas of magnitude arise only after the notion of dimension has first been perceived and the actual limitations of the form are realized. In touch, like­ wise, the intensity of the quality is

realized, as some things are harder, and some softer, than others, but such varia­ tions contribute to the idea of form rather than to the dimension o f touch’s realities. It may seem that we have made no distinction between discerning taste's forms and its magnitude; that variation of quality gives rise to form: and that variation also establishes its magnitude. However, two substances m ay have an equal intensity of sweetness, yet have that variation of quality as to be con­ sidered different. H on ey and maple syrup are approximately the same in­ tensity in sweetness, but no doubt exists as to their being different taste realities. Hearing, as said, has its sole quality of pitch, which is the lowness and high­ ness of tone. Betw een the two extremes exist the realities of sound, which we apprehend by ear. T h e variation of pitch produces sound forms. T h e forms of the sense of hearing, like those of taste, have their magnitude in their in­ tensity. O n e sound appears greater than the other, not in its persistence, but rather in its amplitude. Everything of smell has fundament­ ally either the quality of fragrance or fetor, or the coalition of the two. Like all the preceding senses which we have analyzed, the forms o f smell are de­ pendent upon the variation of the sense quality. Furthermore, the magnitude of the forms of smell, like those of taste and hearing, depends upon their in­ tensity rather than an apprehending of the beginning or end of the form itself the same time as any other olfactory form perceived at the same time. W e find the scent of a lilac quite intense in its fragrance, whether we perceive it at the same time as any other olfactory form or not. T h e comparison may be but by memory. In sight and touch, however, we have seen that it is n eces­ sary to perceive the beginning o f what appears to be another form, or the end­ ing of one which we realize, before the notion of area or dimension can be had. W e have established the hypothesis that out of the quality of the respective The R osicru cian senses are engendered their forms and their magnitude. T h e quality, or quali­ D igest ties, of each sense would then appear to F eb ru a r y be its true reality, yet has the quality, apart from the sense itself, an external 1936

existence? D o the senses substantiate each other? If it can be conclusively proved, for example, that what we see has the same reality to touch, then the quality of sight is a dependable reality. W e see before us a bronze disc eight inches in circumference, and one-quarter inch in thickness. It is highly polished and so smooth it is glass-like. It is a definite reality to our sense of sight. W e touch the disc. T o further identify it by touch alone, we close our eyes. It feels smooth— as smooth and as hard as we saw it. W e find the edge and draw our fingers around it. It is as round as we saw it. In every respect the touch form is identical with the visual form. But we have unconsciously permitted ourselves to draw inferences which have no existence to the sense of sight. A c tu ­ ally, it is impossible for you to visually discern smoothness. Smoothness, as previously shown, is an order of the quality of touch. T h ro u g h touch alone may we actually know smoothness— not through sight. T h e same applies to roughness. A superbly capable artist, a genius, may paint upon a canvas a bristling cactus plant, which in appear­ ance has all of the asperity indigenous to that plant, but touch alone proves whether it actually is rough or not. T h e fact that what to the eyes may appear rough, and to the touch be proved not to be rough, is proof that smoothness and roughness are not natural to the qualities o f sight. O f course, we may feel an object that is smooth, then remove our hands and it will continue to appear smooth to our sight, but sight did not confirm touch, we merely experienced the habitual visual inference of smoothness. W e at­ tempt to confirm the smoothness of cer­ tain visual things by touch, which we would not do if it were natural to the quality of sight. W e do not attempt to prove light by touch. W e infer from the touch of a highly polished surface, which though we may never have seen it, that it shines in the light, yet it re­ quires sight to prove that the shine or reflection of light can be perceived by sight alone; in other words, is of sight’s quality. T h e refo re, all that touch can prove about the reality of the disc is its own qualities, such as hardness, and the
T hirty-fou r

phases of its order, such as smoothness, roundness, and, of course, dimension. The visual identifications, for example, of a form such as bronze— its shade of color and brilliance— are solely due to sight, and in no w ay could these ch a r­ acteristics be substantiated by touch. Both sight and touch have those pecu­ liar geometrical arrangements of their forms which we designate as either round, square, triangular, etc., but this arrangement, or order, does not sub­ stantiate each other’s qualities. T h e fact that to touch, the disc has the order of roundness as well as to sight, does not relate the form perceived by both senses. An o bject may be round to touch and to sight, and yet appear dif­ ferent to both senses. F o r we may feel a round, soft, warm, and non-metallic substance, and to the eye it may appear round also, but hard, cold, and metallic. Suppose we see before us a coin. It appears hard, round, and metallic. W e feel it, and to the touch it is also round, hard, and metallic. W e drop it upon a marble surface and to the ear it has a metallic ring. All this seems to confirm the impressions of sight, to substantiate the visual reality. Actually, however, touch cannot prove the quality of sight, which is light, and therefore the hard ­ ness we imagine we see is not actually seen, but inferred. It has no more exist­ ence to sight than white has to touch, which we might infer from feeling the form of a lily. True, we may have heard the metal­ lic ring, but that is no proof that the metallic ring was from the coin we saw or felt. All that our hearing conveys is a particular pitch with which we asso­ ciate a form. W e only infer that it is the same form we perceived by touch or sight. T h e quality of each sense has reality only unto that particular sense, and not to any other. Ideas arising from group sensations are purely inferences. W e may cite the age-old example of the unreliability of the senses given by the ancient philo­ sopher, Pyrrho, principal advocate of the doctrines of skepticism. H e asked, “W h a t is the reality of an apple? Its scent, color, and shape, or its taste?’’ The color and shape alone do not co n­ stitute an apple, for they may be had in a wax model, and scent alone is not su f­
Thirty-five

ficient, nor is the taste, for synthetic flavors and odors are common. T h e combination of all of these sensations, when frequently experienced, estab­ lishes the idea of the form we know as an apple. Y e t the apple, as such, has no existence which can be perceived solely by any one of the senses. In fact, each of the contributing sensations is more real in its own right than is the idea of the apple. All we can say, then, is that the particular sensations of scent, color, and taste are real, but the inference aris­ ing from their combination is not. N ot one of the sense qualities is less real than the other, but also not one is suf­ ficient proof of the existence of the apple. T h o u g h each sense cannot verify the quality of the other, each seems to be a reality in its own right. In other words, in relation to its particular sense faculty the quality seems to have an external existence, and therefore be a reality. W e have explained the difference between a mental image and one actu­ ally being perceived by sight. W i t h ob­ jective realities we are capable of real­ izing our dual state of consciousness, that we are, and that apparently the o bject perceived is, as well, but with subjective realities and recollected e x ­ periences w e cannot have an immediate awareness of self apart from the sub­ jective experience. W e can gaze at the clock and apprehend the time and be conscious of self, but if we close our eyes and visualize the clock so that the mental picture as nearly as possible ap­ proaches the visual one, we are forced to sacrifice a consciousness of self as we are at the moment. B y rapid alterna­ tion we can be first conscious of self and then the mental image of the clock, but not both simultaneously. W e can hold in memory a mental picture of self but that is not a consciousness of the pres­ ent self. T h is is because the memory impressions and the sensation of self are both subjective, whereas, when we have a sense experience the objective experience predominates, but there is al­ w ays attendant the posterior impulses of self-aw areness. T h u s we have the de­ termining standard between memory experiences and a sentient one, but even a fter the distinction is made, can we be certain that the sense quality is a real­

ity— that is, an actual external experi­ ence? Form s have their existence only in the quality. T h e refo re, for example, are hard, soft, hot, and cold— the qualities of touch— realities actually apart from the body? W e repress the sense o f touch and its qualities have no existence either externally or internally; thus superficially this would give support to the theory that the qualities as realities are introduced through the medium of the senses. However, let us consider this further before accepting it. W e shall take, for example, the per­ son who is completely deaf. It is com­ monly known that such persons have been made to hear by introducing sound impulses to their brains artificially. T h in but rigid materials, elastic enough to vibrate with sounds of normal amplitude, were brought lightly into contact with the teeth of a deaf person so that their vibrations would not be dam pened, and they conveyed sound vibrations in the immediate v i c i n i t y sympathetically through the sensory nerves of the teeth to the auditory nerves, and thence di­ rectly to the brain, where they were in­ terpreted as sound in the ordinary sense. T h e fact that this is possible is ir­ refutable proof that the qualities of the senses, as we know them, D O N O T exist apart from them, and are not in­ troduced through the respective sense organs, but instead the qualities A R E A R O U S E D within us. If one sense faculty can be used, not to substantiate the quality of another, but to convey its V V

agencies for it, it is evident that there exists some faculty common to all the senses and apart from them, which a c­ cording to the manner it is registered and interpreted, causes the different qualities, the senses of which we are conscious. A t least, with the qualities we seemed to be possessed of something tangible, but it now appears the quali­ ties have no reality except when en­ gendered internally, and yet all the things we perceive as realities have the characteristics o f them. W e are again faced with the problem of considering just what is reality since it is not the qualities. T o summarize our findings to the present; First, the world is teeming with realities; such as, for instance, the reading lamp before us, and all the other commonplace things which we know. T h e n we reduced these realities to the qualities of our different senses. In other words, to the sen se o f touch the lamp before us finally came to consist of a certain variation of the qualities of hard and soft, hot and cold, and their geometrical order and dimensions. But we advanced further in our reasoning and investigation, and we found that these qualities themselves had no real­ ity, no existence, in the world except the idea of them, which was aroused within us. W e now have arrived at the point of considering what the true reality is which arouses these notions in our minds.
( T o b e continued in the M arch issue)

V


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.......

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“T H E S Y M B O L IC P R O P H E C Y O F T H E G R E A T P Y R A M ID ”
E E E § \ = T h e above is the title of a new book, which will be issued by A M O R C within the n ext sixty days. It will supplant the form er one entitled, “T h e M ystery and Prophecy of the Great Pyramid.” It will contain new information, the result of further investigation and archeological research. W e ask all who have recently ordered the old book, of which there are no more available, to be patient until the new one is out. You will be very pleased with it. T his new book will retail for the same price as the old one, and yet will contain, as said, many added facts and interesting points of information.
............

The Rosicrucian Digest February 1936

E E E £ £ I

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T hirty-six

STR A N G E M T. SH A STA
More tales and legends abound about this mystery mountain of Northern California than any other mountain on the Pacific Coast of the United States. Towering to a height of some 14,000 feet, its majestic peak is perpetually covered with a blanket of snow and its base is nestled in a stand of magnificent timber. Many sagas relate that in its bosom it shelters the descendants of the ancient Lemurians, and that it was at one time part of the ancient continent of Lemuria. Controversy has raged as to the truth of these tales. Science is divided against itself in the issue. The above scene is from the recently produced A M O R C sound and talking motion picture entitled, "Lemuria, the Lost Continent." which treats this subject in an in­ teresting manner, and which will be exhibited throughout the United States this year by members of the National Lecture Board of A M O RC. travel­ ling via the Courier Car. Members and their friends should not fail to see this motion picture when it is announced in their local newspapers. There are no admission charges. ( C ou rtesy o f Rosicrucian D igest.)

Time on Your Hands
THESE LONG WINTER EVENINGS

HAVE YOU

?
" W i n t e r Evenings were made For reading. Snow, howling winds, rain beating against window panes — all these add zest to good reading. Good reading is the lit­ erature which you Feel is worthy of remembering and which does not give you that gui 1 1y Feeli ng of having wasted your lime. Spend an hour or two each week in broadening your knowledge ol life, of its mys­ teries, and of the accomplishments of great people. Read the titles of the unusual discourses below, and select the one which appeals to you. Eacli discourse is just about the right length for a pleasant evening s reading. They are written in simple, forceful language, and are released as interesting, supplementary reading by the Readers Research Academy. Begin with what you want and discontinue when you please.
ARCANE COSM O LOG Y

Is the earth a cell, and do we dwell in it, instead of outside of it? (21 d is ­ courses) No. t.
E V O L U T IO N W h y are there different races?

S O M E M Y ST IC A L A D V E N T U R E S P u ll aside the re/I of the commonplace, explore the unknown. Ga discourses)

No. tg6.
NUMEROLOGY

Has man descended from other beings? (12 discourses ) No. 12.

Is numerology a D iv in e science? Is it possible to foretell the future by num bers ? (t 6 di scourses) No. 328.
SU PERN A TU RA L

T H E M Y S T E R Y O F M IR A C L E S

W h a t strange powers did the ancients possess? A re their feats possible today? (32 discourses) No. 23/.

H a re you strange psychic or mental ex periences? W hat causes them, and what do they mean? (16 discourses) No. 2Q4.

^ 011 may remit the small sum ol 30 cents each month and receive two discourses, or you may secure the entire course at one time, whichever you prefer, furthermore, you may discontinue a course at any point and transfer to another, by merely continuing the same payments. Subscribe to a course today. Bring a world of interesting subjects into the heart of your home. Order the course bv number. ^ , rvr-T-»

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Member o f FU D O SI” (Federation Universelle des Societes Initiatiques)

The Rosicrucian Order, existin g in all civilized lands, is a non-sectarian, fraternal body o f men and women devoted to the investigation, study, and practical application o f natural and spiritual laws. T h e purpose o f the organ i­ zation is to enable all to live in harmony w ith the creative, constructive. Cosmic forces for the attainment o f health, happiness, and Peace. The O rder is internationally known as AM O R C (an abbreviation), and the AM O R C in Am erica, and all other lands, constitutes the on ly form o f R osi­ crucian activities united in one body having representation in the interna­ tional federation. T he AM O R C does not sell its teachings, but gives them freely to all affilia ted members, togeth er with many other benefits. Inqu irers seeking to know the history, purposes, and practical benefits that they may receive from Rosicrucian association, are invited to send for the free book, "T h e Secret H erita ge.” Address, F ria r S. P. C., care of AM ORC T E M P L E Rosicrucian Park, San Jose, California, U. S. A. (Cable Address: "A M O R C O ” Radio Station W 6 H T B )

Ordres et

Officials of the l\[orth and South Ameyican Jurisdictions
(Including the United States, Dominion o f Canada, Alaska, Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua. Costa Rica, E l Salvador, Republic o f Panama, the W est Indies, L o w e r California, and all land under the protection o f the United States o f America. H. SPENCER L E W IS . F. R. C., Ph. D .................................................................................................Im perator R A L P H M. LEW TS, F. R. C.......................................................................................... Supreme Secretary CLEMENT B. L E B R U N . F. R. C................................................................................................. Grand Master H AR VE Y M ILE S , F. R. C Grand Treasurer E TH E L B. W A R D , F. R. C Secretary to Grand Master H AR R Y L. S H IB L E Y , F. R. C.................................................................................... D irector o f Publications Junior Order o f Torch Bearers (sponsored by AM O R C ). F o r complete Information as to its aims and benefits address General Secretary. Grand Chapter, Rosicrucian Park, San Jose, California.

The follow ing principal branches are D istrict H eadqu arters o f A M O R C
Atlanta, Georgia: Atlanta Chapter No. 650. Dr. James C. O akshette. Master: Nassau Hotel. Meetings 7:30 every Thursday night. New York City, New York: New York Chapter, Rooms 35-36, 711 8th Ave., cor. 8th Ave. and 45th Street. Louis Riccardi, M aster; M argaret Sharpe, Secre­ tary. Inquiry and reading room s op en week days and Sundays, 1 to 8 p. m. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Delta Lodge No. 1, A M O R C , S. E . Corner 40th and Brown Sts., 2nd Floor. Mr. Albert Courtney, Master. Benjamin Franklin Chapter of A M O R C ; W arren C. Aitken, Master; Martha Aitken, Secretary, 2203 N. 15th Street. Meetings for all members every Sunday, 7:30 p.m ., 1706 Rittenhouse Square. Boston, Massachusetts: The M arie Clemens Lodge, Fortunatus J. Bagocius, Master. Temple and Reading Rooms, 739 Boylston St., Telephone Kenmore 9398. Detroit, Michigan: Thebes Chapter No. 336. Mr. W illiam H. Hitchman, M aster; Mrs. Pearl Anna T ifft, Secretary. Meetings at the Florence Room, Fuller Hotel, every Tuesday, 8 p.m . In­ quirers call dial phone No. 1870. San Francisco, California: Francis Bacon Lodge, 1655 Polk Mr. David Mackenzie, Master. Street;

Pittsburg, Pennsylvania: Penn. First Lodge, Dr. Charles D . Green, M aster; 3787 E ast St. N. S., Pittsburgh, Pa. Reading, Pennsylvania: Reading Chapter, Mr. Harrison N. Mucher, Master, 144 Clymer St.; Mr. George R. O s­ man, Secretary. Meeting every Friday, 8:00 p. m., W ashington Hall, 904 W ashington St. Los Angeles, California: Hermes Lodge, A M O R C Temple. Mr. OUln W . Marden, M aster. Reading Room and In­ quiry office open daily, 10 a. m. to 5 p. m., and 7:30 p.m . to 9 p.m . except Sundays. Granada Court, 672 South Lafayette Park Place. Birmingham, Alabama: Birmingham Chapter of A M O R C . For in­ formation address Mr. Cuyler C. Berry, Master, 721 So. 85th St. Chicago, Illinois: Chicago Chapter No. 9, Mabel L. Schmidt, Secretary. Telephone Superior 6881. Read­ ing Room open afternoons and evenings. Sundays 2 to 5 only. 100 E . O hio St., Room 403-404. Lecture sessions for A LL members every Tuesday night, 8:00 p. m. Chicago Afra-American Chapter No. 10. Robert S. Breckenridge, Master; Aurelia Carter, Secretary. Meeting every W ednes­ day night at 8 o'clock, Y . M . C. A., 3763 So. W abash Avenue.

(D irectory Continued on N ex t P a g e )

Portland, Oregon: Portland Chapter. Paul E . Hartson, Master; Telephone East 1245. Meetings every Thurs­ day, 8:00 p.m . at 714 S. W . 11th Avenue. Washington, D, C.: Thom as Jefferson Chapter. W illiam V . W hittington, Master. Confederate Memorial Hall, 1322 Vermont Ave. N. W . Meetings every Friday, 8:00 p. m.

Seattle, W ashington: A M O R C Chapter 586. W alter G. Simpson. Master: Mrs. Carolina Henderson. Secretary. 311-14 Lowman Bldg., between 1st and 2nd Aves. on Cherry St. Reading room open week days 11 a.m . to 4:30 p.m . Visitors welcome. Chapter meetings each Friday. 8:00 p. m.

Other Chartered Chapters and Lodges of the Rosicrucian Order (A M O R C ) will be found in most large cities and towns of North America. Address of local representatives given on request.

P R IN C IP A L C A N A D IA N B R A N C H E S
Vancouver, British Columbia: Canadian Grand Lodge, A M O R C . Mr. H. B. Kidd. M aster, A M O R C Temple. 878 Horn­ by Street. Victoria, British Columbia: Victoria Lodge, Mr. A. A. Calderwood, Master. Inquiry O ffice and Reading Room. 101 Union Bank Bldg. Open week days 10 a. m. to 6 p. m. Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada: Mr. E ly Law, Master, 120 Spence St. (Ph. 33341.) Session for all members every Sun­ day, 2:45 p. m., 304 " B " F.nderton Bldg.. Portage Ave. and Hargrave St. Montreal, Quebec, Canada: Montreal Chapter. Alexandre Chevalier. F. R. C., Master. 210 W e st St. James Street. Inquiry office open 10:00 a.m . to 5 p.m. daily; Saturdays 10:00 to 1:00 p.m . Toronto. Ontario, Canada: Mr. Benjamin W . W akelin, Master. Sessions 1st and 3rd Sundays of the month. 7:00 p. m.. No. 10 Lansdowne Ave. Edmonton, Alberta: Mr. Alfred H. Holmes. Master, 9533 Jasper Avenue E .

SP A N ISH A M E R IC A N S E C T IO N
This jurisdiction includes all the Spanish-speaking Countries of the New W orld. Its Supreme Council and Administrative O ffice are located at San Juan. Puerto Rico, having local Represen­ tatives in all the principal cities of these stated Countries. The name and address of the O fficers and Representatives in the jurisdiction will be furnished on application. A ll co rresp o n d en ce shou ld b e ad d ressed a s fo llo w s: Secretary General of the Spanlsh-American Jurisdiction of A M O R C . P. O . Box 36, San Juan, Puerto Rico.

A FEW

O F T H E F O R E IG N

JU R ISD IC T IO N S

Scandinavian Countries: The A M O R C Grand Lodge of Denmark. Mr. Arthur Sundstrup, Grand Master; Carli Anderson, S. R. C., Grand Secretary. M anogade 13th Strand, Copenhagen, Denmark. Sweden: Grand Lodge "Rosenkorset."' Anton Svanlund, F. R. C., Grand Master. Jerusalemsgatan, 6, Malmo. H olland: De Rozekruisers Orde; Groot-Lodae der Nederlanden. J. Coops, Gr. Sect., Hunzestraat 141, Amsterdam. France: Dr. H. Gruter. F. R. C., Grand Master, Nice. Mile Jeanne Guesdon, S.R .C ., Corresponding Secretary for the Grand Lodge (A M O R C ) of France, 56 Rue Gambetta, Villeneuve Saint Georges, (Seine & O ise). Switzerland: A M O R C Grand Lodge. August Reichel, F. R. C., Gr. Sect., Riant-Port V evey-Plan. Austria: Mr. M any Cihlar, K. R. C., Grossekretar der A M O R C , Laxenburgerstr, 75/9, Vienna, X . China and Russia: T h e United Grand Lodge of China and Rus­ sia. 8/18 Kavkazskaya St., Harbin, Man­ churia.
RO S IC R U C IA N PRESS. LTD.

New Zealand: Auckland Chapter A M O R C . Mr. G. A. Franklin. Master. 317 Victoria Arcade Bids. Queen St., City Auckland. England: The A M O R C Grand Lodge of Great Britain. Mr. Raymund Andrea. K .R . C., Grand Master. 34 Baywater Ave., W estbury Park. Bristol 6. Dutch and East Indies: Dr. W . T h . van Stokkum. Grand Master. W . J. Visser, Secretary-General. Karangtempel 10 Semarang. Java. Egypt: T h e Grand Orient of A M O R C . House of the Temple, M. A. Ramayvelim, F. R .C ., Grand Secretary, 26, Avenue Ismalia, Heliopolis. A frica: The Grand Lodge of the Gold Coast, A M O R C . Mr. W illiam Okai, Grand Master, P. O. Box 424 A ccra. Gold Coast, W est Africa. India: The Supreme Council. A M O R C , Calcutta, India. T h e add resses o f o th er foreign G ran d L o d g es and secretaries will b e fu rn ished on application.
PRINTED IN U . S . A .

M EL IDE BE BORIl a q a iu m p a ir AI1D SllFFERinq ?
I V I l U S T we relive the misfortunes, discour­ agements, and failures of this life? Does death deliver us permanently from tlie vicissitudes of the earth, or is if a temporary respite, returning us once more to the world of man? Is death a glorious opportunity to begin again, at some other time and place, to undo what we have done, and to profit by our experiences o f the past * Shall we instead look upon death as the end, the close of a chapter, with its story incomplete and imperfect/ Does our span here of a few years constitute our sole existence as humans, and if so, is that Divi ne justice? I here are no questions which the human mind can entertain that are more intimate or more vital than these. I hey are interestingly answered and discussed in a marvelous discourse entitled. T h e Soul s Ret urn, prepared by Dr. I I. Spencer Lewis. I his discourse represents years of study on this subject and his fascinating conclusions. 1 o the point, under­ standable and instructive, this manuscript should be in your possession as a valuable document on the subject ol reincarnation. You may obtain it A B S O L U T E L Y W I T H O U T C O S T by merely subscribing to this magazine, I he Rosicrucian Digest,” for just six months. A six-months’ subscription costs only $1.50 and in addition to receiving six copies of this magazine, you will receive at once, with postage paid, this most unusual discourse, which alone is worth more than the magazine subscription price. There are but a limited number of these discourses available, so we advise that vou subscribe at once, and A SK FO R Y O U R G IF T CO PY. V

G I F T F O R YOU

I lie discourse, I lie S oul s R eturn, w as once published serially, in answ er to h un ­ dreds of questions about reincarnation re­ ceived from throughout the w orld by D r. ewis. 1 bis is the lirst time it has ever been released in m anuscript form in its en­ tirety. F o r interesting particulars, read above.

The
SA N

ROSICRUCIAN D1QEST
J O S E . C A L I I'O R N I A . U. S. A.

< r Rgsicrucian Library
The following: books are a few o f several recommended because o f the special knowledge they contain, not to be found in our teachings and not available elsewhere. Catalogue of all publica­ tions free upon request. Volume H. R O S IC R U C IA N P R IN C IP L E S F O R T H E H O M E A N D B U SIN E SS.
A very practical book dealing w ith the solution o f health, financial, and business problems in the home and office. W ell printed and bound in red silk, stamped w ith gold. Price, $2.00 per copy, postpaid.

Volume m .

T H E M Y S T IC A L L IF E O F JESUS.

A rare account o f the Cosmic preparation, birth, secret studies, mission, crucifixion, and later life of the Great Master, from the records o f the Essene and Rosicrucian Brotherhoods. A book that is demanded in foreign lands as the most talked about revelation of Jesus ever made. Over 300 pages, beautifully illustrated, botind in purple silk, stamped in gold. Price, $2.25 per copy, postpaid.

Volume V.

“ I N T O T H E E I G R A N T . . .”

A strange book prepared from a secret manuscript found in the monastery o f T ibet, it is filled w ith the most sublime teachings o f the ancient Masters o f the F a r East. The book has had many editions. W ell printed with attractive cover. Price, $1.25 per copy, postpaid.

Volume V I.

A TH O U SAN D Y E A R S OF Y E STE R D A YS.

A beautiful story o f reincarnation and m ystic lessons. This unusual book has been translated and sold in many languages and universally endorsed. W ell printed and bound with attractive cover. Price. 85c per copy, postpaid.

Volume V U .

S E L F M A S T E R Y A N D F A T E , W IT H T H E C Y C L E S O F L IF E .

A new and astounding system o f determ ining your fortunate and unfortunate hours, weeks, months, and years throughout your life. N o mathematics required. Better than any system o f numerology or astrology. Bound in silk, stamped in gold. Price, $2.00 per copy, postpaid.

Volume

Vni.

T H E R O S IC R U C IA N M A N U A L .

Most complete outline o f the rules, regulations, and operations o f lodges and student work of the Order with many interesting articles, biographies, explanations, and complete dictionary o f Rosicrucian terms and words. V ery com pletely illustrated. A necessity to every student who wishes to progress rapidly, and a guide to all seekers. W ell printed and bound in silk, stamped with gold. Price, $2.00 per copy, postpaid.

Volume X L

M A N S IO N S O F T H E SOUL, T H E CO SM IC C O N C E P T IO N .
W ell

The complete doctrines of reincarnation explained. This book makes reincarnation easily understood. illustrated, bound in silk, stamped in gold, extra large. Price, $2.20 per copy, postpaid.

Volume X II.

L E M U R IA — T H E L O S T C O N T IN E N T O F T H E P A C IF IC .

The revelation o f an ancient and long forgotten M ystic civilization. Fascinating and intriguing. Learn how these people came to be swept from the earth. K n ow o f their vast knowledge, much o f which is lost to man­ kind today. W ell printed and bound, illustrated with charts and maps. Price, $2.20 per copy, postpaid.

Volume X III.

T H E T E C H N IQ U E O F T H E M A S T E R .

The newest and most complete guide for attaining the state o f Cosmic Consciousness. It is a m asterful work on psychic unfoldment. Price, $1.85 per copy, postpaid.

Send all orders for books, w ith rem ittance, direct to R O S IC R U C IA N

SU PPLY BU REA U ,

Ro sicru cian Park, San Jo s e , C alifornia.

PORTRAIT OF GREAT MASTER
Cj Even ifie most renowned portraits of Jesus Cfirist and those murals in which lie is a central figure, were executed several centuries after the crucifixion. I here apparently was never left to posterity from His period any actual representation in art ol the physical appearance of the Master. I he various works portraying Him are but the result of the personal conceptions and idealisms of the artists. Though many artists have claimed their portraits or sculptures of Christ were the result of Divine revelation, the works of each in many cases are extremely unlike. It is not generally known that some of the early portraits 0 f the C Iirist were without beard and nimbus. Nearly all artists, in an endeavor to portray the spiritual nature 01 the Master, have made Him extremely effeminate in facial lines. I hey are further inconsistent by having the hands of a delicate, even cameo-like, appearance. Not only the Scriptures, but other sacred literature sources revea I that by occupation He was a car­ penter and a Jisherman, and 1 lis bands, therefore, coulcl not have been as they are depicted. O n e ol the most startling new pictorial representations o f the Master is the one executed by Dr. H. Spencer Lewis. I lis painting is the result ol much research into the unknown life of Christ. It reveals I lim as having a positive, masculine, masterly coun­ tenance. with kind mystic and spiritual characteristics instead of the usual semi-effeminate ones. It also reveals the Aryan feat ures, Oi\ E T E N T H A C T U A L SIZ E lor it is declared He was not a Jew but an Aryan. E a ch portrait is 8.v 10 inches in size. T hey are reproduced on a I his portrait has won considerable acclaim because of its inspir­ fine grade of heavy paper. I he ing nature and unique conception. I he hand-colored portraits done colored photographs, done in oil, in oil are exceptionally beautiful, and yet. economical. The black are an excellent color likeness of the original. W e pay postage and white reproductions are exactly the same, and less in price.
on each order.

PR IC E:

Painted. . . . Plain . . . .

$<.50

$ 1.00

1 his portrait is an exact photographic reproduction of the orig­ inal done by the Imperator, which is in the Initiation Chamber of the Supreme I emple of the Order in San Jose. Lor size and price read column beneath picture. Send your order and remittance to:

FAM OUS M ARGA TE G RO TTO
P h oto C ou rtesy o f C. E . M itchell, D irector o f the G rotto. The above is a chamber of the beautiful 2000-ft. serpentine grotto of Margate, England. It was first discovered in 1834 A. D. by a school boy. Its designs are composed of a magnificent mosaic of shells. M ystery surrounds its origin. It is thought to have been a Druid Temple; a Rosicrucian Temple: a V iking’s Tom b; a place of Roman burial; or possibly the Shrine of Mithras, the Persian sun-god.

Awaken the Self Within

...

and Conquer the W orld!

QJ Look beyond the horizon! I be visla before you now may be only a mirage of tlie senses—a delusion. Your place in life may be higher, richer, and more commanding, if you raise your view­ point and widen your understanding.

L ife is N ot a Mystery — But a C h a lle n g e
Of You can rise above the slavery of labor and the grudges of toil. You can meet the obstacles in your life and challenge them to submit to your personal power. You have the same mental forces to use which have helped thousands of others to become real masters of their destiny. There is no power to hold you back, but yourself.

D iscover the P o w er W ith in Y o u — a n d Use It!
Of Money, influence, friends, education — will not do for you what you can do wi th the simple releasing ol activities in your mind and psychic faculties, which may now be dormant and awaiting the magic touch ol your own determination.

1 W ill H elp Y O U with This F ree B o o k
GJ Let me introduce you to the kindly offerings of the Rosicrucians — < that old, dependable, non­ sectarian Brotherhood of sympathetic cooperation. 1will send you, without obligation, a remark­ able book that has helped thousands in all parts of the world. Ju st write a letter (not a post­ card of curiosity) and ask for a free copy of J lie Secret Heritage,’ which tells how a great work which started in Egypt has spread throughout the civilized world and has become the Great Light in the lives of thousands of persons who are masters of their own destiny and in command of their greater careers. Others are using these Principles in their daily alfairs — W H Y N O I Y O U ? Add ress your letter carefully to: Scribe S. P. C .

The ROSICRUCIANS
(A M O R C ) SA N JO S E . C A L IFO R N IA

W a t c h for the word A M O R C — It is a Sym bol of R osicrucian Authenticity
(R o sicru cia n M em bers need nol w rite as they ha ve had this interesting hook.)

ROSICRUCIAN DIGEST
C O VERS THE W O R LD

TH E O FFIC IA L, IN TER N A TIO N A L ROSICRUCIAN MAGA­ ZINE O F T II E W O R LD -W ID E RO SICRUCIAN ORDER
Vol. X IV M A R C H , 1936 C O N T E N T S N oT2 Page

Famous M a rg a te G ro tto (Frontispiece) ..................... 41 The Thought of the M onth:

Com prehending the Incom prehensible .....................44
Rosicrucian M essage from the Netherlands A Fundamental Law of the H ealing A r t A Personal Invitation A n cient Symbolism .................. ................................. — ...... 48 .......... 52 56 58 59 62 64 57 72 68

m SSW

C ath ed ral C ontacts ..................................................... 50

Summaries of Science ..... Som e Facts for Mem bers' Notebooks Pages from the Past: Jan e W elsh C a rly le The M ystery of Personality ___ ___—.............

Sanctum Musings: The Sole Reality (Continued)... Christopher Columbus (Illustration)...

E

Subscription to T h e Rosicrucian Digest, T hree Dollars per year. Single copies tw enty-five cents each. Entered as Second Class M atter at the Post Office at San Jose, California, under the A ct o f August 24th, 1912. Changes o f address must reach us by the tenth o f the month preceding date o f issue. Statements made in this publication are not the official exressions o f the organization or its officers unless stated to e official communications.

P ublish ed M onthly by the Supreme Council of
THE ROSICRUCIAN ORDER—AMORC

ROSICRUCIAN PARK

SAN JO SE, CALIFORNIA

THOUGHT OF THE MONTH
C o m p r e h e n d i n g th e In c o m p re h e n s ib le

THE

U R m e m b e r s and friends may feel at times that in a t­ tempting to solve the m ysteries of life we are seeking to com prehend the incom prehensib 1e , and that f o r all p ractical purposes we are w asting our time in trying to lift the veil of ob­ scurity a n d peer behind it or through it. But man is given to attem pting to solve m ysteries. H e delights in being m entally checked in his invasion of the unknown, and with rem arkable p er­ sistency and with the aid of divine revelation, he has throughout the ages penetrated the darkness o f wisdom and has ascended mountain heights of il­ lumination. A nd. strange as it may seem, man has accepted many of the incom prehensible things o f life as com m onplace and b e­ lieves that he understands them. H e deals with some of these m ysteries in such a practical, accep table m anner that he often deceives him self into believing that he understands w hat is not u nder­ standable and discerns that w hich can never be discerned. O n e o f the several incom prehensible m ysteries of life is th at of time. Y e t ordinary time is standardized in our The daily affairs, or at least we think it is, n • and we accep t the existence of time as K ostcru ctan ^ ^ g ^ w ere som ething proved and D igest fundam entally established b y nature. M a rch T h e truth of the m atter is that time does 1936 not actually exist and it is one of m an’s

own artificial creations. Both time and space are things that cannot possibly exist in the com prehension of man and therefore are not proved as existing in the universe as fundam entals at all. No one has ever been able to prove that there is such an elem ent in our lives as time and yet we have allow ed a fictitious standard, and. in fact, a group of ficti­ tious stand ard s of time, to be used as laws to regulate our affairs. W e labor, live, operate, think, and carry on our affairs in accord an ce with these fictitious stand ard s and often allow them to en ­ slave us or draw us into critical situ a­ tions and dire predicam ents. If anyone w ere to ask you right now as you are reading this m atter what time of day it is, and you w ere to answ er in accord an ce with your watch or clock, or a W e s te r n Union or Postal telegraph tim e-keeper, or a governm ent signal, neither you nor an y official of the com panies nor any expert of the governm ent could prove that the time indicated w as correct or that there was any definite w ay by which the “time of d a y " could be established. W e may argue th at time is a m atter of establishm ent through recognition and universal or general consensus of opinion. W e may argue that since the multitude or at least the m ajority of persons in any part of the w orld, or in any country or section o f the country, agree that a certain moment of the clock is the correct time of day for that par­ ticular place, it is th erefore established and is fundam entally a law. T h e fallacy in such argum ents is the fact that the m ajority of persons in any part of the w orld have different opinions in regard to time and that our governm ents and
F orty -fo u r

courts of law have different ideas of time, and there is not the universal recognition and establishm ent of time that we think there is. From the point of view of our con­ sciousness of time, time itself is m erely a conscious realization of duration. B u t the moment we analyze this we realize that time is constantly passing and that a moment of duration is in the past as rapidly as we are conscious of it or realize it. There can be no such thing as the future of time inasm uch as we cannot comprehend that which has not yet caused duration in our consciousness and since we only appreciate duration as it passes, time is co n stan tly moving from nowhere into the past. In the measurement of time, man has arbitrarily throughout the periods of civilization adopted methods for a t­ tempting to measure his consciousness of duration or his com prehension of the duration of consciousness. M an cannot think concentratedly, and with full real­ ization, of two separate, distinct things coincidentally. T h e consciousness o f man and his m ental equipm ent for realizing his thoughts will not permit him to center his com prehension upon the words of this m agazine and coinci­ dent with it be conscious and have a full realization of a piece of music that is be­ ing played, or of some w ords that are being spoken, or of som e thought that is in the mind that is separated from the thought contained in the w ords being read. W ith extraord inary rapidity the consciousness and realization o f the mind can flit alternately or vacillate and swing from one conscious thought and realization to another until, like the jumping of the moving pictures on the screen from one still picture to another, the blending appears to give a continu ­ ous action and all of the sep arate pic­ tures appear to be coincidental. B u t in the ultimate analysis it will be found that man can be conscious of only one thing at a time, despite the fact th at his mind may jump from one to an oth er so rapidly that he believes he is thinking of several things at the sam e instant. In order to m easure the difference b e ­ tween the beginning and end o f the comprehension of som ething and the movement to another thought or im­ pression, man has established m ethods
Forty-five

of m easuring the duration of con sciou s­ ness, and the lapse o f consciousness b e­ tween im pressions and this m easurem ent he calls a m easurem ent of time. P h ilo ­ sophically, the foundation o f time is in a certain sense m erely a fourth dimension th at man has added to space. B u t this is not easily com prehensible either. In order to find some im mutable law of nature by w hich to m easure time, man has taken some o f the movements th at are observed in the universe, b e­ lieving that any m ovement th at is con­ tinuous and stea d fa st, regular and im­ m utable in its principle, requires dura­ tion and, therefore, occupies time. A n y one o f these fundam ental m ovements can becom e a yard stick for m easuring time. P erh ap s throughout the w orld today the most generally used yard stick for the m easurem ent o f time is the m ove­ m ent o f the earth on its axis, or in other w ords, the revolution o f the earth. T h is revolution gives days, periods of months, and a cycle of movement w hich w e call a year. B y dividing the days into m athe­ m atically equal divisions, we arrive at hours, minutes, and seconds. B y divid­ ing the periods o f the seasons we arrive at units called months, and by dividing the y ea r w e attem pt to ad ju st the months into equal divisions of the year, and— run into m any snags. W h y should man have taken the revolution o f the earth as a fundam ental law of the universe? T h e earth is only one o f a num ber o f planets visible to us and each one of these planets has a d if­ ferent cycle of time for its motion. If the argum ents o f scien ce are correct th at the universe is unlimited in space (a n o th er incom prehensible th in g) and our sun and our earth are only small parts of the w hole universe, and if G od and H is om nipotent pow ers rule and control the w hole universe, w hy is it th at man has not found in some other truly universal motion a b etter y ard stick for his m eas­ urem ent o f time? C ertain ly there must be one cycle, one fundam ental law of motion som ew here in the universe that would apply to all the planets and all the beings that live on these planets. If other planets are inhabited — and if there are m any suns throughout the universe with their own planets re­ volving around them— then the revolu-

tion o f our earth could mean nothing to the people on other planets, and their days, hours, and minutes would be d if­ ferent from ours, and ours would mean nothing to them. In other w ords, we would not be able to know the time of m otions throughout the universe and jud ge the time o f things in all parts of G o d ’s creation by the use of the earthly y ard stick because this y ard stick is a unique one differing from all others. It would be equivalent to a few men on this earth having w atches th at travelled the entire tw en ty -fo u r divisions in four­ teen hours instead of tw en ty-fou r, and these persons attem pting to com pre­ hend, regulate, and control the affairs of other people w ho had w atches which required tw en ty -fo u r hours to cover the tw enty -fou r divisions. T h e only excu se that science offers for our arb itrary adoption o f the ea rth ’s motion as a m easurem ent of time is the fact th at the e a rth ’s revolution causes our periods of day and night and that d aylight and night-tim e as two periods of the cycle constitute a day. T h is b e­ ing true, it would be con sisten t to say th at a day began at sunrise and con ­ tinued until the n ext sunrise, giving us a daylight period and a night-tim e period as one com plete cy cle called a day. B u t here again m an's arb itrary m ethods of doing things and creating fictitious stand ard s reveal them selves because throughout the civilized w orld, although the revolution of the earth has been generally adopted as the m easure­ m ent o f time, the beginning o f th at m easurem ent or the beginning of the day is considered differently in different parts o f the w orld by different groups of persons and by different ap p lica­ tions of the realization o f time. F u rth er­ more, in the scientific field we find there are three kinds of days, the so lar day, the sidereal day, and the lunar day. O u r calend ar month is not the sam e as the lunar m onth, for the lunar month centers itself around approxim ately tw en ty-eigh t days, w hile the calen d ar month can be from tw en ty -eig h t to th irty -on e days long — a beautiful exam ple o f m an’s The ridiculous w ays o f creatin g standards RnO rrurinn m easurem ent. O n the other hand, p.. the solar day is not the sam e length as Ut&*st the sidereal day. March H ow ever, the solar day has becom e a 1936 fundam ental unit in astronom ical p rac­

tice and in m ost of the affairs of daily life. W e m easure this day by observing when the sun is directly at the zenith overhead in the locality w here we hap­ pen to be, which makes the noonday different in different localities on the earth and, of course, there are places w here if a person w alks but a qu arter of a mile in one direction or the other, o c­ cupying w atch-tim e of fifteen minutes, he finds th at noontim e is either one hour earlier or later on either side of the line. It is possible for one house to be so situated that it can be eleven o ’clock m idday in one room and tw elve o ’clock in the other, or tw elve in one and one o ’clock in the aftern oon in another room. W h e n w e come to law courts and the legal question of time, we find there are tw o kinds of days, the natural day and the artificial day. T h e artificial day is often called the civil day. T h e natural day includes the tw en ty -fo u r hours b e­ ginning at m idnight and ending at mid­ night, and not beginning at sunrise and ending at the n ex t sunrise. O n the other hand, in certain legal m atters w here a statu te requires certain acts to b e done within so m any days, the law refers to w hat is called clear days, or in other w ords, a num ber o f intervening perfect days not counting the term inal days. If statutes of this kind make no reference to Su n d ays, then the Su nd ays are in ­ cluded among the number of days stated : w hile in some other statutes S u n ­ days and holidays would be excluded and four days might becom e five or six in actual time. In certain forms of human activities there are so-called lay days w hich are divisions of the week and not n ecessarily periods of tw entyfour hours. Civil days, on the other hand, follow the old R om an law and begin at twelve o ’clock noon and end a t the following noon. Still there are civil laws which describe a period o f a day as meaning from sunrise to sunset. Su ch “d ays’’ th erefore m ay be tw elve or fourteen hours long or only nine or ten hours. In other civil and legal rulings w here the obligation is made to pay m oney on a certain day, the law allow s the period to be stretched up to m idnight of that day, even if it had been otherw ise figured as beginning at sunset of the preceding
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day. In such a condition a day would be from thirty to forty hours long. W ith certain religions and religious sects, such as with the Jew ish religion, the day begins at sunset and ends at the following sunset. In connection with certain lines of business a “d ay ” is of a very short period. F o r instance, if an obligation demands a paym ent to be made at a bank the follow ing day, it is implied that that day shall be the period when it is the most convenient for the bank or place to be operating in a normal business m anner. T h a t would make the bank day from approxim ately ten in the morning to three in the a fte r­ noon, or only five hours long instead of tw enty-four. T hu s we see that m an’s attem pt to comprehend an incom prehensible thing, such as a fictitious condition called time, has led him into all sorts o f predica­ ments and contradictions. T h e re is no true standard in the universal law s for such a thing as time since it exists wholly in the consciousness of man and not in nature itself. It is little w onder therefore that man in attem pting to comprehend a fictitious thing th at re ­ sides only in his objective or outer con ­ sciousness should resort to many strange

m ethods of m easurem ent and then find that this yard stick o f m easurem ent or stand ard o f m easurem ent does not suit all of his problem s and therefore change the standards of m easurem ent to suit the conditions and necessities. It is like having a yard stick o f th irty -six inches made of rubber that can be stretched from th irty -six inches to forty or fifty inches to accom m odate certain condi­ tions, or squeezed and reduced to tw elve or fourteen inches to meet other circum ­ stances. A fte r all, we see, therefore, th at the so-called real m ysteries of life such as the law s of G od established at the time of creation and w hich operate in and through us, are not as difficult to com ­ prehend as the artificial, fictitious things of m an’s own m ental creation . M a n 's consciousness a n d com prehension of things— including all the errors of com ­ prehension and m isunderstanding, all the particular theories and erroneous ideas— constitute the really g reat m ys­ teries of life which must first be solved, and the errors and erroneous ideas eli­ m inated befo re man can begin to com ­ prehend the so-called m ysteries of the universe.

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ROSICRUCIAN

i T H E PR A YERS O F T H E M YSTICS
T he book, "M ystics at Prayer," explains in simple language the reason of prayer, how to pray, and the Cosmic laws involved. You come to learn the real efficacy of prayer, and its full beauty dawns upon you. W hatever your religious belief, this book makes your prayers the application not of words, but of helpful, divine principles. You will learn the infinite power of prayer. Prayer is man's rightful heritage. It is the direct means of man’s communion with the infinite force of divinity. T his book contains the words used by the mystics for self-unfoldment. It is a careful selection of the chosen prayers of the mystics, the particular ones that reveal their divine understanding of meta­ physical principles. There are over a hundred of them. T h e name and a brief biographical sketch of each mystic is given with a cross index. T h e book, attractively printed and bound, stamped in gold, on art paper, in two colors, is only $1.00 postpaid. Send your remittance and order to Rosicrucian Supply Bureau, San Jose, California.

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Rosicrucian Message from the Netherlands
GREETINGS FROM ACROSS TH E OCEAN TO OUR MEM BERS IN AM ERICA By
F ra ter

A. A. A.
officers, have kept alive the spirit o f the w ork w aiting for the time to come when the great revival should occur. Sev eral y ears ago, anticipating the year 1934, three or four o f our most active members made con tacts with the A M O R C in various lands in order to make ourselves fam iliar w ith w hat w as being done in the new world as well as here in the old world in the d istricts w here the R o si­ crucian O rd er has been active for m any years. W e have especially enjoyed the literature we have received from the N orth A m erican jurisdiction, and from our personal co n tacts on various o cca ­ sions with the officers representing the N orth A m erican jurisdiction. W h e n the y ear 1934 and the revival drew nearer, the above-m entioned mem­ bers began their individual activities in various localities, often working inde­ pendently and in som e cases unaw are o f w hat the others w ere doing. B y a w ork­ ing o f the Cosm ic law s w e w ere all brought together and brought into con­ tact with one another, and im m ediately there follow ed various organization m eetings both in T h e H agu e and in A m sterdam . D uring the summer of 1934 one o f our official w orkers travelled to B ru ssels. Belgium , and during a m eet­ ing of the In tern ation al R osicrucian C ouncil there, received at the hands of the highest European and A m erican officers the appointm ent to becom e the
F orty -eig h t

R O M O U R H ead q u a r t e r s in T h e H a g u e , H olland, at this C hristm as­ time, w e wish to send greetings to all of the F ra tre s and So ro res of the N o r t h A m erican G ran d Lodge of our R o s i c r u c i a n O rd er. Sin ce e a r l y in the spring o f 1935, I have w anted to w rite an article to ap­ pear in your m agazine T h e Rosicrucian D igest to tell all o f you about the w ork we are doing here in the Kingdom o f the N etherland s in behalf of our org aniza­ tion, w hich in the language of our n a­ tion is known as the “A loude M y stiek e O rd e R o sa e C ru cis,” which as you see gives us the initials A M O R C as in your country. It w as decreed th a t the dorm ant a cti­ vities of R osicrucianism in H olland should be revived publicly in the y ear 1934. F o r many y ears R osicrucianism has been active in our possessions in the Pacific known as the D utch E a st Indies, The Rosicrucian w hile here in H olland w here R osicru ­ cianism w as very strong and very active Digest in its last cy cle o f public w ork, scores M a rch of devoted students o f its principles, and descend ants o f the form er high 1936

first Grand Secretary pro tem of the revival of Rosicrucianism in the new cycle in Holland. Since then the w ork has rapidly grown with enthusiasm. O u r members have talked to friends and acquaintances in an attempt to make further con tacts with those silent w orkers w ho w ere descendants of or follow ers in the foot­ steps of the earlier leaders of the w ork in this country. M uch correspondence followed and in M a y o f 1935 the first official meeting o f the Suprem e C ouncil for this country w as held at T h e H agu e and some forty men and women pledged themselves to the reorganization work and revival of the R osicru cian B ro th er­ hood in the Kingdom o f the N e th e r­ lands. This meeting w as held secret as far as the general public was concerned, and not until we are ready to release certain m anifestoes in the old and au ­ thentic form shall w e attem pt to reach the masses. W e shall follow very clo se­ ly the spirit of the w ork as it has been carried on in the D utch E a st Indies so that this section o f our kingdom shall work in harmony with the other section. W e feel that it will take about three years for us to accom plish here in H o l­ land the work of laying the proper foundation. W e have alread y attracted other persons who have carried over with them from the past an intim acy with the B rotherhood, and those who have felt an inner urge to be associated with the organization for some specific reason. T h e day is draw ing closer w hen we shall realize the power of the w ork in this country, and by the time this message has reached our F ra tre s and Sorores in N orth A m erica w e shall have made much progress in establishing the foundation by having held the first secret initiation of members in the new cycle. T h e m onths of M arch and April, 1936, will mark the first foundation stone in this new structure. All of us realize th at the w ork we have undertaken is a glorious one, but one which calls for real labor and real services, and although we have met many obstacles and have many problem s to solve, we are firmly determ ined to go on and to make the R osicru cian path a permanent roadw ay leading to w ell­ being, happiness, and C osm ic glory.
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F o rtu n a tely for us, very much in the teachings o f our R osicru cian o rganiza­ tion sound logical and m orally right in the h earts of the D utch people, and the ideas and ideals of R osicru cian s are a l­ most identical with the ideas and ideals of D utch citizenry. In the seven or more y ears in w hich many of us here have been carefu lly studying and analyzing the teachings and preparing for the re ­ vival, w e have never found one word in the literatu re of your N orth A m erican system of instruction, nor in any o f the other literatu re th at has com e to us from other districts, w hich contains in thought or p ractice anything that would shock the public opinion in our hom e­ land even am ong the most orthodox C hristian s or Jew s. W e feel, therefore, that it is not only our high duty, but also our great pleasure to go on w ith this great work for w hich a large portion of the D u tch people have been seeking and are qualified and prepared. It shall be our am bition, as with every other jurisd iction, to hold high the ideals o f the B rotherhood , and to uphold its good nam e and in tegrity. A n y w ho may attem pt to defraud us or attem pt to a t­ tack us from below or out o f the dark and gloom y corners of the land, shall meet with the spirit of our true D utch R osicru cian forebears w ho m aintained Rosicrucianism in this cou n try for so long a period ag ain st any and every a t­ tack. N ev er in the h istory o f the O rd er in any land has the organization been defeated when she adhered to her high ideals and won the support c r . her loyal m embers. U n d er the protection of our national flag and with the support of the U nseen M a ste rs w e shall a c ­ com plish w hat w e have set out to do. T h e re fo re , w e transm it through this m essage to our F ra tre s and S o ro res in A m erica, as w e have to other lands, our h eartiest w ishes for a very happy and su ccessful N ew Y e a r in carryin g out the g reat work of the organization, and the am bitions of the individual m embers. M a y this m essage serve as a letter o f introduction to all o f the A m erican o f­ ficers and members w ho are in sym pathy with our efforts in H olland and in the Kingdom of the N eth erlan d s.

ffiM «in m iim in m iiiim in iim iiiiin in n n in iiM in iim in n iin in in iiiin iim »M »n iii»«iM iin u iiiim in in n iiH M iu n n iiim «iin »in iM »iiii

The “Cathedral of the Soul” is a Cosmic meeting place for all minds of the most advanced and highly developed spiritual members and workers of the Rosicrucian Fraternity. It is a focal point of Cosmic radiations and thought waves from which radiate vibrations of health, peace, happiness, and inner awakening. Various periods of the day are set aside when many thousands of minds are attuned with the Cathedral of the Soul, and others attuning with the Cathedral at this time will receive the benefit of the vibrations. Those who are not members of the organization may share in the unusual benefit as well as those who are members. T h e book called "Liber 777” describes the periods for various contacts with the Cathedral. Copies will be sent to persons who are not members by addressing their request for this book to Friar S. P. C., care of A M O R C Temple, San Jose, California, enclosing three cents in postage stamps. (P le a s e state w hether m em ber or not— this is im portant.)

O M E great thinker once said th at if there had been no G od of the uni­ verse, man would have created one. T h is w as said with no feeling of ir­ r e v e r e n c e for it clearly conveys the fact that man is es­ sentially w orship­ ful and ever seeks in his norm al, n a­ The tural thinking state to find th at power, Rosicrucian that intelligence, that something that is Digest g reater than him self and which he can March adore, adm ire, respect, honor, and em ulate. 1936

It has often been noticed th at the little child who has not been taught any creed or dogm a n atu rally leans toward the w orship o f the invisible and the om nipotent. A s the little child grow s to the stage w here he is able to express his w onderm ent, to m anifest his m editative thinking, and to ask an alytical questions in their sim plest form, he reveals that he is seeking to learn about som ething ex ­ ternal to him self, som ething extern al to his parents, that is g reater or more m ag­ nificent or more m ajestic in some sense. Su ch children are easily led into the path o f religion and w orship. A nd they seldom doubt the existence o f an omni­ potent. om nipresent G od as do older ones w ho allow their objectiv e minds to
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deceive them with erroneous prem ises in their reasoning. It has been said b y m any th at this tendency on the p art of the child to want to worship som ething beyond and greater than himself and extern al to his own consciousness is either an inherited tendency derived from his parents or ancestors, or an acquired tendency cre ­ ated out of the practices in his environ­ ment. But this is not true, for there are sufficient instances on record of this tendency on the part o f children born to parents and in a direct an cestral line where there have been no such tend en ­ cies. If it is an acquirem ent, it is not from external conditions or influences, but rather from internal ones, for the love of worship is in every sense an emotion of the soul and not an urge or emotion of the extern al self or objective consciousness. T h e g reatest tendency on the part of the extern al, objective consciousness is to aggrandize oneself and to lean tow ard the adm iration o f the ego. T h is is the basis of the human emotion known as vanity. T h e re is therefore in all average normal human beings a conflict of em otions betw een the outer self and the inner self, the one seeking to find w hat must be a greater and more m ajestic self extern al to the individual, and the other seeking to establish the idea th at there is nothing greater nor more m ajestic, om nipotent, and wise than the outer self of the in ­ dividual. E ven in those cases w here the outer self has been fictitious to the e x ­ tent that an exag gerated opinion o f the ego and an extrem e case o f vanity is made m anifest, there are in the silent, meditative periods o f th at individual’s life many occasions w hen a form or sense of w orship to an extern al pow er is secretly indulged. T h e tendency for man to believe in the existence of a Suprem e B eing, a Father above all fathers, a M ind and Intelligence above all minds and intelli­ gence, is so fundam entally a part of the evolving beings on earth that even prim i­ tive man in the earliest stages of evolu­ tion gradually created sym bols o f w hat that m ajestic, external, om nipotent B e ­ ing resembled and to w hich sym bols or resemblance he m ight express his ad o ra ­ tion and obeisance. T h e building of a g reat cath ed ral on the earth is but a form o f m an’s co n ­
Fifty-on e

tinued desire to express in the greatest grandeur possible his realization of the inspiration of divinity. B u t each and every such attem pt is limited b y the earth ly elem ents and earth ly conditions. T h e most lo fty spire that w as ever con ­ ceived for the greatest o f cath ed rals finally found its apex far below the heavens tow ard w hich its creato rs hoped to extend it. T h e m ost m arvelous and beau tiful forms of art expressing the beau ty o f divine consciousness w ere limited b y m an 's ability in the h and i­ cra fts and arts. M a n has never been able to build out of the con crete, m a­ teria] things of this earth anything that sufficiently represented the h eights of his divine conception and the glory and beau ty o f his spiritual com prehension. In the C ath ed ral of the Sou l, how ­ ever, w e find time and space and the elem ents o f earth ly existen ce no bars to the lo ftin ess and beau ty of m an’s co n ­ ception. T h e C ath ed ral of the Sou l rests upon no earth ly footstool and is formed o f no m aterial elem ents or limited in form, size, w eight, and nature, and its beauty is not o f the geom etrical patterns determ ined by the crystals o f ea rth ’s m atter. T h e C ath ed ral of the Sou l is built o f spiritual things in a spiritual kingdom w hich has neither foundation nor limit to its h eight; th at h as neither breadth nor w idth, nor an y o f the dimensions w hich determ ine and pro­ scribe m an’s earthly creation s. T h e C ath ed ral o f the Sou l is a place for the w orshipping of the soul and not for the o b jectiv e consciousness of man. It is a place w here the spiritual part o f man may abide and rest and find peace, and not a place for his physical body to enter and com ply w ith physical laws. It is a place for th at part o f human existen ce th at is not classified in experi­ ence, or sex, race, color, education, social standing or w orldly w ealth. It is not regulated by time and it is alw ays avail­ able and never closed to the seeker. Its inspiring m essages and thoughts are not limited by the vocabu lary of m an’s brain or b y the oratorical delivery o f m an’s trite m ethods in speaking. Its m essages com e d irect from the consciousness of G o d and are spoken into the p erfect understanding of the soul o f man. Its music, its vibrations of happiness and contentm ent are o f the pristine em ana­ tions of the mind o f G o d and, th erefore,

are free to all. and im mediate in e f­ fectiveness. W e invite all w orshippers o f all creeds and denom inations of all lands and all races to join with us in our w or­ ship in the C ath ed ral o f the Sou l. If you have not read the booklet called,

Liber 777, w hich tells the story o f the
C ath ed ral of the Soul, send for a copy today. Y o u may have it w ithout any obligation and with the benediction of the C osm ic and the best w ishes o f our organization.

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oA Fundam ental Law of the H ealing Art
By
F ra te r

F. W .

A ck erm an

F R IE N D and form er s t u d e n t dropped in to see me the other day. H e w anted to find out if I could help h im t o s e c u r e better results in his profession, to tell him how to build his business. H e told me that he felt th at he w as doing everything possible to get his patients well, th at his office was fully equipped with all the latest instrum ents; still he w as unable to se­ cure the results that fellow practitioners did, and he w ished to find out the reason. In sh ort, he asked, “W h a t ’s w rong with m e?" S o we sat down and proceeded to delve into this business of getting and keeping folks well and happy. V e ry quickly we brought out the fact that there w as a lack of know ledge, or a m isunderstanding upon his part, as to one of the fundam ental law s of the h eal­ ing arts. T h e absence o f this most necessary and vital element w as one of the reasons w hy success did not attend The Rosicrucian his efforts. W h a t is this law or prin­ ciple he had failed to recognize and ob­ Digest serve? It is simply this: A com plete M a rch understanding o f the spiritual element or the m ental aspect of healing. In 1936

o ther w ords, the failure to understand the principle o f the duality o f M an . P erh ap s he w as doing everything for the physical body, but there w as a failure to take into consideration the spiritual man. T h e em otional side of M a n is very cap ab le of influencing his digestion and the functioning of other organs and glands of his body. U nless both aspects o f man are treated and cared for there can be no real cure or lasting benefit, regard less of how effi­ cient the physical therapy. L et us proceed to analyze this spiritual or m ental aspect; or in other w ords, how M in d influences physical conditions. W e will grant, for the sake o f the argum ent, that the individual has been instructed, and is obeying all the law s o f N atu re in regard to exercise, diet, and so forth, but he is still a sick man. N ow the first thing for this individual to do is to think of him self as well, young, full of life and energy. T h e true physician and healer will first o f all instil in the mind o f his patient this thought. N eith er will he indulge in any n eg a­ tive thoughts nor make them to the patient. It does not take very much of an im agination on the part o f my reader to picture the disastrous results that come from this form o f thinking and talking. W e have all seen numerous exam ples. W h e r e there is no vision the people perish, is indeed a true sta te­ ment. T h e more light that can be thrown
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upon the subject of right thinking and living, and upon the su bject of m eta­ physics, the more unnecessary suffering we can eliminate. If you know the Law s of Nature and will obey them— not lie or cheat your own inner-self, or allow the outer man to dictate and rule— you can greatly improve your health. In many cases it is possible to com pletely banish what would otherw ise have been a severe case of illness by this process of R IG H T T H I N K I N G . T h e very wonderful thing about the teachings of the Rosicrucians is that these teachings give the student the truth, the w hole truth, and nothing but the truth regard ­ ing Natural Law . T h is is given in such a manner that the facts can be amply proven by all those w ho are privileged to receive them. It is hoped th at all members appreciate and actually try to prove these Law s by applying them in their own lives, and especially in m atters pertaining to health. In order to understand how it is pos­ sible for the M ind to create certain states of being, it is n ecessary to have a good understanding of the different phases of mental activity. In the higher degrees of the R osicru cian O rd er a complete explanation of the w orkings and various activities of the M ind and brain, the W ill-P o w e r, the M em ory, etc., is given to the student-m em her. However, for the purpose of exp lan a­ tion, in connection with the su b ject as touched upon here, popular definitions will be used. T h e member can substitute the true names for the ones I shall give here. Psychologists divide the activities o f the M ind into three phases as follow s: The Conscious, the U nconsciou s, and the Subconscious. N ow w e are un­ conscious of a great portion o f m ental activity. H ow ever, every m ental im­ pression, such as the sensation of sight, hearing, smelling, tasting, and feeling, and every idea we have ever had in this and past incarnations, has left its im­ pression upon our M ind . M an y o f these are so far below the level of conscious­ ness that they cannot be realized or re­ called at will. Som e o f them m ay force themselves into our consciousness even against our w ills, disturbing normal conscious mental processes.
Fifty-three

T h e “In telligen ce” w ithin our bodies w hich controls, through the nervous system , the involuntary, functional a c ­ tivities of the different parts, and of the body as a w hole, has been called the “ U nconscious M in d .” T h e activities of the “ Su bconscious M in d ” are norm al­ ly controlled by the im pressions received from the different parts of the body and, although it is closely related to the “ U n con sciou s and C onscious M in d s” there is norm ally no conscious m ental control over the involuntary activities of the body. Sen sation s and feelings make little or no im pression upon the “ C on ­ scious M in d ” unless they are unusual or unexpected, stron ger than or different from others accom panying or preceding them, or the mind is especially su scept­ ible to their influence or in a sta te of expectan t attention to them. H ow ever, all im pressions from the outside and A L L ID E A S O R IG IN A T IN G W I T H ­ IN T H E M IN D A R E R E G I S T E R E D A N D R E T A I N E D IN T H E S U B ­ C O N S C I O U S M IN D , and by their accum ulative effects, create a sense of superiority, or in feriority, a gratification of its w ishes, or the reverse, or arouse other sensations, m emories, em otions and impulses dorm ant in the “ U n co n ­ scious M in d ,” and these may produce or influence conscious m ental activities or states o f mind. T h e “C onscious M in d ” represses and subm erges all thoughts and memories th at carry a feeling of inferiority, failure, tim idity, hum iliation, or o f pain and dis­ pleasure. T h e “ U n con sciou s M in d ” re­ tains these ideas and they have a pow er­ ful influence upon its conduct and great­ ly in terfere with the norm al outlet of the em otional energy stored in the “ U n ­ conscious M in d .” Stro n g com binations o f thoughts and feelings known as com ­ plexes may produce ideas, em otions, and actions in acco rd an ce with the urges, instincts and desires behind them, but co n trary to the code of ethics and rules o f conduct of the individual, or bring about conflicts betw een the “ C o n ­ scious and U nconscious M in d s” and greatly disturb the norm al functioning of both. U n con sciou s likes and dislikes, w ish­ es and fears, and in ten se em otions, esp ecially when the norm al outlets or com pensations are denied them, con ­

stantly influence our thoughts, speech, and actions. T h e evolution o f the sen ­ sations reaching the brain, the form and content of the conscious thoughts, and the nature and strength of the feelings and em otions present in the "C on scio u s M in d ,’’ are determ ined alm ost entirely by w hat is stored aw ay in the " U n ­ conscious M in d ,’’ the inherited instincts and the accum ulated experiences o f the present and past incarnations. U n n a ­ tural em otions, intense em otions, and long-su stained em otions seriously dis­ turb the norm al m ental processes and produce states of mind w hich make it im possible for the individual to think and act as a norm al person. T h e in­ dividual may not be aw are o f the pres­ ence and of the harm ful effect o f these because of their being repressed into the "U n co n scio u s M in d ,’’ as e x p l a i n e d above, but in a great many instances, the individual is conscious o f the em o­ tional disturbance but does not fully realize their disturbing effects. E a ch individual should do his or her utm ost to control anger, fear, w orry, ex ­ citem ent, hate, envy, jealou sy , grief, and all depressions or morbid m ental states. T h e re are germs of hate, envy, greed, jealousy, anger, fear, and w orry, ju st as surely as there are pathogenic germs, and the first named are the H eralds of the last group. H ow to over­ com e these morbid m ental states is largely an individual problem requiring a critical and honest inventory, and the use of W ill-P o w e r, persistence and p a­ tience. D islike for o n e’s w ork or a sso ­ ciates, disappointm ents over the failure o f one's plans, and a general d issatis­ faction of o ne’s lot in life, are common and im portant causes o f m ental discord and nervous disturbances. U n til there is absolute peace and harm ony in the m ental aspect there can not be per­ fection in the physical aspect. O n e should overcom e this condition by real­ izing that his lot in life and his place in the schem e o f things has been d eter­ mined by a W is e Intelligence, and should m ake him self more w orthy of ad ­ vancem ent into an environm ent that is The more pleasant. W e cannot progress Rosicrucian until we prove ourselves w orthy of ad ­ vancem ent. Digest

digestion, etc., are controlled by a sy s­ tem o f nerves called the "A u tonom ic N ervous S y ste m ." T h is nervous system is under control o f the "Su b con sciou s M in d ." T h e three phases o f M ind described above a r e closely related physiologically and psychologically, and the im pressions received b y and the activities of one o f them may disturb the activities o f the other two. H ere we have another w onderful exam ple of the Law o f the T ria n g le . T h is being true, it is only logical to assum e that anything which disturbs the normal activity of the "Su b co n scio u s M in d " may disturb som e of the norm al functional activities o f the body, w hich are controlled by the "S u b co n scio u s M in d ,” and the truth of this assum ption has been am ply proven. T h e influence of fear, anger, pain, and dejection in retarding and inhibiting bodily functions, and of hope, joy, pleasure, and high spirits in stimulating and acceleratin g the physiological pro­ cesses, are w ell-know n exam ples o f the effects o f conscious mental activities and states of mind upon the physical func­ tions o f the body. T h e "U n co n scio u s M in d " is the re­ pository of the long-continued and more intense em otions, especially those based upon the instinctive w ishes and fears, and the more firmly fixed or established mental states and attitudes, which are initiated and m aintained by th eir close association, past and present, with un­ pleasant experiences. T h e se em otions, states, and attitudes profoundly influ­ ence both the conscious m ental activities and physiological processes o f the body, w hich are, to a large exten t, controlled by the “Subconscious M in d .” A mental shock, a loss o f em otional control, or a long-continued morbid state of mind like w orry, fear, grief, despondency, or an ger m ay produce, through its influ­ ence on th e "S u b co n scio u s M in d ,” dis­ turbances in im portant body functions, which if long continued, term inate in functional or even organic diseases. It is in the above described m anner that M ind rules the body. W h ile it is true that there are many diseases o f purely m ental origin and these can be cured through the use of mental or m etaphysical m eans alone, the g reater portion of the diseases with w hich m ankind is afflicted have a physi­
F ifty -fou r

March
1936

T h e normal functional activities of the body, the circulation, respiration,

cal as well as a mental origin. T h is is true because mankind does not violate one Law of N ature but many. Sim ply violating the Law o f R ig h t Thin kin g would be productive of disease of pure­ ly mental origin. B u t m ankind also violates the Law of R ig h t E atin g . Drinking, Breathing, and others, and consequently we m u s t also have a physical origin of disease. In my humble opinion I believe the L aw o f R ig h t Thinking to be of param ount im port­ ance. If man did not violate this Law in the first place, he could not violate the others and thence there would be no o c­ casion for him to be sick. The “Unconscious and Subconscious Minds" cannot be fooled by a false a s­ sertion from the “C onscious M in d ,” or from others. Little benefit can be ex ­ pected from the denial of the existence of a condition know n to the “S u b ­ conscious or U nconscious M in d s.” In order that healers, regard less o f school of thought, secure the g reatest success in their chosen field, they should take into consideration this m ental aspect. Curative and corrective su gg es­ tions that will arouse the feeling or idea that the desired result is in the process of accomplishment must be used, but not as a fact when it is not. A n attem pt should be made to instil the belief th at the desired changes are in progress.

th at im provement has begun, rath er than the idea that the morbid condition is n on -existen t. W h e n the physician or h ealer attem pts to replace the valid be­ lief th at there is a physical disorder with the erroneous statem ent that no such disorder is present, he only serves to fix attention upon, and to ex ag g erate the im portance of, the harm ful idea or know ledge o f the presence o f the physical disorder. H e should never mention or direct attention to the ab ­ norm al physical condition or m ental state, but should endeavor to divert a t­ tention from it. T h e suggestion o f the goal desired must be p ractical and h a r­ monize with a basic w ish of the “ S u b ­ conscious M in d .” A ll things are in a process of con stan t change, or in a state of becom ing som ething else. S o it is with m ental and physical conditions. W e must realize the truth o f this in handling human ills. D isease and other abnorm al conditions w h e n handled under this plan are in a process of b e­ coming a state of health. T h ro u g h the “Su b co n scio u s” you can influence the activities of the body for good b y con stan tly assum ing the m ental attitude of health. T u rn aside from the path of unharm ony and w rong think­ ing, enter the “S ta te o f B eco m in g ” w hich eventually leads on to that broad highw ay o f health and happiness.

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V
F O R U M •

R O S I C R U C I A N


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i IM PO R TA N T N O T IC E T O A LL MEM BERS
A statement is being circulated in some advertising matter throughout the country to the effect that A M O R C has "purchased" or "bought out" the school and system of Yogi breathing and mystical teachings formerly conducted as a school by a Mr. Gardner of Los Angeles. Such statements are absolutely untrue.

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► | f ► ► £ ►

Mr. Gardner advertised in some very bombastic circular matter for a year or more his personal, private course in telepathy and mind reading and similar subjects, claiming that he was selling the lessons at a very economical price "before the Rosicrucians ta k e over my entire system.” Our organization never considered taking over the teachings of Mr. Gardner nor anyone else and especially such nondescript matter as being offered by the gentleman. A M O R C has never purchased the courses of study, writings, books, or lectures of any individual or private school. D o not be misled by any such propaganda.

