www.smdailyjournal.

com
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Weekend • July 6-7, 2013 • Vol XII, Edition 277
NO END IN SIGHT
WORLD PAGE 8
WARRIORS’
BIG MOVE
SPORTS PAGE 11
BART GETS BACK
ON TRACK FRIDAY
LOCAL PAGE 5
PROTESTERS CLASH OVER MORSI IN EGYPT
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The $1.7 million revamp of
Crestview Park should not include
converting its athletic field from
natural to synthetic turf, city staff
will recommend to the City
Council on Monday.
The about-face from the staff’s
previous recommendation to use
artificial grass as a cost-savings
measure that extends playing
hours is due to a lack of wide sup-
port from the Crestview neighbor-
hood, the sports community and
an even 2-2 split vote in June by
the Parks and Recreation
Commission that passed the buck
straight to the City Council.
At the same meeting, the com-
mission also favored 3-1 an over-
all design for the park that
includes swings, nine parking
spaces rather than the existing 15
and the addition of five trees.
Playground equipment would be
replaced with new age-appropriate
and accessible equipment with a
seating area for parents. The hard-
court area will also get a colorful
surface and new markings.
At Monday night’s meeting, the
council be asked to consider the
recommendation along with the
suggestion by staff that it remove
the synthetic turf component.
Theoretically, the five-member
City Council could split much as
the Parks and Recreation
Commission did because Mayor
Bob Grassilli must recuse himself
from the vote because he lives
near the park.
Councilwoman Karen Clapper
said she is still considering the
recommendation along with
emails and letters from the com-
munity but is glad city staff took
the initiative of reconsidering
turf.
Councilman Ron Collins is
more direct.
“I never liked turf anyway,” he
said.
In his report to the City
Council, Public Works Director
Jay Walter said the public has
City may nix fake park turf
Vocal neighbors support natural grass at San Carlos’ Crestview Park
By Juliet Williams
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — Gov. Jerry
Brown is drawing praise and glow-
ing reviews from the national
media for his deft political maneu-
vering in closing a $25 billion
budget deficit and restoring some
of California’s financial luster
after years of recession.
The state’s credit rating is on the
rebound, schools are expecting an
infusion of money this fall, and
the budget for the new fiscal year
even includes a modest rainy day
fund after years of deficits forced
billions of dollars in program
cuts.
Yet Brown’s legacy remains
uncertain as he finishes his third
term in the governor’s office and
prepares for a
likely re-elec-
tion campaign
for a fourth and
final one.
The $6 bil-
lion a year in
sales and
income tax
increases he
persuaded vot-
ers to approve last fall will be
expiring by the end of his possi-
ble fourth term in 2019, leaving
the same type of budget headaches
he inherited. What Brown has
called California’s “wall of debt”
remains, including an estimated
$200 billion in unfunded public
pension and retiree health care lia-
bilities.
California spending,
debt remains a worry
Rorke Denver author photo, below right, by Rob Greer. Rorke Denver, top right, in “Act of Valor,” still courtesy of
Bandito Brothers Production. A chopper delivers a SEAL boat from “Act of Valor,”courtesy of Bandito Brothers
Productions. Book cover image, left, courtesy of Hyperion.
By Paul McHugh
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
A star on the U.S. Navy SEAL
teams arrives soon in the Bay
Area. Rorke Denver acquired his
status an old-fashioned way: he
fought to win it by a code he has
embraced in full. Recently, a few
other SEALs, after serving their
nation well, chose next to serve
themselves by seeking fame and
fortune in a way that ignored
promises made to the service. But
Denver, a 14-year veteran, served
the brotherhood by hewing to
channels and procedures when he
played a lead role in the 2012 hit
action movie, “Act of Valor,” then
published a memoir, “Damn Few
— Making the Modern SEAL war-
rior,” (four weeks on the New York
Times best-seller list in spring).
Cmdr. Denver will appear at
Kepler’s Books in Menlo Park on
the evening of July 9; at Books
Inc. — Opera Plaza on July 10; and
at the Commonwealth Club on
Life in the Navy SEALs
Rorke Denver to visit the Bay Area for three events
State enjoying resurgence, Gov. Brown
getting praise for closing budget gap
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
County officials disagree with
the majority of a civil grand jury’s
conclusions about its pension
plan and will not implement rec-
ommendations made in a report
that estimated more than $2 bil-
lion in unfunded liability, accord-
ing to the legally required
response.
However, not every facet of the
response “SamCERA’s Unfunded
Liability: The
Elephant in the
Room,” was
met with oppo-
sition.
The Board of
S u p e r v i s o r s
does agree there
is no assurance
the San Mateo
C o u n t y
Employees Retirement
Association’s strategy change to
County responds to grand
jury pension costs report
Jerry Brown
John Maltbie
See PENSION, Page 20
See BROWN, Page 20
See TURF, Page 19
See SEAL, Page 19
FOR THE RECORD 2 Weekend • July 6-7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
Publisher: Jerry Lee Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
jerry@smdailyjournal.com jon@smdailyjournal.com
smdailyjournal.com scribd.com/smdailyjournal
twitter.com/smdailyjournal facebook.com/smdailyjournal
Phone:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (650) 344-5200 Fax: (650) 344-5290
To Advertise: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ads@smdailyjournal.com
Events: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . calendar@smdailyjournal.com
News: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . news@smdailyjournal.com
Delivery: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . circulation@smdailyjournal.com
Career: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . info@smdailyjournal.com
As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing.To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
more than once, longer than 250 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
The 14th Dali
Lama is 78.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1933
The first All-Star baseball game was
played at Chicago’s Comiskey Park;
the American League defeated the
National League, 4-2.
“Nothing is worth more than laughter. It is
strength to laugh and to abandon oneself, to
be light.Tragedy is the most ridiculous thing.”
— Frida Kahlo, Mexican painter 1907-1954
Nancy Reagan is
92.
Actor Sylvester
Stallone is 67.
Birthdays
REUTERS
A model poses during the annual World Bodypainting Festival in Poertschach,Austria.The world's biggest bodypainting event
takes place from July 5 to 7 at Lake Woerthersee in Austria's southern Carinthia province.
Saturday: Cloudy in the morning then
becoming sunny. Patchy fog in the morn-
ing. Highs in the 70s. South winds 5 to 10
mph... Becoming west 10 to 15 mph in
the afternoon.
Saturday night: Clear in the evening
then becoming cloudy. Patchy fog after
midnight. Lows in the 50s. Northwest
winds 5 to 15 mph.
Sunday: Cloudy in the morning then becoming sunny.
Patchy fog in the morning. Highs in the 70s to lower 80s.
Light winds... Becoming west 10 to 15 mph in the after-
noon.
Sunday night: Clear in the evening then becoming cloudy.
Patchy fog after midnight. Lows in the 50s. West winds 10 to
15 mph decreasing to around 5 mph after midnight.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
(Answers Monday)
KIOSK LIGHT UPBEAT ENTICE
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: After he retired, King Arthur opened a —
“KNIGHT CLUB”
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
LYODD
TALUF
VISNET
LINSAD
©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
J
u
m
b
le

p
u
z
z
le

m
a
g
a
z
in
e
s

a
v
a
ila
b
le

a
t

p
e
n
n
y
d
e
llp
u
z
z
le
s
.
c
o
m
/
ju
m
b
le
m
a
g
s
Print your answer here:
1 9 8
3 6 29 40 51 4
Powerball
July 3 Powerball
14 25 36 40 47
July 3 Super Lotto Plus
Daily Four
26 20 27 38
Fantasy Five
3 0 3
Daily three midday
I n 1483, England’s King Richard III was crowned in
Westminster Abbey.
I n 1535, Sir Thomas More was executed in England for
high treason.
I n 1777, during the American Revolution, British forces
captured Fort Ticonderoga.
I n 1885, French scientist Louis Pasteur tested an anti-
rabies vaccine on 9-year-old Joseph Meister, who had been
bitten by an infected dog; the boy did not develop rabies.
I n 1917, during World War I, Arab forces led by T.E.
Lawrence and Auda Abu Tayi captured the port of Aqaba (AH’-
kah-buh) from the Turks.
I n 1944, an estimated 168 people died in a fire that broke
out during a performance in the main tent of the Ringling
Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus in Hartford, Conn.
I n 1945, President Harry S. Truman signed an executive
order establishing the Medal of Freedom.
I n 1957, Althea Gibson became the first black tennis play-
er to win a Wimbledon singles title as she defeated fellow
American Darlene Hard 6-3, 6-2.
I n 1963, the cult horror movie “Blood Feast” had its world
premiere at a drive-in theater in Peoria, Ill.
I n 1973, classical conductor Otto Klemperer, 88, died in
Zurich, Switzerland.
I n 1983, Fred Lynn of the California Angels hit the first
(and, to date, only) grand slam in an All-Star game as the
American League zoomed to a 13-3 victory over the
National League in Chicago’s Comiskey Park.
I n 1988, 167 North Sea oil workers were killed when
explosions and fires destroyed a drilling platform. Medical
waste and other debris began washing up on New York City-
area seashores, forcing the closing of several popular
beaches.
Actor William Schallert is 91. Singer-actress Della Reese is
82. Actor Ned Beatty is 76. Singer Gene Chandler is 73.
Country singer Jeannie Seely is 73. Actor Burt Ward is 68.
Former President George W. Bush is 67. Actor-director
Sylvester Stallone is 67. Actor Fred Dryer is 67. Actress
Shelley Hack is 66. Actress Nathalie Baye is 65. Actor
Geoffrey Rush is 62. Actress Allyce Beasley is 62. Rock musi-
cian John Bazz (The Blasters) is 61. Actor Grant Goodeve is
61. Country singer Nanci Griffith is 60. Jazz musician Rick
Braun is 58. Country musician John Jorgenson is 57. Former
first daughter Susan Ford Bales is 56. Hockey player and coach
Almond growers use special equipment
to collect ripe almonds from almond
trees. Amachine grabs the tree and shakes
the nuts to the ground. Another machine
sweeps and picks up the almonds.
***
After creating the claymation character
Gumby, Art Clokey (born 1921) invested
in a toy called Moody Rudy. It was a face
made of clay that could be molded in to
“any expression to suit your mood.” The
toy did not sell well.
***
Ecchymosis is the medical word for a
bruise.
***
In 2006, the U.S. Postal Service intro-
duced a stamp commemorating jury duty.
The 41-cent stamp shows 12 faces of rep-
resentative jurors in silhouette, with the
words “serve with pride.”
***
The state of Texas has towns named
Earth, Mercury and Pluto.