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Fifty-five

oA Personal Invitation
EVERY MEMBER OF AMORC IS INCLUDED IN THIS MESSAGE By
T h e Im p e ra to r clim ate, diversity o f scenery, and de­ lightful surroundings than the central portion of C alifo rn ia. So far as scenery goes, there is the variation o f the moun­ tain tops— easily reached in a few hours — to the valleys filled w ith fruit trees, m agnificent parks, and cities, to the ocean shore with its beaches and many form s o f am usem ent. O n e can lie in the sunshine on the sands o f the beach and enjoy the refreshing breezes from the ocean in the morning and at noon, and late in the afternoon tramp through the w ooded sections of the mountains and en jo y all the pleasures o f the mountain peaks. F o r food there is an endless variety of fresh fruits, preserved here and ship­ ped throughout the w orld under the brand o f D el M o n te, and tem pting a r­ ray s o f fresh vegetables, all sold at nom inal prices, making living costs ex ­ trem ely reasonable. T h e re are beautiful hotels at nominal rates, attractiv e auto cam ps with very econom ical arrangem ents, f u r n i s h e d rooms, small bungalow cottages, and m any other places w here individuals and couples can live for a w eek or two, more econom ically than in alm ost any other part of the country. T h e pleasures are endless and are not dependent upon the expenditure o f money. W h e th e r you com e by autom obile or by train, w hether you w ant to drive your own ca r or be driven by others, you will find members here ready to take you on sightseeing trips and help to entertain
F ifty -six

T I S once more my pleasure to invite every member of our O rd er in the N o r t h A m erican jurisdiction, w h e t h e r a new member or one of lo n g -s t a n d i n g , w h e t h e r in t h e low er d egrees or higher degrees, to come to C alifo rn ia and en jo y with us the w eek or ten days of celebration, entertainm ent, instruction, and guidance at the time of our annual C onvention. T h is summer the C onvention will have its opening session on Su n d ay evening, July 12. T h e C onvention will continue th ereafter with sessions each morning, afternoon, and evening throughout the w eek, ending on Satu rd a y evening, July 18. M em bers and their friends will un­ doubtedly follow the procedure of other y ears and arrive here three or four days b efo re the opening of the C onvention and remain some days a fter its con­ clusion. Su ch persons make a two w eeks' stay in the cen tral part of C a li­ fornia, spending one w eek w ith us and another w eek in visiting the northern and southern p arts of C alifo rn ia, in­ The cluding S a n F ran cisco , L os A ngeles, Rosicrucian H ollyw ood, and the great in ternational Digest fair at S an D iego. March T h e re is no more beautiful spot in the whole o f the U nited S ta te s for its 1936

you. Between the sessions o f the C on ­ vention in our large auditorium there are periods for recreation and pleasure that make each hour of the day from sunrise to long a fter midnight filled with

happiness,
benefit.

instruction,

and

direct

You will meet a t the C onvention the leading R osicrucian minds of A m erica, persons in every w alk of life, in every religion, every profession, and in every occupation. Y o u will find those from your own State, o ften from your own city, and perhaps from your own neigh­ borhood, who will be glad to m eet you and talk with you regarding your ex ­ periences and their own and help you to understand the law s and principles better. Y ou will find con geniality and a real spirit o f brotherhood and frank­ ness that will please you. You will have an opportunity to visit all of the offices and departm ents o f the organization and see them in operation, and stand and w atch the hundreds of methods of efficient routine and preci­ sion that are used in carrying on the great work. Y o u will meet and talk with those who help to prepare your mono­ graphs, who help to mail them to you, who answer your letters of inquiry and who help to solve your problem s. Y o u will meet those with whom you are dealing day a fter day and w eek a fter week in your activities as a member. You will see the beautiful museum with its relics from all over the w orld, and especially from those m ystic places and mystic lands that are associated with the mystical evolution of man. Y o u will see the new laboratories and scientific work rooms o f our own university build­ ing. You will see the A m enhotep S h rin e and other E gy p tian arch itectural fea­ tures. Y o u will m eet the officers and have interview s with them. Y o u will spend many en jo yab le hours on the lawns o f R osicru cian P ark and around its fountain, Shrine, and shady nooks. You will find interesting stores in the heart of the city and within an hour’s ride of the city itself some o f the largest universities and historical places o f the W est. Y ou will hear em inent R osicru cian s lecture and dem onstrate the principles o f our teachings; you will participate in mystical cerem onies, ritualistic m eetings,
F ifty-seven

and other incidents on a crow ded pro­ gram th at will make im pressions in your mind never to be forgotten. If you have ever been to R osicru cian P ark before, you will find new surprises aw aiting you this summer. Y o u will see scientific dem onstrations you may never have w itnessed before and perhaps will never see again. A nd at the end of the great week there will be the w onderful banquet, free to all attending the C on ­ vention, held in the g reat civic au ditor­ ium o f the city with music, speeches, and hum orous incidents to make the o c­ casion a m em orable one. E v ery lodge and chapter should a r­ range now to have an official delegate present at the C onvention as usual. E v ery D istrict Com m issioner who can possibly do so should attend so that he m ay meet others and togeth er w ork out plans for the follow ing y ear. E v ery G ran d C ouncilor should also try to be present to read his official y early report and m eet with others in outlining sug­ gestions to the new staff o f G ran d C ouncilors w ho are elected. E v ery member w hether officer, d elegate, or Com m issioner, is invited to be present and offer his or her su ggestions in the m any forums and on the m any o cca ­ sions w hen the various com m ittees of the C onvention ask for com m ents, criti­ cism s, resolutions, a n d suggestions. E v ery member who desires to speak is given an opportunity to present his sug­ gestions and com m ents. T h is is the op­ portunity for those with constructive ideas, or those who have critical com­ m ents to make to bring them b efo re the C onvention in the proper m anner and have them voted on or acted upon in acco rd an ce with the constitution of the organization or in a spirit o f dem ocracy. T h e Suprem e C ouncil and B oard of D irectors of A M O R C each y ea r have made the C onvention the occasion for such im provem ents, m odifications, or changes in the activities of the org aniza­ tion as will meet the desires and the best in terests of the m ajority of the members. It is the one great occasion when the membership o f the organization ex ­ presses its w ishes and has an oppor­ tunity w ithout restriction to participate in the direction of the activities of the organization. M em bers m ay bring their relatives and assu re them o f a delightful and

profitable stay in this valley, even though they cannot take part in the ses­ sions of the C onvention, for the sessions w ithin the closed auditorium are limited strictly to those w ho hold membership cards show ing they are active members in good standing. T h e re are so many things to en jo y here in this valley that there is no need for anyone to rem ain at home because he is not a member and cannot attend the C onvention. If you w ant to know w hat is the best w ay to com e to C aliforn ia b y train, steam boat, or autom obile, and w hat is V V

the m ost econom ical m anner o f reaching this part o f the cou ntry, w rite to the C onvention C hairm an for inform ation. If you w ant to reserve rooms in ad ­ vance, or places at auto cam ps, be sure to state your desires, but it is not n eces­ sary to make such reservations in ad ­ vance since the hotels and auto cam ps can supply adequate room for all who come. T h is is my personal invitation to each and every member and I hope to see m ore this y ear as I have seen m ore at each of the C onventions of the past. V

ANCIENT SYMBOLISM
Man, when conscious o f an eternal truth, has ever sym bolized it so that the human consciousness could forever have realization o f it. Nations, languages and customs have changed, but these ancient designs continue to illuminate mankind w ith their m ystic light. F o r those who are seeking light, each month we w ill reproduce a symbol o r symbols, with their ancient meaning.

OLDEST ROSICRUCIAN ALLEGORY
T his sym bolic il­ l u s t r a t i o n is the most revered o f all Rosicrucian o n e s , fo r it depicts the fundamental tenets o f the O rder’s philo­ sophy. T he l a r g e circle is emblematic o f the macrocosm, the universe as a whole, bein g com­ plete without begin­ n in g o r end. W ith ­ in the circle is the triangle, the symbol o f perfection repre­ senting the law of duality, the binary forces o f n a t u r e com bining to pro­ duce all creation. The smaller circle w ith the human f ig ­ ures w ithin it al­ ludes to the m icro­ cosm, t h e s m a l l w orld o f which man­ kind is a part, and which is governed by the same laws as the macrocosm, o f which it is a part. The square sym bolizes stability and indicates that all human conduct, in accord w ith the principles o f the macrocosm and microcosm worlds, is proper and w ill lead to a life of security. In the allegorical scene are also shown numerous geom etrical symbols, which is to teach us that the laws of the universe are ord erly truths and as dependable as the axioms o f mathematics, one o f the sciences based upon these universal laws. This illustration is taken from a very rare Rosicrucian book o f the 16th century, now in the archives o f the Order.

The R osicru cian D igest M a rch

1936
F ifty-eight

Each hour o f the day finds the men o f science cloistered in laboratories without ostentation, in vestigatin g nature’s m ysteries and extending the boundaries o f knowledge. T he w orld at large, although profiting by their labors, oftentim es is deprived o f the pleasure o f review in g their work, since general periodicals and publications announce only those sensational discoveries which appeal to the popular imagination. It is w ith pleasure, therefore, that we afford our readers a m onthly summary of some o f these scientific researches, and b riefly relate them to the Rosicrucian philosophy and doctrines. T o the Science Journal, unless otherw ise specified, we give full credit fo r all m atter which appears in quotations.

Human Wants

H E R E is no deny­ ing that the human, as are all anim als, is selfish. M an in­ terprets the entire w orld of sensation in terms o f value to him self. In the purely philosophi­ cal a n d spiritual sense this self is, as D escartes e x ­ p r e s s e d it, the thing th at thinks, but in the practical sen se as it is accep t­ ed by the average man, self is dual. It is the body with its organs, limbs, d e­ sires and passions on the one hand, and on the other it is the im m aterial, in tan g ­ ible consciousness and the deep-seated emotions and urges of w hat are said to be soul. M an considers it natural that anim als beneath him in the scale of development give themselves over entirely to biologi­ cal demands, th at they will not repress
Fifty-nine

any appetites for the nobler purposes of duty to their kind or the w elfare o f their species. In other w ords, it is expected that anim als will m anifest and express self only in a gratification of the bodily urges. B u t man, with the facu lty of reason and the influence o f soul, though su b ject to the same bodily desires, is ex ­ pected to heed the im m anent voice of conscience, and to deny the physical self pleasure a t times, so as to further the higher ends o f the inner urges. T h u s when we endure pain, suffering, and the torm ent of the body for an a ct of justice, we are said to be selfless. It resolves down to this: If we stifle the cries of the body, sacrifice physical gratification to attain a m oral ideal, we are lauded as being unselfish and as living in conform ­ ity with m an's higher purpose in the universe. W e may look at it another w ay. It is thought proper if w e acquiesce to the demands of the appetites as long as by so doing we do not violate the codes of ethics and m orals prescribed by men

The R osicru cian en<^ anc* ° b ject
i c

them selves. W h e n , how ever, upon o c­ casion w e are confronted w ith dual tem ptations, the satisfyin g of a bodily urge and also the urge to remove the ir­ ritating pangs o f conscience, the situa­ tion is most annoying. If we abandon ourselves to the sensuous pleasure, pub­ lic condem nation, the cry o f “selfish ,” stim ulates the pangs of conscience and m akes the irritations o f the m ental self even m ore intense. On the other hand, if we heed our m oral dictates and sub­ due the tem ptations of the physical self, we are said to be an adm irable ch a r­ acter, and we find an exalted pleasure in our self-con tro l and strength of will. In either case we have done ju st as w e w ished to do. W e succumbed to w hat to us w as the g reatest and the highest pleasure. In follow ing the d ictates o f w hat we please to call virtue, we find therein a g reater personal satisfactio n than in yielding to bodily pleasures. In either case we are selfish, beyond doubt. E v en though we may sacrifice an im mediate personal benefit to bring happiness to an other, it is still in the psychological sense a selfish act. W e do it because w e w ant to, because we find it more plea­ surable to do for the other fellow than for ourselves. T h e philanthropist finds a far greater exhilaration in bestow ing a g ift than in receiving it. If he did not, he would not do it. T h e re fo re , we do nothing w hich cannot be traced to the interests of self. E ven when w e destroy ourselves we are still thinking in terms o f self. M an y believe, perhaps erron­ eously, th at in death they will find the happiness they failed to m aterialize in life, and it brings them far g reater pleasure th erefore to seek death than to continue to live. T h e g reatest quest o f hum anity has ever been summum bonum in life. S o ­ crates, P lato, A ristotle, and the N eo platonists thought they found it in an intellectual life. T h e pleasures of the mind to them w ere the highest, because they w ere n ot transient and they w ere not lessened by being pursued. T h e C y ren aics, H ed onists, and certain later follow ers of E picurus declared th at the

cau se disease and pain— their result— w ere the very opposites o f the pleasure and physical happiness w hich they sought. P lato, in defense o f m ental happiness, said it w as the highest pleasure because those w ho experienced it had chosen it in p erference to physical pleasures. T h o s e who have never experienced the ecstasy o f the m ental life should not presum e to know th at the sensuous life w hich they chose w as best and the high­ est good. T h o u g h man by nature cannot avoid being selfish, it is reasonable that the selfish inclinations o f his higher nature be follow ed instead o f those o f his lower being. T h e pleasures o f the lower self are more direct and any benefits we de­ rive from them are quite obvious. T h e pleasures and benefits we derive from ad herence to the dictation o f the higher self are indirect, but others most alw ays share them in addition to ourselves, and because of this they should be preferred b y society. T h e patron o f a rt who founds a great studio for public instruc­ tion in art, or sponsors an institution to

assist indigent art students, is gratifying
a wish th at art shall be dissem inated be­ cau se it brings him additional pleasure to see others en joy it. T h is is a selfish pleasure, p sychologically speaking, yet others derive benefits from it. C o n se­ quently, a human w ant which, though selfish, if it will benefit others is a pre­ ferred desire. Su ch w ants should and must be encouraged among hum ans. It is interesting in conjunction with the topic of human w ants to read the follow ing excerp t from the excellen t article by P ro fesso r E d w ard L. T h o rn ­ dike, D irector of P sych olo gy , T e a ch ers C ollege, Colum bia U niversity. D irector T h o rn d ik e has gathered with the aid of his collaborators much interesting stati­ stical information to show ju st w hat the average human being w ants. It is to be expected that m ost men and most women will seek physical pleasures because, as w e have said, they are the most obvious and the m ost fundam ental because they are most closely related to the animal nature of man. T h e higher pleasures that inure to the intellectual are few and difficult to obtain, and consequently there are few w ho devote them selves to the intellectual life. A nd y et it is these
S ix ty

D ig est M a rch 1936

w as t^ le harm on­ izing o f the senses, a prolonging of sensuous pleasures. T h e y o f course postulated a necessary caution so as to avoid perversion and d egradation, b e ­

few who do devote them selves to the in­ tellectual and the m oral pleasures w ho closely knit society together by the fact that they produce those lasting things which we call the finer and better things of life. Professor T h o rn d ik e says: ‘‘T h e work o f a science o f values, a realistic ethics, is to learn w hat men do want and how to improve their w ants, and to trace the consequences o f acts, events, ideas, attitudes, etc. "W h a t are the fundam ental and de­ pendable satisfaction s of life for man? A leading p sychiatrist answ ers, ‘Love and secu rity.’ B u t a student of b o y s’ gangs may think th at ‘C onflict and ad ­ venture’ is as good an answ er. T h e philanthropists of the early and mid­ nineteenth centu ry thought th at men would be satisfied if they and their children w ere w ithout hunger and pain, able to read, with regular w ork ten hours a day and freedom to think and vote as they liked. C ynics of the tw en­ tieth century doubt w hether people in general really w ant liberty and culture as much as beer and excitem ent. " I have no sa tisfacto ry answ er, and no time to state the provisional answ er which anthropology, p sychology, soci­ ology and the other sciences o f man suggest. I shall instead report one small bit of evidence concerning w hat the in­ habitants of this country w ant. " W e do know fairly w ell how the population o f this country spent their incomes in 1929. U sing the figures given by Lynd and supplem ented by Dr. E lla W o o d y a rd , we have 17 billions / 2 bil­ for food, 8 billions for clothing, 6 x lions for autom obiles, and so on through thirty items like a billion and a h alf for laundry, cleaning and dyeing, over a billion and a half for tobacco, to threequarters of a billion for death and burial. " T h e paym ent for food satisfies ch ief­ ly hunger, appetite and the w ant for sweet and savory tastes, but also in part the craving for social enjoym ents, for the approval and esteem of others, for protection against disease. P aym en t for physicians is chiefly for protection against disease and pain, but also helps to satisfy the more general cravings for security, com fort, self-resp ect and the approval of others. Laundry bills repre­ sent the satisfactions o f self-resp ect and
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social approval, protection ag ain st di­ sease, pleasures o f sigh t and smell, and others also. ‘‘B y the aid o f a consensus of psy­ chologists, I have divided each item of our people's expenses among the w ants to w hich it probably m inisters, and then com bined the results into a list o f w ants and the am ounts paid for the sa tisfa c­ tion th ereof. T h e outcom e will suffer from w hatever con stan t errors afflict psychologists today, but this inventory of w ants satisfied from income is at least a step in the right direction. I shall not present it in detail, but only by samples. A ccord ing to it: ‘‘O u r bill for food is spent as follow s: 5 6 per cent to sa tisfy hunger; 15 per cent to g ra tify the pleasures of taste and smell; 10 per cen t for the pleasures of com panionship and social intercourse, including courtship; 3J/2 per cent for the approval of others, and sm aller p ercen t­ ages for protection again st disease, pro­ tection ag ain st cold, enjoym ent of the com fort of others and the pleasures of vision. ‘‘O u r bill for clothes is spent ( a c ­ cording to the p sych ologist's distribu­ tio n ): 41 per cent for protection again st cold, heat and w et; 6 % per cent for pro­ tection again st anim als and disease; 12*/2 per cent for the approval o f others; 7 per cent for self-ap p rov al; 10 per cen t to gain pleasure in courtship and sex activities; 8 per cen t for other social intercourse; 6 per cent for pleasures of vision; 3*/? per cent to win m astery or dom ination over others, and 2 per cent to win their affection. ‘‘T h e 7 0 0 million dollars for cos­ m etics and beauty parlors is spent about one-seventh for the pleasures o f sight and smell, on e-fou rth for the pleasures o f sex and courtship, one-third to gain general approval from others, oneeighth to have inner self-app rov al, and about on e-ten th to secure m astery or dom ination. ‘‘W h e n the entire annual budget is thus transform ed item by item into a budget for the satisfactio n of human w ants, paym ents for sensory pleasures, security, approval of others and the pleasures of com panionship and so ci­ ability ( including rom ance and cou rt­ ship) are in each case close in m agni­ tude to the am ount paid for freedom

from hunger. In fact, we pay m ore to m aintain self-resp ect and the good opinion o f others and avoid scorn, deri­ sion and shame than to keep our bodies fed and free from the distress of hunger. “W e pay more for entertainm ent (in ­ cluding the intellectual pleasures and the sensory pleasures of sight, sound, taste and sm ell) than for protection against cold, heat, wet, animals, disease, crim inals, and other bad people, and pain. “Less than one-third o f w hat we spent w ent for w ants which must be satisfied

to keep the human species alive and selfperpetuating. T h e rest w ent ch iefly to keep us amused and com fortable physi­ cally, intellectually, m orally, and especi­ ally socially. “ R elatively little is paid for the satis­ factions of the intellectual life. T h e psychologists do, how ever, pay us the com plim ent of crediting us with spend­ ing tw ice as much from g ood will to man as from fear of crim inals and other bad men, and o f spending at least as much to win the affection o f our fellow men as to have the pleasure o f bossing them .”

V

V

V

Some Facts for M embers’ Notebooks
By
T h e S u p rem e S e c r e ta r y

E A D E R S of our book, T he M ysti­

cal L ife o f Jesus,
som etim es state to our members that they cannot believe th at the book is based upon newly discovered f a c t s regarding the life o f Jesu s and the tex ts of the H oly Bible. T h e y con ­ tend that new facts pertaining to the life and times o f Jesus have not been discovered in old m anu­ scripts found hidden in secret or sacred places of the N ea r E a st. A s an aid to our members in answ ering such arg u ­ m ents, we call attention to the fact that a few m onths ago a learned antiquarian w ho had aided in bringing to the W e s t ­ ern W o rld th e new ly discovered “ M ount Sinai M an u scrip t of the B ib le ,” The now fam ous throughout the w orld as R osicru cian the K od ex Sinaiticus, called upon us, D igest and among other things which he dona­ M arch ted to our research library he gave us photographic reproductions of the pages 1936

of this famous m anuscript, including sections o f the true G ospel o f S t. Luke, w hich varies from th at published in the authorized version o f the H oly Bible. T h e im portance of this m anuscript was described in the Jan u ary 1, 1934, and follow ing issues of Time, the news m agazine. W e learn now from new s reports that once more, as at various times in the past cen tu ry, the sands o f E g y p t or obscure places in the N e a r E a s t reveal an oth er B iblical tex t. In December, 1934, there w as discovered in a rare li­ brary of m anuscripts a papyrus manu­ script containing a section o f the Gospel of S t. John, w ritten betw een the years 80 and 170 A . D . D uring the first week of F eb ru a ry another highly important discovery consisting o f 86 pages of the E p istle of S t. Paul, w ritten in the third century and evidently the oldest New T estam en t tex t o f any length w as made in E g y p t. P a rts of this new ly discovered m anuscript w ere secured b y the Uni­ versity of M ich ig an . D iscoveries of this kind are con stan tly revising many im­ portant and significant passages and phrases in the C hristian Bible, throwing
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light upon points that have been in dis­ pute or which contain a key to facts not hitherto revealed.

W arning T o Our M em bers
O u r members are hereby w arned re­ garding a confusion of terms in some literature now being distributed through the mails and addressed to “Sin cere Seek ers A fte r T r u th .” A pam phlet is­ sued by M r. C lym er of Pennsylvania now sets forth that in Jan uary of 1935, a little over a year ago, he registered and established in the S ta te of P en n sy l­ vania a so-called R osicru cian movement under the nam e o f “T h e R osicrucian F o u n d a tio n ," and th at he had this title patented recently in order to protect it again st “all infringem ent of an y kin d ." F o r many y ears the A M O R C has used the term, “T h e R osicrucian F o u n ­ d atio n ,” in its application blank for membership w herein all new members understand th at their first registration fee is paid to the “ R osicru cian F o u n d a­ tio n ” and that the purpose o f this F o u n ­ dation is to perpetuate and m aintain for y ears and cycles into the future the R osicru cian organization in this country as it has been m aintained in other lands. M r. C lym er h as used m any nam es in past y ears for his publishing society, and in fact, has changed the registered nam es of his society quite frequently. T h e o b ject o f now using the term, “ T h e R osicru cian F o u n d a tio n ,” a fter A M O R C had been using it for so m any years, is quite evidently an attem pt to confuse the minds of those who have had our literature and w ho in good faith have contributed to our “ R o sicru ­ cian F o u n d a tio n ," w hich w as the o rig ­ inal one in this country. O u r members and friends are th erefo re w arned n ot to be deceived into thinking that the “ R o si­ crucian F o u n d a tio n ” established by us and for which we m aintain reserve funds and tow ard which we are con ­ stantly contributing in buildings, equip­ ment. and other w ays, is in an y w ay a s­ sociated with this new registered and confusingly named body in P en n sy l­ vania.

1936 and C onflict
Since it is so easy to forget at the end of a year the im portant occurrences of the early part of the year, we call a t­ tention now to the fact th at the first months of 1936 are alread y fulfilling some of the predictions made in our pamphlet, 1936 and Conflict. R eports from Europe, the A tlan tic C o ast line o f both sides of the ocean, and from various parts of the U nited S ta te s, reveal that the storms of wind, rain, and snow are of an unusual nature and in many cases more severe and more destructive than at any time in the past century. O u r members should carefu lly observe the weather reports, as well as the cosm o­ logical, atm ospheric, and other m ani­ festations of nature, and find therein verification o f the predictions made in our annual pamphlet.

T he N ew D igest C o t’er
In answer to questions regarding the symbolism of the new cover, we wish to say that the fountain called “W a te r s of Life” represents the con tents of this magazine with its refreshing know ledge to quench the thirst o f those who are seeking truth. A t this fountain one person is enjoying a drink o f the lifegiving w aters. A n o th er w ho has a l­ ready enjoyed such a drink has filled a vessel to carry home to others th at they too may enjoy some of it. T h e blue in the background represents the Cosm ic and it colors the w aters of the fountain with its mystic tone. T h e architectu re represents the structures o f life built upon truth and serving to p rotect the fountain. T h e two columns may be given the nam es o f love and happiness, health and strength, or lo y alty and per­ severance. A s we drink from the foun­ tain we can make the symbolism come true.

V
READ
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V

V
FORUM

THE

ROSICRUCIAN

P A G ES
from the

JANE WELSH CARLYLE
: = I | = = | E E r : = i I = E 5 § s Each month w e w ill present excerpts from the w ritin gs o f famous thinkers and teachers o f the past. These w ill give our readers an opportunity o f know ing their lives through the presentation o f those w ritin gs which ty p ify their thoughts. Occasionally such w ritin gs w ill be presented through the translation or interpretations o f other eminent authors of the past. Jane W elsh Carlyle, though the w ife o f the famous eccentric and dominant Thomas Carlyle, never submerged her personality in his genius. She profited by her life w ith him, fo r his idiosyncrasies stimulated her talents. She was b om at H addington, Scotland, July 14, 1801. She was the daughter o f a w ell-to-do physician who died when she was but eighteen years o f age. H e le ft his entire estate to her, but she w isely assigned it to her mother who gave her an allowance equivalent to what she had received from her father, She became infatuated w ith h er tu tor, one Irv in g , who was betrothed to another. Irv in g , a fte r his m arriage, arranged fo r Carlyle, six years her senior, to continue instructing her. She m arried Carlyle in 1826 when she was tw enty-five years o f age. T h e ir m arried life was exceedin gly difficult because o f the clash o f temperaments. She once w rote to a friend, “ D on’t m arry a genius; I have married one, and I am m iserable.” H e r thoughts w ere quite profound, and she had a conscious philosophy o f life which she endeavored to live. H e r personal philosophy is b eautifully expressed in the simple dialogue below, which it is said she never intended to have published. E very reader, I am certain, w ill e n jo y its forcefulness and w ill observe in it the expressions and view s o f life o f many persons whom they meet in the d aily course o f their lives. \ § : S § f i E = = E E \ E = § § = E

............... .......................................................................................................... -....... 6

B

DIALOGUE BETWEEN THE BIRD AND THE WATCH
ATCH :

chirp, chirp!”

“C h i r p ,

The Rosicrucian plain C an ary bird. Digest W atch : A t all events, thou a rt a
M a rch 1936

W h a t a w eariness thou a rt with thy chirping! D o es it never o c c u r to thee, f r i v o l o u s thing, th at life is too s h o r t to be chirped aw ay at this rate? Bird: N ever. I am no P h iloso ­ pher, but ju st a

C reatu re of T im e, that has been hatched, and that will surely die. A nd , such b e­

ing the case, methinks thou art im pera­ tively called upon to think more, and to chirp less. Bird: I “called upon to th in k!” How do you make that out? W ill you be kind enough to sp ecify how my condition would be improved by thought? Could thought procure me one grain of seed or one drop of w ater beyond w hat my m istress is pleased to give? Could it pro­ cure me on e-eighth o f an inch, one h a ir’s-b read th more room, to move about in? O r could it procure me to be hatched over again, with better auspices, in fair, green wood, beneath the blue, free sky? I im agine not. C ertain ly I never yet betook m yself to thinking, instead of singing, th at I did not end in dashing

wildly against the w ires o f my cage, with the sure loss o f feathers, and at the peril of limb and life. N o, no, in this very conditional w orld, depend upon it, he that thinks least will live the longest; and song is better than sense for ca rry ­ ing one handsom ely along. W atch: Y o u con fess, then, w ithout a blush, that you have no other aim in existence than to kill time. Bird: Just so. If I w ere not alw ays killing o f time, T im e, I can tell you, would speedily kill me. H eigh-ho! I wish you had not interrupted me in my singing. W atch: T h o u sighest, C hico: there is a drop of bitterness at the bottom of this froth of levity. C on fess the truth; thou art not w ithout com punction as to thy course of life. Bird: Indeed, but I am though. It is for the P ow er that made me, and placed me here, to feel com punction, if any is to be felt. F o r me, I do not fulfill my destiny. In the appointing of it I had no hand. It w as with no consent of mine that I ever was hatched. . . N o r yet w as it with consent of mine that I w as made to depend for subsistence not upon my own faculties and exertions, but on the bounty of a fickle m istress, who starves me at one time and surfeits me at an ­ other. D eeply, from my inm ost soul, have I protested, and do protest, against all this. If, then, the chirping with which I stave off sorrow and ennui be an o f­ fence to the w ould-be wise, it is not I, but Providence, should bear the blam e, having placed me in a condition w here there is no alternative but to chirp or die; and at the same time made selfpreservation the first instinct of all liv­ ing things. W atch: U nhappy C hico! N o t in thy circum stances, but in thyself, lies the im­ pediments over w hich thou can st not gain the m astery. T h e lot thou cornplainest of so petulantly is, with slight variations, the lot o f all. T h o u art not free. T e ll me who is. A las, my bird, here sit prisoners; there also do prison­ ers sit. T h is world is all a prison, the only difference for those w ho inhabit it being in the size and aspect o f their c e lls.. . . B ird: W ith all due reverence for thy universal insight — picked up, H eaven knows how, in spending thy days a t the
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bottom of a dark fob— I must continue to think th at the birds of the air, for exam ple, are tolerably free; at least, they lead a stirring, pleasurable sort of life, w hich well may be called freedom in com parison with this o f m ine............. W o u ld that the egg I w as hatched from had been addled, or that I had perished w hile yet unfledged! I am w eary of life, esp ecially since thou hast constituted th y self my spiritual adviser. A y de mi! — B u t enough o f this! It shall never be told that I died the death o f Jen k in ’s hen. "C h ico , point de faiblesse!"

W atch: It w ere more like a C hristian to say, "H ea v en by my stren g th !” Bird: A nd pray, w hat is a C hristian? I have seen P o ets, Philosophers, P o li­ ticians, B lu e-sto ckin gs, Philanthropists — all sorts o f notable persons — about my m istress; but no C hristian s, so far as I am aw are. . . W atch: B ird! thy spiritual darkness exceed s belief. W h a t can I say to thee? I wish I could make thee w iser better. Bird: If w ishes w ere saw s, I should request you to saw me a passage through these w ires; but wishes being sim ply wishes. I desire to be let alone of them. W atch : G ood counsel at least is not to be neglected and I give thee the best, w ouldst thou but lay it to h e a rt............. A h , C hico, in pining for the pleasures and excitem ents w hich lie beyond these w ires, take also into account the perils and hardships. T h in k w hat the bird of the air has to suffer from the w eather, from boys and beasts, and even from other birds. Storm s and snares and un­ know n w oes beset it at every turn, from all w hich you have been m ercifully de­ livered by being once for all cooped up here. Bird: T h e re is one known woe, how ­ ever, from w hich I have not been de­ livered in being cooped up here; and that is your absolute wisdom and im­ pertinent in terferen ce — from w hich sam e I pray H eaven to take me with all convenient speed. If ever I attain to freedom , trust me, the very first use I shall make of it will be to fly w here your solemn prosy tick shall not reach me any more forever E v il befall the hour w hen my m istress and your m aster took it into their heads to sw ear "e tern a l friendship," and so occasion a

juxtap osition betw een us tw o w hich N atu re could never have m eant. W atch: M y “M a ste r? ” T h o u im­ becile! I own no m aster: rath er am I his m istress, of whom thou speakest. N o th ­ ing can he do w ithout appealing to me as to a second better conscience: and it is I who decide for him w hen he is in­ cap able of deciding for him self I say to him, “ It is time to g o ,” and he goeth; or, “T h e re is time to s ta y ,” and he stay eth. H ard ly is he aw ake in the morning w hen I tick au thoritatively into his ear

"Levez-vous, M onsieur! Vous avez des grandes choses a faire!” and forthw ith
he gathers him self together to en jo y the light o f a new day— if no better there m ay b e A y , and when the night is come, and he lays him self down to sleep, I take my place at his bedhead, and, like the tend erest nurse, tick him to repose. Bird: A nd suppose that he neglected to wind thee up, or that thy mainspring chanced to snap! W h a t would follow then? W o u ld the w orld stand still in consequence? W o u ld thy M a ste r— for such he is to all intents and purposes—

lie forever in bed, expecting this Levezvous? W o u ld there be nothing in the wide universe besides thee to tell him w hat o ’clock it w as? Im pudent piece of mechanism ! depend upon it, for all so much as thou thinkest of th yself, thou couldst be done w ithout. II n ij a point de montre necessaire! T h e artisan who made thee with files and pincers could make a thousand of thee to order. C ease, then, to deem th y self a fit critic for any living soul. T ic k on, with in­ fallible accu racy , sixty ticks to the minute through all eternity, if thou wilst, and canst, but do not expect such as have h earts in their breasts to keep time w ith thee. A h eart is a spon­ taneous, impulsive thing, w hich cannot, I would have thee know , be made to beat alw ays at one measurem ent rate for the good pleasure o f any tim epiece that was ever put togeth er.— A nd so goodday to thee; for here comes one who— thank H eaven— will put thee into his fob, and so end our te te -a -te te .

W atch (w ith a sig h ): T h e living on earth have much to bear.

RO SICRUCIAN N EW Y E A R C ELEBR A TIO N
E V E R Y M EM BER W E LC O M E In every Lodge and Chapter of the North American jurisdiction, on or about Friday, March 20, there will be conducted the annual mystical Rosicrucian New Y ear ceremony, a beautiful, impressive symbolical affair. Each and e v e ry Rosicrucian National member of the Grand Lodge, whether a member of a Lodge or Chapter or not, is entitled to at­ tend these sessions. T h e y are co rd ia lly invited to be present by the o fficers of the Lodges and Chapters. In the back of this magazine, in the directory, you will find listed the names and addresses of many of the Lodges and Chapters. If they are in your vicinity, write at once, or call upon them to learn the exact date of the session. Below are the names and addresses of the Chapters which, because of lack of space, do not appear in the directory. San Diego, Calif.— Chapter Secretary: Mrs. E v a W eary , 3621 40th St. Oakland, Calif.— Chapter Master: Dr. W alter S. Baker, Wakefield Bldg., Rm. 406. Atascadero, Calif.— Chapter Master: Mrs. Minnie Tuggy, Route 1, Box 41. Denver, Colo.— Chapter Master: Mrs. Nora Beck, 2576 Albion St. First Lodge of Connecticut— Master: Mrs. M ary Andross, So. W indsor, Conn. South Bend, Indiana— Chapter Master: Mrs. E tta Rice, 728 E . Indiana St. St. Louis Chapter— Master: Mr. Oliver W . Dunbar, 4355-a Laclede Ave. Omaha, Nebraska— Chapter Master: Dr. Frederick Gonder, 5716 N. 24th St. Newark, N. J.— H. Spencer Lewis Chapter— Master: Frank A. Hammond, 80 E lla St. Cincinnati, Ohio— Chapter Master: Albert M. Barnes, 9 Euclid Ave., Ludlow, Ky. Cleveland, Ohio— Chapter Master: Mr. W . J. Slemmons, 867 Lecona Drive. Dallas, T e x as— Chapter M aster: Mr. J. M. Blaydes, 2910 Pine St. W ich ita Falls— Chapter Master: Mrs. Mona M yers, P. O . Box 8 . Salt Lake City, U tah— Chapter Master: Herman R. Bangerter, 2nd W est St. Milwaukee, W is.— Chapter Master: Mr. Alois F. Eckmann, 2923 W . Highland Blvd.

The Rosicrucian Digest March
1936

\

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T he

Mystery of Personality
By

ARE W E W H A T W E THINK W E ARE, OR A RE W E LIVING IMAGES?
T h e Im p e ra to r descriptive of the appearance of the person, or descriptive o f his home, his castle, his occupation, and finally the fam ily nam e or group name w as adopted. A t first m any o f the fam ily nam es w ere the nam es of the castles, estates, provinces, or occupations of the fath er or ch ief of the fam ily. B u t a fte r all is said, the nam es which each o f us carry to distinguish us from others do not distinguish the personal­ ity but rath er the individuality. T h a t w hich distinguishes us most clearly, most definitely, and certain ly most s a t­ isfacto rily , is the picture o f presentm ent o f our own personality. T o illustrate w hat I mean, I will cite an incident th at occurred ju st a few days ago. A large social organization in this city found that it w as n ecessary to select from its membership, com posed w holly of women, a com m ittee o f fifteen to attend a very im portant civic affair as representatives of the women o f the cen tral portion of C alifo rn ia. I w as present with the two officers who had the responsibility o f selecting this com ­ m ittee. A s they began to pick out the women for the com m ittee o f fifteen, I noticed that em phasis w as given in each and every case to certain outstanding ch aracteristics o f the personality of the individual. M rs. Sm ith w as not selected because her nam e w as M rs. Sm ith, and because th at name distinguished her from others, but because of some charm ,

N S O M E o f the m onographs o f our d egrees o f study the su b ject of in­ di vi dual i t y and personality is dis­ cussed at consider­ able length, but we find in the problem of p e r s o n a l i t y m a n y interesting facts that are com ­ monly overlooked or g r e a t l y mis­ understood. W e have a common practice at the present time throughout the civilized and uncivilized w orld to give nam es to children at birth, and these nam es they bear throughout their lives excep t when changed by m arriage, or changed volun­ tarily with the permission of a court of law. T h e history of this p ractice is very interesting and show s th at at the very dawn of civilization man attem pted to distinguish him self and his associates by certain vow el sounds used for the purpose o f identification. A t first these names w ere o f one or two syllables, and for many hundreds of y ears each in ­ dividual usually bore but one name, a given name. F in ally because of the multiplicity of these given nam es and the many sim ilarities, certain ad jectives were added to distinguish one from the other. A t first these ad jectives w ere
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or some pleasant, im pressive trait of personality, or because of some m ental, intellectual, or other talen t w hich she had developed and m anifested in an e f­ ficient and useful m anner. In other w ords, the com m ittee w as selecting fifteen personalities and not fifteen in­ dividuals or fifteen nam es. T h is becam e evident when a num ber of persons selected w ere unknown b y name to the com m ittee. I heard one o f the tw o per­ sons say, “T h e re is th at lady, the one w ho alw ays smiles so pleasantly when she meets everyone, who dresses so conservatively and yet co rrectly , w ho never seems to have an ear for any critical comments, but is alw ays ready to offer constructive suggestions, and the one who alw ays arrives a little early at all the m eetings and w ants to know if there is som ething that she can do to help in the w ork o f the org an izatio n .” T h e y did not describe h er physical ap ­ pearance very definitely, but certainly they did not describe her husband or the position he occupied, or the house she lived in, or her age, or any of the other points of distinction excep t those that pertained in a limited m anner to her personality. It w as very evident th at it w as the personality of this individual th at had impressed the tw o officers, and not the fact that she w as the w ife of one o f the leading bankers of the city, or th at she had a m agnificent home, or did a g reat deal of social entertaining, or had considerable w ealth, or had been to E u rop e a num ber of times, or that she had three sons w ho w ere w ell-know n in business in the city, or any other factor except th at w hich related to her per­ sonality. I have noticed in my con tact w ith su ccessful business executives in large corporations and institutions that in selecting em ployees or associates for certain im portant positions, con sid era­ tion w as given first of all to the person­ ality o f those who w ere under con sid ­ eration. E v ery large executive will tell you that he is more fam iliar with per­ sonalities in his institution than with nam es. H e will adm it to you th at there T he are a num ber of persons whom he con­ Rosicrucian tacts throughout the day in a casual Digest m anner, and w hose nam es he has never March learned, but w ho he has marked alm ost unconsciously in his mind because of 1936

som e outstanding ch aracteristic of per­ sonality. Som etim es these ch aracter­ istics are unfavorable, and for that reason the person is marked in a de­ ro g ato ry w ay, and perhaps would be one of the first to be discharged, sus­ pended, or laid off tem porarily if any reduction in the num ber o f em ployees w ere necessary. O n the other hand, others will be prom oted, advanced, and given more authority and opportunity for the use of their abilities because of outstanding points of personality that are favorable. O u r personalities are things which w e create and make, more than we realize. It is true that we inherit a few traits of personality from our ancestors, but even th ese can be modified, and often are modified, by the traits which we volun­ tarily adopt, I do not w ant to overlook the point th at our health has some b ear­ ing upon our personalities. Y e a rs ago w hen the functioning of the spleen was not thoroughly understood, it w as a s­ sumed that it had som ething to do with the ch aracter and personality, and we find evidence o f th at old belief in modern phrases such as “his spleen must be out of order to d a y ,” w hen we find someone w ho is grouchy and unruly or tem pera­ m ental. A person w hose health is below par and who is suffering to some degree, or annoyed in his harm onious balance by an ailm ent, will sooner or later have his personality reflect the physical and m ental mood within. It certainly is not too much to say that a person in poor health cannot alw ays m anifest in a n a­ tural m anner a pleasing personality, or even the true p ersonality that would m anifest if the health w ere norm al. It is alw ays possible under certain cir­ cum stances to place upon ourselves a tem porary cloak of fictitious personality. B u t this h yp ocritical presentm ent of ourselves never deceives for any length of time. A cloak m ay serve on occasion am ong stran gers for a few hours or for a few seconds, but there is one reason w hy such a cloak, if worn very long, d efeats its own purpose. T h e person who is w earing it must constantly keep it fresh and active in order that it serve its purpose, and in doing this the mind is so continuously centered upon the fictitious ch aracteristics of personality being assum ed, and so constantly con­
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cerned lest an error o f personality be expressed or a slip made th at w ould re ­ veal the true personality, th at the in ­ dividual is constantly ill at ease and not natural and soon creates the im pression in the minds of others that he or she is acting. T h e re is nothing so destructive to a good im pression of one’s personality than the im pression given to others of acting. W h a te v e r charm , w hatever power, w hatever good there may be in our personalities must be revealed as natural, and not as artificial if the per­ sonality is to win its w ay. But there are traits o f personality acquired through inheritance or through momentary ill health, or perhaps through temporary w orries and problem s that disconcert which can be deliberately modified and gradually rejected and cast out. O u r personalities are th ere­ fore something w hich we can create, and which we do create from day to day and year to year. If we think that our physical ap pear­ ance and our individuality as human beings is something th at chan g es from year to year through age and through experience and through the trials and tribulations of life, w e should realize that personality too is co n stan tly ch an g ­ ing and th at each experience o f lire, each trial, each suffering, each test of our capabilities and pow ers contribu te more definitely to the molding of our personality than they do to the physical appearance of the body. W e have often heard it said that a person who has lived a long time has grown more aged look­ ing or more gray, more w rinkled or more stooped, but has also grown more "mellow” in personality. Fortunately for the human race and the advancem ent of civilization, as well as for the unfoldm ent o f our evolution, the trials and tribulations of life have from century to centu ry modified co n ­ structively and for the b etter o f all co n ­ cerned, the personality of the average individual. In other w ords, the greatest good that time and evolution have con­ tributed to the advancem ent o f civiliza­ tion has been in the im provem ent o f the personality of human beings more than in the im provement of his physical ap ­ pearance. Scientists remind us th at in the evo­ lution of the human form throughout the
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ages, man has becom e m ore upright in his stature and h as soften ed in his physical appearance, has becom e more gracefu l in his m ovem ents, and has lost a num ber of physical attributes w hich are unnecessary and which made him crude and primitive in appearance. But these great im provem ents in our physi­ cal makeup are o f far less im portance to the advancem ent o f civilization than the im provem ents that have taken place in the p erson ality of man. I have said above th at man is the creato r o f his personality and can make it alm ost w hat he w ishes to make it. H ow ever, I do not w ant to slight the fact that some traits of personality have been added to the average individual unconsciously and involuntarily through the experiences of life. B u t these in­ voluntary im provem ents do not begin to equal in num ber or in im portance the voluntary qualities and attributes that man has d eliberately developed, not a s ­ sumed. A g ain the distinction is being made betw een assum ed or artificial or tem porary traits of personality, and those which have been deliberately or involuntarily developed gradually and over a length o f tim e and w hich have becom e natural and perm anent. P erh ap s one of the outstanding traits o f human personality is the tendency to smile pleasantly when in com pany with those persons who can appreciate and do appreciate a pleasant expression of personality. It is said that man is the only living member o f the anim al king­ dom that can smile, and express a smile, and through a smile reveal jo y and h ap­ piness. M a n h as m ade the m ost of this natu ral ability d eliberately and uncon­ sciously. W e do find human beings whom we would suspect as having no ability to smile, and no facility for ex ­ pressing any jo y or happiness that m ay be in their h earts. C ertain ly they are in the m inority. T h is one ch aracteristic o f personality when d eliberately developed becom es an outstanding and im pressive one. W e soon find ourselves liking and enjoying the com pany o f those who smile easily and sincerely. It is not only because they help to contribu te to our happiness and the p leasan tness o f the day, but they cause us to feel th at the person is happy w ithin, and has found the real k ey to some happiness. It is a

human tendency for individuals to seek happiness or to seek the jo y o u s side of life. T h is has been one of the fund a­ mental elem ents controlling the p ro g res­ sive developm ent o f man in the process of evolution. Su ch persons are dis­ tinguished very definitely from those w ho w ilfully or unconsciously seek the sordid and unhappy side o f life. Su ch persons are either m entally unbalanced, m entally deficient, or psychically un­ developed. E v en among the crim inal classes w here the tend ency is to a sso ­ ciate with th at w hich is deplorable, destructive, unhappy, contentious, or abnorm al, there is a d egree o f in con ­ sistency m entally and p sych ically, and such persons are not norm al hum an b e ­ ings. E ven when p sych oan alysts state that some of these persons deliberately asso ciate them selves with the sordid and unhappy side of life and try to tell us that it is not because o f an y uncon­ trollable urge from w ithin, w e must ad ­ mit th at such persons are m entally de­ ficient or abnorm al, and that th erefore their d eliberateness in this regard is not a sign of strong m entality, but rather a sign of a condition which should arouse our com passion and our pity. F o r this reason most crim inals and those w ho love to be a part of the underw orld should be treated by us as needing p sy ­ chopathic consideration and treatment rath er than dire punishm ent. W h e n we presen t our personalities to our friends and acquaintances, w e are presenting a picture o f the real self within. D uring the daytim e w hile we are occupying an im portant executive position and feel th at we must w ear a cloak o f extrem e dignity and au thority in order to demand or command respect from em ployees and so-called inferiors, we may put upon ourselves an artificial cloak, and assum e an outer expression of personality th at is not our true selves. B u t in m oments of relaxation and in social co n tacts and in m oments that we are unaw are of, the real personality underneath the cloak will reveal itself and will m ake a more lasting and more understandable im pression than those The which w e m ay have assum ed. E m ­ Rosicrucian ployees under any executive will frankly Digest state th at they take w ith a so-called March grain o f salt the exacting attitude and critical m annerism s o f their em ployer. 1936

for they have noticed at odd moments that underneath his outer cloak there is a personality of fairness, kindness, ju stice, and happiness. B u t in the same m anner an artificial cloak of kindness and m ercy, of sincerity and fairness is detected in all of its falseness ju st as readily. T h e re is nothing th at will tend to develop a pleasing personality, and one w hich in a very subtle and m ysterious m anner im presses itself in its truth fu l­ ness upon all whom we con tact, more than the adoption o f an attitude of to l­ eran ce in all m atters of distinction. In other w ords, if we adopt a universal and human point o f view in regard to dis­ tinctions of individuals and their ex ­ periences in life, w e becom e kind and gentle in personality. S o long as we can feel that one race or nation of people is better than another, or th at one race or nation o f people w orse than another; or so long as we can feel th at persons of one religion are w rong, or represent the b lack people of the w orld, w hile those o f another or several other religions are b etter; or so long as we feel convinced th at persons of one color or class are low er in the scale o f life or less desir­ able than others, we are bound to have certain ch aracteristics m aintained in our personality that are unfavorable and w ill sooner or later m anifest themselves in detrim ental w ays. T h e absence o f an y form of religious w orship in our beings is a d erogatory elem ent in our personalities that is sure to reflect itself unfavorably. T h e person w ho does not love G od — a suprem e be­ ing of som e kind representing the omni­ potence of the universe— is lacking in one o f the first elem ents o f a pleasing personality. T h e person who cannot love all men and all women as human beings as his kindred, free from dis­ tinctions that will belittle any of them, is lacking an oth er im portant element th at m akes a pleasing personality. T h e person w ho cannot find actual jo y and happiness in life itself, and in living, lacks a very essential elem ent in a pleas­ ing personality. T h e one w ho cannot see that there is far more good in the w orld, far more jo y , far more happiness, far more of the ideal and beautiful, is doomed to have a most disagreeable personality. T h e one w ho can find him­
S even ty

self ready to listen to the tales of gossip and the critical remarks of other persons, and find interest in such stories, is sure to have his personality darkened and clouded, and to have this cloudiness re ­ veal itself to others. So we find that our personality is something that we can regulate and control. It should be som ething th at is composed of a code of life which we can adopt at the beginning and develop and make a true and inherent part o f our­ selves. W e should give as much thought to the development of this personality as we give to the development o f the brain and the mind and their faculties. It should begin w ith the training o f a child, and step by step as the child is taught to walk and to talk, to read and to understand, he should be taught the essentials of a pleasant, happy person­ ality. As he is taught to have his face and hands cleansed th at the dirt and dross that have disguised the real fea­ tures should be removed, he should be taught to remove from his consciousness those things that will conceal the p er­ sonality’s real charm s. A n exam ple should be set by the developm ent o f the personalities o f the parents, and the things that we read and the things that we permit ourselves to see and w itness are contributory factors o f w hich we are often unaware. The man or woman who reads daily or weekly only those new spapers or periodicals that deal with the contentions between labor and capital, betw een the various opposing factors o f social and economic conditions, and the attack s between rival political parties, is sure to develop a personality th at is contentious and generally su p er-critical. O n the other hand, those w ho m ake it their business to read such literature, and especially such new spapers as attem pt to present the higher and b etter side of

life, and to ignore as unessential the sordid and unfortunate things of life, will develop a tendency tow ard attu n em ent w ith the happy, sunlit side o f the w orld. T h e re are new spapers w hich de­ light in overem phasizing the sordid things as constituting the m ost im portant new s of the world. T h e re are other pub­ lications w hich love to em phasize the kind and good things w hich life pre­ sents from day to day. O n e cannot, for instance, take up a book o f astronom y and read it carefu lly w ithout becom ing convinced th at there are m arvelous law s in the universe co n ­ sta n tly operating for the good of man, and as one w alks out in the evening and lifts his eyes tow ard heaven, he is bound to find new jo y in noticing the groups of stars, their arrangem ents, and observing things about them th at he had never seen before. H aving read the book, and having becom e acquainted with another part o f the universe, he finds a new field for pleasant and happy contem plation. B u t those w ho read only such books that deal with crime and w ith w ar, or with the econom ic struggles of our earth ly system s, is bound to look upon every business transaction, every social co n tact, and every incident o f life with a som ew hat cyn ical and critical attitude. T h e se things affect our personality, as do our private thoughts and our person­ al convictions w hich are subtly created and molded by the things we read and hear, observe and com prehend. T h e creating o f p ersonality is som e­ thing th at is continuous and eternal from birth to transition, and beyond; personality is im m ortal. A s we build and create it tod ay and tom orrow , it will act and re a ct and exp ress itself in the eternal future. It will be the real part of us th at will survive our earthly existen ce and becom e our spiritual h eritage in the kingdom of G od.

V

V

V

PLAN NOW TO ATTEND THE ROSICRUCIAN CONVENTION — JULY 12-18

Seventy-one

SANCTUM MUSINGS T h e Sole Reality
TH E SOLE REA LITY
(T h is a rticle is continu ed from th e last issue an d w ill b e co n clu d ed in th e A pril issu e.)

N O U R discovery th at the m agnitude or d i m e n s i o n of form s and form s t h e m s e l v e s are subordinate to the sense quality, we have learned that one condition a c ­ counted for them, and th at is v aria­ tion — a variation o f the quality. W e can produce v ari­ ations o f a sense quality ourselves, and observe the different sense form s it pro­ duces. F o r an exam ple, certain medi­ cinal in jectio n s into the eye will cause distortion of visual o b jects, changing their appearance. A lso partial subduing o f the sensitiveness o f our facu lty of touch will change the nature of its forms to us. T h e norm al variations, for which we are not responsible, and which a c ­ count for our notions of reality, are ob ­ viously the result o f a mysterious e x ­

A re these changes brought to us, or do w e extend our senses to them? In other w ords, do we p ro ject our sight to the cau se o f its quality, the cause of w h at we know is light, or does the cause extend itself to the sense organ and in­ duce light? W e reach out our hand and feel the thin, cool, smooth vessel w hich we know is a drinking glass. B y this act, how ­ ever, w e have not extended our sense of touch. It is still limited to its qualities. W e have m erely brought the sense of touch w ithin range of the ag en cy which gives rise to the sense quality and the idea w e obtain from it. W e place our fingertips upon a vibrating su rface. T h e impulses are easily perceived by the sense of touch. G rad u ally the electrical excitation is diminished, and w e no longer feel the pulsations. T h e re is now no possible w ay by w hich we can ex ­ tend our sense of touch to realize the sensations again, for the actuating force has w ithdraw n. In considering the extension o f an extern al ag en cy w hich actuates our senses, w e must not think of extension alone in terms o f moving to or from us in space, as a vehicle. T h e extension may consist of such a variation in the nature of the agen cy th at it is no longer capable o f exciting the sense faculty,
S ev en ty -tw o

ternal agency.
W e shall seek this extern al agen cy. If there w ere not variation, all we have The found th at depended upon it would Rosicrucian cease to be; consequently, we must con­ Digest clude th at this extern al ag en cy has the March attribute o f variation or brings about change. 1936

and that is the equivalent, therefore, of having moved from us as could a vehicle. W e commonly and erroneously refer to modern instruments as extending the senses. No instrument yet invented has accomplished that feat. W e peer through the giant reflecting telescope of some modern astronomical observatory and see a distant nebula, previously not visible to the naked eye, floating befo re us in the heavens like a filmy veil. Y e t we have not extended our sense of sight. W e have added no quality it a l­ ready had not possessed. N o r has the nebula, millions of light y ears from us, any more visual form or reality than any object we discern w ith our unaided sight. W e have intensified, or m agni­ fied, if you will, the extern al ag en cy sufficiently to excite the facu lty of sight which it was not capable o f before. W e have not projected into stellar space our vision, but rather made the extended agency capable of being perceived. W e listen to voices w hich originate thousands of miles from us. Betw een the one who speaks and ourselves lies a continent, perhaps seas, y et we have not by the instruments which- make this pos­ sible, extended our auditory sense to them. W e have amplified the sound so that it can enter the range of our h ear­ ing. W e have conveyed it to our sense by a mechanical means. Our external energy has now, from the foregoing, acquired in addition to change the function of E X T E N S I O N . These two ch aracteristics partially iden­ tify the mysterious external ag ency of which we are in search. F o r there is, as we know, only one state capable of producing such conditions as C H A N G E and E X T E N S I O N , and th at is A C ­ T IO N . In fact, action is identified only by its characteristics o f change, and such functioning as would also com e in the classification o f extension. T h e re is no state but that which is declared to be in action that has the ch aracteristics of change and extension. T h is assigns A C T IO N for the moment the im port­ ance of being the extern al ag en cy . However, we are accustom ed to con­ sidering action as a result of a cau se rather than a prim ary cause itself, but more of this latter, for we are com pelled to consider also at this time the opposite
Sevcnty-thcee

of action — the state of Q U I E S C E N C E . W e cannot deny the prom inence that qu iescence plays in our conscious life. Q uiescen ce, the state or condition which seem s, in so far as our sense faculties are concerned, devoid of everything — all quality, form, dim ension, or m agnitude. Y e t by the very fact that we realize it, it takes on the sem blance of reality in its own right. A better understanding o f qu iescence is had b y judging it by the same stand ard s by w hich w e ju d g e the sense qualities. If we repress a sense faculty, we im­ m ediately becom e conscious of quies­ cence, the absence o f that action to w hich we credit all o f our sense reali­ ties. T h e re exists a void. O n the other hand, we m ay keep the sense alert, and still quiescence can persist. F o r e x ­ ample, in a dark room devoid of light, regard less o f w hat we are doing, we are aw are o f a state o f quiescence. W h e n we blindfold our eyes we are also aw are of it, no m atter how alert we attem pt to keep the sense of sight. T h e com pari­ son betw een the two experiences reveals no difference as far as the nature o f the state of quiesence, or absence of any visual action is concerned. Q u iescen ce has every evidence of existen ce with or without the sense faculty. A t least, if it exists as well w ithout it, we are not de­ pendent upon it for a realization of quiescence. A nd it is further apparent that this state of quiescence is not sole­ ly engendered from w ithout, as are the sense qualities. C h an g e and extension, we have de­ clared, are the ch aracteristics o f action, but they are never perceived in them ­ selves. T h e y are to be found only in w hat w e apprehend as realities. W e never see change w ithout that w hich is said to be changed, or have we ever ex ­ perienced extension w ithout the percep­ tion o f som ething extending itself. In fact, to our senses, chan ge and ex ten ­ sion seem to be the process or mode of action o f a state, thing, or condition. W e can say that the thing, state, or condition is but the result of the change, extension, or action , yet action alw ays has, so far as our minds conceive it, form. T h e state o f qu iescence, on the other hand— and we are using the term quies­ cen ce here to mean absence of th at a c ­

tion w hich excites the sense qualities— is absolutely devoid of form . H ow do w e apprehend the state o f quiescence? Is it not by realizing the absence of a c­ tion? T h e state of quiescence is not realized by w hat it is, but instead by w hat it is not. A ction is know n by the forms it assum es, w hereas quiescence is know n by the absence of such forms. It is patent, therefore, w here action never w as, qu iescence could not be. Q u iescen ce has a negative existence in the absence o f the positive action. It is reason able to presum e th at there ca n ­ not be the absence of som ething that w as not, and for this reason quiescence has no definite reality of its own, and w e are brought back to the consid era­ tion of action as reality, as the extern al cause of all sense forms. A ction is found only in form, those things we perceive through the medium of the sense faculties or the effects they produce, w hich we designate as condi­ tions. W e arbitrarily regard some form s as w ithout action, as being inert, and y et upon deliberation w e will find it im manent in them, also. T h e rocks, with time and the ele­ m ents, becom e inpalpable. T h e m ighty ocean is ceaseless in its surge. T h e earth continues its rhythm ic rotation. T h e planets pursue their courses. N o th ­ ing rem ains untouched b y change, and chan ge is the expression o f action. E v ery th in g w hich is, is o f action; there­ fore, everything is action. T h e law s by which things m anifest or chan ge appear to be an exception, to have perm anency and be immutable, but the law s are not things; they are their causes, and the cau se o f a thing is action. Y e t action it­ self does not change, it m erely expresses the ch aracteristic of chan ge by assum ­ ing to us m ultitudinous forms. A ction, then, is that which is. L et us substitute the w ord “ Iso s" for action— the G reek derivative for the word “is " or “ equal." It is truly appropriate. A ll things being action, and action that which is, all things are then fundam entally equal. Isos is reality. It is dependent upon no cause. Its existen ce is not imparted T he Rosicrucian to it. It is ubiquitous. If Isos is all that is, it has alw ays been. It could not have Digest been created from nothing, for nothing March is the absence of som ething. W e can realize a sta te o f apparent nothingness 1936

only b y first having know ledge of som e­ thing, w hich by con trast is absent, or th at we im agine should exist. T h e only positive existence, as w e have con ten d ­ ed, is th at w hich is— not th at which is not. A w aren ess of existen ce precedes the idea of n on -existen ce. S in ce Isos is all that is, it could not have had any beginning. From w hence did it com e? A nd if it cam e from som e­ thing, then th at would not be the be­ ginning, for w hence did that come? If Isos had no beginning, neither can it have an end. W h a t would constitute the end o f Isos? P aten tly , it would mean the ceasing o f all that is existent. B u t since nothing as a state is depend­ ent upon som ething having existence, som ething, th erefo re, can n ot return to nothing. If Isos w ere to acquire a state of nothingness which could be measured in term s of its relation to Isos, then it would have a definiteness, the equiva­ lent of Isos itself. In other w ords, this nothingness would have existence, or be Isos. If the condition of nothing or the void, as the opposite o f Isos, exists in its own right, then it is not really n oth­ ing but som ething. It, in fact, IS . It is but a different state o f Isos. T h is m ay appear inconsistent with a previous conclusion th at w hat we as human beings perceive as a state o f quiescence — the absence of a sense quality— is not itself a reality, but m ere­ ly our realization of the absence of reality. In so far as our human percep­ tions are concerned, how ever, w e can conceive as realities only those varia­ tions of our own sense qualities which have form. A nd the sta te o f quiescence lacks form. B u t when w e consider Isos o r that w hich m erely has existence, form is not concerned. A n y state or condition, anything which would per­ sist, would b y that fact, be. A nd if it was, it would then b e Isos. F o r further exam ple, light is never detected w ithout form, w hereas com­ plete darkness is w ithout form. Light and its form s are positive to our sense perception, and consequently are reali­ ties to us. D arkn ess, on the other hand, is negative by con trast, and being form­ less, is not a reality to us, but a mere realization of the absence of reality. L e t us suppose, how ever, that light was
S even ty-fou r

as formless as is darkness, then as simple states of existence, they would be equal. Both to us would be reality, for neither would be considered the posi­ tive state. N either would be assigned preference. D arkness then would have being equal to light. N eith er would be a state consisting of m erely the absence of the other, for neither would be the predominating, or even the preferable one. So it is with Isos. A n y condition maintaining a state as fixed as Isos would in fact be it, no m atter how d if­ ferent. In fact, Isos is a state o f being. Therefore, anything, w e reiterate, th at is, even if different then w hat it w as, is nevertheless, Isos. A cco rd in g ly , we conclude, Isos cannot cease to be. W ith the accep tance, how ever, of the theory that Isos is continuous, w e are confronted with the n ecessity o f e x ­ plaining why we periodically are aw are of a state of quiescence— a period when to us at least Isos is absent. Is it that Isos cyclically passes befo re us causing a realization of it, and at other times when we fail to perceive it, or are aw are only of quiescence, it has not ap­ proached us? T o entertain such a theory would mean th at w e would be sep ara­ ting the human and his consciousness from the universe, from Isos itself. A s man is part of Isos, it cannot parade before him as a detached thing or state, causing him to be periodically aw are of it. Being embodied in it, the periods when we are not aw are o f it through one or all of our senses, are obviously due to another reason. Furtherm ore, if Isos were sep arate and ap art from the human consciousness, w e would need to give a reason for a progression o f it before m an’s consciousness. Isos pervades all, as it is all. T h e r e ­ fore, it does not advance or retreat from one state or another. It is bounded by no state to which it could be draw n or from which it could be repelled. A s previously stated, Isos is not cap able of becoming n on-existen t. A ccord ing ly , it could not lapse into a void from which it would periodically arise. Su ch voids, if they existed by the fact o f their e x ist­ ence would be the equivalent of Isos. Thus the gaps of quiescence, o f which we are aw are, are not indications o f a period o f dorm ancy out o f w hich will again arise Isos in form s of the sense qualities.
Seven ty-five

T h e re is still an oth er question which also dem ands attention. It is this. Isos is the cause o f the sense qualities, and their varied form s, yet Isos is uniform in its nature. H ow , then, does it cause the sense qualities to so vary as to m ani­ fest all o f the realities we perceive? F irs t w e repeat: Isos is an absolute state of existen ce. It has no fixed ch ar­ acteristics such as are apprehended by the senses. It is pure being, and not as we perceive it to be. If, then, Isos acts upon our sense qualities to produce vari­ ations, it implies th at in some m anner it fluctuates. W e have previously considered Isos as action. W e will, th erefo re, approach the problem from this point again . L et us conceive this prim ary action, this Isos of w hich all things are com posed, as being quantitative. W e shall consider it as having qu antity m erely for the pur­ pose of an alysis. E ven action s with w hich w e are fam iliar, though alw ays associated with some o b je ct or o b jects, seem to have a definite cap acity, as though they w ere quantitative. F o r e x ­ am ple, a m agnetic field betw een two m agnetized poles. O n ce this field has been detected, to us it has a potential state of accom plishm ent. It is capable o f producing certain results. T h e exten t of its accom plishm ent is its qu antity to us. T h e re fo re , we will assum e th at this universal basic action is of a certain qu antity, but its qu antity rem ains con­ stan t. B y assigning this action con stan cy, we are not implying th at it is limited by any boundary or state w hich would prevent it from increasing, for there is nothing to restrict it. N o r is there an y ­ thing w hich it could assim ilate to in ­ crease itself. W e must think of this action as a great ball, but a ball w ithout su bstan ce— a ball o f potentiality, as a globular m agnetic field, if you can co n ­ ceive th at. F u rth er, w e must conceive it not as floating in anything, or having an y relationship to anything else, for it alone is everything. T h is action is ceaseless. A state o f inaction would be im possible. F o r if this action w ere not, neither could inaction be, for there IS only this action, no other state; not even a negative one could persist. In ertia, in com parison to action, is a sta te o f n othingness, and as w e have

concluded, such a state has no existen ce in its own right, for there is only that which is. If inertia, as a state or co n ­ dition, could persist so as to id entify it. it would have an existen ce o f its own, and consequently would not be n othing­ ness, or inertia. O n the other hand, this action must be definable in term s of accom plishm ent. If the action w ere ju st a state of being, we would not perceive it in the form s w e do. It would not, in other w ords, vary the qualities o f our senses as it evidently does. W e cannot, how ever, describe it as a motion w hich has d irection, since it, it­ self, is all direction and it is not rem ote from an y place tow ard w hich it can progress, or w ithin an y place from w hich it can egress. T h is ball of action has the attribute o f expansion. It is not, as we hereto fo re explained, drawn as a unit toward anything, but expand s from its center in the m anner of pulsations. T h e positiveness o f its nature asserts itself. T h e nucleus distends. It follow s its law of being by the action of dis­ tending itself, and furthers its nature. T h is distention does not add to it for it assim ilates nothing. It is, instead, a fullness o f its function. L ike a rope w hich is uncoiled and then stretched to its fullest extent, it has added nothing to its nature, but it is more cap able o f fulfilling the purpose o f its length by being uncoiled, than coiled. T h e surge of this pole o f action, we can d escribe as being outw ard from the cen ter w ithout being directional. T h e center, as this distention continues, b e­ com es less positive, less active in con ­ trast to its outer area, if we continue to

im agine this basic action as being in the form of a ball. W h e n the intensity o f action betw een the cen ter and the rem ote region b e ­ com es quite disproportionate, there is a rebound tow ard the less active center, and then a repulsion outw ard in a rhythm ic manner again. C ontinuing our an alogy, we may realize that the action would be graduated in intensity betw een its points or poles o f alternation . T h e g reatest intensity would occur, we can im agine, im m ediately subsequent to its alternation. In other w ords, ju st at the point of rebound tow ard the center or outw ard. N ow we have reasoned that the state of quiescence, w hich m anifests to us as the absence o f the sense qualities, is due to a lack of excitation of the sense organs. T h is being so, it establishes the sound premise th at only some phases of Isos, this universal action, are received b y the senses and arouse their qualities. T h is con traction and expansion of Isos, with its gradation of intensity, is th erefo re not entirely w ithin the range o f perception of the human conscious­ ness. A degree o f this distention is a p ­ parent— w hat portion to the w hole may never be know n— but w ithin this decjree lies all o f the reality we perceive. Even th at range is not entirely apprehended by any one of the senses. It is also not equally divided am ong the faculties, for some of them detect a greater exten t of the in ten sity of Iso s’ action than others. B eyond and below the range of a sense facu lty a state of qu iescence exists to man.

(T o be concluded next month)

V

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THE

ROSICRUCIAN

FORUM

The Rosicrucian Digest March
1936

SALT LAKE C IT Y C H A PTER O PEN S READING ROOM

i.

W e are pleased to announce that the Salt Lake City Chapter is opening a reading room and library at 303 Ness Building, 28 W e st Second South Street, Salt Lake City. It is open both to members and the general public.

S ev en ty -six

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RARE W O O D C U T O F C H R ISTO PH ER CO LUM BUS
The above splendid woodcut was executed by D eBry. famous artist, who illustrated many Rosicrucian manuscripts and books. All of the charts, diagrams, and symbols con­ tained in the voluminous work of Rosicrucian teachings by the eminent Robert Fludd, of the seventeenth century, are also the result of the workmanship and ability of D eBry. T h e above illustration is of Christopher Columbus, and is from a rare Rosicrucian book in the archives of A M O R C . This book also contains dozens of portraits of eminent Rosicrucians and personages of the past. M any of these portraits are priceless, because there are no others in existence. From time to time we will reproduce them, so that our readers may eventually collect a library of excellent portraits of renowned Resicrucians of the past. (C o u rtesy o f R osicru cian D igest.)

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H ave Y o u a Solution for the Problems That A rise?
|N A material sense your daily world is dual. O n e portion of your daily life is devoted to your home, family, and friends; the other to your business, to the field of endeavor, to the part you personally play in the great scheme of life. Daily, even hourly, there are problems that arise of paramount importance. Upon the proper solution ol them depends perhaps not only your own happiness, but the happiness and welfare of those dependent upon you. You have oft times felt lire need of such advice as could be immediately applied to the problems at hand, advice which would give you practical, working tools to correct conditions ol your environment whether it be home or office. T h e book. Rosicrucian Principles for the Home and Business, deals wi th the prevention of ill health, the curing of many of the common ailments, and the attainment of peace and happiness, as well as the building up of the affairs ol life that deal with financial conditions. 1 he book is filled with hundreds of prac­ tical points, dealing especially with the problems of the average business man and the person employed in business. It points out the wrong and right way for the use of metaphysical and mystical principles in attracting business, increasing one s income, promoting business propositions, starting and bringing into realization new plans and ideas, and the attainment ol the highest ambitions in life. Look at some of these chapter headings. You will note that they take into consideration those things which we all face daily in our lives.
THE TRUTH ABOUT AFFIRMATIONS. THE COSM IC AND YOU. MENTAL ALCHEMY'. COMMANDING COSM IC HELP. SECURING MONEY. THE ATTAINMENT O F W EALTH. SEEKING EMPLOYMENT. IMPRESSING OTHERS. AN UNUSUAL HELP IN NEED. THE L A W O F COMPENSATION. ATTRACTING PATRONAGE. THE ROUND TABLE.

"Rosicrucian Principles lor the Home and Business is not theoretical, but strictly practical, and is in its fifth edition, having had a wide circulation and a uni­ versal endorsement not only among members of the Organization who have volun­ tarily stated that they have greatly improved their lives, by the application of its suggestions, but among thousands of persons outside of the Organization. It has also been endorsed by business organizations and business authorities. T h e book is of standard size, well printed, bound in silk cloth, and stamped in gold. Price, postage prepaid, Sa.oo.

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M ember of “ F U D O S I” (Federation Universelle des Ordres et Societes Initiatiques)

T he Rosicrucian Order, existin g In all civilized lands, is a non-sectarian, fratern al body o f men and women devoted to the investigation, study, and practical application o f natural and spiritual laws. T h e purpose o f the organi­ zation is to enable all to live in harmony w ith the creative, constructive. Cosmic forces fo r the attainm ent o f health, happiness, and Peace. T h e O rder is internationally known as A M O R C (an abbreviation), and the AM O R C in Am erica, and all other lands, constitutes the only form o f R os i­ crucian activities united in one body having representation in the interna­ tional federation. T h e AM O R C does not sell its teachings, but gives them freely to all a ffilia te d members, togeth er w ith many other benefits. In qu irers seeking to know the history, purposes, and practical benefits that th ey m ay receive from Rosicrucian association, are invited to send for the free book, ‘ 'Th e Secret H e rita g e ." Address, F ria r S. P. C., care of

AMORC TEM PLE R osicrucian Park, San .Jose, C alifornia,
(Cable Address: "A M O R C O "

U. S. A. R adio Station W 6 H T B )

Officials of the North and South American Jurisdictions
(Including the United States, Dominion o f Canada, Alaska, Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras. Nicaragua, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Republic o f Panama, the W est Indies, L o w e r California, and all land under the protection o f the U nited States o f America. H. S PE N C E R L E W IS . F. R. C., Ph. D .................................................................................................Im perator R A L P H M. L E W IS , F. R. C...................................... Supreme Secretary CLE M E NT B. L E B R U N , F. R . C ................................................... Grand M aster H A R V E Y M IL E S . F. R. C Grand Treasurer E T H E L B. W A R D , F. R . C Secretary to Grand M aster H A R R Y L . S H IB L E Y . F. R. C...................................................................... D irector o f Publications Junior Order of Torch Bearers (sponsored by A M O R C ). F o r com plete inform ation as to its aims and benefits address General Secretary, Grand Chapter, Rosicrucian Park, San Jose, California.

T h e follow ing principal branches are District H eadqu arters o f A M O R C
Atlanta, Georgia: Atlanta Chapter No. 650. Dr. James C. O akshette, Master: Nassau Hotel. Meetings 7:30 every Thursday night. New York City, New York: New Y ork Chapter, Rooms 35-36, 711 8th Ave., cor. 8th Ave. and 45th Street. Louis Riccardi, Master; M argaret Sharpe, Secre­ tary. Inquiry and reading rooms open week days and Sundays, 1 to 8 p. m. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Delta Lodge No. 1, A M O R C , S. E . C orn er 40th and Brown Sts., 2nd Floor. M r. Albert Courtney, Master. Benjamin Franklin Chapter of A M O R C : W arren C. Aitken, Master; M artha Aitken, Secretary, 2203 N . 15th Street. Meetings for all members every second and fourth Sun­ days, 7:30 p. m.. at 1521 W e st Girard Ave. (Second Floor, Room B ). Boston, Massachusetts: The M arie Clemens Lodge, Fortunatus J. Bagocius, Master. Temple and Reading Rooms, 739 Boylston St., Telephone Kenmore 9398. Detroit, M ichigan: Thebes Chapter No. 336. Mr. W illiam H. Hitchman, M aster; Mrs. Pearl Anna T ifft, Secretary. Meetings at the Florence Room, Fuller Hotel, every Tuesday, 8 p. m. In­ quirers call dial phone No. 1870. San Francisco, California: Francis Bacon Lodge, 1655 Polk M r. David Mackenzie, Master. Street;

Pittsburg, Pennsylvania: Penn. First Lodge, Dr. Charles D. Green, M aster; 3787 E ast St. N. S., Pittsburgh, Pa. Reading, Pennsylvania: Reading Chapter, Mr. Harrison N. Mucher, Master, 144 Clymer St.; Mr. George R. Os­ man, Secretary. Meeting every Friday, 8:00 p. m., W ashington Hall, 904 W ashington St. Los Angeles, California: Hermes Lodge, A M O R C Temple. Mr. Ollin W . Marden, M aster. Reading Room and In­ quiry office open daily, 10 a.m . to 5 p.m ., and 7:30 p.m . to 9 p.m . except Sundays. Granada Court, 672 South Lafayette Park Place. Birmingham, Alabama: Birmingham Chapter of A M O R C . For in­ formation address Mr. Cuyler C. Berry, M aster, 721 So. 85th St. Chicago, Illinois: Chicago Chapter No. 9, Mabel L. Schmidt, Secretary. Telephone Superior 6881. Read­ ing Room open afternoons and evenings. Sundays 2 to 5 only. 100 E . O hio St., Room 403-404. Lecture sessions for A LL members every Tuesday night, 8:00 p. m. Chicago Afra-American Chapter No. 10. Robert S. Breckenridge, M aster; Aurelia Carter, Secretary. Meeting every W ednes­ day night at 8 o ’clock, Y . M. C. A., 3763 So. W abash Avenue.

(D irecto ry Continued on N e x t P a g e )

Portland, Oregon; Portland Chapter. Paul E . Hartson, M aster; Telephone E ast 1245. Meetings every Thurs­ day, 8.00 p .m . a t 714 S. W . 11th Avenue. Washington, D . C.: Thom as Jefferson Chapter. W illiam V . W hittington, M aster. Confederate Memorial Hall, 1322 Verm ont Ave. N. W . Meetings every Friday, 8:00 p. m.

Seattle, W ashington: A M O R C Chapter 586. W alter G. Simpson. M aster; Mrs. Carolina Henderson, Secretary. 311-14 Lowman Bldg., between 1st and 2nd Aves. on Cherry St. Reading room open week days 11 a. m. to 4:30 p. m. Visitors welcome. Chapter meetings each Friday, 8:00 p. m.

Other Chartered Chapters and Lodges of the Rosicrucian Order (A M O R C ) will be found in most large cities and towns of North America. Address of local representatives given on request.

P R IN C IP A L C A N A D IA N B R A N C H E S
Vancouver, British Columbia: Canadian Grand Lodge, A M O R C . Mr. H. B. Kidd, Master, A M O R C Temple, 878 Horn­ by Street. Victoria, British Columbia; V ictoria Lodge, Mr. A. A. Calderwood, M aster. Inquiry O ffice and Reading Room, 101 Union Bank Bldg. Open week days 10 a. m. to 6 p. m. Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada: Mr. E ly Law, Master, 120 Spence St. (Ph. 33341.) Session for all members every Sun­ day, 2:45 p. m„ 304 “B " Enderton Bldg., Portage Ave. and Hargrave St. Montreal, Quebec, Canada: Montreal Chapter. Alexandre Chevalier, F. R. C., Master, 210 W e st St. Ja m es Street. Inquiry office open 10:00 a. m. to 5 p. m. daily; Saturdays 10:00 to 1:00 p.m . Toronto, Ontario, Canada: M r. Benjamin W . W akelin, Master. Sessions 1st and 3rd Sundays of the month, 7:00 p. m.. No. 10 Lansdowne Ave. Edmonton, Alberta: Mr. Alfred H. Holmes, Master, 9533 Jasper Avenue E .

SP A N ISH A M E R IC A N S E C T IO N
T h is jurisdiction includes all the Spanish-speaking Countries of the New W orld. Its Supreme Council and Administrative O ffice are located at San Juan, Puerto Rico, having local Represen­ tatives in all the principal cities of these stated Countries. T he name and address of the Officers and Representatives in the jurisdiction will be furnished on application. A ll co rresp o n d en ce shou ld b e ad d ressed a s fo llo w s: Secretary General of the Spanish-American Jurisdiction of A M O R C , P. O. Box 36, San Juan, Puerto Rico.

A FEW

O F T H E F O R E IG N

JU R ISD IC T IO N S
Auckland Chapter A M O R C . Mr. G. A. Franklin, Master, 317 V ictoria Arcade Bids. Queen St., City Auckland.

Scandinavian Countries: T h e A M O R C Grand Lodge of Denmark. Mr. Arthur Sundstrup, Grand M aster; Carli Anderson, S. R. C., Grand Secretary. Manogade 13th Strand, Copenhagen, Denmark. Sweden: Grand Lodge “Rosenkorset.” Anton Svanlund, F . R. C., G ran d M aster. Jeru salem s gatan, 6, Malmo.

New Zealand:

England: T h e A M O R C Grand Lodge of Great Britain. M r. Raymund Andrea, K. R. C., Grand Master, 34 Baywater Ave., W estbury Park, Bristol 6. Dutch and East Indies: Dr. W . T h . van Stokkum, Grand Master, W . J. Visser, Secretary-General. Karangtempel 10 Semarang, Java. Egypt: T h e Grand Orient of A M O R C . House of the Temple, M. A. Ramayvelim, F. R. C., Grand Secretary, 26, Avenue Ismalia, Heliopolis. Africa: T h e Grand Lodge of the Gold Coast, A M O R C . Mr. W illiam Okai, Grand Master, P. O . Box 424 Accra, Gold Coast, W est A frica. T h e add resses o f other foreign G ran d L o d g es and secretaries will b e fu rn ished on application.

Holland:
De Rozekruisers Orde; Groot-Lodge der Nederlanden. J. Coops, Gr. Sect., Hunzestraat 141, Amsterdam. France: Dr, H. Gruter, F . R. C., Grand Master, Nice. Mile Jeanne Guesdon, S.R .C ., Corresponding S ecreta ry fo r the G ran d L o d g e ( A M O R C ) of France, 56 Rue Gambetta, Villeneuve Saint Georges, (Seine & O ise). Switzerland: A M O R C Grand Lodge. August Reichcl, F. R. C., Gr. Sect., Riant-Port Vevey-PIan. Austria: Mr. M any Cihlar, K. R. C., Grossekretar der A M O R C , Laxenburgerstr, 75/9, Vienna, X . China and Russia: T he United Grand Lodge of China and Rus­ sia, 8/18 Kavkazskaya St., Harbin, M an­ churia.
R O SIC R U C IA N PRESS, LTD.

1DIEL IDE BE BORIt AQAin m PAm AHD SUFFERITIG ?
U S T we relive the misfortunes, discour­ agements, and failures of this life? Does death deliver us permanently from the vicissitudes of the earth, or is it a temporary respite, returning us once more to the world of man? Is death a glorious opportunity to begin again, at some other time and place, to undo what we have done, and to profit by our experiences of the past? Shall we instead look upon death as the end, the close of a chapter, with its story incomplete and imperfect? Does our span here o f a few years constitute our sole existence as humans, and if so, is that Divine justice? There are no questions which the human mi nd can entertain that are more intimate or more vital than these. 1 hey are interestingly answered and discussed in a marvelous discourse entitled, 1 he Soul s Return, prepared by Dr. H. Spencer Lewis. I his discourse represents years ol study on this subject and his fascinating conclusions. To the point, under­ standable and instructive, this manuscript should be in your possession as a valuable document on the subject ol reincarnation. You may obtain it A B S O L U T E L Y W I T ! l O U T C O S T by merely subscribing to this magazine, I he Rosicrucian Digest,” for just six months. A six-months subscription costs only $1.50 and in addition to receiving six copies of this magazine, you will receive at once, with postage paid, this most unusual discourse, wh ich alone is worth more than the magazine subscription price. There are but a limited number of these discourses available, so we advise that you subscribe at once, and A SK FO R Y O U R G IF T COPY.

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T h e discourse. T h e Soul s Return, w as once published serially, in answ er to h un ­ dreds of questions about reincarnation re­ ceived from throughout the w orld by D r. Lew is. I his is the first time it has ever been released in m anuscript form in its en­ tirety. L o r i n t e r e s t i n g particulars, read above.

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^Rosicrucianlibrary
The following: books are a few ol several recommended because o f fhe special knowledge they contain, not to be found in our teachings and not available elsewhere. Catalogue o f all publica­ tions free upon request. Volume II. R O S IC R U C IA N P R IN C IP L E S F O R T H E H O M E A N D B U S IN E S S .
A very practical book dealing with the solution o f health, financial, and business problems in the home and office. W ell printed and bound in red silk, stamped w ith gold. Price, $2.00 per copy, postpaid.

\ olume III

T H E M Y S T IC A L L IF E O F JESUS.

A rare account o f the Cosmic preparation, birth, secret studies, mission, crucifixion, and later life o f the Great Master, from the records of the Essene and Rosicrucian Brotherhoods. A book that is demanded in foreign lands as the most talked about revelation o f Jesus ever made. O ver 300 pages, beautifully illustrated, bound in purple silk, stamped in gold. Price, $2.25 per copy, postpaid.

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“ UNTO TH EE I G RAN T . .

It is filled with the A strange book prepared from a secret manuscript found_ in the monastery of Tibet, most sublime teachings of the ancient Masters of the F a r East. The book has had many editions. W ell printed with attractive cover Price, $1.25 per copy, postpaid.

Volume VI.

\ l H o rs A N D Y E A R S OF YESTERD AYS.

A beautiful story of reincarnation and m ystic lessons. This unusual book has been translated and sold in many languages and universally endorsed. W ell printed and bound with attractive cover. Price. 85c per copy, postpaid.

Volume V II.

S E L F M A S T E R Y A N D F A T E , W IT H T H E C Y C L E S O F L IF E .

A new and astounding system o f determ ining your fortunate and unfortunate hours, weeks, months, and years throughout your life. No mathematics required. Better than any system o f numerology or astrology. Bound in silk, stamped in gold. Price. $2.00 per copy, postpaid.

Volume V III

T H E R O S IC R U C IA N M A N U A L .

Most complete outline o f the rules, regulations, and operations o f lodges and student work o f the O rder with many interesting articles, biographies, explanations, and complete dictionary of Rosicrucian terms and words. V ery com pletely illustrated. A necessity to every student who wishes to progress rapidly, and a guide to all seekers. W ell printed and bound in si Ik, stamped with gold. Price. $2.00 p er copy, postpaid.

Volume XI

M V N SIO N S O F T H E SOUL, T H E C O SM IC C O N C E P T IO N .
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L E M I R IA — T H E L O S T C O N T IN E N T O F T H E P A C IF IC .

The revelation o f an ancient and long forgotten M ystic civilization. Fascinating and intriguing. Learn how these people came to be swept from the earth. K n o w o f their vast knowledge, much o f which is lost to man­ kind today. W ell p rin ted and bound, illustrated with charts and maps. Price. $2.20 per copy, postpaid.

Volum e X m .

T H E T E C H N IQ U E O F T H E M A S T E R .

The newest and most complete guide fo r attainin g the state o f Cosmic Consciousness. It is a masterful work on psychic unfoldment. Price. $1.85 per copy, postpaid.

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THE INSTITUTION BEHIND THIS ANNOUNCEM ENT

THE MUSIC OF THE SPHERES
(JJ Pythagoras, the ancient G re e t philosopher, was the first to declare that all things are in accord with number, and the secret harmony which exists between them is the key to the universe. I he ancients also proclaimed that the perfect mathematical arrangement of the planets produced magnificently enrapturing vibrations which became known as I he M u s ic of the Spheres. I his Cosmic music was beyond the auditory sense of human beings and was perceivable by man only through attunement with the lorees ol nature when his inner being would rhythmically oscillate in majestic time with the universe. I he great composers ol the centuries have sought to capture emotionally this music of the spheres and reduce it to notes. In fact, the beautiful compositions of many ol the masters are evidence of ll ie I )ivine influx. lany of the Rosicrucian compositions also have a touch of this afflat us. I he composition, Sweet Rosae C rue is. is particularly inspiring

I his selection w as dedicated at the first Rosie rucian N evv ^ ear cere­
SW EET
R osicru cia n piano in dies,

RO SAE
song

CRU C1S
lor now

mony to be held in this jurisdiction during the present cycle ol the Order. All lovers of music who have heard it at Rosicrucian lodges or chapters, or elsewhere, have requested copies. Because of an in­ creasing demand for it, we have reproduced this selection in sheet music form at a nominal price so it may be had by all music lovers. Members will find by playing or singing it in their homes that it produces a very soothing, peaceful effect. A limited number of copies is available, so procure yours now. Send order and remittance to:

1 11is official, h ra u liln lly written arranged is accom panim ent

availab le . Its size is q '/ j x 12V2 ll is artistically arranged and w ell printed. Price ini ludes postage to you.

PR IC E:

2 5 cents per copy.

T /. e

R O S I C R U C I A N
P A R K

S U P

P L Y
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B U R E A U
C. A L I F O R N I A

R O S I C R U C I A N

N J O S E .

D R . C H A R L E S G R E E N . F. R. C.
Dr. Green, of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, was the first Deputy Grand M aster of the Rosicrucian Order for the Pennsylvania jurisdiction, and later became the State Grand Master. He was initiated in the Order in 1916 and was unanimously elected Chairman of the first Rosicrucian Convention, of the present cycle of the Order, in the summer of 1917 at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He was also a member of the committee that drafted the original constitution of the A M O R C of this jurisdiction. A t present he presides as Master of The First Lodge of Pennsylvania. He is held in high esteem by all Rosicrucians whose privilege it has been to know him. (C ou rtesy o f R osicru cian D igest.)

How didthe Ancients learn Life’s great secrets?
A m azing W as T h eir K now ledge of Life and of N ature's Laws
"V ^ T H E N C E came the knowledge and power that gave the ancients such complete mastery? In countless ways they were forty centuries ahead of their time. Their understanding of basic truths, so long ago, still baffles modern men of science. W ere their secret teachings lost? Destroyed? Suppressed? Advanced thinkers know that truth cannot change, that true knowledge is never really lost. Long before the dawn of our so-called civilization, the wisest of the wise found w ays to m eet and study their priceless knowledge. Secret brotherhoods were formed to perpetuate their marvelous work. . . . And out of such early origin there grew what is now the Rosicrucians, known throughout the world as A M O R C . Slowly down the corridors of time the Rosicrucians have added students in every county, in every state and in every land. W herever there are men and women who are not content to merely exist from day to day— wherever there are humans imbued with the sound belief that man was gifted with a mind for use, for understanding, for thinking— there you will find Rosicucians. They belong to every race and every creed, rich and poor alike.

PRIVATELY SEALED BOOK . . . FREE

Earnest men and women are in­ vited to send for a free copy of the privately sealed book,‘‘The Secret Heri­ tage.” It tells the interesting particulars about the Rosicrucians and how any one willing to study as little as one hour a week, at home, may qualify to apply for the means of acquiring the fascinating and enlightening Rosicrucian teachings. Use the coupon and obtain your compli­ mentary copy.

R o s ic r u c ia n s
San Jose

(A M O R C )

California

“ ' T h e R o s i c r u c i a n s A r e N o t A R e l i g i o u s Organizatiu
-------------------------------USE T H IS G IF T C O U P O N -----------------------

Scribe E. O. D. T h e Rosicrucians (AM O R C) San Jose, California Please send m e free copy o f p rivately sealed book, “ The Seat H e rita g e," w hich I shall read as directed. Nam e A d d re s s

C ity

ROSICRUCIAN DIGEST
C O V ER S THE W O R LD

TH E OFFICIAL, IN TERNA TIO NAL ROSICRUCIAN MAGA­ ZINE O F T II E W O R LD -W ID E ROSICRUCIAN O RDER
A P R IL , 1936

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Dr. Charles G reen , F. R. C . (Frontispiece) The Thought of the Month: W o rld Aspects. . The Kabala C ath ed ral C ontacts Entering N oah's Rainbow Summaries of Science Pages from the Past Does Fear Enslave Y o u ? Ancient Symbolism

ARISTOTLE

Sanctum Musings: The Sole Reality (Concluded) Balinese Sacrificial A lta r ( Illustration)

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Subscription to T he Rosicrucian Digest. Three Dollars per year. S in gle copies tw enty-five cents each. Entered as Second Class M atter at the Post Office at San Jose. California, under the Act o f August 24th, 1912. Changes o f address must reach us by the tenth o f the month preceding date o f issue. Statements made in this publication are not the official ex ­ pressions o f the organization or its officers unless stated to be official communications.

Published Monthly by the Supreme Council of
T H E R O S IC R U C IA N O R D E R — A M O R C

ROSICRUCIAN PARK

SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA

THOUGHT OF THE MONTH
W O RLD ASPECTS
By THE IMPERATOR
utt

THE

F O N E w e r e to judge world co n ­ ditions, and espe­ cially world psy­ chology, by t h e present-day new s­ paper reports, one would be tempted to say t h a t the year 1936 is des­ tined to be an out­ standing y ear in _______________ the human methods o f destruction. But 1 am of the firm opinion that the year 1936 will prove to be a y ear of construction, and o f constructive think­ ing, and particularly of constructive action and reaction. Despite the fact that during the month o f F eb ru ary and the early part of M a rch the principal in­ ternational moves centered around the prospects of w ar and the arbitrary a c ­ tions of leaders and dictators who seem ­ ed to be bent upon war, there is a trend of wholesome constructiveness back of the complex situations which cannot fail to impress the careful thinker and student of international affairs. W e have already expressed in our little booklet dealing with future world events, the thought that the involved and entangled activities of the y ear will prove 1936 to be one of conflicts, but all conflicts are not destructive, and most certainly not all of them end in ultimate destruction of fundamental principles. Evolution in all of its phases is a co n ­ The flict. It ever has been so, and must ever Rosicrucian be so. T h e contest between right and Digest wrong is an eternal conflict and yet it is A pril not a destructive process, but leads ulti­ mately to constructive thinking and 1936

action. T h e great, good things which we now enjoy in our lives are the result of conflict, of contest, and of processes that appeared at one time or another to be wholly destructive. It is not a matter of o n e’s view-point, but of time. If we take any important feature of civiliza­ tion and diagram it as a circle in the process of moving through the stages of evolution, we may find that the circle covers a period of ten years, a hundred years, or a thousand years. A n y in­ dividual examining that circle during his lifetime covering a period of thirty or forty years is examining merely one segment of the circle, and that segment may be in the part o f the process of tearing down, the act of preparing and clearing aw ay the dross and the unde­ sirable to make room for the refinement that is to follow. V iew in g the matter from this close and limited aspect gives a wrong impression of w hat is taking place. View ing the Italio-Ethiopia situation from a distant point o f view with a lack of all of the actual facts, and during just one section of the circle of time to which the matter is related, we see only the destructive processes of this conflict at work, and are tempted to look upon the contest as an unwarranted w arfare and a destructive process wherein the strong­ er attempts to dominate the weaker. T h e newspapers and the unthinking critics of the situation call it a war of civilization against the uncivilized, a war of religious differences, a w ar of greed, a war of economic advancements, a bit of political maneuvering, a manifesta­ tion of ego and self-aggrandizement, and a contest between the white and black races. It may be all of these
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things, or any one of them, and yet not just that alone. W h a t is taking place in this particular war between the Italians and the Ethiopians is typical of what has occurred in many different cen­ turies between many different countries, and for the same identical purposes, and leading to the same inevitable results, and if we examine those results closely from this distance and later point of view, and as the historian of the future will view this present situation, we shall see that some good was in the making, and that eventually much good will re­ sult from this unpleasant conflict. The time is undoubtedly coming— and we all pray that it will be soon— when human w arfare and the actual destruction of living bodies and the destruction of man's magnificent crea­ tions in art, literature, architecture, and other material things will not be neces­ sary as a part of world evolution or the advancement of civilization. In the past it has seemed to be necessary for man to make war upon man, and by the test of physical strength and dire suffering force into action and mold into existence certain fundamental principles that a d ­ vance the scheme of civilization and promote the activities of evolution. W hile we are forced in fairness and unbiased consideration of everything in­ volved to look forward to the ultimate good that will result from such a co n­ flict, we can n ct help condemning the human idea and practice of war that centers its force in the destruction of human life and property. It is not only natural, but absolutely right for man and mankind collectively in nations and groups to fight for that which he be­ lieves is right, and which will advance civilization and the best interests of those concerned. And in such a fight it is not only natural but proper in the universal scheme of things that man should put into the fight every element of effort, every degree of sincerity, and every amount of personal sacrifice. But it should not be a fight to death, and it should not be a fight that includes the use of weapons of destructiveness, the shedding of blood, the loss of life, and the things that have already been evolved in the arts and sciences. T h e fight should be a contest of minds, and should exhibit the prowess of each in­
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dividual and each nation in being able to master the mental and psychological conditions involved. A nd the time is coming when a greater contest, a greater conflict, a greater struggle requiring all of the genius, all of the wit, all of the powers of individuals to settle interna­ tional arguments, but this fight, this contest, will be settled within a room while all are sitting at a table, and where the emblem of peace instead of the emblem of w ar will reveal its spirit. T h e victors in such a case will be victorious indeed, and those who lose will have lost nothing, but gained. It is a notable fact that so far as physical and material things are con­ cerned, the victors of most of the wars of civilization have been the losers, and the losers have been heavy losers, in­ deed. T h e loss of life and property, of prestige and morality, of ethics and principles has represented a greater fa c­ tor than anything that was gained by the conquest. But still the conquest must go on until man himself, individually and collectively, realizes that the funda­ mental principle is change, and that old ideas, old methods, old standards, and old principles must give way to the new, and that progress will brook no delay, and will kneel before no adversary. Like the motion of the heavenly planets that plough their w ay through space, never affected by the anticipation of what may be in their path and overcom­ ing what seems to our finite minds many great obstacles in theoretical principles, so is the progressive thinking of man and the onward march of civilization ploughing its way through the quagmire of human interference and the inane, bemuddled thinking and reasoning of the human brain. O f the many wars that appear to be part of the horizon at this very moment in the early part of M a rch , no doubt many of them will fail to manifest in even a skirmish between a few in­ dividuals. Som e of them may be forced into action of a short duration, and some of them will be frustrated by the very spirit that emanates them. Already the situation has become so complex in Europe, and the demand for coopera­ tion between nations has become so open, and the expression of ideas has become so public that many of the

matters which were secretly in dispute have lost their power, and have become impotent and unessential. O n e thing is certain: T h e r e has been a greater tend­ ency in the past two years for the statesmen of various nations openly to discuss formerly secret alliances, a g ree­ ments, and compacts between them, and to air to the public the matters which they thought were in conflict and of serious consequence. T h e exposure of these things to the light of publicity, and to the understanding of the world has caused many of them to melt into insignificance and to dissolve into in­ consequential considerations. T h e fear of the unknown, as I have stated elsewhere, is one of the great dreads that ensnares and enslaves not only the individual, but groups and n a­ tions of individuals. T h e secret com­ pacts, agreements, alliances, maneuvers, and ambitions of rival nations have al­ ways been an incentive for secret prep­ arations for war, and secret anticipa­ tions of conflicts, and when these things could no longer be held in secrecy be­ cause of their explosive nature, they burst forth in bombshell and the destruc­ tion of life and property. T h e days of secret diplomacy and of agreements and compacts are rapidly passing. T h e days when rulers, dictators, and diplo­ mats could negotiate and barter the lives and property of their subjects without consulting them, and without giving them an opportunity to express their disapproval, are rapidly becoming a thing o f the past. H eretofore the greatest ambition of each nation of peoples has been that of peace nation­ ally and internationally, while in secret the ambition of the rulers and statesmen has been that of aggrandizement, greed, political power, and personal egoism even to the extent of annihilating the subjects under them and destroying the nation itself in an attempt to fulfill that which is born of the lowest instincts. Into the scheme of things has always come the influence of the progressive

lessness and the ambition for advance­ ment and improvement, but G o d has given man a brain, a mind, a heart with which to understand, to comprehend, to analyze, and to carefully plan and create. Throu gh the constant restless­ ness of man and the ambitions to move forward and onward in the scheme of civilization, man has always found it necessary to criticize the past and to remedy the present. B u t he has at his command two methods for accomplish­ ing these results— the one by means of animalistic instincts of the lowest na­ ture, and the other through the idealism o f his mind and the creative power that moves through his being. B efo re the year of 1936 is over we may faintly discern w hat the future historians will unquestionably proclaim; namely, that some of those who now in their ignorance and personal ambition are apparently seeking war and carrying on campaigns that seem to be destruc­ tive and objectionable, were moved by idealistic restlessness in their beings, but motivated in their physical actions by a wrong interpretation of the urge within them in resorting to physical means of contest instead of mental and spiritual. Y e t they will have accomp­ lished some good, and future historians will name some of the present leaders o f conflict as unconscious, unknowing contributors toward a greater universal peace than we have seen for many cen­ turies. A lread y in many parts of the world, and among many civilized nations the opinion regarding the justice, the neces­ sity, or the temporary reason for the conflict between Italy and Ethiopia is changing, and the condemnation that once centered on Italy and its leaders is modifying to a form of acceptance and understanding. T h e conflict will always be condemned for its physical destruc­ tiveness and for the nature in which the contest was carried on, but there will be an increasing realization of the justifi­ cation of the claims made, and the cor­ rection of principles underlying the dis­ putes and arguments. In other words, the time is rapidly approaching when we shall see that good-will comes out of the contest for both Ethiopia and Italy, but we shall regret that the leaders of both nations were not able to solve the
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tendencies o f the universe and o f the The R osicru cian D igest A p r il 1936
mind of G od. W h i l e men have proposed in secret and in selfishness, G od has disposed in universal advancement. God has deliberately put into the consciousness of man the spirit of rest­

problem and work out the solution w ith­ out resorting to bloodshed. It is impossible for us in any part of the world, and in any circumstances to rightly judge the problems involved and to see the hand of progress and the spirit of evolution working in its true form, but the fault lies with us, and not with the conditions or the principles . Our great duty, however, lies in not a t­ tempting to understand what problems now face and may face the nations of the world in the future stages of evolu­ tion, but in proceeding at once to advo­

cate and to bring into universal accep t­ ance the spirit and principle of arbitra­ tion to supplant the spirit of war. W h e n the future contests, therefore, are solved, and all the future difficulties are met and overcome through arbitration, both the victors and the vanquished will gain, and the world will take its next great step forward in bringing about the Kingdom of Heaven on earth. ( T h e foregoing is purely the personal opinion of the Imperator expressing w hat he believes to be an appropriate thought for the month.)

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O U R N E X T EG Y PT IA N T O U R
All of our members will be glad to know that the proposed tour to mystic lands, in­ cluding Egypt and a score of other ancient countries and cities, is definitely set to start next January, and that hundreds of members have made registration, many of them having paid for their tickets or made large deposits. T h e registration list for the tour is still open, for the more we have in the touring party, the better will be all of the facilities that we can reserve in advance and the more enjoyable will be every feature of the trip. Any member in any branch of our organization is entitled to take the trip with us and to be accompanied by any member of his family whether a member of the Order or not. For further information, see the special article about the Egyptian tour in the April issue of T he R osicru cian Foru m and then write to the Egyptian T o u r S ecretary , C / o A M O R C , Rosicrucian Park, San Jose, California. If the steamship people and others had the same knowledge and faith last year which we had, a large number of our members would be with us at this very date in the Mediterranean enjoying the tour that was to leave New Y ork last February. W e stated positively in 1934 and throughout 1935 that no war would interfere with our tour. But people of little faith doubted our predictions and the steamship company cancelled the boat and a few of our members withdrew their registrations. T h e y felt sure that a ter­ rific war would center itself around the Mediterranean and European countries. Y et up to the p resen t time — the middle of M arch — not a sh o t h a s b een fired in the Mediterranean and not a single incident has occurred that would have interfered with a peaceful, happy, and instructive tour. W e stood alone in our attitude of faith in our prediction, for nearly all the world's statesmen and practically all the newspapers of the world proclaimed war as imminent every month throughout 1935. W ith the same faith we are planning our tour for next winter. D o not miss it if you can possibly go along. E G Y P T IA N T O U R S E C R E T A R Y . •E E ighty-seven

T h e Kabala
By
F ra te r

S.

M . M a ch te i

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N D E A L I N G with this subject, it is e s s e n t i a l , at the outset, to have an understanding of its terminology, its chronology, and of the r e l a t i o n s h i p between practical Kabala and theo­ retical Kabala. K a b a l a is der i v e d f r o m the Hebrew root K A B B A I L , — “ to receive”— and is, liter­ ally, “ the received or traditional lore.” It is the specific term for the esoteric or mystical doctrine concerning G od and the universe, asserted to have come down as a revelation to elect saints from a re­ mote past, and preserved only by a privileged few. T h e r e is the theosophical or theoretical system, K A B A L A ’I Y Y U N I T , and the theurgic or practi­ cal, K A B A L A M A ’A S I T . In the chronology, we encounter some difficulties. T h e name K A B A L A does not occur in literature before the eleventh century. I refer, of course, to the gen­ eral literature on the subject. T h e mysThe tic lore o f the geonic and Talmudic R osicru cian Pfri°df the m odem concepts of K abala and is traced, according to D ig est tradition, back to Creation, through a A p ril series of teachers and saints. F rom the 1936 geonic period (9 th to 11th centuries),

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when the oral traditions first appear to have been recorded in treatises, each system was developed independently of the other. In the 14th century, the gulf between theoretical Kabala and practical Kabala was bridged by the appearance of the Z O H A R (S p le n d o r ). I n ’ this volume both systems converged. If the anthropologist is correct in his statement that there is no pure ethnic group,— and it is conceded that he is right— how much more so must it be true, in the field of ideas, that the inter­ course between peoples greatly influ­ enced their thoughts, and that, in the metaphysical studies, the Gnostics, the Neoplatonists, the Aristotelians, the G rec o -A ra b ic philosophers, and others, contributed to the present form of the Kabala? T h e speculative school of Kabala took for its problem metaphysics in the strict sense of the word; namely, the na­ ture of God and His relation to the world. T h e other movement was religioethical in nature. Practical Kabala or mysticism endeavored to apply meta­ physics to the every-day problems, and, after a while, it degenerated into a cult where amulets, angelology, demonology, and superstitions played the leading role, and where the principles of Cosmic laws were relegated to a minor and sup­ porting part. A ny o ne knowing the names and functions of the angels could control all nature and its powers. Only
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the initiated knew the names and w hat they actually represented. T h e follow­ ers of the cult conceived of the angels as “beings.” as physical messengers, intermediaries close to the T h ro n e. T h e term Kabala rightly ch aracter­ izes the theosophic teachings as an ancient sacred “tradition” instead o f being a product o f human wisdom. T h e Kabala, by which speculative Kabala ( K A B A L A ’I Y Y U N I T ) is essentially meant, was, in its origin, merely a sy s­ tem of metaphysics; but, in the course of its development, it included many tenets of dogmatics, divine worship, and ethics. God, the world, creation, man, revelation, the M essiah, law, sin, atone­ ment, etc.— such are the varied subjects it discusses and describes. T o depart for a few moments from the technical terminology of the sub­ ject, we may profit greatly if we view the subject objectively, examining the problem in the light of motives as dis­ tinguished from effects. W h a t prompted the saints, who possessed the knowl­ edge, to reveal it to others? W h y does man speculate as to the reasons and causes for his being here? W a s it the intention of the early Kabalists and mystics to train m iracle-w orkers, men who should perform the unusual to in­ spire fear and awe in the minds of the populace? From early Kabalistic writings, we learn that man had become enslaved to the environment; that he gave little heed to his rightful place as the “created image of the D ivine.” It was the pur­ pose of the instruction in the K abala to restore to man his G od-consciousness, his realization of the use to which he might put the powers with which he had been endowed by the C reator. T h e Kabala sought to impress man that he was a microcosm, a miniature of the macrocosm, and that, within him, were locked up all the Cosmic forces in evi­ dence in the universe. M a n has ever been eager and ready to take the “bows,” to acknowledge the applause— deserved or undeserved; but, how to liberate these imprisoned forces, how to make them manifest, were things which had to be taught to man. M a n ’s egotism responds to the title of the great “I A M , ” and the bubble bursts when
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m an’s weakness, his inability to be the M aste r, becomes obvious. S o it is that we come to understand the task which confronted the Kabalists, the mystics of all times. F o r their start­ ing point they took the doctrine of the E N - S O F (In fin ite). It is the doctrine of all Kabalistic speculation. G od is the infinite, unlimited being, to whom one neither can nor may ascribe any attri­ butes whatever; who can, therefore, be designated merely as E N - S O F ( “with­ out en d ," “the In finite"). H ence the idea of G od can be postulated merely negatively: it is known what G od is not, but not what H e is. T h e question pre­ sents itself: how did such an O n e create the universe? T o which we have the answer in the S E F I R O T or “emana­ tions,” the progressive stages by which this E N - S O F , the Infinite, projected it­ self, and, through combinations of the Se firo t in trinities or triads, accomp­ lished creation. T h e doctrine of the Sefiro t is perhaps the most important doctrine of the K abala. T h e Sefirot are the tools of the Divine power, superior creatures, that are, however, totally different from the Primal Being. G od is immanent in the Sefirot, but H e is Himself more than may be perceived in these forms of idea and being. T h e Sefirot themselves, in and through which all changes take place in the universe, are composite in so far as two natures may be dis­ tinguished in them; namely, ( 1 ) that in and through which all change takes place, and ( 2 ) that which is unchange­ able, the light or the Divine power. T h e Kabalists call these two different na­ tures of the Se firo t “ O R ” (L ig h t ) and “ K A I L I M ” ( V e s s e l s ) . F o r, as vessels

o f different color reflect the light o f the sun differently without producing any change in it, so the divine light mani­ fested in the S efirot is not chan ged by their seem ing differences.
A detailed description of the progres­ sive stages by which the Sefirot unite, in triads, to accomplish creation, would be too technical and too lengthy for one article. T h e s e conclusions, however, are interesting: T h e first three Sefirot, K E T E R (C ro w n , or Primal W i l l of G od), H O K M A H ( W i s d o m ) , and B I N A H (In tellect) form a unity among themselves; that is, know ledge, the

know er, and the known are in G od

identical, and thus the world is only the expression o f the ideas or the absolute form s o f intelligence. W e further note
that the first three Se firo t form the in­ telligible world; the second triad is moral in character; while the third triad of Sefirot constitutes the natural world. T h e tenth Sefirah, M A L K U T (D o m in ­ ion) is that in which the will, the plan, and the active forces become manifest, the sum of the permanent and immanent activity of all Sefirot. In the Kabala, the soul is threefold, being composed of N E F E S H , R U A H , and N E S H A M A H . N efesh is the a ni­ mal, sensitive principle in man. and is in immediate touch with the body. Ruah represents the moral nature; being the seat of good and evil desires, according as it turns toward N esham ah or N efesh . N esham ah is pure intelligence, pure spirit, incapable of good or evil; it is pure divine light, the climax of soul-life. T h e Kabalists explain the connection between soul and body as follows; All souls exist before the formation of the body in the suprasensible world, being united, in the course of time, with their respective bodies. T h e descent of the soul in the body is necessitated by the finite nature of the former: it is bound to unite with the body in order to take its part in the universe, to contemplate the spectacle of creation, to become conscious of itself and its origin, and, finally, to return, after having completed its tasks in life, to the inexhaustible fountain of light and life— G od.

W h i l e N esham ah, the pure spirit, divine light, intelligence, ascends to G od, Ruah, the moral nature, enters E d en, to en jo y the pleasures of P a r a ­ dise, and N efesh , the animal, remains in peace on earth. T h is applies only to the just. A t the death of the godless, N esham ah, being stained with sins, en­ counters obstacles that make it difficult for it to return to its source: and, until it has returned, Ruah may not enter E d en, and N efesh finds no peace on earth. Closely connected with this view is the doctrine of the transmigration of the soul (reincarnation?) on which the K abala lays great stress. In order that the soul may return to its source, it must previously have reached full develop­ ment of all its perfections in terrestrial life. If it has not fulfilled this condition in the course of O N E life, it must begin all over again in another body, con­ tinuing until it has completed its task. N atural magic depends largely on man himself; for, according to the K abala, all men are en dow ed with in­

sight and m agical pow ers which they may develop. T h e means especially m entioned are: “K A W W A N A H ”— in­
tense meditation, in order to attract the higher spiritual influences; a strong will exclusively directed toward its object; and a vivid imagination, in order that the impressions from the spiritual world m ay enter profoundly into the soul and be retained there.

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AN A PO LO G Y T O O U R M EMBERS
T h e officers of the Grand Lodge at San Jose wish to apologize to all of the members for the delay that has been caused in the last several months in the prompt answering of correspondence directed to the officers personally or to the various departments. Because of many improvements that are being made in the monographs, preparations for the Convention, and other matters that have come in an accumulated form for immediate attention, much of our correspondence has been delayed. T h e increasing of membership and the resulting increase in correspondence each day of the week and each week of the year>constantly present a problem requiring adjustments in many departments. W e hope that by the first of M ay we shall have all letters answered promptly in accordance with a new routine. T h e cooperation of our members is heartily solicited in this regard.

The Rosicrucian ^
D igest A pril
1936
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E E E | E 5

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T h e "Cathedral of the Soul” is a Cosmic meeting place for all minds of the most advanced and highly developed spiritual members and workers of the Rosicrucian Fraternity. It is a focal point of Cosmic radiations and thought waves from which radiate vibrations of health, peace, happiness, and inner awakening. Various periods of the day are set aside when many thousands of minds are attuned with the Cathedral of the Soul, and others attuning with the Cathedral at this time will receive the benefit of the vibrations. Those who are not members of the organization may share in the unusual benefit as well as those who are members. T h e book called "Liber 777" describes the periods for various contacts with the Cathedral. Copies will be sent to persons who are not members by addressing their request for this book to Friar S. P. C., care of A M O R C Temple, San Jose, California, enclosing three cents in postage stamps. (P le a s e state w hether m em ber or not— this is im portant.)

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Time. in the States on the

N recent mont hs one of the power­ ful radio stations o f E n g l a n d , lo­ cated just outside of L o n d o n and with studios within the city of London, has b e e n broad­ casting at a special period that begins each morning at 3 :0 0 a. m. London or G r e e n w i c h T h is is equivalent to 10:00 p. m. eastern sections of the United and C anad a, and to 7 :00 p. m. western coast of N orth America.

It is likewise a convenient hour for many countries and nations affiliated with the great British Empire. T h i s special broadcast period therefore enables the British radio station to speak to a larger number of its subjects and people, as well as friends, than at any other time of the day. T h e programs are clearly heard on short-w ave radio equipment in almost any part of the world. E a ch of the broadcast periods begins with the ringing of the great bells of the clock tower known as Big Ben. B ut on M o n ­ day mornings — which is Su n d ay eve­ ning or afternoon in a large part of the world, the periods are followed by the chimes of W estm in ster, and then a m ag­ nificent religious service of a n on-sec­

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tarian nature is conducted while millions of people pray in unity and listen to words of inspiration and Divine revela­ tion. T h is becomes almost a universal church service and it is an ideal thing in spirit and purpose. W h e n we stop to realize that with most religions a special day o f the week has been set aside for a sacred and holy day and for special worship, and when we realize that this one and only day out of the seven is a definite day with many of them, we see the sad situation of an attempt on the part of man to standardize his religion and religious worship, and to confine his hours of spiritual thought to a small period of his weekly life. W h i l e many argue that Saturday is the true Sunday, and others argue that F rid ay is the most sacred of all, and a large portion of the world holds fast to Su n d ay as being the only

true holy day of the week, the person who is truly spiritual in nature will realize that every hour of every day of every week and month o f the year is an equally fortunate and propitious time for spiritual communion, and it is in this sense and for this purpose that the C athedral of the Soul offers to such persons an opportunity for spiritual con­ templation in united hearts and minds. W h e t h e r you are a member or not, if you have not had the marvelous experi­ ence of such spiritual communion and contemplation with the accompanying thoughts of millions in agreem ent and attunement with you, send for the book mentioned in the heading of this depart­ ment, Liber 777, and join with the multi­ tudes in this undenominational, non­ sectarian, and wholly spiritual system and method of Divine inspiration and guidance.

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ROSICRUCIAN

IM PO R T A N T N O TIC E
W e regret to state that our Sovereign G ran d M aste r, Dr. Clement LeBrun, is seriously indisposed and confined to his home where he is receiving competent attention and treatment from physicians, meta­ physicians, and nurses. His indisposition manifested itself very keen­ ly at our recent N ew Y e a r ceremony on T h u rsd a y evening, M a rc h 19, and it was found necessary for him to discontinue his regular routine activities at his office and sanctum and to remain at home. His secretary and assistants will look after his correspondence during his absence from the office, for it may be many weeks before he can take up these activities in person. In the meantime, all of our members are asked to remember him in their prayers and to send him the kindest thoughts that he may soon recover. W e feel sure that the waves of love directed toward him from all parts of the world will give him vigor and an understanding of the high esteem in which he is held by every member whom he has contacted personally or through correspondence. IM P E R A T O R .

The Rosicrucian Digest April
1936
0.

6
N in ety-tw o

Entering

^
By
F r a t e r W illia m

o a tis R a in b o w
H.
M cK egg,

F. R. C.

"If the sp ectato r cou ld en ter into th ese Im ag es o f his Im agination , a p p ro ach in g them on the fiery chariot o f his con tem p lativ e thou ght; if h e cou ld en ter into N oah 's R ain bow , o r into his bosom, or cou ld m a k e a frien d an d com pan ion o f th ese im ages o f w onder, w hich a lw a y s en treats him to lea v e m ortal things (a s h e must k n o w ), then w ould he arise from his g ra v e, then w ould he m eet the L o rd in the air, an d then h e w ould b e h a p p y ." — W illiam B la ke.

E V E R before have Light and Color, essentially one, oc­ cupied the human mind to so great an extent as now with t h e i r w on­ ders. T h ro u g h the medium of Light we are penetrating beyond the veil of matter to have re­ vealed to us, b e ­ sides the secrets of existence on earth, the existence of that inner world we cannot see with finite sight. “T h e re is O n e Universal Soul, dif­ fused through all things, eternal, in­ visible, unchangeable; in essence like Truth, in substance resembling Lig h t.” Pythagoras came to this wisdom as far back as the 6th century B. C. O n ly to ­ day are we turning our whole attention to this irrefutable T ru th . T h e greatest advancement, aw aken­ ing, and stimulation o f the human race occur when C olor abounds in daily life. T h e Gothic A g e used colors to arouse man’s mind. T h e E lizabethan era w as an era of color and pageantry. In both ages mankind progressed.
N in ety-three

T h e Shakespearean plays and sonnets abound in color-wording. T h e y are the works of the greatest color-poet the world has yet seen. In order to learn and understand Cosmic Laws, to become a medium of the Supreme M ind, the Invisible Light abounding through all things, Sir F r a n ­ cis B aco n guided his contemporaries to­ ward the study of N ature and her se­ crets. However, he stressed that N ature was only the medium, and not the se­ cret, of G o d ’s mysteries. Light and C olor demanded investigation before mere Form. B aco n had made a deep study of Light and Color, and knew their m ys­ tical effects. Likewise, he studied stag e­ craft, staging many plays, elevating the theatre which, at that time, had fallen to a low and degraded position. H e re­ newed it to its real worth as H u m an ity ’s magic mirror. In “M asq u es and T r i ­ umphs” he says: “ Since princes will have such things it is better they should be graced with elegance than daubed with co s t.” H e directed many plays enacted by the two companies owned by E d w ard V e r e , E a rl of O x fo rd . Until this century the stage was— and should be still — the place where mystical, scientific, and poetical creations may be

demonstrated to the people for their understanding, study, and enlighten­ ment. In “Sense and P erception,” in an e f­ fort to interest others to seek into their origin, Bacon dwells on light vibrations. “B efo re we can enter the remote and hidden parts of Nature, it is requisite that a better and more perfect applica­ tion of the human mind should be in­ troduced. . . . A s navigation was imper­ fect before the use of the compass, so will many secrets of nature and art re­ main undiscovered, without a more per­ fect knowledge of the understanding, its uses, and ways of working. " T h a t the form of Light should not have been duly inquired into appears a strange oversight, especially as men have bestowed so much pains upon per­ spective: for neither has this art, nor others, afforded any valuable discovery in the subject of Light. Its radiations, indeed, are treated, but not its origin: and the ranking of perspective with mathematics has produced this defect, with others of the like nature, because philosophy is thus deserted too soon.” Just as there is a world of matter, so there is a world of spirit. A s there are colors seen by Finite Sight, so there are colors seen by Infinite Sight. T h e s e latter are psychic, or what Edwin D . Babbitt, in his now rare and valuable book, “ Principles O f Light A nd C o lo r,” called "third grade colors." W h e n en rapport with finer grades of light, all bodies become as transparent as clear crystal. “Tra n sp a re n cy comes from the fact that certain substances have such a chemical affinity for all the ignited color-ethers, as to draw them on with great power and transmit them beyond. T h e s e substances whose atoms cannot be polarized by light are not transparent.” D abbling in a search for hidden light and color might appear as futile to the worldly-minded. Y e t which is more futile: to follow Intuition, or to accept T h e o r y ? Babbitt points out that scien­ tists in his day boasted of a single ether The — as they do today— and have no facts Rosicrucian to prove it. H e wanted to know how Digest thousands of grades of forces, luminous, April electrical, and magnetic, could be trans­ mitted over and through it? 1936

“T h e psychic lights and colors are inexpressibly beautiful and manifest the infinite activities of nature unseen by ordinary eyes. . . . T h i s higher vision exalts the conception and shows that there is a grander universe within which is the real cosmos. . . . T h e s e finer in­ terior views of nature and her forces show us that there are universes within universes, and that the condition of things which we inhabit is not the real universe, but the mere shadowy outer shell of being, while the real cosmos is so much more intense and swift and powerful than the grosser grade of ma­ teriality around us that the latter com­ pares with the former somewhat as a mist compares with a solid substance.” In 1672, Isaac Newton published the theory that the white light of the sun contains seven degrees of refrangibility. N e arer our own times, Helmholtz stated that each color is founded by its own law of vibrations, and incapable of sub­ division. B e that as it may, B abbitt started seeking for the psychic colors and found them. “ In the y ear 1 8 7 0 .” he relates, “I commenced cultivating, in a dark room and with closed eyes, my interior vision, and in a few weeks or months was able to see those glories of light and color which no tongue can describe or intel­ lect conceive of, unless they have been seen. . . . W h e n I opened my eyes upon the sky and earth around me after see­ ing these, they seemed almost colorless and dim and feeble. . . Sometimes foun­ tains of light would flow out from me and become lost to view in the distance. M o re generally, flashing streams of light would move to and fro in straight lines, though sometimes fluidic emana­ tions would sweep around in curves of a parabola as in a fountain. W h a t was more marvelous than anything else was the infinite millions of radiations, emana­ tions, and luminous currents which at times would seem streaming from and into and through all things, and filling all the surrounding space with corusca­ tions and lighting activities. I believe that if the amazing streams of forces which sweep in all directions could be suddenly revealed to people, many would go wild with fright for fear they should be dashed to pieces.”
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Babbitt was one of the first in modern times to apply the law of colors to cure human ills. Like the great mystic, P a r a ­ celsus, he could see the auric colors emanating from each human being. A c ­ cording to the intensity or dullness o f the colors, he could deduct the ailment, and where the chief mischief lay in the invalid's body. Within each human being dwells the source of all Light and Color; it may be reached by the true seeker. “T h e W o r d , or the Voice, of G od shall be given to those worthy of it.” It is the interior world from which we have “ fallen.” There, all things are spiritualized. O uter forms are but gross shadows of the Real. Outer colors are but feeble re­ flections of the T r u e colors within. On our way to the inner world we see, at first, fleeting clouds of color; forms as of flaming opal come and go; streams of colors appear in designs and geometric patterns, like symbols flashed through the dark clouds for our guid­ ance. W ord s of speech cannot arouse the soul. Lessons and lectures are useless, except as signs on the path, leading us to the Closed D oor. T h a t is why the fine arts— Poetry, M usic and Painting — have always aided man to aspire and achieve lofty things. T h e y speak to the inner self; they arouse the soul; they help us to open our psychic sight and to behold the iridescent glories in color and sound behind the form of the world. William Blake awed people with the radiance of the colors he put into pic­ tures. It was said he mixed gold and silver with his paints to get such phen­ omenal hues, and accounted for his be­ ing always a poor man. It was also de­ clared that the Comte de Saint Germain ground up sapphires, rubies, and emer­ alds, to attain his brilliant blues, reds, and greens. O f course, today we know that both these Rosicrucians knew the secrets of vibrations! W h e n Saint Germain depicted jewels in some of his paintings they had a fire and a radiance in them that hinted of magic. A physician and a chemist, he knew the hidden secrets of Nature, for he had mastered Nature. H e could fuse diamonds and show no jointure in them. He could “purify” jewels. Saint Germain was one of the leaders in pointing out the w ay to the inner
Ninety-five

world. H e did not pose, but was plain­ ly matter of fact. B ut he told his dis­ ciples that they belonged to the order of M elchisedek— which the Bible tells us the M a ste r Jesus belonged to. “Be the torch o f the w orld,” he said. “ If your light is that only of a planet, you will be nothing in the sight of G od. I reserve for you a splendor, of which the solar glory is a shadow. Y o u shall guide the course of stars and those who rule empires shall be governed by y ou .” T h e r e is a means of entering the fire o f colors not seen with mortal sight. W h e n the darkness disperses, the Bow in the Clouds will be seen, the colors of which outshine any in the finite world. It is thus, as B la k e says, "w e meet the Lord in the air.” T h i s was the chief truth he expressed all through his life. “T h e Persons who ascend to M e e t the Lord, coming in the Clouds with power and great Glory, are representations of those States described in the Bible under the Nam es of the F ath ers before and after the Flood. N o a h is seen in the midst of these, canopied by a Rainbow, on his Right hand Shem and on his left Japhet; these three Persons represent Poetry. P aint­ ing, and M usic, the T h r e e Powers in M a n of conversing with Paradise, which the flood did not sweep a w a y .” ( H is comment on his picture “ Vision o f L ast

Judgm ent.” )
A t the Library of C ongress is to be seen C arl G u th e rz ’s pictorial spectrum of light, expressing the idealizations of the seven principal colors. V iolet — State. Indigo — Science. Blue — T ru th . G reen — Research. Y ellow — Creation. O range — Progress. R ed — Poetry. I n d e e d , man's inner development might be said to go through this order of colors. In the Persian S u fis’ four “ Schools of C o lo rs,” W h ite is ecstasy, inspiration. Shelley, another of our great colorpoets, tells us that all poetry, all crea­ tion, is derived from Love, “a going out of our own nature (ek stasis) and an identification of ourselves with the beautiful which exists in thought, action, or person not our ow n.” “ E x ta s is ,” Eliphas Levi writes, “is a voluntary and immediate application of the soul to the universal fire, or rather to that light — abounding in images— which radiates, which speaks and cir-

culates about all objects and every sphere of the universe.” Ancient manuscripts from occult sources state frequently about the " V o i c e o f the F i r e . ” T o become masters of the A stral Light we must, as the original teachers tell us, learn to “hear the Light speak.” A complete correspondence to the cosmos resides within man. H ad we no such correspondence, no inner response would manifest at outward forms. T h e color vibrations in things we see strike a response on the color organ of our body. A sunset, a painting, a flower garden, might hold us momentarily enraptured. O n such immortal moments Lavater has some pertinent comments to say, for these moments make us as one with the universe, the universe one with us. " H e who has frequent moments of complete existence is a hero, though not laurelled: is crowned, and without crowns, a king: he only who has en­ joyed immortal moments can reproduce them. “W h a t e v e r is visible is the vessel or veil of the invisible past, present, future — as man penetrates to this more, or perceives it less, he raises or depresses his dignity of bein g.” In his copy of L avater's “Aphorisms O n M a n , ” Blake wrote in the margin of this maxim:

it is possible soon to see and hear events that occurred centuries ago. Kepler gave a Color and a tone to each planet. M o dern astronomers tell us the color of each planet as seen through the telescope. M ystically, they are as follows: M erc u ry — Purple, the color of M a je s ty , Dominion, S e lfE steem. V e n u s — G reen, color of Y ou th , Kindness, Fertility. M a r s — R ed, denot­ ing C ourage, Nobility, Strength. Jupiter — Blue, color of Hope, Spirituality. S atu rn — B lack, representing E arth , Jus­ tice, M ourning. M a r s stands for F ire. Jupiter for W ater. Saturn for E arth . T h e M oon for Air. T h u s the four primary elements of the universe. T h e national colors of E ngland and the United S tates are R ed, W hite and Blue — Fire, A ir and W ate r. In occult mysteries the C hariot o l Hermes is drawn by four living cheru­ bim with four faces. T h e correspond­ ences are thus: E a rth Body Ox F ire M in d Lion W ater Soul M an A ir Spirit E a g le

A vision o f the Eternal N ow .
“L et none turn over books, or roam the stars in quest of G o d, who sees him not in m an." M a n , however, prefers to study the stars than himself. Even though our greatest astronomers tell us that what we gaze at are not things as they are, but as they were. “W h a t has been for a long time the past for the earth is only the present for a distant observer in sp ace,” writes Camille Flammarion. “ It is not the P resent state of the sky which is visible, but its past history. . . . T h e progressive motion of light carries with it through Infinitude the ancient history of all the suns and all the worlds in an eternal

M a n is the shadow of the Shadow of G o d. H e formed man from the earth and breathed into him the Spirit of Life, and man became a Living Soul. Since Creation took place after the “ F a ll,” it too must be in the likeness of the Divine Shadow . T h e Chariot o f Hermes stood to the early mystics as the four elementary manifestations of the one substance. Herein lies the secret of the Sphinx, guarding the triangular pyramids on their square base! Around the Chariot is a rainbow. It is the H oly Mountain wherein dwell the seven Spirits of Lights, the Elohim of the G odhead. It is also the divine vision of Ezekiel. ( R e a d the entire first chapter, and par­ ticularly note verse 2 8 .) But if we keep constantly in mind that the microcosm of man is alluded to all the time, it will be easier to understand the mystery— in fact, to test the truth of it! T h e colors of the prophet’s vision emanate in centrifugal radiations. T e l e ­ vision transmits pictures of events actu­ ally happening. Developing our psychic organs permits us to expand our mind.
Ninety-six

The n '” ' • osicru ctan Digest A pril 1936

present

only ^

^

stars>

never the present. Light transports us into the Infinite Life. B y the advance­ ment we have made in Light and Sound

An expansion of consciousness turns our head into a radio-television appara­ tus. Things that are hidden are thus brought forth in Light. ( Jo b 3 8 ) The Fall succeeded the Paradisical state of M an and the W o r ld , and was necessary as a formation of external Nature and physical sense. T h e D a rk ­ ness became a veil on which the colors of the Inner W o r l d could be reflected, though in a much lesser degree. In unity, the sun’s ray is pure white. Broken up, it separates into seven colors, seven tones of music, from which all other colors and tones evolve. T h e F all of man from the inner world divided his powers. Unity became disunity. In the inner world man had the stars within him in all their brightness, all the planets and constellations. T h e n came the day of darkness. “T h e stars went out, the planets were destroyed.” A new crea­ tion had to evolve out of the old one. The correspondences to the stars and planets, and to all else in the universe, withdrew to the centre of man's being, as he fell from the inner world to the shadow. T h e “ F lo o d ” followed the “Fall." N oah is the symbol of the aspiring soul eager for development, unfoldment, and illumination. H e breaks away from the material, seeking spirit­ ual wisdom. After many days on the waters o f re­ generation, N oah sees the Cloud, and in the Cloud the colored Rainbow . Through this sign N oah reaches the Holy of Holies where he hears the voice of God and learns the means of salva­ tion of mankind. ( G e n . 9 : 1 2 - 1 5 ) The Bow signifies the w ay of co n­ tacting Astral Light, seeing visions therein and becoming prophetic. T h e fixation of this Light by the Divine Grace bestowed on our will is repre­ sented by the serpent pierced by the arrow, the Aleph of Kabalistic lore. Heinrich Khunrath, one of the great­ est of Rosicrucian mystics and teachers, tells us in one of his works, “T h e A m ­ phitheatre of E ternal W i s d o m , ” that the seeker goes through various phases of development, or periods of progress. In one part he says that the G a te of the Sanctuary is enlightened by the T h r e e Lights, or the Seven M y stic R ays.

Eliphas Levi says that this book as a whole contains all mysteries of the high­ est initiation. “ It is,” he adds, “a true manual of T ranscen d en tal M a g ic and H ermetic P hilosophy.” T h e meaning of “ Entering N o a h 's R a in b o w ” is reaching the Sanctuary, the real church of the M asters. W h e n we ourselves are set within the Cloud we are prepared to see and be in the many - colored rainbow. T h e Inner W o r l d is reached. It is but the sign. If we be not w orthy the clouds will not disperse. If, however, we allow the Immortal R ose to blossom, nurturing it with the w ater of regeneration, the Cloud disappears and the Light and C olors alone are left. T h u s do we be­ come prophets! W e see visions and dream dreams! T h e present time is the era of spiritual enlightenment. T h e E a rth C onscious­ ness and the Human Consciousness are rising higher, nearer to Cosmic C o n ­ sciousness. W e are about to propound the T ru th that “T h e soul as M icrotheos, G o d in miniature, is the solution of all the riddles of mysticism." ( W i n d e l b an d .) W e know the rainbow is caused by a refraction of light in a prism of water. T h e world, if not divided against itself, is a Divine Unit. Separated into por­ tions, it becomes multiple. It is like the B ow. Pure Light is its real essence; divided into seven colors when refracted by the prism. T o see the world and humanity in the T r u e Light is to see All as O n e — a mighty Unit, transfigured by Love. A s above, so below. A s in the uni­ verse, so in man. W e become trans­ figured by "entering N o a h ’s rainbow .” F o r as we serve as a prism for Light and Color, so may we enter into the Pure Light, to which all belong. T h e Closed D o o r is opened. T h e H o ly of Holies is reached, and by Divine G race alone we are permitted to enter therein. T h e Divine F ire in which we become bathed renews us. W e hear the F ire speak! W e learn th at M u sic is the V o ic e of G od! C olo r His Speech!

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v v v
Ninety-seven

SUMMARIES w O F SCIENCE

Each hour of the day finds the men o f science cloistered in laboratories without ostentation, in vestigatin g nature’ s m ysteries and extending the boundaries of knowledge. T he w orld at large, although profiting by their labors, oftentim es is deprived o f the pleasure o f review in g their work, since general periodicals and publications announce only those sensational discoveries which appeal to the popular imagination. It is with pleasure, therefore, that w e afford our readers a m onthly summary of some of these scientific researches, and briefly relate them to the Rosicrucian philosophy and doctrines. T o the Science Journal, unless otherwise specified, we give full credit for all m atter which appears in quotations.

Celestial Collision
T shuttled back and forth a c r o s s its filmy bridge, la y ­ ing down strand after strand of the t h r e a d - l i k e sub­ stance it e x u d e d f r o m its b o d y . W e a v i n g in and out, it produced a pattern of mathe­ matical exactitude. E v e n t u a l l y t he tiny creatu re’s lacy web screened the entire aperture of the lower end of the rain spout. H ere was not an extravagant display of energy, but a methodical and purposeful act. N e a r at hand were the prey— vulturous flies buzzing about the remains of an unfortunate fledgling who had tried his wings too soon. W it h in this small world were crowded all the elements of T he Rosicrucian a possible success. Attainment was near at hand. Aroused by necessity, the in­ Digest stinctive intelligence sought a favorable April environment for its purpose. W h a t an 1936 excellent combination of circumstances, a blessing of fate! T h e r e was the greedy prey, a rigid foundation to support the snare and high enough to be free from the lurking danger of the sticky tongues o f those tailless amphibians, toads and frogs. W h a t security! W h a t master­ fulness in choosing this locale! W h a t confidence these circumstances must have instilled! T im e certainly would reward, it would seem, such a sequence of causes with the happy, profitable results of the loud buzzing o f a hapless victim. T h e end must be inevitable — an end free from failure, for all that need be known to assure that was apparently realized. O utside o f that tiny world— the world of a few square feet— was a great un­ known one— unseen, unheard and undisturbing. Just beyond the border of it were eyes that saw this tiny creature and the things of its world. T h e y were the eyes of man looking down upon it. T h e r e was a mind also that not only comprehended the chain of events upon which the creature depended, but ap­ prehended causes which could shake its
N in ety-eight

very world— things the insect could not even imagine, yet it reigned supreme in its ignorance. If speak it could, it would cry a challenge to the unknown. It had coped before with tangible elements. W h y could it not conquer again and again? In contrast to its triumphs, what could exist out there in the apparent nothingness which could cause it terror? It knew friend and it knew foe within its own world. W h a t else was there? It had lived long in its small way, in its small realm, proving that it had been alert. Nothing which could ever great­ ly affect its w elfare had gone unper­ ceived. W it h reflection the human looked down upon the swiftly moving and busily occupied creature. Its world was complete. Its limits were the feeble pow­ ers of its faculties of perception. Little did it realize that another world existed, of which its own was an infinitesimal part— a world which it was at the mercy of at all times; a realm of forces and beings so great that it could not per­ ceive them, even though they were om­ nipresent. Its little environment at the height of its greatest certainty was al­ ways on the verge of becoming chaos by elements which concerned themselves not the least with its world, or its in­ terests. In fact, its world as it knew it had no existence. It was a microscopic part of a still greater one, and its efforts were part of the collective activities of millions of beings, forces and causes. As man continued to contemplate upon these things, a gust of wind lashed the bows of the trees, lightning rent the heavens, and the clouds poured forth rain. T h e human fled to shelter, and with a spurt and loud gurgle w ater rushed from the rain spout, washing at his heels the creature, its web, and the prey, and inundating its little world— a world in which it was about to add another triumph to its feeble supremacy. In contrast to the universe, even as we conceive it, m an’s globe is as incon­ sequential in the scheme of things as were the few feet of earth the world in which the spider dwelt. F o r all of man's accomplishments in the world of which he is a part, for all of his mastery of its laws, forces and conditions, he is help­ less in the path of Cosmic causes, which are manifesting a higher end than he
N inety-nine

can conceive. His world can be sh at­ tered, dashed into impalpable bits, crushing his hopes and his dreams; yes, even his cherished beliefs, and yet, such a cataclysm may be the orderly progres­ sion of law fulfilling a magnificent intent. M a n should neither curse the forces which destroy his microcosmic world, nor become arrogant, defiant, and b o ast­ ful, when the ultimate has not yet ar­ rived, because the former is not in­ tended as an affliction of punishment, and the latter is not the result of his powers. T h e spider's brief fortunate circumstances were not because it had momentarily suspended the laws of na­ ture, but that in the course of things change had not yet reached its sphere. So it is with man in his element. M a n ’s existence, since the earth first knew him until it will long since have forgotten him, will be but a tick of Cosmic time. M a k e the most of the in­ tervening interval, he should; but a l­ ways with a consciousness that it is with the gracious decree of an intelli­ gence and an order that he is permitted to do so. and not because of any influ­ ence that he has exerted. E a ch hour of the day is a respite from eternity out of which he came and into which he will return. Fortunate is he that has been given consciousness of the moment. Foolish is he who thinks that being co n ­ scious of it, he has secured it. A part, man may play; robes and costumes he may wear; scenic effects, fame and for­ tune he may create, but the curtain must and will come down when the story has been told, regardless of its forceful por­ trayal. In life man has done naught but dramatize his thoughts and emotions. T h e realities remain as constant and as unswerved from their purpose as ever. F o r g e t the particular and think of the whole. Contemplate the magnitude of a plan having a consistency of purpose that treats all things alike, subjecting everything to its end. F eel secure only in the knowledge that change is in­ evitable — a change out of which will come stupendous results, a transform a­ tion out of which a new order will co n ­ tinuously appear. D o not make the mis­ take which insults the human reason of believing that the world must continue

in accord with the highest good as man conceives it. Consider the following recent news article, and excoriate from your thoughts the vain idea that the earth continues its rhythmic oscillation and its stability b e ­ cause it shelters you. Realize the por­ tending momentary change, and lift your thoughts to the thrill of the mys­ tery of its cause. “A great rock hurtling through space is having its photograph taken by astronomers eager to chart its heavenly path before it disappears from view. " T h i s new minor planet is the small­ est o bject in astronom y’s annals, except the meteorites which smash into the earth. It came closer to the earth than an y other thing in the heavens, except possibly one or two comets. " I t is known as the Delporte object, after the Belgian astronomer P ro fesso r E . Delp orte who discovered it on F e b ­ ruary 12. N ot until several more ob­ servations were made could its path in the heavens be computed and its un­ usual diminutiveness and proxim ity discovered. "H e r e are the H arvard O bservato ry figures showing the new plan et’s claims to fame: Size— O n e third mile or only one twenty-five thousandth of the earth ’s size. W e i g h t — F iv e hundred million tons, about the same as a small mountain. D istance aw ay — W h e n first observed was within two or three mil­ lion miles of the earth. " C a b le advices to Scien ce Service from the International Astronom ical Bureau at C openhagen described it definitely as 'planet,' that is, a minor planet or asteroid, with an elliptical path around the sun. " O r b it computations made at H a r ­ vard C ollege O bservatory, University

of California, and U niversity of M ic h ­ igan show that the tiny planetoid is moving swiftly aw ay from the earth. Drs. Fred L. W h ip p le and L. E . C u n ­ ningham located and photographed the Delporte o bject with the new and pow­ erful instruments at H a r v a rd ’s O a k Rid ge station in the town of Harvard, M assachu setts. "P ro fe s s o r Delporte has been an a c­ tive discoverer of small planets and com ets. O n e such o bject that he dis­ covered in 1932, also called the D el­ porte object, came very close to the earth, but the present o b ject is not the same. " T h r o u g h a study of the tiny object astronomers believe they may be able to discover many hitherto unknown characteristics of similar small particles. T h e y also hope to determine its orbit so as to make possible a prediction as to if, and when, it may return. "B e c a u s e the o bject is so small, it is expected to be greatly affected by the gravitational forces of the planets V e n u s and M ercury , which it passes very closely, thus permitting the most accur­ ate measurements ever made of the masses of these planets. "Prelim inary calculations at Harvard indicate that the orbit is on approxi­ mately the same plane as that of the earth. Its closest approach to the sun is about half the distance from the earth to the sun, while its greatest distance from the sun is equal to about one and one-half the earth-to~sun distance. " T h e estimated length of time re­ quired for the completion of the orbit is roughly sixteen months, the shortest period for any heavenly body, with the exception of the earth, V e n u s and M e rc u ry .”

The Rosicrucian Digest April
1936

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PLAN TO ATTEND THE ROSICRUCIAN CONVENTION — JULY 12-18

O n e H undred

P A G ES
from the

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...............u m m i u u m m u u M l m ..........M i n i ............m i ................

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ELBERT HUBBARD
Each month we w ill present excerpts from the w ritin gs o f famous thinkers and teachers of the past. These w ill give our readers an opportunity o f know ing their lives through the presentation o f those w ritin gs which ty p ify their thoughts. Occasionally such w ritin gs will be presented through the translation or interpretations o f other eminent authors o f the past. This month we present E lbert Hubbard. Hubbard, eminent Am erican philosopher and essayist, was born in Bloom ington, Illinois, in 1850. His education in his youth was meager. H e had a common school education and supported himself by w orkin g on a farm and in a p rin tin g office. Later, he devoted him­ self to private study and extensive travel. H e concluded his travels by settlin g at E a 3 t Aurora. N ew York, where he established the renowned R oy cro ft Press. The magnificent typograph y o f the periodicals and publications disseminated from that establishment made them recognized examples o f the highest in the printing art. H is first publication was a little magazine known as the “ P h illis tin e " which almost im m ediately at­ tracted attention. An essay appearing in one o f its issues entitled, “ A Message to G arcia,” was so w ell received that it was later published in pamphlet form and eventually had a total circulation throughout the w orld o f fifteen m illion copies. When about fo rty years o f age, he entered H arvard College and for a period o f three years studied literature and language. Mr. Hubbard was not on ly a forceful thinker and writer, but brought additional laurels to himself by his eloquent manner o f speaking and his splendid platform appearance. He was especially inclined toward mysticism and occult and metaphysical studies and researches. H e sponsored numerous small societies in their investigations o f the m ysteries o f nature. H e was intim ately known to the Im perator o f the Rosicrucian O rder o f the N orth and South Am erican jurisdiction. Below are a few o f his numerous essays. E very reader w ill be impressed w ith the sim ­ plicity o f his style, its beauty, and the fact that each thought expressed is exceedin gly cogent.
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1 1 1

1m i n i m i f S l

The Teacher
T I S a great thing to teach. T o give yourself in a w ay to i n s p i r e others to think, to do, to become — what nobler a m b i t i o n ! T o be a g ood teacher demands a high degree of al­ t r ui s m, f or o ne must be willing to sink self, to die, as it were, that others may live. T h e re is something in it that is akin to motherhood— a brooding qual­
One Hundred O ne

ity. E v e ry true mother realizes that her children are only loaned to her — sent from G od — and the attributes of her mind and body are being used by some P ow er for a Purpose. T h e teacher is training her children to do without her.”

Desire
“W h a t is it wins? W o r k you say, but you are wrong. It is desire that brings every good thing. Did you ever watch a cat about to spring for a bird? T h e cat does not think about working to se­ cure that bird: about how to place its body for the most graceful spring— not

that. It is just Riled with the d esire, and it does exactly the proper thing — the single-hearted thing. R abbits can run faster and farther than cats, but rabbits never catch birds— they do not desire to.”

Eternity
“W e are living in eternity now, just as much as we ever shall. G od is right here now, and we are as near Him now as we shall ever be. H e never started this world a-going and went aw ay and left it— H e is with us yet. T h e r e is no devil but fear, and nobody and nothing can harm you but yourself. W e should remember the weekday to keep it holy, live one day at a time, doing our work the best we can. T h e r e is no more sacred place than that where a man is doing good and useful work, and there is no higher wisdom than to lose yourself in useful industry, and b e kind — and be kind.”

the man is the low est standard h e sets upon himself. “T h a t is why we need Som e O n e to believe in us— if we do well, we want our work commended, our faith corro­ borated. “S o note this, when you find the strong man he is one who is well sus­ tained. “T o associate closely with those who doubt or distrust you is eventually go­ ing to make you distrust yourself. And then we get dead conformity, hopeless mediocrity, nothing more. T h e indivi­ dual who thinks well of you, who keeps his mind on your good qualities, and does not look for flaws, is your friend. W h o is my brother? I'll tell you, he is one who recognizes the good in me.”

On W alt Whitman
“M o st writers bear no message— they carry no torch. Sometimes they excite wonder, or they amuse and divert— divert us from our work. T o be diverted to a certain degree may be well, but there is a point where earth ends and cloudland begins, and even great poets occasionally befog the things which they would reveal. “ Homer was seemingly blind to much simple truth; V irg il carries you away from earth; H o race was undone with­ out his M a cae n as; D ante makes you an exile; Shakespeare was singularly silent concerning the doubts, difficulties, and common lives of common people; B y ­ ron’s Corsair life does not help you in your toil, and in his fight with English B ards and Scotch Reviewers we crave neutrality: to be caught in the meshes of Pope's Dunciad is not pleasant; and Low ell’s F a b le [or Critics is only an­ other Dunciad. But above all poets who have ever lived, the author of Leaves of G rass was the poet of humanity. “ M ilton knew all about Heaven, and D an te conducts us through Hell, but it w as left for W h it m a n to show us Earth. His voice never goes so high that it breaks an impotent falsetto, neither does it growl and snarl at things it does not understand, and, not understanding, does not like. H e was so great that he had no envy, and his insight was so sure that he had no prejudice. He never boasted that he was higher, nor claimed
O n e H undred T w o

My Creed
“ I wish to be simple, honest, natural, frank, d e a n in mind and d e a n in body, unaffected — ready to say, ‘I do not know ,’ if so it be, to meet all men on an absolute equality— to face an y obstacle and meet every difficulty unafraid and unabashed. I wish to live without hate, whim, jealousy, envy or fear. I wish others to live their lives, too— up to their highest, fullest and best. T o that end I pray that I may never meddle, dictate, interfere, give advice that is not wanted, nor assist when my services are not needed. If I can help people, I will do it by giving them a chance to help them­ selves; and if I can uplift or inspire, let it be by example, inference and sugges­ tion, rather than by injunction and dic­ tation. I desire to R adiate L if e !”

Fear and Doubt
“T h e world accepts a man at the esti­ mate he places upon himself. M a n y men are strong at times, but strong men make enemies — they have detractors— The calumny calls and hate hisses. T h e n R osicru cian doubt comes creeping in, possibly the enemies are right— ah, who knows! And D igest instantly the doubt is communicated to A p ril the public— the m an’s face tells his fears 1936 to all he meets. And their estimate of

to be less than any of the other sons of men. He met all on terms of absolute equality, mixing with the poor, the low­ ly, the fallen, the oppressed, the cul­ tured, the rich— simply as brother with brother. And when he said to the out­ cast, ‘Not till the sun excludes you will I exclude you,’ he voiced a sentiment worthy of a god. "He was brother to the elements, the mountains, the seas, the clouds, the sky. He loved them all and partook of them all in his large, free, unselfish, untram­ meled nature. His heart knew no limits, and feeling his feet mortis'd in granite and his footsteps tenon’d in infinity, he knew the amplitude of time. "Only the great are generous: only the strong are forgiving. Like L o t ’s wife, most poets look back over their shoulders: and those who are not look­ ing backward insist that we shall look into the future, and the vast majority of the whole scribbling rabble accept the precept, ‘M an never is, but always to be blest.’ " W e grieve for childhood’s happy days, and long for sweet rest in Heaven, and sigh for mansions in the skies. And the people about us seem so indifferent, and our friends so lukewarm: and really no one understands us, and our environ­ ment queers our budding spirituality and the frost of jealousy nips our aspira­ tions: ‘Oh Paradise, oh Paradise, the world is growing old: who would not be at rest and free where love is never cold.’ So sing the fearsome dyspeptics of the stylus. O h enemic he, you blood­ less she, nipping at crackers, sipping at tea, why not consider that although the evolutionists tell us where we came from, and the theologians inform us where we are going to, yet the only thing we are really sure of is that we are here!

‘‘T h e present is the perpetually mov­ ing spot where history ends and pro­ phecy begins. It is our only possession — the past we reach through lapsing memory, halting recollection, hearsay, and belief: we pierce the future by wist­ ful faith or anxious hope, but the present is beneath our feet. ‘‘W h it m a n sings the beauty and the glory of the present. He rebukes our groans and sighs— bids us look about on every side at the wonders of crea­ tion, and at the miracles within our grasp. H e lifts us up, restores us to our own. introduces us to man and N ature and thus infuses into us courage, man­ ly pride, self-reliance, and the strong faith that comes when we feel our kin­ ship with God. ‘‘He was so mixed with the universe that his voice took in the sw ay of ele­ mental integrity and candor. Absolute­ ly honest, this man was unafraid and unashamed, for Nature has neither ap­ prehension, shame nor vain-glory. In L eaves o f G rass W h it m a n speaks as all men have ever spoken who believe in G od and in themselves— oracular, with­ out apology, without abasement— fear­ lessly. H e tells of the powers and mys­ teries that pervade and guide all life, all death, all purpose. His work is mascu­ line, as the sun is masculine: for the Prophetic voice is as surely masculine as the lullaby and lyric cry is feminine. ‘‘W h it m a n brings the warmth of the sun to the buds of the heart so that they open and bring forth form, color, per­ fume. H e becomes for them aliment and dew; so these buds become blos­ soms, fruits, tall branches, and stately trees that cast refreshing shadows. ‘‘T h e r e are men who are to other men as the shadow of a mighty rock in a w eary land— such is W a l t W h it m a n . ”

•a TA K E T H IS SPECIAL BUS T O T H E CO N V EN TIO N
Would you like to travel in a privately chartered comfortable bus from your state to the National Convention in San Jose, with all of your fellow passengers Rosicrucians? Would you also like your round trip fare to be considerably cheaper than the usual rail or bus rates? O f course you would, and we will try to make this possible for you. D o you live within one hundred and fifty miles of either New Y ork City; Pittsburgh, Penn.; Chicago, Illinois; St. Louis, Missouri; Kansas City, Missouri, or Denver, Colorado? If you do, write to the Secretary of Bus Arrangements, Rosicrucian Order, A M O R C , Rosi­ crucian Park, San Jose, for full particulars.