***
William S. Harley (1880-1943) and
Arthur Davidson (1881-1950) were the
original founders of the Harley-Davidson
Motor Company. They built and sold the
first motorcycle in 1903 in Milwaukee,
Wis. The company is still headquartered in
Milwaukee.
***
Do you know the last lines of the fol-
lowing movies: “Gone With the Wind”
(1939), “Casablanca” (1942), “Mary
Poppins” (1964) and “Pirates of the
Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest” (2006)?
See answer at end.
***
Michael J. Fox (born 1961) played
Alex Keaton, the eldest son in the televi-
sion sitcom “Family Ties” (1982-1989).
In the show, Alex was a conservative
Republican. He kept a framed photo of
Richard Nixon (1913-1994) in his bed-
room.
***
The average adult’s spinal cord is 17.5
inches long.
***
The comic strip “Little Orphan Annie”
was first published in the Chicago Tribune
in 1924. The red-headed orphan’s favorite
exclamations were “Gee whiskers” and
“Leapin’ lizards!”
***
Precious gems were used in engagement
rings before diamonds became standard.
Each gem had significance, for example
garnet signified truth and amethyst meant
sincerity.
***
Comic superhero Captain America uses
a shield as his weapon. The shield is 2.5
feet in diameter and weighs 12 pounds.
The indestructible shield cannot be pene-
trated, is not affected by temperature
extremes and is immune to radiation.
***
Many celebrities have their own pro-
duction companies. David Letterman’s
(born 1947) production company is
called Worldwide Pants. Drew
Barrymore’s (born 1975) is Flower Films.
Tim Allen’s (born 1953) is called Boxing
Cat Productions.
***
A typical water tower holds about a
day’s worth of water for the community it
serves.
***
Woolaroc is a 3,700 acre wildlife pre-
serve in the Osage Hills of Oklahoma,
home to native wildlife including buffalo,
elk and longhorn cattle. The name
Woolaroc is derived from three words
describing the area: the woods, lakes and
rocks.
***
Tiffany & Company, makers of fine
jewelry since 1837, has an iron-clad rule.
The trademark Tiffany Blue box may only
leave the store when it contains some-
thing that has been purchased. The iconic
boxes themselves are never sold or given
away.
***
The temperature of milk when it leaves
the cow is 101 degrees Fahrenheit. Fresh
milk is quickly cooled and stored at 40
degrees Fahrenheit.
***
Answer: “Gone With the Wind” —
“After all, tomorrow is another day!”;
“Casablanca” — “Louis, I think this is
the beginning of a beautiful friendship.”;
“Mary Poppins” — “Goodbye, Mary
Poppins. Don’t stay away too long.”;
“Pirates of the Caribbean”— “So tell me,
what has become of my ship?”
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments?
Email knowitall@smdailyjournal.com or
call 344-5200 ext. 114.
36 42 51 52 53 49
Mega number
July 2 Mega Millions
2 9 9
Daily three evening
9
10
6
Mega number
The Daily Derby race winners are Winning Spirit , No. 9, in
first place; Eureka,No.7,in second place; and Hot Shot,No.
3, in third place.The race time was clocked at 1:47.23.
3
Weekend • July 6-7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Dental aide facing prison
for groping teen patient
A 48-year-old dental assistant accused of
massaging a 15-year-old female patient’s
chest and groin during her care at a Redwood
City office pleaded no contest Friday to two
counts of committing a lewd act on a child
more than 10 years younger.
In return for the plea, Gabriel Cruz
Medina, of South San Francisco, faces two
years in prison and lifetime sex offender reg-
istration when formally sentenced Sept. 11.
The negotiated deal frees Medina from a
preliminary hearing on five counts of lewd
acts on a child which carries up to five years
in prison.
Redwood City police arrested Medina in
April but the girl reported the alleged inci-
dent Nov. 19, 2012, the day she claims, dur-
ing a visit to Western Dental, he allegedly
massaged her breast and touched her genital
area several times over her clothing.
Medina is free from custody on $25,000
bail and ordered to have no contact with the
victim.
Man arrested for
possessing ‘dry ice bomb’
A 32-year-old Redwood City man was
arrested for possessing a “dry ice bomb”
officers found in the middle of the 400 block
of Ruby Street Thursday night, according to
police.
At approximately 10:53 p.m., officers
responded to the area on the report of a sus-
picious two-liter bottle in the road that was
visibly swelling from pressure building
inside. Officers recognized it as a type of
homemade bomb known as a “chemical
reactive device” with high explosive poten-
tial. Police called for assistance from the
San Mateo County Sheriff’s Office Bomb
Squad, whose members confirmed it was a
“dry ice bomb” and detonated it in place.
Police arrested Richard Santos, who initial-
ly resisted arrest and was found to be in pos-
session of drug paraphernalia. He was booked
into the San Mateo County Jail for posses-
sion of an explosive device, possession of
drug paraphernalia and resisting arrest.
Anyone with information about this
crime is asked to contact Detective Jessica
Gray at 780-7129.
Gas venting planned
for Redwood City
Pacific Gas and Electric crews will vent
natural gas in the afternoon and early
evening Monday, July 8 near Edgewood
Road and Interstate 280 to work on a pipe,
the utility announced Friday.
The smell of natural gas and the sound of
it venting may be present. The utility
assures the gas will quickly dissipate and is
not harmful. Anyone with concerns or ques-
tions is asked to call 1-800-743-5000.
Caltrain service disrupted
after death on tracks
Caltrain service was restored Friday morn-
ing after a death on the tracks near the
Atherton station, according to the transit
agency.
At approximately 7:15 a.m., a north-
bound train passing through the Atherton
station at 1 Dinkelspiel Station Lane hit the
pedestrian.
Service was fully restored by 9:30 a.m.
Caltrain does not stop at that station on
weekdays.
Local briefs
BURLINGAME
Disturbance. A man ran off without pay-
ing for his cab fare on Easton Drive and El
Camino Real before 9:18 a.m. Monday,
June 24.
Arre s t . Aman was arrested for being under
the influence of a controlled substance on
the 1200 block of Floribunda Avenue before
11:20 a.m. Sunday, June 23.
Arre s t . An underage man was arrested for
driving under the influence on Burlingame
Avenue and California Drive before 3:42
a.m. Sunday, June 23.
Disturbance. Aman pushed a woman into
bushes on Howard Avenue and Park Road
before 12:27 a.m. Sunday, June 23.
BELMONT
Suspi ci ous ci rcumst ance. Someone
reported finding items in their home out of
order on Notre Dame Avenue before 12:39
p.m. Wednesday, June 26.
Disturbance. Someone reported hearing
loud voices and music on Old County Road
before 2:28 a.m. Wednesday, June 26.
Suspi ci ous person. A man was acting
strange at the intersection of Notre Dame
and Manzanita avenues before 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday, June 25.
Suspi ci ous ci rcumst ances. Someone
reported checking a backpack for contra-
band on Alameda de las Pulgas before 12:25
p.m. Tuesday, June 25.
Suspi ci ous ci rcumst ances. Someone
reported an unknown person tried to get
into the bedroom window on Kedith Street
before 12:25 a.m. Tuesday, June 25.
FOSTER CITY
Noi se compl ai nt . Loud music was heard
on Bodega Street before 11:05 p.m.
Tuesday, July 2.
Disturbance. Awoman was heard in a ver-
bal dispute with a man on Bowspirit Lane
before 8:59 p.m. Tuesday, July 2.
Burglary. A backpack containing three
prescription medications and a man’s lunch
was stolen from a vehicle on Metro Center
Boulevard before 2:18 p.m. Tuesday, July 2.
Disturbance. Someone requested police
assistance during a heated union meeting on
Chess Drive before 11:32 a.m. Saturday,
June 29.
Harassi ng cal l s. An 80-year-old woman
received several calls from a man demanding
she send him money before 2:33 p.m.
Friday, June 28.
REDWOOD CITY
Arre s t . A man was arrested after being
caught going into peoples’ yards and hiding
behind trees on Stambaugh Street before
9:46 p.m. Saturday, June 29.
Assaul t. Aman was assaulted and his cell-
phone was stolen on Rolison Road before
9:29 p.m. Saturday, June 29.
Arre s t. A man using a payphone and
screaming at passersby was arrested for
being drunk and disorderly on El Camino
Real before 8:19 p.m. Saturday, June 29.
Arre s t . A person was arrested after being
found in a vehicle with beer cans inside on
Florence Street before 6:12 p.m. Saturday,
June 29.
SAN BRUNO
Grand theft. Someone reported their lap-
top, camera and Samsung Mini Tablet were
stolen out of her hotel room on the 500
block of El Camino Real before 2:08 p.m.
Wednesday, June 26.
Suspi ci ous ci rcumst ances. Someone
reported being stalked by a man driving a
gray Chevrolet Equinox on the 1200 block
of Shelter Creek Lane before 11:16 p.m.
Tuesday, June 25.
Grand theft. Someone reported their ring
was stolen from their hotel room on the 400
block of El Camino Real before 9:59 p.m.
Tuesday, June 25.
Police reports
Who could be mad at a child’s laugh?
A person complained of juveniles
laughing in the area on the 2200 block
of Summit Drive in Burlingame before
9:05 p.m. Sunday, June 23.
4
Weekend • July 7-6, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Justbeage62+andownyourownhome:
✓ Turn home equity into cash
✓ Pay off bills & credit cards
✓ No more monthy mortgage payments
✓ Remain in your home as long as you live
✓ You retain ownership (title) to your home
✓ FHA insured program
Calltodayforafree,easytoreadquote
650-453-3244
R
EVERSE
MORTGAGE
CALL FOR A FREE BROCHURE OR QUOTE
SERVING THE ENTIRE BAY AREA
CarolBertocchini,CPA
NMLS ID #455078
Reverse Mortgage
Specialist and a CPA
with over 25 years
experience as a
financial professional
Homeowner must maintain property as primary residence and remain current on
property taxes and insurance
Security 1 Lending.
NMLS ID #107636. Loans will be
made or arranged pursuant to CA
Dept of Corp Residential Mortgage
Lending Act License #4131074
5
Weekend • July 6-7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Canon Rebel SL1 2 Lens Kit
Worlds Smallest and Lightest Digital SLR Camera
Canon EOS Rebel SL1 18 MP Digital DSLR with 1080p HD Video
with 2 Zoom Lenses - 18-55mm IS STM and 55-250mm IS II
Canon Rebel SL1 w/18-55mm IS STM and 55-250mm IS Zooms $1099.98 - $200 = $899.98
All Canon Cameras include a Canon USA Warranty Registration Card
154 West 25th Avenue San Mateo 650-574-3429
View our products at kaufmannscameras.com
After
$200.00
Instant Rebate
$899.98
FULLER, Alice “Bunny” Barrie
Died on June 21, 2013 in Belmont after
a long illness and with her family close
by. Born Alice Jean Barrie on January 25,
1926 in Bryn Mawr, PA. Bunny headed west
in 1952 to San Francisco, met her future
husband and lived almost continuously in
San Mateo.