Qm ,
One H undred T h ree

cDoes F ea r Enslave Y o u ?
OFTEN IT IS TH E M A STER OF OUR LIVES AND W E A RE UNCONSCIOUS OF IT
By T
he

I m perato r P erhaps the greatest element of fear that is almost universal in human beings everywhere is fear o f the unknown . A m o ng psychologists and psychi­ atrists fear of the unknown is classified as a fundamental emotion and as a logical and reason able emotion. B ut the strange part about this fear of the un­ known is that it increases with a cer­ tain degree of intelligence or with a cer­ tain degree of acquired knowledge. T h e very ignorant, unthinking, unintelligent person has less fear o f the unknown than the one who has a smattering of knowledge and a small degree of wis­ dom. T h e little child who has not learned much of life has less fear of un­ known things and is affected less by his lack o f knowledge than the adult who has acquired some knowledge and has dabbled inconsistently and improperly into a lot of subjects which have given him a false or incomplete idea of many important principles. T h e child who knows nothing of fire does not fear it. T h e person who has had only a little experience with fire becomes enslaved by the fear of it, while the one who has learned much about it and has had much experience with it has little fear of it, and the same is true of many of the elements and principles of life. It has been found that as we become better acquainted with the fundamental principles of all natural laws, we become
O n e H un dred Four

A N Y persons to­ day are a c t u a l l y c o n t r o l l e d or di­ rected in all of their thinking and a ct­ ing by the emotion of fear without be­ ing d i r e c t l y con­ scious of the de­ gree or extent of the influence, while on the other hand t h e r e are multi­ tudes w h o thor­ oughly realize that the greatest and most enslaving problem which they have to face is that of the Frankenstein of fear. M a n y of our members, and hosts of our friends and acquaintances and thousands of individuals not connected with our organization, have written to us from time to time asking whether we could help them to escape from this subtle and ever-present influence of fear. D o not be too sure that fear is not affecting your life. Y o u may be like millions of persons who glibly state that they are not affected by any supersti­ tious beliefs, and yet a casual inquiry of The Rosicrucian their thoughts and practices in life will show that they are more or less guided Digest by superstitious creeds or dogmas, ideas, April or practices that they have almost un­ consciously adopted. 1936

Jess fearful of the unknown— the un­ known principles, the unknown actions of these principles, and the unknown conditions and situations. T h e greatest expression of the fear of the unknown is made manifest by the average person when he realizes that he is on his socalled death bed or face to face with the possibility of eminent transition. T h e realization of the fact that the future state and future conditions across the borderline are unknown, creates the most horrifying fears and makes the prospect of transition the most dreadful picture, the most terrifying realization, in the human mind on the part of those who look upon the future state as an unknown condition. Despite the fact that every branch, every denomination, and every division of the Christian religion teaches that life beyond death, or the life that fol­ lows this existence on earth is a magni­ ficent and beautiful experience filled with all of the possibilities of jo y and happiness, and despite the fact that all of these Christian denominations sing songs of joy in anticipation of their spiritual contact in the future, the av er­ age Christian on his death bed is like unto the average person of no religion at all in fearing the unknown beyond the grave. T h is is not meant as a criti­ cism of the Christian religion, but a criticism of the weakness of human faith. Faith seems to sustain the aver­ age human being in matters that are of passing or temporary value, but when it comes to matters that have duration and continuous influence, faith seems to be of little value in the face of a lack of positive knowledge. O n ly those who feel that they have convincing knowl­ edge of what the future holds in store for them or whose faith is sublime and transcendental, are unfearful of the change that takes place at transition and of what lies just beyond the border­ line. W e see this trait of fear of the un­ known made manifest when normal per­ sons enter a building or structure with which they are unacquainted and find themselves in the dark and about to cross the threshold into a room that is unknown to them. T h e fear of what lies just beyond the threshold in such a case is identical with the fear o f the
One H undred F iu e

future. A n d there are those who fear taking a journey on a steamship cross­ ing the Pacific or Atlantic because, never having traversed the ocean and having no conviction or positive know l­ edge of what lies beyond the horizon, they are fearful of it. I have talked with scores of persons who began to express this fear the moment the great steam­ ship had been freed from its dock and had pointed its bow toward the eastern or western horizon of the sea. Im­ mediately they began to question what the evening would bring and the mor­ row, and what would happen in the dark of the night or in case of a storm, or what would happen when o n e’s foot was placed upon foreign soil. But we have noticed that little children will rush into a dark room or into empty places unconscious of any fear or a n y hesi­ tancy that might take hold of their a c ­ tions. Y e t after a child has been told something of the dark and given some little knowledge of its dangers or pos­ sible dangers, or fictitious dangers, this little knowledge makes him conscious of the fact that there is more knowledge which he does not possess and it is this lack of knowledge that constitutes the elements of the unknown. T e a ch in g a little child that he must not go here or there because of the bogey man — a habit that was quite common thirty to fifty years ago— made more children fearful of the unknown than any one other thing, and it had an influence upon them throughout their lives. T h e fictitious, mythical, fairy-like bogey man of their childhood grew as they grew until he was a F rankenstein of monster size in their adulthood, al­ w ays just across the threshold, or just behind a door, or hidden just beyond a veil or curtain and ready to seize hold o f them if they ventured too far. A nd this leads us to the second analy­ sis of the complex of fear. It is a hesi­ tan cy which unconsciously affects us and seizes hold of us in our thinking and acting when we are venturing into new lines, new acts, new fields of thought. It affects the business man in both his business and social affairs, and it affects the woman at home in her social and home affairs. It affects young and old alike. E xperien ces in life which beget wisdom and knowledge are the only

things that eventually free such men and women from the influence of fear. T h e emotion of fear is not always on the surface and it is not easily recog­ nized as such. M a n y persons, if not most of the educated and intelligent men and women, have different names for this bogey man of fear. T h e most common name for it is Caution. O th er names are Reasoning, Consideration, Analysis, Preparation, and Forethought. T h o s e who claim that they have no superstitious beliefs will tell you that the hesitancy they manifest is due to a hunch, whereas in fact it is a supersti­ tious belief that fear is warning them. T h e r e is a vast difference between the hesitancy that results from real cautious­ ness and the hesitancy that comes from subconscious or conscious fear. O n e may be thoroughly adventuresome and free from any fear at all even in enter­ ing into an unknown field or taking part in an exploration of the unknown conditions of the wilds and explored portions of any continent, or even of entering the mouth of a sleeping vol­ cano, and yet one can be cautious. B e ­ ing cautious does not inhibit our actions and delay our procedure as much as it causes us to be on guard in considera­ tion of the known things or anticipated possibilities. Caution, preparation, analysis, and study are excellent matters of procedure in all the affairs of life. T h e y beget progress and are the handmaids of ad ­ venture. F ear, on the other hand, frustrates our plans and turns our foot­ steps backward or enslaves us to our present position and makes us unable to proceed, to advance, to grow, expand, or develop. It is claimed by some that fear is an inherited quality of nature, particularly when the fear complex is strongly developed and not of a subtle, subcon­ scious nature. I will not argue the point, for it may be true that some degree of fear has been inherited through frights and fearsome situations experienced by the mother during the prenatal period, or through the inheritance of cowardice The from either one of the parents; but R osicru cian "whether inherited or acquired, fear is an emotion that can be overcome and Digest for which we have no excuse, least of A pril all the alibi that it is the result of some experience on the part of our forebears. 1936

F e a r is the very antithesis of bravery. It causes us to default in making of ourselves what we should be. It robs us of a divine inheritance far greater than any inheritance from our earthly parents. Life is a conquest continually from the hour of birth to the hour of transi­ tion. Life is not merely a period of acquirement. W e do not come into life empty-handed and empty-minded like a blank book with its unprinted pages ready to be filled with human experi­ ences and with lessons and wisdom which we must learn bitterly or with joy. W e come into existence fortified with an inner, divine, omnipotent wis­ dom that is ready as well as qualified to enable us to master every situation and to lift ourselves beyond those experi­ ences in life which must come to those who are not brave but are fearful. T h e refo re, our lives are conquests re­ sulting from the challenge of the wisdom and self within to the ignorant and superstitious earthly conditions around us. O n ly to him who is fearless is the conquest a success and only to the brave is given the palm of reward. T h e divine and Cosmic laws sustain us in our bravery while G o d ’s con­ sciousness and mind in us provide us with every means to overcome the germs of disease, the frailties of life, and the weakness we have acquired. W i t h ­ out fear in our consciousness and with an open mind and a willing attitude to let the laws of G o d and nature prevail, our battle against the odds of life is easy. But when fear is given its op­ portunity to influence us or when we allow its subtle influence to affect us unconsciously by our refusal to cast it out of our being, the conquest of life becomes a long and tedious battle in which the odds are against us to such a great degree th at the average human being cannot possibly win the rewards that he should win. In the first place, the average in­ dividual in his lack of understanding and in his wilful refusal to investigate and study the more fundamental prin­ ciples of our existence does not realize that the fear of a thing animates it, strengthens it, and enthrones it until it becomes a master which whips us and holds us in humble position and in­ activity. T h e moment we allow our
O n e H un dred S ix

consciousness to form a realization of a thing through our fear of it, w e create that thing into a reality where before it was non-existent. B y giving credence or consideration to our fear of anything we immediately tie upon our ankles and our wrists the shackles and the chains which the fearful thing has created out of fiction or out of imagination, or out of the superstitious beliefs of the day. I have seen persons in perfectly healthy and normal condition go aboard a steamship and immediately rush to their cabins to undress and go to bed, out of fear of the possibility of seasick­ ness. I have seen them a few hours later in the night suffering all of the unpleasantness of m al-de-m er, and I have heard them speak of the disagree­ able effects of the rocking and tossing of the ship when, in fact, the ship was still at anchor attached safely and steadily to the pier and had not moved one inch from where it had been for days. T h e belief that the ship was to leave at midnight whereas in fact it was scheduled to leave after midnight has caused many to become seasick within an hour after midnight while the boat was still waiting for the rising tide to take it out of the dock in the morning. I have seen persons enter an airplane fully anticipating that the moment they stepped into it they would become air sick, and the influence of this fear made itself manifest before there was any real physical cause for their condition. M en and women have approached business propositions with a timidity, hesitancy, and an attitude of mind based upon the emotion of fear within them and from the very start the success of their plans was doomed and each and every failure, each and every incident that delayed them in their progress, and each and every unfortunate incident was easily traceable to the fear that domi­ nated their thinking and their acting. M ore fortunes in money and in the ma­ terial things of life have been lost by those who hesitated out of fear than by those who ventured too quickly and without caution. Bravery and fearless­ ness beget power and a venturesome, optimistic, constructive attitude of mind, and this in turn attracts favorable co n ­ ditions even when there are some un­ favorable ones to be overcome. F e a r
One H undred S ev en

creates a pessimistic attitude inwardly if not outwardly. And this attitude of mind attracts failure and it inhibits con­ structive thinking and it makes the mind cynical, doubtful, and creative of un­ favorable anticipation w'hich in turn be­ come realities that enslave the in­ dividual. T h e r e is only one w ay in which each individual can eliminate from his con­ sciousness the influence of fear. It is first of all by becoming familiar with the fundamental principles of life and es­ tablishing a firm conviction in the mind and heart that all of the activities of the universe are essentially constructive and good, and that it is only our angle or view-point of some of these forces and operations in the universe that make them have the false appearance of being destructive. T h e second point is to establish in our minds and con­ sciousness the absolute and eternal fact that all of these good and constructive processes of nature are the result of the constructive, beneficent, merciful, lov­ ing consciousness of God, and that G od is love and goodness and that all seem­ ing unkindnesses and injustices are due to our misunderstanding, misinterpreta­ tion, or miscomprehension of things as they are. T h e third is to become con­ vinced of the fact that man is possessed of the creative power of God and that he is master of his own career and can create, both mentally and physically, the things that he requires, the things that he can image, and the things which will make him w hat he should be or w hat G od intended him to be. T h e fourth is to practice the principles of this faith or belief in the omnipotence and goodness of G o d and the creative power within man by refusing to visual­ ize that which is unfortunate, destruc­ tive, unhappy, sinful, or inharmonious to our best interests. T h e fifth point is to be venturesome and brave in the realization that we can overcome the evil more easily than we can escape the conclusions and creations of our own thinking; that poverty, ill health, un­ happiness, misery, and failure in the conquest of life are things that we create if we give life to them, power to them, through our fear— our belief— of them. T h e manifestation of fear— even in the guise of hesitancy and caution be­

cause of analysis and study— is a sign of weakness and never of strength. T h e strong are brave and the brave are ven­ turesome. T h e weak are hesitant and the hesitant are fearful and the failures are of this class inevitably. E a c h new venture into the unknown, whether it be the unknown o f finances, the un­ known of business, the unknown of study and investigation, the unknown things of life, the unknown principles of religion, the unknown labyrinth of mental power, each venture into these unknown things is a victorious con­ quest and each brings strength to the

character, fortitude to the emotions, and encouragement and progress to the mind and heart. B e brave, therefore, and make sure that your hesitancy, your extreme carefulness, your doubts and your delays for investigation, are not the alibis of fear and therefore the balls and chains that hold you in a false place in life and let only the dazzling picture of success and happiness pass before you as a parade upon the horizon while you are entombed in your false position and must watch the parade go by.

READ

THE

ROSICRUCIAN

FORUM

ANCIENT SYMBOLISM
V
M an, w hen co n scio u s o f an e te rn a l tr u th , h a s ev er sym b olized it so th a t th e hum an co n scio u sn ess could fo rev er have re alization o f it. N ation s, lan g u ag e s and cu sto m s have ch an ged , but th ese a n cie n t d e sig n s co n tin u e to illu m in a te m ankind w ith th e ir m y stic lig h t. F o r th ose who a re see k in g lig h t, each m onth we w ill rep ro d u ce a sy m b o l o r sy m b o ls, w ith th e ir a n cie n t m ean in g .

THE MYSTIC This is another reproduction of an old woodcut illustration taken from one of the rare Rosicrucian books in the ar­ chives of the Order. It may be rightly termed the mystic, for it depicts the ancient al­ chemist employing in a mys­ tical manner, the laws of nature to manifest its phenomena. Note the lion representing the power of justice, devouring the serpent which g) depicts the satanic influence of evil. On the wall beneath the window is shown the symbolic key to life, the Egyptian Crux Ansata.

The Rosicrucian Digest April
1936

One H un dred E ight

SANCTUM MUSINGS
THE SOLE REA LITY
( C ontinu ed from tast m on th)

T I S interesting to note that the state of quiescence is absolutely devoid of the ch aracter­ istic of dimension, as that term is ap­ plied to the reali­ ties of touch and s i g h t , or as its equivalent inten­ sity is applied to h e a r i n g , tasting, and smelling. Upon a first consideration, we are apt to b e­ lieve that we have experienced quies­ cence as having dimension, but such conclusions are the result of confusing the cause of the idea of dimension with quiescence. F o r example, in a dark chamber where nothing is visible to us, and visual quiescence exists, we can, nevertheless, ascertain the dimension of the chamber and are apt to believe, therefore, that we have determined the area of the visual void or quiescence. W e place our back against the wall and extend our arms before us, and slowly walk forward, until we feel another wall or object. B y counting our footsteps, we determine the dimension between the wall and the first other o bject felt. B ut this method would not give the state of visual quiescence any dimension, for we
O ne H un dred N in e

saw nothing. T h e r e was no visual qual­ ity, thus we could not measure its e x ­ tent. W h a t we did do, is to measure the changes of the sensations of touch. Beginning with the sensation of the wall against our back, we counted each additional change of sensation, each different position, when a step was taken, until we eventually reached the opposite wall or another object in the chamber. If, however, quiescence had existed to touch, as it did to sight, this would not have been possible. Suppose we were suspended in the chamber, so we could not, through the sense of touch, perceive any part of it, or any ob­ jects in it, then a notion of dimension would not be possible, just as it was not possible with visual quiescence. A definite distinction must now be made between quiescence and space. A state of quiescence begins to our senses, with the end of a form and ends with the beginning of a form. F o r example, we see a lighted candle, and then it is extinguished and the chamber is plunged into darkness and we see nothing. Q u i­ escence begins with the darkness and continues until we visually perceive something again. T o this interval of quiescence, no dimension can be given. We cannot say that so many yards, feet or inches existed between the end of our perception of one object and the

beginning of our experience o f another. However, when we look at a form and observe its end and the beginning of another or the apparent absence of any other, or space, we say the form has dimension. T h i s is arrived at by measur­ ing the extent of the form, the particular variation of that quality of sight which makes it visible to us. T o do this, we must at all times be conscious of form. W e must perceive the old form and the beginning of the new, or merely perceive the form and its limits— that is, an ap­ parent absence of anything else around it, which we call space. T o illustrate— I can determine the dimension of a book either by noting where another immedi­ ately beside it begins its form, or by ob­ serving where space appears to sur­ round it, constituting the end of its form. T h u s I measure the visual form that is constant and which I identify as a book and where a variation or a sud­ den demarcation of the constancy be­ gins, I conceive it as a new form. Q ui­ escence cannot have dimension, because it lacks a sense quality and lacking a quality, there can be no variation o f it, the extent of which can be measured. T h i s conclusion offhand may seem im possible to reconcile with space, for space appears as formless as does the state of quiescence, and yet, we can a s ­ sign it dimension. First, it must be realized that space is never perceived without relation to matter or form. H ow are we visually conscious o f space? It is only by perceiving its limits, which limits are the beginning of form. Being conscious o f form, we conceive that that state or condition which appears to be without it, is space, because it has the capacity to occupy form. Never, at any time, has man apprehended space in the sense of a void, without it being related to form. Although space may appear formless, it has the same quality as form, but without variation. Space visually perceived is sigh t’s quality o f light without variation. T h e lack of variation causes us to conceive a form­ less state. T h e r e is no expanse o f this state of the absolute quality of sight or The light so great that we cannot perceive R osicru cian its boundaries o f visual forms. If there were, we would experience a condition U igest similar to quiescence. Even when lookA p ril ing heavenward on a clear day, space is 1936 limited by an illusionary ceiling of blue

which constitutes form, gives the area probable dimension. T w o cubes are placed before us and we say they are twelve inches apart. In the area between is space; it is a state to sight without form; yet it has dimen­ sion because we can measure its extent between the forms, where it begins and where it ends. T h i s dimension of space is comparable with the dimension of form. W e repeat, form must always be perceivable as a boundary for us to give space dimension. W e may desire to measure the area between a certain mountain and a lake hundreds of miles distant. Obviously, both forms, the mountain and the lake, could not be perceived at one time, nor in fact, could either one be, afte r we had travelled about half w ay between them, yet this does not alter our assertion that space must be perceived simultaneously with form to have dimension. In such a case as the one given, the distance is arrived at by measuring from the mountain to a form which is seen, thence from that point to another and so on, or by sub­ stituting such arbitrary forms as foot and yard rules, or mathematical calcula­ tions which are continually in our con­ sciousness as for ms during the period o f measurement. W h a t is the limit of the quiescence of the senses? Actually, it is when form is again perceived. Since it is possible during a period of time equal to our in­ terval of quiescence to perceive an ob­ ject of any size, we cannot therefore know what capacity to assign quies­ cence. Quiescence is not a mere absence of form, but the absence of the quality of the sense of which forms are com­ prised. Since the quality is possible of manifesting nearly any dimension of which the human mind is capable of grasping, we cannot give it a fixed dimension. Sp ace, being bounded by forms, its area or dimension is its poten­ tial capacity of the forms seen, or its capacity is certain arbitrary units of measurement between the forms. A form capable of being measured, that is, having its dimension or exten­ sion determined, is for that period at least, apparently at rest. If it were changing rapidly to another form or dis­ appearing entirely, it would not be con­ stant enough for us to determine its extent. Th e refo re, if it is fixed enough
O n e H un dred T en

to be measured, it is fixed in our co n­ sciousness for the moment at least. It matters not that the form itself may in relation to others be in motion; as long as its particular expression or identity remains unchanged, it is fixed. Its length, breadth, or height is ascertained by substituting arbitrary changes along the extent of the fixed form. T o illu­ strate— Th e re lies before us, let us sup­ pose, a board. It appears to maintain its form, and it also appears at rest. W e proceed to measure the extent of that form by taking a rule, scaled, we will say, to three feet. W e turn this fixed rule of three feet end over end, along the surface of the board, counting each change of position of the rule until we perceive a change of form; that is, the end of the board. T h e total count of the arbitrary changes along the extent of the fixed form is its dimension. Th u s, to ascertain the dimension of a form we break up its seeming rest into units of action, brought about by changing the position of our rule. E a c h unit of the rule is fixed and its form at rest also, but the change of its position and the mathematical progression gives it an artificial action. Our deliberation upon space brings us to a consideration of that illusion of human consciousness designated as T I M E . It is so closely related to space that many psychologists and metaphysi­ cians refer to it and space as the space­ time factor. Although as we have seen, the state of quiescence cannot be sub­ ject to the same standards as space— that is, it does not have extension or dimension, it does exist in time. A b ­ sence of perception of action gives rise to a realization of a state of quiescence. This interval between states of percep­ tion is possible of measurement. T h e interval of quiescence is divided into mathematical units. T h e extension of these units is the determining factor in knowing the duration of the period of quiescence. O n the other hand, we may take the opposite of this quiescence or perception and find it exists in time also. Perception is the realization of form. Form, as we know it, is action, even though it may appear at rest. Single or several forms, or forms which change as we perceive them, if consti­ tuting a single period of perception, are measured by time. A n entire experience,
One H un dred E lev en

whether we perceive it as action or not, if we consider the experience as fixed, at rest, may be measured by dividing it as we did with quiescence, into mathe­ matical units. T h e sum total of these units is the duration of the sense experi­ ence, or the period of our consciousness of the form or forms perceived. T h i s explanation may appear incon­ sistent, for it has been said that quies­ cence cannot be measured as is space, yet we have, it seems, applied the same method to it and perception in determin­ ing their time. But, there is actually a vast difference, extremely significant yet simple enough to be overlooked by many. W e begin an explanation of this difference by approaching it from the point of consciousness. B y conscious­ ness, we mean that state by which we realize the variation of the sense quali­ ties. have knowledge of the realities and of self. T h e period of consciousness does not alter to us the nature of an idea or a form. W e perceive a splash of color and a geometrical form, and say that we see a red cube; neither the color nor form of the object is intensified by increasing the length of time we are conscious of them. O n c e an idea is definitely formed in our minds as to the nature of an object, it has that moment, to that sense or combination of senses, acquired as much reality as it will ever have to them. T h e period required to register the idea may be three seconds or five minutes, but an additional period of consciousness will not alter the na­ ture of the fundamental sense impres­ sions. T h e re fo re , it is cogent that the elements which contribute to our notion of dimension, are not affected by the period of consciousness. According to our previous hypothesis then, when there is established the notion of dimen­ sion, there must be apprehended at the same time either the limits of the form in comparison with others, space, or the mechanical changes of measurement. T h e salient point is that measurement for determining the extension of reality and space is dependent on perceived change— a change in reality from one form to another, or from reality to space. T h e only im portance of the period of consciousness is that it be long enough to measure the changes. T h is, as said, may be accomplished in either a long or short interval. If I have before

The R osicru cian Digest A pril 1936

me a map with a scale of miles, I can at a glance, determine a distance of five thousand miles between cities, a distance which without the map might require several weeks to measure. W h e n e v e r the elements, as in the example of the map, are all combined in such a manner that the idea is formed at once in my consciousness, space and extension also have their illusionary existence to me instantaneously. T h e length of the period of continued consciousness mat­ ters not. T im e is likewise measured in terms of change, but a change of conscious­ ness, not reality. W h e n we are co n ­ scious of a thing, the consciousness is of the N O W . E verything we have ever experienced, if not forgotten, would be of the now, if the experiences were not interrupted by periods a fraction of a second in duration, when we are not conscious at all. T h e s e intervals, when we are devoid of consciousness, cause the experiences of consciousness to have an orderly progression. It makes it pos­ sible for us to distinguish between the immediate and what preceded it. If it were not for this, we would have no im aginary conception of a past or a future, but just a continuous merge of sense impressions. T o measure the period of conscious­ ness, we must have points of beginning and end that are recognized by all alike. W e cannot very well count backward to a certain experience and state that an event occurred so many experiences ago. T h i s would mean nothing to another, for the duration of his experiences may have been longer than ours and he would not realize the same lapse of time. T h e re fo re , we have taken the motions of certain stars and the sun as standards of movement, recognized by all, and we aver that a day consists of so many periods of this movement. T h e s e periods are mathematical units of progression from one fixed point to another. A c tu a l­ ly, what has been done is to divide man's consciousness of the change of position of the earth, sun, and planets into the arbitrary units of time. M a n ’s consciousness of the changing of the f ? rth ’ su"- and Planets’ is a fixf d state: H e can describe the various phases of motion of the Cosmic bodies, but with­ out the artificial division of time, how could he measure the period of his fixed

consciousness of them? W it h o u t hours, minutes, seconds and their equivalent, how could he measure that period of change, of which he is conscious, from whence the sun is seen in the E a s t until it is seen in the W e s t ? A sustained conscious experience is a period of fixation. B y this is meant that consciousness is arrested by the sense impressions which engender it. A l­ though there may be a number of these different intervals of arrested conscious­ ness or experiences, each may be of different duration, some twice as long as others, some half or quarter as long. F o r others to comprehend by compari­ son, the duration of our consciousness, we must describe it in units which have the same significance to them. Could you conceive the elapsed time if one said, “ F o r exercise yesterday, I rode a bicycle and paddled a can o e?’’ Y ou would need measure the duration of the period of consciousness of those experi­ ences before you could conceive the time they are said to have consumed. Y o u would need apply to that fixed ex­ perience of riding a bicycle and pad­ dling the canoe, the arbitrary units of measurement, hours, minutes, and sec­ onds. E a c h unit of time is a change, and we count the mathematical changes until there is a change in consciousness — that is, until there is had a new idea or group of ideas, constituting a new experience. T I M E , if we are to concisely define it, is the duration of the period of con­ sciousness. It is the duration of the per­ sistence of an idea or group of ideas. E a c h experience is consciousness ar­ rested. S P A C E is perception without form. E X T E N S I O N is the extent of the character of a form or space. C hang e in the character of reality gives rise to the idea of D I M E N S I O N . C hange in the character of space gives rise to the idea of reality and to the idea of the dimension of space. T h e changes of time are changes in con­ sciousness. T h e changes of space and extension are changes in the source of all reality. T o put it more pointedly, in time the changes seem to take place within us, and in space and extension the changes appear to take place e x ­ ternally. W i t h time we measure the duration of the idea itself, but with space and extension we measure the
O ne H undred T w elv e

cause of the idea. All three are obvious­ ly the properties of consciousness, states of mind apprehended, to which we have assigned identity, just as we did our sense qualities, which in their own rights have no existence. These three states which have an imaginary realism, time, space and e x ­ tension, are provoked by the external causes we have set forth. T im e has its illusionary existence to us in the e x ­ periences of all the special senses. T h e re is no difference in measuring the dura­ tion of consciousness of a sound, than in measuring the duration of the co n ­ sciousness of a taste. T h e period of consciousness may be alike, regardless of the contributing sense quality. T h e conceptions of space and extension, however, as we conceive them, arise only from the qualities of the senses of sight and touch. It is only with the senses of sight and touch that we can be aware of more than one form, or a form and void simultaneously. T h u s we can see two or more objects at a time, and measure the extent of each. F u r ­ thermore, we can always visually per­ ceive the limit of any o bject or what may seem to be its limit; even the horizon is the beginning of an illusionary void. This perception of two or more forms or of form and void simultaneously makes it possible for us to conceive their extent. If a form were seen with­ out its limits, we would not imagine space or extension. Sometimes the example of a person in a dark chamber with eyes open is cited as an exception to this. It is said that he sees no form, yet is conscious of space. W e repeat, he is not conscious of space, but of quiescence, the absence of any excitation of the organs of sight whatsoever. Space, as heretofore de­ lineated, may be conceived as having dimension, but quiescence can not be. Could the subject in the dark chamber visually ascertain the dimension of the chamber? Patently not. Y e t, if that chamber were well-lighted, although empty, he could measure the extent of its space by perceiving the surrounding forms, the walls and ceiling. W i t h touch likewise, space and extension are co n­ ceived by apprehending one or more forms, or form and void simultaneously. W e feel an object, and around it exists a void. W e determine the extent of the
One Hundred T hirteen

form by ascertaining its limits, where the void begins. T o touch, the extent of void is known by substituting for its units of measurement in form, rules, yardsticks, steel measures, tapes, etc. T h e y are all forms, because they can be felt. T h e y bridge the void between ob­ jects. Sp ace would not be known to us through touch, if we were not simultan­ eously aware of a touch form, something which we at the time could also feel. An absolute state of quiescence of touch is known by the fact that even the limbs of our own body do not register sensa­ tions of feeling. In other words, in terms of objective feeling, our body would have no existence. But when we are aware of space through the sense of touch, we also have the sensation and feeling of our own physical form. L et us contrast this reasoning with the experiences of the sense of hearing. W e have found that the extent of the forms of sound are known to us by their amplitude, their intensity. T h is intensity is not realized, however, by comparison with another sound of less intensity heard at the time or by comparing it with silence, but rather by comparing it with recollected experiences of sounds. In fact, if two sounds are apparently heard simultaneously, it is because they are of nearly the same intensity or the lesser one would not be heard at all. T h e ideas of space and extension arising within the senses of sight and touch, are ascertained by comparing concomitant variations of the quality of the senses, or by comparing the concomitant sensa­ tions of space and reality. T h e limits of a form, as we so often repeat, are known to us only by ascertaining at the time we perceive them the beginning of another form or that state which to us appears as space. In sound there is no limit to the form perceived, until we are only conscious of another, then the former does not exist to us at all. W e may hear several sounds at one time, as for instance, a singer accompanying an orchestra. T h e music may have greater amplitude than the human voice, yet the limits of either are not perceived by us until one or the other is no longer appre­ hended by us at all. V isu a l objects and objects of touch may have their limits perceived, even while they continue to exist to us, and consequently, the extent of the character of the o bject is de-

terminable. T h is same principle under­ lies the experiences of the senses of smell and taste. A variation o f the qual­ ities of smell may give a scent a distinct fragrance, but the extent of the ol­ factory form can be known only by its intensity. A s long as it continues, its limits in relationship to any other scent are not discernible. T h e extent which we perceive is qualitative rather than quantitative. It is difficult to compare these experiences with visual ones. T h e best analogy is that it is like seeing one object more clearly than another, and in such an instance the important factor is not the extent of the object, but the definiteness of the impression, a register­ ing of the quality variation sufficiently for a clear comprehension of the sensa­ tion. W e may, for example, never know where the sweetness of an apple begins or ends, in relation to the sweetness of a persimmon, but we can know that the degree or intensity of one is greater than the other. B y a process of reasoning, we have reduced all conscious reality, all things of the universe to I S O S , the universal Cosmic action. B u t what of man, he who interprets at least a portion o f this action, this flow of Isos, and who as­ signs it form, and all of the other pro­ perties which constitute our conscious world? Is he a part of it? T h e r e can be no question but that his substance, the material elements of his nature, have their existence to him in the same illusionary manner as do the particulars of the world about him. T h e r e are, how­ ever, those intangible elements, that strange faculty which interprets, and in which the qualities are aroused and which is known as consciousness. F u r ­ ther, there is that subtle force, life, which matter envelops and upon which consciousness depends. A re they too independent of Isos? M a n is the measure of all things: in him alone do they have the distinction of separateness and individuality, as we have seen. A p a rt from the thought of his mind, the particulars of the universe fall into that magnificent unity, that The ceaseless flow of the one— Isos. T h e ir R osicru cian natur^s do not become any less real without the mind of man, but they are Digest free from confinement in words, terms, A pril colors and forms. If the mind of man 1936 can conceive the indivisible universe as

a fantasmagorical world of things, then man too is a product of his own fancy. W e cannot admit o f a dualism of man and reality, but just the sole reality, Isos. If the idea of the multiplicity of the universe is a product of mind, then man likewise, as one of the things con­ ceived, is a product of his own mental processes. His individualism is as un­ real, as unseparated from the rhythmic oscillation of Isos as the cloak on his back. T h e fact that self-consciousness exists as apart from the objective con­ sciousness of man does not alter this conclusion. T o contend that because man may exclude the world of parti­ culars, shut out the imaginary forms of the outer world and be aware of self only, and that he has therefore an existence apart from the external world, is false reasoning. Consciousness is a state of awareness, a field of sensitivity to stimuli. It iso­ lates its impressions and gives them a substance and separateness that they do not possess. W i t h a continuation of consciousness and the agitating forces which engender it, a mental world exists to man, whether it be a realization of self or externality. Presuming that all things we perceive have existence, just as we realize them, if we concentrate our powers of observation on one object to the exclusion of all else, could we rightfully say that that thing alone had existence and all else upon which we did not concentrate was non-existent? If the alternating surges of Isos can a c ­ count for the realities man perceives through his senses, then this sam e surge in his own being, which is of the same source, can be the cause of the idea of self. If the external world can react on consciousness to cause the conception man has of it, then man's own nature can react in like manner to cause a selfconsciousness. T h is reasoning, then, in­ terposes consciousness between the illu­ sion of a world of particulars and the realization o f self. T h e belief conse­ quently that consciousness is a separate reality in the universe, is a pure figment of the human imagination. Consciousness is never found without life. A t least in a lifeless body there are none of the characteristics of conscious­ ness found. Furthermore, consciousness has never been found embodied in a substance unlike animate matter. T h a t
One H un dred Fourteen

is, matter having the general properties of life. Thus, we are obliged to con­ clude that life and consciousness are related and that both have existence only in matter and not apart from it. Deep anesthesia submerges nearly all manifestations of consciousness and yet life persists without a serious retarding of its functions. T h e refo re, conscious­ ness is evidently subordinate to life force. Although the world to man teems with things he has classified as reali­ ties, he has made general divisions of them, such as energies, matter, gasses, solids and liquids, and it is his first step in the recognition of the unity of reali­ ties. Also, although Isos is a single reality, insofar as its primary nature is concerned, its graduated intensity as explained earlier, causes a varying e x ­ citation of the sense organs and the human mind is capable of grasping the relationship of the phenomena they pro­ duce, resulting in the classifications we have of them. T h e affinity of life is matter. T h e refo re, it has never been classified by man separately as an ener­ gy of the universe and, in fact, it is not. Life is the harmonious relationship of two intensities of Isos. T h is relation­ ship arrests both of them and unites them as one, without either losing its in­ dividual nature. B y this we have not divided Isos into separate realities, but combined its variations. Let us use the following hypothetical illustration: Suppose we had a long, narrow, and very thin sheet of a certain quality of rubber, thin enough to be translucent. Let us further suppose that we focused a bright light on this tautly stretched rubber sheet and it emanated a definite color after passing through it, and as we lessened or increased the tautness of the sheet, the color of the light passing through it would change. A t certain degrees of tautness definite colors would be produced. Let us presume that at a certain point when passing from one color into another, a blend of the two would be had, engendering a third color unlike either of the others, in which at all times the two component colors would exist. T h is condition would be like the state of life caused by an in­ duction or attraction between one in­ tensity of Isos, which ordinarily mani­ fests to us as matter, and another un­ named intensity or energy. Life, then,
O ne H undred F ifteen

is that peculiar condition or stress and strain between two variations of in­ tensity of Isos. T h e r e is a constant pull and push or tendency for both of the contributing intensities to expand into their graduated orders. T h is stress and strain causes minor fluctuations of the intermediary condition or state of life. V ariatio n s of matter, one of the phases of this triune condition which we know as life, produce sensations within us, which we attribute solely to external compulsion and which we comprehend as being of a physical nature only. E x ­ cessive variations or disturbances tend to disrupt the equilibrium of the triune state of life and produce sensations varying from minor irritations to intense pain, depending on their severity. T h o s e variations which stabilize and maintain this relationship of matter and the un­ known phase of intensity of Isos, and which consequently strengthen the co n­ dition which exists between them, and which is known as life, produce sensa­ tions of a pleasurable nature. V aria tio n s of that unknown phase of Isos likewise produce sensations, but they seem to have an immanent origin. T h e y are known to us as the instincts and cause a realization of self, as they appear dis­ tinct from the sensations which are a s ­ sociated with external causes. If man could avoid every physical disturbance, every disease, every injury, every state and condition which would affect his physical being, whether it be pleasurable to him or not, and also sup­ press his objective senses, he would not have any sensations of pain or pleasure, nor would he even be possessed of any ideas. O u r thoughts arise only from an interpretation of our sensations and sense impressions. Further, if man could anticipate every need of his particular nature and permit neither an excess nor deficiency of indulgence and thus meet the requirements of the state of balance of which his life consists, he would not be aw are of the inherent urges of his being, or the instincts. H e would not, patently, be aware of self, for who can define self as apart from the instinctive and emotional urges which we feel. Consequently, sensation is more than the parent of ideas and the stuff with which reason builds thought; it is con­ sciousness itself. W i t h the disappear-

an ce of consciousness, man has vanished. His body, like the stars over his head and the grass beneath his feet, has its form exclusively in the evanescent hypersensitive oscillation of the flow of the life force. His ego, self, and personality vanish when the medium for perceiving and defining the shades of difference which existed to him as ex □ • • •

ternal and internal form has gone. M an, when consciousness dissolves, merges into the whole from whence he had never departed, and he loses an identity which he never had. Isos claims her own; there is but one reality, Isos, Cosmic action. All else is glorious illusion, even man, in whom the illusion occurs. .0

T H E END

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H A V E Y O U N O TIC ED ?
The Prince of W ales seriously considered marriage in M arch. Real estate sales and building activity have had their greatest increase since the beginning of the depression. T h e concerted attacks on the Townsend Old Age Plan. T h e recent new developments in colored motion picture photography. All of these constitute the latest news of the hour. Y et they are referred to in the predictions contained in the little brochure entitled, "1936 andConflicts,” which was printed late in 1935. Each prediction is being faithfully fulfilled. T he startling accuracy of this bookletwill interest all readers. Obtain a liberal supply for distribution to your friends Yc and acquaintances. T hey will be sent without cost and with postage paid. Just address a letter asking for the number you wish to the Rosicrucian Supply Bureau, San Jose, California. I E E § | § i 1

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TEM PLE TO PICS
E E E E = E 1 | E E E E Z = § I E Rosicrucian Park at this time is resounding with the sound of hammers. Gradually there is rising to a greater height than any of the surrounding structures, a new building to be used for scientific purposes, a structure which will prove of the greatest interest to the membership and all who are privileged to enter it and witness the demonstrations that will take place therein. W h at the building is, is a secret for the time being, but it will be announced as a surprise later.

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Even though the winter of 1936 has been the most severe in several years, with dust storms, blizzards and floods, the Courier Car is right on schedule, and up to the present not one city included in its itinerary has been omitted, nor even one lecture in any city. At this time, the Courier car is right in the flood area, and daily we have been in touch with the members of the National Lecture Board who accompany it. T h ey have advised us that they will make every effort to complete their plans, so as not to disappoint all those who are expecting to hear the lectures and see the special motion pictures and demonstrations of Rosicrucian scientific principles. it * * * * The coming Rosicrucian Grand Lodge Convention gives evidence of being the largest ever held by the Order during its present cycle of activity. Representatives of A M O R C state that more members have indicated their intention of coming to the Convention than in any other year. Those who do come will be well pleased with the special arrangements being made to make this Convention the best ever,

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rj* ^ n . K o s ic r u c ta n D ig e s t * .I

E E E E E E I = Z E E ^ E |

T h e Rosicrucian New Y ear ceremony held in the Francis Bacon Auditorium in Rosicrucian Park on Thursday, March 19th, was highly enjoyed by all. In addition to the ceremony itself and the addresses made by the various officers, there was a demonstration of the revolutionary new type organ known as the Hammond Electrical Organ, which produces marvelous tones, and which functions in accordance with the principles of vibrations as taught in the Rosicrucian physics. In addition to the vocal numbers of the Rosicrucian choir, there was an oriental dance entitled "T he Dance to Buddha" which was very impressive and symbolical. ♦ * * ♦ * Rosicrucian Park is being increased in size by one third. M any new lawns are being added, walks, flower beds, shrubs and trees. A date palm over thirty feet in height was one trees added. W eighing twenty tons it required special equipment for its moving. T he grounds of Rosicrucian Park are always admired and enjoyed by the thousands who visit the Supreme Grand Lodge throughout the year.

April
1936

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„.Q
One H undred S ixteen

B A L IN E S E SA C R IFIC IA L A L T A R
T h e above is a heretofore never published photograph of an ancient altar used for sacrificial purposes, located in an isolated village in the south part of the isle of Bali in the Dutch E ast Indies. T o the right of the altar is the portal of a temple partially in ruins. Observe over the doorway the raised open hands, as if bestowing a benediction on all who enter. T h e photograph clearly reveals the magnificent Hindu art, sculpture and architecture. T his forgotten shrine was personally photographed by Fratcr Jansen of Holland. (C o u rtesy o[ R osicru cian D igest.)

Pyramid Prophecies (ytartle the World!
"'T P I I I . depression " ill (om e lo .1 delinite end on September i(). 10361’hese arc nol the w ords of a m odern economist. Kill 1 1it- proplictic w ords ol w isdom of a mystic people carved on llio ( ’treat Pyram id nearly filtv centuries ago. So amnz ingly accurate arc tin- predictions of tin* ( »renl Pyram id that modern science lias sent its greatest savants to study 11if veiled syne Imlism it contains, with. flic fiope of being aide to look across un lxirn centuries into an unknow n lulure. I lie eminent D r. A . I . Strati li-G o rd o n . Scotch siientist. w ho recently returned from Egypt. in a surp rising new spaper interview declared that nearly all ol the Pyram id prophecies were lu llille d . Science is intrigued, not w ith a seersliip. not by tales of supernatural vision, hut by legends that the sages possessed a strange mathem atical form ula b y w hich hum an, economic, and political tendencies w ere m ysteriously reduced to a methodical system ol cyclical forecast, just as modern science forecasts the weather. W it h these strange cycles the ancient Pyram id B uilders presaged the fa ll of the R om an E m pire, the com ing ol C hrist, the discovery ol A m erica, the W o r ld nr. and tin* depression. O th e r predictions, the lu ll import of w hich are nol yet realized, are being seriously studied.

A G R IP P IN G N E W B O O K
In line w ith these latest archaeological discoveries in Lgvpt. I )r. I I . Spencer L e w is has just completed a new w ork entitled. I he Sym holii Prophecy ol the G re a t P yra m id .’ I his hook fra nkly discusses the origin of the Pyram id b uilders and the purpose ol the G re a t Pyram id itself. H e e xplains how its build ers formed the lirst mystery schools ol wisdom and held w ithin them secret initiations. Look at some of the intriguing chapters this hook contains: M Y S T I.R IO U S T R A D IT IO N 'S .
T ill PROPHECY O P EVENTS. KNOW LEDGE? TH E SECRET PASSAGEW AYS. WHENCE THE CAME T H IS MYSTERY IN IT IA T IO N S .

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N o lover of history and mystery can alford to he without this hook. W it h in it are pub lished lor the first time the diagrams and charts of the n ew ly discovered subterranean temples and places of conclave never thought to exist, from w hich are heing taken tablets containing the truths these mystery people taught. T h e book is also a thing ol beauty, being hound in silk cloth, scarab green in color, a nd h ig h ly ornamented w ith Egyptian sym bolism ; illustrated and w ell-printed. ll is economically priced. N o matter w h at hook you have read on the Pyramid, this one w ill reveal new facts and new knowfe dge.

W h e re d id these people acq uire their w isdom ! W hat sources ol know ledge w ere open to them ? f hese fascinating questions are occupying the attention of the w o rld ’s greatest thinkers today.

O n ly

$2.00 in c lu d in g postage

ROSICRUCIAN
R O S I C R U C I A N P A R K

SUPPLY
S A N I O S L .

BUREAU
C A L 1 F O R N I A , U .S. A .

TH E PURPO SES OF

THE

ROSICRUCIAN

ORDER

Member o f “ FU D O S I” (Federation Universelle des Ordres et Societes Initiatiquea)

T he Rosicrucian Order, existin g in all civilized lands, is a non-sectarian, fraternal body o f men and women devoted to the investigation, study, and practical application o f natural and spiritual laws. T h e purpose o f the organi­ zation is to enable all to live in harmony w ith the creative, constructive. Cosmic forces fo r the attainment o f health, happiness, and Peace. T h e O rder is internationally known as AM O R C (an abbreviation), and the AM O R C in Am erica, and all other lands, constitutes the on ly form o f R osi­ crucian activities united in one body having representation in the interna­ tional federation. T he AM O R C does not sell its teachings, but gives them freely to all affilia ted members, togeth er w ith many other benefits. In qu irers seeking to know the history, purposes, and practical benefits that they may receive from Rosicrucian association, are Invited to send for the free book, "T h e Secret H e rita g e ." Address, F ria r S. P . C., care o f

AMORC TEMPI,K Rosicrucian Park, San Jose, California, U. S. A.
(Cable Address: "A M O R C O ” R adio Station W 6 H T B )

Officials of the J\[orth and South Am erican Jurisdictions
(Including the United States, Dominion o f Canada, Alaska, Mexico, Guatemala. Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Republic o f Panama, the W est Indies, L o w e r California, and all land under the protection o f the United States o f America. H. S PE N C E R L E W IS . F. R. C.. Ph. D ................... Im perator R A L P H M. L E W IS . F. R . C.............................. Supreme Secretary C LE M E N T B. L E B R U N , F. R. C............... .................................................................................. Grand Master H A R V E Y M IL E S , F. R. C Grand Treasurer E T H E L B. W A R D , F. R. C Secretary to Grand Master H A R R Y L . S H IB L E Y , F. R. C.................................................................................... D irector of Publications Junior O rder o f Torch Bearers (sponsored b y A M O R C ). F o r complete inform ation as to its aims and benefits address General Secretary, Grand Chapter, Rosicrucian Park, San Jose, California.

T h e follow ing principal branches are District H eadqu arters o f A M O R C
Atlanta, Georgia: Atlanta Chapter No. 650. Dr. James C. O akshette, Master: Nassau Hotel. Meetings 7:30 every Thursday night. New Y o rk City, New York: New Y ork Chapter, Rooms 35-36, 711 8th Ave., cor. 8th Ave. and 45th Street. Louis Riccardi, Master: M argaret Sharpe, Secre­ tary. Inquiry and reading rooms open week days and Sundays, 1 to 8 p. m. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Delta Lodge No. 1, A M O R C , S. E . Corner 40th and Brown Sts., 2nd Floor. Mr. Albert Courtney, Master. Benjamin Franklin Chapter of A M O R C : W arren C. Aitken, M aster: M artha Aitken, Secretary, 2203 N. 15th Street. Meetings for all members every second and fourth Sun­ days, 7:30 p.m ., at 1521 W est Girard Ave. (Second Floor, Room B ). Boston, Massachusetts: T h e M arie Clemens Lodge, Fortunatus J. Bagocius, Master. Temple and Reading Rooms, 739 Boylston St., Telephone Kenmore 9398. Detroit, Michigan: Thebes Chapter No. 336. Mr. W illiam H. Hitchman, M aster; Mrs. Pearl Anna T ifft, Secretary. Meetings at the Florence Room, Tuller Hotel, every Tuesday, 8 p. m. In­ quirers call dial phone No. 1870. San Francisco, California: Francis Bacon Lodge, 1655 Polk Mr. David Mackenzie, Master. Street:

Pittsburg, Pennsylvania: Penn. First Lodge, Dr. Charles D. Green, M aster; 3787 E ast St. N. S., Pittsburgh, Pa. Reading, Pennsylvania: Reading Chapter, Mr. Harrison N. Mucher, Master, 144 Clymer St.: M r. George R. O s­ man, Secretary. Meeting every Friday, 8:00 p. m., W ashington Hall, 904 W ashington St. Los Angeles, California: Hermes Lodge, A M O R C Temple. Mr. Ollin W . Marden, Master. Reading Room and In­ quiry o ffice open doily, 10 a. m. to 5 p. m., and 7:30 p.m . to 9 p.m . except Sundays. Granada Court, 672 South Lafayette Park Place. Birmingham, Alabama: Birmingham Chapter of A M O R C . For in­ formation address M r. Cuyler C. Berry, M aster. 721 So. 85th St. Chicago, Illinois: Chicago Chapter No. 9, Mabel L. Schmidt, Secretary. Telephone Superior 6881. Read­ ing Room open afternoons and evenings. Sundays 2 to 5 only. 100 E . Ohio St., Room 403-404. Lecture sessions for A LL members every Tuesday night, 8:00 p. m. Chicago Afra-American Chapter No. 10. Robert S . Breckenridge, Master; Aurelia Carter, Secretary. Meeting every W ednes­ day night at 8 o'clock, Y . M. C. A., 3763 So. W abash Avenue.

(D irecto ry Continued on N e x t P a g e )

Portland, Oregon: Portland Chapter. Paul E . Hartson, M aster; Telephone E ast 1245. Meetings every Thurs­ day, 8:00 p.m . at 714 S. W . 11th Avenue. Washington, D. C.: Thom as Jefferson Chapter. W illiam V . W hittington, Master. Confederate Memorial Hall, 1322 Vermont Ave. N. W . Meetings every Friday, 8:00 p. m.

Seattle, Washington: A M O R C Chapter 586. Fred Motter, Master; Mrs. Carolina Henderson, Secretary. 311-14 Lowman Bldg., between 1st and 2nd Aves. on Cherry St. Reading room open week days 11 a. m. to 4:30 p. m. Visitors welcome. Chapter meetings each Monday, 8:00 p. m.

Other Chartered Chapters and Lodges of the Rosicrucian Order (A M O R C ) will be found in most large cities and towns of North America. Address of local representatives given on request.

P R IN C IP A L C A N A D IA N B R A N C H E S
Vancouver, British Columbia: Canadian Grand Lodge, A M O R C . Mr. H. B. Kidd, M aster, A M O R C Temple, 878 Horn­ by Street. V ictoria, British Columbia: V ictoria Lodge, Mr. A. A. Calderwood, Master. Inquiry O ffice and Reading Room, 101 Union Bank Bldg. Open week days 10 a. m. to 6 p. m. Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada: Mr. E ly Law, Master, 120 Spence St. (Ph. 33341.) Session for all members every Sun­ day, 2:45 p. m., 304 “B ” Enderton Bldg., Portage Ave. and Hargrave St. M ontreal, Quebec, Canada: Montreal Chapter. Alexandre Chevalier, F. R. C., Master, 210 W est St. Jam es Street. Inquiry office open 10:00 a.m . to 5 p.m . daily; Saturdays 10:00 to 1:00 p.m . Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Mr. Benjamin W . W akelin, M aster. Sessions 1st and 3rd Sundays of the month, 7:00 p. m., No. 10 Lansdowne Ave. Edmonton, Alberta: Mr. Alfred H. Holmes, M aster, 9533 Jasper Avenue E .

SP A N ISH A M E R IC A N S E C T IO N
T his jurisdiction includes all the Spanish-speaking Countries of the New W orld. Its Supreme Council and Administrative O ffice are located at San Juan, Puerto Rico, having local Represen­ tatives in all the principal cities of these stated Countries. The name and address of the O fficers and Representatives in the jurisdiction will be furnished on application. A ll co rresp o n d en ce shou ld b e a d d ressed a s fo llo w s: Secretary General of the Spanish-American Jurisdiction of A M O R C , P. O. Box 36, San Juan, Puerto Rico.

A FEW

O F T H E F O R E IG N

JU R ISD IC T IO N S

Scandinavian Countries: T h e A M O R C Grand Lodge of Denmark. Mr. Arthur Sundstrup, Grand Master; Carli Anderson, S. R. C„ Grand Secretary. Manogade 13th Strand, Copenhagen, Denmark. Sweden: Grand Lodge "Rosenkorset.” Anton Svanlund, F. R. C., Grand M aster. Jerusalemsgatan, 6, Malmo. H olland: De Rozekruisers Orde; Groot-Lodge der Nederlanden. J. Coops, Gr. Sect., Hunzestraat 141, Amsterdam. France: Mile Jeanne Guesdon, S.R .C ., Corresponding Secretary for the Grand Lodge (A M O R C ) of France, 56 Rue Gambetta, Villeneuve Saint Georges, (Seine & O ise). Switzerland: A M O R C Grand Lodge. August Reichel, F. R. C., Gr. Sect., Riant-Port V evey-Plan. Austria: Mr. M any Cihlar, K. R. C., Grossekretar der A M O R C , Laxenburgerstr, 75/9, Vienna, X . China and Russia: T h e United Grand Lodge of China and Rus­ sia, 8/18 Kavkazskaya St., Harbin, M an­ churia.
R O S IC R U C IA N PRESS. LTD.

New Zealand: Auckland Chapter A M O R C . Mr. G. A. Franklin. Master, 317 Victoria Arcade Bids. Queen St., C ity Auckland. England: T h e A M O R C Grand Lodge of Great Britain. M r. Raymund Andrea, K. R . C., Grand Master, 34 Bay water Ave., W estbury Park, Bristol 6. Dutch and East Indies: Dr. W . T h . van Stokkum, Grand Master, W . J. Visser, Secretary-General. Karangtempel 10 Semarang, Java.

Egypt:
T h e Grand Orient of A M O RC. House of the Temple, M. A. Ramayvelim, F. R. C., Grand Secretary, 26, Avenue Ismalla, Heliopolis. Africa: T h e Grand Lodge of the Gold Coast, A M O R C . Mr, W illiam Okai, Grand Master, P. O . Box 424 Accra, Gold Coast, W est Africa. T h e ad d resses o f other foreign G ran d L o d g es and secretaries will b e fu rn ished on application.
P R IN T E D IN U . S . A .

w ri

1DILL IDE BE BORT1 AQAin m p a ir ATID SUFFERinq ?
M u s t we relive the misfortunes, discour­ agements, and failures of this life? Does death deliver us permanently from the vicissitudes of the earth, or is it a temporary respite, returning us once more to the world of man ? Is death a glorious opportunity to begin again, at some other time and place, to undo what we have done, and to prolit by our experiences of the past '' Shall we instead look upon death as the end, the close of a chapter, with its story incomplete and imperfect? Does our span here of a few years constitute our sole existence as humans, and if so, is that Divine justice? There are no questions which the human mind can entertain that are more intimate or more vi tal than tl lese. They are interestingly answered and discussed in a marvelous discourse entitled, I he So u l’s Return, prepared by Dr. H. Spencer Lewis. I his discourse represents years ol study on this subject and his fascinating conclusions. I o the point, under­ standable and instructive, this manuscript should be in your possession as a valuable document on the subject ol reincarnation. You may obtain it A B S O L U T E L Y W I T H O U T C O S T by merely subscribing to this magazine. T he Rosicrucian Digest, for just six months. A six-months subscription costs only $1.50 and in addition to receiving six copies of this magazine, you will receive at once, with postage paid, this most unusual discourse, which alone is worth more than the magazine subscription price. There are but a limited number of these discourses available, so we advise that you subscribe at once, and ASK FO R YO U R G IF T CO PY. A G IF T F O R YOU . . . .

T lie discourse. T lio Soul s Return, w as once p ub lished serially, in answ er in h u n ­ dreds of questions about reincarnation re­ ceived from throughout the w orld by D r. I.e w is. T h is is the lirst time it has eve, been released in m anuscript form in its en­ tirety. l o r interesting particulars, rend above.

The
SA N

ROSICRUCIAN DIQEST
J O S E . C A L I F O R N I A . U.S.A.

< r Rgsicrucian Library
The follow ing books are a few of several recommended because o f the special knowledge they contain, not to be found in our teachings and not available elsewhere. Catalogue of all publica­ tions free upon request. Volume II. R O S IC R U C IA N P R IN C IP L E S F O R T H E H O M E A N D B U SIN E SS.
A very practical book dealing with the solution o f health, financial, and business problems in the home and office. W ell printed and bound in red silk, stamped with gold. Price, $2.00 per copy, postpaid.

Volume III.

T H E M Y S T IC A L L IF E O F JESUS.

A rare account o f the Cosmic preparation, birth, secret studies, mission, crucifixion, and later life o f the Great Master, from the records of the Essene and Rosicrucian Brotherhoods. A book that is demanded in foreign lands as the most talked about revelation o f Jesus ever made. Over 300 pages, beautifully illustrated, bound in purple silk, stamped in gold. Price, $2.25 per copy, postpaid.

Volume V.

" I N T O T H E E I G R A N T . . .”

A strange book prepared from a secret manuscript found in the monastery o f T ibet. It is filled with the most sublime teachings o f the ancient Masters o f the F a r East. The book has had many editions. W ell printed with attractive cover. Price, $1.25 per copy, postpaid.

Volume VI.

A TH O U SAND YE AR S OF YESTERD AYS.

A beautiful story o f reincarnation and m ystic lessons. This unusual book lias been translated and sold in many languages and universally endorsed. W ell printed and bound with attractive cover. Price, 85c per copy, postpaid.

Volume V II.

S E L F M A S T E R Y A N D F A T E , W IT H T H E C Y C L E S O F L IF E .

A new and astounding system o f determ ining your fortunate and unfortunate hours, weeks, months, and years throughout your life. No mathematics required. Better than any system o f numerology or astrology. Bound in silk, stamped in gold. Price, $2.00 per copy, postpaid.

Volume V III.

T H E R O S IC R U C IA N M A N U A L .

Most complete outline o f the rules, regulations, and operations o f lodges and student work o f the Order with many interesting articles, biographies, explanations, and complete dictionary o f Rosicrucian terms and words. Very com pletely illustrated. A necessity to every student who wishes to progress rapidly, and a guide to all seekers. W ell printed and bound in silk, stamped with gold. Price, $2.00 per copy, postpaid.

Volume X I.

M A N S IO N S O F T H E SOUL, T H E CO SM IC C O N C E P T IO N .
W ell

The complete doctrines o f reincarnation explained. This book makes reincarnation easily understood. illustrated, bound in silk, stamped in gold, extra large. Price. $2.20 per copy, postpaid.

Volum e X II.

L E M U R IA — T H E LO S T C O N T IN E N T O F T H E P A C IF IC .

The revelation o f an ancient and long forgotten M ystic civilization. Fascinating and intriguing. Learn how these people came to be swept from the earth. K now o f their vast knowledge, much o f which is lost to man­ kind today. W ell printed and bound, illustrated w ith charts and maps. Price, $2.20 per copy, postpaid.

Volume X III.

T H E T E C H N IQ U E O F T H E M A S T E R .

The newest and most complete guide for attaining tlie state o f Cosmic Consciousness. It is a masterful work on psychic unfoldment. Price, $1.85 per copy, postpaid.

Send all orders for books, w ith rem ittance, direct to R O S IC R U C IA N

SU PPLY

BU Ri AU,

Rosicrucian Park, San Jo se , C alifornia.

THE MUSIC OF THE SPHERES
(lj Pythagoras. the ancient ( >reek philosopher. was tlie lirst to tlr< hire that all things are in accord with numher. and the secret harmony which exists between them is the hey to the universe. I he ancients also proclaimed that the perfect mathematical arrangement of the planets produced magnificently enrapturing vibrations which became know n as /he Al u s i c o f l l i e Spf i o res . I his C osinic music was beyond the auditory sense of human beings and was perceivable by man only through attunement with the forces of nature when his inner being would rhythmically oscillate in majestic time with the universe. I he great composers of the centuries have sought to capture emotionall\ this music < > l the L ■I ■ spheres and reduce it to notes. In fact, the beautilul compositions of many of the- masters arc evidence of the Divine influx. Many of the Rosicrucian compositions also have rhe composition. Sweet Rosae C ru< is. a touch of this afflatus. is particularly inspiring

I his selection was dedicated at the lirst Rosicrucian New Aear cere­
SW EET Rosicrucian piano in d ie s.
KOSAV e n v o is

mony to be held in tins jurisdic tion during the present cycle of tbe Order. All lovers of music who have heard it at Rosicrucian lodges or chapters, or elsewhere, have requested copies. Because of an inc rensing demand for it. we have reproduced this selection in sheet music form at a nominal price so it may he had bv all music lovers. Members will find In playing or singing it in their homes that it produces a very soothing, peaceful effect. A limited number of copies is available, so procure yours now. Send order and remittance to:

T liis official. b ea utifully \'rilte n song arranged is for now accom panim ent

n \ ailal.tle. Its size is 0V2 x l a '/ i It is artistically arranged and w ell printed. Price includes postage to you.

P R IC E :
25 cen ts p e r co p y .

T h e

R O S I C R U C I A N
P A R K

S U P P L Y
S A N

B U R E A U
C A L I F O R N I A

R O S I C R U C I A N

J O S E ,

T H O R K I I M A L E H T O , K. R. C.
F ra te r K iim alehto has the distinction of being one of the oldest members, in point of time, in the R osicru cian O rd er since its re-establishm ent in N orth A m erica. He w as an active co ­ w orker of the Im perator when the Suprem e Lodge w as located in N ew Y o rk C ity tw enty y ears ago. He w as the first G rand M aster of the O rd er during its present cy cle, and he directed the publication of the form er m agazine, and headed the P ub­ lishing D epartm ent of the O rd er at that time. H e is now a G rand C ouncilor and Inspector G eneral of the O rd er. In F ra te r K iim alehto is exem plified a rare com bination of business ability and m ystical tem peram ent. He has also been a member for m any y ears of the F reemasonic and M artinist O rders.

American Rosae Crucis

(Courtesy of The Rosicrucian D igest.)

What Secrets of L
W ere T a u g h t in the A n cien t W isdom Schools?
W a s

T he G r e a t K n o w le d g e o f
C o n t in e n t s

T he L o s t
P r e s e r v e d

. ..

?

W

H O were these beings that dared to in­ vade the forbidden realms of nature? Secreted in subterranean chambers, concealed from the eyes and jeers of the curious, they in­ voked the forces of the universe. W e r e tlie great miracles of the past public demonstrations of their secretly discovered profound laws of n a­ ture? Tales, age-old, tell of strange feats — the transmutation of base metals into gold, projec­ tion of thought, and an elixir for the preserva­ tion of life. Are these fantasies or the echoes of marvelous achievements of sages who devoted their lives to investigating the mysteries of life? W h a t great wisdom was theirs? W h a t startling revelations were made to them? In the flicker­ ing torchlight in the still hours of the ni ght, did they learn the amazing wisdom of a forgotten people whose culture survived a sinking land?

C iJ Condemned by those who feared its powers and denied to those who would abuse it, this heritage of learning has been preserved against the ravages of time and man. 1 oday in all their beautiful simplicity and practical useful­ ness these age-old teachings are made avai Iable to thousands.

T h i s S e a le d B o o k

F ree

QJ You men and women who have been seek­ ing a means within to better your station in life, or hoping to accomplish the things about which you dream, will find in these truths of the cen­ turies the end of your search. T h e Rosicrucians (not a religious organization), the present cus­ todians of these principles, invite you, if you are sincere in your desire, to write for the free Sealed Book which explains how you may receive and share this unusual knowledge.

Th e R O S I C R U C I A N S
R O S IC R U C IA N
A M O R C

P A R K . S A N J O S E . C A L IF .

*

ROSICRUCIAN DIGEST
COVERS THE WORLD

TIIE O FFIC IA L, IN TER N A TIO N A L RO SICRUCIAN MAGA­ ZINE O F T H E W O R LD -W ID E RO SICRUCIAN ORDER
Vol. XIV MAY, 1936 No. 4

m nFnni

Thor Kiimalehto, K. R. C . (Frontispiece) ..................... 121 The Thought of the M onth: O ur Storm Sufferers.... 124 A Psychological A p proach to International Understanding ............................................................126 C athed ral C o n ta c ts 128 W h a t is C h a ra c te r? ............................. 130 Spring, The Awakening Season.................................... 132 Pages from the Past...................................... 133 N ew Fields of Exploration ........................ 135 Summaries of Science ................................................... 137 To Those W h o Seek........................................................141 The Unseen Guardians ...................... 142 A n cien t Symbolism ........................................................146 Immortality .....................................................................147 Sanctum Musings: The M ystery of M t. Shasta... 153 The Rosicrucian Planetarium (Illustration) ................... 157

E9nEHu"

S T . " M V t t R fiW

Subscription to T h e Rosicrucian D igest, T h ree D ollars per year. Single copies tw en ty-flve cents each. Entered as Second Class M atter at the P ost Office at San Jose, California, under the Act o f August 24th, 1912. Changes o f address must reach us by the tenth o f the month preceding date o f issue. Statements made in this publication are not the official e x ­ pressions o f the organization or its officers unless stated to be official communications.

P ublished M onthly by the Suprem e Council of
THE ROSICRUCIAN ORDER—AMORC

ROSICRUCIAN PARK

SAN JO SE. CA LIFO R NIA

THOUGHT OF THE MONTH
OUR STORM SUFFERERS

THE

H E most outstand­ ing thought of the month with all of us here at H ead q u a r t e r s , and th ro u g h o u t our g e n e r a l member­ ship, is of the un­ fortunate c o n d i ­ t i o n s that have s u d d e n l y come upon a large num­ ber of our mem­ bers in v a r i o u s parts of the United State s because of the floods, storms, and winds. W e fully expected that this year would be one of strife and contention among the earthly and Cosmic elements. T h a t is why we termed the year " 1 9 3 6 and Conflicts. B efo re the year is over it will have proved itself to be a year of conflicts of all kinds. But we regret, as does every thinking person, the suffering, sacrifice, agony, and mental torture that has come to men, women, and children in various cities and states in the past few months. Reports coming to us from various sections show that the floods that de­ stroyed homes and p r o p e r t y came through some areas very suddenly and unexpectedly. N o one who has not been through one of these floods can possibly imagine the anguish, as well as the actual suffering that follows the floods, storms, or tornadoes, but one outstand­ ing fact revealed in every letter we have The Rosicrucian received from the flood or storm area shows that the spirit of the individual Digest has not weakened and the power of May right thinking has not lessened in any instance. 1936

Some scientists attribute these freak Cosmic and earthly conditions to the appearance of spots on the sun. U n ­ questionably sun spots do affect Cosmic vibrations and these in turn affect a t­ mospheric and earthly conditions, but in the charts of the tendencies of gen ­ eral conditions throughout the world which we examined a number of times in recent years, it was plainly indicated that a cycle of storm and strife between the elements of the earth and the air would start again early in 1936 and continue into the summer. And it was indicated that many of these unusual conditions would appear in parts of the country or in places where they had never appeared before, and that is why we tried to intimate in our 1936 pam­ phlet that places that had not been visited before would be visited by co n­ flict this year. T h e very unfortunate thing about all of this is that even if our members and friends had been properly warned by due appreciation of what was said in our pamphlets there is little that could be done to avoid the results except to have moved or changed their localities, and to have abandoned their homes and built others in other places, but it would have been difficult even then to tell where to move, or where to go and count upon one hundred per cent safety. In some of the reports that we have received it has been pitiful to learn that the homes of our members and officers o f chapters and lodges have been flood­ ed to the second floor, and that beautiful furniture, including pianos, has fallen apart as the waters receded, leaving the interior and exterior walls of the homes
One H undred T w en ty-four

in jeopardy. O n e may ask whether all of this is necessary in the great universal scheme of things, but no one can answer that question without having a complete understanding of the Infinite M in d and universal laws. M a n y of these homes had to be without light, heat, cooking facilities, or even the proper hygienic facilities for five or six days or longer, and many were deprived of the proper food for many days. T h e r e was always the constant danger of fire and the col­ lapse of the temporary places or upper parts of buildings where persons a t­ tempted to live, and all business was interfered with, and even the means and facilities for communication by mail, telegraph, telephone, or otherwise. O n c e again the amateur radio stations played an important part and rendered invalu­ able services in sending communications to relatives and friends without fee, and kept the outside world in contact with many communities that were otherwise isolated. S o often those persons who like to listen only to the popular broad­ cast programs think that the slight hum­ ming sound or other signal sounds which the amateurs use in their experimental work constitute a nuisance that should be done aw ay with, but they forget that it is the development of the experimental work of these amateurs over a period of twenty-five or thirty years that has given us the modern use and benefits of radio in entertainment and in business, and in every great catastrophe these amateurs with their thousands of con­ tacts with others have played an im­ portant part in the rendering of em er­ gency services. W e wish it were possible to extend our hand in sympathy and love to each one of our members and friends who has suffered during these past few months, but all we can say is that we hope that this issue of the magazine will reach them and carry to them our thoughts,

and that they will sense the thoughts of our thousands of other members who will read these words and utter a prayer in their behalf. O n e of the most interesting features of the entire situation has been the let­ ters that have gradually come to us from hundreds of communities, and hundreds of members, in which the thought is e x ­ pressed (in the words of one of them ), “ If it had not been for my understand­ ing of certain laws and principles gained through the A M O R C teachings, and if it had not been for the strength derived from my A M O R C membership, I could not have born the suffering and the trials and tribulations that have come upon us. It is just one more instance in which we are given ample proof of the value of the A M O R C membership in times of test and trial.” W e have learned in the past years through hun­ dreds of letters coming to us weekly and monthly that our members generally find strength, hope, and certain definite knowledge in our lectures, lessons, and principles that enable them to meet the obstacles, the trials, the problems, and the too often discouraging incidents of life that might otherwise cause them to go down in defeat instead of rising as M aste rs and facing the world with a new power that carries them to victory. W h a t e v e r may be the purpose in the Divine M in d which sets the Cosmic powers into action in a seemingly de­ structive form, we must remember that all which seems to be destructive is not alw ays so, and that very often there is a good purpose and a good motive back of the darkest and most sorrowful event. T h e Cosmic will undoubtedly assist and help those who know how to c o ­ operate and keep their lives and minds attuned to the higher principles and never lose faith nor doubt the mercy and goodness of G o d and His ways.

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• R E A D T H E

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F O R U M •

R O S I C R U C I A N

One H undred T w en ty-five

A Psychological Approach to International U nderstanding
By Soror R
on a

E

l iz a b e t h

W

orkm an

V V E N as two people can k n o w e a c h other only through an interchange of vibrations— and to t h u s interchange or reproduce those vibrations it must be necessary that they have a com­ mon rate, or re­ sponse — so it is with nations. E a ch nation h a s w hat might be termed a national vibratory rate produced by mass habits of thought. T h i s national “'mass vibration” is the result of historical occurrences, o f racial habits, of speech, of food and drink and wearing apparel, and is constantly in­ fluencing the individual's method of thought and checking and coloring his reactions to impacts from those of a n ­ other country or race. T o gain knowledge and comprehen­ sion of another, to be able to respond to him through reproducing his vibrations, it is often necessary to widen the range of the mind. Especially is this true when T he Rosicrucian one has to be able to respond to the na­ tional rate before one can bring about a Digest response to the individual. In other May words, you have to produce within your­ self a rate of vibration identical with 1936

V

V that of a nation before you can really understand the individual citizen of that country, because his vibrations are so greatly influenced by those of the mass. In thus increasing one’s mental vibra­ tory rate one is enabled to comprehend many things heretofore non-existent in so far as your particular mind is con­ cerned, or not understood in its reality because of lack of adequate response. Sin ce this is true of individuals, it is equally true of nations, for nations are only individuals multiplied many, many times. T h u s it can be seen that the unfriend­ liness, the lack of understanding be­ tween countries is due in large part to the barrier of the mass thought and to the lack of individual response brought about by the limited range of vibrations among the m ajority o f the people. It is appalling, in this age of books and pictures, of radios and movies, to contemplate the ignorance concerning even one’s next-door country which is displayed by people supposedly welleducated, and when the width of a world lies between, it seems impossible for many to realize that those far-off people really live and love, hate and fight, give birth and die in essentially the same manner and prompted by the same impulses as those whom they con­ tact in their daily life. How can one
O n e H un dred Tiventy-six

expect a realization of brotherhood, of unity, in the face of such an inability to respond, under such a lack of vibra­ tory comprehension? I recently heard a woman, who had taught the rising generation for a num­ ber of years, express absolute disbelief when told that the people of India pos­ sessed a “bible” and had a culture dat­ ing back many, many centuries, while her ideas of China certainly contained no conception of their splendid philo­ sophies, no comprehension of the charm of their poetry, no realization of their appreciation of beauty. T h in k of the opportunities for the inculcating of the ideals of international unity which had been absolutely and utterly wasted through this teach er’s ignorance of other lands and people. Fundamentally all human life is the same. W e are born, live, love, marry, beget off-spring and die whether we be­ long to one nation or another. It is only in the transitory things of life, the un­ essentials, that we differ, and when one becomes cognizant of the inherent rela­ tionship beneath the national masks we wear, then a realization of unity, of real brotherhood, begins. During the last few years there has been a notable increase in clubs o rg an ­ ized for the study of other lands, soci­ eties for the establishing of international relations, and various other attempts by colleges and groups of private indi­ viduals to bring about a greater devel­ opment of response between ourselves and other nations, and all are a decided step in the right direction. These groups, even though working separately will in time increase the vibratory range of the “mass vibration" about them through the constant impact of their own increasing rate, and with many
® R E A D T H E

strong minds working upon the welding of the separated entities into a h ar­ monious whole, the mass thought of the entire country is bound to be influenced. However, t h e s e various groups, especially the study groups, can only prove of benefit if they study, think, and speak of that which each country has to offer with A P P R E C I A T I V E in­ terest instead of C R I T I C A L interest, for if they concentrate upon the faults, the evils, and the dissimilarities between this other country and their own, then they are generating a critical vibration which certainly does not promote a brotherly feeling, but does build up a feeling of superiority in themselves, which in itself will frustrate any further development of comprehension. If you can find nothing to admire in a nation or a person, rest assured it is because you have such a narrow range of vibra­ tion that you cannot reach and respond to all that they really are. Furthermore, to study an y nation only through one medium, history for instance, gives no more real under­ standing of the people in that country than one would gather of a S h ak esp ear­ ean drama if he attempted to see and hear it through a pinhole. H istory gives only one view-point, and not alw ays an accurate one at that, and therefore will increase your vibratory range only on one line, but the study of a co u n try ’s history, combined with an appreciative knowledge of its literature, its art, its philosophy, its folklore, will give a development, a response, which cannot fail to break through the barrier erected by the mass thought and, contacting and understanding the individual, bring about a realization that all are but one race— E arth people, fundamentally the same.
F O R U M •

R O S I C R U C I A N

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RO SICRUCIAN C O N ST IT U T IO N
The Constitution and Statutes of the Grand Lodge of A M O R C contain rules and regulations which govern the membership of every Rosicrucian. Every member should have knowledge of his or her constitutional rights, privileges, and limitations. Failure to have a copy or to become conversant with it may inadvertently jeopardize your member­ ship standing. Obtain a copy today. It may be had for practically cost, or 10c. Send your order to the Rosicrucian Supply Bureau. 3--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- B O ne H undred T w en ty -sev en

T h e ‘‘Cathedral of the Soul” is a Cosmic meeting place for all minds of the most advanced and highly developed spiritual members and workers of the Rosicrucian Fraternity. It is a focal point of Cosmic radiations and thought waves from which radiate vibrations of health, peace, happiness, and inner awakening. Various periods of the day are set aside when many thousands of minds are attuned with the Cathedral of the Soul, and others attuning with the Cathedral at this time will receive the benefit of the vibrations. Those who are not members of the organization may share in the unusual benefit as well as those who are members. T h e book called "Liber 777” describes the periods for various contacts with the Cathedral. Copies will be sent to persons who are not members by addressing their request for this book to Friar S. P. C., care of A M O R C Temple, San Jose, California, enclosing three cents in postage stamps. (P le a s e sta te w h eth er m em ber or not— this is im portant.)

AN IN TERESTIN G LETTER
O doubt our mem­ b ers and th o u ­ s a n d s of our friends w h o are interested in the Cathedral of the Soul will be glad to know how far and wide on this old earth the in­ terest in the C a ­ thedral has spread The among those who Rosicrucian like to lift them­ Digest selves above the material things of life May and dwell in Cosmic and spiritual ecstasy from time to time. W e have 1936 often referred to the fact that during the C athedral hours or the various periods of the day there are thousands of our members in various parts of the world sitting in unified concentration and med­ itation and that all the minds of these persons meet in transcendental com­ munion within the great Cathedral. T h is fact, which all of our members should be conscious of during their con­ centration periods with the Cathedral of the Soul, makes for a sense of spir­ itual unity and human brotherhood. T o think that while we are sitting in our in­ dividual sanctums extending our con­ sciousness upward and onward to the H o ly of Holies o f the Cosmic C ath e­
O n e H un dred T w en ty-eight

dral, others in various parts of the world are doing the same thing, and that we are all bound together for the time b e ­ ing in a sacred and spiritual union, helps to give us strength and a feeling of peace and happiness that is like a tonic to the mind and soul. W e have at this time a letter from an eminent member of the Belgian Senate living in Antwerp and author of several books dealing with the history and anti­ quity of the Rosicrucian O rd er and one who is very learned and seriously en­ thusiastic about the principles and teachings of the Rosicrucians. In this letter he makes the following comments: “ During the past few weeks 1 re­ ceived the interesting booklet, L iber 777. Not only the Rosicrucians but all mys­ tics throughout the world will enjo y with you and with your American mem­ bers this great privilege to which you have invited them and will meet with you and others in great jo y as though all of us were actually in physical a t ­ tendance in the Cathedral of the Soul. In the troublesome periods through which the world is now passing the Cathedral of the Soul will be an every­ day jo y filled with the devotion of stu­ dents and seekers under the guidance of invisible masters, angels, and initiates. T h e y will find in this contact the poise and power to resent the activities of the darker forces and the strength to guide humanity. All who pay, through the sign of the R osy C ross, their adoration to the God of our hearts, will receive inspiration from the G re a t H ierarchy and will become true Disciples of the
• R E A D T H E

Lord Christ and help to carry out the great plan of the Logos. T h e s e C a th e ­ dral periods of universal contact are periods of profound transformation for the world, leading to the establishment of a new humanity. In our own group of students in this country we are mak­ ing much progress but I want you to know how greatly we en jo y our con­ tacts with you and those of the western hemisphere in the communion periods of the Cathedral of the S o u l.” It is indeed a great joy and pleasure to think that the elect and select of hu­ man minds and souls throughout the world are constantly lifting to a higher level the consciousness dwelling within human forms. T h e r e is no more m ag­ nificent and inspiring period in our daily lives than the few minutes spent mornings, afternoons, or evenings in union with thousands of others in the C athedral of the Soul where we bask in the strength and life of G od the F a th er of all creatures and find jo y in the uni­ versal peace of the Cosmic mind. If you want to help in this great work and attract to yourself the more spiritual values and a better comprehension of life itself, be sure to call the attention of your friends and acquaintances whether they are members or not, to this C athedral of the Soul and have them send for the free booklet Liber 777 and join with us in the daily periods of sacred communion. T h e r e are no obli­ gations, no fees, nothing to be given except thanks to G od and the best help that we can give to humanity.
F O R U M •

R O S I C R U C I A N

p i

----------------------------------------------------------------H A V E Y O U A L IT E R A T U R E PACKET?
W e have prepared a packet of attractive, assorted folders and leaflets explaining the purpose of the Rosicrucian Order for members to distribute to friends and acquaintances. The folders and brochures have been designed and written to appeal to different minds and temperaments. Every Rosicrucian should obtain one of these free packets at once, and select from it literature which he or she thinks would most interest his or her associ­ ates. Make a practice of meeting a mind with a sympathetic thought. Study person’s interests and approach them with the proper Rosicrucian leaflet containing a text that you know will appeal to them. W rite today to the Rosicrucian Supply Bureau, San Jose, California, for the free packet.

la______________________________________________________________________
O ne H un dred T w en ty-nine

W hat Is Character ?
HOW W E M AY DISTINGUISH TH IS A T T R IBU T E FROM SOUL AND PERSONALITY
B y F r a t e r J a m e s B. R
H I L E t u n i n g in “T h e V o ic e of E x ­ perience’’ on my radio a short time ago, the question came up: W h a t is C h a r a c te r, how d o e s it function, and where does it come from? It was this question that was asked of the radio audience by a great man whose mission in life is to help, aid, and assist those who are afflicted, unfortunate cripples, the blind, and souls in delusion. Is not this word “ch a ra cte r" a term much misunderstood by most o f us— a term to which we have not given due thought as to the profound depths of its true meaning as applied to human na­ ture? O n e trying to analyze the word is bombarded with a myriad of things to which it is labelled, just like a drug store of modern times that sells every­ thing but drugs. W e note that a figure, a letter, or sign is called a character, also a reference or certificate of ability: T he Rosicrucian then again we say a graph or chart has a characteristic curve and so on; in Digest quoting our fellow creatures we also use May the word in a sense that is more or less 1936 confusing to our comprehension of the
o w n ey,

F. R. C.

real idea of it as a function. F o r in­ stance, the phrase, “Bill is a bad ch ar­ a cter,” or “A n d y is a peculiar char­ acter," could convey a picture of the outside of a person rather than the in­ side— that is, the things he does, and not what he is. A nd so the word is subject to so many interpretations in our consciousness, that it is really difficult to keep out the multitude of ideas that bob u d , far re­ mote from the primal idea which is that of moral excellence. L et us consider, however, the term C haracter in the sense of moral virtue as applied to the human personality, and we find a most complex condition relatively associated with functions of our dual nature. In the present system of education within the walls of our schools and col­ leges, mental development or brain cul­ ture is the essential goal. T h e brain of man, which is most wonderfully formed, and whose functions are astounding and beyond our comprehension, is glorified as the physical organ o f consciousness, and certainly sometimes unduly as the supreme instrument of human control and contact with the objective world through the functions of the five senses, reason, memory, will-power, etc. D oes C h aracter have its seat in the brain? And does mental development
One H undred T hirty

positively unfold that which is hidden within and dormant? Let us answer that by asking another question: D o we find the man of great and developed brain power, who is capable of occupying a high and important position in the busi­ ness world, correspondingly perfect in the moral virtue which we call C h a r ­ acter? If such were the case, then we could consider brain development as man's means of attaining perfection. But we do know that character func­ tions through the brain as the organ of consciousness and manifests itself in the senses, while the organ itself is not the generator. W h e n considered according to the law of our sacred triangle, ch a r­ acter is the positive point and brain the negative point, through which mani­ festation (the third point) takes place. Ontology teaches us that G od formed man out of the dust of the earth and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life, and man became a living soul. S o in the wonderful teachings of A M O R C we gradually grow into the realization of this great truth, the truth which makes you free, free from the illusion that material substance forming our body is the real man. D o we not learn from science that the actual chemical elements of which our body is composed could be purchased at the drugstore for less than a dollar? This then proves that brain of itself is but “ dust of the earth ," and as such has absolutely no power of itself, in spite of the fact that m an’s education has caused him to glorify his brain in a ma­ terial aspect as the king and ruler of his consciousness, failing to realize the truth that it is but a transformer, just as the electrical transformers in the power sta­ tion which convert power into economi­ cal distribution. Here again we see a good illustration of the subject under consideration, that of human character. A s the great high tension primary electric current enters the " d e a d " transformer, bringing life as it were into every part by its electro­ magnetic vibrations, it impresses the dead wires of the secondary coils. T h e y are not physically connected to the primary, yet within these coils electric current is induced in suitable voltage for contact of our homes, in illuminating them and operating various other ap ­
O ne H un dred T h irty-on e

pliances for our needs. T h is secondary current might be compared to the ob­ jective faculties of the brain w hereby we contact and operate material things, while the high tension primary might be compared to our psychic self. T h is brings us into the line of thought to recognize that the human character in element is essentially spiritual and not material; it is one of the many a t­ tributes of the soul, which in turn is the real essence of all consciousness both subjective and objective, and is a verit­ able segment of the Divine W h o le . Just as rhe high-frequency radio waves which are radiated out into space from the broadcasting center are picked up by tuning your radio tubes, and are translated into audible sound through your receiving set, so the Infinite Pow er of the Cosmic is forever broadcast in its incomprehensible high vibrations to be received by the psychic attunement of the soul and translated into objective and subjective consciousness through the brain and sympathetic nervous sy s­ tem, the quality and efficiency of the re­ ception being known as "c h a r a c te r.” T h e soul, which is in itself ever per­ fect, is gradually unfolded as it is im­ pressed upon the "dust of the ea rth ” ( m a n ’s material b o d y ). T h ro u gh many incarnations in varied experiences this unfoldment constitutes the ego or in­ dividual personality of man, and here is the actual seat of the character. It c a n ­ not be truly said that personality is the picture of, or manifestation of the soul. T h a t which we call soul is in reality part of the Divine and essentially all perfect, whereas the personality is as something growing out of the dust of the earth, like unto an acorn growing into an oak tree. C haracter is the mani­ festation of the personality and may possess more or less moral excellence. T h e r e was previously quoted the term, "b ad ch aracte r," but we must not take that too literally; one's personality or ego in the process of evolution and development may be termed good or bad, and the varied experiences w here­ in heredity and environment as im­ pressed upon the mind play a most im­ portant part as factors in the translation of character as manifested in the outer life, but there is no such thing as " b a d ” character any more than we could think

of “ dry w et." T h e difference in person­ alities is rather m ore or less for ch ar­ acter means goodness. F inally we conclude that human ch ar­ acter is a paramount virtue of moral e x ­ cellence and is attracted to the ego in the form of individual quality, sur­ viving so-called death, and gaining greater perfection in each incarnation regardless of brain power but nourished by, and dependent upon, the attitude of the personality to environment and its proficiency in conducting the goodness

of G od through all the aspects of mind into service, love, and loyalty to o n e’s fellow man. C ha racter is power, fearless, and aims straight for the goal of perfection; it is as a rudder of the ship, guiding one upon the straight course over the sea of life; it alw ays smiles at adversity and uses obstacles as stepping stones to a t­ tain greater heights; it is ever kind, considerate and unselfish; it is G o d ’s idea.

Spring, T h e Awakening Season
B y S o r o r E lsa F . A
H A T jo y and e x ­ pectation fill the air at this glorious time! E verything s h o w s s i g n s of new life, the awakening to a c ­ tivity and unfoldment. It takes a keen observer to see the first signs of it, which are precious promises of the later beauty which is enjoyed by the multitudes. All powers of heaven and earth com­ bine in this happy miracle which so powerfully symbolizes a periodical re­ surrection and continuity of joyful, use­ ful activity. T h is happy awakening is a beginning only in a relative sense and depends largely on the periods preced­ ing it. If everything has been handled and prepared favorably to new growth, now it will become evident. T h e r e will be abundance of joyful promise in the garden and field of him who has labored honestly and intelligently in order to produce, the season before. Likewise will careless neglect and indifference be­ come apparent as impoverished soil can support only straggly growth. All re­ gret and labor now cannot offset neglect of former duties but it can lay the right foundation for the season to come and so The bring at a later date the deep satisfaction Rosicrucian which work well done alw ays brings. Digest Seed we now use is the result of past May efforts and our future success depends entirely on the manner in which we use 1936
ngle

seed at the present time. T h e r e is precious power everywhere and in everything which N ature unlocks and dispenses to those w ho learn from her and adhere to her wise laws. T h e great transformation laws of Nature are beautifully held before our eyes by those agile, dainty creatures, the butterflies. H ow jubilant and ecstatic their rhythmic frolicking! N o more creeping in loathsome form, destruction to N a tu re ’s garment, but beautiful things to behold, flying freely and gracefully sipping the choicest nectar — N ature serving them generously. T h e crowning touch of beauty, developed in silence and obscurity. W h a t an inspiration and stimulation for our own efforts, in evoluting out of the drab and sad things of life into the sunshine and abundance of G o d ’s crea­ tures. All is according to unchanging and wise laws, and quick conformity to them brings quickest results and release from the burdens we accumulate through ignorance of such laws or foolish dis­ obedience. T h e r e is eternal spring-time possibility for man; he may start any time to give signs of awakening to a higher sense of life and develop those qualities and virtues which make for eternal as well as temporal happiness and satisfaction. T h e r e is alw ays resur­ rection season for him who is willing to step into the light and expand by earnest effort to reach complete liberation. N ew unfoldment is the springtime which pre­ cedes full bloom and final fruitage. “F o r whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap.”
O n e H un dred T hirty-tw o

PAG ES
from the

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SIR HUMPHRY DAVY
Each month we w ill present excerpts from the w ritin gs o f famous thinkers and teachers of the past. These w ill g iv e our readers an opportunity o f know ing their lives through the presentation o f those w ritin gs which ty p ify their thoughts. Occasionally, such w ritin gs w ill be presented through the translation o r interpretations o f other eminent authors o f the past. T h is month w e present Sir H um phry Davy. Sir H um phry D avy attained prominence as a renowned chemist and a poet and m eta­ physician— two spheres o f human expression quite opposite to each other. H e was born at Penzance, Cornwall, England, December 17, 1778. H e began the study o f medicine in 1795, but was won over to chemistry. H e later became lecturer at the R oyal Institution, then new ly established. H e was both b rillian t and forceful. H e gained prominence b y the invention o f what is known as the "s a fe ty lam p” fo r miners, preventin g the previously common explosions in mines from what was termed by the miners as "fire-d a m p " or ignitible gasses. H e was knighted fo r distinguished service to his country in 1812, and be­ came a Baronet in 1818. It has been said o f him that if he had not won recognition as an outstanding chemist, he could have as a poet and metaphysician, because o f his poetic temperament. Examples o f his m ystical insight are given below in the b rief essays. E very lover o f mysticism and metaphysics w ill enjoy his cogent statements. Althou gh not a R osi­ crucian in affiliation, he apparently was in thought and sympathy.

......... The Office of Pain
H E laws of nature are all directed by D iv in e W is d o m for the purpose of p r e s e r v i n g l i f e, and in c re a s in g h a p p i n e s s . Pain seems in all cases to p r e c e d e the mutilation or de­ struction of those organs which are essential to vital­ ity, and for the end of preserving them; but the mere process of dying seems to be the falling
O ne H undred T hirty-three

.....

into a deep slumber; and in animals, who have no fear of death dependent upon imagination, it can hardly be a c ­ companied by very intense suffering. In the human being, moral and intellectual motives constantly operate in enhancing the fear of death, which, without these motives in a reasoning being, would probably become null, and the love of life be lost upon every slight occasion of pain or disgust. B u t imagination is creative with respect to both these pas­ sions, which, if they exist in animals, exist independent of reason, or as in­ stincts.

Pain seems intended by an all-wise Providence to prevent the dissolution of organs, and cannot follow their d e ­ struction. I know several instances in which the process of death has been ob­ served, even to its termination b y good philosophers; and the instances are worth repeating: D r. Cullen, when dy­ ing, is said to have faintly articulated to one o f his intimates, “I wish I had the power of writing or speaking; for then I would describe to you how pleasant a thing it is to die.” D r. B lack — worn out by age, and a disposition to pulmonary hemorrhage, which obliged him to live very low— whilst eating his customary meal o f bread and milk, fell asleep, and died in so tranquil a manner that he had not even spilt the contents of the cup which rested on his knee. A nd the late Sir Charles Blagden, whilst at a social meal, with his friends, M onsieu r and M a d am e Bertholt and G a y Lussac, died in his chair so quietly, that not a drop of the coffee in the cup which he held in his hand, was spilt.

Indestructibility of Mind
T h e doctrine of the materialists was always, even in my youth, a cold, heavy, dull, and insupportable doctrine to me, and necessarily tending to ath e­ ism. W h e n I had heard with disgust, in the dissecting-rooms, the plan of the physiologist, of the gradual accretion of matter, and its becoming endowed with irritability, ripening into sensibility, and acquiring such organs as were necessary by its own inherent forces, and at last issuing into intellectual existence, a walk into the green fields or woods, by the banks of rivers, brought back my feelings from nature to G od. I saw in all the powers of matter the instruments of the Deity. T h e sunbeams, the breath of the zephyr, awakening animation in forms prepared by divine intelligence to receive it, the insensate seed, the slum­ bering eggs which were to be vivified, appeared, like the new-born animal, works of a divine mind; I saw love as the creative principle in the material a " d this love only as a d ‘T e a t' 1 hen my own mind 1 felt con nected with new sensations and indefinite hopes— a thirst for immortality; the great names of other ages and of distant

The R osicru cian n. d ig e s t M ay 1936

tribute.

™ rIf

nations appeared to me to be still living around me, and even in the fancied movements o f the heroic and the great, I saw, as it were, the degrees of the in­ destructibility of mind. T h e s e feelings, though generally considered as poetical, yet, I think, offer a sound philosophical argument in favor of the immortality of the soul. In all the habits and instincts o f young animals, their feelings and movements, may be traced an intimate relation to their improved perfect state; their sports have alw ays affinities to their modes of hunting or catching their food; and young birds even in the nests, show marks of fondness which, when their fram es are developed, be­ come signs of actions necessary to the reproduction and preservation of the species. T h e desire of glory, of honor, o f immortal fame, and o f constant knowledge, so usual in young persons of well-constituted minds, cannot, I think, be other than sym ptom s o f the infinite and progressive nature of the intellect— hopes which, as they cannot be gratified here, belong to a frame of mind suited to a nobler state o f exist­ ence. Religion, whether natural or revealed, has alw ays the same beneficial influence on the mind. In youth, in health and prosperity, it awakens feelings of grati­ tude and sublime love, and purifies at the same time that it exalts. B ut it is in misfortune, in sickness, in age, that its effects are most truly and beneficially felt; when submission in faith and humble trust in the divine will, from duties become pleasures, undecaying sources of consolation. T h e n it creates powers which were believed to be e x ­ tinct; and gives a freshness to the mind, which was supposed to have passed aw ay forever, but which is now reno­ vated as an immortal hope. T h e n it is the Pharos, guiding the w ave-tossed mariner to his home— as the calm and beautiful still basins o f fiords, surround­ ed by tranquil groves and pastoral meadows, to the Norw egian pilot escap­ ing from a heavy storm in the North S e a — or as the green and dewy spot, gushing with fountains, to the exhaust­ ed and thirsty traveller in the midst of the desert. Its influence outlives all earthly enjoyments, and becomes strong­ er as the organs decay and the frame dissolves. It appears as that eveningO n e H un dred T hirty-fou r

star of light in the horizon of life, which, we are sure, is to become, in a n ­ other season, a morning-star; and it throws its radiance, through the gloom and shadow of death.

Intimations of a Future Life
Music is the sensual pleasure which approaches nearest to an intellectual one, and may probably represent the de­ light resulting from the perception of the harmony o f things, and of truth as

seen in G od. T h e palm as an evergreen tree, and the amaranth as a perdurable flower, are emblems of immortality. If I am allowed to give a metaphorical al­ lusion to the future state of the blest, I should imagine it by the orange grove in that sheltered glen, on which the sun is now beginning to shine, and of which the trees are at the same time loaded with sweet golden fruit and balmy silver flowers. Such objects may well portray a state in which hope and fruition become one eternal feeling.

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New Fields of Exploration
By
S o ro r F lo r e n c e M c L a n e E p le r

UR world is circum­
scribed by compre­ hension. W h a t we do not know does not exist for us, therefore it cannot come within the radius of our hem­ isphere until we recognize it. N o tw o individuals’ world is similar. E a ch revolves in a sphere of his own anamorphous and limited conception of life. M a n y of us never expand beyond the routine of our daily existence a n d thought. Som e remain unenlightened throughout their entire lives. Y e t most of us are vaguely conscious of these un­ known vistas expanding about us, but lack the will or knowledge to awaken the power that will encompass these realms within our comprehension. T o d a y , a good m any bemoan the fact that there are no new continents to e x ­ plore, that the day of adventure is over. Y e t as the Chinese philosopher, C o n ­ fucius, aptly expresses:
O ne H un dred T hirty-five

“W e need not seek beyond humble door to find the w orld."

our

N either need we seek beyond our humble door for adventures or new worlds to conquer. W i t h i n each of us lies the dormant ability to explore the thousand and one paths that lie hidden beneath our consciousness. Science is gradually enlarging the physical universe for us, bringing stars, suns, and constellations nearer with sensitive instruments — unfolding the microscopic world before us, that we may know something of the composition o f physical things. However, it is a slow process, and the occult student who has so trained himself that he can obtain in­ formation accurately, may after a com­ paratively brief period of exacting re­ search, disclose truths that would have taken the world o f science by mere physical means years to discover. T o those sufficiently developed are re­ vealed intraverse and extraverse worlds of vibrations so fine or coarse that they go within or beyond the gamut of phy­ sical sensation and comprehension. Som e of these worlds in their cyclic re­ volutions pass through our earth period­

ically. T h e r e is no reason to doubt but that they exert a profound influence; the coarser sub-telluric spheres bring­ ing in their wake a cycle o f lower forces, war, pestilence, destruction, etc.; those of finer radiation than our earth exert­ ing vibrations of illumination, peace, achievement, and so on. B y increasing our faculties and con­ sciousness beyond the gamut of every­ day ability, becoming as sensitively at­ tuned as the delicately wrought instru­ ments that detect color and sound be­ yond the color and sound of our pre­ conceived spectrum and keyboard, we may thus transport our activities into a different realm, wherein lies untold vistas to explore. Souls having attained sufficient advancement and spiritual power could thus divert the inclement influence of these cycles of darkness by knowing and understanding when and how to so radiate an aura of spiritual light about the earth that it could not be affected by lower radiations.
R E A D T H E

T h e mental realm opens another field for the adventurous-minded. M a n y scientists now aver that the average person uses less than two per cent o f his brain cells and that a genius like Edison uses not more than five per cent. T h e startling possibilities that await us in this Reid can only be assumed; a field where by degrees we may discover how to vivify these dormant brain cells and find a new world of undreamed splendor awakened in our consciousness. A bo ve all these realms of activity lies the exploration of our Soul, the miracle o f its hidden wonders and composition. If we could find its meaning, w e could find the meaning of all that is or ever shall be. Could we find it in its complete entirety we would find it contained the Universe and all Existence, that it en­ compassed the whole of Divine C om ­ prehension, which is all that there is. T h e s e are but a few of the open fields that lie before us, and all in end are but paths that lead to T h a t which we sought in the Beginning!
F O R U M

R O S I C R U C I A N

B U LLET IN REGARDING O UR SOVEREIGN GRAND M ASTER
W e regret to say that our beloved and illustrious F ra te r D r. Le Brun is still very ill and confined in his home under the strict regulations of physicians and nurses. T h e r e have been a few brief periods of slight improvement during the past month, but often followed by periods of weakness and discouraging symptoms. H e has sensed very keenly the loving vibrations and healing thoughts sent to him by our members, and he is being given every possible help. W e are hopeful of having him in full health and vigor for the Convention sessions this summer, but your good thoughts and prayers are needed at this time.

The Rosicrucian Digest May
1936

H. S P E N C E R L E W I S .

O n e H undred Thirty-six

Each hour o f the day finds the men o f science cloistered in laboratories without ostentation, in vestiga tin g nature’s m ysteries and exten d in g the boundaries o f knowledge. The w orld at large, although profiting by their labors, oftentim es is deprived o f the pleasure o f review in g their work, since general periodicals and publications announce only those sensational discoveries which appeal to the popular imagination. I t is with pleasure, therefore, that w e afford our readers a m onthly summary o f some o f these scientific researches, and b riefly relate them to the Rosicrucian philosophy and doctrines. T o the Science Journal, unless otherw ise specified, we give fu ll credit fo r all m atter which appears in quotations.

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The Human Machine
Y N CH R O N IZ A TION plays a fundamental p a r t in o u r m o d e r n electrical, m e c h ­ anical, and indus­ trial world. M a ­ chines and devices having d i f f e r e n t speeds or functions are made to per­ form in unison so as to serve a com­ mon a n d higher end. Synchronization is to the mechani­ cal world what harmony is to the human world. Apparatuses are compelled to operate jointly beyond or below the limits in­ tended for them when they were orig­ inally designed so that they may serve a new purpose, having a greater util­ itarian value than if they functioned separately. Simple mechanisms are
O n e H un dred T hirty-seven

oftentimes required to make a sacrifice of their highest efficiency so that they can be united with others for a greater cause. Sound motion picture equipment is an example of this synchronization, this harmonious relationship o f independent­ ly developed devices. T h e motion pic­ ture camera was originally never in­ tended to pass film before its lens at the rate of ninety feet per minute, but with the advent of photographing sound on film and if sound motion pictures were to be produced, the speed of the camera had to be synchronized with that of the electrical recorder. T o continue the phenomenon, no deviation from this synchronization can be made. Inde­ pendent consideration cannot be shown to either phase of the process. T h e camera and recorder mechanism have been combined to bring about a new and third factor— the sound picture.

T h is combining of mechanical and electrical units has given us today a highly complex industrial development with its multitude of products and facili­ ties. T h e great mechanical advancement today is not due to newly discovered principles of mechanics embodied in de­ vices unlike any others, but to the com­ bining of established machines to per­ form new duties. T h e uniting of ap­ paratuses is the evolution of the machine. A s every engineer well knows, this process of synchronizing the functions of machines and devices involves a m ajor problem. T h e y must avoid the establishment of a conflicting factor. W h e n perfect synchronization is a c ­ complished, the integral units become one, but when imperfect synchroniza­ tion results a state or condition is brought about which interferes with the functioning of the separate parts. H a r ­ mony, mechanically speaking, is when the separate devices of an apparatus are able to perform their functions, and their functions in turn merge into an­ other which does not conflict with them. If, for example, a machine is so joined to another to do a certain work that e x ­ cess heat is generated, and this heat eventually retards its normal operation and contribution of service, the a d ­ vantage of synchronization would ob­ viously be offset by this danger factor. All this is thoroughly understood by engineers when they consider machines, but unfortunately men generally give too little thought to this principle when they consider themselves and machines jointly. Biologically, physiologically, and psychologically, man functions as a machine; the mechanism of his body and o f his mind is as bound by physical laws as machines are by mechanical principles. F o r perfect health and proper functioning as a human, the integral parts of his organism must be synchro­ nized. All this man understands, but what he neglects is the synchronization of his being with the machines he has created. W h e n man uses a machine, T he that is, when he directs and uses its Rosicrucian function to serve an end of his own, he Digest is in a very definite sense combining May himself with it. W h e n man has created, for example, a machine such as the 1936

tractor, giving it purposely great traction and power, it is expected that he will not pit his strength against it. T h e func­ tion of the tractor is to exceed man's power of pulling and pushing. M a n ’s function is to direct and apply the superhuman power of that machine and any other effort on his part would be but to oppose his and the tractor’s proper function. Consequently, man is obliged to syn­ chronize himself with the machine to produce the results expected from a combination of their functions. T h e first step in synchronizing with a ma­ chine is to learn the functions of the machine; the second, to learn the func­ tions of the human. M a n should ask himself such ques­ tions as these: W h a t is the purpose in directing and applying the power of the machine? H ow far can a human go in fulfilling his function without danger of losing synchronization with the ma­ chine? W h a t sacrifices should man make to meet the demands of the machine and yet avoid destruction by it? M o s t of our horrible automobile ac­ cidents are the result of man not proper­ ly synchronizing his human machine with the one he drives. H e over or under-estimates the limits of his human mechanism in concentrating on deriving the utmost from the one he directs. W h e n emergencies arise, this lack of synchronization causes reactions which he either did not contemplate or did not imagine existed, which reactions are of serious consequence. T h e s e reactions conflict both with the functions of the machine and of his being and disaster inevitably results. If man is going to unite himself with the machines he creates, as he is doing hourly, he must discontinue his practice of exercising his functions as a human and the functions of the machine to the extreme without the necessary harmoni­ ous relationship of them both. H ow this lack of synchronization of the human and the machine is one of the principal causes of automobile accidents is e x ­ plained by Professor Yand ell Hender­ son of Y a l e University. Professor Y an d ell says in part: “ A recent accident on a road by a lake in Switzerland — the most tragic
O ne H un dred T hirty-eight

and sorowful event in the entire history of the motor car — challenges science. Accidents of this type are frequent. The conditions producing them exist in every modern car and every motorist. For the analysis and explanation of these conditions — particularly as co n ­ cerns the reactions of the motorist— all that is needed is the application of wellestablished principles of neuro-physio­ logy. Y e t up to the present time no one appears to have made such an analysis. "T h e type of accident is that in which the explanation commonly offered is that ‘the car went out of control.’ Y e t in many cases subsequent examination demonstrates that the steering gear, motor, and brakes were in good order. "In reality, it is the motorist who ‘goes out of control.' Y e t he acts in the only manner that his nature permits: the manner in which every human being always instinctively acts — and always will act— under the circumstances. "In all cars now, the throttle is co n ­ trolled by the downward pressure of the motorist’s right foot upon a pedal. Any occurrences that cause him sud­ denly to press down hard upon that pedal opens the throttle wide and causes the car to leap ahead with maximal a c ­ celeration. If he is then forced by his own reactions to continue to hold his foot clamped down hard upon that pedal, the car drives ahead until it col­ lides with some object sufficiently solid to stop it or until it is overturned or until the motorist is thrown out of his seat. If he is thrown out and his foot thus re­ moved from that pedal, the car slows down or stops. If, on the contrary, he retains his seat to the end, the speedo­ meter is generally found to indicate a high speed at the instant of final crash. T h e critical feature in these accidents is, therefore, the continued pressure of the motorist’s foot on the throttle pedal. ‘‘Norm ally the motorist regulates the speed o f the car and its starting and stopping by means of several highly artificial reactions developed in his nerv­ ous system through training and e x ­ perience. W h e n speed is called for, he obtains it by a steady pressure with his right foot: an act that through all the ages prior to the invention o f the motor car was never before employed by man or any of his animal ancestors to pro­
One H un dred T hirty-nine

duce either rapid acceleration or co n ­ tinuous motion. " I f the motorist wishes to go more slowly or to stop, he calls into play an ­ other much more complex acquired re­ action. H e draws his foot back, moves it a few inches to one side, and then presses down upon another pedal. T h e two acts— that by which he induces a c ­ celeration and speed and that by which he slows and stops the car — are thus closely similar in form, yet diametrically opposite in purpose. " T h a t the human nervous system generally functions well even under these highly unphysiological require­ ments is indeed remarkable in view of the observation of Pavlov on ‘condi­ tioned reflexes’ in animals. H e finds that, when two closely similar stimuli or ‘conditions’ are used to excite quite dif­ ferent reactions, serious nervous dis­ turbance may result from the ‘dilemma.’ In the motorist two widely different ‘conditions’ — one calling for accelera­ tion, the other for stopping — are re­ quired to excite two closely similar re­ actions. Y et, these two acts are seldom confused, even in emergencies. T h e motorist very rarely mistakes the throttle pedal for that of the brake. " W h a t happens in serious cases of ‘car out of control’ is rather that another reaction is called into play: a reaction so powerful that it instantaneously abolishes all the motorist's acquired or ‘conditioned reflexes.’ T h i s reaction is as instinctive as that of a drowning man who seizes any one that tries to save him and drowns both. In the motorist the reaction concerned is the ‘self-righ t­ ing reflex’ that is excited by any sudden severe disturbance of equilibrium. It is a complex reaction in which the head, body, arms and legs are all involved. W h e n it occurs in the driver of a car, the impulse that dominates him is to steady himself in his seat. H e grasps the wheel with his whole strength. His arms stiffen, and he is as likely to steer off the road as along it. Simultaneously, and as part of the same nervous and muscular complex, he performs another act so instinctive that in most cases he is entirely unconscious of it. His legs are forcibly extended, and his feet are pressed down hard. It is the muscular

act that Sherrington, who discovered it in the dog, named the ‘extensor thrust.’ “ In less technical language this means that any motorist, no matter how e x ­ perienced, who is suddenly and severely jolted, instantly reacts to steady himself in his seat; and in so doing he presses his foot down hard on the accelerator pedal. “ If then the first jump of the car sends it along a course where it meets other jolts and bumps in rapid succes­ sion, the driver tries in vain to recover the equilibrium of his own body. And, as part of this effort, he continues to press down on the pedal and thereby sends the car completely ‘out of con­ trol.’ S o far as he has time to think at all, he is amazed at the w ay the car be­ haves; yet that behavior is entirely due to the pressure of his own foot on the pedal and the grip of his hands on the wheel. “T h is righting reaction to recover equilibrium, and gain support for the body, is universal. It occurs in all ani­ mals. E v en a newborn baby has it fully developed; and no training can eradi­ cate its impulse. A cat, no matter how it is dropped, alw ays twists its body around and lands on its feet. A man who slips on an icy pavement, or whose chair falls backward, instinctively tries to recover his balance. In all our a n ­ cestors through millions of years of rough-and-tumble life, this instinctive reaction has prevented many a broken bone and saved many a life. It is only now that the physiologically unwise a d ­ justment of the pedal controlling the throttle of the modern automobile co n ­ verts this instinctive reaction of personal safety into a reaction that often sends the motorist to disaster. “H o w completely the righting re­ action may dominate a motorist is e x ­ emplified in an accident in which the following details were reliably estab­ lished: A t a cross-road a high-powered sport car, in which three young men were riding, struck some obstruction that gave it a severe jolt, but did not T he Rosicrucian overturn the car nor break any essential part. T h e car then left the road, plowed Digest six hundred feet across a field, leaving May the ground at one place for twenty-five 1936

feet, and with the driver still in his seat crashed at high speed into a house. “In another accident that happened to come under my own observation, a young and inexperienced motorist in overtaking and trying to pass ahead of another car, ‘sideswiped’ and locked with it. B oth motorists then accelerated until they overturned one hundred yards further on. If, on the contrary, the power in both cars had been shut off, they would have come almost or quite to a safe stop in this distance. “ In another case, directly reported to me, a lady was driving a small sedan at less than traffic speed, when a fast truck passed ahead of her. T o give room she drove to the right until two wheels of her car went off the edge of the cement. In getting back on the cement, she accelerated and swerved over to the left side of the road; then still accelerating back to the right side; and finally at full speed to the left side again, where the car went off the road entirely and turned over. “ It is quite certain that none of the four drivers included in these accidents could have explained why their cars be­ haved as they did. N o r could any of them, after the initial event, have re­ moved the right foot from the throttle pedal. All that they were capable of doing— and in fact did— was to steady themselves in their seats by pressing down on that pedal, not merely with ordinary force, but with the whole strength of their legs. “In such cases as these there is an initial physical jolt. B ut even that is not necessary. In the records of accidents that I have examined, there are many in which the driver was first merely startled and responded— as every one normally does— by a momentary extensor thrust of his legs. T h e car jumped, thus jo lt­ ing the driver, bringing his foot still more forcibly down on the pedal, and sending the car crashing into a tree, or another car, or through a railing, or off a bridge into a river. I recently saw a new car with an inexperienced driver jump forward, swerve, mount the side­ walk and smash against a telegraph pole. T h e perfect driver would not be­ have as he did; but even normal men and women often do. M a n y things may
O n e H undred F orty

startle a driver who— with an apparent­ ly clear road ahead— is not paying very close attention. It may be a child or other pedestrian that suddenly appears directly in front of the car; or it may be another car cutting across or coming in from a side road. A nd thus startled he accelerates, instead of slowing down, and crashes into the other car or runs down the pedestrian. “On curves also a driver tends to feel himself out of balance, and often finds it hard to avoid increasing the pressure

of his foot on the pedal, even when he realizes that his speed is excessive. T h is tendency to accelerate is one of the reasons that cars so often go off of curves and smash or turn over. “S u ch in brief is the explanation that physiology affords of w hy and how a car that is in perfect order easily ‘goes out of control.’ It reveals a hitherto un­ suspected interaction between the car and human nature. W e can not change human nature— not in a million y e a rs.”

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T o Those W ho Seek
By
K a te F e e ly

O W definite is the d e m a r c a t i o n be­ tween discrimina­ tion a n d d o u b t though the skeptic may not acknow l­ edge it. C lear and dis­ tinct is the line be­ tween d e v o t i o n and sentimentality though the mawk­ ish do not observe it. Love holds no traffic with possessive­ ness though the jealous will never be­ lieve it. Personality is the seed of suffering though the ignorant elevate it. Impersonal thought is the road to wisdom though t h e r e be few who seek it. Impersonal affection is the blossom of love though there be few who culti­ vate it. Impersonal deeds are the tools of ser­ vice though there be few who use them. T h e impersonal word is the creative word through which righteousness is born on the earth but there be few, as yet, who utter it.
O n e H un dred F o rty -o n e

A w areness is the key that unshakles the slave but many are the thoughtless who know not their bondage. Sorrow is a g r e a t emancipator. T h ro u g h the burden of pain and the friction of frustration man begins to perceive his chains. Y e t all men seek comfort and avoid sorrow. Plasticity is a test of the disciple’s understanding which the rigid do not pass. T h e M aste rs seek him who can do many things acceptably. O n ly the un­ knowing assert variety and mediocrity to be synonymous. Scorning humble means the proud im­ poverish themselves. F o r the path to the M aste rs is paved with small and humble services laid down by the dis­ ciple. H e knows the M a ste rs do not need them but he lays them along the way that other men may more easily and quickly find what he himself is seeking and he thereby earns the re­ ward of greater work in T h e ir service. T o seek truly is to think. T o think truly is to live. T o live truly is to love. T o love truly is to serve. T o serve truly is to find w hat all men seek.

T h e Unseen Guardians
LAWS OF NATURE THAT GOVERN OUR EXISTENCE By
F ra te r

T. H.
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M ille r , V

F. R. C.

I T H v e r y few, if any, exceptions, we human beings all want t h i n g s to h a p p e n in o u r lives— exciting, in­ teresting, romantic things, and some­ times even painful or harmful things. A s long as we think that the fu­ ture m a y h o l d some further ad ­ ventures and new experiences in store for us, we feel that the present struggle for existence is worth while. In many cases it is a struggle against heart-breaking odds, but we hang on. W e fight as best we know how to fight for the future, which as far as we know may or may not bring to us the experi­ ences we w ant to live through before we are obliged to relinquish this earthly life. W h a t a picture it seems to be, yet, we need not look far for an abundance o f evidence that will support its truth­ fulness.

The If we could read our own futures and Rosicrucian find in them absolutely nothing that Digest would be new or interesting to us, how May many of us would care to go on with
1936
this business of living?

A t times our thinking seems to be do­ ing its utmost to persuade us that we cannot reasonably expect any further happiness in this life, but we stand fas­ cinated beside the table of chance and wait with all the eagerness of a roulette player to hear the cropier sing out the glad news that the ball has stopped on our number at last. W e live in hopes. M a n y of us live in the blindest of hopes, for we trust the good will of chance to bring us the things we are living for but do not see how to secure by any other means. W e often believe that we see success and happiness come unearned, undeserved, and unexpectedly, to someone else. W e believe that we have as good a chance as they had, so we continue to play with life instead of depositing our energies and abilities in the savings bank of original and constructive effort. W e who admit that we have not suc­ ceeded in achieving our goals, are often inclined to believe that the fault is in no way our own. T h a t would be the logical excuse, if we had never had an oppor­ tunity to learn from the examples of eminently successful persons the secrets of their success. H ow many of us have never had a chance to learn how some of these men and women turned the most adverse circumstances of poverty and ill health into the most glorious victories?
O n e H un dred Forty-tw o

Our many public libraries all contain books in which are recorded the events of the lives of every person who achieved great success. All of these records in­ dicate that these great ones did not reach their goals by starting out for the half-way mark. T h e y clearly indicate that unless they had striven for the highest, they would not have reached beyond the middle. From them we can learn that only the highest ambitions will raise us above mediocrity. If we desire no more than ordinary success, are we likely to achieve even that? If we are not willing to make the sacrifices and put forth the best that is in us, are we likely to rival the accomp­ lishments of the great? The lives of great men and women are records o f incessant vigilance, of being constantly on guard against their own tendencies toward mediocrity. T h e y are records of speech and actions that have been analyzed before being spoken or made. T h e y are not records of speed. W h e n we are asked— and seldom be­ fore being asked— we profess a faith in the goodness of our fellow men and the goodness of all creation. W e can glibly quote instances of the provisions that have been made for our w elfare and happiness. W e see many things that nature is doing for us, but w e fail often to see the most obvious examples that nature is setting before us as a guide to our individual happiness and success. W e see that nature permits one animal to eat another for food, but w e fail to see that the same animal is constantly on guard against more enemies than man has to watch out for. W e see how the beautiful forests cover the hills of our country, but w e fail to see the thousands of insects, the diseases, and the damaging storms which the trees must conquer if they are to grow. C an we not see vigilance and a constant battle against deteriorating elements in all that is? H o w much vigilance are we exercising in the protection of our own futures— futures that are being made today, this very minute? T h e present contributes its nature to the whole or final result. If we are still at the gaming table, can we expect such a contribution to produce an entirely different result? It seems that religion has suffered more abuse than any of the other forms
One H undred F o rty -th ree

in which man has sought to embody truth. T h e great works of art are universally admired. T h e efforts of science and philosophy are discussed without bias, but when we come to religion we find that it has been literally torn to pieces b y differences of opinion. W e do not seem to realize that the truth which re­ ligion is trying to give to us is the same truth that art, science, and philosophy are offering. W e have certainly found some truth in each of these forms. H a v e we been assuming that the truth is not O N E and U N I V E R S A L ? M a n y of us have the same blind faith in our religions as we have in our chance of happiness in this earthly life. W e fail to connect the present with the im­ mortal life that our religions speak of. W it h o u t knowing — or really caring to find out — how much truth is em­ bodied in the doctrines that have been taught to us from childhood, we leave such abstract subjects to more ambitious minds. W h e n those minds publish a new proof or disproof of some point of logic, w e give their findings a passing glance; if the point in question does not seem to apply directly to our own case, we drop the whole matter in disappoint­ ment and even disgust. C an we not see that human beings must be appealed to individually before they can become in­ terested in any one else’s ideas? C an we not see that our failure to inculcate truth into the minds of the masses o f our fellow men is a result of our tendency to generalize, instead of particularizing and individualizing the truth? W h i l e we a re maintaining that the truth is universally applicable, we ca n ­ not afford to deny that human experi­ ence is a greatly varied reality. D oes it not seem possible that you or I may be contacting the truth at one place, but by virtue of our being in that place we preclude the possibility of anyone else contacting it in an identical way, or at the same place? How can we claim that we have co n ­ tacted the whole truth at once, unless we have becom e as vast as the whole truth— in fact, its counterpart? H o w can we expect anyone else to believe that we know the whole truth, unless they can see that we are con­ stantly expressing all of it? W h e n we realize how far short we fall in such e x ­

pression, it leaves us few grounds upon which we can expect others to follow. W e have discovered that a minute of demonstration is more effective than an hour of sa les’ talk, when we want to sell an article that the customer will have to operate himself. If we lose confidence in an automo­ bile when the salesman makes an error in demonstrating it, we can readily see w hat happens to the confidence of his listeners when a reformer fails to dem­ onstrate all of the truth all of the time. O u r job of reforming the habits of the world is very likely to assume such a formidable aspect that we will lose our enthusiasm for it. If a gear is not perfectly meshed and synchronized with the one that supplies the driving force, we would not expect it to drive a third gear efficiently. In such an analogy we can understand the w aste or dissipation of force that occurs when the mechanism of transmission is not perfect. W e can understand the apparent failure of truth to reach all minds of man at once and in its original strength. In its progress from the Source, it has to pass through such devious channels of personal experience that in many cases it completely loses its identity. W e do well to examine w hat others give to us as truth, for it is difficult to tell how far and by what route it has finally come to our hand. If we apply acid to a bit of yellow metal, we may be greatly disappointed when it begins to disintegrate before our eyes; however, we know that we have not destroyed anything of great value. If it does not disintegrate, we have removed all doubt of its value. H ave we applied the acid test to all of our opinions? W h e n we know that our greatest oratory cannot give to other people first-hand experience of the subject we are expounding, we are inclined to urge experiment before urging belief. Intolerance is practiced only when we lose sight of a fundamental law of human nature which clearly states: " E a c h of us can see only through the eye of our own experience.” W h e n we The Rosicrucian are intolerant we are expecting super­ natural abilities in others. W e do not Digest call it superstition, but we sometimes do May the pig an injustice by calling it pig­ headedness. T h e pig seems to try very 1936

hard to lead his natural life, but can the same be said of many of us? In the business world the dealer in wearing apparel— both men's and wom­ e n ’s— knows that unless he can prove that his new spring styles are being worn by other people, he has little chance of selling many of them. H e uses a natural law to sustain his business. H e displays pictures of living models dressed in similar garments; he shows clippings from fashion center news­ papers, describing the new styles; he makes much of the names of well-known designers whose creations he is offering for sale— and how we do buy! W e might not be proud to admit that we are being deftly controlled by such a law in the hands of the merchant we patronize, but we need not be ashamed o f our sheepish conduct. T h e law is not of the merchant’s making. H e has not "put one over on us," and we do get our m oney’s worth if we are careful buyers. T h e merchant merely considers it a principle of good business, which it is. If it were not for the functioning of this law, we would know none of the many interesting changes that take place in some of our living habits. T h e law is impersonal, but also beneficial. T h e reformer who rants and raves about the perversity of human nature while he depends on his own example and oratory to change the w ays of the multitude, is actually robbing the ideal of the dignity that would find approval in the minds of his audience. His chance of success is no greater than that of a street vender who is yelling himself hoarse trying to sell something that nobody would care to be seen buy­ ing or using. It might be spectacular to pin an artificial rosebud to a real rose bush, but few of us would care to claim that it would burst into bloom there. W e all love to watch spectacles, yet we all have a tremendous aversion to becoming spectacles ourselves. C o n tra ry to rumors that frequently circulate, human minds still have a genuine respect for the dignity of that which is natural. W h e t h e r it is sad or ju st natural, it is a fact that many of us are antagon­ ized by even the mention of the word religion. W e get an unpleasant sensa­
O n e H undred Forty-four

tion of squeamishness with the idea of religion. It is the same sensation that we experience when we come unexpect­ edly face to face with a creditor whom we have been dodging for some time. W e are glad when the opportunity to change the subject offers itself. W hen we analyze this reaction, we often find that it is really a repetition of the sense of aversion that was aroused in us by someone who first mentioned the subject to us and who did not make clear to us that religion does not de­ mand that we must all become ministers, priests, rabbis, reformers, or evangelists. Since such roles did not appeal to us at the time, we have continually been try­ ing to avoid what we unconsciously consider a creditor. If we thought that science was trying to make scientists of all of us, it is very probable that we would feel a similar aversion to science. Likewise with philosophy or any of the arts. Now we realize that we do not have to be artists to enjoy and benefit by the creations of art. W e derive great pleasure and recreation from the theatre, which is an art. N o actors have ever insinuated th at w e must all become actors. Let us not be too hasty in accusing our religionists o f having caused this aversion. W e must remember that we have always the choice of applying what they have taught or discarding it. N o one can wield the power of our own conscience over us unless we consent to have it so; furthermore, they have no right to do so. W h e n we look analytically at most of our pet aversions and personal a n ­ tagonisms, we discover little reason for any attitude other than tolerance. If we want our children to benefit from the truth of religion, would it not be wise to free their minds of the idea that religion means to make preachers of them, one and all? If they have no desire to become preachers, religion will not destroy their other natural ambi­ tions, and if these predominate how can they become conscientious preachers? W e do not want to conduct a school of hypocrisy with our own children as the pupils. T h e mind of a child readily grasps the beautiful connection that exists be­
O ne H un dred F o rty -fiv e

tween all of the forms of truth. If we foster this impression, the child will soon be in a position to teach us many things that we have been blind to ourselves. T h e child will not tell us what we must believe, but will tell us what it sees and w hat we have failed to see. W i t h the commodity of truth we are each one of us a salesman. If we c a n ­ not demonstrate the goods, we cannot hope to sell much more of it. If what we have sold in its place does not work satisfactorily in the lives of our cus­ tomers, are they not likely to be on our doorsteps tomorrow, demanding a re­ fund? In the final analysis, when we have applied the acid test to all of our co n­ victions, we usually discover that the only real perversity of which we are guilty is ignorance. T h e discovery makes us humble, and when we have achieved humility we are on the thres­ hold of light. V o lu m es have been written about na­ ture and the advantages of studying n a ­ ture, but we have wasted much time in reading them if we have failed to com­ prehend the unity of truth which all creation is constantly illustrating for us. A s we have noted above that the truth which other people try to give to us may be so distorted by its passage through many minds and mouths, we are making no mistake if we go to the same source from which that truth came originally. If we do not believe that such a thing is possible to us, it is very often because we have permitted our unbelief to keep us from trying. W e have not applied the acid test to that conviction. W e have not been sincere with ourselves. W e have been hoping that we might be able to use the brass for gold and we have received no more for our brass than it is worth. W e have not deceived nature for she is always with us; she has watched our plannings to deceive her through our own eyes. Sh e is trying to put us on our guard against ourselves, but many o f us still think that we have a chance to catch her asleep. D oes the heart that beats within us ever sleep? W e have examined the functions of a few of the laws of nature that govern our existence and we have found that

they are absolutely impersonal in o pera­ tion and can be made to serve or to in­ jure our purposes. T h e y are not of any use to us until we understand them. W h e n we do understand them we no longer suffer from the errors of acting in opposition to them. T h i s knowledge is always at hand and is given freely to those who seek it that they might co n­ form to its dictates. N one other finds it. It has been said, “T h e noblest em­ ployment of the mind of man, is the

study of the works of his C re a to r .” If we deny the truth of this statement be­ fore we have tested it, which will suffer more, the statement or ourselves? T h u s the apprentices keep watch, that the metal may be pure but not con­ sumed by the fire which purifies it. T h e unseen guardians exercise the vigilance that we neglect until we per­ ceive the advantage of it.

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ANCIENT SYMBOLISM
Man, when conscious o f an eternal truth, has ever sym bolized it so that the human consciousness could forever have realization o f it. Nations, languages and customs have changed, but these ancient designs continue to illuminate mankind w ith their m ystic light. F o r those who are seeking light, each month we w ill reproduce a sym bol o r symbols, w ith th eir ancient meaning.

T H E T E M P L E O F L IF E The circular structure, somewhat like a temple, represents the period of man's life from birth to death. A lw ays in his presence is the tree of knowledge, with its fruit of wis­ dom. If man partakes of this fruit, he m ay look beyond the narrow confines of the structure, or his daily life, and see the magnificent vista of the universe, depicted by the landscape which surrounds the structure. The open doorw ay alludes to the portal through which man will learn to look when he has eaten of the fruit of the tree. This impressive and beautiful symbolism is from a
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Rosicrucian manuscript, centuries old, in the repository of the O rd e r.

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The Rosicrucian Digest May
1936

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O ne H undred Forty-six

Immortality
IS IT SUSCEPTIBLE OF SCIENTIFIC PROOF? By
A lb e r t A . S te w a rt

H E greatest ques­ tion w i t h which the mind of man may struggle— the problem of the ages — is: “ W h e n c e c a m e we a n d w h i t h e r are we tending?” Is o u r destiny annihilation, reabsorbtion, or co n ­ tinued existence as conscious b e i n g s after the ordeal which we call death? W h e n the question of future existence breaks over the bounds of dogmatic theology, and man is yet not satisfied with his grasp of the revelations of n a ­ ture about him, we may gravely ask, ‘ W h a t remains upon which the in ­ quiring soul may lean?” W e feel that through science nature reveals to us evidences of the truth of that which we all desire, but concerning which many of us are compelled to en ­ tertain an honest doubt. Science speaks thus: — T h e r e is a drastic and appealing method of illus­ trating the wonderful contrast between the millions of years of world history, and the few thousand years of m an ’s his­ tory, and that all the w ay along down the ages, since the world began as a mass of fire-mist having its birth in the
O ne Hundred. F o rty -sev en

sun, there has been a steady working out of the supreme design of a glorified type of man. Suppose that the millions of years since that nebulous beginning of the world be represented by one day of tw en ty -four hours. O f that day, the primordial period, reaching to the very first appearance of life in its lowest form, would occupy twelve and one-half hours, from midnight to 12:30 at noon. T h e epoch following, during which the present coal layers were green, or white forests, and life developed through the Protozoa, Arthropoda and the fish period to the Reptilian age, takes up the succeeding eight hours, to 8 :3 0 in the evening. T h e n came reptilia, comprising snakes, lizards, crocodiles and other Sauria, and their history occupies our time up to a quarter past eleven at night. W e now have left, three-quarters of one hour. T h is three-quarters o f an hour, with the exception of two minutes, will be occupied in the development of the T e rtia ry world— the world of mon­ ster mammals. T h e two minutes remaining will be the whole time of the life of man upon the earth, from the glacial period until now. Assuming that the last six thou­ sand years will cover the period of m an’s recorded history, it will represent the last five secon ds o f these last two

minutes o f our hypothetical day.

During these mighty ages carbon dioxide, which is destructive o f the higher forms of life, was being with­ drawn from the atmosphere by the vegetable kingdom. It w as just the right element for that life, and was being de­ posited in the earth, and finally the earth's atmosphere w as reduced to the proper chemical consistency to sustain the present forms of life— a higher order than of any preceding age. T h is would appear to be evidence of the working out of an infinite design in which man is the apex. E ls e why was the earth so carefully prepared for his reception? W h e t h e r man was prepared for con­ ditions here, or the environment was made to fit the man, the inference of definite design favorable to the creature called man is hard to escape. T o further illustrate this point, let us briefly consider the most abundant and useful of all metals, iron, and see if we do not find more evidence of design favorable to man in an exalted station above other members of the animal crea­ tion. T h e specific gravity o f iron is much greater than that of many of the stones that form the foundations o f continents, and without definite, intelligent design, would be drawn naturally, by the force of gravity, below all lighter substances, at the time o f the molten or plastic state of the earth in its transition from the gaseous state to the solid globe. Y e t iron w as held in suspension in the a t­ mosphere in the form of ferric acid and other gaseous ingredients for long ages a fter the lighter stones had crystallized into their present forms. T h u s iron, so useful to man, was solidified nearer the surface, within m an’s reach. It even appears, in places, to have been precipitated upon the present sur­ face of the earth in the form of rain, as at present upon the surface o f the sun. S o it may have actually “rained pitch­ forks” in “the k no ck-d o w n ” over areas now known as M ich igan and W i s c o n ­ sin, w here it is scooped up with steam shovels, in the form of iron sand. W h i l e it can be readily understood how and w hy the coal beds were formed The Rosicrucian in the T e rtia ry , Carboniferous, Triassic, and C retaceous periods, does it not seem Digest a little singular that iron should be de­ May posited in the same periods? W o u l d not 1936 this apparant anomaly be further evi­

dence of design especially favorable to

man? N either coal nor iron would be
very useful to man without the other. W o u l d it not seem a matter o f design that the time necessary to ripen or pro­ perly prepare this product for m an ’s use was so accurately computed as to be ready when the only being capable of utilizing it had arrived at that state of social and intellectual progress to need that very thing in the development of implements necessary in the conquest of the natural forces, air, water, fire, elec­ tricity? W o u l d it not seem a m atter o f design that the giant mammals of the T e rtiary world, with their great muscular, but low brain power, were succeeded by classes of animals of much smaller bodies but larger brains? Science tells us that the present group o f domestic animals appeared upon the earth simultaneously with man, or per­ haps a little previously, but endowed with sufficient brain power and tractability to be readily brought under the dominion of man. F rom the first pulsation of life upon the earth in the bit of protoplasm called “am eba”, the dawn animal o f the Laurentian period and the primeval parent o f organisms, all the w ay down the ages to man, there has been a steady growth of the divine essence called intelligence, a process of psychic evolution. All the prehistoric forms of life have been linked into that growing chain. T h e fact is borne in upon the mind with irresistible force from a careful survey of the facts of science, as r e ­ vealed to us a t this time, that avoirdu­ pois and brute strength have been yield­ ing steadily to the advance o f intellect through all the ages past, which might be construed to indicate that intellect is the flowering and fruiting of the divine plan. It will be generally acknowledged that the highest conception of human suc­ cess is not the conquest of the material world, but will be measured by the de­ gree in which is found the most harmon­ ious blending of the virtues of intel­ lectuality and righteousness. T h e s e may be characterized in the one word, s p ir it u a lit y , Definitely, the g o o d thought, the kind word, and the helpful deed. H ere is a great sentimental plea for immortality: w herefore this struggle
O n e H undred Forty-eight

for the finer attributes and sensibilities of life, if death is to be the end of all? Intellect is undoubtedly individualized in definite psychic personalities, capable of cogitation, volition, growth, variation, and apart from and beyond chemical action. If these things be true, then in­ tellect is the only force in the universe capable of grasping and comprehending that concept, and intellect must have conceived and is executing that plan. A design which requires infinite intelli­ gence to conceive and infinite time in the process of development, must be of in­ finite consequence to that Infinite C re a ­ tive Intelligence. A highly glorified type of man, we must inevitably conclude, is the end to­ ward which all creation tends, the aim of the infinite design. It is hard to understand w hy an in­ finite intelligence should busy itself through countless ages to evolve a selfconscious, active, supreme ego that will cease to exist at the moment of its de­ parture from the earthly temple in which it functions so nobly and for such a brief period in the plans of mortality. W e may conceive of each individual organism as an assemblage of atoms, so wisely coordinated as to produce a de­ finite, complex, and pleasing fabric, perfectly harmonized and synchronized in all its parts— the architect and builder an ofF-shoot of the universal life, a spray from the fountain-head of constructive, vital, conscious force. T h e individual consciousness functions to harmonize with the physical organism, just as a traveller down a lane bends his course to its crooks and turns while he himself was the maker of the lane and gave it all its crooks and devious windings. T h e dweller within a house may have been the builder thereof, but makes his life therein conform to the architectural characteristics of the edifice. S o I co n­ ceive the spirit of man to be influenced in a large degree by the body in which it dwells, though it has been the creator of that body. T h a t such a creature as man could result from mere chemical and physical force is inconceivable. R ath er must he be the product and masterpiece of an All-wise purpose, working throughout all the ages past, and for such an ego to step outside its earthly prisonhouse will surely not mean annihilation. All
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the known facts of mortal existence, spiritual and material, demand the hy­ pothesis of continued individual exist­ ence for their rational explanation. B y means of the laws of chemistry, also biological science, revolutionary variations may be achieved in the phy­ sical world even to the extent of break ­ ing up the molecules and changing the primal nature of substances. If, by the magic of intellect, man is enabled to change the essential nature of the elements and assemble them in such manner as to produce new sub­ stances, and varying types of organ­ isms, does not the very fact of being thus able to control the forces of nature amount to creation? If we, by operating from a circumfer­ ence to a focal center, produce a re­ sultant in the nature of new entities through the agency of our creative in­ tellect, are we not creators? A re we not thereby demonstrating our immediate relationship with the C reator of all, and must necessarily partake of the attribute of eternal persistence? M e r e energy, or modes of motion, may be differentiated from life as being devoid of cogitative powers. T o illus­ trate:— A weight is projected into space. Its motion is momentum and not voli­ tion. It can not be conceived of as ani­ mated by the vital current self-contained which runs through all organisms. T h is is life, and must be conceived of as cap ­ able of appropriating unto its self the material elements requisite to the co n­ struction and maintenance of the physi­ cal structures. T h is power we can not conceive of as an attribute of force, as electricity, which is energy which func­ tions through various media and mech­ anisms, without any capacity to think, feel, or will. Sin ce m an’s intelligence seems to pos­ sess the capacity to grasp and compre­ hend the laws of the universe in ever increasing magnitude and is thereby em­ powered to alter the material creation to suit his fancy, would it be unreason­ able to assume that this intelligence must be manifestations of that same in­ telligence that has been w o r k i n g throughout all the ages past and that we are thereby linked with immortal existence?

W e must admit that there is much in nature that declares an intelligence far beyond the utmost reaches of man. W h i l e m an’s intellect is of that trans­ cendent power and quality to enable him to survey every field, to contem­ plate the heights, delve into the depths, and reach out towards the breadths of knowledge, yet we cheerfully grant that in his quest of the absolute he must ever fall short in any field. T h i s is a guar­ antee of room for progress throughout all eternity. M a n ’s intellect is endowed with the magical power of self-development. A s far as we are able to observe, no other creature has ever possessed this power. All other forms of life have advanced by the slow process of evolution. T h e r e ­ fore, it would appear that man occupies the exalted station o f suprem e import­ ance in creation's plans. W e may observe from this point the progression of the divine ray, the quickening essence of life as it proceeds through all the kingdoms of nature up to man, which seems to be the objective of the divine plan up to this stage. W e observe the wonderful inherent power of adaptation of all life to its environ­ ment. B ut the most wonderful of all is the fact that man is able to assist the creator in that process of adaptation and variation. In like observations the h y ­ pothesis o f m an ’s creative endowment finds further support and strength. A n apparent anomaly in creation is found in the fact that while scientists tell us that life results from chemical action, yet while animating the body it possesses the power to withstand the coma-bacillus, the chemical ag ency of disintegration, and hold in abeyance its myriad army of bacteria. T h e re in we see that the law of chemical affinity is set aside and its power defied as long as life persists in the body, but at the instant of death the millions of bacteria spring into action and disintegration of the soul’s earthly temple soon results. T h o s e who incline naturally by their habits of thought to the philosophy of biogenesis, spontaneous generation, may The R o sicru cian conceive that man is able to trace mortal existence back to the union of the Digest psychic germ with inorganic matter M ay from which the living organism results. 1936 T h i s life germ, which is incompre­

hensible at this stage of m an’s powers of discernment, possess the potency and wisdom to construct and sustain the or­ ganism under proper conditions per­ forming the processes of excrement and renewal during the entire period of our sojourn here. T his process, science chooses to designate chemical action. T h e psychic personality is conceived to intelligently unite certain material co n ­ stituents as nitrogen, oxygen, calcium, magnesia, iron, etc., and from such com­ monplace materials a personality results, with intelligence capable of embracing and comprehending every phenomenon in the universe, from the most minute interchange of chemical atoms, to the rotation of the fixed stars. T h e material body may be likened unto the outer wrapper behind which the soul is partly hidden. It functions through the agen cy of a nervous system and through which shines gleams of divine light, infinite intelligence. But let the spirit inhabitant evacuate the temple and those material elements be decom­ posed into their various classifications, and we find that all the material in the construction of the human form divine fat, iron, sugar, lime, phosphorus, mag­ nesia, potassium, sulphur, w ater and all is worth on the market today about ninety-eight cents. Suppose that the ego which has as­ sembled the necessary elements and con­ structed this physical organism departs from this house it has built, is it not logical that this psychic personality, this intelligent, constructive force might maintain definite individual existence which it must have had prior to the con­ struction of this particular edifice? If it constructed this evanescent dwelling after the form and law of its spiritual existence, may we not conceive that it might construct another, its counterpart, in some other environment? As it existed prior to this manifestation, so it will hereafter. I am the builder of a house composed of lumber, brick, and plaster. I am the vitalizing essence of that building, the ego, the life of the structure. I existed prior to it. It grows old and crumbles to decay. M a y I not leave that house and sail to the uttermost parts of the earth and there find more lumber, brick, and plaster, and construct another dwelling,
O ne H undred Fifty

a replica of the first, and function th ere­ in the same as in the former? Madam Curie, the discoverer of ra ­ dium, asserts that all materials are radiating into space emanations which are to them the same as life is to us. T h e iron founder has much trouble with dead iron. Lead dies if exposed too long to the air. Copper dies through the action of water. W e are told now that lead is dead radium. W h o can tell but what the vital essence of radium may be restored to us through the agency of the “X " ray, or some other agency, or that we may yet re-assemble those em ana­ tions and reduce them again to radium? And whereas there are now only a few ounces of it in the world, we may have tons of it if we so desire. Now those emanations are not lost. The law of the conservation of forces forbids that. S o if my life force leaves this body which it has constructed from the elements, because of weakening nerve connections, and finds those same elements in some other plane, may it not build another organism, more or less ethereal, but not less potent and in­ tellectual? If, as science is telling us now, life is chemical action, then it must follow that the compounding of the same elements will produce like results again and again, so long as they are combined under the same conditions and in the same proportions. But chemistry tells us that atoms are not endowed with vital force, but are moved, like the dead chess-men on the board, by outside intelligence. W e l l, that outside intelligence is the stay and comfort of our souls. T h a t outside in­ telligence must possess the attribute of volition and be pre-existent. It first manifests in the sphere of mortals in the union of the psychic germ with a minute particle of protoplasm, resulting in what might be termed the “ Psych op lasm ,” which inherently possesses the potency of a C aesar or a Shakespeare. This brings us logically to the pro­ position that both intellect and [orm exist independent of the conception of tangible matter or the material elements, even outside of and independent of protyle itself, which is as far down the line as chemistry seems to go and at which point science bumps against the
One H undred F ifty -o n e

brass wall. T h e electron is the vitalizing force in protyle. Philosophy carries us further in the proposition just laid down by stating that personality exists outside of matter and functions in the matter composing our bodies through the agency of the nervous system. T h i s may be illustrated b y a very familiar phenomenon. W e place the frost crystals with their infinite variety of beautiful figures under the compound microscope and learn that in their end­ less variety of artistic forms there is just one prevailing primary geometric figure. W e apply heat and the artistic tracings disappear; more heat and the w ater is evaporated; still more heat and the water is turned into gas. T h ro u g h all these transformations the fundamental form persists. T h is may be demonstrated by lowering the temperature until the gas is reduced again through vapor and w ater back to frost, where the tracings reappear and are found to be all varia­ tions of the original geometric figure. T o make our application, we will co n ­ sider a few examples: Going aw ay down in the scale of animal life we find the fresh w ater hydra and the sea anemone. If either is severed into bits it will be found that each particle will soon develop into a complete and per­ fect organism conforming to the original pattern, showing that form and intel­ ligence with power to reconstruct the organism must have existed independent of the matter composing the original organism. A little higher up in the scale of ani­ mal life we find a small animal of the lizard family, known to natural history as the newt. If a leg of the newt be severed at the body, it will grow out again, gradually develop and finally be­ come complete as before— toes, claws and all. N ow w hat is it that keeps in mind the form and dimensions of that lost member and constructs the new one? W e may observe wonderful examples of healing and reconstruction in our own wounded and mangled bodies, per­ formed by some intelligent agency working from within through the instru­ mentality of the nerves. T h is agency m a y b e designated the “ Psychic P erso n ­ ality ,” which may be conceived to pos­ sess a knowledge of the particular or­

ganism it animates and the power of construction and maintenance. S o we will reassert that form exists in the laws governing matter, and since a portion of our bodies may be reconstructed may we not be encouraged therefrom to hope for the reconstruction of the entire body by this same vitalizing intelligence? If the P sychic Personality possesses consciousness and volition, and by vir­ tue of these self-determining attributes results in mortal existence, is there any reason for assuming that it will cease to do so or lose that power or attribute hereafter or in any other existence? A fte r finding the material elements, which are inexhaustible, to be the best means of expression here, would it not be logical to conclude that it will be the same in any other corner of the illimit­ able universe, and eternally, for matter itself is indestructible and eternal? W h i l e it seemed at one time that faith in the immortality of the soul was destined to destruction by the findings of scientific research, it will no doubt soon develop that science will furnish our most convincing proofs.

A t this time, in the minds of many, that faith is well established upon a scientific base as a working hypothesis, as protyle, ether, and ions of the scien­ tist, and no one questions the reality of those elements today. Sin ce our intellectual bonds have been broken and the fear of trespassing upon the domain of the Almighty has been removed, we may freely analyze in­ telligently and verify scientifically all the facts of life, and we may hope soon to peer further into that realm where “Curtained varities their secret conclave hold.” So, if we familiarize our minds with the eternal realities of life within our reach and prayerfully employ our M ind — that searchlight illumined by the power of G o d — we will be carried in­ evitably to the solid ground of faith in the permanence of the vital current and its individual persistence, which in man is manifest as the Soul, the highest ex­ pression o f Divine Immanence which we can conceive up to this point in Cosmic Evolution.

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EG Y PT IA N ROCK TOM B
T h e full-size, exact reproduction of an Egyptian rock tomb of the Feudal Age of Egypt, which is visited by thousands annually in the Rosicrucian Museum at San Jose, California, bears a startling similarity to the newly discovered tomb beneath the Pyramid of Chepheron. Visitors to the Rosicrucian Museum, who have seen the recent rare photo­ graphs of the portal to the 5000-year-old tomb just excavated by Dr. Selim Hassan of Egypt, have been amazed at the sameness of appearance between the reproduction and the new archeological find. T h e tomb in the Rosicrucian Museum was constructed from photographs and diagrams of rock tombs found in the V alley of Kings, Egypt. All of these tombs were of about the same design and appearance; and it is not mystifying there­ fore that Dr. Hassan's discovery should be similar. T h e recent publicity given these new excavations has heightened public interest in things Egyptian and caused a keener ap­ preciation of the accuracy of the Rosicrucian exhibit, which is the only one of its kind in North A m erica. A M O R C ’s recent book, "T h e Symbolic Prophecy of the G reat Pyra­ mid,” is the only one today containing diagrams of the new excavations and referring to the mysterious passageways now established as fact by science.