Suddenly widowed in 1965, Bunny raised
her two children while working for the San
Mateo - Foster City School District. She
retired as the Confidential Secretary to the
Superintendent in 1991.
Bunny loved to travel the world and all over the USA. When at her home
of 44 years in San Mateo, she enjoyed many hobbies and volunteered at the
Peninsula Humane Society. But most of all she loved spending time with
her family and numerous friends.
She is preceded in death by her husband, Myron E. Fuller, Jr. and parents,
Elizabeth (Thornton) and Robert Barrie, Jr. She is survived by her son Bob
and his wife Ann of San Jose; daughter Beth of Duarte, CA; stepdaughter
Sherrie Dobbie of Lindenhurst, NY; sister and brother in law, Suzanne and
John Gromala of Medford, OR. She will be greatly missed by her grandchildren
Stephanie; Steven and his fiancée Tracy and her great granddaughter Jaslynn
and numerous friends and relatives across the country.
Funeral Services were private.
Obituary
Pauline Kaldre
Pauline Kopli, born Nov. 11, 1911 in
Haapsalu, Estonia died peacefully at the age
of 101 July 1, 2013 in the car of the
Williams family.
Pauline loved embroidery and had a small
business with several workers in Estonia. In
1944, she immigrated to Germany and
worked in a Berlin post office. During the
bombing of Berlin, she tried to escape by
train, but it was hit by bombs. She fully
recovered after hospitalization.
Soon after, she ended
up in a DP camp in
Amberg. She worked as a
maid for an American mil-
itary commander’s fami-
l y, which sponsored her
relocation to the United
States.
After completing her
services to the command-
er, she relocated to
Canada where many other Estonians immi-
grated after the war.
She married Roman in 1950 and became a
house wife. In 1963, Pauline and Roman
immigrated to the United States to settle in
the San Francisco Bay Area. She traveled
the world, was very active in various
Estonian clubs and had many great friends.
Donald Edward Molteni
Donald Edward Molteni, born May 16,
1933, died June 30, 2013.
Don was born in San Francisco to Edward
and Ethel Molteni. Atrue San Franciscan, he
attended Washington High School and
CCSF. He was a lifelong supporter of the
Giants and the 49ers. He married the love of
his life, Nina Turcich, who died in 2005 just
three months shy of their 50th wedding
anniversary. He was a devoted father to
Linda Dieterle (Mike) and Donna Lovett
(Allen). Grandfather of Joe, Ben, Dana and
Parker. Brother to
Beverly Hammel and
Uncle to Lynn and Brian.
He was an avid bowler
for over 60 years, loved
wine, St. Helena, jigsaw
puzzles, reading the
paper cover to cover and
Joe’s of Westlake. A
memorial service will be
held at 1 p.m., Friday
July 12 at First Presbyterian Church of
Burlingame. In lieu of flowers, donations to
the Giants Community Fund, 24 Willie
Mays Plaza, San Francisco, CA 94107 are
preferred. Arrangements have been entrust-
ed to Chapel of the Highlands in Millbrae.
Obituaries
Pauline Kopli Don Molteni
CITY GOVERNMENT
• On Monday, the
B u r l i n g a m e
P l a n n i n g
Commi ssi on will
study an application to
increase the hours of use
for a patio area at
S a h a a r a
Mediterranean Pizza and Cuisine, 1130
Broadway. As proposed, the restaurant would
extend the hours from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. seven
days a week to 11 a.m. to midnight Monday
through Saturday with the patio area closing at
10 p.m. The total space of the restaurant would
go from 540 square feet to 1,440 square feet with
a maximum of 600 square feet for a patio located
behind the restaurant. Such an expansion would
also mean an increase of employees from three
to seven.
The commission meets 7 p.m. Monday, July
8 at City Hall, 501 Primrose Road.
• The Redwood City Utilities
Committee of the City Council will receive
an update on trash rates and recycled water fund-
ing.The committee meets 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Wednesday, July 10 at the Public Works
Di vi si on, 1400 Broadway, Redwood City.
THE ASSSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — Commuter rail service
resumed Friday in the San Francisco Bay Area
after unions called off a strike and agreed to
extend a labor contract for a month while bar-
gaining continues.
Thirty-five trains were put back in service
in time for an expected light evening com-
mute, the Bay Area Rapid Transit agency said.
Frances DeLoach of Oakland was among the
dozens of commuters who lined up at the West
Oakland station for the first trains to San
Francisco after nearly five days without serv-
ice.
DeLoach, catering supervisor at AT&T
Park, was excited that she didn’t have to drive
and pay as much as $50 to park, and could
take the time to focus on preparing her staff
before the Giants-Dodgers game.
“I sure hope BART and those unions can
resolve their issues,” DeLoach said.
The current contract between BART, the
nation’s fifth-largest rail system, and its two
largest unions will be extended for 30 days
after expiring earlier this week.
“The parties will continue to negotiate just
as hard as they are now,” California Labor
Secretary Marty Morgenstern said late
Thursday. “The battle’s not over. The job’s
not done.”
Morgenstern said he and two top state medi-
ators urged the bargaining parties to agree to
an extension of the current labor deal. Both
groups had said they were far apart in negoti-
ations, but details were not provided.
“Unfortunately, the issues that brought us
to this point remain unresolved,” BART
General Manager Grace Crunican said.
Key sticking points in the labor dispute
include salaries, pensions, health care and
safety.
Josie Mooney, a chief negotiator for
Service Employees International Union
Local 1021, asked the public to help keep the
parties on task.
“We stand together tonight and we expect
to be standing together with a new contract at
the end of Aug. 4 and we hope to goodness
that you insist that all the parties do the right
thing,” Mooney said.
BART serves more than 400,000 com-
muters each weekday. It carries passengers
from the farthest reaches of San Francisco’s
densely populated eastern suburbs to San
Francisco International Airport across the
bay.
The strike began early Monday after nego-
tiations broke off. Talks resumed Tuesday
amid mounting political and public pressure.
Negotiations continued on Wednesday and
again for nearly 12 hours on Thursday before
the parties announced the strike was over.
BART begins running again
6
Weekend • July 6-7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
Absolutely. When you prepay, your funds are kept in an
account you can access from anywhere at your time of
need. The funds are protected and availability is
assured.We gladly honor arrangements made at other
funeral homes.
Please contact us if we can be of
assistance to you.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — California
lawmakers improperly stopped
funding certain medical services
that rural and other specialized
health clinics provided to low-
income residents under the state’s
Medicaid program, a federal appeals
court ruled Friday.
A three-judge panel of the 9th
U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals
reversed the finding of a trial judge
and said federal law requires states
participating in Medicaid to reim-
burse clinics serving migrant work-
ers, homeless people and other poor
populations for “a panoply of med-
ical services to under-served com-
munities” that includes chiropractic
care, dental care, optometry, podia-
try and speech therapy.
To save money, the Legislature in
2009 eliminated coverage for adults
receiving those services through
the state’s Medicaid program,
known as Medi-Cal, saying they
were optional because they were not
provided by medical doctors.
Although the federal Centers for
Medicare and Medicaid Services ulti-
mately authorized the move, the 9th
Circuit panel said only Congress
can change the terms of Medicaid
coverage, which are now written to
mirror the services covered by the
government’s health insurance pro-
gram for the elderly and disabled,
Medicare.
The ruling came in a lawsuit
brought by the California
Association of Rural Health Clinics
and Avenal Community Health
Center, a clinic in Kings County.
Medi-Cal must cover
podiatrists, dentists
Congrats to 12-year-old Ros e
Scot t from Menlo Park who is a
winner in the Michelle Obama
heal thy l unch contest. Now
she gets to go to the White House.
***
As part of Adult Education
Week, four San Mateo Union
Hi gh School Di stri ct Adult
School students were named win-
ners in its 2013 Es s ay
Cont es t. The winners were:
Marina Krautsava, Adi l Ul as,
Faina Nisenban and Hulya
Zira. All are recent immigrants to
the United States.
Their essays, which were read
aloud to a standing-room-only
audience at the Adult School in San
Mateo March 15, emphasized the
value of their education, particu-
larly their English classes.
Ulas declared that his experience
at the Adult School has been “one
of the best of my life.” Krautsava,
in a moving essay, stated that her
time at the Adult School has meant
much more than ongoing academic
progress. She said it has proven to
be a vehicle to help her get her life
in order and to “rise from the
ashes.” As she put it, “I can
respect myself again.”
San Mateo Deputy Mayor
Robert Ross praised all of the
winners, along with the work of
the Adult School itself, and noted,
“Every time you see a teacher
smile and say thanks.”
The winners received certificates
from Superi ntendent Scott
Laure nc e . All of the winning
essays were scheduled to be posted
on the Adult School’s Facebook
page.
***
We all know that a smile can
“light up a room.” Asmile, can be
defined as “a facial expression
formed by flexing the muscles near
both ends of the mouth and by
flexing muscles throughout the
mouth,” now imagine that you
couldn’t form a simple smile and
what your life would be like.
The Interact Club students at
Mercy Hi gh School
Burlingame, under the direction
of their moderator, Cynt hi a
Yabes , pondered that very
thought, and this year decided they
would, during February and
Valentine’s Day, do a Candi-Gram
fundraiser to help raise money for
Operati on Smi l e.
Operation Smile is a worldwide
children’s charity organization
that helps treat facial deformities
such as cleft lips & cleft palates.
The students at Mercy Burlingame
raised over $250 which, in the
next few months, Operation Smile
medical mission teams will be
using as they transform lives, one
smile at a time! The team will be
going to over 13 countries and
will help the thousands of children
waiting for surgery.
STATE/NATION 7
Weekend • July 6-7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Kelli Kennedy
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MIAMI — Dan Lopez rarely gets sick and
hasn’t been to a doctor in 10 years, so buy-
ing health insurance feels like a waste of
money.
Even after the federal health overhaul takes
full effect next year, the 24-year-old said he
will probably decide to pay the $100 penalty
for those who skirt the law’s requirement that
all Americans purchase coverage.
“I don’t feel I should pay for something I
don’t use,” said the Milwaukee resident, who
makes about $48,000 a year working two
part-time jobs.
Because he makes too much to qualify for
government subsidies, Lopez would pay a
premium of about $3,000 a year if he chose
to buy health insurance.
“I shouldn’t be penalized for having good
health,” he said.
Persuading young, healthy adults such as
Lopez to buy insurance under the Affordable
Care Act is becoming a major concern for
insurance companies as they scramble to
comply with the law, which prohibits them
from denying coverage because of pre-exist-
ing conditions and limits what they can
charge to older policy holders.
Experts warn a lot of these so-called
“young invincibles” could opt to pay the fine
instead of spending hundreds or thousands of
dollars each year on insurance premiums. If
enough young adults avoid the new insurance
marketplace, it could throw off the entire
equilibrium of the Affordable Care Act.
Insurers are betting on the business of that
group to offset the higher costs they will
incur for older, sicker beneficiaries.
The nonpartisan Congressional Budget
Office estimates that about six million peo-
ple of various ages will pay the tax penalty
for not having insurance in 2014, the first
year the law championed by President Barack
Obama will be fully implemented.
It’s hard to estimate how many of those
will be the young and healthy adults insurers
are trying to reach, but that subgroup makes
up a very small portion of the overall market.
Even though it’s small, experts say it could
be enough to throw the system’s financing
off-kilter.
About 3 million 18-24 year-olds in the
U.S. currently purchase their own insurance.
Many pay high prices for scant benefit s,
with high deductibles and co-pays because
they make too much to qualify for Medicaid
and have no coverage options from their
employers or parents. The Urban Institute
estimates that the majority of adults in their
20s will qualify for government subsidies
under the Affordable Care Act.
Premium hikes could be a disincentive for
young people weighing their options.
Premiums for people aged 21 to 29 with sin-
gle coverage who are not eligible for govern-
ment subsidies would increase by 42 percent
under the law, according to an analysis by
actuaries at the consulting firm Oliver
Wyman. By comparison, an adult in his or
her early 60s who would see about a 1 percent
average increase in premiums under new fed-
eral health rules.
Health insurers fear younger
people will opt out of coverage
By Laura Olson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — The state Senate has
approved legislation that would reinstate
mandates that police departments keep
records of restraining orders and adopt stan-
dards for responding to domestic violence
calls.
The bill passed Wednesday reverses lan-
guage in a previously approved budget bill
that would have made those practices
optional for law enforcement agencies.
Under that scenario, the state would not have
been required to pick up the cost of compli-
ance, as it must when it issues a mandate.
The Senate bill will now heads to the
Assembly.
Advocates for crime victims and several
district attorneys said the requirements are
needed to help protect victims’ rights.
In a letter urging Gov. Jerry Brown to veto
the previous bill, Sacramento County
District Attorney Jan Scully wrote that mak-
ing the policies optional would “send
California back to the Dark Ages in regards
to definitions, standards and arrest practices
for domestic violence.”
State law requires local agencies to abide
by the domestic violence information poli-
cies included in the Senate bill, but the
requirement has been suspended for two
decades. Even so, state officials say police
and sheriff’s departments have continued to
follow those requirements.
The Senate approved the legislation on a
37-0 vote, without debate.
Camille Hayes, spokeswoman for the
California Partnership to End Domestic
Violence, said the organization was pleased
the Senate chose to keep the domestic vio-
lence requirement in state law.
Eliminating the mandate instead of sus-
pending it temporarily would have sent a
negative signal to police regarding how
they should respond to such cases, she said.
Rules on domestic violence
cases are reinstated by bill
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — Rebounding state rev-
enue bolstered by temporary tax increases
recently approved by voters are paying off
for California’s largest public employees’
union.
The state Senate this week, following ear-
lier approval in the Assembly, ratified a
three-year agreement that gives the 95,000
members of Service Employees
International Union Local 1000 4.5 percent
pay raises by July 1, 2015. The agreement
was negotiated between the union and Gov.
Jerry Brown’s administration.
The union supported Brown’s successful
drive last fall for a ballot initiative tem-
porarily raising the statewide sales tax and
income taxes on those making more than
$250,000 a year. The tax increases are
expected to generate about $6 billion more
per year.
Democrats used their two-thirds superma-
jority in the Senate on Wednesday to
approve AB1377 on a 27-8 vote, sending
the bill containing the agreement to the
Democratic governor for his signature.
They acted days after SEIU 1000 gave
Brown’s 2014 re-election campaign com-
mittee $54,400.
“We don’t really have any comment on
that specific contribution,” union
spokesman Jim Zamora said. “But it is
worth noting that SEIU Local 1000 worked
very hard in 2010 to elect Jerry Brown and
to defeat (Republican) Meg Whitman.
Nothing has changed in terms of our sup-
port for him.”
Aspokesman for the governor would not
comment on the timing of the contribution,
opting instead to address the contract itself.
“This is a good, solid agreement that’s
fair to taxpayers and employees, which is
why it received strong support from both
Democrats and Republicans,” Evan Westrup
said in an emailed statement when asked
about any relationship between the contract
and the contribution.
Lawmakers approve raises
NATION/WORLD 8
Weekend • July 6-7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
s Contemporary Fine Art & Crafts
s Fabulous Food &Wine
s Home & Garden Exhibits
s Green Products Showcase
s Artisan Specialty Food
Purveyors
s Health &Wellness Displays
s Microbrew &Wine Tasting Tent
s Engaging Chefs’ Demos
s Action-Packed Kids’ Fun Zone
s Rock‘n Roll, Blues, Jazz &
Party Music
s Saturday Twilight Concert
California Blues Machine
5:30 - 8pm in Fremont Park!
s On-Site Bicycle Parking
s Ample Free Parking Downtown
s Please Consider Public Transit
s Free Admission
July 20-21, 10am-6pm
Santa Cruz Avenue, Menlo Park
Download Our
Awesome App!
The Bay Area’s Premier Summer Festival
Info-line: 650-325-2818 | www.miramarevents.com | |
Presented By The Menlo Park Chamber Of Commerce | www.menloparkchamber.com
A FAMILY SHARING HOPE IN CHRIST
HOPE EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
600 W. 42nd Ave., San Mateo
Pastor Eric Ackerman
Worship Service 10:00 AM
Sunday School 11:00 AM
Hope Lutheran Preschool
admits students of any race, color and national or ethnic origin.
License No. 410500322.
Call (650) 349-0100
HopeLutheranSanMateo.org
Baptist
PILGRIM BAPTIST CHURCH
Dr. Larry Wayne Ellis, Pastor
(650) 343-5415
217 North Grant Street, San Mateo
Sunday Worship Services at 8 & 11 am
Sunday School at 9:30 am
Website: www.pilgrimbcsm.org
LISTEN TO OUR
RADIO BROADCAST!
(KFAX 1100 on the AM Dial)
Every Sunday at 5:30 PM
Buddhist
SAN MATEO
BUDDHIST TEMPLE
Jodo ShinshuBuddhist
(Pure Land Buddhism)
2 So. Claremont St.
San Mateo
(650) 342-2541
Sunday English Service &
Dharma School - 9:30 AM
Reverend Ryuta Furumoto
www.sanmateobuddhisttemple.org
Church of Christ
CHURCH OF CHRIST
525 South Bayshore Blvd. SM
650-343-4997
Bible School 9:45am
Services 11:00am and 2:00pm
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00pm
Minister J.S. Oxendine
Clases de Biblicas Y Servicio de
Adoracion
En Espanol, Si UD. Lo Solicita
www.church-of-christ.org/cocsm
Congregational
• THE •
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
OF SAN MATEO - UCC
225 Tilton Ave. & San Mateo Dr.
(650) 343-3694
Worship and Church School
Every Sunday at 10:30 AM
Coffee Hour at 11:45 AM
Nursery Care Available
www.ccsm-ucc.org
Non-Denominational
Church of the
Highlands
“A community of caring Christians”
1900 Monterey Drive
(corner Sneath Lane) San Bruno
(650)873-4095
Adult Worship Services:
Friday: 7:30 pm (singles)
Saturday: 7:00 pm
Sun 7, 8:30, 10, & 11:30 am,
5 pm
Youth Worship Service:
For high school & young college
Sunday at 10:00 am
Sunday School
For adults & children of all ages
Sunday at 10:00 am
Donald Sheley, Founding Pastor
Leighton Sheley, Senior Pastor
REDWOOD CHURCH
Our mission...
To know Christ and make him known.
901 Madison Ave., Redwood City
(650)366-1223
Sunday services:
9:00AM & 10:45AM
www.redwoodchurch.org
Nicaragua, Venezuela offer asylum to Snowden
MANAGUA, Nicaragua — Presidents Daniel Ortega of
Nicaragua and Nicolas Maduro of Venezuela said Friday they
were willing to grant asylum to NSA leaker Edward
Snowden.
Snowden has asked for asylum in several countries,
including Nicaragua and Venezuela.
“As head of state, the government of the Bolivarian
Republic of Venezuela decided to offer humanitarian asylum
to the young American Edward Snowden so that he can live
(without) ... persecution from the empire,” Maduro said,
referring to the United States. He made the offer during a
speech marking the anniversary of Venezuela’s independ-
ence. It was not immediately clear if there were any condi-
tions to Venezuela’s offer.
In Nicaragua, Ortega said he was willing to make the same
offer “if circumstances allow it.” Ortega didn’t say what the
right circumstances would be when he spoke during a speech
in Managua.
World in brief
Relatives clash over 911 call in Florida shooting
SANFORD, Fla. — The mothers of Trayvon Martin and
George Zimmerman listened Friday to the same 911
recording of someone screaming for help, and each said
she was convinced the voice was that of her own son.
The starkly conflicting testimony over the potentially
crucial piece of evidence came midway through
Zimmerman’s murder trial in the 2012 shooting of the
unarmed 17-year-old.
“I heard my son screaming,” Sybrina Fulton, the
teenager’s mother, said firmly after she was played a
recording in which distant, high-pitched wails could be
heard in the background as a Zimmerman neighbor asked
a dispatcher to send police. Moments later on the call,
there was a gunshot and the crying stopped.
Gladys Zimmerman, though, testified she recognized
the voice all too well: “My son.” Asked how she could be
certain, she said: “Because it’s my son.”
The testimony came on a dramatic, action-packed day
in which the prosecution rested its case and the judge
rejected a defense request to acquit Zimmerman on the sec-
ond-degree murder charge.
Furloughs begin for
Defense Department civilians
WASHINGTON — More than 650,000 civilian Defense
Department workers will begin taking the first of their 11
unpaid days off next week, but the cut in salary they will
see in the three months may pale compared to what offi-
cials worry could be larger scale layoffs next year.
Roughly 85 percent of the department’s nearly
900,000 civilians around the world will be furloughed,
according to the latest statistics provided by the
Pentagon. But while defense officials were able to shift
money around to limit the furloughs this year, there are
widespread worries that if automatic budget cuts go for-
ward for 2014, thousands of civilian, military and con-
tract jobs could be on the chopping block.
Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel is expected to provide
senators with more details early next week on how the
next wave of across-the-board budget cuts will affect the
department, said Pentagon press secretary George Little.
Nation in brief
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CAIRO — Enraged Islamists pushed back Friday against
the toppling of President Mohammed Morsi, as tens of
thousands of his supporters took to the streets vowing to
win his reinstatement and clashed with their opponents in
violence that killed 30 and drove the divided nation toward
an increasingly dangerous showdown.
In a battle on a bridge over the Nile River in Cairo, gun-
fire rang out and flames leaped from a burning car as the rival
camps threw volleys of stones and fireworks at each other.
Military armored vehicles raced across the bridge in a coun-
terattack on Morsi’s supporters.
The clashes accelerated after the supreme leader of Morsi’s
Muslim Brotherhood defiantly proclaimed that his followers
would not give up street action until the return of the coun-
try’s first freely elected president, swept out of power days
earlier by the military. Morsi opponents called out the pub-
lic to defend against the Brotherhood, deepening the battle
lines.
In scenes of mayhem, troops opened fire on peaceful pro-
Morsi protesters. Islamists threw one opponent off a
rooftop.
“God make Morsi victorious and bring him back to the
palace,” Brotherhood chief Mohammed Badie proclaimed
before cheering supporters at a Cairo mosque in his first
appearance since the overthrow. “We are his soldiers we
defend him with our lives.”
Badie said it was a matter of honor for the military to abide
by its pledge of loyalty to the president, in what appeared to
be an attempt to pull it away from its leadership.
“Your leader is Morsi. ... Return to the people of Egypt,”
he said. “Your bullets are not to be fired on your sons and
your own people.”
Hours later, Badie’s deputy, Khairat el-Shater, considered
the most powerful figure in the organization, was arrested in
a Cairo apartment along with his brother on allegations of
inciting violence, Interior Ministry spokesman Hani
Abdel-Latif told the Associated Press.
After the speech, a large crowd of Islamists surged across
6th October Bridge over the Nile toward Tahrir Square, where
a giant crowd of Morsi’s opponents had been massed all day.
Battles broke out there and near the neighboring state TV
building. Pro-Morsi youth shielded themselves from flying
stones and fireworks with sheets of barricaded metal. Acar
burned at the top of an exit ramp amid the sounds of auto-
matic weapons and shotguns.
“They are firing at us, sons of dogs! Where is the army?”
one Morsi opponent shouted as another was brought to
medics with his jeans soaked in blood from leg wounds. At
least three people were killed at the bridge.
The fighting ended when at least seven armored personnel
carriers sped across the bridge, chasing away the Morsi sup-
porters. Young civilians jumped onto the roofs of the APCs,
shouting insults at the Islamists and chanting, “The people
and army are one hand.”
More clashes erupt in Egypt
REUTERS
Pro- and anti-Mohammed Morsi protesters clash near Tahrir
Square in Cairo. Islamist allies of ousted president Mursi called
on people to protest on Friday to express outrage at his
overthrow by the army and to reject a planned interim gov-
ernment backed by their liberal opponents.
OPINION 9
Weekend • July 6-7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Clarification on
abortion foes story
Editor,
For clarification purposes, I wanted to
let you know that the photographs
used by Mr. Foti are not of aborted fe-
tuses as he claims, but are instead
photographs of stillborn babies (“For-
mer mayor power washes abortion
foes,” in the July 2 edition of the Daily
Journal).
You can imagine the respect he must
feel for women who have lost their ba-
bies, only to have them used as hideous
and shocking images for his propa-
ganda. As for his eyes hurting, you can
bet there will be a lawsuit — he loves
to sue. I used to stand across the street
from him at Planned Parenthood in San
Mateo, to assist women into the clinic.
He has peculiar ways of getting hurt —
by bumping into you and then crying
assault and battery. Mr. Foti loves to
talk about himself too. I think it would
be a great story if someone did a biog-
raphy on him and published it in the
local news.
Cynthia Cornell
Burlingame
The real scary monster
Editor,
Mike Caggiano, in his letter that sup-
posedly celebrates our Independence
Day, calls the Israel lobby a “scary
monster” (“Israel and our independence
day” in the July 4 edition of the Daily
Journal). He further accuses Israel of
poking U.S. officials in the eye for
continued settlement activities. How-
ever, Caggiano misses the point. The
really scary monster is what would re-
sult if Israel wasn’t there as we know it.
Today, as the Arab world is shaken by
yet more turmoil as the Egyptian mili-
tary overthrows yet another autocratic
ruler and chaos reins almost everywhere
else, Israel remains the only stable
democracy in the area. In fact, the pos-
sibility of democracy taking root
anywhere else in the region in any sem-
blance like the one we celebrate today
is almost inconceivable. Israel is a true
friend to the United States, has always
been so and will always be. Sometimes
friends disagree — so what?
If Caggiano pines for a one-state solu-
tion that includes a so-called right of
return for the Palestinians, then it
spells the end of the region’s only Jew-
ish state, only democracy and only true
friend the United States has there. Just
imagine the area ruled by Hamas insteas
— yikes, now that’s really scary!
The settlements aren’t the issue, which
is neighborhood acceptance of Israel’s
right to exist as a Jewish state. Every-
thing else is a shell game. Israel has
already ceded land for peace and would
do so again. As I celebrate the Fourth of
July, I also celebrate the only stable
democratic friend we have in the neigh-
borhood — Israel.
Ron Kramer
Palo Alto
‘If the shoe fits’
Editor,
I just finished reading Michelle Du-
rand’s column, “If the shoe fits,” in the
June 14 edition of the Daily Journal.
What a laughable column that is!
It is very sad that a person was killed
by a woman’s shoe. But, the rest of the
column is so funny I think most read-
ers, like me, enjoyed Durnad’s column
for her clever choice of words.
Julia M. Bath
San Carlos
Letters to the editor
The Sacramento Bee
T
he 1960 California Master
Plan for Higher Education cre-
ated a landmark contract
between the state and its citizens:
Every Californian qualified for entry
would have a seat in one of the
Golden State’s three higher education
systems.
But after a decade on the financial
chopping block and faced with ever-
present budget gaps, what happens
when the state is increasingly taken
out of the equation?
Last week it was learned that
University of California President
Mark Yudof had granted approval for
the UCLAAnderson School of
Management’s flagship MBApro-
gram to move from a state-supported
funding model to a self-supported
one, where student tuition would
cover the entire cost of the program.
The world will not end with this
one shift at the Anderson school,
which only gets 6 percent of its
budget from the state. But it is part
of a larger trend that should concern
everyone who cares about
California’s institutions of higher
learning. Anderson’s M.B.A. pro-
gram is the largest professional
program both in terms of enroll-
ment and the size of its budget to
move to a self-supported standing.
It marks another step down the path
of what former UC Berkeley
Chancellor Robert Birgeneau
described as UC’s transformation
from a “state-supported” to a “state-
located” university.
UCLA’s announcement came only a
day before Gov. Jerry Brown signed
into law a state budget that included a
5 percent increase to the UC system,
which allowed the university to
extend its one-year undergraduate
tuition freeze for another year.
While the university still faces
significant budget challenges, the
timing of Yudof’s decision sends a
mixed message to students, families
and faculty. One the one hand, uni-
versity officials complain about
inadequate support from the public
and Legislature. Yet right after state
leaders and taxpayers have stepped
up to increase that support, the uni-
versity allows another professional
program to separate itself from the
state, using the excuse of shaky state
support to justify such shifts.
It should be remembered that tax-
payer dollars helped build institu-
tions such as the Anderson school.
Continued public support helps
ensure the school remains focused on
service to California, as opposed to
service to alumni and corporations
that contribute to the school.
It would be a vote of confidence in
the state for the UC to hold back on
further moves towards privatization.
It also should reassess some of the
revenue-generating moves it made
during tight times, such aggressive
recruitment of foreign students will-
ing to pay out-of-state tuition.
While the latest budget begins to
reverse some of the dramatic cuts of
the past, the governor and state leg-
islators must ensure that plans for
multi-year funding increases are hon-
ored in years to come. And the uni-
versity needs to do its part by using
restraint in spinning off parts of the
university into self-supporting sub-
sidiaries.
Will UC march down path of privatization?
Independence
By Chuck McDougald
O
n Independence Day, I joined my friends from
American Legion Post 82 to host a carnival at the
V.A. Hospital in Menlo Park for our sick and injured
veterans and their families. There was plenty of food and
entertainment. The families, particularly the children,
enjoyed themselves. This celebration reinforced why I am
glad to live in the land of the free, and the home of the brave.
We celebrate the adoption of the Declaration of
Independence just as Founder John Adams
suggested in a letter to his wife Abigail,
“It ought to be commemorated, as the
Day of Deliverance by solemn Acts of
Devotion to God Almighty. It ought to be
solemnized with Pomp and Parade, with
Shews, Games, Sports, Guns, Bells,
Bonfires and Illuminations from one End
of this Continent to the other from this
Time forward forever more.”
It wouldn’t be a bad idea to grab a cold beverage, find some
shade, sit down and re-read the Declaration of Independence
to understand why John Adams thought it ought to be com-
memorated with “Acts of Devotion to God Almighty” and
“Bonfires and Illuminations.”
The second paragraph grabs you and won’t let go: “We hold
these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal,
that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalien-
able Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the pur-
suit of Happiness.”
And, the ringing conclusion, “We mutually pledge to each
other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor,” still send
shivers up my spine.
Those were tough times 237 years ago. King George did
not tolerate such disobedience. The slightest display of disre-
spect could bring a public flogging, imprisonment, torture,
or, worse, hanging. So, woe be to the signers of this docu-
ment. Yet, these brave men did not hesitate. They had the
courage to stand up for what they believed in, and they did
what they thought was right.
I remember a time when living in the land of the free and
home of the brave seemed like a cruel joke to me. Discharged
from the Army in June 1969, I flew home to Georgia. Ahip-
pie spat on my boots in the airport and called me a baby
killer. That shocked me. I had just returned from Vietnam. I
knew the war was unpopular, but I did not anticipate the
hatred most people exhibited toward those in uniform. Only
the intercession of two Marines prevented me from hurting
this greasy-haired excuse of a human being.
That was enough. I went home and told my mom I could
not stay here. Two weeks later, I was gone. I lived in Asia for
the next 14 years.