The Rosicrucian Digest May
1936

O n e H un dred Fi[ty-two

SANCTUM MUSINGS
THE MYSTERY OF MT. SHASTA
R O M time to time m e m b e r s of our N ational R esearch Council, and other members interest­ ed in the mystery traditions of the ancient Lemurians, send us notations of anci ent and modern investiga­ tions or reports of old and new a c ­ counts pertaining to Lemuria and from these we are gathering a large mass of new and old facts that are interesting indeed. It would appear from the old newspaper clippings, magazine articles, and scien­ tific reports that have come to us, that the traditions and weird tales regarding a mysterious race or class of people liv­ ing in the vicinity of M t. S h a sta date far back into the earliest history of the Pacific Coast. In fact, it is very evident that the story regarding these mys­ terious people living in three or four se­ cluded or protected points of the Pacific Coast, including the islands in the Pacific near Santa Barbara, are part of the earliest traditions of the W e s t . A s time has passed on and means of in­ vestigation have prepared incentive, it has been found that many of the oldest of the traditions of the Pacific C oast were based upon facts.
O ne H un dred F ifty -th ree

O n e of the oldest of these traditions was that reported in Spain or parts of Europe long before C alifornia was actually drawn upon any reliable map. T h i s ancient tradition is to the effect that California was more or less of an island continent isolated and separated from the W e s t e r n W o r l d and that it was golden indeed. R eference was not only made to the gold of the sunshine and the gold of the setting sun in the evening, but to the vast amount of gold in its hills and valleys. T h e earliest stories of California pictured it as a place of untold wealth in many minerals, not only gold. T h e s e stories persisted for many years, even after California w as explored by many expeditions, and the reputed wealth, along with the stories of gold, were scoffed at and laughed at with ridicule in the same manner as many ridicule today the idea that any descendants of a lost or ancient Lemurian tribe still live in some parts of the P acific’s mountain ranges or vol­ canoes. Certainly, the stories about the gold o f California have been proved true and even during the recent years of depres­ sion thousands of men and their families moved into the old vacated valleys and sections of C alifo rnia’s Gold Rush country and reoccupying the buildings of the so-called ghost cities that still re­ main, once more washed the old soil and derived a living from it. M e n and

their families who wanted to work found that without doing any actual mining it was possible to earn a liveli­ hood by merely washing the soil and extracting the gold. M a n y husbands and wives and sometimes children la­ bored side by side, each earning a fair income. Gold, as well as other minerals, is still being extracted from various parts of the S ta te throughout the year. W h y should anyone believe that the mysterious and weird traditions of the ancient Lemurians, constituting another one of the old W e s t e r n W o r l d stories, would fail to be proved true also? In nearly every case in ancient history or the history of foreign lands where we can trace traditions and stories coming down to us from antiquity, scien ce has found, or exploring expeditions have discovered, that the traditions were based upon fact. Certainly there is no other story outside that of gold, con­ nected with the early history of C a li­ fornia, that was as wide-spread and universally accepted and repeated as that of the existence of descendants of some very old race. T h e stories about these so-called Lemurians or mystery people passed on from one generation to another in many of the oldest families of the Pacific C oast and today the stories are still being maintained as a b ­ solutely true. M o st of those writers or speakers who have claimed that these traditions are untrue or unreliable have made no real investigation and are just as biased in their attitudes as they claim others are biased in giving them any criticisms. O n e of the interesting denials o f the M t. S h asta traditions is that which a M r. Pelley published lately in one of his issues of a political newspaper ow n­ ed and controlled b y him. H e sar­ castically reports the story of two per­ sons who were travelling through north­ ern California and stopped for a day or two in or near M t. Shasta and m ade casual inquiry among some persons they met in various places. M r. Pelley states that each time they asked these natives The northern California about the mysR osicru cian ter*es ° f ^ t . S h a sta they were informed that the stories were ridiculous and that D igest there was no foundation in fact in them. M ay Upon the statements thus made to them M r. Pelley proceeds to ridicule the 1936

whole tradition and to label the stories as an invention of some publishing house, probably meaning the A M O R C . W e have no w ay of knowing precisely who was interviewed by M r. Pelley and his associates, but it does not matter. It is very evident from what M r . Pelley says that his mind was biased and pre­ judiced before he began his investiga­ tion and with such an attitude he made the inquiries and received just the kind of information he wanted. N o doubt there are persons living within the shadows of M t. Sh a sta and families who have lived there for several gen­ erations and who alw ays ridicule these ancient traditions and claim that there is no foundation in fact for them. Such persons usually say: “ I have lived in the neighborhood o f M t. S h asta for twenty-five years and have heard these stories repeated often but I have never met or seen anyone or anything that seemed mysterious to me and, therefore, I do not believe there is a word of truth in the stories.” Such persons can be found in all parts of the world today. T h e r e are in­ dividuals living in the shadow of the Brooklyn bridge in N ew Y o r k and the W a s h in g to n M onum ent in the Distict of Columbia who will probably say that they know nothing about any of the old stories that are told about these great structures. I know of one old character who lived within thirty-five or forty minutes of N e w Y o r k and who said that he had lived so close to N ew Y o r k all his life and y et he did not believe any of the stories about the existence in N ew Y o r k C ity of buildings that were more than ten stories high. H e said he had never seen in any of his journeys through N e w Jersey farm lands any structures over five stories high and he believed that one of ten stories might be built but that the reports about build­ ings in N e w Y o r k being forty or fifty stories high were pure fiction because— he had never seen any! O n the other hand, there are hundreds of persons living in the district of Mt. S h asta and in other points of Northern California, as well as hundreds who have visited there for short periods, who testify differently. A nd as I have said above, from all the reports and clippings and comments we have gathered from
O ne H un dred Fifty-four

magazines and newspapers there have been hundreds of persons in the past centuries who have seen or heard and written much about intangible and pecu­ liar occurrences. C ertainly when tradi­ tional stories of this kind have persisted for so long a period and the reports from various sources and various in­ dividuals are so much alike, there must be some foundation in fact for all that has been said. One of the interesting things about the whole situation is that when tourists journey through northern California and come near to the district of M t. Shasta and make inquiries as to how and when they may see some of the mysterious occurrences, the natives of that district do not attempt to take ad­ vantage of the situation and advise the tourist to remain two or three days and see the sights for themselves. T h e y either say that they have seen these o c­ currences at different times and do not know when they may be seen again or they deny they have ever seen anything or anyone else will see anything. T h is shows the truthfulness of the attitude of the people and proves that the tradi­ tions about M t. S h asta are not being commercialized. If there was no foun­ dation for any of the facts and the whole story had been invented merely to attract visitors to the district of M t. Shasta, there would be a concerted action on the part of the natives of that section to encourage tourists to stay, and there would be souvenirs sold and hotels built to take care of the multi­ tudes that would stay for days and weeks, and in every w ay we would see the evidences of a commercialized form of fiction. T h e absence of all this proves that these stories about M t. S h asta are not the inventions of persons who wish to take advantage of the gullibility of the public. W h a t , then, can be the mo­ tive for telling these stories and report­ ing them in newspapers, magazines, and other records for so many decades? W e have talked with persons who have called upon us here at H e a d ­ quarters and we have talked with others in the district of M t. S h asta who have seen and heard and made contact with these peculiar affairs and incidents, and although these different persons have never met or come together to standard­
O ne H undred F ifty -fiv e

ize their stories or agree upon the points they dwell upon, their stories are always much alike and for this reason constitute a form of evidence that c a n ­ not be cast aside with indifference. W e are sorry to note that a certain group of lecturers now travelling about the United State s have taken advantage of these traditions and are presenting them in an exaggerated, elaborated, and aggrandized form that no longer bears any resemblance to the original tradi­ tions, and that they claim certain pos­ sibilities to those who go and stay in the district of M t. S h a sta for a certain length of time. T h e result has been that hundreds of persons have gone out of their w ay to visit M t. S h asta and have reported to the natives of that section the most elaborate descriptions of imag­ inary happenings that the human mind could invent. T h e result has been that the old timers of the M t. S hasta district are thoroughly disgusted and no longer w ant to talk about the matter to the average enquirer. Among the new bits of evidence that have come to our files supporting the idea that an ancient race of people, commonly believed to be descendants of the Lemurians of the lost continent of the Pacific, is a report taken from the files of some official surveyors who dis­ covered similar occurrences and condi­ tions near another famous mountain peak on the Pacific Coast. It must be kept in mind that if the stories about M t. Sh asta are true or based upon truthful facts, the whole Pacific C oast is involved, or at least that portion of it lying between C an ad a and M ex ic o . W e know that in addition to the district of M t. Shasta, the district of Klammath F a lls and along the Klammath River contains evidences of the existence of an ancient race who left behind mark­ ings and carvings of an unusual nature, and we know that on the island just off the coast at Sa n ta Barbara, California, an ancient race once lived that has now disappeared, and we know that in southern C alifornia and down into lower California and across the M ex ic a n border there are evidences of o ccupa­ tion by an ancient race. According to this new report, a W i l ­ liam Pom ranky with R obert Stevens and six more surveyors visited the

district above M t. O lym pia in the State of W a s h in g to n about the 16th of M a y , 1912. During the evenings while in and about the district of M t. O lym pia these men saw wonderful white lights near the foothills o f the mountain and some at points part w ay up the side of the mountain. Surprised at such strange sights which they knew could not come from any known habitation or settle­ ment, they investigated further one eve­ ning and finally saw strange buildings with people going back and forth in front of them and heard the music which these people produced. T h e ir re­ port describes one large building in the center with a large dome. T h e y say the ground around these buildings w as on an incline and was covered with grass and small fir trees. T h e y said that in the daytime all of their investigations failed to discover these buildings and the cause of the lights which could only be seen at nighttime. T h e report states that R obert Stevens and M r . P om ranky believed that they were looking upon supernatural people and supernatural buildings since they could see nothing in the daytime. A n old hermit, however, living eleven miles from the mountain, told them he had seen lights many times and it was a common occurrence. T h e y interviewed Indians living in the vicinity and these Indians plainly revealed their reluctance to tell any facts. T h e manner in which they held up their hands and refused to be questioned about the strange people and strange buildings told an eloquent story. W e have seen the Indians near Klammath take the same attitude. W e have

met many others w ho refuse to tell the ordinary visitor anything more than that the traditions are true. W e understand, of course, that those who are allowed or permitted to make a contact or discover anything definite are enjoined against telling any of the facts. T h e story of the discovery of M r. P om ranky and his associates is part of a report made by M r. Pom ran ky of Idaho and vouched for by a M r. G arringer who lives in Idaho and who says he has known M r. P om ranky and the reports he makes for some years. Undoubtedly, as time passes and more surveyors, scientists, explorers, and others peep through their old nota­ tions and records, we shall have a large addition to our verified facts. T h e story of the lost continent of Lemuria does not depend for its exist­ ence and probabilities upon the existence of any descendants now living in any part of the world. T h e r e is ample scien­ tific evidence to support the story of the sinking of a great continent in the Pacific O ce a n. B ut there is also an ac­ cumulating mass of evidence to support the ancient traditions of some strange race of people having once lived in va­ rious parts of California and some of them still living near M t. S h a sta To quote M r. Ripley, believe it or not, there are some facts back of all these tradi­ tional stories, but those facts will never be commercialized through public lec­ tures to the extent that Americans are asked to believe the most highly im­ probable and impossible of stories such as those being told on the lecture plat­ form by several modern lecturers on psychology and mysticism.

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F O R U M

R O S I C R U C I A N

sr

RO SE-CROIX U N IV E R S IT Y
June 22nd is the date of the beginning of the Rose-Croix University summer session. If you have not enrolled for the six-weeks' preliminary matriculation course, do so at once. E very student desiring to register at the Rose-Croix University must first receive these preliminary lessons and be examined upon them. T h e final examination must be received by June 1st, otherwise it will not be accepted for this term. Even if you will not be able to attend this year, take the course now and prepare yourself for a future registration.

T he Rosicrucian Digest May
1936

One H undred Fifty-six

THE

R O S IC R U C IA N

P L A N E T A R IU M

The picture above shows the front of the new Rosicrucian planetarium building now nearing completion at Rosicrucian Park. It is entirely in Arabic style of architecture, making one more example of Oriental architecture in the group constituting the main buildings of the A M O R C Headquarters. T h is planetarium will be distinctly unique in its arrangements and in the mechanical facilities which will enable the lecturer to demonstrate the theories of not only the Copernican theory of cosmogony but the geocentric and cellular cosmogonies. T h e building was designed and all of its mechanical equipment invented by the Imperator of A M O R C . It will be open for use during the coming annual Convention. (C ou rtesy o f T h e R osicrucian D igest.)

The M ark • • of Distinction
'fla te in a l tfnsicjnia in c ite
NkY O U are never a stranger in any gathering, if your affiliations are known. S o c ia l barriers and bonds are broken by the simple display of a membership emblem. Y o u are never an "u nknow n* to others, if you signify your interests and ideals by the dignified wearing of your fraternal insignia. N o land is far from home, or any nation very foreign, if you can meet there, people who think as you do. A membership emblem is a magnet that draws out of the daily passing throng, the indifferent world, the people you should know' and make your friends.

This Handsome Ring
The ring is made of sterling silver, with beautiful enamel finish, and has an embossed E gyptian design consisting of the sphinx and pyramids. T h e R o sic ru c ia n insignia is impres­ sively set off. It is a ring every R osicrucian— m an or w o m a n —will be proud to wear. The men s ring of the same design has a massive­ ness w h ich is a desired feature o f all mascu­ line jewelry. T h e wom en s ring is sturdy, yet dainty and ornate. O b ta i n your size by cuttin g a hole in a card to accom m odate your ring finger, and send the card with your order and remittance to the address below. I hese rings will give years of constan t wear.

FO R M EN

£C °°
^ 5 0

FO R W O M EN

Postuc/e In clu d e d

ROSICRUCIAN
R O S I C R U C I A N PARK

SUPPLY
SAN J OSE.

BUREAU
C A L I F O R N I A . U.S.A.

TH E PU RPO SES OF

THE

ROSICRUCIAN

ORDER

“FU D O SI”
(Federation Unlverselle des Ordres et Societes In itlatlques)

M ember o f

T he Rosicrucian Order, existin g in all civilized lands, is a non-sectarian, fraternal body o f men and women devoted to the investigation, study, and practical application o f natural and spiritual laws. T h e purpose o f the organ i­ zation is to enable all to live in harm ony w ith the creative, constructive. Cosmic forces fo r the attainment o f health, happiness, and Peace. T h e O rder is internationally known as A M O R C (an abbreviation), and the AM O RC in Am erica, and all other lands, constitutes the only form o f R osi­ crucian activities united in one body having representation in the interna­ tional federation. T h e AM O R C does not sell its teachings, but gives them free ly to all affilia ted members, togeth er w ith many other benefits. Inqu irers seeking to know the history, purposes, and practical benefits that they may receive from Rosicrucian association, are Invited to send for the free book, "T h e Secret H e rita ge.” Address, F ria r S. P. C., care o f

AMORC TEM PLE R osicrucian Park. Ran Jose, C alifornia, IT. S. A.
(Cable Address: "A M O R C O " Radio Station W 6 H T B )

Officials of the ^ o r t h and S o u th American Ju risd ictio n s
(Including the United States, Dominion o f Canada, Alaska, M exico, Guatemala. Honduras, Nicaragua. Costa Rica, El Salvador, Republic o f Panama, the W est Indies, L o w e r California, and all land under the protection o f the United States o f America. ....... Im perator H. S PE N C E R L E W IS . F. R. C., Ph. D R A L P H M. L E W IS . F. R. C.............. Supreme Secretary C LE M E N T B. L E B R U N . F. R. C................................................................................................. Grand Master H A R V E Y M IL E S . F. R. C Grand Treasurer E T H E L B. W A R D . F. R. C Secretary to Grand Master H A R R Y L . S H IB L E Y , F. R. C.................. D irector o f Publications Junior O rder o f Torch Rearers (sponsored b v AM O R C ). F or complete inform ation as to its aims and benefits address General Secretary, Grand Chapter, Rosicrucian Park, San Jose. California.

T h e follow ing principal branches are District H eadqu arters o f A M O R C
Reading, Pennsylvania: Reading Chapter. Mr. Carl Schlotzhauer. Master: Mr. George R. Osman, Secretary. Meeting every 1st and 3rd Friday, 8:00 p. m., W ashington Hall, 904 W ashington Street. New York City, New York: New Y ork Chapter, Rooms 35-36, 711 8th Ave., cor. 8th Ave. and 45th Street. Louis Riccardi, M aster: M argaret Sharpe, Secre­ tary. Inquiry and reading rooms open week days and Sundays, 1 to 8 p. m. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Delta Lodge No. 1, A M O R C , S. E . Corner 40th and Brown Sts., 2nd Floor. M r. Albert Courtney, Master. Benjamin Franklin Chapter of A M O R C : W arren C. Aitken, Master: M artha Aitken, Secretary, 2203 N. 15th Street. Meetings for all members every second and fourth Sun­ days, 7:30 p. m., at 1521 W e st Girard Ave. (Second Floor, Room B ). Boston, Massachusetts: T h e Marie Clemens Lodge, Fortunatus J. Bagocius, Master. Temple and Reading Rooms, 739 Boylston St., Telephone Kenmore 9398. Detroit, Michigan: Thebes Chapter No. 336. Miss Ella A. Milliman, M aster; M rs. Pearl Anna Tifft. Secretary. Meetings at the Florence Room, Tuller Hotel, every Tuesday, 8 p. m. In­ quirers call dial phone No. 1870. San Francisco, California: Francis Bacon Lodge, 1655 Polk Mr. David Mackenzie, Master. Street:

(D irectory Continued on N ext P age)

Pittsburg, Pennsylvania: Penn. First Lodge. Ralph M. Ross, Master: 610 Arch Street. Atlanta, Georgia: Atlanta Chapter No. 650. Dr. James C. O akshette, M aster: Nassau Hotel. Meetings 7:30 every Thursday night. Los Angeles. California: Hermes Lodge, A M O R C Temple. Mr. Dun­ can G. W right, Master. Reading Room and Inquiry office open daily. 10 a. m. to 5 p. m. and 7:30 p.m . to 9 p.m . except Sundays. Granada Court, 672 South Lafayette Park Place. Birmingham, Alabama: Birmingham Chapter of A M O R C . For in­ formation address M r. Cuyler C. Berry, Master. 721 So. 85th St. Chicago, Illinois: Chicago Chapter No. 9. H. C. Blackwell, M aster: Mabel L. Schmidt, Secretary. T e le ­ phone Superior 6881. Reading Room open afternoons and evenings. Sundays 2 to 5 only. 100 E . Ohio St., Room 403-404. Lec­ ture sessions for A LL members every T u es­ day night, 8:00 p. m. Chicago Afra-American Chapter No. 10. Oliver T . McGrew, M aster: Nehemiah Dennis. Secretary. Meeting every W ednes­ day night at 8 o'clock, Y . M. C. A., 3763 So. W abash Avenue.

Portland, Oregon; Portland Chapter. Floyd D. Cook, Master: 405 Orpheum Bldg. Meetings every Thurs­ day, 8:00 p.m . at 714 S. W . 11th Avenue. Washington, D . C.: Thomas Jefferson Chapter. Howard E. Mertz, Master. Confederate Memorial Hall. 1322 Vermont Ave. N. W . Meetings every Friday, 8:00 p. m.

Seattle, Washington: A M O R C Chapter 586. Fred Motter, Master: Mrs. Carolina Henderson, Secretary. 311-14 Lowman Bldg., between 1st and 2nd Aves. on Cherry St. Reading room open week days 11 a. m. to 4:30 p. m. Visitors welcome. Chapter meetings each Monday, 8:00 p. m.

O ther Chartered Chapters and Lodges of the Rosicrucian Order (A M O R C ) will be found in most large cities and towns of North America. Address of local representatives given on request.

P R IN C IP A L C A N A D IA N
Vancouver, British Columbia: Canadian Grand Lodge, A M O R C . Mr. H. B. Kidd, M aster, A M O R C Temple, 878 Horn­ by Street. V ictoria, British Columbia; V ictoria Lodge, Mr. A. A. Calderwood, Master. Inquiry O ffic e and Reading Room, 101 Union Bank Bldg. Open week days 10 a. m. to 6 p. m. W innipeg, Manitoba, Canada: G. F. Gostick, M aster: 361 M achray Ave., Session for all members every Sunday. 2:45 p. m.. 304 " B " Enderton Bldg., Portage Ave. and Hargrave St.

BRANCHES

M ontreal, Quebec, Canada: Montreal Chapter. F. E . Dufty, Master; 210 W e st St. James Street. Inquiry office open 10 a. m. to 5 p. m. daily: Saturdays 10 to 1 p. m. Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Miss Edith Hearn. Master. Sessions 1st and 3rd Sundays of the month, 7:00 p. m., No. 10 Lansdowne Ave. E dm on ton , Alberta; Mr. Alfred H. Holmes, Master, 9533 Jasper Avenue E .

S P A N ISH A M E R IC A N

SE C T IO N

This jurisdiction includes all the Spanish-speaking Countries of the New W orld. Its Supreme Council and Administrative O ffice are located at San Juan, Puerto Rico, having local Represen­ tatives in all the principal cities of these stated Countries. T he name and address of the O fficers and Representatives in the jurisdiction will be furnished on application. A ll co rresp o n d en ce sh ou ld b e a d d ressed as fo llo w s: Secretary General of the Spanish-American Jurisdiction of A M O R C , P. O . Box 36, San Juan, Puerto Rico.

A FEW
Scandinavian Countries:

O F T H E F O R E IG N

JU R IS D IC T IO N S
Auckland Chapter A M O R C . Mr. G. A. Franklin, M aster, 317 Victoria Arcade Bids. Queen St., City Auckland.

New Zealand:

T h e A M O R C Grand Lodge of Denmark. Mr. Arthur Sundstrup, Grand M aster: Carli Anderson, S. R. C., Grand Secretary. Manogade 13th Strand, Copenhagen, Denmark. Sweden: Grand Lodge “Rosenkorset.” Anton Svanlund, F . R. C., Grand M aster. Jerusalemsgatan, 6, Malmo. H olland: D e Rozekruisers Orde; Groot-Lodge der Nederlanden. J. Coops, Gr. Sect., Hunzestraat 141, Amsterdam. France: M ile Jeanne Guesdon, S.R .C ., Corresponding Secretary for the Grand Lodge (A M O R C ) of France, 56 Rue Gambetta, Villeneuve Saint Georges, (Seine & O ise). Switzerland: A M O R C Grand Lodge. August Reichel, F . R. C., Gr. Sect., Riant-Port V evey-Plan. China and Russia: T he United Grand Lodge of China and Rus­ sia. Tem porary new address: 651 W e i Hai W ei Road, Ap. 22/b, Shanghai. Mail ad­ dress P .O . Box 513, Shanghai, China.
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England: T h e A M O R C Grand Lodge of Great Britain. M r. Raymund Andrea, K. R. C., Grand Master, 34 Bayw ater Ave., W estbury Park, Bristol 6 . Dutch and East Indies: Dr. W . T h . van Stokkum, Grand Master. W . J. Visser, Secretary-General. Karangtempel 10 Semarang, Java. Egypt: T h e Grand Orient of A M O R C . House of the Temple, M. A. Ramayvelim, F. R. C., Grand Secretary, 26, Avenue Ismalia, Heliopolis. Africa: T h e Grand Lodge of the Gold Coast, A M O R C . M r. W illiam Okai, Grand Master, P. O . Box 424 Accra, Gold Coast, W est Africa. T h e addresses o f o th er foreig n G ran d L o d g es and secretaries will b e furnished on application.
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UJILL IDE BE BORE AQAin m PAin AT1 D SUFFERlTiq ?
M u S T we relive the misfortunes, discour­ agements, and failures of this life? Does death deliver us permanently from the vicissitudes of tlie earth, or is it a temporary respite, returning us once more to the world of man? Is death a glorious opportunity to begin again, at some other time and place, to undo what we have done, and to prolit by our experiences of the pasO Shall we instead look upon death as the end, the close of a chapter, with its story incomplete and imperfect? Does our span here of a few years constitute our sole existence as humans, and if so, is that Divine justice? There are no questions which the human mind can entertain that are more intimate or more vital than these. I hey are interestingly answered and discussed in a marvelous discourse entitled, " I he Soul s Return,’ prepared by Dr. H. Spencer Lewis. 1 his discourse represents years of study on this subject and his fascinating conclusions. To the point, under­ standable and instructive, this manuscript should be in your possession as a valuable document on the subject of reincarnation. You may obtain it A B S O L U T E L Y W I T H O U T C O S T by merely subscribing to this magazine, I he Rosicrucian Digest. for just six months. A six-months subscription costs only 1.50 a nd in addi tion to receiving six copies of this magazine, you will receive at once, with postage paid, this most unusual discourse, which alone is worth more than the magazine subscription price. There are but a limited number of these discourses available, so we ad vise that vou subscribe at once, and A SK FO R Y O U R G IF T COPY.

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T h e discourse. I he Soul s Return, w as once published serially, in answ er to hun ­ dreds of questions about reincarnation re­ ceived from throughout the w orld by D r. L ew is. T h is is the first time it has evei been released in m anuscript form in its en­ tirety. F o r interesting particulars, read above.

The
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^Rosicrucian Library
The follow ing books are a few o f several recommended because of the special knowledge they contain, not to be found in our teachings and not available elsewhere. Catalogue of all publica­ tions free upon request. Volume II. R O S IC R U C IA N P R IN C IP L E S F O R T H E H O M E A N D B U SIN E SS.
A very practical book dealing with the solution o f health, financial, and business problems in the home and office. W ell printed and bound in red silk, stamped with gold. Price, 52.00 per copy, postpaid.

Volume III.

T H E M Y S T IC A L L IF E O F JESUS.

A rare account o f the Cosmic preparation, birth, secret studies, mission, crucifixion, and later life o f the Great Master, from the records of the Essene and Rosicrucian Brotherhoods. A book that is demanded in foreign lands as the most talked about revelation o f Jesus ever made. Over 300 pages, beautifully illustrated, bound in purple silk, stamped in gold. Price, $2.25 per copy, postpaid.

Volume V.

“ U N T O T H E E I* O R A N T . .

A strange book prepared from a secret manuscript found in the monastery o f Tibet. It is filled with the most sublime teachings o f the ancient Masters o f the F a r East. The book has had many editions. W ell printed w ith attractive cover. Price, $1.25 per copy, postpaid.

Volume V I.

A TH O USAND YE AR S OF YESTERD AYS.

A beautiful story o f reincarnation and mystic lessons. This unusual book has been translated and sold in many languages and universally endorsed. W ell printed and bound with attractive cover. Price, 85c per copy, postpaid.

Volume V II.

S E L F M A S T E R Y A N D F A T E , W IT H T H E C Y C L E S O F L IF E .

A new and astounding system o f determ ining your fortunate and unfortunate itours, weeks, months, and years throughout your life. No mathematics required. B etter than any system o f numerology or astrology. Bound in silk, stamped in gold. Price, $2.00 per copy, postpaid.

Volume

Vni.

T H E R O S IC R U C IA N M A N U A L .

Most complete outline o f the rules, regulations, and ’operations o f lodges and student work o f the Order with many interesting articles, biographies, explanations, and complete dictionary o f Rosicrucian terms and words. V ery com pletely illustrated. A necessity to every student who wishes to progress rapidly, and a guide to all seekers. W ell printed and bound in silk, stamped w ith gold. Price, $2.00 per copy, postpaid.

* * ■ >

Volume X I.

M A N S IO N S O F T H E SOUL, T H E COSM IC C O N C E P T IO N .
Well

The complete doctrines o f reincarnation explained. This book makes reincarnation easily understood. illustrated, bound in silk, stamped in gold, extra large. Price, $2.20 per copy, postpaid.

Volume X II.

L E M U R IA — T H E L O S T C O N T IN E N T O F T H E P A C IF IC .

The revelation o f an ancient and long forgotten M ystic civilization. Fascinating and intriguing. Learn how these people came to be swept from the earth. K n o w o f their vast knowledge, much of which is lost to man­ kind today. W ell printed and bound, illustrated with charts and maps. Price, $2.20 per copy, postpaid.

Volume X III.

T H E T E C H N IQ U E O F T H E M A S T E R .

The newest and most complete 'uide for attaining the state o f Cosmic Consciousness. It is a masterful work on psychic unfoldinent. Price, $1.1 a per copy, postpaid.

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Our Suggestion To You A MEETING OF THE MINDS
C 1 J W hen you write, you have one party in mind. Tliat party may be one individual or a group of tbem, but your thoughts are alone for them. You do not wish your thoughts to reach a mind or minds for whom they were not intended. Furthermore, you do not wish others to interpret your ideas for you. However. this is only possible when you take tfie proper pre­ cautions to see that your communications are brought directly to the personal attention of your correspondent. The Rosicrucian student who fails to properly address his or her communications, or give all needed information lor their proper delivery, causes his or her letter or report to be read, interpreted, and handled by many persons before reaching its proper destination. I o avoid such conditions and to facilitate a prompt re­ ply to communications, we have prepared a special large ( orrespondence 1ablet for students, at an economical price. 1 he cover of the tablet is also especially useful. Besides being a blotter, there is printed upon it all essen­ ST I ’DENT'S tial instructions as I o W h o m , W h e r e and W h e n T o CORRESPONDENCE W r i t e . At the top of each sfieet there is printed informa­ TABLET tion lor the proper direction of your letter. 1 he stationery E ach tablet contains 50 Inrye S '/a -in cli x 1 i-in r ii business size consists of a light, strong, and good quality bond paper. sheets. T h e blotter cover w ith its printed inform ation about I his is a most serviceable article and one that no the various departments is a use tut addition lo each tablet. student should be without. ^ ou owe it to yourself to make -10c each ; 3 for S 1 .0 0 this reasonable purchase. Send order and remittance to:

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J OSE.

DR. J . C. GUIDERO
Prater Guidero, a member of the Order for years, was one of the founders of Hermes Lodge of A M O R C in Los Angeles, for years master of that body, and for the last several years has been Deputy Grand Master of the Order for the jurisdiction of Southern California. He is well known to thousands of members in Southern California, who enjoy his jovial personality and wise counsel. (C o u rtesy of R osicrucian D igest.)

The Spark of Qenius
• • •

H O W TO KI NDLE IT
not let it d ie wi thin your bosom for want ol direction and expression. T h e Rosicrucians (not a religious organization) have for cen turies shown men and women like yoursell how to marshal their Heeling thoughts, make out of them important factors for achieve­ ment and accom plishm ent in life. Their simple and rational method for the direction of mind and the aw a ken in g of the dormant powers of self is founded upon an age-old system ol personal development, used by the sages since antiquity.

F lo w in g hair and flowing lies do not make a genius, but the How of ideas does. T h e world may never beat a path to your door or bestow honors upon you, b u t if you receive one original idea about your work, trade, or profession, you will rise head and shoulders above all others a b o u t you. T h e world is teeming with those who say about the sue cesses of life, W h y didn t I think of th a t? T h e reason is th at they were w aiting to be struck with an idea. D o not let the years slip by. hoping for an idea with great possi­ bilities to descend upon you. Ideas are thoughts and they can be generated, brought into realization, m ade into everyday realities —but you must know how.

I his Startling B o o k — Free
I lie Secret H eritage is a hook w hich contains no bom bastic promises, no va in assurances, but a trank in vi­ tation to a va il yourselt ol the know ledge it oilers. T h o u ­ sands have been led by it from m ediocrity to the highest pin nacle of their hopes, for it tells just flow you may a vail yourself of this helpfu l inform ation the Rosicrucians gla d ly give. Lise the coupon below and w rite today for your tree copy, il you are sincere in your w ish to advance in life.

T h at M ysterious Som ething
H a v e you ever bad th at tightenin g s en sa ­ tion in your solar plexus, that slight Hush of excitement from a sudden impression that you could improve on the work ol another? Have you felt the irresistible urge to create, to build, to originate, to do differently than you have ever done, and yet. do not know where to b e g in ? It is the mysterious creative power, the spark of genius w ithin you. D o

Scribe S. P. C . Rositrtn ian O rde r, A M O R ( San Jose, C a lifo rn ia
Gentlem en: I am sincerely interested in the un usua l know ledge possessccf b y the R osicrucians; therefore, k in d ly send me a F R E E ropy of " T h e Secret H eritage at once, exp la ining how I may obtain the inform ation they oiler.

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ROSICRUCIAN DIGEST
THK OFFICIAL IN TERNA TIO NAL BO SK R IC IA N MAGA­ ZINE O F T I I K W O RLD-W IDE ROSICRUCIAN ORDER
Vol. X IV J U N E , 1936 C O N T E N T S Dr. J . C . G u id ero (Frontispiece) ... No. 5 Page 161 164 169 173 175 176 177 180 183 185 195 197 .... C O V ER S THE W O R LD

The Thought of the M onth: The AntiJewish Propaganda ..................................... C rim e in A m erica C ath ed ral C ontacts Thoughts A b o u t Honesty A n cien t Symbolism Summaries of Science C onvention Arouses Enthusiasm Pages from the Past Sanctum Musings: The Philosophy of M arriage The Rosicrucian Planetarium

H a i^ b JiL S

Thousands H e a r Rosicrucian Lecture (Illustration)

IIIIIIIH IM IIIM H Iim M IIIIIM IM IIIM IIim illM M IM IIIU n iM lllllllllllllllllim ilM llin ilM IIIIIIIIIIIII!

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Published Monthly by the Supreme Counoil of

C v T T iV ^ l IV

T H E R O S IC R U C IA N O R D E R — A M O R C

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SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA
M

THOUGHT OF THE MONTH
THE ANTI-JEWISH PRO PAG AN D A

TH E

T may seem strange to s o m e of our members and read­ ers that with so m a n y bombastic news items in the p a p e r s from all parts of the world i n f o r m i n g us of highly "i mportant” council meetings, a n d international discussions, I should look upon the anti-Jewish propaganda as an out­ standing thing to constitute my thought for the month. But there is growinn in the United States and in some other parts of the W e s t e r n W o r l d a campaign of propa­ ganda and outright, deliberate, ridicu­ lous attacks upon the Jewish people generally, O u r members and friends send to us from one end of the month to the other leaflets, pamphlets, circulars, newspaper items, magazine stories, and what-not presenting the pro and con of this absurd campaign. T o the mystic and the philosopher, as to the artist, musician, and inventor, there is no na­ tionalism and no racial distinctions that warrant the individual in looking upon any one nation or race or sectarian class of persons as universally inferior, evilminded. detrimental to world peace and happiness, or deserving of unrestricted condemnation. The W i t h i n the past twenty-five years R osicru cian there have been a number of campaigns D igest started in different parts of the W e s t e r n June W o r l d attempting to point out that the Jewish people as a race have no other 1936

ambition in their hearts or minds than to conquer the world and particularly to conquer Gr ea t Britain, Canada, and the United States. In the literature issued by these wild propagandists we were told twenty or more years ago that the Jewish people had everything planned and definitely settled to seize hold of and control all of the farm and agricul­ tural lands of the United States by 1930, and that thereafter all other per­ sons in these States would be under the tyrannical and nefarious dominion of the Jewish people. A s 1930 approached the literature setting forth this great scheme became less prolific, less definite, and finally disappeared, and the idea was even abandoned by those who were the most vociferous in their assurances that we were all condemned to submis­ sion to such racial control. T h e year 1930 came and the predicted revolu­ tions and seizure of our great lands failed to make appearance. On e of the very disturbing incidents of the Ameri­ can national life that let the bottom drop out of the campaign’s argument was the fact that in the economic crash of 1929 Jews and Gentiles alike suffered and. in fact, some of the greatest financial in­ stitutions that were disasterously affect­ ed by the collapse were those either owned, controlled, or directed by per­ sons of the Jewish faith. T h e power which was claimed to be in their hands and by which they would take advant­ age of every situation and never lose but always gain was quite evidently misrepresented by the propagandists. Since 1930 campaign after campaign along new lines, often very original be­ cause very absurd, has been carried on
O ne H undred Sixty-four

through the wide dissemination of liter­ ature and by news articles and stories in such distinctly class publications as that issued by an organization attempt­ ing to promote a “ C hristian" political party by fanning into wild flame the mild antagonism that a small portion of the American populace has toward per­ sons and things distinctly Jewish. As matters stand today, it would ap­ pear that anything that is wrong was born in the Jewish mind, and that a n y ­ thing evil was concocted out o f Jewish instincts, and any program or practice that is not to o n e’s liking can be instant­ ly catalogued as being Jewish and, therefore, deserving of immediate criti­ cism and destruction. A ccording to these propagandists, since all evil ema­ nates from Jewish intellect and Jewish power, the great spiritual writers, philo­ sophers, and mystics made a serious mistake in all of the past ages in not realizing that Sa ta n was a Jew and that His Satanic M a je s ty and his entire kingdom constitute the center and source of all Jewish traditions and practices. In fact, the fires of hell must be attended by the m ost devout o f the Jews, if we are to believe the ridiculous stories of these propagandists. Since G od is the opposite of all evil and if all that is evil is Jewish, then G o d must be a Gentile — wholly, exclusively so. H o w it comes about that the Jews have ever been de­ vout worshippers of this same G o d which the Gentiles love and adore, is one of the mysteries which the propa­ gandists have not yet solved in their

inimical and most efficient im agery.
As a typical sample of the foolish propaganda now in circulation in the form of pamphlets, leaflets, broadsides, long dissertations, and documents being sent through the mail to every person whose address can be secured, we have one three-sheet specimen of literature entitled, “A Constructive A n t i- P r o ­ gram.' T h e program outlined therein is anti-everything that can be directly or indirectly traced to Jewish influence by a distorted imagination. T h e r e is noth­ ing at all “constructive" about the liter­ ature or the plan it contains. All of the evils of our present times not only in America but throughout the world are attributed to the Jews. T h e reason our American dollar is worth only 59c is be­ cause the Jews have seized hold of the
O ne H un dred S ixty-five

other 4 1 c somewhere, somehow. T h e only reason that eleven million men are out of employment is because the Jews are in control of all the good positions— despite the fact that among the eleven million unemployed there are several million who are orthodox Jews. T h e reason that the sands of the desert blow over cities, the waters of the rivers over­ flow their banks, the snow came in bliz­ zards during the winter, and the rain fell too heavily along with storms at sea and significant spots on the sun, is be­ cause the Jews have directed these things in order to help whip Americans and others into submission to their in­ sidious power. A n d as a demonstration of the false and ridiculous length to which these propagandists will go to try to prove one of their absurd contentions, one of the pages in this large piece of propa­ ganda is devoted to an attack upon Franklin Roosevelt, the President o f the United States. T h e attack is not a fair and argumentative criticism of his ad ­ ministration generally, such as we are apt to hear from the mouths of sane and sensible persons during a political cam ­ paign, or as we might hear from the lips of men and women who are good citi­ zens and who honestly and patriotically analyze national conditions with a hope of improving them. T h e attack begins on its first line with unkind and flippant terms attempting to portray President Roosevelt as a typical Jew, because for­ sooth, Roosevelt admitted at one time somewhere that perhaps his ancestry could be traced back far enough to show that there were Jews in their families or persons of the Jewish faith or race. T h e same thing might be said of many of our very best families in America, and if connections with persons of the Jewish religion is a stigma, a great many noble families in America and elsewhere in the world had better hurriedly burn their genealogies before these propagandists get hold of them. T h e n to support the idea that the Government of the U nited States, and particularly during this period under the Roosevelt administration, is strictly within Jewish control, the circular at­ tempts to show that the new one dollar bill, issued during 1935 under the Roosevelt administration, is a “ Jew ish” one dollar bill. F o r proof of this con-

E ?

THOUGHT OF THE MONTH
THE ANTI-JEWISH PRO PAGAND A

T H E

T may seem strange to s o m e of our members and read ­ ers that w'ith so m a n y bombastic news items in the p a p e r s from all parts of the world i n f o r m i n g us of highly “important" council meetings, a n d international discussions, I should look upon the anti-Jewish propaganda as an out­ standing thing to constitute my thought for the month. But there is growinn in the United States and in some other parts of the W e s t e r n W o r l d a campaign of propa­ ganda and outright, deliberate, ridicu­ lous attacks upon the Jewish people generally. O u r members and friends send to us from one end of the month to the other leaflets, pamphlets, circulars, newspaper items, magazine stories, and what-not presenting the pro and con of this absurd campaign. T o the mystic and the philosopher, as to the artist, musician, and inventor, there is no n a­ tionalism and no racial distinctions that warrant the individual in looking upon any one nation or race or sectarian class of persons as universally inferior, evilminded. detrimental to world peace and happiness, or deserving of unrestricted condemnation. The W ith in the past twenty-five years R osicru cian there have been a number of campaigns D igest started in different parts of the W e s t e r n Ju n e W o r ld attempting to point out that the 1936 Jewish people as a race have no other

ambition in their hearts or minds than to conquer the world and particularly to conquer G reat Britain. Canada, and the United States. In the literature issued by these wild propagandists we were told twenty or more years ago that the Jewish people had everything planned and definitely settled to seize hold of and control all of the farm and agricul­ tural lands of the United States by 1930. and that thereafter all other per­ sons in these States would be under the tyrannical and nefarious dominion of the Jewish people. A s 1930 approached the literature setting forth this great scheme became less prolific, less definite, and finally disappeared, and the idea was even abandoned by those who were the most vociferous in their assurances that we were all condemned to submis­ sion to such racial control. T h e year 1930 came and the predicted revolu­ tions and seizure of our great lands failed to make appearance. O n e of the very disturbing incidents of the Ameri­ can national life that let the bottom drop out of the cam paign’s argument was the fact that in the economic crash of 1929 Jews and Gentiles alike suffered and. in fact, some of the greatest financial in­ stitutions that were disasterously affect­ ed by the collapse were those either owned, controlled, or directed by per­ sons of the Jewish faith. T h e power which was claimed to be in their hands and by wrhich they wrould take advant­ age of every situation and never lose but alw-ays gain was quite evidently misrepresented by the propagandists. Since 1930 campaign after campaign along new lines, often very original be­ cause very absurd, has been carried on
O n e H undred Sixty-four

through the wide dissemination of liter­ ature and by news articles and stories in such distinctly class publications as that issued by an organization attempt­ ing to promote a “ C hristian ” political party by fanning into wild flame the mild antagonism that a small portion of the American populace has toward per­ sons and things distinctly Jewish. A s matters stand today, it would ap­ pear that anything that is wrong was born in the Jewish mind, and that a n y ­ thing evil was concocted out of Jewish instincts, and any program or practice that is not to one's liking can be instant­ ly catalogued as being Jewish and, therefore, deserving of immediate criti­ cism and destruction. According to these propagandists, since all evil ema­ nates from Jewish intellect and Jewish power, the great spiritual writers, philo­ sophers, and mystics made a serious mistake in all of the past ages in not realizing that S atan was a Jew and that His Satanic M a je s ty and his entire kingdom constitute the center and source of all Jewish traditions and practices. In fact, the fires of hell must be attended by the most devout of the Jews, if we are to believe the ridiculous stories of these propagandists. Since G od is the opposite of all evil and if all that is evil is Jewish, then G o d must be a Gentile — wholly, exclusively so. H o w it comes about that the Jews have ever been de­ vout worshippers of this same G o d which the Gentiles love and adore, is one of the mysteries which the propa­ gandists have not yet solved in their inimical and most efficient imagery. As a typical sample of the foolish propaganda now in circulation in the form of pamphlets, leaflets, broadsides, long dissertations, and documents being sent through the mail to every person whose address can be secured, we have one three-sheet specimen of literature entitled, " A Constructive A n t i- P r o ­ gram.’ T h e program outlined therein is anti-everything that can be directly or indirectly traced to Jewish influence by a distorted imagination. T h e r e is noth­ ing at all “constructive” about the liter­ ature or the plan it contains. All of the evils of our present times not only in America but throughout the world are attributed to the Jews. T h e reason our American dollar is worth only 59c is be­ cause the Jew s have seized hold of the
One H undred S ixty-five

other 4 1 c somewhere, somehow. T h e only reason that eleven million men are out of employment is because the Jew s are in control of all the good positions— despite the fact that among the eleven million unemployed there are several million who are orthodox Jews. T h e reason that the sands of the desert blow over cities, the waters of the rivers over­ flow their banks, the snow came in bliz­ zards during the winter, and the rain fell too heavily along with storms at sea and significant spots on the sun, is be­ cause the Jews have directed these things in order to help whip Americans and others into submission to their in­ sidious power. A n d as a demonstration of the false and ridiculous length to which these propagandists will go to try to prove one o f their absurd contentions, one of the pages in this large piece of propa­ ganda is devoted to an attack upon Franklin Roosevelt, the President of the United States. T h e attack is not a fair and argumentative criticism of his a d ­ ministration generally, such as we are apt to hear from the mouths of sane and sensible persons during a political cam ­ paign, or as we might hear from the lips of men and women who are good citi­ zens and who honestly and patriotically analyze national conditions with a hope of improving them. T h e attack begins on its first line with unkind and flippant terms attempting to portray President Roosevelt as a typical Jew, because for­ sooth, Roosevelt admitted at one time somewhere that perhaps his ancestry could be traced back far enough to show that there were Jews in their families or persons of the Jewish faith or race. T h e same thing might be said of many of our very best families in America, and if connections with persons of the Jewish religion is a stigma, a great many noble families in America and elsewhere in the world had better hurriedly burn their genealogies before these propagandists get hold of them. T h e n to support the idea that the Government of the United States, and particularly during this period under the Roosevelt administration, is strictly within Jewish control, the circular a t­ tempts to show that the new one dollar bill, issued during 1935 under the Roosevelt administration, is a “ Jew ish” one dollar bill. F o r proof of this con-

in the center of the triangle represent the letters “M C L A , ” or the Jewish word “M e z la ,” which is generally interpreted by all of the Jewish authorities as mean­ ing a “benediction and the blessings of wisdom from the most High Influence.” It may be considered in modern times as a “good lu ck" symbol, but in reality it is a sacred symbol or benediction and not one to be used lightly by those who wings there is a circular h alo o f glory have the highest understanding o f its in the clouds in the center of which are meaning. Among many Jews of the grouped thirteen five-pointed stars. T h e present time there is a more or less com­ writer ignores the significance and sym ­ mon greeting or passing salutation in bolism of the number thirteen in this the words “ M o zel-to v ,” which means group, but calls attention to the fact that good luck or “the best of everything to these thirteen stars are so arranged that you ." by tracing an outline of their group one B ut this symbol of the interlaced tri­ discovers that they are in the form of a angles was not invented by the Jews six-pointed star. T h e n he ignores that and has never been limited strictly to this six-pointed star is in truth an inter­ Jewish use. Among the Rosicrucians laced or double triangle, one triangle and mystics, and especially among the having its apex upward and the other alchemists, metaphysicians, the Essenes having its apex downward. T h e n quot­ and the Therapeuti, this sacred symbol ing from some ancient books he shows had a significance that w as not re­ that this very, very old emblem or inter­ ducible to the terse and commonplace laced triangle is called King Solom on’s expression of good luck, nor was it Seal and was a part of the famous sym­ limited or associated in any particular bolical breastplate supposed to have w ay in the minds of the mystics with been worn by King Solomon and worn any exclusive connections with the Jew ­ b y the high priests of the Jewish re­ ish faith. T h e writer of this critical pro­ ligion in their symbolic ceremonies. He paganda fails to realize that almost all shows also a reproduction o f a medal o f the racial symbolism and mystical that some Jewish organization prepared terminology, as well as the dates of the as a token of appreciation to Roosevelt holy days and sacred ceremonies co n­ on the back of which is this King So lo ­ stituting the basic prayers of the Jewish mon's Seal with the three Jewish ch ar­ religion, came from E g y p t and from acters in the center of it thus making a O riental lands. T o use this symbol, complete replica of one of the most therefore, as it is on the Seal of the ancient of all the mystical, occult United States to prove that Roosevelt is a Jew and that he has “sold out” the symbols. T h e contention o f the writer o f the American Goverment to the Jews is just circular is that the mystical symbol so absurd that it would be laughable means “ good luck and wisdom to except when we realize that there are a Franklin D. R oosevelt, our m odern few weak-minded and foolish persons in every country of the world who are M o se s leading Jewry in the Promised Land (A m erica) under the Seal of So lo ­ worse than sheep in following the m o n .’’ Could anything b e m ore ri­ thoughts o f som e leader who attempts to impress his listeners with the idea diculous! It is true, as every student of the that he is most profound in his under­ standing of things and very cunning in K abala and of the Z o h ar, and of ancient his ability to see behind the significance mystical symbolism knows, that this six-pointed star or interlaced triangle is of everything. And in addition to the fact that the known as the “sign of the macrocosm or The Seal of King Solomon is older than the the creation of the greater w orld,” for Rosicrucian Jewish people or Jewish religion, this the six points are supposed to be repre­ Digest new one dollar bill with the Seal of the sentative of the six days of creation of June United States on it does not represent the universe. T h e Jewish characters or a new idea just released by M r. R oose­ 1936 letters of the Jewish alphabet which are
O n e H u n dred S ixty-six

tention, the writer of the circular who signs himself R obert E . Edmondson “publicist-economist," called attention to the fact that this one dollar bill has on one side the reverse and obverse il­ lustrations of the G re a t Seal of the United States. T h e n he calls attention to the fact that if a person exam ines the obverse side of the Seal he will note that directly over the eagle with its spread

velt. It was our unquestionably loyal and truly patriotic statesm an of the past, Benjamin Franklin, who was chairman of a committee of three to invent and design the original Seal of the United States and, as a mystic and Rosicrucian, Benjamin Franklin took up this matter of the G reat Seal while he was in F ra n ce and brought back to America a mystical seal filled with mystical symbolism of a prophetic nature. It was in this original seal, submitted by Franklin and adopted by our C ongress back in the 18th cen ­ tury, that this group of stars first ap­ peared over the eagle and certainly B e n ­ jamin Franklin was not a Jew nor were any of the members of his committee, nor were all the members of C ongress Jews, and the President of the United States at that time was certainly not a Jew. W h y does not M r . Edmondson refer to the reverse side of the G re a t Seal which also appears on the one dollar bill? In that part of the Seal we see the G reat Pyramid of E g y p t with its apex suspended in the air in the form of a triangle and in the center of this the All Seeing E y e . Here is the remainder of the mystical symbolism of the S e a l and if M r. Ed m ondson’s arguments are in accordance with logical reasoning, he should claim that because half of the Seal of the United S tates has a Jewish symbol on it and the other half has an E gyptian symbol on it, there is going to be a constant struggle in the United States between the Egyptian s and the Jews to own and control the country and people, and that as we walk down the street or attempt to buy or sell real estate or attempt to carry on our every day affairs, we should constantly watch out for either the Jew w ho may be just in front of us ready to rob us, or the Egyptian who may be standing behind us ready to mystify us or perhaps throw us into a hypnotic sleep and take every­ thing aw ay from us before the other fellow does. Y e s, all modern civilized countries grant a certain amount of freedom of the press and freedom of speech to e x ­ press our wishes, but does it not seem that these privileges are becoming a license to attack and tear down, thus wilfully and maliciously deceiving a portion of the public? A s soon as we begin to analyze our worldly and personal difficulties and at­
One H un dred Sixty~seven

tempt to excuse our own w eaknesses, or try to find the cause outside of ourselves and pin the matter down to a difference in religion, race, nationality, or some­ thing else, we are not only making fools of ourselves, but we are stirring up a fundamental instinct that has been the basis of wars, unrest, intrigue, and de­ struction. T h a t there are bad Jews is just as true and unmistakable as the fact that there are bad Gentiles. T h a t as a race of people the Jews have had to exercise cunning as their greatest per­ sonal asset in place of political power is not a fault but a circumstance of their situation in the world. T h a t they have for centuries and in all countries been picked as the race to be severely criti­ cized is not the fault of any of the pres­ ent day Jews, nor probably a fault of those that represented the highest and finest principles of Jew ry. It has been due entirely to the unfortunate tendency o f human nature for the stronger to pick upon the w eaker with the inevitable re­ sult that the w eaker are constantly seeking to lift themselves up in selfdefense. If the Jews ever attain, as a race of people in this country or else­ where, one tenth of the political power, financial power, cunning, fortitude, and aggrandizement that is being attributed to them by these propagandists, it will be due entirely to these continuous campaigns of attack. O n ly by realizing that we are all children of God, all having our in­ dividual weaknesses, evil tendencies, misunderstandings, ambitions, desires, and dreams, can we put ourselves in attunement with the Cosmic and place ourselves physically and mentally in the category of universal brotherhood. Until we learn to love all men and all women as we should love G od and His crea­ tures, and until we learn to think kindly o f every creature, even those who have walked in the shadows of sin and evil, can we hope to find salvation and free­ dom from the false shackles that hold us earthbound to the grossest and most animalistic instincts. T h e soul in the body of a Jew today may be the soul in the body of one born in the Christian religion and attaining heights in C h ris­ tian theology in the next century. W e may reject the friendship of a Jew to­ day only to find it necessary, or co n ­ venient, or profitable tomorrow to a c ­

cept not only his friendship but his hand in fellowship. Some of these propagandists have claimed that A M O R C in its foundation in America and the Supreme Grand Lodge in its activities in Sa n Jose are owned or controlled by Jews. Aside from the falseness of this situation there is a question of purpose or reason. W o u l d the A M O R C be less than it is today, or better than it is today, if Jews had laid the foundation for its American activities and were today directing its affairs? I frankly admit that I cannot answer such a question, and I have yet to find anyone who can answer it with­ out beginning his argument with bias and prejudice. T o those who think that other world events occurring right now or precipi­ tating unhappy conditions in various places constitutes more important matter for the thought o f the month than this analysis of the anti-Jewish propaganda, let me say that the very spirit of this

anti-Jewish propaganda is the spirit of the wars that are in the offing, that are being planned right now, that millions of people are attempting to prevent and which millions o f persons have had to suffer and pay for in the past. T h e spirit o f this anti-propaganda is the spirit of racial and religious hatred and that is the foundation and the basis of m an’s greatest errors of a personal and na­ tional nature and until this unnatural,

poisonous, destructive spirit in man can
be eliminated and he can love his fellow beings for their good qualities and for­ give them for their evil ones and never give thought to their race or religion, universal peace and universal brother­ hood can never be established and the individual himself can never shake off the shackles and chains that tie him down to the lowest plane on earth. ( T h e foregoing remarks represent the personal opinions of the Imperator as dictated b y him for this department. — E d itor)

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ATTEND THE ROSICRUCIAN CONVENTION — JULY 12-18

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COME W IT H U S T O EG Y PT
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The Rosicrucian Digest June
1936

There is still am ple time to m ak e reservations to accompany us on our tour next January through the Mediterranean to Egypt, Palestine, and a dozen or more other countries bordering on the Mediterranean and in the very cradle of civilization. T his unique tour, the second that has been conducted by A M O R C , will be under the direction of the Imperator and his wife, and will include practically fifty cities of interest to students of mysticism and ancient history. It will include outstanding features that have never been included in any other trip to the Orient or to the mystical lands. Special trains, steamship, entire hotels, and chartered automobiles in every city will make the tour conven ient, luxurious, and happy and yet extremely economical. T h e price for this tour is lower than any similar tour with so many special features, and will be an unforgettable event in the life of each one who participates. Any member of any section or grade of our work with his or her immediate relatives is entitled to go on this trip. W om en, unaccompanied by their husbands, or young people who have been fearful of travelling alone, will find this an unusual opportunity to travel safely in good companionship and with the utmost of en joym en t. T he tour will last about sixty days beginning the last week of January, 1937. F o r further information and registration, write to the Rosicrucian Egyptian T our Secretary, C/o A M O R C , Rosicrucian Park, San Jose, California.

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One H undred S ixty-eight

Crim e In America
HOW ROSICRUCIANS WOULD PREVENT IT
B y F r a t e r H a rv e y M ile s , F .

R. C.

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age and strength to face facts will O A T T E M P T an analyze the picture, and obtain that article on Crime jewel o f T R U T H that was smothered P r e v e n t i o n and in glamor, while the others remain in cover the subject thoroughly with­ ignorance and wonder. T h e re fo re , we will, in our humble out incurring re­ way, try to assist in the prevention of buff and censure, or hurting some­ crime by pointing out to our fellow Rosicrucians and to all seekers of light one's feelings and causing some mis­ who read this article, the cause o f crime understanding, is and how to prevent it. Crime is desig­ nated as being the commission o f an act difficult i n d e e d . forbidden by public law, or a violation T h e real t r u t h of public right. J. M artineau said, generally has to be “Human society may punish us for our submerged and left for those who are crimes; human monitors may reprove us willing to digdeeply and then are big enough to accept itwhen they have for it. vices; but G o d alone can charge upon us the sin which H e alone is able T R U T H suffers because of the narrow ­ ness o f its receptors, and that is the to forgive." A nd that sin which only G od can forgive us is the T H O U G H T reason that pages and sometimes vol­ we hold in our minds. N o man-made umes are written to explain a truth or a principle when it could be given in just law can punish us for our evil thoughts. W e can rob, murder, plunder, and com­ a few words. W h e n a philosopher, a mystic, or a mit the most atrocious crimes in our thinker in any field of truth and le arn­ mind and nothing but G O D can repri­ ing wishes to convey new light to those mand us; but the M A N I F E S T A T I O N who are groping in ignorance and dark­ of those T H O U G H T S are punishable ness, in superstition and fear, in delusion by law. M a n is born a destroyer, as well as and deception, and he feels that it may not be well accepted, he paints or a creator, of life. If crime is the taking of a m an’s life for a personal, unjust creates a beautiful picture around the deed, or for the preservation of o n e ’s truth and by the time he has finished own life, man is simply acting under an with his picture you have missed the impulse that is born in him; for man­ T R U T H which he so desired to con­ kind the world over is imbued with the vey. But the earnest soul w ho has cour­
O n e H un dred S ixty-nin e

desire to kill. A s a rule, man does not care so much what he kills, just so he can prove the mastery of life through physical force. M e n by the hundreds go out into the woods and fields during hunting season and slaughter and kill beautiful and graceful animals just for the joy of killing, and call it sport. T h e y will come back from a hunting or sport­ ing trip, so-called, and express them­ selves on the great jo y and the wonder­ ful feeling that it is to watch an animal drop after they have carefully levelled a gun at its head and pulled the trigger. Civilized man roams the jungles of India, A frica, and the M a la y Peninsula, lurking to kill some beautiful specimens of various types of animals just for the jo y of watching an animal fall after levelling a gun at its head. T h e y do not need to kill these animals for food or self-preservation, but it is the jo y of killing that they desire. T h e y call it sport. M A N I S B O R N A C R I M I N A L ; H E D O ES N O T BEC O M E ONE. M a n evolves from the criminal through civilization and the cultivation of the H I G H E R M I N D and his psychic facul­ ties, and it is such teachings as the R osi­ crucian philosophy that give man an understanding of life and teach him the value of it. All life is sacred in the di­ vine scheme of things, and no man has the right to kill; yet some of our most cultured minds prepare to slaughter mankind wholesale by w ay of nation­ wide w arfare. If we are willing to admit that we are born with the inclination to destroy life and that the first thing w e would do to preserve our own existence is to kill, then we must say that to prevent crime we must begin at home with the chil­ dren, because the development of crime begins in the mind of the adolescent. T h e mind of the child is the most fertile soil for the stimulation and breeding of TH O U G H TS O F LUST, M URDER, T H I E V E R Y , F A L S E H O O D , and all other types of crime; and the best edu­ cators of crime are your daily papers, the moving pictures of certain types, seventy-five per cent of the magazines The purchased from news-stands, obscene Rosicrucian literature that gets into the home by Digest various channels, and stories that are June told by the parents in the presence of their children. Children between the 1936

ages of seven and fourteen will go to a show, witness an atrocious crime in the play, and they will come home so e x ­ cited and enthralled over the lust which they were permitted to witness that they dream about it day and night, and final­ ly they decide to execute the same per­ formance— but only in play. T h e y re­ construct the scene, but the fun turns out to be disastrous; for an accident occurs that they do not expect and if the child is old enough to go to a re­ formatory or a home of correction, that becomes his future home. If he is more unfortunate, he may be sent to some penitentiary where he will get future education along similar lines. W e read in the newspapers that if a child twelve years of age commits a major crime in Soviet Russia, he will be liable for the full penalties of the law, including capital punishment, the same as adults. Isn ’t that enlightening for mothers and fathers? Children born in the midst of vibrations of the most hor­ rible crimes, being punished by death and executed by the very people who have been responsible for the increase of crime in their country. Imagine that! Pronouncing a capital punishment sen­ tence on a twelve-year-old boy or girl. A nd this L A W is made by L E A D E R S of a great country! D o they not realize that the killing of such a young person who is totally ignorant of morals and ethics, or right or wrong, is stimulating H A T R E D of the worst kind, not only in the parents' minds, but in the minds and hearts of all other adults in the community, and this hatred is the be­ ginning of more crime? Y o u can never prevent crime by committing more crime. It has been tried for thousands of years unsuccessfully. Instead of helping hu­ manity outgrow its natural tendency toward crime, people's minds are stimu­ lated in the desire for crime, and they are agitating the objective mind by pro­ paganda of war, gangsterism, under­ world activities, and by showing pic­ tures of insidious atrocities to fruitful and immature minds. Just recently a picture w as shown in one of our local theaters illustrating the operation of a photo-electric cell, and there w as enacted a scene showing how, by breaking the contact of invisible rays, a trigger of a gun hidden in the
O n e H undred S ev en ty

wall would be pulled, someone shot, and in no way could they detect the crime. T h e device was so cleverly secreted in the house that murder was continuously carried on for G R E E D , A V A R I C E , L U S T , and S E L F I S H N E S S . A n e x ­ cellent illustration for our youths to give them ideas to work out under the proper environment. W a r today is the biggest and most profitable business the world has ever known. It is the biggest “ra c k e t" in the world today and is controlled by a class of W a r Lords that instruct and educate young men in crime. T h e s e W a r Lords seek only power and self-aggrand ize­ ment. T h e y use the cleverest psycho­ logy to induce young men in their ranks; they are taught to kill and plunder, and they are made to think that it is their patriotic duty. T h e y are heroes when they spill blood for politics. But if any soldier would kill a man in self-defense after returning to civil life, he is bran d ­ ed as a criminal and sentenced to prison, if not acquitted by a jury of people who are generally half-illiterate. W e read in a Sa n F ran cisco new s­ paper of a little girl, six years of age, criminally attacked by a high-school boy. H e coaxed her into his car, drove to a place of seclusion, chloroformed the little girl, assaulted her, and drove down Stanford Avenue and threw her body onto a lawn, leaving her to find her w ay into the house half unconscious. W h a t gave this young man the idea to do this horrible thing? Is it something he has inherited or is it instilled into his mind by P I C T U R E S A N D ST O R IE S , CHEAP N O V ELS AND O BSC EN E L I T E R A T U R E ? If it is the latter, then the first thing to do in the prevention of this type of crime is to preclude the sale of all such reading material and picture shows that inform youths of such things. (Bu t don’t worry, it w o n 't be done; b e ­ cause there are thousands o f dollars profit going to someone by publishing this cheap trash.) If it is heredity, he should be put under observation and given the care of a psychiatrist, medi­ cine, or any other branch of science that is helpful in these cases. Crime is induced into the young minds of our modern youth by the glori­ fication of gangster leaders and under­ world brilliance, and until parents really begin to think and act it will continue.
One H undred S e v en ty -o n e

W e read of T h e lm a Rediger, twentyyear-old Springfield, Missouri, business -college student, who applied for the jo b o f springing the death trap on F ra n k M cD a n ie l, condemned negro. Sh e states that she has plenty of nerve for that sort of thing and that she would just like to see how it feels to hang a man. Is n ’t that an aspiration to be proud of— the lust to kill a human being just to see how it feels, or to get the reaction? W o u l d n ’t some young man just love to have this girl for a wife, and to be the M O T H E R of his children? W e pick up another daily paper and read of a fifteen-year-old school girl who is spending her days in a hospital as a result of being criminally attacked by H arley Barrick, twenty-two, and Lester Silva, seventeen. T h e youths o f ­ fered to drive the girl home from a young-people’s party, but instead they drove to a lonely spot, beat her and se­ duced her, later taking her home, ravaged by the lust of young men ob­ sessed with a sex desire and perverted minds. T h e youths are on their w ay to some penitentiary to learn how to b e ­ have (or get w o rse). T h e girl is in a hospital under the care of a nurse, try­ ing to get well, and then to meet her friends and family in shame and dis­ grace. W h a t effect will this experience have on her future? W i l l she be able to live down the disgrace? W i l l the public let her live it down? O n e thing is certain — she will alw ays distrust the male sex and I am sure that no one can ever blame her. T h e cause of this crime can be traced directly to the yellow press and the moving pictures of the type that edu­ cates young minds to this sort of crime. Crime of this nature is the direct result of sex filth that is seen both on the vaudeville stage and screen, and is con­ taminating the youth of modern times; and it will continue among our young people until the parents of these children rise up in arms against the showing of such trash to the public. T h e public mind is perverted with sex and if we are going to stop crime of this nature we must first P R E C L U D E T H E S A L E of all literature that is distorting and con­ taminating the young mind and develop­ ing perversion.

In looking over ten or fifteen various magazines that are bought at new s­ stands we take note of the type of a d ­ vertisements in them. H ere they are: “S e x L ife in A m erica"; “ Curious S e x P ra ctic e s” ; “ Scientific S e x u a lia ” ; ‘S e x ­ ual S la v e ry ” ; “ Underw orld V i c e ” ; “Love, W o m a n , S e x ” ; ‘Stran g e E ro tic C u sto m s” ; “S e x L ife in Europe and A m e rica” ; “ Revolting R acial C e re ­ monials” ; “Love and Sexu al L ife .” T h e s e are the titles of volumes our young men and girls are absorbing and their minds are becoming channels of filth and corruption, and the thousands of people who read this foul and ob­ scene literature are becoming one gi­ gantic mental c e s s p o o l T h e r e is organized in America the Council of 76, in alliance with the United S tates F la g Association. It is the purpose and intention of the Council of '7 6 to stamp out crime of every co n ­ ceivable sort; but they need the assist­ ance of every R O S I C R U C I A N and every man and woman in America who stands for H I G H I D E A L S and H I G H M ORAL STA N DA RD S. O u r Im­ perator, D r. H. Spencer Lewis, is the S ta te Chairman for the Council of '7 6 in California, and has been awarded special honors by the United Sta te s F lag Association for the work his coun­ cils have done. B u t they have only be­ gun to eradicate crime from America; they have hardly scratched the surface.

W e would like to have everyone who reads this article write us and offer his or her assistance in this gigantic problem and uplifting movement which will benefit all mankind. A mong the thousands of Rosicrucians throughout the world, we know there are those who will constantly project their thoughts and vibrations of strength and power into the consciousness of the multitudes who are weak and easily swayed by desire and lust and the glorification of sin, and not condemn them, but help them rise out of the depths of H E L L into which they have permitted themselves to fall. T h e be­ ginning of crime is in the T H O U G H T S we create and radiate from our minds, and when we can help the unfortunate souls create thoughts of C O N S T R U C ­ T IV E N E SS , G O O D N ESS, LO V E, and C O M P A S S I O N for all mankind, we will have begun to stamp out crime in America. T a k e the impression of crime aw ay from the objective mind and it will not breed and manifest a reality for which som e innocent person will have to suffer. Crime must go, but it can only go if every red-blooded American will lend a hand. W r i t e to the Benjam in Franklin Council of 76, Suite 7 0 7 -7 0 8 , F irst N a ­ tional B an k Building, San Jose, C alifo r­ nia, for any information you wish, and it will be graciously given to you.

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THE

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H O W Y O U M A Y H ELP
T h e R osicru cian D igest has been the means of interesting hundreds of persons in the higher principles of life and has directed them to the teachings of A M O R C . It is neces­ sary, therefore, that we have as many persons as possible read it. S o we offer for the next ninety days a trial subscription of six months for $1.00. This special rate is for N E W S U B S C R IB E R S only, brought in by members of A M O R C . Fellow Rosicrucians, send the name and address of a friend and $1.00, and T h e R osicru cian D igest will be sent to him or her for six months. Help us to place T h e R o si­ crucian D igest into the hands of seekers and do them, as well as the organization, a great deal of good. T his special rate is allowed only to new subscribers whose names and addresses are sent in by A M O R C members. Address: T h e R osicru cian D igest, Rosicrucian Park, San Jose, California.

The
R osicru cian

Digest June
1936
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O n e H undred S ev en ty -tw o

T h e "Cathedral of the Soul” is a Cosmic meeting place for all minds of the most advanced and highly developed spiritual members and workers of the Rosicrucian Fraternity. It is a focal point of Cosmic radiations and thought waves from which radiate vibrations of health, peace, happiness, and inner awakening. Various periods of the day are set aside when many thousands of minds are attuned with the Cathedral of the Soul, and others attuning with the Cathedral at this time will receive the benefit of the vibrations. Those who are not members of the organization may share in the unusual benefits as well as those who are members. T h e book called “Liber 777” describes the periods for various contacts with the Cathedral. Copies will be sent to persons who are not members by addressing their request for this book to Friar S. P. C., care of A M O R C Temple, San Jose, California, enclosing three cents in postage stamps. (P le a s e state w hether m em ber or not— this is im portant.)

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HOUSES OF GOD
T I S customary to hear the Protestant c l e r g y m e n , the R o m a n Catholic p r i e s t s , and the Jewish rabbis alike refer to churches, c a t h e d r a l s , and s y n a g o g u e s as “houses of G o d ,” and it is quite cus­ tomary to hear the average individual who is devoted to his religion speak of going to his church to pray, to worship, to receive the Holy
O ne H undred S ev en ty -th ree

Sacraments, or to listen to G o dly a d ­ vice, as going into a sacred place to re­ ceive therefrom the divine benediction that resides within the holy edifice. In fact, it is quite customary to hear those who enjoy the quiet and peace of the church or cathedral say that they love to go there even when there are no services, no music, no ritual, and no sermon, because of the holy vibrations, the sacred radiations from the altar, and the holy of holies within the church which seem to surround them and per­ meate their very body and soul. T h e interesting fact is, however, that a church, a cathedral, a synagogue, a

(&\ | rru ~ u "L r|

In looking over ten or fifteen various magazines that are bought at new s­ stands we take note of the type of a d ­ vertisements in them. H e re they are: “S e x Life in A m e rica” ; “Curious S e x P ra ctic e s” ; “Scientific S e x u a lia ” ; ‘S e x ­ ual S la v e r y ” ; “ Underw orld V i c e ” ; “Love, W o m a n , S e x " ; ‘S tran g e E ro tic C u stom s” ; “ S e x Life in Europe and A m e rica” ; “ Revolting R acial C e re ­ monials” ; “Love and Sexu al L ife .” T h e s e are the titles of volumes our young men and girls are absorbing and their minds are becoming channels of filth and corruption, and the thousands of people who read this foul and o b ­ scene literature are becoming one gi­ gantic mental cesspool. T h e r e is organized in America the Council of '76, in alliance with the United S tates F lag Association. It is the purpose and intention of the Council of 76 to stamp out crime of every co n­ ceivable sort; but they need the assist­ ance of every R O S I C R U C I A N and every man and woman in America who stands for H I G H I D E A L S and H I G H M ORAL STA N DA RD S. O ur Im­ perator, D r. H. Spencer Lewis, is the S ta te Chairman for the Council o f 76 in California, and has been awarded special honors by the United S tates F lag Association for the work his coun­ cils have done. B ut they have only be­ gun to eradicate crime from America; they have hardly scratched the surface.

W e would like to have everyone who reads this article write us and offer his or her assistance in this gigantic problem and uplifting m ovem ent which will benefit all mankind. Among the thousands of Rosicrucians throughout the world, we know there are those who will constantly project their thoughts and vibrations of strength and power into the consciousness o f the multitudes who are weak and easily swayed by desire and lust and the glorification of sin, and not condemn them, but help them rise out of the depths of H E L L into which they have permitted themselves to fall. T h e be­ ginning of crime is in the T H O U G H T S we create and radiate from our minds, and when we can help the unfortunate souls create thoughts of C O N S T R U C ­ T IV E N E S S , G O O D N ESS, LO V E, and C O M P A S S I O N for all mankind, we will have begun to stamp out crime in America. T a k e the impression of crime aw ay from the objective mind and it will not breed and manifest a reality for which some innocent person will have to suffer. Crime must go, but it can only go if every red-blooded American will lend a hand. W r i t e to the Benjam in Franklin Council of 76, Suite 7 0 7 -7 0 8 , F irst N a ­ tional B an k Building, S a n Jose, C alifo r­ nia, for any information you wish, and

it will be graciously given to you. FORUM •


0 1 ,

READ

THE

ROSICRUCIAN

H O W Y O U M A Y H ELP
T h e R osicru cian D igest has been the means of interesting hundreds of persons in the higher principles of life and has directed them to the teachings of A M O R C . It is neces­ sary, therefore, that we have as many persons as possible read it. So we offer for the next ninety days a trial subscription of six months for $1.00. T his special rate is for N E W S U B S C R IB E R S only, brought in by members of A M O R C . Fellow Rosicrucians, send the name and address of a friend and $1.00, and T h e R osicru cian D igest will be sent to him or her for six months. Help us to place T h e R osi­ crucian D igest into the hands of seekers and do them, as well as the organization, a great deal of good. T his special rate is allowed only to new subscribers whose names and addresses are sent in by A M O R C members. Address: T h e R osicru cian D igest, Rosicrucian Park, San Jose, California.

The Rosicrucian Digest June
1936

O n e H un dred S ev en ty -tw o

p.
T h e ‘‘Cathedral of the Soul" is a Cosmic meeting place for all minds of the most advanced and highly developed spiritual members and workers of the Rosicrucian Fraternity. It is a focal point of Cosmic radiations and thought waves from which radiate vibrations of health, peace, happiness, and inner awakening. Various periods of the day are set aside when many thousands of minds are attuned with the Cathedral of the Soul, and others attuning with the Cathedral at this time will receive the benefit of the vibrations. Those who are not members of the organization may share in the unusual benefits as well as those who are members. T he book called "Liber 777” describes the periods for various contacts with the Cathedral. Copies will be sent to persons who are not members by addressing their request for this book to Friar S. P. C., care of A M O R C Temple, San Jose, California, enclosing three cents in postage stamps. (P le a s e state w hether m em ber or not— this is im portant.)