In 1976, I was living in Manila. Americans living there
celebrated on July 4, but not in a big way. I missed the home-
town celebrations of my youth, particularly since I was liv-
ing in a country ruled by an authoritarian strongman. Afriend
called. It was the 200th anniversary of the signing. He was a
member of the Golden Knights, the elite skydiving team of
the U.S. Army. They were going to New York and perform a
free-fall exhibition at the Statue of Liberty.
He wanted me to join him and the guys for beers. I
declined. I wasn’t ready. It would take a while longer for me
to recuperate. However, I did see him perform on television.
It was a glorious celebration of our nation’s independence
and the American ideals contained in the declaration.
I finally came home in 1982. In hindsight, I am sorry I
missed that day and all of the other Independence Day cele-
brations. I understand now that Vietnam was an unpopular
war. And I understand why, when all of us came home, there
was no parade.
Our country has changed much since those dark days of
1969. Our military men and women are supported by our citi-
zens, as shown by the 50,000 fans standing and cheering the
Salute to Armed Forces at a recent San Jose Earthquakes
game. It is great to see veterans being honored, rather than
spat on.
So, after a brief respite, my love affair with America con-
tinues. And once again, I am proud to say that I live in the
land of the free and the home of the brave.
But we must not forget — on this day — the cost of our
independence; we must never forget that freedom isn’t free.
Chuck McDougald headed the Veterans Coalition, first for
California, then for the Western Region, when Sen. John
McCain ran for president in 2008. In 2010, he served as
Statewide Volunteer Chair for Carly Fiorina’s campaign for the
U.S. Senate. He is currently the Western Region director for
ConcernedVeteransforAmerica.org. He lives in South San
Francisco with his wife and two kids.
Other voices
Guest
perspective
Follow us on Twitter and Facebook:
facebook.com/smdailyjournal
twitter.com/smdailyjournal
Onlineeditionat scribd.com/smdailyjournal
OUR MISSION:
It is the mission of the Daily Journal to be the most
accurate, fair and relevant local news source for
those who live, work or play on the MidPeninsula.
By combining local news and sports coverage,
analysis and insight with the latest business,
lifestyle, state, national and world news, we seek to
provide our readers with the highest quality
information resource in San Mateo County.
Our pages belong to you, our readers, and we
choose to reflect the diverse character of this
dynamic and ever-changing community.
SMDAILYJOURNAL.COM
Jerry Lee, Publisher
Jon Mays, Editor in Chief
Nathan Mollat, Sports Editor
Erik Oeverndiek, Copy Editor/Page Designer
Nicola Zeuzem, Production Manager
Kerry McArdle, Marketing & Events
Michelle Durand, Senior Reporter
REPORTERS:
Julio Lara, Heather Murtagh, Bill Silverfarb
Susan E. Cohn, Senior Correspondent: Events
BUSINESS STAFF:
Charlotte Andersen Charles Gould
Gale Green Kathleen Magana
Kevin Smith Leah Staver
INTERNS, CORRESPONDENTS, CONTRACTORS:
Paniz Amirnasiri Carly Bertolozzi
Elizabeth Cortes Rachel Feder
Darold Fredricks Natalia Gurevich
Ashley Hansen Tom Jung
Jason Mai Jeff Palter
Nick Rose Andrew Scheiner
Sally Schilling Kris Skarston
Samantha Weigel Chloee Weiner
Sangwon Yun
Letters to the Editor
Should be no longer than 250 words.
Perspective Columns
Should be no longer than 600 words.
• Illegibly handwritten letters and anonymous letters
will not be accepted.
• Please include a city of residence and phone number
where we can reach you.
• Emailed documents are preferred:
letters@smdailyjournal.com
• Letter writers are limited to two submissions a
month.
Opinions expressed in letters, columns and
perspectives are those of the individual writer and do
not necessarily represent the views of the Daily Journal
staff.
Correction Policy
The Daily Journal corrects its errors.
If you question the accuracy of any article in the Daily
Journal, please contact the editor at
news@smdailyjournal.com
or by phone at: 344-5200, ext. 107
Editorials represent the viewpoint of the Daily Journal
editorial board and not any one individual.
BUSINESS 10
Weekend • July 6-7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 15,135.84 +147.29 10-Yr Bond 2.73 +0.22
Nasdaq3479.38 +35.71 Oil (per barrel) 103.22
S&P 500 1631.89 +16.48 Gold 1223.20
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Friday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Abercrombie & Fitch Co., up $1.69 at $49.24
A Jefferies analyst reiterated his “Buy”rating on the teen retailer’s stock
saying that it may benefit from cost-cutting measures.
ManpowerGroup Inc., up $2.14 at $56.79
Shares of the staffing company rose after the Labor Department’s said
that U.S. employers added 195,000 jobs in June.
Barrick Gold Corp., down 93 cents at $13.76
Shares of the Toronto-based gold and copper seller and producer
dropped as gold prices fell sharply.
Nasdaq
Linn Energy LLC, up 66 cents at $23.45
Shares of the oil and gas company rose,halting a slide after it announced
earlier this week that it was being investigated by the SEC.
Netflix Inc., up $4.19 at $225.10
Shares of the online streaming service have more than doubled since the
beginning of the year as it signed more deals with studios.
Arena Pharmaceuticals Inc., down 16 cents at $7
Shares of the drug developer hit a 52-week low Friday. The company’s
weight-loss drug became available for sale in June in the U.S.
World Acceptance Corp., down $10.51 at $78.19
The subprime consumer lender said that it didn’t complete its latest
annual report citing problems with allowance for loan losses.
SunPower Corp., up $2.27 at $24.43
Shares of the solar power company hit a 52-week high Friday.The stock
has more than quadrupled since the beginning of the year.
Big movers
By Christina Rexrode
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Stocks ended with a
surge Friday after traders decided that a
healthy job market mattered more than
the Federal Reserve scaling back its
economic stimulus.
After the government reported strong
hiring for June, traders and investors
struggled over how to react. At first,
they pushed stocks higher because the
report was better than expected. Then
they pushed stocks lower because
improved hiring last month made it
more likely the Federal Reserve could
ease back on its bond buying.
After waffling early, investors and
traders finally settled on an optimistic
outlook. The Standard & Poor’s 500
had its strongest performance in three
weeks.
“In general, I think our economy is
standing on its own two feet right
now,” said David Brown, chief market
strategist at Sabrient, a Santa Barbara,
Calif., research firm for institutional
investors.
U.S. stock indexes shot higher when
the market opened, fueled by the Labor
Department’s report that the U.S. econ-
omy added a stronger-than-expected
195,000 jobs last month. But the
gains tapered off within the hour, and
all the major indexes dipped briefly
into the red.
By the end of the day, the three main
U.S. indexes had more than recovered,
each ending about 1 percent higher.
The Dow Jones industrial average
rose 147.29 points to 15,135.84. The
S&P 500 rose 16.48 points to
1, 631. 89. The Nasdaq composite
climbed 35.71 to 3,479.38.
“I think the initial reaction was,
‘Yay, all these people are employed,
and then, ‘whoops,”’ Brown said, dur-
ing late-morning trading.
The whiplash day illustrated the com-
plex and outsized role that the Fed has
played in the stock market in recent
weeks.
The Federal Reserve, led by Chairman
Ben Bernanke, has been propping up
the economy by buying bonds and
keeping interest rates low. Investors
know that the Fed isn’t going to con-
tinue the stimulus forever, but they
worry that developments like Friday’s
positive jobs report could make the Fed
yank away the stimulus too soon.
The jobs picture “gives Bernanke
more of a mandate” to rein in Fed stim-
ulus programs, Brown said.
Investors will get other clues about
the economy next week, when earnings
season starts. Aluminum giant Alcoa
reports second-quarter results after the
market closes Monday
As investors bought stocks, they
sold bonds Friday, another sign that
they think the Fed will tamp down its
bond buying. The yield on the 10-year
Treasury note jumped dramatically to
2.73 percent from late Wednesday’s
level of 2.51 percent. That was the
highest yield for the 10-year note since
August 2011.
Relatively few shares changed hands
Friday because many traders were still
on vacation after the Fourth of July
holiday Thursday. Light volume may
have contributed to the market’s early
volatility. The market can be moved by
changes in even a relatively small num-
bers of shares.
Traders also noted that U.S. stock
indexes were playing catch-up after
missing out on Europe’s big gains
Thursday.
Jobs report sends stocks up
By Christopher S. Rugaber
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — U.S. employers are sending a message of
confidence in the economy — hiring more workers, raising pay
and making the job market appear strong enough for the Federal
Reserve to slow its bond purchases as early as September.
The economy gained a robust 195,000 jobs in June and many
more in April and May than previously thought. The unemploy-
ment rate remained 7.6 percent in June because more people
started looking for jobs — a healthy sign — and some didn’t find
them. The government doesn’t count people as unemployed
unless they’re looking for work.
The Labor Department’s report Friday pointed to a U.S. job
market that’s showing surprising resilience in the face of tax
increases, federal spending cuts and economic weakness over-
seas. Employers have added an average 202,000 jobs for the past
six months, up from 180,000 in the previous six.
The job growth is being fueled in part by consumer spending
and the housing recovery. Consumer confidence has reached a 5
1/2 year high and is helping drive up sales of homes and cars.
Hiring was especially strong in June among retailers, hotels,
restaurants, construction companies and financial services firms.
“The numbers that we’re seeing are more sustainable than we
thought,” said Paul Edelstein, U.S. economist at IHS Global
Insight, a forecasting firm. “We’re seeing better job numbers,
the stock market is increasing and home prices are rising.”
Average pay also rose sharply last month. It’s exceeded infla-
tion this year after barely keeping pace since the Great
Recession ended four years ago. Average hourly pay rose 10
cents in June to $24.01. Over the past 12 months, it’s risen 2.2
percent. Over the same period, consumer prices have increased
1.4 percent.
Stocks surged Friday. The Dow Jones industrial average jumped
147 points, nearly 1 percent. The yield on the 10-year Treasury
note soared to 2.73 percent, its highest point since August 2011,
from 2.51 percent late Wednesday. That’s a sign that investors
think the economy is improving and that the Fed will slow its
bond buying this year. If it did, long-term rates would likely rise.
Among the employers benefiting from Americans’ continued
willingness to spend is Carlisle Wide Plank Floors, based in
Stoddard, N.H. Carlisle makes hardwood flooring used in stores,
restaurants and hotels. CEO Michael Stanek said orders jumped
30 percent in the first quarter compared with a year earlier.
The company is hiring factory, sales and administrative
employees to meet the higher demand. Carlisle expects to add
about 15 employees this year to its 85-person workforce.
Friday’s report showed that the U.S. economy added 70,000
more jobs in April and May than the government had previously
estimated — 50,000 in April and 20,000 in May.