HOUSES OF GOD
T IS customary to hear the Protestant c l e r g y m e n , the R o m a n Catholic p r i e s t s , and the Jewish rabbis alike refer to churches, c a t h e d r a l s , and s y n a g o g u e s as “houses of G o d ," and it is quite cus­ tomary to hear the average individual who is devoted to his religion speak of going to his church to pray, to worship, to receive the Holy
O ne H undred Seventy~three

Sacram ents, or to listen to G o dly a d ­ vice, as going into a sacred place to re­ ceive therefrom the divine benediction that resides within the holy edifice. In fact, it is quite customary to hear those who enjoy the quiet and peace of the church or cathedral say that they love to go there even when there are no services, no music, no ritual, and no sermon, because of the holy vibrations, the sacred radiations from the altar, and the holy of holies within the church which seem to surround them and per­ meate their very body and soul. T h e interesting fact is, however, that a church, a cathedral, a synagogue, a

mosque, or a holy sanctum within the home is made holy, is made sacred, and made divine in all of its vibratory in­ fluences by the individual who goes there and by his attitude of mind, and by the sincere and religious expressions o f his soul. Neither church nor temple, cathedral or synagogue, is a holy place simply because it has been constructed in the architecture of a religious edifice, and because it is to be or is about to be used for religious worship or instruc­ tion. T h e most magnificent cathedral or temple built for religious worship and in every sincere manner dedicated to the worship of G o d and the preachment o f divine principles, if left standing va­ cant, idle, and unused from the moment of its completion, would never become a holy place charged with sacred vibra­ tions and impressive in its radiations no matter if it grew to be a thousand years old and was venerated for its antiquity. W h a t e v e r there is that is holy and sacred within the walls of a church or temple, and whatever sacred vibrations and sacred spirit is felt as a part of the holy place, are brought into the struc­ ture or created and attracted there by the religious devotion, sincerity, pray­ ers, and meditations of the human be­ ings who assemble within its walls. It is usually said at the completion and dedication of a church or temple, cathedral or synagogue, that it is co n ­ secrated to G od and dedicated to re­ ligious worship. A t the very best the church upon its completion is offered to G od and His worshippers, and it is the performance of worship, the study of sacred laws, the devotion of the w or­ shippers, and their prayers and sincere attitudes day after day, week after week, and year after year, that fills the very walls and all of the holy spaces within with the vibrating energy of soul essence that is so easily sensed by those who enter the portals for meditation and peace. F o r this reason man m ay ar­ range a sanctum in his home and through his sincere worship, his holy respect and regard for the place, and his attunement with the Divine Conscious­ ness may cause his sanctum to become T he R osicru cian charged with the very spirit o f G od and the vibrations of Divine power. T h e r e ­ Digest fore, it is not the nature of the structure, June nor its location, the name o f its creator, 1936 nor the purpose for which it was plan­

ned that makes a church or a cathedral, a mosque, a synagogue, or a sanctum a holy place. Such holy places can be­ come filled with the spirit of G od and charged with the emanations of His consciousness through the projection of H is mind and understanding, His love and mercy to the worshippers, but these transcendental elements that make a church or a temple distinctive in its im­ pressions from other buildings and pow­ erful in its influences are attracted to the place of worship b y the sincerity and devotion of those who assemble there. T h e C athedral of the Soul built with­ out any material elements, unsupported by any financial powers, resting upon no earthly foundation, and owned and con­ trolled by no distinctive group of in­ dividuals is just such a holy place made sacred by the devotion and the worship, the prayers and the love of the thou­ sands who use it as the channel for the contact with the consciousness of God. It is the intangible, immaterial, and in­ visible meeting place of the souls of thousands who must lift up their con­ sciousness to the cathedral and to God in order to find attunement with the church and its holy mission on Sunday. If you are not a regular attendant at any church, or if you are, you will find the Cathedral of the Soul a great con­ venience and a great help in lifting up your heart and mind, your inner con­ sciousness, to a higher plane where you will meet within the C athedral the souls of thousands of other individuals and the consciousness and divine emanations of G od and the H oly Saints, of Jesus the Christ and His Disciples, of M ary the Holy M other, and all of the patri­ archs and angels of your religion and of all religions. Th ro u gho ut the day and moments of doubt, despondency, tiredness, peace, happiness, or want, you can momentar­ ily lift yourself up and find in the C athedral the attunement, the vibratory harmony, and peace and power that will enable you to commune with God and with your soul. W h y not take ad­ vantage of this opportunity and make it a regular practice to devote a few min­ utes each morning, afternoon, and eve­ ning to meditation and prayer in the Cathedral of the Soul? Y o u will find it inspiring and illuminating, and you will
One H undred S even ty-four

find it helpful in the hours of trial and tribulation. If you are a non-member and have not read and studied the op­ portunities explained in the C athedral booklet called Liber 777, send for a free copy now and enjoy the benefits it of­ fers. W it h o u t religious bias or pre­ judice, without sectarian differences, without distinctions of any kind, you will always find a Cosmic surge of

Divine power, a G o dly benediction, a peace and a power that will help you along the path of life. S t a r t this month by making the Cathedral of the Soul your holy sanctum, not to supplant your church, not to supplant your form o f re­ ligious worship and instruction, but to offer you a haven in your restless hours, and a retreat for the soul in its anxiety to contact the heavenly hosts beyond.

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Thoughts About Honesty
By
A lle g r o

O N E S T Y s e e ms such a trite thing to discuss. From the day we first began to hear with conception in this incarnation to the present m o m e n t , we have continu­ ally h e a r d t a l k about h o n e s t y . W h e n we learned to read the printed word we f o u n d much said about honesty. A nd early in our career we heard these expressions: “H onesty is the best policy,” “T h o u shalt not steal," “B e truthful," and " O h , what a tangled web we weave when first we practice to deceive.” T h e n Karma, through the experiences of life, began to teach us about honesty. Incident after incident came about to show us about truth and untruth. Hour after hour, day after day, and year after year the lessons of life pointed out by the law of cause and effect and other great principles that honesty is the k ey ­ note, the very foundation of all progress. T o construct the foundation of hon­ esty for our edifice of life, we must first clear away the rough obstacles which obstruct the building site. T h e s e ob­ stacles are very much the same in
O n e H undred S ev en ty -fiv e

most cases. T h e outstanding ones are: thoughtlessness, laziness, cowardliness, love of material gain and pleasures, and prejudice. Thoughtlessness and laziness are very closely related. It is hard to draw a line between the sort of mind which draws no lesson from the beauty, harmony, and order about him, and the one who steps crushingly upon the delicate blos­ som of a lovely flower rather than use the energy to alter his course a very few inches. Cowardliness and love of material gain and pleasures are also related. A m an ’s fear of being considered different from his fellow man and the fear of be­ ing held up to the ridicule of those about him is a definite form of cowardice. B ut it is the sacrifice of a sort of aggrandize­ ment hoped for in the mind of his friends or companions that he really fears. In like manner he fears to lose and wishes to hold the gleaming attrac­ tions of material gain and pleasures. . . . He considers these things his treasure— and “where a m an’s treasure is, there will his heart be also." Prejudice is a term that cannot be fairly used without its co-partner ignor­ ance. N either can be complete without the other. O n ly the ignorant show pre­ judice and certainly the prejudiced show ignorance. T h e s e two are the greatest

enemies of honesty. W e find prejudice in the assumptions taught us in our earliest youth; w e find it in our govern­ ment; we find it in the text books of our schools; we find it in the teachings of our churches, w ho seek to verify their own assumptions and whims instead of looking for truth; and we find it within our own makeup when we yield to selfish temptations. W e fail to keep this honesty problem steadily before our consciousness be­ cause we have become so accustomed to its presence and have overlooked its eternal necessity. But we must have the foundation, the base of honesty to build on. If we will but appreciate the truth that it is our first golden key to progress,

w e will learn to love it: and if we love it we will give it more attention. W e can remove the barriers of thoughtlessness and laziness, of cow ard­ liness and love of gain, o f prejudice and ignorance, if we love honesty. W e can replace these undesirable things with everything of the greatest beauty and of the greatest good. T h is foundation of honesty will cause us to carefully a n ­ alyze what we see, hear, do, and think, and will bring us to meditate more often upon everything reaching our conscious­ ness, seeking for truth. S o a beautiful structure will be start­ ed, for all that we are is the result o f w hat w e have thought. And if we abide earnestly by honesty our soul will abide continually in “more stately mansions."

ANCIENT SYMBOLISM
M an, w hen co n scio u s o f an e te rn a l tr u th , h as ev er sym b olized it so th a t th e hum an co n scio u sn ess could fo rev e r have realiz a tio n o f it. N atio n s, la n g u a g e s and cu sto m s have ch an ged , b u t th e se a n cie n t d esig n s co n tin u e to illu m in a te m ankind w ith th e ir m ystic lig h t. F o r those who a r e seeking lig h t, each m o n th we w ill rep ro d u ce a sym bo l o r sy m b o ls, w ith th e ir a n c ie n t m ean in g .

L IG H T A G A I N S T D A R K N E S S

The allegorical illustration this month, like many symbols and al­ legories, can be interpreted in various ways. The common inter­ pretation of this very, very old allegory is that before the arts and sciences can be established in any new land or community, there must be driven from that land, all of the superstitions, fears, and the misbeliefs of the people. The coast land in the illustration, represents it to be a new country. The figures of humans with various symbols above their heads, d ep ict the different arts and sciences, culture and learning. They are shown driving from the land, demons, serpents, and monsters, which allude to the misbeliefs ---------H i illustration from one of the rare Rosicrucian books in the private archives of A M O R C . 5 ----------- »

The Rosicrucian Digest June
1936

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B -----

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One H un dred Seventy~six

Each hour o f the day finds the men o f science cloistered in laboratories without ostentation, in vestigatin g nature's m ysteries and extending the boundaries of knowledge. The w orld at large, although profitin g by their labors, oftentim es is deprived o f the pleasure o f review in g their work, since general periodicals and publications announce only those sensational discoveries which appeal to the popular imagination. It is w ith pleasure, therefore, that we afford our readers a m onthly summary o f some of these scientific researches, and briefly relate them to the Rosicrucian philosophy and doctrines. T o the Science Journal, unless otherw ise specified, we give fu ll credit fo r all m atter which appears in quotations.

C o s m ic R a y s

H E source of the m y s t e r i o u s rays which on the one h a n d s e e m to bombard the earth, and on the other to constitute the magnetic field about it, is still a muted question in th e s c i e n t i f i c world. In certain circles it is being m a i n t a i n e d that the ray is the result of the destruction of matter through either the tremendous explosions of Cosmic bodies or the gradual devolutionary processes of the e a r th ’s elements. T h e s e scientists co n ­ tend that this disintegration returns a mass to its primary energy, and it is this force which is detected and identified as the Cosmic ray. T h e y insist that the ray is generated by this deterioration of
One Hundred Seventy-seven

matter. T h e y overlook the fact of first causes, that is, that all our present mass is the result of an energy and the energy must have originally preceded the first complex forms of matter. In other words, the energy responsible for the nature of matter existed before it. F o r example, modern science today in its laboratories has reduced matter and its forms to the basic energy of which it is composed, and which generally speak­ ing is termed an electronic energy. T h is electronic energy consists o f electrical potentials, both negative and positive, the source of which is unknown to science. A s science studies it, it learns that this energy seems to constantly be seeking to organize again into complex forms, or in other words, to build itself up into the structure we know as matter. T h e refo re, this energy underlies all things; all things consist of it. Peculiar to state, this constructive energy of the universe parallels in many respects, in­

so far as its functioning is concerned, the so-called Cosmic ray, and yet science attributes the Cosmic ray only to the destructive processes, to the disintegra­ tion of matter. Now, certainly it is to be realized that this energy, this elec­ tronic energy, does not exist only in mass, but exists and prevails every­ where, even where there is no mass or matter, as we know it. If this were not so, then there would be true voids or vacuums between all of the heavenly bodies, and this we know is not true. T h u s, if this electronic energy prevails everywhere, it should alw ays be de­ tectable. W h e n matter is destroyed, as we term it, that is, reduced to its simplest nature, it returns to this electronic energy, but the energy may be ascer­ tained before it has evolved into matter. T h e re fo re , we as Rosicrucians contend that the Cosmic ray and this universal electronic energy are the same, and can be detected at all times, aside and apart from explosions of distant stars, and it is not merely the result of destruction and disintegration of matter. N o matter how high one will rise above the earth, whether one or a million miles, this uni­ versal energy will alw ays be detected. T h e Cosmic is a proper term for it, for it is universal, but it is not gener­ ated; it is the very being of the universe. T h in g s arise from it and return to it. It is the source out of which other things are composed; it comes from nothing else. Fortunately, there are other schools of science which also hold this point of view, and who do not believe that the source of the Cosmic ray can be ascertained by flights into the stratos­ phere or beyond. It is quite true that the destruction of a large star will in­ tensify the bombardment of a certain area of the universe with Cosmic rays, and it is because that mass of matter has returned to its simplest state suddenly, and would naturally intensify the abso­ lute energy of the area. It is interesting to read the following item of scientific news in connection with these theories, with regard to the Cosmic ray.

verse, Cosmic ray records are being studied to see if they show any relation to the gigantic stellar explosion or super-nova that was discovered by Dr. Edwin Hubble and Glenn M o o r e of the M o u n t W ils o n O bservatory while they observed with the world's largest tele­ scope distant nebulae in the V ir g o con­ stellation. Som e years ago Drs. F . Z w ic k y and W . Baad e put forth a theory that cosmic rays originate when a star explodes into a super-nova. W i t h the discovery of the great outburst of Nova V irg inis there is new interest in the theory. Dr. Hubble explained that the bearing of his discovery on the theory is as yet indeterminate but that the spectra of the super-nova are being studied."

A Code For the Embryonic Scientist
Recently the scientific world was shaken by the announcement of the death of the eminent and beloved scien­ tist, Pavlov, on F ebruary 27, at the age of 87 years. Just before his death he was asked what he could wish to the youth of his country who devote them­ selves to science. His reply given below is translated from Russian by Professor P. Kupalov, chief assistant in the Pavlov Institute at Leningrad. It is not only ap­ propriate for the young scientists of his country and all countries, but for all who are sincerely interested in the acquisition of knowledge. “ Firstly, gradualness. A bou t this

most important condition

of

fruitful

scientific work I never can speak with­ out emotion. Gradualness, gradualness and gradualness. From the very begin­ ning o f your work, school yourselves to severe gradualness in the accumulation o f knowledge. “Learn the A B C of science before you try to ascend to its summit. Never begin the subsequent without mastering the preceding. N ever attempt to screen an insufficiency of knowledge even by the most audacious surmise and hypo­ thesis. How soever this soap-bubble will rejoice your eyes by its play it inevit­ ably will burst and you will have noth­ ing except shame. “ School yourselves to demureness and patience. Learn to inure yourselves to
One Hundred Seventy-eight

T he Rosicrucian Digest June
1936

“ Because a star exploded seven mil­ lion years ago with the brilliance of thirty million suns, there is a chance that science will know more about the Cosmic radiation that continuously bombards the earth from remote depths of the uni­

drudgery in science. collect the facts!

Learn, compare,

"P e r f e c t as is the wing of a bird, it never could raise the bird up without resting on air. F a c ts are the air of a scientist. W it h o u t them you never can fly. W it h o u t them your ‘theories’ are vain efforts. " B u t learning, experimenting, ob­ serving, try not to stay on the surface of the facts. Do not become the archi­ vists of facts. T r y to penetrate to the secret of their occurrence, persistently search for the laws which govern them. "Seco n d ly , modesty. N ever think that you already know all. However highly you are appraised, always have the courage to say of yourself — I am ignorant. " D o not allow haughtiness to take you in possession. Due to that you will be obstinate where it is necessary to agree, you will refuse useful advice and friendly help, you will lose the standard of objectiveness. "T h ird ly , passion. Remember that science demands from a man all his life. If you had two lives that would not be enough for you. B e passionate in your work and your searchings.”

legends without scientific foundation, and of little or no importance, and cer­ tainly not worthy of learned research. E v en today, accounts of these strange mysteries of the skies are discredited and largely laughed at by either those who wish to conceal their own ignor­ ance of the causes or who frankly dis­ believe the stories. Such an attitude is not the true scientific spirit and the Rosicrucian O rd er has often lamented that science permitted the suppression of these facts. W e may not believe these instances are due to any super­ natural influence, but it is our duty, if we profess to desire the advancement of learning, to thoroughly investigate the unusual, the unknown. It is indeed, therefore, encouraging to know that to­ day, science thoroughly investigated the brown snow phenomenon of N ew Hampshire, and gave a well-founded explanation of the cause. T h is is a step in the right direction. T h e report reads: "D u rin g the early morning of F e b ru ­ ary 25, 1936, about 2 cm. of sleet and hail fell at Hillsboro, N. H., following about 10 cm. of light snow the evening before. T h e hail had a distinctly brow n­ ish, purple color, and contrasted strong­ ly with the pure white new snow be­ neath when the crust was broken. C lose examination revealed that the color was due to minute particles of soil. T h e day before newspapers had reported severe dust storms in Colorado and other parts of the W e s t . Connection between the two occurrences seems generally a c ­ cepted. In order to determine the amount of silt deposited, 3 samples 1 sq. m. in area were laid out on level ground about 100 m. apart, and aw ay from trees or buildings near Hillsboro, N. H. alt. 8 0 0 feet. All the snow and hail showing discoloration was removed from the sample areas with a clean plate and placed in clean enameled kettles. W h e n melted the resulting water was distinctly dirty and some sediment quickly settled out. D ark purple, oily bubbles were common on the surface. A fte r standing one week in a large graduate the suspension had cleared partially, but the purplish film persisted on the surface. T h e w ater from the

Brown Snow
T h is item could have been captioned " T h e rain of bull-frogs,” "R a in of red snow, butter or ink” for all these things, like the recent storm of brown snow, actually occurred. Som e of the instances were separated by several centuries. T h e so-called rain of butter, one of the most mysterious of all of these phenomena, was a peculiar grease-like, yellow sub­ stance which fell from the skies and which was found to be edible and re­ sembled, strangely, the manna described in the Bible, said to have fallen from the heavens. Science had no precedents by which to judge these strange phenomena, so when the reports of the occurrences were submitted to their councils, and the facts did not coincide with their estab­ lished theories, they were damned. T h a t is, they were declared to be mere
One Hundred Seventy-nine

meter-square samples was evaporated by boiling and the sediment collected in a G o och crucible in sample I and in weighed filter papers in II and III after it had proven extremely slow work to get water to pass through the soil col­ lected in crucibles. T h e samples were then oven-dried, cooled in a desiccator and weighed. T h e results were as follows:

Wt. of silt deposited on 1 sq. m.

Sample I .................................... 1.6192 Sample I I .................................. 1.16 00 Sample I I I ................................ 1.6682 A v .................................................. 1.3825

grams grams grams grams

“T h is is at the rate of 1,382 kg. per sq. km. and roughly equivalent to 12.3 lbs. per acre or almost 4 tons per sq. mile.

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Convention Arouses Enthusiasm
YOU ARE IN VITED TO JOIN W IT H US IN A HAPPY VACATIO N
By T h e C o n v e n tio n S e c r e t a r y

A N Y of you will certainly m i s s a very happy vacat i o n a n d ex tra ­ o r d i n a r y oppor­ tunity to witness many d e l i g h t f u l demonst r ations and hear many un­ usual l e c t u r e s if you do not attend the annual C o n ­ vention this sum­ mer. N ever before have our members throughout the coun­ try expressed so much enthusiasm about our annual Conventions. T h is is due to the fact that the good-will tour of our field lecturers visiting so many cities and showing moving pictures of the buildings and grounds at Rosicrucian Park, and giving brief demonstrations of our laws and principles, has caused hundreds of our members to be extreme­ ly anxious to come to S a n Jose this sum­ The mer and spend a week or ten days with Rosicrucian us here.

ties and all of the features of our work in actual progress! T h in k of contacting and interviewing the officers and de­ partment w orkers with whom you are in correspondence, or who prepare your monographs and answer your letters and render you the special services from week to week throughout the year! E ven without the great sessions of the Convention with their lectures and demonstrations, visitors to Rosicrucian P ark are alw ays made happy by the contacts with the scores of workers here and with a visit to the various offices, workrooms, scientific laboratories, and other fascinating features of the organ­ ization. T a l k with any member who has visited Rosicrucian P ark within the last two or three years and you will find that he regretted his inability to stay for days, weeks, or months. N o w you have an opportunity to spend a week o r more with us here in the most delightful section of California and during the m ost enjoyable climatic period of the year. A vacation trip to California is alw ays like the realization of a lifelong dream. T h i s summer the railroad {ares are greatly reduced, as are the bus fares, so that not only is it
One Hundred Eighty

Digest
Ju n e 1936

T h in k of actually visiting each and every one of the departments o f our or­ ganization and seeing all of our activi­

a real pleasure to visit California but economical as well. E very visitor who ever comes here from the eastern or midwestern States is impressed with the fact that the moment your train or auto­ mobile crosses over the heights of the glorious and fascinating Sierra Nevada Mountains, sprinkled with the ghost towns of the mining camps, and charm­ ing in its thousands of scenic wonders, the entrance into California on the west of these mountains is like the entrance into a new world or a new empire. In the winter months, when all of the eastern and midwestern State s are co v­ ered with snow and the weather is cold, on the western side of the mountains they find grass lawns and flowers grow ­ ing in abundance and the climate mild enough to go bathing in the waters of the Pacific, even on Christmas D ay. Remember that the western coast of the United States is a part of the ancient continent of Lemuria. Its soil is different, its earthly products are different, its flowers and shrubbery grow in variety and abundance, the climate is different, and the very spirit of the people is so different from that of other parts of the continent that one cannot help being im­ pressed with this fact. It is because everyone here is cheerful, happy, healthy, and enjoying the magnificence of earthly and Cosmic blessings. Y ou will be surprised and pleased with what you find at Rosicrucian Park, located in the center of S an ta Clara Valley, known for many years as, “T h e Valley of H e a r t’s D elig h t.’’ It is from this valley that the famous D el M o n te products are shipped to all parts of the world, along with hundreds of other brands and varieties of fruits and vege­ tables. Living here is economical and healthy and along with these features is that of continual pleasure in the variety of scenery and the enjoym ent of life in all of its phases. Rosicrucian Park typifies the very best of everything in Sa n ta Clara Valley, or in the whole of California. In the grounds of Rosicrucian P ark grow all of the varieties of flowers and shrub­ bery typical of California, in addition to specimens of shrubbery and flowers sent to us from various parts of the world. Here you will find plants, trees, and flowers that are typical of the hottest climates of South A frica and Australia,
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and even of E g y p t and Palestine, alo n g ­ side of those that grow in the snows up on the sides of M t. S h a sta or in the northern portions of Alaska, C anada, and the European countries. T h e n there are the interesting build­ ings and fascinating structures. Since the y ear 1927 A M O R C has built twelve different units o f Oriental architecture representing the various countries of the N e a r E a s t and F a r E a s t where mysti­ cism has influenced the design, the coloring, and the beauty of construction. Y o u will find at Rosicrucian P ark the Administration Building and Supreme Tem ple in Egyptian architecture of the middle period; the Science Building in the E gy ptian architecture of the earlier period. Y o u will find the great C o n ­ vention Auditorium in M oorish archi­ tecture, the large Oriental M useum in Byzantine architecture, and you will find also an open air temple built as a re­ production of the style and architecture of Amenhotep's temple at Luxor, E gypt. A nd then there is the new planetarium building in pure A rabic architecture, presenting a perfect replica of one of the large and fascinating mosques of the F a r E a st. T h e r e are nooks and corners in the P a rk grounds where little groups can meet for discussion and pleasant conversations. Hours can be spent in the M useum looking at the hundreds of individual exhibits from every part of the world and particularly from the lands of mysticism. Just to walk into the full-size reproduction of one of the ancient tombs of E g y p t and to dwell there a while in meditation, as if one were in the V a lle y of Kings at T hebes, or to stand before a cross-section of the G re a t Pyramid and see the initiation chambers, or the interior of King T u t ’s tomb, carries one far aw ay from this modern world into the times and places of the development of civilization. Interesting programs with music, lec­ tures, demonstrations, exhibits, and defi­ nite instruction are held daily in the large auditorium, and in the evenings after the sessions members meet for pri­ vate discussions and there will be pageants on the lawns which will depict incidents of ancient ceremonies in E g y p t and other lands. A n opportunity to participate in an Oriental E gy ptian initiation in the Supreme T em ple is a f ­ forded every visitor to the Convention

so that those who wish may have the distinction of having had an honorary initiation in the highest temple of the O rd er in N orth America. In the planetarium (described else­ where in this issue) there will be daily lectures and demonstrations revealing many of the Cosmic laws. Advanced members and leading workers of the O rd er from all parts of the country will conduct special classes or forums for the benefit of the members in each of the various degrees, and at the end o f the week there will be held the usual b an ­ quet given by the officers o f the O rd e r as a parting honor to all who have a t­ tended. T h is great banquet, the largest held in this part of California each year, will be held this summer in the new Civic Auditorium of the city of S a n Jose, with the impressive surroundings of Spanish architecture and with de­ lightful music and the utmost of comfort. T h e re will be ample time mornings, early afternoons, and late in the eve­ nings for sightseeing, and automobiles will be provided for those who come by train, and guides will be glad to show our visiting members the historical sites of this very old part of the continent. V S ....... V

Remember, you may come a few days before the Convention and visit various parts of California, or stay in San Jose and enjoy with us every hour of the time; or you can remain for a few days after the Convention and receive every courtesy in enjoying your visit. T h e Convention opens on Su n d ay evening, July 12, and closes Saturd ay evening at the banquet. If you wish to know about automobile camps in this valley which are con­ venient and economical and of excellent standard, or about hotel reservations which are nominal and of a very high quality, write at once to the Convention Chairman for information.

Special Bus From the E ast
It is planned to have a special com­ fortable and modern bus come from the metropolitan area of N ew Y o r k and C hicago to California, travelling along the most interesting scenic routes. T h is will afford an opportunity to travel west­ ward in the most economical and en jo y ­ able manner. If you wish to make a r­ rangements to join others in this four or five day trip with the bus, see the an­ nouncement below in regard to this matter. V «.jp

S P E C IA L C O N V E N T IO N
E I 1 E E E \ | § |

BUS FARES
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The R osicru cian D ig est June 1936

W e have finally obtained, from a nationally-known bus company, special rates from New York and Chicago to San Jose. N E W Y O R K to San Jose and return, round-trip fare, $70.00. From C H IC A G O to San Jose and return, round-trip fare, $55.00. Make your reservations at once. If you live within one hundred miles or more of Chicago, arrange for your transportation by writing to Mrs. Leta M. Santee, 3311 Diversey Avenue, Chicago, Illinois; if within a hundred miles of New York, write to Mr. T hor Kiimalehto, 105 Pinehurst Avenue, New Y ork City. You must P U R C H A S E Y O U R T IC K E T B E F O R E JU N E 20th. These buses will travel through some of the most scenic sections of the country. T hey are de luxe parlor coaches, comfortable, roomy, and each bus will have two chauffeurs.

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One H undred E ig h ty -tw o

PAG ES
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GOTTFRIED WILHELM LEIBNITZ
: : : | : : : I \ • ; \ \ : \ : Each month we w ill present excerpt3 from the w ritin gs o f famous thinkers and teachers o f the past. These w ill give our readers an opportunity o f know ing their lives through the presentation o f those w ritin gs which ty p ify their thoughts. Occasionally, such w ritin gs w ill be presented through the translation or interpretations o f other eminent authors o f the past. Thi3 month we present Baron von G ottfried W ilh elm Leibn itz. Leibn itz' philosophy is definitely related to the period known as the beginning o f modern philosophy. H e was born in L eipsig. June 21, 1616, and received his general education at the U niversity o f L eipsig. In 1667 he was invited by Baron von Boineburg to come to Frankfort as councillor to the Elector o f Mainz. H is scientific inclinations were aroused by several visits to P a ris in 1672 and to London in 1673. where he met many leading scientiflc men. P u b licity was given his philosophical view s and his mathematical genius when controversy arose between him self and Newton, because o f his system of differential calcuius which greatly resembled N ew ton 's method o f fluxions. In 1676 he was appointed librarian to the Duke o f Brunswick-Luneberg. From then on he spent the rem ainder o f his life in Hanover. Am ong his chief works in philosophy are the “ M onadologie,” and in nalural science his "P ro ta g a e a ,” a treatise on geology. Our readers and Rosicrucians w ill be particularly interested in his metaphysical views, and below are two excerpts from these metaphysical w ritin gs which are w orth y o f the careful attention o f every student. = i i i | = | § § \ ; § \ \ s \ I

How Conceptions Are Derived From the Senses
R I S T O T L E pre­ ferred to compare our souls to blank tablets p r e p a r e d for writing, and he m a i n t a i n e d that nothing is in the u ndersta n ding w h i c h does not come through the senses. T h is posi­ tion is in accord with the popular conceptions as Aristotle’s positions usually are. P lato thinks more profoundly. Such tenets or
One H undred E ig h ty -th ree

practicologies are nevertheless allow­ able in ordinary use somewhat in the same w ay as those who accept the Copernican theory still continue to speak of the rising and setting of the sun. I find indeed that these usages can be given a real meaning containing no error, quite in the same w ay as I have already pointed out that we may truly say particular substances a c t upon one another. In this same sense we may say that knowledge is received from without through the medium of the senses b e­ cause certain exterior things contain or express more particularly the causes which determine us to certain thoughts.

Because in the ordinary uses of life we attribute to the soul only that which be­ longs to it most manifestly and particu­ larly, and there is no advantage in g o ­ ing further. W h e n , however, we are dealing with the exactness of meta­ physical truths, it is important to re co g ­ nize the powers and independence of the soul which extend infinitely further than is commonly supposed. In order, therefore, to avoid misunderstandings it would be well to choose separate terms for the two. T h e s e expressions which are in the soul, whether one is conceiving of them or not, may be called ideas, which those which one co n ­ ceives of or constructs may be called conceptions, conceptus. But whatever terms are used, it is always false to say that all our conceptions come from the so-called external senses, because those conceptions which I have of myself and o f my thoughts, and consequently of b e ­ ing, of substance, of action, of identity and of many others come from an inner experience.

E a c h substance expresses the whole universe, some substances, however, more distinctly than others, each one especially distinctly with regard to cer­ tain things and according to its own point of view. T h e union of the soul with the body and even the action of one substance upon another consist only in the perfect mutual accord, express established by the ordinance of the first creation, by virtue of which each substance follow­ ing its own laws falls in with what the others require and thus the activities of the one follow or accom pany the activi­ ties or changes of the other. Intellects, or souls which are capable of reflection and of knowing the eternal truths and G o d have many privileges that exempt them from the transforma­ tion of bodies. In regard to them moral laws must be added to physical laws. T h e better things are understood, the more are they found beautiful and com­ fortable to the desires which a wise man might form. T h o s e who are not content with the ordering of things cannot boast of lov­ ing G o d properly. Justice is nothing else than love felt by the wise. C harity is universal benevolence whose fulfillment the wise carry out comformably to the dictates of reason so as to obtain the greatest good. W is d o m is the science of happiness or of the means of attaining the lasting contentm ent which consists in the con­ tinual achievement of a greater per­ fection or at least in variations of the same degree of perfection.
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Maxims
A body is an aggregation of sub­ stances and is not a substance, properly speaking. Consequently, in all bodies must be found indivisible substances which cannot be generated and are not corruptible, having something which corresponds to souls. All these substances have been al­ w ays and will alw ays be united to or­ ganize bodies diversely transformable. E a c h of these substances contains in its nature the law of the continuous progression of its own workings and all that has happened to it and all that will happen to it. E x cep ting the dependence upon God, all these activities come from its own nature.
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AM ORC REG ISTERED IN PEN N SYLV A N IA
The R osicru cian D igest Ju n e 1936
E E E E Members and friends of A M O R C will be pleased to learn that the Supreme Grand Lodge of the Ancient and M ystical Order Rosae Crucis, the Rosicrucian Order, a corporation, is registered in the State of Pennsylvania, and has been since September, 1934. Lodges of A M O R C have been established in Pennsylvania for years prior to the registration. E E E E §

O ne Hundred Eighty-four

SANCTUM MUSINGS
THE PHILOSOPHY OF M A RRIAGE

A R R I A G E does not begin with the traditional hegira from the stately church steps through the show ­ er of r i c e a n d shoes to the w ait­ ing car. N either has it its begin­ ning in that aw ak ­ ening to responsi­ bility that comes with the departure from the squalid office of a small-town justice of peace. Legally, the connubial state may be said to have then begun, but the elements which will make for its continuance or failure began years previously. T h e romance and courtship of life begins with self-consciousness, the ap­ praisal of the emotions and desires. Humans, like all other animals, are im­ pelled by the surges of sensations which well up within them. In infancy, as do the beasts, they instinctively and un­ consciously attempt to either maintain the emotional urges and to appease the desires they engender, or to avoid the causes which ag gravate them. T h e infant, in performing even the simplest function, is an automaton. W i t h transcendency to an ag e of reason, the
O ne H undred E ig h ty -fiv e

conditions and things which gratify the most intense desires are analyzed. T h is analysis does not at first constitute a study of the relationship of cause to e f­ fect. It is far more superficial. It is an identifying of the effect so it can be more easily attained in the future. T h u s, for example, the small b o y ’s analysis of candy is not to determine its ingredients or to ascertain w hat contributes to the pleasureable state when he devours it, but rather to establish in his memory its taste, color, smell and shape, so that when he again experiences the desire for it he can be more certain of acquiring the thing which will gratify it the most. T h e factors that satisfy the desires and appetites and appease the emotions become the fundamental interests of life. R eason is the slave of these interests for it follows the dictates of our emotions. W h e n the reason has suppressed a de­ sire, it has done so only because of a more subtle emotion of which we are not fully aware. W i t h a realization of the interests of life, as defined individ­ ually, each human begins the courtship of life. T h e s e worldly interests are not with­ out their romantic setting; in fact, if they lacked glamor they would fall short of that satisfaction they bring to us. Hourly, daily, this wooing of interests continues. W e endure hardships, abuse,

and suffering with the hope that we will eventually be wedded to our fondest in­ terests and find therein a lasting hap­ piness. T h e young boy has a growing con­ sciousness of his increasing strength and exercising it gives him a personal satisfaction. It pleases the instinct of preservation that endeavors to express itself in aggressiveness and self-reliance. H e plans and seeks out w ays of devel­ oping his muscles and building a strong body. Athletics becomes one of his prin­ cipal interests in life. Books, games, people, and everything related to this interest has an attraction for him, and he courts it. T h e little girl is aw are earlier in life than the boy of symmetry of form and the harmony of color. Sh e seeks these things because they are pleasurable to her. T h i s appreciation of symmetry and harmony is a realization of exterior beauty and it aw akens the ego, the de­ sire to be to others equally as attractive as these things are to her. T h is results in their adorning themselves with what they think is beautiful, so that the things may impart to the person a correspond­ ing beauty. T h e little girl desires to be as sought as she in turn seeks the beau­ tiful. H e r interests center in all things that satisfy this inherent vanity. She openly woos them. W o o in g these interests in life requires a certain activity. A normal body gen­ erates a nerve energy potential. T h is energy is intended by nature to meet the demands which may be made upon it. T h is excessive energy is not produced for the functioning of the involuntary actions of the body, but to meet the de­ mands of the will. It is the physical force we are able to exert in moving our limbs, in pulling, pushing, lifting, w alk­ ing, running and talking. W h e n moder­ ately utilized, we experience no discom­ fiture, but if we exceed the normal sup­ ply the depletion causes fatigue and consequent irritation. O n the other hand, absolute inactivity, if one is healthy, causes a corresponding ann o y ­ ance, an increasing tenseness, a tingling The R osicru cian sensation as though each cell were en­ deavoring to discharge its surplus D igest energy. T h is unpleasant sensation pro­ Ju n e vokes bodily or mental action, for if the 1936 brain is very active this energy is con­

sumed by its cells and the same end is accomplished as if the limbs were used. Th e refo re, healthy persons seek action, both of body and mind, to eliminate this feeling of irritation. T h e person who mainly lives a mental life has so developed his thought facul­ ties that he unconsciously discharges this excess energy in mental activity. It is, in fact, easier for him to rid himself of it in this manner, and it brings him a greater pleasure. O n the other hand, those accustomed to physical activity are almost involuntarily compelled to do bodily exercise in work or play. T h e nerve energy follows the path of least resistance in seeking to dissipate itself. T h e r e comes a period in life when even those accustomed in earlier years to physical exercise find the body not cap­ able of performing, and yet nature sup­ plies an excess of energy. N ature com­ pensates by permitting man to cogitate. It affords reminiscence, the combining of multitudes of previously registered sensations into pleasing pictures of the past. It is an effort which consumes the less-frequent excess nerve energy. Children have less experiences to draw upon, and a greater nerve force. Consequently, reflection is not sufficient activity for them. T h e mere expenditure of this energy in bodily action is not very enjoyable. T h e r e must be more in­ centive than the desire to just expend the energy. Adults have an objective in work and in play. Children find theirs mainly in play, and mostly with other children. Association with other chil­ dren suggests the course that play shall take and it is not as irksome as indi­ vidually planning it; consequently chil­ dren seek companionship of any nature. If there are a number of children to select from, the child will choose one whose conduct nearest approaches the ideal of his or her interests. A boy par­ ticularly interested in athletics— boxing, for example— will be drawn to one in his group of companions who displays the greatest boxing prowess. T h is selec­ tion is secondary. T h e primary urge is for companionship, which affords the action desired. If a child's interests are properly de­ veloped and disciplined by the parents, the child will naturally select com­ panions whose conduct corresponds to
O n e H undred E ighty-six

those regulated interests. Suffice to say that in play the child is continually selecting a mate, wooing one who pleases him or her. In very early years the child’s interests are sexless. H e or she seeks to gratify them where they may, and whoever contributes to their interests — boy or girl — becomes a chosen companion. A boy and girl of five can find un­ limited pleasure playing together in a sandpile, without the disdain for each other’s sex that comes a few years later. T h e self-segregation that comes with the attaining of the age of eight or ten years is due to an imagined stigma if one is found associating with the opposite sex. Parallels are drawn. T h e girl is com­ pared with the mother; the boy with his father. T h e re is a realization of the similarity. It is apparent to the boy and girl at the age of eight or ten that the father and mother, though having mu­ tual interests, live to a considerable e x ­ tent in different worlds, worlds that are distinctly related to their sex, and any intermingling of these worlds is not con­ sidered proper. T h u s the boy fashions his conduct after his father, and the girl after her mother. T o do the things the girl would do would, to the boy, be a sacrifice of the dignity of his sex, for his father never attempts to assume his mother’s role. Consequently this segre­ gation is more a matter of suggestion than instinctive. T h e proof of this is found in the cases of boys raised by widows from infanthood without the in­ fluence of a man about. T h e ir effeminate interests are acquired by suggestion, and not natural inclination. W i t h puberty a new desire dawns, which at first the mind is not able to de­ fine. It is like the occasional restless­ ness adults experience, and yet they are not able to determine w hat will remove it. T h e first development of sex con­ sciousness is in the lessening antipathy toward the opposite sex. It manifests in a strange ecstasy when in the presence of the other sex. T h is sudden transition of sentiment is at times confusing to the child and causes him or her to become self-conscious when with those of the other sex. T h is state of mind is fol­ lowed by a more quizzical one, an at­ tempt to self-explain the attraction the other seems to have.
O ne H undred E ig h ty -sev en

T h e desire finally is idealized. T h e boy or girl sees certain physical or mental traits in the opposite sex that are preferable. T h e r e is visualized the ideal, the one whose presence it is imagined will bring a great personal happiness. Just as the small boy keenly interested in boxing has a mental ideal of a boxer and seeks among his companions one who will exemplify it, so the youth seeks among those of the opposite sex a personification of the new desire he experiences. During this period all other traits and characteristics of the opposite sex which might have formerly appealed, even have been the cause of previous com­ panionship, are disregarded. T h u s be­ fore the consciousness of this new de­ sire, a boy might have braved the scorn of his fellows by being seen with a little girl companion because “Susie or M a r y could draw such nice pictures and he likes pictures,” but now his whole and only interest in her is this subtle a t­ traction of which he understands noth­ ing. H e notices in her, or she in him, only those characteristics which height­ en or lessen the appeal of the ideal which the desire has established. T h e value of a member of the other sex is measured by this predominant de­ sire. Accordingly, companionship is found in this one interest— the satisfy­ ing of the desire to be in their presence. It may be, as it all too frequently is, that the one to whom the boy or girl is a t­ tracted lacks interest in all those other things which he or she has wooed since early childhood before this new urge of the emotions was felt. It is not that love is blind, as the old proverb says, but rather that love puts temporary blinders upon the reasoning faculties. Love com­ pels the senses to perceive only w hat the mind desires. A t the average age of marriage, the man and w oman’s abilities are not fully developed. T h e y have been awakened, but their talents mature later with time, if not hindered. However, at the m ar­ riageable age the interests are already well established. F o r years prior to mar­ riage the youth and the girl have freely, as much as time and opportunity per­ mitted, given themselves over to their individual interests — those inclinations which were felt in childhood, gradually

defined, and finally pursued. T h e s e in­ terests constitute their life. W h i l e they may have recently wooed or been wooed by one of the opposite sex, they have been married to these other interests for years and they cannot easily be di­ vorced, nor does the boy or girl desire that they should be. T h e r e is, after marriage as before it. the inclination to continue devotion to these interests. Prior to marriage most humans habitu­ ally pursue their interests. T h e y are the natural channels for the expressions of their emotional and mental life. In fact, it is difficult for the average youth to explain w hat his interests are. Deprive a man or woman of their habitual activ­ ity and immediately they are aw are of what their interests in life are. O u r in­ terests do not follow in rotation, nor are they constant. T h u s one may be inter­ ested in music and need it for personal gratification and happiness and yet there would not be a persistent urge at all times to play or listen to music. O u r in­ terests are fundamentally related to our instincts and our emotions. Certain things which we do appease an emotional desire. It brings such sa t­ isfaction that we thereafter define the desire in terms o f the things or condi­ tions which removed it. T h e same emo­ tional urge may develop in one person a love for music; in another a love for poetry. In one, harmony of thought exists; in the other, harmony of sound. Both produce the same emotional effect in different persons. O u r interests are therefore cyclical. T h e y make them­ selves known with our moods, our emo­ tional states. W e feel like drawing, writing, playing an instrument, because first we have an innate urge to act, and secondly, this urge is only quieted by doing those things which from experi­ ence we know satisfies them. T h e s e moods in some are frequent, and in others but occasional. However, the mood is no less dominant because it only occasionally occurs. T h e individual who is moved to play his or her chosen in­ strument daily derives no greater pleas­ ure from that period than the one who The is possessed by the mood but once R osicru cian weekly. D igest A fte r marriage these immanent inter­ Ju n e ests which have been common to a per­ son will eventually assert themselves, 1936

and demand their rightful place in a man or w om an’s life. T h e first cog­ nizance a husband or wife may have that their marriage is fundamentally a mistake is when their marital partner un­ wittingly opposes one of these personal interests. T o maintain domestic tranquil­ lity, a personal desire of long standing— one of the expressions of an emotion— may be voluntarily suppressed, but in doing so the individual always feels that he or she has made a tremendous sacri­ fice. W h e n such sacrifices are made, the ultimate in connubial happiness can never be attained. M a n y men and women have a high affection for their matrimonial mate, but the possible ex­ cellence of their state of marriage is lacking because there is not a coherence of interests. T h e poets for centuries have sung that marriages are born of the heart. In the poetic sense this is true. Trad ition ­ ally we think o f the heart as the seat of emotions, the center which reflects the feelings, joy, grief and the passions. T h e motivating factor which ultimately leads to the marriage ceremony pre­ scribed by the state in the majority of instances is the biological urge. Thus, psychologically speaking, the emotions symbolized by the heart are the birth­ place of the natural desire for marriage. T h o u g h this marriage impulse be born of the heart, unless it is carefully nur­ tured by the reason it grows like many hot-house plants to abnormal propor­ tions at the sacrifice o f its other attri­ butes and longevity. T h e exercise of reason in preparing for marriage does not mean cooling the romantic fervor by employing a method which subjects the feelings to a chilling laboratory analysis. In fact, dwelling on the harsh realisms of the functions of marriage and the origin of the impelling force which brings it about has a very disquieting effect upon the idealism one may have of it. If the illusionary glamor which surrounds marriage is destroyed, you strike deeply at public morals and conventions. T h e refo re, any such form of dialectics cannot be encouraged for social reasons. But reason, instead of robbing anticipated marriage of its ap­ peal, can strengthen it, not by increas­ ing the desire itself but by surrounding it with as many complementary interests
O ne H undred E ighty-eight

as possible. If no complementary inter­ ests can be related to it, obviously the object in whom the marriage interest is centered is at fault. Suppose, as an analogy, you had a friend of the same sex with whom you had a common interest. T h is interest is more than superficial. W e shall say it is deeply instilled in your nature. Let us also say it is not your only interest, but it is one of the principal ones. Y o u meet this person weekly at a place where you may both devote yourselves to this regard in a congenial and sympathetic environment. It may consist of the love of music, sculpture, drama, astronomy, or one of a multitude of things. For this period weekly you give over your whole mental and psychic self to a com­ plete absorption in this interest. Y o u willingly exclude all others. B ut would you agree to eliminate from your life continually your other interests? Y o u realize their significance, their relation to your needs and to your continued happiness. In fact, you would know that the enthusiasm you have for your hobby, your avocation, this preferred in­ terest, would depend upon avoiding monotony which would come if there was not an alternation of interests. Y o u would strenuously resist, therefore, hav­ ing this friend who had a similar domi­ nant interest share your daily life, if in every other respect his or her conduct or mannerisms and other regards was diametrically opposed to yours. Y o u would fully realize that the mutual single interest could not be sustained at its highest level at all times. T h e refo re, if there was a vast divergency of other habits and characteristics, conflict would eventually result. T h is conflict would in fact, reason tells you, even dampen the attraction of the common interest exist­ ing between you. If you would apply such reasoning to hobbies and avocations, then w hy not exercise it with respect to marriage? W h y not try to ascertain whether the object of your affections is sympathetic to your secondary interests— the inter­ ests which draw you to other individuals where the matter of sex is not co n­ cerned. T h e extent of these correlated concerns is also a matter of importance. It is a rare phenomenon indeed when the interests of two people are identical,
O ne H undred E ighty-n in e

and in the same order of value. T h e r e is a scale of appeals in life for each of us. E a c h of us can quite readily in a general w ay define our major interests in life, and then in a downward course name those less appealing. Som e of those less fortunate who have a cramped mental life cannot go beyond a second classification. Insofar as the married are concerned, it is quite natural that their major inter­ est is biological, those subtle intangible influences which make themselves felt merely because of the difference in polarity of sex. Follow ing this, then, there should be the main intellectual binding factors, the things that were preferred as interests in life prior to marriage. All of these pre-nubial con­ cerns may not be shared alike, but if those for which each have the greatest fondness are, the foundation of connu­ bial happiness is sound. Matrimonial companionship exists only in these major interests. In fact, companionship in all interests is practically an impos­ sibility psychologically, and is not neces­ sary for harmony. T h e r e are certain in­ terests which are obviously related to the inclinations of sex, interests which are of the temperament of women, and others which are rooted in masculine impulses. T h e s e different interests are natural, and not conflicting, for neither sex looks to the other to share them or seeks the other's companionship in them. A test of marital companionship is possible. If a man or woman can look upon their mate dispassionately, and see in them those intellectual and mental qualities and characteristics which would draw them to one of their own sex, then there exists a bond other than sex. If a husband or wife displays no concern for anything which the other en jo ys in­ dulging in a mixed society, the unity of their interests is exceedingly fragile. If one has a predilection for scholastic pur­ suits, history and literature, and finds stimulus in conversing with another of his or her own sex on these topics, the partner in marriage should naturally have the same general cultural tenden­ cies, for if he or she has not, mere sex attraction will not be able to permanent­ ly bridge the mental gulf between them. During our recent economic upheaval, the increase in divorces was alarming.

Crises of every kind alw ays disclose formerly non-apparent weaknesses, for they usually tax to the utmost the things they affect. W h e n external pressure is not severe, internal domestic strife can be relieved by resorting to interests which keep the discordant problem in the background. W h e n two persons whose temperaments and interests are foreign to each other can no longer be continually free of each o ther’s company during leisure hours by indulging their separate favorite pastimes, the matters of issue between them are bound to break through the restraint and cause serious consequences. Reduction of in­ comes and unemployment o f late years has brought thousands of husbands and wives together as they should have been for years, but their original separateness had been caused by extreme difference of interests, and therefore the compul­ sory companionship was short-lived and they were soon added to the mounting number of divorces. During these times the hue and cry was that ex travagance was the main cause of these divorces, especially at a time when economy and thrift was the vital need. In the m ajor­ ity of instances, this cry was merely to keep the real reason from being heard. T h o u q h ex travagance in most states of the Union and most countries of the world is not good and sufficient grounds for divorce, it has been declared the contributing cause by men and women alike in even prosperous times. W h a t really constitutes domestic e x ­ travagance? T h e administration of home finances can, in many respects, parallel that of business. T h e first use of incom­ ing funds by a business enterDrise is for the maintenance of its program, its over­ head, payroll, taxes, rentals, security (insurance and reserve funds), and the continuance of its advertising, sales and good-will activities. Good-will activities are contributions to the social needs of the community, hospitals, charitable in­ stitutions and benevolent societies. T h is creates public respect for the concern— a necessary adjunct to any business. Luxuries in business most often include ventures into the realm of expansion, The R osicru cian unnecessary mechanizing of their plants, financial contributions to political parties D igest to attempt to influence public opinion. Ju n e In prosperous times business can stand 1936 these luxuries, many of which are sheer

gambles, sometimes bringing fortunate results. In depressing times these later ventures, if they jeopardize the main­ tenance funds, are naught but extrava­ gances. In a home, the first need is also to meet the demands of maintenance, rent and taxes, food, household and inci­ dental expenses, and clothing. In these first demands upon the family resources must also, as with business, be included G O O D W I L L . Domestic good will is brought about by relief from the routine duties of the day. T h u s under this head­ ing must be classified entertainment and cultural pursuits. Sound home ad­ ministration also includes the security provision which wise business direction considers a necessity. T h is security is life, accident and fire insurance and a surplus savings’ account. N o home is extravagant where money is being spent in accord with such a plan. E x trav a­ gance cannot exist if each one of these requirements has been met. It is true a family can change the distribution pro­ portion of their funds, but that does not mean extravagance. F o r instance, the rent and food costs can be reduced and the difference applied to security or good-will. E x trav a g an ce in home re­ quirements occurs only when any one of the first demands is jeopardized. If the family obligates itself to live in squalid, depressing quarters so as to in­ crease its savings, this constitutes an ex­ travagance for it is a waste of the need­ ed human comforts to attain a monetary power. Further, if cultural pursuits and pleasures compel limiting the amount of life insurance to a sum which would leave a member or members of the family destitute after funeral expenses had been paid, we have extravagance in still another form. In an analysis of the majority of those cases where extravagance is given as a direct cause of divorce, it is surprising to note that it is not the extravagance considered above. It is usually contend­ ed that the extravagance consists of pursuing an interest which to all intent and purposes is constructive, and most times cultural, but which is not consid­ ered such by the complainant. In other words, husbands bewail their wives’ wasteful expenditure of money on little
O ne H undred Ninety

drama or music club membership fees, or memberships in fraternal organiza­ tions having nominal dues, and which are devoted to an appreciation of the arts, merely because they are not sym­ pathetic with these interests, and they themselves often spend an equal or larger sum on the pleasures they think necessary in life. W i v e s in turn will often harass their husbands for throw­ ing their money away, which seems so to their limited vision and lack of in­ tellectual comprehension, because their husband spends two or three dollars a month for a series of lessons on abstract metaphysics and philosophy. T h e wife, thinking in terms of the buying power of money in satisfying her entirely dif­ ferent concerns, cannot appreciate the sincere enjoyment her husband gains from this nominal expenditure. T h e husband or wife whose values of life are solely materialistic try to subject all that they purchase or secure from in­ vestments to an examination by the senses. If they cannot, it seems to them an extravagance. T h e y will consider knowledge not immediately convertible into dollars and cents as a dissipation of resources. However, this same type when they leave the theater lobby after a performance have nothing to display for their investment except a personal satisfaction. T h e y cannot see the simi­ larity between the joy a student of music, art, or philosophy receives from his investment and the gratification he obtains from the theatrical performance. Objections to cultural pursuits not en­ dangering the first demands upon the family income are signs of incompati­ bility. One of the greatest torments a human must endure is complete domination by another. T h a t society, conventions, and the law permit such subjugation of one human to another makes it none the less grievous. T h e r e is nothing that robs life of those expectancies of the future to which we strive to cling fast like the suppression of our psychic tendencies and latent talents. T h o u g h we may to ourselves admit that the grains of genius have not been planted in our souls, we like to give utterance to those feelings which we know are of the stuff from which greatness comes. T h e humble streetworker who loses his thoughts in
One Hundred N in ety-on e

the sounds he draws from his inexpen­ sive violin has found refuge in a world that transcends this — a world of the inner emotions. N o genius absorbed by the ethereal-like tones he produces on his Stradivarius can have his conscious­ ness more liberated. T o deny another human this occasional afflatus is the greatest crime one can be guilty of, and yet many husbands and wives with a supercilious attitude interfere with their mate's emotional manifestations. T h e y deny them either the paltry few dollars which makes possible these simple and exquisite joys, or boisterously ridicule these interests about which they are most sensitive, until in defense they sup­ press them within the recesses of their being where they become rancor and breed hatred. Th o u san d s upon thou­ sands of homes are subject to this domestic imperialism, an imperialism born out of incompatibility. W i t h most imperialists, a vain stupidity adds to the hopelessness of the situation because they sincerely believe that the oppres­ sion they exercise is for the best concern of all. Domestic agreement between husband and wife with respect to the particulars of their individual interests is not es­ sential. If the husband and wife are both artistically inclined, though the one may prefer sculpturing and the other dress designing, there prevails a har­ mony of sentiment. A man may vent his imagination in inventive activity, and a woman in short-story writing, and yet these interests would complement each other because they are inspired by the same inherent urges. T h e r e is in each the latent desire to create, to bring into existence something which coincides with the ideal their mind has conceived. B oth can appreciate each o th er’s thrill of realization when the idea material­ izes under the direction of applied in­ telligence, and each o ther’s ebullient pride when it is completed. T h e r e must be a unanimity of emotional response. T h e channels into which these tempera­ ments are drawn are, so far as this a c ­ cord is concerned, not of importance. W h a t matters is how the imagination wishes to play, as long as it is not stilted by ridicule or checked by absolute op­ pression? A n emotion is an actuating force. Its end comes in the movement of

mind and body. T h e means employed is of no concern. O n the other hand, an unimaginative person may make life miserable for one who finds freedom in the play of mind. T h o s e who find exquisite joy in creating in fiction incidents, characters and con­ ditions which expand their mental world and carry them to great heights not ob­ tainable otherwise, are tortured when their consciousness is continually forced to return by persons of unimaginative minds and bind itself to realities. It is natural that men should fre­ quently express differently a tempera­ ment which they have in common with their wives. Both may have creative ability, but in the man it may take the form of mechanical pursuits and in the woman, aesthetic interests. T h is differ­ ence in manifestation is influenced by the general emotional nature of the sex. A monogamous marriage is impos­ sible, regardless of the restraint of soci­ ety and the dictates of convention, where the only existing tie is sex in­ terest. N o human cares to merely live, but rather to live for an end. M a n lives because he finds in life something which strongly appeals to him, because he has desires he hopes to gratify b y living. T h is applies alike to the dominant ap­ petites of the lower nature of the sensu­ ous and to the lofty ideals of the in­ tellectual. T h e course o f one's life is, therefore, always in the direction of these interests. E ven disinterest, diffi­ dence, and indolence are interests, for those who are so inclined find pleasure in them or they would not continue them. In the main, it is extremely for­ tunate for the human race that our de­ sires are not easily satiated, or for very long. T h e mental pleasures are intensi­ fied by the continual growth and change of the ideal toward which the mind is drawn and the physical pleasures, though often becoming less frequent be­ cause of physiological changes, are stimulated by the imagination and thus kept alive. W h e r e marriage has been established on a foundation of sex interest alone, The marriage can last only as long as the Rosicrucian the marriage partner continues to represent Digest the height of the ideal of that interest. June A man, for example, who has a great fondness for roses, visualizes the perfect 1936

rose in form, color and scent. T h a t vi­ sion stays with him at all times. It does not ch ange as long as the interest in roses continues. If he obtains a splendid specimen, one that is comparable with his exemplar, it should not be expected that he will continue his interest in it even a fter its bloom has wilted. His interest will direct him to search else­ where for another like the perfect speci­ men he still visualizes. S o it is with a marriage built upon physical attraction. T h e interest in physical attraction will not diminish quickly with the years, but interest in the original O B J E C T of the attraction is bound to, for physical at­ traction in a human reaches a zenith as it does in a flower. Consequently, the husband or wife seeks elsewhere for an exemplification o f the physical ideal. M arria g e s of this type clutter the divorce courts and fill the front pages of yellow journals with scandals. Fundamental human interests such as sex, compel at­ tention by man, but woe is the couple whose sole mutual interest is sex. The interest will persist, but within a few years neither one will be the object of the o th er’s interest. It may seem to some that we have not taken into consideration moral force. T h e y contend that sex attraction may be the essential and dominating factor in causing a marriage. It may also be the sole interest each may have in the other, and yet some characters assert such a strong influence that with the waning of sex glamor there will result no promiscuity or improper conduct with others of the opposite sex. It is said, therefore, that marriages of this kind are lasting because of the interposing of moral responsibility. B ut this is a cir­ cumlocutory argument, for when moral values are interposed, there is no longer the single interest o f sex. T h e re is, in addition, the interpretation built up by the reason of certain delicate emotional reactions to conduct. M o rals are definitely related to virtue, and virtue is a kind of sympathetic emo­ tion causing us to extend the same amity to others as we hope to receive from them. Individuals who can appreciate such moral duties toward each other, even when the sex interest in each other wanes, have more than just a sex tie. T h e y have this mutual moral responsi­
O n e H un dred Ninety-two

bility which is as distinct a human in­ terest as the love for harmony in color and sound, or in other words, music and art. Such couples then, in fact, have double mutual interests. W h e n the physical one fails, the moral one pre­ vails. It is evident a monogamous mar­ riage depends up on a combination of in­ terests other than sex. Especially should one of the interests be cultural for the cultural desire can never be quite satis­ fied and is alw ays a higher end to strive for, since mental pursuits can be fol­ lowed later in life than physical ones. T h e unifying efficacy of the former is greater. Psychologically, love is selfish, though oftentimes indirectly so. W e love those who love the things we do. T h is love, of course, is not to be taken in the physi­ cal sense. T h e s e higher loves, as Plato termed them, will persist long after the love of sex is dormant, and they make for the staple marriages upon which so­ ciety depends. Contests between husbands and wives for home dictatorship have been the prime cause of many marital rifts. M a n y of these conflicts are provoked by tradi­ tions which are obsolete today. A t a time in the past when woman was a chattel of man, not far above the cattle in the pasture in value to him, man was physically and mentally superior to her. His distinct physical advantage com­ pelled him to be the provider, to travel, to study natu re’s phenomena, to sharpen his wits to better cope with enemies and the elements. W ’oman was as confined as the few domestic animals the family owned. Sh e had no future, therefore was not required to exercise her mental powers. She was in every respect m an’s inferior. T h e r e could be no question of man's rightful place as head o f the house, lord and master of the home. Civilization and the machine age have changed all that. T h e modern woman with a n y initiative can in the confines o f her home become as conversant with world topics as her husband through the medium of the press, news periodicals, radio, and motion pictures, not to men­ tion a world of books by eminent au­ thorities on the events of the day. T o ­ day the average man is less an in­ dividualist than he was a century ag o when the world was primarily an ag ri­
One H undred N in ety-three

cultural one. M o s t men, whether of the white collar or laboring class, are cogs in modern industry. A fair livelihood is assured them b y being if nothing else routine plodders. T o a great extent the law-enforcing agencies of society have prevented man from resorting to physi­ cal violence in disputes with his mate so even that attribute affords him little su­ periority in his home today. T h e refo re, the present-day male has no claim to home dictatorship by virtue of his sex and tradition. T h i s position, if it is to be assumed in the home at all, must go to the natural aggressor— the one who is the most positive in his or her desires and can enforce them by sheer power of will. T h e aggressive spirit is to be found in either sex. It is not in a n y sense strictly a masculine characteristic. A g ­ gressiveness can be acquired, but it is most frequently instinctive. P sy ch o ­ logically it is due to the ability to con­ centrate intently upon an idea, keeping it prominent in the consciousness, build­ ing up thereby an artificial desire which becomes directly related to the idea. T h e artificial desire is will, which com­ pels action of body and mind to satisfy itself or attain the final end of the idea. All other interests are subordinated to this dominant thought and the person moves constantly in a direction which he or she believes will fulfill this single purpose. T h is aggressiveness does not relate to all the interests o f the in­ dividual, but he or she usually tries to relate other interests to the cause of the aggressiveness. T h u s a man may be a dynamic force in his business and in his other interests be quite calm, but w hen­ ever in his secondary interests some­ thing suggests the possibility of further­ ing the preferred one, this aggressive spirit will be aroused. W h e r e this aggressiveness is co n ­ cerned with domestic matters it will, if it is resident in only one member o f the family, cause that one, regardless of sex, to be the director of the household. T h e r e can be no unhappiness caused by it if there exists between husband and wife the needed mutual interests, for this aggressive spirit will but promote to the fullest the interests which they both share and enjoy. W h e r e the common interests are lacking, the aggressive one

will by the very momentum of his or her will, pull aw ay from the other and rapidly bring about the eventual divorce. Husbands who are not naturally a g ­ gressive should not attempt to assume the role and bring themselves into con­ flict with a naturally aggressive wife merely because they believe their place in the home has been usurped. W h e r e there is no common interest between man and wife, the aggressive member will continue the attempt to impose his or her interest upon the other, and the state of environment of the home can easily be imagined. W h e r e one is par­ ticularly aggressive in an interest not shared by the other, tolerance will be exhibited if both share another common interest. Consequently, the n o n -ag gres­ sor of the family should continually keep before the other the things of mutual in­ terest if domestic harmony is to reign. W h a t is the ultimate end of marriage is a question quite frequently asked. T h e answer cannot be a general one for it depends upon the point of view. M a r ­ riage serves not one purpose but sev­ eral. Biologically, the legal and moral aspects of marriage are inconsequential. In the biological sense marriage consists of a union of the two sexes and a propa­ gation of the species. From this point of view a man and woman have served their purpose in life when they have re­ produced their kind. T h is is the final and ultimate attainment of nature, bio­ logically. W h e n they are no longer capable of this function in a strict bio­ logical sense, they become liabilities in­ stead of assets. Sociologists, on the other hand, have a more illumined though none the more utilitarian co n­ cept of marriage. Fam ily responsibility keeps alive moral values. It invokes sympathetic emotions. T h e instinct of self-preservation extends from the in­ dividual to his immediate dependents. It curbs the individual’s brutal passions and causes the finer sentiments to be e x ­ pressed in ways and means intended to protect the weaker members of the family. T h is restraining influence will unite men in supporting the institutions The of society which care for the indigent, R osicrucian helpless and unfortunate which they Digest would not be concerned with if they

were thrown upon their own resources, with no other responsibilities. T h e di­ rect selfishness of man is curbed by the thought that his acts may reflect upon his dependents. If the state of marriage did not exist, the family would become extinct and so would those institutions of society which depend upon an appeal to man's charitable nature which is aroused by family life. M e n risk any conduct for their own regard, but will weigh the risks of a venture if it is to jeopardize their im­ mediate family. Society is an enlarged family promulgating on a larger scale the interests of the families of which it is composed. D estroy the ties which hold a family together, and society crumbles. Consequently every wise government avoids experimentation with family life, or those influences which make for its strength and security. Psychologically and philosophically, the final object of the state of marriage is the creation of an environment which provides the emotional means to bring man peace of mind and eliminate the restlessness of search. M a n by nature loves to peregrinate. He hopes to find in point of space those thing which will quell the longings of his emotional self. T h e more aggravating these urges, the more restless he becomes. H e expects to find just over yonder hill that mys­ terious something which he cannot de­ fine which will quiet the welling sensa­ tions within him. It is the extreme e x ­ ception who will climb the mountain top within himself and from the lofty peak of his mind seek within the depths of his nature the cause of his restlessness. M arriage provides the emotional en­ vironment man needs to stifle these pangs of agitation. C are of wife and family runs man through a gauntlet of his emotions. E very emotion is played upon. N o sentiment is left unexpressed. W h e n man experiences within the fam­ ily circle those sensations to which his emotional nature responds, life’s inter­ ests become centered there. T h e uncer­ tainties of a peace and pleasure beyond the hill become a gamble which he will not chance for the benefits of his im­ mediate known environment. V V
O ne H un dred N in ety-fou r

June
1 93 6
V

T h e Rosicrucian Planetarium
AN UNUSUAL ADDITION TO THE FEA TURES A T ROSICRUCIAN PARK
By T h e S u p re m e S e c r e t a r y
N T h e Rosicrucian D igest f o r l a s t month there was reproduced a large picture of the new planetarium build­ ing n o w nearing completion at R osi­ crucian Park. T h is picture has aroused so much interest that we feel our m e m b e r s will be glad to have some further facts about it. T h e re are a number of scientific planetariums in Europe, but there have been only four in America. M o s t of these were built upon high mountain tops or in isolated points aw ay from the hearts of cities and always more or less inaccessible to the average visitor. T h e Rosicrucian planetarium is the first one to be built in a small city and directly on one of the important highways and easily reached without special convey­ ances or the loss of considerable time. F or this reason the Rosicrucian plane­ tarium will not only be an enjoyable fea­ ture for the hundreds of members who visit Rosicrucian Park each year from all parts of the O ccid ent and Orient, but it will be unusually convenient to the many thousands of tourists from all
One H undred N in ety-five

parts of Am erica who pass northward or southward along the main highway of California. T h u s one more Rosicru­ cian cultural attraction will bring thou­ sands of strangers to Rosicrucian Park, there to become acquainted with the ra ­ tional, sane, scientific, and practical ac­ tivities and teachings of our organiza­ tion as compared with the extremely fantastic, impractical, or theoretical teachings of so-called occult organiza­ tions that create many doubts in the minds of the public and leave a very er­ roneous impression as to what the vari­ ous mystical organizations of the world are attempting to accomplish. Just as our O riental Museum at R o si­ crucian P a rk brings thousands of visit­ ors today who are surprised to find that the Rosicrucian O rd er does not deal e x ­ clusively with intangible things of the clouds, or invisible things of the imagi­ nation, but with the practical and useful things of life, so the planetarium will at­ tract cultured, thinking men and women of all parts of the W e s t , and likewise the tourists from all parts of the world. O n ce again the A M O R C will be dis­ tinguished in encyclopedias and refer­ ence books, and in statistical informa­ tion published by the S ta te o f C ali­ fornia, and by historical authorities everywhere as the first and only fra­ ternal organization in America, or per­

(6 \ pjxruxrj

haps in the world, to build and operate a planetarium for the public exhibition of the scientific principles of the Cosmic and the universe. It will impress think­ ing persons with the fact that this or­ ganization does practical things in a practical w ay and deals with the most advanced revelations of science. B y reference to the picture of the building as published last month in this magazine, it will be seen that when the Imperator designed this new building, as he designed all of our other O riental buildings at Rosicrucian Park, he made this new one representative and typical o f another of the O riental types of architecture. T h i s one is impressively and distinctively of the A rabic type of mosque to be found in T u rk e y , Syria, Palestine, E g y p t, and other places of the E ast. Its two large domes, covered with silvery metal, sparkle in the sun­ light and moonlight and attract the at­ tention of the tourists as they approach Rosicrucian Park. Its spires and turrets are typical of the minarets attached to the mosques of the O rient. T h e color­ ing of the building, while harmonizing with the other O riental buildings or the other eleven units of our buildings at Rosicrucian Park, is distinctly that of the M oham m edan and A rabic principles. W it h in the building which is one hundred and fifteen feet long, there are large reading and lounging rooms, rest rooms, cloak room, editorial room and research library. T h e main foyer is lined with black marble and with marblesque floors and a wide stairw ay leading to the planetarium proper. In the planetarium the lecture sessions will be conducted in theme as if one were a t­ tending a performance in a “theater of
R E A D
Q u in n

the sky.’’ In this planetarium will be demonstrated the movement of all the groups of stars and of the planets and o f the various Cosmic laws which oper­ ate throughout the universe. T h e entire movement of the stars, planets, comets, and other heavenly features which usually require a y e a r’s time will be re­ produced in one hour. O n e will learn more about the fundamental principles of astronomy and the formation and operation of the universe in an hour’s lecture than in the reading of many books. Differing from the other few planetariums in America, or those in Europe, all of which are owned and controlled by scientific institutions, the Rosicrucian planetarium will not be confined ex­ clusively to a demonstration of the astronomical laws according to the Copernican theory. In this planetarium the old theories of ancient astronomy which guided the E gy ptian s will be demonstrated. Because of the need of flexible mech­ anical apparatus for this planetarium in order to be free from the limitations of the C opernican theories and to demon­ strate at the same time the Cosmic laws known to our members, every piece of apparatus to be used was designed and invented by our Imperator, and manu­ factured under his direction right here in California, many o f the parts and most intricate pieces being made in our own laboratories by the Imperator and his assistants. E v ery feature of the mechanical operation is therefore orig­ inal and distinctly adaptable to the dem­ onstration of the principles taught in our monographs.
F O R U M

T H E

R O S I C R U C I A N
1111 i n n ii t i i i m u i n n m u m 111

'{9

IM P O R T A N T B U L L E T IN
W e are happy to announce that our beloved Sovereign Grand Master, Dr. Clement Le Brun, has gained slightly in health and strength and has been able to leave his home for a few minutes at a time for short walks and drives. W e are very hopeful of his complete recovery, and he and his family desire to thank all of our members for their loving thoughts, messages, and flowers. of our members are earnestly solicited. = [ i \

The R osicru cian D ig est T h e continued good wishes Ju n e 1936 a . .........................................

i
O n e H un dred N in ety-six

T H O U S A N D S H EA R R O SIC R U C IA N L E C T U R E
Since January, thousands of men and women in all of the principal cities of the United States have heard Frater P c o le . m em ber of the National Lecture Board of A M O R C expound the history and purposes of the Rosicrucian Order. Thousands of members, likewise, have heard him elucidate the A M O RC teachings. Althouqh the Courier Car has but half completed its second transcontinental tour, it has been so well received that plans are under way to again reroute it across the nation. The public has also acclaimed the exhibition of the special sound and talking motion pictures by Frater Brewer, which are one of the features ol tie Courier ar s visit to a citv T he picture above was taken recently on the occasion of Frater Poole's public address in Chicago. * y ^ (C ou rtesy o f R osicrucian D igest.)

I I

A MA Z I N t i

I I

Says W e l l ' K n o w n E g y p t o l o g i s t of

PYRAMID BOOK
O N E is belter qualified lo comment w ith authority <m a book about the G reat Pyramirl than M r. H u g h A . M atier. w ell-kn ow n Egyptologist and archaeologist. M r. M atier spent years in Egypt, m aking a personal study of the G re at Pyram id. H e participated in the renowned Petrie expedition in F ayoum . E gypt, brin gin g to light m any astounding relics. H e is a founder member of the P acific G e o g ra p h ic Society, and the A llie d A rchaeological Societies of the Pacific. H e is also a m ember of the A rt, H istorical, Scientific A ssociation of C a n a d a , now searching for evidences o! early man on the Pacific C oast of N orth A m erica. M r. M a tie r voluntarily wrote the follow ing letter w h ile reading D r. L e w is ’ latest book. " T h e Sym bolic Prophecy’ of the Great Pyram id.

H ollyw ood, California
2 8 t h A p r il i W 5

Uy d e a r D r

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I t re a lly Is a lon 6 time since
hPd so much p l e a s u r e I n a b o o k . - i t h w h ich t h i s T he c l e a r n e s s fo u n d s u b je c t i s d e a l t I s am arlnP. t o nn o l o g l e t l i k e m y s e lf and I am s u re you w 6 l v e th o u sa n d s o f p e o p le Br e a t p l e a s u r e , t h o s e who h a v e n o t been t o E g y p tI t was d i f f i c u l t t o p u t I t down e f o r t h e few m in u te s r e q u ir e d t o w r i t e
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m u st th a n k you and c o n g r a t u l a t e you on th is
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m a s t e r p ie c e .

3o now, t o y o u r book a 6 a l n and w ith my co m p lim e n ts and b e s t w is h e s . y 0 u t o b e l i e v e me, d e a r D r . S p e n c e r Lew s . Y o u re m o«t s t n c e r e l > i

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The R O S I C R U C I A N
SAN JOSE. CALIFORNIA

S U P P L Y

B U R E A U
U. S. A.

TH E PU RPO SES O F

THE

ROSICRUCIAN

ORDER

Member o f

••Funosi”
(Federation Universelle des Ordres et Societes Tnitiatique.s)

The Rosicrucian Order, existin g in all civilized lands, is a non-sectarian, fraternal body o f men and women devoted to the investigation, study, and practical application o f natural and spiritual laws. The purpose o f the o rga n i­ zation is to enable all to live in harmony with the creative, constructive. Cosmic forces fo r the attainment o f health, happiness, and Peace. The O rder is Internationally known as AM O R C (an abbreviation), and the AM O RC in America, and all other lands, constitutes the only form o f R osi­ crucian activities united in one body having representation in the interna­ tional federation. The AM O R C does not sell its teachings, but gives them freely to all affiliated members, togeth er with many other benefits. In qu irers seeking to know the history, purposes, and practical benefits that they may receive from Rosicrucian association, are invited to send fo r the free book. "T h e Secret H e rita g e ." Address, F ria r S. P. C\, care of AM OKC T E M P L E Itosicriician P a rk , San -lose, C alifo rn ia, U. S. A. (Cable Address: "A M O R C O " Radio Station W tiH T B )

Officials of the North and South American Jurisdictions
(In cluding the United States, Dominion o f Canada, Alaska. Mexico. Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua. Costa Rica, El Salvador. Republic o f Panama, the W est Indies, L o w e r California, and all land under the protection o f the United States o f Am erica.) H. S PE N C E R L E W IS . F. R. C.. Ph. D .................................................. C L E M E N T B. L E B R U N , F. R. C........................................... R A L P H M. L E W IS . F. R. C................................................................... H A R V E Y M ILE S . F. R. C. E T H E L B. W A R D . F. R. C H A R R Y L. STITBLEY, F. R. C..........................................- ..................... Im perator Grand Master Supreme Secretary Grand Treasurer Secretary to Grand Master D irector o f Publications

Junior O rder o f Torch Bearers (sponsored b y A M O R C ). For com plete inform ation as to its aims and benefits address General Secretary. Grand Chapter, Rosicrucian Park. San Jose, California.