The Fed has been buying $85 billion in Treasury and mortgage
bonds each month since late last year. The purchases pushed
long-term interest rates to historic lows, fueled a stock rally and
encouraged consumers and businesses to borrow and spend. The
low rates have helped support an economy that’s had to absorb
government spending cuts and a Social Security tax increase
that’s shrunk paychecks this year.
U.S. economy
adds 195K jobs
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court’s
landmark ruling on same-sex marriage
has private employers around the country
scrambling to make sure their employee
benefit plans comply with the law.
The impact of the decision striking
down part of the federal Defense of
Marriage Act is clear in the 13 states and
the District of Columbia where gay mar-
riage is currently legal or soon will be:
Same-sex married couples must be treated
the same as other spouses under federal
laws governing tax, health care, pen-
sions and other federal benefits.
But employee benefit experts say the
effect of the ruling remains murky in the
other 37 states. The court left intact
another provision of the federal anti-gay
marriage law that allows one state not to
recognize a same-sex marriage performed
elsewhere.
“What’s the federal government going
to do when you have a valid marriage in
New York and the couple moves to Texas?
We don’t know the answer to that,” said
Scott Macey, president of the ERISA
Industry Committee that represents large
employers.
The confusion is creating uncertainty
for many companies that operate nation-
wide and want to administer benefit plans
in a uniform manner.
“My members are all across the coun-
try,” Macey said. “Most, if not all of
them, would prefer to have a consistent
rule across the country. They don’t want
to worry about changing things from
state to state.”
For workers living in states that have
legalized same-sex marriage, the Supreme
Court’s decision means gay spouses are
entitled to a host of benefits they were
denied previously. The decision extends
pension and Social Security survivor
benefits to same-sex spouses, grants
equal access to the Family and Medical
Leave Act and gives employees married to
same-sex spouses the guarantee of unin-
terrupted health care coverage under the
federal COBRAhealth benefits program.
Same-sex couples can also get the same
tax break on health coverage that other
couples have been receiving. Before the
court’s ruling, same-sex spouses covered
by employer health plans had to pay
taxes on the benefits they received,
which on average added up to an extra
$1,000 year. And employees now will be
able to seek reimbursement from flexible
health spending accounts for the medical
expenses of gay spouses.
Same-sex ruling has employers tweaking benefits
<< Oakland pitching shines in K.C., page 14
• Things are heating up in France, page 13
Weekend, July 6-7, 2013
MEN’S FINAL: IT’S NO. 1 VS. NO. 2 FOR THE WIMBLEDON CHAMPIONSHIP >> PAGE 13
ANDRE
the giant
Warriors clear cap space, sign All-Star forward
By Antonio Gonzalez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — The Golden State
Warriors have landed a coveted free
agent — just not the one every-
body was talking about.
The Warriors reached an agree-
ment with swingman Andre
Iguodala on a $48 million, four-
year deal Friday, two people with
knowledge of the situation said.
The people spoke on condition
of anonymity to The Associated
Press because NBA rules prevent
confirmation of moves until July
10. One said the Warriors cleared
more than $24 million in salary
cap space by sending Richard
Jefferson, Andris Biedrins and
Brandon Rush to the Utah Jazz
along with unspecified draft picks.
Yahoo Sports, which first
reported the deal, said the Warriors
were only taking back Kevin
Murphy and his non-guaranteed
$788,000 deal for next season.
While the Warriors had hoped to
sign Dwight Howard, the team was
informed by the seven-time All-
Star he would not be signing with
them. Instead, Golden State
unloaded its expiring contracts for
what it believes was the next best
player on the market.
The complicated moves give the
rejuvenated franchise, fresh off an
appearance in the second round of
the playoffs and with a stockpile
of promising young talent, a
potent scorer and perimeter
defender to team with point guard
See ANDRE, Page 14
By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The San Jose Sharks started the
free agency period Friday by
focusing on their own players,
signing restricted free agent for-
ward Tyler Kennedy to a two-year
contract, re-signing unrestricted
free agent defenseman Scott
Hannan to a one-year deal and for-
mally announcing a five-year con-
tract with star center Logan
Couture.
With little room under the
shrinking salary cap and an under-
whelming free-agent class, gener-
al manager Doug Wilson tried to
keep together as much as possible
of the group that went to Game 7
of the second round before losing
to Los Angeles.
“We’re trying to continue on
what we began at the trade deadline
or just prior to it of maintaining
our identity of attacking with
speed,” Wilson said. “Everybody
that we added or re-signed or
brought back kind of meshes in
with that.”
Kennedy, acquired during the
draft from Pittsburgh for a second-
round pick, will get $4.7 million
over two years. Hannan, brought
back at the trade deadline for a sec-
ond stint in San Jose, received a
$1 million contract.
Couture signed a $30 million
deal that keeps him from being a
restricted free
agent next sum-
mer and buys
out three years
of unrestricted
free agency
while keeping
him under con-
tract through
2018-19. He
also has a lim-
ited no-trade clause.
“I want to be with the Sharks for
a long time,” Couture said. “The
five-year extension was some-
thing myself and the Sharks were
both comfortable with. We went
from there and the deal came
together really quickly. It was very
easy to do. I want to be in San Jose
and they know that. From what I
picked up, they want me out there.
It was very easy. ”
Sharks sign D Scott Hannan, F Tyler Kennedy
See SHARKS Page 14
Logan Couture
By Joe Kay
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CINCINNATI — The Reds and
Giants were exploring numerous
options Friday for making up their
rained-out game in Cincinnati,
including the possibility of play-
ing it on the road.
Day-long rain forced the teams to
call off the final game of their series
scheduled for
Thursday after-
noon. It was
San Francisco’s
only trip into
town.
The teams
share an off day
on Aug. 29,
their only break in long stretches
of games. Manager Dusty Baker
said Friday that the teams are
exploring three or four different
scenarios, including the possibili-
ty of playing the makeup in
Colorado or as part of a doublehead-
er in San Francisco.
“There is no easy solution to
this,” Baker said. “I’m sure this is
not the only time it’s going to hap-
pen to somebody with the sched-
ule.”
The packed schedule is the prob-
lem.
The 29th of August is the only
time the Reds and Giants share a day
off. Both teams would prefer to
keep that day free. The defending
NL Central champion Reds play 20
days in a row before that day off,
followed by 13 consecutive days.
Adding a game on the 29th would
have them playing for 34 straight
days — a tough thing late in the
season.
Giants explore
make-up game
dates, options
See GIANTS Page 14
Giants and
Dodger renew
the rivalry
Page 15
GAME DAY
DAILY JOURNAL ILLUSTRATION
12
Weekend • July 6-7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DO YOU HAVE KNEE PAIN?
Experience relief with advanced, non-surgical treatments.
Do you wake up with knee
pain?
Does knee pain limit your
level of activity?
Has your doctor
recommended surgery?
Do you have pain when
walking up or down stairs?
Have you run out of options
to relieve your pain?
If you answered yes to
any of these questions,
you are a candidate
for our non-invasive
treatment program.
Meet Dr. Brian Mitchell
Millions of individuals give up their
active lifestyle to knee pain because
they feel they are too young for major
surgery. I am here to tell you there’s an
effective and FDA approved alternative
to surgery. If you suffer from any de-
gree of knee pain, I invite you to regain
control of your life by visiting our state
of the art facility.
How Do We Treat Knee Pain?
We use a non-invasive, multi-disciplin-
ary approach to provide complete care
and dramatically improve patient’s
results. We customize our treatment
programs for every individual. This
may include visco-supplementation to
lubricate the joint, individualized reha-
bilitation to strengthen the muscles
surrounding the injury, or bracing for
stabilization and support.
What Is visco-
supplementation?
Visco-supplementation, also
known as joint therapy, supple-
ments the knee with a natural
occurring substance called hyal-
uronic acid that is often deficient
in arthritic knees. This lubricates
the knee joint to reduce friction
between the bones of the knee to
provide significant pain relief.
Why is individualized reha-
bilitation Important?
The muscles surrounding the
injury can become weak and stiff
making it difficult to do everyday
tasks. Individualized rehabilita-
tion reduces inflammation and
increases range of motion, flex-
ibility and strength.
Will I feel better right away?
Most patients feel relief in a matter
of weeks and can go back to their
daily activities.
Will insurance cover
the cost?
Yes, most insurance providers and
Medicare will cover treatment upon
approval of your benefits.
Are the treatments
successful?
We’ve treated thousands of patients
and over 90% have experienced
significant pain relief and regained
mobility.
How will I know if this
is right for me?
If you’re suffering from knee pain,
your first step is an evaluation with
Dr. Brian Mitchell our Board Certi-
fied Physical Medicine and Rehabili-
tation doctor.
What are patients saying?
I arrived to my first appointment in a wheelchair because I couldn’t bear any weight on my right
leg. The physician and therapists worked together to create a plan specifically for me. I quickly
progressed from a wheelchair, to a walker, to a cane, to full weight on my leg. The treatments and
one-on-one rehabilitation gave me my life back. – Diana V., Huntington Beach, CA
Accredited by: Emere Medical Professional Corporation
Call today to schedule an evaluation
650-458-4248
Dr. Brian Mitchell, D.O.
101 S. San Mateo Dr. #202 º San Mateo
Factors That Cause
Osteroarthritis:
t8FJHIU
t"HF
t1SFWJPVTJOKVSZUPUIFKPJOU
t(FOFUJDGBDUPST
What To Consider
Before You Have Surgery:
t*TUIFSFBOBMUFSOBUJWFUPTVSHFSZ
t8JMM*NJTTUJNFGSPNXPSL
t8JMMNZJOTVSBODFDPWFSBMMUIFDPTU
t8IBUJTUIFSFDPWFSZUJNF
GRAND
OPENING
$BMMGPSB
BQQPJOUNFOU
650-458-4248
SPORTS 13
Weekend • July 6-7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
S.A.M S A M
1940 Lesl i e St. , San Mateo, CA 94403
Sam
Tsang
Grand Opening!
92
101
Hillsdale
Shopping
Center
Hillsdale
Caltrain
Station
We are Here!
S El Camino Real
West
East
South North
$12.00
Eat Lunch Downtown and
get your Hair Cut!
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
SAIGON BARBER SHOP
35 South B Street / 1st Ave.
(Next to China Bee)
Downtown San Mateo 94401
(650)340-8848
Mention this ad- Daily Journal Special
MENS
HAIRCUT (reg.$14)
by
Special:
4 Speakers
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON — For 368 points, for
five sets, for a record 4 hours, 43 min-
utes — most quite marvelous, all with
a berth in the Wimbledon final at stake
— Novak Djokovic and Juan Martin
del Potro put on a memorable show.