T he follow ing principal branches are District H eadqu arters o f A M O R C
Reading, Pennsylvania: S an Francisco, C alifo rn ia:

Reading Chapter. Mr. Carl Schlotzhauer, Master: Mr. George R. Osman, Secretary. Meeting every 1st and 3rd Friday. 8:00 p. in.. Washington Hall. 904 W ashington Street.
New Y o rk City, New Y o rk :

Francis Bacon Lodge, 1655 Polk Mr. David Mackenzie, Master.
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania:

Street;

Penn. First Lodge. Ralph M. Ross, Master: 610 Arch Street.
A tlan ta, G eorgia:

New York Chapter, Rooms 35-36, 711 8th Ave.. cor. 8th Ave. and 45th Street. Louis Riccardi. Master; Margaret Sharpe. Secre­ tary. Inquiry and reading rooms open week days and Sundays, 1 to 8 p. m.
P hiladelphia. P ennsylvania:

Atlanta Chapter No. 650. Dr. Janies C. Oakshette, Master: Nassau Hotel. Meetings 7:30 every Thursday night.
Los A ngeles, C alifo rn ia:

Delta Lodge No. 1, A M O R C . S. E. Corner 40th and Brown Sts.. 2nd Floor. Mr. Albert Courtney, Master. Benjamin Franklin Chapter of A M O R C ; Mr. James De Fulio, Master: Martha Aitken. Secretary. 2203 15th Street. Meetings for all members every second and fourth Sun­ days. 7:30 p. m.. at 1521 W est Girard Ave. (Second Floor. Room B ).
Boston. M assachusetts:

Hermes Lodge, A M O R C Temple. Mr. Dun­ can G. W right, Master. Reading Room and Inquiry office open daily, 10 a. m. to 5 p. rn. and 7:30 p. m. to 9 p. m. except Sundays. Granada Court. 672 South Lafayette Park Place.
B irm ingham , A labam a:

Birmingham Chapter of A M O R C For in formation address Mr. Cuyler C. Berry, Master, 721 So. 85th St.
Ch icago, Illin ois:

The Marie Clemens Lodge, Chester A. Robinson, Master. Temple and Reading Rooms, 739 Boylston St.. Telephone Kenmore 9398.
D etroit. M ich igan :

Thebes Chapter No. 336. Miss Ella A. Milliman, Master: Mrs. Pearl Anna Tifft, Secretary. Meetings at the Florence Room, Tuller Hotel, every Tuesday, 8 p. m. In­ quirers call dial phone No. 1870.

Chicago Chapter No. 9. H. C. Blackwell. Master; Mabel L. Schmidt, Secretary. T e le ­ phone Superior 6881. Reading Room open afternoons and evenings. Sundays 2 to 5 only. 100 E. Ohio St., Room 403-404. Lec­ ture sessions for A LL piembers every T u es­ day night, 8:00 p. m. Chicago Afra-American Chapter No. 10. Oliver T . McGrew, Master; Nehemiah Dennis. Secretary. Meeting every W ednes­ day night at 8 o'clock. Y . M. C. A., 3763 So. W abash Avenue.

(D irecto ry Continued on N ext P a g e )

Portland , O reg on:

Seattle, W ash ington:

Portland Chapter. Floyd D. Cook. Master: 405 Orpheum Bldg. Meetings every Thurs­ day, 8:00 p.m . at 714 S. W . llth Avenue. Washington, D. C.: Thom as Jefferson Chapter. Howard E. Mertz. Master. Confederate Memorial Hall. 1322 Vermont Ave. N. W . Meetings every Friday, 8:00 p. m.

A M O R C Chapter 586. Fred Motter. Master: Mrs. Carolina Henderson, Secretary. 311-14 Lowman Bldg., between 1st and 2nd Aves. on Cherry Street. Reading room open week days 11 a. m. to 4:30 p. m. Visitors welcome. Chapter meetings each Monday. 8:00 p. m.

Other Chartered Chapters and Lodges of the Rosicrucian Order (A M O R C ) will be found in most large cities and towns of North America. Address of local representatives given on request.

P R IN C IP A L C A N A D IA N B R A N C H E S
Edm onton. A lb erta: M o n treal. Q uebec. C anada:

Mr. F. G. Avenue E .

Powell.

Master.

9533

Jasper

V icto ria , B ritish C olum bia:

V ictoria Ledge, Mr. George A. Phillips, Master. Inquiry Office and Reading Room. 101 Union Bank Bldg. Open week days 10 a .m . to 6 p.m .
W inn ip eg , M an ito ba, C anada:

Montreal Chapter. F. E . Dufty. Master: 210 W est St. James Street. Inquiry office open 10 a.m . to 5 p.m. daily; Saturdays 10 a. m. to 1 p. m.
T o ro n to , O n tario . C anada:

Miss Edith Hearn. M aster. Sessions 1st and 3rd Sundays of the month, 7:00 p. in., No. 10 Lansdowne Ave.
V an cou ver, B ritish C olum bia:

G. F. Gostick. Master, 361 M achray Ave Session for all members every Sunday. 2:45 p. m., 304 B Enderton Bldg., Portage Ave. and Hargrave St.

Canadian Grand Ledge, A M O R C . Mrs. Ethel M. W are, Master. A M O R C Temple, 878 Hornby Street.

SP A N ISH A M E R IC A N S E C T IO N
T his jurisdiction includes all the Spanish-speaking Countries of the New W orld. Its Supreme Council and Administrative Office are located at San Juan, Puerto Rico, having local Represen­ tatives in all the principal cities of these stated Countries. T he name and address of the Officers and Representatives in the jurisdiction will be furnished on application. Secretary General of the Spanish-American Jurisdiction of A M O R C , P. O. Box 35. San Juan, Puerto Rico.

A ll correspondence should be addressed as follows:

A L E W O F T H E F O R E IG N JU R IS D IC T IO N S
Scand in avian Countries: New Z ealan d :

The A M O R C Grand Lodge of Denmark. Mr. Arthur Sundstrup, Grand Master: Carli Anderson, S. R. C., Grand Secretary. Manogtide 13th Strand, Copenhagen. Denmark.
Sw eden:

Auckland Chapter A M O RC. Mr. G. A. Franklin, Master. 317 Victoria Arcade Bldg. Queen St., City Auckland.
England:

Grand Lodge Rosenkorset.' Anton Svanlund, F. R. C., Grand Master. Jerusalemsgatan, 6, Malmo.
H o llan d :

The A M O R C Grand Lodge of Great Britain. Mr. Raymund Andrea. K. R. C., Grand Master, 34 Bay water Ave., W estbury Park. Bristol 6 .
D u tch and East Indies:

De Rozekruisers Orde; Groot-Lodge der Nederlanden. J. Coops, Gr. Sect., Hunzestraat 141, Amsterdam.
Fran ce:

Dr. W . T h . van Stokkum, Grand Master: W . J. Visser. Secretary-General. Karangtempel 10 Semarang, Java.
Egypt:

Mile. Jeanne Guesdon, S.R.C ., Corresponding Secretary for the Grand Lodge (A M O R C ) of France, 56 Rue Gambetta, Villeneuve Saint Georges, (Seine & O ise).
Sw itzerland:

T h e Grand Orient of A M O R C . House of the Temple, M. A. Ramayvelim, F. R. C., Grand Secretary, 26. Avenue Ismalia, Heliopolis.
A frica:

A M O R C Grand Lodge. August Reichel, F. R. C., Gr. Sect., Riant-Port Vevey-Plan.
C hina and Russia:

The United Grand Lodge of China and Rus­ sia. Temporary new address: 651 W ei Hai W ei Road, Ap. 22/b, Shanghai. Mail ad­ dress P. O. Box 513. Shanghai, China.
R O SI C RU C I AN PRESS, LTD. ,

The Grand Lodge of the Gold Coast, A M O RC. Mr. W illiam Okai, Grand Master. P. O. Box 424 Accra, Gold Coast, W est Africa.

The addresses of other foreign Grand Lodges and secretaries will be furnished on application.
e*^||IS iS » P R I N T E D I N U . S. A.

India’s Secret Control of Nature’s Forces
It all seemed so uncanny. T h e tense atmosphere, the throbbing pulsations, as though an electrical current were passing through your body. Then, suddenly, before your eyes, the body o f the subject to whom you had spoken but a few moments before, rises rigidly, horizontally, from the stone floor upon which it rested. Y our senses reel, as you realize that this body, this weight is rising without any physical support. You involuntarily shake yourself, as if to awake from a dream. This cannot be possible, you think, this control of natural law. It must be illusionary. T o con­ firm your suspicions you thrust your hand into the cold vapor-like substance wh ich surrounds the rising form. Y our hand passes freely about it, you encounter nothing. It is true, you gasp, the body is levitated — suspended in space. So James D. W a rd , physician, world traveler, and metaphysician, described an experience in one of India s mystery monasteries. He was one of the few occidentals ever to he permitted to witness this feat. Scientists have scoffed at actual suspen ded animation, but have never been able to satisfactorily explain the phenomena. The secret principle is used in the Orient, not for theatrical effects, but for mystical purposes. Or. W a r d s remarkable discourse on the use of this strange power, en­ titled, Suspended A nim ation, is available as a special gift at this time. Or. W a rd , on numerous occasions, was honored by the mystics of the Orient because of his keen insight into tl leir ways and customs, and the integrity of the author is therefore unquestioned.

FREE — This Manuscript
Every new subscriber to f he Rosicrucian Digest will re­ ceive this exceptional premium — no extra cost whatever. Just send a six-months subscription to 1 lie Rosicrucian Digest lor only $1.50 ami ask for your F R E E copy of the highly inter esting manuscript, Suspended Animation, by Dr. James D. \\bird. Address:

T h e ROSICRUCIAN DIGEST
S a n Jose, California, U.S.A.

^Rgsicrucian Library
The follow ing books are a few of several recommended because o f the special knowledge they contain, not to be found in our teachings and not available elsewhere. Catalogue o f all publica­ tions free upon request. Volume II. R O S IC R U C IA N P R IN C IP L E S F O R T H E H O M E A N D B U SIN E SS.
A very practical book dealing with the solution of health, financial, and business problems in the home and office. W ell printed and bound in red silk, stamped w ith gold. Price, $2.1)0 per copy, postpaid.

Volume III.

T H E M Y S T IC A L L IF E O F JESUS.

A rare account o f the Cosmic preparation, birth, secret studies, mission, crucifixion, and later life o f the Great Master, from the records of the Essene and Rosicrucian Brotherhoods. A book that is demanded in foreign lands as the most talked about revelation o f Jesus ever made. Over 300 pages, beautifully illustrated, bound in purple silk, stamped in gold. Price, $2.25 per copy, postpaid.

Volume V.

“ UNTO TH EE I G R AN T . . ”

A strange book prepared from a secret manuscript found in the monastery o f Tibet. It is filled with the most sublime teachings of the ancient Masters o f the F a r East. The book has had many editions. W ell printed with attractive cover. Price, $1.25 per copy, postpaid.

Volume V I.

A TH O U SAN D Y E A R S OF YE STE R D AYS.

A beautiful story o f reincarnation and m ystic lessons. This unusual book has been translated and sold in many languages and universally endorsed. W ell printed and bound with attractive cover. Price, 85c per copy, postpaid.

Volume V II.

S E L F M A S T E R Y A N D F A T E , W IT H T H E C Y C L E S O F L IF E .

A new and astounding system o f determ ining your fortunate and unfortunate hours, weeks, months, and years throughout your life. No mathematics required. Better than any system of num erology or astrology. Bound in silk, stamped in gold. Price, $2.00 per copy, postpaid.

Volume V III.

T H E R O S IC R U C IA N M A N U A L .

Most complete outline o f the rules, regulations, and operations of lodges and student w ork o f the Order with many interesting articles, biographies, explanations, and complete dictionary o f Rosicrucian terms and words. V ery com pletely illustrated. A necessity to every student who wishes to progress rapidly, and a guide to all seekers. W ell printed and bound in silk, stamped with gold. Price, $2.00 per copy, postpaid.

Volume XI.

M A N S IO N S O F T H E SOUL, T H E CO SM IC C O N C E P T IO N .
W ell

The complete doctrines of reincarnation explained. This book makes reincarnation easily understood. illustrated, bound in silk, stamped in gold, extra large. Price. $2.20 per copy, postpaid.

Volume X II.

L E M U R IA — 'T H E LO S T C O N T IN E N T O F T H E P A C IF IC .

T he revelation o f an ancient and long forgotten M ystic civilization. Fascinating and intriguing. Learn how these people came to be swept from the earth. K n ow o f their vast knowledge, much o f which is lost to man­ kind today. W ell printed and bound, illustrated with charts and maps. Price, $2.20 per copy, postpaid.

Volume X III.

T H E T E C H N IQ U E O F T H E M A S T E R .

The newest and most complete guide fo r attaining the state o f Cosmic Consciousness. It is a masterful work on psychic unfoldment. Price. $1.85 per copy, postpaid.

Send all orders for books, w ith rem ittance, direct to R O S IC R U C IA N

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THE INSTITUTION BEHIND THIS ANNOUNCEMENT

DIGEST

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Our Suggestion To You A MEETING OF THE MINDS
C IJ W h e n you w rite, you have one party in mind. I hat party m ay he one individual or a group of them , hut your thoughts are alone for them. You do not w ish your thoughts to reach a mind or minds for whom they were not intended. Fu rtherm ore, you do not wish others to interpret your ideas for you. H ow ever, this is only possible w hen you take the proper pre­ cautions to see that your com m unications are brought directly to the personal attention of your correspondent. 1 he R osicru cian student w ho fails to properly address his or her com m unications, or give all needed information for their proper delivery, causes his or her letter or report to be read, interpreted, and h an d led by m any persons before reaching its proper destination. To avoid such conditions an d to facilitate a prom pt re­ ply to com m unications, we have p repared a special large ( orrespondence price.
ST l ’D E N T 'S C O R R E SP O N D E N C E TA BI .FT
E a c h tablet contains 50 large 8 '/2-inch x 1 1-inch business size sheets. The blotter rover w ith its printed inform ation about the various departments is a useful addition to ear h tablet.

1 ablet for students, at an econom ical

T h e cover of the tablet is also especially useful.
W hom , W h ere

Besides being a blotter, there is printed upon it all essen­ tial instructions as T o
W
rite

and \ \

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A t the top of each sheet there is printed inform a­ 1 he stationery

tion for the proper direction of your letter.

consists of a light, strong, and good quality bond paper. I his is a most serviceable article and one that no student should be w ithout. Y ou owe it to yourself to make this reasonab le purchase. S end order and rem ittance to:

40c each: 3 for 31-00

T h e

R O S I C R U C I A N
P A R K

S U P P L Y
S AN

B U R E A U
C A L I F O R N I A

R O S I C R U C I A N

J O S E .

ALBERTUS MAGNUS
O n e of the scholastic philosophers of the M iddle A ges. T e a c h e r of S t. T h o m as Aquinas, and one of the greatest m ystics of all periods. T h is illustration is taken irom an old R osicrucian volume of 1579 A . D . containing numerous portraits of the old M asters.

(Courtesy of The Rosicrucian Digest.)

~ jr " ) !.■ ' ^ jg e ll

k

•v

w 3 ^ :^ - *

W h a t S t r a n g e Power s
Did the A n c i e n t s Possess?

C V E R Y important d iscovery relating to mind power, sound thinking and cause and effect, as applied to self-advancem ent, w as known cen­ turies ago, before the m asses could read and w rite. M uch has been w ritten about the wise men of old. A popular fallacy has it that their secrets of personal pow er and successful living were lost to the world. Know ledge of natu re’s law s, accum ulated through the ages, is never lost. At times the great truths possessed by the sages were hidden from unscrupulous men in high places, but never destroyed.

thoughts and actions are governed by funda­ mental law s. E xam p le: T h e law of com pensation is as fundam ental as the law s of breathing, eating and sleeping. All fixed law s of nature are as fascinating to study as they are vital to understand fo r success in life. Y o u can learn to find and follow every basic law of life. Y o u can begin at an y time to dis­ co v er a whole new world of interesting truths. Y o u can start at once to aw aken your inner pow ers of self-understanding and self-ad vance­ ment. Y o u can learn from one of the w orld's oldest institutions, first known in Am erica in 1694. E n jo y in g the high regard of hundreds of leaders, thinkers and teachers, the O rd er is known as the R osicru cian Brotherhood. Its com­ plete nam e is the "Ancient and M y stical O rd er R osae C ru cis," abbreviated by the initials " A M O R C ." T h e teachings of the O rd er are not sold, for it is not a com m ercial organization, nor is it a religious sect. It is a non-profit fraternity, a brotherhood in the true sense.

W h y W e r e Their Secrets Closely G u a rd e d ?
O n ly recently, as time is m easured; not more than tw enty generations ago, less than 1/100th of 1 % of the earth ’s people w ere thought cap ­ able of receiving basic know ledge about the laws of life, for it is an elem entary truism that know l­ edge is pow er and that power cannot be en­ trusted to the ignorant and the unw orthy. W isd om is not readily attainable by the gen­ eral public; nor recognized when right within reach. T h e averag e person absorbs a multitude of details about things, but goes through life without ever knowing w here and how to acquire m astery of the fundam entals of the inner mind— that m ysterious silent something which "w h is­ p e r s ' to you from w ithin.

N ot For G eneral Distribution
Sin cere men and women, in search of the truth— those w ho wish to fit in with the w ay s of the world— are invited to w rite for com plim en­ tary copy of the sealed booklet, " T h e Secret H e ritag e.” It tells how to co ntact the librarian of the archives of A M O R C for this rare know ledge. T h is booklet is not in­ tended for general distribution: nor is it sent w ithout re­ quest. It is there­ fore suggested that you w rite for your copy to the Scribe w h o s e a d d r e s s is given in the coupon. T h e initial step is for you to take. Scribe S . P . C ., P osicru cian B r o t h e r h o o d . S a n J o s e , C a lifo r n ia . P le a s e s e n d c o p y o f s e a le d b o o k le t . " T h e S e c ­ ret H e r ita g e ," w h ich 1 sh a ll r e a d a s d ire c te d . N a m e. A d d r es s.

Fundamental Laws of N ature
Y o u r habits, accom plishm ents and w eak­ nesses are the effects of causes. Y o u r

( R o sic ru c ia n M e m b e r s h a v e h a d this u n u su al b o o k le t .)

ROSICRUCIAN DIGEST
fc a m a tic c 1
C O V ERS THE W O R LD SOCRAT

TH E O FFIC IA L IN TER N A TIO N A L ROSICRUCIAN MAGA­ ZINE O F T II E W O R LD -W ID E ROSICRUCIAN ORDER
Vol. X IV J U L Y , 1936 No. 6

C O N T E N T S Albertus Magnus (Frontispiece)The Thought of the M onth: O pening the Tomb Im portant N otice to all Mem bers C a th ed ra l C ontacts Pages from the Past Earth Rays in A ction Summaries of Science Sanctum Musings: A Study in Perfumes. A n cient Symbolism

Page 201 204 208 213 215 218 224 228 231 232 237

r a a ia m M —

The " G r e a t M a s te r" Hoax The Long N ight of the Soul (Illustration)

E
t

Subscription to The Rosicrucian Digest, T hree Dollars per year. Single copies tw enty-five cents each. Entered as Second Class M atter at the P ost Office at San Jose. California, under the Act o f August 24th. 1912. Changes o f address must reach us by the tenth o f the month preceding date o f issue. Statements made in this publication are not the official exressions o f the organization or its officers unless stated to e official communications. Published M onthly b y the Supreme Council of

tllU tu A '

T H E R O S IC R U C IA N O R D E R — A M O R C

ROSICRUCIAN PA R K

SAN JO SE, CALIFORNIA

H E R E is one very mysterious, mysti­ cal, secret tradition running t h r o u g h the history and esoteric principles of the Rosicrucians w h i c h i s never completely understood either in its symbolism or p r a c t i c a l useful­ ness until the stu­ dent has reached the highest degrees. I refer to the o pen­ ing of the tomb of C. R. C. It falls to the lot of each group of chief executives of each branch of the Rosicrucian O rder throughout the world, periodically in each century, to open the tomb of Christian Rosenkreuz and release therefrom that which has been held in darkness and give to the world that which will co 7 istitute the g reater light. Not only is the “b o d y" of C .R .C . to be taken from the tomb and after a period o f time reburied again to await the next periodical removal, but the se­ crets preserved in rare manuscripts or carved hieroglyphs on the wall of the tomb, engraved upon pieces of metal, inscribed on jewels and marked with blood on pieces of parchment, are also to be made alive again with modern interpretation and practical application. Because of this old tradition, which is an established custom and ruling, the The Rosicrucian R°sicrucians have been known for many centuries as guardians of the tomb and D igest the co n serv a to rs o f the world's greatest July secrets. But among Rosicrucians them­ 1 9 36 selves they feel that they are more than

guardians of a tomb, for they rejoice in the fact that it is their privilege to open the tomb and to let the imprisoned powers within it enjoy the light of day. It is the bringing forth of knowledge from the tomb into Light. Life, and Love that constitutes the great joy of the a d ­ vanced R o sicru cia n s. It is not to be wondered, therefore, that this high ideal and glorious privi­ lege of opening tombs and bringing out of darkness into Light that which may enjoy the Light of Life and Love, b e ­ comes a fundamental desire, ambition, and practice with every real Rosicrucian. He constantly seeks for every opportun­ ity of opening any and every tomb that holds within its enclosure that which should enjoy Light, Life and Love, or that which will bring Light. Life, and Love to others. C on trary to the ambi­ tions of the fanatical occultists of Oriental lands who constantly seek to hide and make secret the higher prin­ ciples of life and the great fundamental laws of nature, the Rosicrucians seek to reveal rather than conceal. T h e ir only restraint is governed by their knowledge that there are times and seasons for such revelations and that the periodic, cyclic manifestations of the process of evolu­ tion govern the periods in each year and each century when certain preserved knowledge and certain revealed wisdom will be given in the scheme o f human evolution. It is natural, also, that the enthus­ iastic, advanced Rosicrucians in every country and every section of each coun­ try would seek for ways and means of carrying out this spirit of opening the tomb and bringing into the Light that
T w o H undred Four

which has been held in darkness. S y m ­ bolically and allegorically this principle can be applied in many w ays. F o r many years the R osicrucians in N orth A m eri­ ca, for instance, have been opening the tombs in the hearts and souls o f those who are confined in penal institutions or places of correction by giving them such knowledge and such guidance as will enable them spiritually to leave their places o f d arkness and en jo y the free­ dom of know ledge and the pow er that comes with such know ledge. In scores of prisons or sim ilar institutions there are students o f our teachings w ho are being helped and who in turn are helping others and who will some day put into practice for their own betterm ent and the upliftm ent o f those depending upon them, the principles of our teachings. T h is is but one phase o f the w ork o f our W e lfa r e and Sunshine C ircles. B u t for some time the Sunshine C ircles in v ari­ ous parts of N o rth A m erica have been planning to spread their w ork and in­ crease their activities in a very distinct and unique manner. F o r some time the secret Sunshine C ircles associated with each of our lodges or chapters have placed small advertisem ents in new spapers and m ag­ azines throughout the continent offering to give spiritual advice and help, p rac­ tical assistance, free m edical and legal advice, vocational and em ploym ent a s­ sistance to the needy. T h e replies to these advertisem ents have been carefu lly analyzed and investigated and each week or each month sees members of t h e s e R osicrucian Su nshine C ircles carrying on their w elfare w ork and bringing sunshine into the lives of per­ sons who may never have heard o f R osicrucianism and w ithout any attem pt to proselyte or enlist their interest in our teachings. N o t only has help been given in nursing, medical treatm ent, and busi­ ness and professional advice, the m eet­ ing o f sudden em ergencies, overcom ing of obstacles, but clothing, food, and many other m aterial, practical aids have been given to these persons. From time to time w e have mentioned the activities of these Su nshine C ircles in T h e Rosicrucian Forum and have been encouraging each one o f these C ircles to enlarge its staff of volunteer
T w o H un dred F i ve

w orkers and to widen the scope of its interests and con tacts. A short time ago we announced that the largest of these R osicru cian Su n ­ shine C ircles, th at located in the Los A n g eles d istrict and under the direction o f F ra te r G eo rg e Baldw in, director o f the Su nshine activities in Sou th ern C a li­ fornia, had decided to take up the great w ork o f bringing jo y and happiness into the lives o f the shu t-ins. W e announced th at other Sunshine C ircles should give thought to this m atter also and replies cam e even from foreign jurisd ictions of our O rd er asking for details as to our A m erican m ethods o f procedure, and we are happy in the fact that the shut-ins in m any lands are now receiving a new and interesting form o f aid and a ssist­ a n ce that brings forth enthusiastic com ­ m ents from them. S o often w e forget th at there are thousands of persons in every section of the country w ho are not actually ill but in dire need for com panionship, assist­ an ce in solving som e of life ’s problem s, enjoyin g some o f the privileges that are m an’s b irth righ t, and participating in even the most simple and common of every day indulgences w hich all o f us en jo y perhaps so freely and so abun­ d antly th at w e give little thought to them. M a n y o f these persons are con ­ fined to bed, couch, wheel chair, or very often special form s o f harness or equip­ m ent w hich makes it n ecessary for them to lie in uncom fortable positions hour a fter hour and day a fte r day because of som e abnorm al condition in their body resulting from accident or other m isfo r­ tune, and m any of these are in poor cir­ cum stances dependent upon ch arity for ju st food and clothing, or perhaps m edi­ cal advice, and, too. m any of them are in institutions, sanitarium s, hospitals, boarding houses, or small furnished room s separated from friends and rela­ tives and dependent w holly upon an o c­ casional kindly visitor to read to them or to tell them of the things of the o u t­ side w orld or bring them in con tact with the g reater things o f life. V e r y seldom indeed does an yon e offer to take them for a ride in an autom obile or for an out­ ing in their w heel chair, or tak e them into the sunshine or am ong the trees and flowers, or to see the hills, lakes,

rivers, or oceans. T h e y read of the moving pictures, the co n certs, the happy things of life, but they en jo y none of them for they can n ot go alone and they have no one w ho takes the time or the trouble to bring these things into their lives. A nd so our Sunshine C ircle in Los A ng eles planned to widen its activities and to include all o f the service to the shu t-ins that could possibly be arranged . T h is activity on the part o f our Su n ­ shine C ircle has grow n to such an ex ­ tent that w e are happy to announce th a t the great convention o f the Sunshine F ed eratio n of S h u t-In s w as held in the G reek T h e a te r in Los A n g eles on Su n ­ day, June 7. O u r good F ra te r G ordon W illia m s, in ch arge o f the shut-in activ ­ ities, w orked unceasingly planning for this convention together with the S u n ­ shine Com m ittee and the advice o f the shut-ins them selves. T h e convention w as one o f the greatest hum anitarian dem on­ stration s ever held in the city o f Los A ngeles. O v er five thousand helpless persons w ere interested in planning to go to the convention and arrangem ents w ere made to assist them. M a y o r Sh aw o f L o s A n geles endorsed the plan and read a letter from the P resid en t o f the U nited S ta te s and from various persons and organizations approving this great service to the shut-ins. T h e Los A n geles R ealty B o ard , the L os A n g eles N o n P artisan League, and the new spapers united to help in the plan, giving g reat publicity to the affair. T h e largest o f the moving picture studios arran ged to send their very best talent to the co n ­ vention. T h e Y ello w T a x ic a b C om pany offered thirty of its cab s to assist, w hile the M o to r T ra n sit C om pany furnished large buses. T ru c k s w ere donated to carry w heel chairs and occupants to and from the great park surrounding the G reek T h e a te r. T h e special shut-in am ­ bulances, arranged and designed b y the Su nshine S h u t-In Com m ittee, in the form o f sedans arranged to hold one or two cripples in their w heel chairs or on cots, also carried large num bers to the convention. A sixty -p iece band donated its services and a band o f singers and vaudeville talen t from various th eaters also participated. A great op en-air pic­ nic w as held along with the en tertain ­ m ent and am usement. H undreds of the

persons w ho attended enjoyed their first picnic and out-door pleasure in many years. Food in abundance w as supplied and everything th at would feed body and mind w as provided. T h e re w as no attem pt at any form o f propaganda and no distinctions w ere made in regard to class or creed but in every w ord, in every handshake, in every a ct per­ form ed, the spirit o f good-w ill and love for hum anity w as m ade m anifest. N ew officers for the Su nshine and S h u t-In activities w ere elected and plans made for extending these sorts o f community picnics and parties to all points o f the cou n try. T h is is som ething in w hich w e would like to have every true R osicru cian p ar­ ticipate. If you are a physician and w ant to offer your services in b eh alf o f the Su n sh in e and S h u t-In w ork, get in touch w ith the n earest ch ap ter or lodge in your district and offer your services to the chairm an. If you a re a nurse, or can do p ractical nursing, or you are an atto rn ey and anxious to offer your ser­ vices, be sure you do so. If you can spare the time to act as an investigator, or to visit am ong the shu t-ins, the un­ fortunate, the sick and needy, and bring w ords of ch eer and carry to them som e­ thing o f the practical things they need, or assist in bringing them in touch with other w orkers w ho can give them advice or guidance such as they require, get in touch w ith y ou r Su nshine C ircle. If you do not know the name and address o f the officers of the ch ap ter n earest you or you do not know the nam e o f your local d istrict representative w ho can w ork with you in starting a Sunshine C ircle, w rite to the Suprem e S ecreta ry in care of A M O R C , Sa n Jose, C a li­ fornia, and ask for the name and a d ­ dress o f the proper person to con tact. M a n y of those w orking in the Su n ­ shine C ircles are men and women busy with their own professions and daily affairs, y et they are w illing to sacrifice some o f their time in b eh alf o f this great w ork. O n ly recen tly I received a letter from a jud ge of the Superior C ourt in one o f the larger cities o f N ew Y o rk S ta te in w hich he said that busy though he w as in his regular court w ork and in his special court o f dom estic relations, he would be glad to give legal advice and assistan ce to those who w ere direct­
T w o H undred Six

ed to him by our Sunshine group in his locality. L etters like this com e to us con­ stantly from our members and we w ant to see more o f this volunteer w ork ca r­ ried on during the coming y ears so that all of our Sunshine and S h u t-In C ircles will render more and m ore efficient help throughout the continent. Rem em ber th at A M O R C as an insti­ tution and as a foundation has grown to be one o f the largest organizations of its kind in the W e s te r n W o r ld as it has been in other countries, solely because it

has so unselfishly rendered service to others and because we know the truth back o f the principle th at as w e offer ourselves to the C osm ic as channels for good, so the C osm ic will rem em ber us in our needs and requirem ents. U n til you learn the lesson o f giving before receiving, or offering befo re you ask, or being ready to serve b efo re pleading to G od for help, you cannot know the jo y o f being in tune w ith the Infinite and in harm ony with the law s o f G od and the C osm ic.

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ROSICRUCIAN

FORUM

1 IM PO R T A N T B U LLET IN
W e are very happy to announce that our beloved Sovereign Grand Master, Dr. LeBrun, is very much stronger and is rapidly recovering from his recent serious illness. He has been able to visit Rosicrucian Park and to bask in the sunlight on the lawns and to visit his office for a brief period and even to visit the planetarium. M any offer daily to take him riding in their automobiles and otherwise help to make him happy and con­ tented while he is gaining strength, but his greatest joy is found in sensing and realizing the continuous contact made with him through the thoughts and prayers of our members in every part of the world. His recovery up to the present time is like unto a miracle and all of us thank God for the granting of the pleas uttered by our members and for the loving thoughts and tender wishes sent by all who know him. W e have every hope that he will be able to attend many of the sessions of the Convention in July. -IM P E R A T O R .

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ST. LO UIS C H A PTER M EETIN G S
All Rosicrucian members of A M O R C who live within the vicinity of St. Louis, Missouri, should avail themselves of the opportunity of attending the weekly chapter meetings in that city. T h e special rituals, unusual addresses and association with others of like mind will prove most beneficial to you. It is only necessary that you visit the chapter and present your membership credentials to be entitled to all privileges. T h e chapter meetings are held in Parlor C, Hotel Marquette, Eighteenth and W ashington Avenue, on every Tuesday at 8:00 p. m. For information call the Secretary, Frater Ernest G. Ross, 4515 Clayton Avenue, Telephone Newstead 1703.

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T iv o H un dred S ev en

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Important Notice T o All Members
W H E T H E R O R N O T Y O U A R E C O M IN G T O T H E A N N U A L C O N V E N T IO N , P L E A S E R E A D T H IS M A T T E R V ER Y CA R EFU LLY
By T
he

I m perato r

H E R E comes a time in the life o f every organization w h e n i t s ideals, and its pow er to carry out its ideals, and the grow th a n d developm ent o f its good w ork, a ttra ct to it the criticisms o f those who either seek to d i s t u r b its h a r­ mony, or to co n ­ trol it for personal reasons. F o r many y ears A M O R C has been gradually increasing in membership, and increasing in pow er and usefulness. W h e n A M O R C w as small in its mem­ bership, tw enty-five y ears or more ago, and when its Im perator w as financing all of its activities from his own re ­ sources, and when there w ere no sums of m oney set aside for expansion or grow th and development, there w ere no critics, and no one claim ing that he should be elected Im perator or elected to the B oard of D irectors in order that he might control and m anage the o rg an ­ ization.

tions, and long hours o f labor. B u t to ­
day the situation is different, and it has been so for the last two or three years. E v e ry so often one or two persons in the background of the membership, hav­ ing w aited and w atched carefu lly for some opportunity, suddenly arise pro­ claim ing them selves com petent to be a ch ief director of A M O R C , an executive of its affairs, and demanding that A M O R C either submit to the proposals of reorganization, or stand the blasts of criticism . T h o u san d s o f our members are fa ­ miliar with these trials and tribulations which have confronted the Im perator and the present B oard o f D irectors of A M O R C . T h e y know how these D i­ rectors have borne the burden of labor and responsibility, of trials and tribula­ tions w ithout losing faith, w ithout sa cri­ ficing one of the ideals or high principles of the O rd er. A t every one of our N atio n al C onventions these m atters have been discussed, and in righteous indignation the members have unani­ mously voted their loyal support to the Im perator and B oard of D irectors, and vehem ently disclaimed the criticism s and contentions of the tw o or three m al­ contents. E a ch o f our members should know right now, befo re the C onvention is held this summer, ex a ctly w hat the three or four critics and com plainers of the O rd er are contending and claim ing. W e
T w o H un dred E ight

The In fact, for approxim ately tw enty Rosicrucian years nobody sought to be a director of Digest A M O R C , or to assume its responsi­ July bilities. its obligations, its financial defi­
1936 cits, its worries, its trials and tribula­

It is to be noted, also, that the mem­ bers w ho have been with the O rd er the longest time in num ber o f y ears, who 1. It is claimed by them that in past have reached the highest grades, w ho years each and every member of the have given the greatest services to the O rder who held a membership card O rd er, who have given the greatest sup­ was equivalent to a shareholder, or a port to the O rd er, are not am ong these profit-sharing member of the O rd er, and critics, and are w holly out of sym pathy all of its finances, property, and assets. with the idea that the funds and assets, T h e absurd claim is made that by hav­ the buildings, the grounds, the rare ing paid dues to A M O R C the member books and m anuscripts, and everything was im m ediately a sharehold er in all of else belonging to the O rd er should be the funds, assets, buildings, grounds, distributed in stew ardship among all of lectures, m anuscripts, teachings, and the members, thereby leaving no au to­ everything else of a valuable nature b e­ cratic au thority, no exclusive control of longing to the O rd er. In other w ords, the things that are the m ost sacred and it is claimed that each member of the most valued. O rd er in the past, no m atter how long T h e questions th at might logically be he has been a member, or w hat he has asked by all o f our members are these: done to help build up the O rd er, w as a If these critical members joined A M ­ member also of the Suprem e Lodge O R C for the benefit of its teachings and (B o a rd o f D ire cto rs) and had a right to direct, and vote upon every expenditure, its helpfulness, w hy are they spending every im provement, every change or so much m oney, even hiring attorn eys and going into court, to fight for the modification in the lectures, the en g ag ­ “ rig h t” to d irect the affairs of the ing of an attorney to protect the O rd er, O rd er? W h y are they spending hun­ the extension of its activities, the in­ dreds or thousands o f dollars trying to creasing o f free benefits to the members, or the addition of features th at will help secure voting control over the O rd e r’s the membership. It is claimed by these assets and its adm inistration? H ow do they exp ect to get back again the money few persons that because they had mem­ bership in the “Suprem e G rand L o d g e” they are spending to fight the present they had a right to vote upon everything adm inistrators? T h e thousands upon thousands of that the O rd er does. T h e further stran ge claim is made that somehow, in some members who are deeply interested in the studies, teachings, and practices of w ay, the members w ere suddenly de­ the O rd er have frankly stated over and prived o f these rights and that the D i­ rectors “ usurped” the rights of the mem­ over again that they wish no one had to bers and d eliberately took unto them ­ bother at all with the rules and regula­ tions, with the adm inistration, and with selves the “rig h ts” of the members. the direction o f the m aterial affairs of It is to be noted th at the few mem­ the O rd er, and they are p erfectly willing bers who claim this sort of thing are not to leave those things in the hands o f the those who have ever given a single do­ sam e D irectors, who for m any y ears nation to the O rd er, or given any special have com petently and proficiently taken services to build up the O rd er, or added care o f these things. to its assets, or added to the O rd e r’s 2. T h e n ext argum ent of these critics dignity and reputation, or ever gone out is th at the exclusive adm inistration of of their w ay one iota to contribute to the O rd er, and all o f its sacred posses­ the spiritual, the sacred , or the p ractical sions, teachings, m anuscripts, and other helpfulness of the O rd er. T h e y have things, should be taken aw ay from D r. merely paid their dues for a time, and Lew is, the Im perator, and the members in some cases have becom e delinquent of his fam ily, and D r. Le B ru n. T h e y and dissatisfied because the Im perator demand a new B o ard of D irectors, prob­ and the D irectors took exception to their ably selected by the critics, to be placed lack of interest in the studies, and there­ in ch arge of everything. T h e ir argu ­ upon have becom e critics and claim ants m ent is that there is som ething sinful, for the right to vote in directing the som ething w rong, som ething absolutely affairs of the O rd er. fraudulent in the fact th at D r. Lew is will enum erate these u nfortu nate and untrue contentions as follow s:
T w o H undred N in e

and three members o f his fam ily are on the B o ard of D irecto rs along w ith D r. Le B ru n, or with w hom ever else is elected from time to time as Sovereign G ran d M aste r. T h e y ignore the fact th at nearly every one o f A M O R C ’s charters and valuable docum ents is in the personal nam e o f D r. Lew is, and a few in the name o f R alph Lew is, his son. T h e y ignore the fact th at w hen the In ­ ternational C ouncil of R osicru cian s and the Suprem e H ierarch y o f the W o r ld entrusted D r. Lew is w ith the form ation and establishm ent o f A M O R C , and placed in his hands the rare seals, jew els, docum ents, m anuscripts, ch a r­ ters, and other things in his ow n name, they made him personally pledge that as long as he lived he would protect these things, and th at he would choose and prepare tw o or three oth ers whom h e could trust in his own im mediate circle, to assist him in preserving these things ag ain st the atta ck of enem ies and ag ain st the inroads of the dark forces and m aterialism . T h e y forget th at if a new B oard of D irecto rs w ere elected by the critics D r. Lew is could not, and would not, turn over to these D irectors all o f his valuable possessions and thereby break his pledges and prom ises. T h e surprising idea w hich these critics have is th at they have been deprived o f the pow er to appoint or elect others to control and direct the affairs o f A M ­ O R C , and make D r. Lew is a mere h ire­ ling of the new B o ard . T h e y would have him obey their orders and tak e out of his vaults the sacred teach in gs he is preserving for the higher grade mem­ bers and give them to all o f the mem­ bers, and establish groups o f members anyw here and everyw here accord ing to their w ishes, and do everything they would su ggest w hile he ju st spent his time from m orning to night w riting le c­ tures and preparing m atter for the gen­ eral membership to dispose of as it m ay vote. T h e s e critics forget that the members of the Lew is fam ily w ho are now a ssist­ ing him in controlling and preserving the O rd er w ere the original incorpora­ tors o f A M O R C , the original co founders of it, the original w orkers w ho sacrificed their hours of pleasure in home life, and hours of recreation on Su nd ays and holidays, w ho sacrificed their per­

sonal incom es to build up and create and m aintain the organization. T h e y forget th at it is these sam e m em bers o f the L ew is fam ily w ho began these activ­ ities y ears ago w ith only the personal funds of D r. Lew is, and w hen the O rd er did not own an inch of ground or a single little sh ack for its headquarters!

T h ere never was a time when all the mem bers o f the O rder held or p ossessed any voting pow er; th erefore, they could not have been deprived o f it, nor did the “Lew is fam ily” usurp any rights of the
members. B y careful planning, a very econom ical expenditure o f the funds of the O rd er, the utm ost o f personal sa cri­ fice and labor, and preventing scandal and attack s upon the O rd er, the present D irectors have enabled the O rd er to grow to a point w here it has its own grounds— its beautiful grounds— and its beautiful buildings, and all of its other valuable assets. T h e y forget, or ignore, the fact, that instead o f erecting all o f the beautiful buildings that these D irectors have given to A M O R C , such as the Shrine, the A uditorium , the O rien tal M useum , and the beau tiful law ns and fountain, and now the large Planetarium , the money expended for these things could have been legally expended b y D r. Lew is in large salaries to all officers in the past tw enty y ears, and there would have been no reason for the members to demand that such beautiful buildings be constructed, and so m any extra things added to our teachings and principles, and such special features as the G ood W ill T o u r of the C ourier C a r and other co stly featu res which the members now en joy. T h e y ignore the fact th at in the papers filed w ith the F ed eral G o v ern ­ ment, and w ith the S ta te of C alifornia, and in the C onstitution of the O rd er, D r. Lew is and his fam ily voluntarily put into these papers the follow ing words regarding the funds and financial assets of the organization: N o t one part of the funds or m aterial assets of A M O R C shall ever accrue to the personal benefit o f a n y o f the members, an y o f the di­ rectors, or any o f the officers o f the organization. In other w ords, y ears ago. D r. Lew is and his fam ily put themselves on legal record binding themselves legally not to personally possess any o f the finances or m aterial a ssets o f A M T w o H undred T cn

O R C . Y e t these critics contend that press their opinions or propose resolu­ the members have possessed a control of tions, because th ey had not alw ays these things, when D r. Lew is and his know n ju st w hat m atters w ere to be fam ily voluntarily denied it to them ­ voted upon, and no proxies w ere re­ selves. quired from those w ho could not attend. W h a t is there w rong, or sinful, or T h e y claim th at the au to cratic form o f destructive, about four members o f one governm ent of A M O R C is w rong b e­ fam ily being on a B o ard o f D irectors cause the members never voted such when the members of that fam ily w ere authority to the D irectors! Y e t, the the creators and builders o f the o rg an i­ C onstitution o f the O rd er, since the first zation itself? M a n y o f the oldest firms members joined in 1909 to 1916 and or institutions in E n gland and A m erica since then has been au to cratic, and all w ith w hich we are proud to deal, point members w ere accepted under that C o n ­ with pride to the fact that the control stitution. W h a t a terrible time w e would of the business has been in the same have as D irecto rs if each time some im­ fam ily for m any generations, thereby portant m atter arose we would have to guaranteeing the integrity, safety , hon­ spend several thousand dollars in post­ esty, and good-w ill o f the organization age in sending a proposal to all of our or concern. In the history of R osicru members to vote upon (a s w e are doing cianism from the earliest ages the inner this m onth with this m a tter), and w ait circle of directors, pledged to preserve days and w eeks for the answ ers to come the organization in their cou ntry, has back! been members of one fam ily tied to ­ W h y are these members so fearful of gether in such a m anner th at not one the present au to cratic adm inistration of of them could take ad vantage o f the A M O R C ? W h y have they w aited until other, thereby preventing any outside A M O R C has becom e a large and pow­ control, any outside destructive pow er. erful organization with beau tiful build­ It is to be noted th at none o f our old- ings and beautiful grounds befo re they time members, none of our advanced sought to have a share in its m anage­ and h igh-grade members, none o f our ment? W h y did they not come forw ard members w ho has given im portant ser­ with such a demand to sh are in the re­ vices and devotion to the O rd er, has sponsibilities and liabilities, deficits and ever criticized the fact that four mem­ expen ses o f A M O R C w hen it w as small bers o f the Lew is family w orked to ­ and struggling and fighting to m aintain gether harm oniously and so liberally its dignity and ideals? H as not our and sincerely to preserve the O rd er. A t au tocratic form of governm ent for A M ­ each C onvention in past y ears this fact O R C proved to be the fairest, kindest, has been highly praised and unani­ and most ju st th at w e could have? Is not mously indorsed, but tod ay three or four our C onstitution equally binding on all, members who are not in good standing in ju stice, w ithout show ing p referen ce in the O rd er spiritually, and in very to anyone? T h ro u gh o u t all the ages of bad standing otherw ise, are claiming the h istory of R osicrucianism the gov­ through the courts that the Lew is fam ily ernm ent has alw ays been autocratic with occupies its position, and the Suprem e the pow er and control rem aining in the O fficers hold positions of au thority w ith­ H ierarch y of a few directors, th ereby out the sanction of the membership! enabling them to m eet quickly and hur­ T h e y claim th at these D irecto rs— the riedly, to take care of any sudden co n ­ founders and creato rs o f A M O R C — il­ ditions, to preserve and protect all o f its legally “usurped” their position! assets, and y et pledging among them ­ 3. T h e se critics further contend th at selves, and putting their pledge on legal the members of the O rd er never have record, th at they shall not take unto them selves in a mercenary way one iota had an opportunity to affirm their ap ­ proval of the adm inistrators of the o f the m aterial assets o f the o rg an i­ zation. O rd er. T h e y say that the votes taken at our C onventions here w ere not rep ­ So , these are the things th at will be resentative of the O rd er despite the fact brought b efo re all o f the members at th at all members had been invited to the C onvention, and are being brought attend, and to rise on the floor and ex ­ befo re all of the members w ho cannot
T w o H undred E lev en

attend the C onvention. B efo re the C o n ­ vention is held in San Jose, beginning July 12, a letter will be sen t to every m ember o f A M O R C o f N orth and Sou th A m erica, explaining these mooted points, and asking each and every mem ­ ber to vote w hat he believes is right. E a ch member will be sent a pink paper w hich is in the form o f a p roxy, and if he cannot com e to the C onvention in person, he should send his p ro xy to one of several persons in S a n Jo se who will vote for him. W e have voluntarily arran ged to have an accred ited , licensed auditor w ho is not a member o f the O rd er exam ine these proxies and count them and tabu late them, and w e will present them to the members w ho are here at the C onvention as delegates from every part of the country, and ask them also to vote. B y this v ote o f our members we will show th at our few critics are w rong in their argum ents. T h e se tw o or three com plainants claim th at they represent the entire m em ber ship , and th at they are voicing the rest-

So w atch for the special letter that will com e to you b efo re the 3rd or 4th of July. O pen it im m ediately and read it! C a refu lly analyze every point. D o not take the attitude that you are not in­ terested, unless you are perfectly satis­

fied with the way the organization is operated. If you are so satisfied that
you feel you do not w ant to vote, then you need not do so, and no one can make you vote. B u t if you resent this so rt o f a tta ck upon the O rd er, then sign the pink paper as your proxy and mail it back to us in the special envelope which you receive with it. It must reach us b efo re July 12th. E v ery lodge and every ch ap ter should have its officers attend to this m atter and urge th at every member vote. L et every d elegate w ho is coming to the

Convention contact those w ho are re­ ceiving these letters, and be able to tes­
tify at the C onvention how these mem­ bers feel about the m atter. W e do not w ant an y member to feel th at he is being unduly influenced, or that his membership in the O rd er will be jeopard ized by his vote, or that he will in an y w ay affect his personal interests by the m anner in w hich he votes; but we do w an t fairness and ju stice to prevail, and we w ant every member to express him self, and once and for all determine w hether A M O R C shall continue as it is and grow bigg er and b etter all the time, or w hether it shall be throw n into dis­ ruption and the D irecto rs w ho have w orked and sacrificed so g reatly be cast aside and rebuked. T h o s e w ho may feel th at the present system o f A M O R C governm ent should be com pletely ch an ged , or agree with the critics, m ay com e to the C onven­ tion and vote their opinions, or give their proxies to an y delegates or mem­ bers w ho are coming to the C onvention.

lessness an d spirit o f criticism o f all o f our m em ber si W e know this is false
and we w ant to be able to prove it to the C ou rt w here they have taken their case and exp ect a jud ge to solve the problem. T h e ir statem ent that w e h ave implied in our literature, or th at w e have im­ plied at one o f our C onventions in the past y ears that every m ember is also a member o f the “ Suprem e G ran d L o d g e” (B o a rd o f D ire cto rs) and has a sort o f dem ocratic voice in the control o f the organization, is unfounded and cannot be proved by a single truthful docu­ ment. W e do not believe there are ten mem bers in the w hole o f the A M O R C organization w ho have ever believed that they had a voting pow er in the adm inistration o f the O rd er, or a co n ­ trol in its assets.

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The Rosicrucian Digest July
1936

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T w o H un dred T w elv e

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T he "Cathedral of the Soul" is a Cosmic meeting place for all minds of the most advanced and highly developed spiritual members and workers of the Rosicrucian Fraternity. It is a focal point of Cosmic radiations and thought waves from which radiate vibrations of health, peace, happiness, and inner awakening. Various periods of the day are set aside when many thousands of minds are attuned with the Cathedral of the Soul, and others attuning with the Cathedral at this time will receive the benefit of the vibrations. Those who are not members of the organization may share in the unusual benefits as well as those who are members. T he book called "Liber 777 describes the periods for various contacts with the Cathedral. Copies will be sent to persons who are not members by addressing their request for this book to Friar S. P. C., care of A M O R C Temple, San Jose, California, enclosing three cents in postage stamps. (P le a s e state w hether m em ber or not— this is im portant.)

0.

A B I D I N G IN P E A C E

H ROUGHOUT the w o r l d today m o st c i v i l i z e d countries are look­ ing f o r w a r d to u n i v e r s a l peace, even w h i l e they are contem plating strifes and w arfare in the very near future. It is a l­ w ays the hope of every civilized na­ tion of people that the n ext w ar w hich will involve them will be the last one and th at the ulti­
T w o H undred T hirteen

mate good of to d ay ’s struggles and to ­ m orrow ’s b attles will be the end of w ar and the establishm ent of perpetual peace. T o d a y great em phasis is placed upon the n ecessity of political, national, p h y ­ sical peace. It is said that mankind needs nothing greater in his social and political life than the assurance of n a ­ tional peace and guaranteed protection from the ravages of w ar. B u t g reater than even such peace is the peace that is acquired of the Soul and the separation from all w orldly struggles.

It is true th at nations of people can make little progress in their cultural ad ­ vancem ent and their m aterial upliftm ent w hile their minds and their hands are occupied in destructive processes. It is also true th at the laten t pow ers, the physical and m aterial assets, the p ar­ ticular ad vantages and possibilities of each nation cannot be unfolded and utilized to the b est ad vantage if w ar is in the offing and plans and preparations for a struggle against another nation are under consideration. In fact, the mind of the nation and its people can n ot think constructively and con cen trate its vast pow ers tow ard the ideal conditions o f life w hile time and m oney are spent need lessly in w ar and w hile the m ental faculties and m oral stand ard s are low ­ ered to harm onize with the ideas and principles of w ar. N o r can the mind of the individual and the Soul of man or w om an develop along the highest lines and perm it o f the unfoldm ent o f the individual facu l­ ties and abilities w hile the heart and mind are enslaved and inhibited b y the o rd inary struggles o f life. It is only w hen we take ourselves apart from the everyday affairs o f life that we see life in its true colors. T h e struggle for the physical necessities o f life is a battle. O vercom ing the op­ posing forces of life is a continuous w arfare. M eetin g the hypocrisy, evils, deceits, the trickery o f the d arker side o f life constitutes a tiresom e and e x ­ hausting w arfare. From all of the w orldly, physical, m a­ terial struggles of life, the Sou l seeks separation. From all o f the annoyances, discordant notes, and inharm onious situ­ ations, the Sou l seeks restful seclusion and peace. W h e n the Soul is at peace, it is at rest m om entarily. P ea ce is a tonic, an inspiration to the heart and mind o f the

individual. R eligion furnishes the W a y to eternal peace. B u t the Soul needs here and now on this earth plane the daily relaxation and daily attunem ent th at quickens its spirit and bathes it in the sublime effulgence of communion w ith itself. T h e C ath ed ral of the Sou l offers to those w ho en jo y peace and harm ony as periods of relaxation, an opportunity to lift the mind up above and beyond the con tests of life, the sordid and sorrow ­ ful incidents of our existence, and the struggles o f our earthly affairs. In the C ath ed ral of the Soul the h eart and mind o f the individual may enter m orning, noon, or night, for a few minutes or for a few hours. Its vast portals are ever open to the Soul that seeks them. W ith in the C ath ed ral the D ivine S e lf with all of us will meet the Sou ls and hearts o f thousands of others. H ere all m ay dwell for a while in peace and harm ony, unmindful o f the personal problem s o f life and o f the battle cries of our existence. T h e effect o f such re­ laxation and Cosm ic attunem ent is in­ stantaneous in soothing the worried mind and inspiring the troubled heart. It brings health and strength and power to the body and a sense of contentm ent and peace th at nothing else can afford. If you are a stran ger to the benefits o f the C ath ed ral o f the Soul, w hether member or not, w rite for Liber 777, w hich will be sent w ithout obligation, and join with thousands of others in these daily periods o f C osm ic peace and inspiration. L et the C ath ed ral o f the Soul be your special sanctum , your holy of holies, w here you in privacy and spiritual jo y may dwell w henever the need is g reatest or the Soul speaketh. It is an experience never to be forgotten and a hope th at is the last and ultimate ideal of our life on earth.

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Two Hundred Fourteen

PAG ES
from the

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JO H A N N G O T T F R IE D

von

H ERD ER

Each month we w ill present excerpts from the w ritin gs o f famous thinkers and teachers o f the past. These w ill give our readers an opportunity o f know ing their lives through the presentation o f those w ritin gs which ty p ify their thoughts. Occasionally, such w ritin gs w ill be presented through the translation or interpretations o f other eminent authors o f the past. This month we present Johann G ottfried von H erder. H erder was one of the outstanding German classical w riters o f his period. H e was imbued w ith the ideal o f reform ing the philosophy and th eology o f his period. H e was of a highly sensitive nature and worked w ith great ardor, on every new subject to which he turned his attention, but unfortunately, his zeal did not endure and many o f his great works are incomplete. H e le ft a definite impression upon the peoples o f his time, and conveyed some profound thoughts which are more appreciated now, than during his own time. H e wa3 born August 25, 1724, at Mohrungen, East Prussia. H e was o rigin ally schooled and prepared to be a surgeon, but upon w itnessing his first operation, fainted and turned th ereafter to theology. In 1764 he was appointed teacher and preacher in a Cathedral school at R iga. H e gained prominence there, and was offered a chair o f th eology in one o f the prominent universities, but in 1776 the Grand Duke appointed him Court Preacher and Counselor o f the upper consistory. H e wa3 a great adm irer o f K a n t’s w ritin gs yet seemed extrem ely critical o f them at times. Although o f a m ild disposition, he was quite vicious in his attacks on his enemies. Students o f metaphysics w ill all enjoy reading his works, fo r they w ill find in them a keen sense o f the mystical. B elow is an excerpt from one o f his prominent w ritin gs entitled. “ Man a L in k Between T w o W o rld s.” Thi3 should not be read hurriedly, but digested slow ly.

E .............

.....ill

M A N A L IN K B E T W E E N T W O W O R L D S
V E R Y T H IN G in N ature is con­ nected: one state pushes f o r w a r d and prepares a n ­ other. If, then, man be the last and h igh est link, closing the chain of terrestrial or­ ganization, hem ust begin the chain of a higher order o f creatu res as its low est link, and is probably, therefore, the middle ring betw een th e tw o ad ­
Tw o Hundred Fifteen

joining system s o f the creation. H e ca n ­ not pass into an y other organization upon earth w ithout turning backw ard and w andering in a circle. T h a t he should stand still is im possible; since no living pow er in the dominions of the m ost active goodness is a t rest; thus there must be a step b efo re him, close to him, y et as exalted above him as he is pre-em inent over the brute, to whom he is at the sam e time nearly allied. T h is view o f things, w hich is supported by all the law s o f nature, alone gives us the key to the w onderful phenom enon of man, and at the sam e time to the only philosophy o f his history. . . .

" F a r as the life of man here below is from being calculated for entirety; equally far is this incessan tly revolving sphere from being a repository o f per­ m anent w orks o f art, a garden of neverfading plants, a seat to be eternally in­ habited. W e come and go: every m o­ ment brings thousands into the world, and takes thousands out of it. T h e E arth is an inn for travellers: a planet, on w hich birds o f passage rest them ­ selves, and from w hich they hasten aw ay. T h e brute lives out his life; and if his y ears be too few to attain higher ends, his inm ost purpose is accom p­ lished: his cap acities exist, and he is w hat he w as intended to be. M an alone is in contradiction with him self, and with the E a rth : for, being the most p erfect of all creatures, his capacities are the farthest from being perfected, even when he attain s the longest term of life b efo re he quits the w orld. But the reason is evident: his state, being the last upon this E a rth , is the first in an oth er sphere o f existence, w ith re ­ spect to which he appears here as a child m aking his first essays. T h u s he is the representative o f tw o w orlds at once; and h ence the apparent duplicity o f his essence. . . . " I f superior creatures look down on us, they may view us in the sam e light as w e do the middle species , with which N atu re m akes a transition from one elem ent to another. T h e ostrich flaps his feeble w ings to assist him self in running, but they can n ot enable him to fly; his heavy body confines him to the ground. Y e t the organizing P aren t has taken care o f him, as w ell as o f every middle creatu re; for they are all perfect in them selves, and only appear d efective to our eyes. It is the same with man here below : his d efects are perplexing to an earth ly mind; but a superior spirit th at inspects the internal structure, and sees more links o f the chain, m ay indeed pity, but can n ot des­ pise him. H e perceives w hy man must quit the w orld in so m any different states, young and old, w ise and foolish, grown gray in second childhood, or an The em bryo y et unborn. O m nipotent good­ Rosicrucian ness em braces m adness and deform ity, Digest and all the degrees o f cultivation, and all July the errors of man, and w ants not b a l­ sams to heal the wounds th at death 1936

alone could m itigate. Sin ce probably the future state springs out of the pres­ ent, as our organization from inferior ones, its business is no doubt more closely connected with our existence here than we im agine. T h e garden above bloom s only with plants of w hich the seeds have been sown here, and put forth their first germs from coarser husk. If, then, as w e have seen, sociality, friendship, or active participation in the pains and pleasures o f others, be the principal end to w hich hum anity is di­ rected, the finest flower o f human life must necessarily there attain the vivi­ fying form, the overshadow ing height, for w hich our heart thirsts in vain in any earth ly situation. O u r brethren above, th erefore, assuredly love us with more w arm th and purity of affection than w e can b ear to them: for they see our state more clearly ; to them the moment o f time is no more, all discrep­ ancies are harm onized, and in us they are probably educating unseen partners o f their happiness, and com panions of th eir labors. B u t one step farther, and the oppressed spirit can b reath e more freely, the w ounded heart recovers: they see the p assenger approach it, and stav his sliding feet w ith a pow erful hand. "S in c e , therefore, w e are of a middle species betw een tw o orders, and in some m easure partake o f both, I cannot con ­ ceive th at the F u tu re sta te is so re ­ m ote from the P resen t, and so incom ­ m unicable with it, as the animal part of man is inclined to suppose, and indeed m any steps and events in the history of the human race are to me incom prehen­ sible, w ithout the operation o f superior influence. A divine econom y has cer­ tainly ruled over the hum an species from its first origin, and conducted him into the cou rse the readiest w ay. . . ." T h is much is certain, that there dwells an infinity in each of m an’s powers, which cannot be developed here, where it is repressed by other pow ers, by anim al senses and appetites, and lies bound as it w ere to the state of ter­ restrial life. P articu lar instances of m em ory, of im agination, nay, of pro­ phesy and prehension, have discovered w onders of th at hidden treasure which reposes in the human soul; and indeed the senses are not to be excluded from this observation. T h a t diseases and
T w o H undred Sixteen

partial d efects, have been the principal occasions of indicating this treasure alters not the nature of the case; since this very disproportion w as requisite to set one o f the w eights at liberty, and display its power. T h e expression of Leibnitz, that the soul is a mirror of the universe, contains perhaps a more profound truth than has usually been educed from it: for the powers of a universe seem to lie con­ cealed in her, and require only an or­ ganization, or a series of organizations, to set them in action. Suprem e goodness will not refu se her this organization, but guides her like a child in leadingstrings, gradually to prepare her for the fulness of increasing enjoym ent, under a persuasion th at her powers and senses are self-acqu ired . E ven in her present fetters space and time are to her empty words: they m easure and express rela­ tions o f the body, but not of her in­ ternal capacity, w hich extends beyond time and space, when it acts in p erfect internal quiet. G ive th y self no concern for the place and hour of thy future existence: the Sun, that enlightens thy days, is n ecessary to thee during thy abode and occupation upon earth; and so long it obscures all the celestial stars. W h e n it sets, the universe will appear in greater m agnitude; the sacred night, th at once enveloped thee, and in which thou wilt be enveloped again, covers thy

E a rth with shade, and will open to thee the splendid volume o f im m ortality in H eaven. T h e re are h abitations, w orlds and spaces, th at bloom in unfading youth, though ages on ages have rolled over them, and defy the changes of time and season; but everything th at appears to our eyes decays, and perishes, and passes aw ay; and all the pride and hap­ piness of E a rth are exposed to inevit­ able destruction. T h is earth will be no more, when thou th y self still art, and en jo y est G od and H is creation in other abodes, and differently organized. O n it thou hast enjoyed much good. O n it thou hast a t­ tained an organization, in which thou hast learned to look around and above thee as a child o f H eaven. E n d eavor, th erefore, to leave it contented ly, and bless it in the field, w here thou hast sported as a child o f im m ortality, and as the school, w here thou h ast been brou ght up in jo y , and in sorrow , to m anhood. T h o u h ast no farth er claim on it; it has no farth er claim on thee. A s the flower stand s erect, and closes the realm of the su bterranean inanim ate creation, to en jo y the com m encem ent of life, in the region of day; so is man raised above all the creatures th at are bow ed down to the E a rth . W ith up­ lifted eye, and outstretched hand, he stands as a son o f the fam ily, aw aiting his fa th e r’s call.

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T w o H undred S even teen

Earth Rays In Action
By
E rn e st G onzen bach
(E d ito r’s N o te: In explan ation o f fa c t that this is the author o f the article in "A m erican F o rests " o f A pril, 1934. qu oted in P ronunziam ento X IV .)

A R T H R A Y S , in effect, are Cosm ic R a y s in reverse. T h e latter come to us from the C o s­ mos, the sun, the planets, the stars o f all m agnitudes. T h e y have been but recen tly dis­ covered and little is as y et actually know n about them, but it is the C o s­ mic rays th at have had all the publicity. E a rth ray s are identically the same thing, except that they do n ot originate in th e Cosm os but in the earth itself, w hich, being one o f the planets, would logically be expected to send out sim ilar rays. T h a t earth rays exist has been amply established in m any w ays; the m ost cur­ ious thing about them is how they have com e to be overlooked b y science until now. P erh ap s “overlooked” is not the right w ord; “ disbelieved” would better fit their case, for they are scornfu lly T he dismissed in quarters w here one would R osicru cian look for open-m inded reception. B o th of Digest the great electrical com panies o f our Ju ly country, G en eral E le ctric and W estin g -, house, flatly turned down opportunities 1936

to investigate them. P ro fesso rs of elec­ trical engineering sneered a t them, and still sneer, when they are not actually insulting. B u t earth rays exist, and their ex ist­ ence can be proven by the very instru­ ments devised by electrical science. T h e se instrum ents are nothing less than radio receivers, with A , B and C b a t­ teries connected in certain w ays and of som ew hat higher voltage than com m er­ cial receivers used for the sam e purpose. A n y reader w ho h as a radio in his car discovers them con stan tly, to his an n oy­ ance. E v ery autom obilist know s, espe­ cially peace officers w ith radio equipped cars, th at there a re certain spots w here the radio will n ot function, ceases to transm it and is silent. Policem en know w here these places are and avoid them; th ey speak o f them as “dead sp o ts” and never park their cars near them. A u tom obilists driving over roads will every now and then find that their radio sud­ denly is stilled as they drive along, m aybe for only a fraction of a second, then autom atically it resumes its func­ tioning. W e ll, the auto has merely passed over one of these “dead spots.” H ere is w hat has happened. T h e se “dead sp o ts” are alw ays, w ithout e x ­ ception, places w here tw o earth rays cross each other! I have checked such
Two Hundred Eighteen

places several hundred times, and never have I failed to find a crossing of two rays ex actly a t the indicated “dead sp o t!" L ast summer a man riding a m otorcycle w as killed by lightning on a broad boulevard on both sides of which there w ere row s o f tall trees and also electric pow er lines. T h e re was universal astonishm ent th at lightning should strike in the middle of a broad road bordered by trees and power lines, both o f which would seem to be logical targets for lightning, and certainly more logical than a m otorcycle rider. A po­ liceman show ed me the ex act spot w here the man w as killed, then hurriedly moved his bike a few feet, as it had ceased to function. H e w as over a “dead sp o t.” A little search w ith a pendulum established the fact that it was a crossing of tw o rays! W h ic h is com plete confirm ation o f the G erm an B aro n von P o h l’s dictum that lightning never strikes the earth

T h a t this w hole universe o f ours is one m ass of invisible rays is readily believable. T h e b est an alogy in e x ­ planation I have ever seen is th at on page tw o o f Pronunziam ento X I V , in w hich the radiations surrounding the earth are com pared to “a piano k ey ­ board a mile long . . . o f w hich we are using, and are cap able o f using, only a few o cta v es.” I m ay be perm itted to doubt th at even a keyboard a mile long could represent all the enorm ous ran ge of earth ly radiations. O u r ow n bodies are made up of in­ dividual cells, som ething like a quad­ rillion of them inside the hide o f every one o f us, each o f them a pow er station sending out rad iations. S o are all liv­ ing things mere m asses of individual cells, anim als, trees, grass, and every­ thing th at eats, lives and reproduces itself. T h a t each and every one of them sends out radiations of differing frequencies is to be expected, although w e do not, a t this w riting, have an y m eans o f m easuring or even detecting these radiations. B u t there are cellular creatu res w ell-equipped for the purpose, at least th at is the theory o f the F ren ch p rofessor G eo rg es L akhovsky o f P aris. T h is em inent p ro fesso r’s ideas w ere m entioned all through the a rticle on E a rth R ay s w hich appeared in “A m eri­ can F o re sts ” in A pril, 1934, and w hich w as quoted quite accu rately in P ron un ­ ziam ento X I V . T h e experim ents he carried on with carrier pigeons showed conclusively th at it is neith er sight, nor h earing, nor any special sense of o rien t­ ation th a t guides the pigeons; they are guided b y electrical radiations like those com ing from a radio beacon on an air field, but of infinitely sm aller power. T h e fa ct that pigeons unaccustom ed to long distance flights have to be trained for them proved to be a certain co n ­ firm ation rath er than repudiation o f the theory. W o rk in g from th at basis, P ro fesso r Lakh ovsky advances the astounding theory that it is radiations originating from at present unknow n sources which guide eels spaw ned in the wide reaches o f the A tla n tic ocean to th e particular stream s from w hich their parents had em igrated to propagate their species on the unknow n breeding grounds o f the

except at a p lace w here two rays cross each other! It also explains w hy light­
ning rods, and even the lightning a r­ resters of electric pow er lines, so often fail to function as expected. T h a t also I have checked in several hundred cases, especially on trees struck by lightning; not only because trees nearly alw ays leave visible effects o f lightning, but also because I happen to be an arborist, with a professional interest in the effects o f earth ray s on trees. Invariably and w ithout single exception, lightningstruck trees stand either over or near a spot w here two ray s cross each other! T h e explanation of the im portance of these ray crossings is quite simple. T h e rays originate w ithin the earth itself at uniform density, but are de­ flected by any good electrical conductor in their path, such as m ineral deposits and underground w ater veins. T h u s one ra y 5 0 0 feet below the su rface may rise above a w ater vein and in its path to the su rface may cross another w ater vein sim ilarly deflecting a ray. T h e effect then is that the strength of these two rays is the sum of the elect­ rical forces of both rays. T h u s it rises higher into the atm osphere than a single ray, and the earth being n egatively charged, it is the natural path to the earth for any electrical discharge from the clouds.
T w o H un dred N in eteen

A tlan tic. H e ad vances the sam e e x ­ planation for the m ystery of the salmon, and even that o f m igratory birds. N o t only advances the theory, but provides pretty sound proof. F o r w ithin the oral cavity of all these long-d istance w anderers he found suit­ able receiving devices! T h e y are n oth ­ ing less than the sem i-circular channels filled w ith some organic liquid w hich are part of the oral structu re of all living things capable of moving about from place to place, except among the invertebrates; these have no sem i­ circular channels, but in their place possess mem branous vesicles which serve a sim ilar purpose as do the oral channels. B y experim entation he was able to establish the fact that these o r­ gans control the sense of d irection, and when removed life did not cease, but the mutilated living organism could only move in such direction as that controlled by w hatever part of the oral organs had been left for the purpose. H is re ­ ports are quite com plete and, w hile not pleasant reading for the squeam ish, are conclusive. H e finds th at these oral channels are posed with a definite geom etrical ratio to each other. In living organism s w hich have the pow er to m ove in only two directions, there are only tw o of these channels, guiding the particular living thing to right or left. In the case o f birds, flying insects and sim ilar organism s w hich have the pow er of moving in three directions, there are three of the channels, posing in goniometric position with the longitudinal plane o f each channel a t right an gles to the other two. T h is goniom etric ratio should be readily understandable to any one who has ever studied geom etry; it is a w ell-know n figure in textbooks. T h e additional fact is to be noted that these channels are filled with some o r­ ganic fluid highly sensitive to electrical vibrations, the theory being that any changes in radiations are com m unicated to the highly sensitive w alls o f the channels, who in turn activate the brain cells th at control the flight. B ird s and flying insects, then, capable of three-dim ensional motion, can not fly in any direction w ithout cutting across any vibrations encountered in their paths. T h e receptivity of the oral

channels to w hatever beam of vibra­ tions they may encounter is therefor proportional to the angle a t w hich they cut across such beam , and so variation o f electrical impulses is established; a variation th at w ithout a doubt registers w here it will have the desired effect. N o doubt th at the receiving organs of individuals is delicately ad justed to the periodicity and w ave length of his species and th at all vibrations o f d if­ feren t nature are n ot perceptible and have no e ffects. S o far as I see it, this is a perfectly simple and logical explanation o f the so -called “m ysterious” pow ers which guide living organism s such as fish, birds and insects. B y the same token, it explains th a t fam ous “hom ing-in­ stin ct” w hich guides dogs, horses and other anim als back to their place of abode, although in their case the re ­ ceiving organ is not arranged for three dim ensional direction, nor have they need of it, since their movements are purely tw o-directional. N o other e x ­ planation has ever been advanced that sounds as logical as this. T o accep t such explanation, however, assum es that w e must n ecessarily a c ­ cept the existen ce o f earth rays and the m yriads o f sim ilar rays th at vibrate in the ether about us. T h a t the alleg ­ orical keyboard would have to be longer than one mile is indicated by the fact th a t these vibrations occur in frequen­ cies o f hundreds o f cycles per second to the frequency o f cosm ic ray s, which vibrate at a rate o f five hundred quintrillion cycles (5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ) per second. It would take the L ick O b serv ato ry telescope to see the oth er end of th at keyboard! T h e re rem ains the question as to how the living organism s which m ake use of these ray s receive the electrical impulses. In the case o f insects th at is readily answ ered, for they are provided with an tennae for the very purpose; in fact, the nam e for the w ires w hich pick up the radiations, and receive them, at radio stations, has been directly borrow ­ ed from the insect w orld. Like Judy O ’G ra d y and the C olo n el’s L ad y, the an ten n ae o f insects and radio stations are sisters under the skin. T h a t these an ten n ae are sometimes referred to as “ feelers” is a mere figure o f speech;
T w o H undred T w en ty

their connection with the m ysterious guiding impulses has been am ply es­ tablished. Birds and fish, on the other hand, possess no such “ feelers.” If they are capable o f receiving electrical vibra­ tions, and I fully believe th at they are, they must come to them in some other w ay. T h a t also has been answ ered by Lakhovsky. B y long and involved re ­ searches he establishes the fact that the friction o f b ird s’ w ings in the atm os­ phere accum ulates an electrical ch arge on the su rface o f the bird s’ bodies. B y experim ent he finds th at this ch arge is increased with the distance, or height, o f the bird above the earth 's su rface at the rate o f one volt for each cen ti­ meter. F o r birds flying at a thousand or several thousand feet above the su r­ face, that am ounts to an astonishing potential charge. A t 3 0 0 0 feet it is close to 10 0 .0 0 0 volts! T h e re then is the bird ’s