Their baseline
exchanges were
lengthy and
intense, accompa-
nied by loud grunts
of exertion and
exhaustion, punc-
tuated by the thud
of racket string
against tennis ball.
In the end, as he
almost always does lately, Djokovic
displayed the stamina and fortitude to
win a long-as-can-be match, edging
del Potro 7-5, 4-6, 7-6 (2), 6-7 (6), 6-
3 Friday to close in on a second
Wimbledon championship and sev-
enth Grand Slam title overall.
“Unbelievable to watch,” said del
Potro.
“Draining,” said Djokovic, who has
won 10 of his last 12 five-setters.
“One of the most exciting matches
I’ve ever played in my life.”
Folks around here felt just as
euphoric about Friday’s second semifi-
nal, even if it was far less competitive
or compelling. Britain has waited 77
years for one of its own to claim the
men’s trophy at Wimbledon, and for
the second consecutive year, Andy
Murray is one victory away. He came
back from a set down, then a break
down in the third, and got past 24th-
seeded Jerzy Janowicz of Poland 6-7
(2), 6-4, 6-4, 6-3 in a match that con-
cluded with Centre Court’s retractable
roof shut.
“I was very
relieved after the
semis last year,
whereas this year
... I was a bit hap-
pier,” said Murray,
who lost to seven-
time champion
Roger Federer in
the 2012 final.
“I’ll be probably
in a better place mentally. I would
hope so, just because I’ve been there
before.”
On Sunday, the top-ranked Djokovic
faces No. 2 Murray, the third time in
the past four Grand Slam tournaments
they will meet in the final. The excep-
tion was last month’s French Open,
which Murray skipped because of a
bad back.
Last September, Murray defeated
Djokovic in five sets at the U.S. Open
to earn the first major title anywhere
for a British man since Fred Perry at
that tournament in 1936 — months
after Perry’s historic win at
Wimbledon. In January, Djokovic
beat Murray at the Australian Open.
Now they’ll settle things at the All
England Club.
Born a week apart in May 1987, and
with similar styles that rely on terrific
returning and successful defense at the
baseline, they are creating a growing
rivalry, one that could someday
belong alongside Djokovic vs. Rafael
Nadal, and Nadal vs. Federer. Federer,
Nadal and Djokovic divvied up 31 of
the last 33 Grand Slam titles. The
exceptions were at Flushing
Meadows, for Murray in 2012, and del
Potro in 2009.
On Friday, with the temperature in
the 70s and the court bathed in sun-
light, Djokovic and del Potro pro-
duced a contest worthy of two major
champions — the longest semifinal,
by time, in Wimbledon history.
Theirs also was the first Wimbledon
semifinal in the 45-year Open era
between two men who hadn’t dropped
a set in the tournament.
Del Potro won the last time they
played, in March, and also the only
other time they faced each other at the
All England Club, for the bronze
medal at last year’s London Olympics.
But neither of those was at a Grand
Slam, and Djokovic plays his best
when the stage is the biggest.
A harbinger of things to come, the
first set was as tight as could be for 11
1/2 games and 52 minutes, packed
with thunderous strokes by both men
— the crowd gasped loudly at some of
the hardest — and Djokovic’s trade-
mark scrambling, sliding defense.
No. 1 Djokovic to face No. 2 Murray
Andy Murray Novak Djokovic
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — An already
troubled America’s Cup took a wacky
tack Friday when Luna Rossa threat-
ened to sit out the opening race of the
challenger series, prompting the boss
of the American defender to call the
Italians “a bunch of spoiled rich kids
dressed in Prada gear. ”
It just wouldn’t be an America’s Cup
without a controversy and some smack
talk.
The only difference this time is the
tiff has its roots in changes made fol-
lowing the death of British sailor
Andrew “Bart” Simpson on May 9 in
the capsize of Artemis Racing’s 72-
foot catamaran.
That accident led regatta director
Iain Murray to make 37 safety recom-
mendations, including changes to the
rudders that he says will make the
high-performance, 72-foot catama-
rans more stable, particularly as they
speed downwind riding only on hydro-
foils.
Luna Rossa and Team New Zealand
have protested, saying Murray doesn’t
have the authority to unilaterally
change the rules. They say their boats
were designed and built under the old
rules and they don’t have time to build
new rudders and, perhaps more impor-
tantly, test them. They’ve also said
they feel the change gives an advan-
tage to defending champion Oracle
Team USA, which doesn’t have to race
until the start of the 34th America’s
Cup on Sept. 7.
The opening race of the Louis
Vuitton Cup for challengers is set for
Sunday, between Luna Rossa and Team
New Zealand.
The protest is scheduled to be heard
Monday. Murray said the jury is from
the International Sailing Federation
and sets its own schedule.
Italy threatens to sit out
America’s Cup opener
By Jerome Pugnire
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ALBI, France — When they sit down late on Saturday
afternoon for the ritual they call the “apero” — meaning
nibbles and alcoholic drinks — the French still won’t
know who is going to win their beloved Tour de France this
year.
They, however, might have a much clearer idea of who
won’t win it.
Riders who don’t have the legs to carry them to victory in
Paris, who have been bluffing and pretending to be strong
in the first third of the 2,115-mile Tour, could be cruelly
exposed on Saturday when the race sharply gains altitude in
the Pyrenees mountains where France and Spain meet.
Although the two climbs on the menu aren’t the most bru-
tal of this 100th Tour, they’re still tough enough to make
all but the strongest riders struggle. Just how decisive the
ascents prove will depend on how aggressive, ambitious
and confident the strongest climbers are feeling. If they
want to test overall race favorites Chris Froome and Alberto
Contador, or if those two want to test each other, then Stage
8 offers the first real opportunity for them to do so.
“It depends if people want to hold their cards close to
their chests or if they want to come out swinging,” said
American rider Tejay van Garderen. “I expect for them to
come out swinging, so there should probably be some big
gaps.”
Almost certainly, Daryl Impey’s second day in the race
leader’s yellow jersey on Saturday will be his last, at least
this year. The first South African to wear that prized shirt
doesn’t have the uphill bursts of speed to stay with Froome,
Contador and other contenders for overall victory should
they go at each other like hammer and tongs up to the Col
de Pailheres, immediately followed by a slightly less ardu-
ous ascent to the Ax 3 Domaines ski station.
Impey is convinced Froome will be wearing yellow in
Paris on July 21.
“The climbing ability he’s shown, he’s definitely nearly
in a league of his own. He’s obviously a different climber to
Contador, but I think Chris is going to be hard to beat.”
On a stage that, with the mountains looming, felt like the
calm before a storm, Peter Sagan from Slovakia won the fin-
ishing sprint Friday in Albi, an enchanting medieval city
on the banks of the Tarn river, dominated by its 13th cen-
tury fortified brick-built Sainte-Cecile Cathedral and listed
as a World Heritage site by the United Nations’ cultural
agency, UNESCO. Impey rode strongly to stay in Sagan’s
bunch and keep the race lead he inherited from teammate
Simon Gerrans on Thursday.
Sagan is running away with the Tour’s chase for the green
jersey, awarded to the rider who collects most points from
sprints at the end of stages and during them.
Things get serious
at Tour de France
SPORTS 14
Weekend • July 6-7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Stephen Curry and company. And for
Iguodala, it’s a chance to play with another
contender.
Iguodala averaged 13 points, 5.4 assists
and 5.3 rebounds last season for the Denver
Nuggets, who lost in six games to the
Warriors in the opening round of the play-
offs. He spent his first eight years in the
NBA with the Philadelphia 76ers and has
averaged 15.1 points on 46 percent shoot-
ing for his career.
The Nuggets were hoping to entice
Iguodala to come back to the Mile High
City, especially because he could return on a
five-year deal while the most he could get
elsewhere was four years. The Nuggets
offered Iguodala a five-year deal worth $60
million with $52 million guaranteed, a per-
son familiar with the situation said, adding
that Iguodala would’ve made only $4 mil-
lion in the final year of a frontloaded deal.
Sacramento, led by new general manager
and former Denver executive Pete
D’Alessandro, also sought Iguodala’s serv-
ices. The Kings reportedly offered Iguodala
a four-year deal worth at least $52 million
but pulled the deal when Iguodala didn’t
immediately agree, in part, because they
didn’t want to be used as leverage.
The departure of Denver’s top defender
could be a big blow to a team that won a
franchise-best 57 games during the regular
season only to flop in the first round again.
This already had been a tumultuous offsea-
son for the Nuggets, who had NBA
Executive of the Year Masai Ujiri leave to
take over as general manager in Toronto.
Later, the team severed ties with Coach of
the Year George Karl.
Afew Nuggets players turned to Twitter to
express their feelings on Iguodala’s deci-
sion to bolt for the Warriors.
“It was a pleasure. Great guy!” forward
Wilson Chandler wrote.
Speedy point guard Ty Lawson said:
“Smh!!!!” (shaking my head) and later
added, “Business is business.”
Iguodala even sent a message to Curry
that ended with the phrase, “LETS GET
IT!!!!” Curry responded by saying it would
be a great four years.
Continued from page 11
ANDRE
The Sharks also agreed to a deal with
goalie Alex Stalock, who will compete with
Harri Sateri to be the backup to Antti Niemi.
Last year’s backup, Thomas Greiss, signed
with Phoenix.
The deals leave the Sharks temporarily
over the salary cap, according to
CapGeek.com, but they could get relief if
injured forward Marty Havlat begins the sea-
son on long-term injured reserve after off-
season double sports hernia surgery.
“We will have room and assets to add play-
ers in season,” Wilson said. “One of the
things of a day like today is you can do
some things and add some pieces, but some-
thing has to go out. We don’t want to have a
piece come in that forces a piece out. We’d
rather wait and be patient and add something
that just adds to our team in season.”
The Sharks also announced that Brent
Burns will remain at forward next season. A
former All-Star defenseman, Burns gave San
Jose a big spark last season when he moved
to forward, where he teamed with Joe
Thornton on an effective line that helped
San Jose reach Game 7 against Los Angeles.
Burns had nine goals and 11 assists in 23
regular-season games as a forward and added
two goals and two assist during the play-
offs. Wilson said the move will be at least
for this upcoming season although he envi-
sions Burns still playing the point on the
power play.
“We saw how good he can be and how he
can impact games as a forward,” Wilson
said.
Continued from page 11
SHARKS
The defending World Series champion
Giants play 16 straight days before that one
day off, followed by 17 straight games.
They, too, would wind up playing 34
straight days during the decisive part of the
schedule.
Baker said a long stretch of games like
that could wear down a contending team.
“When you’re out of gas that late in the
year, you don’t get gas back until after the
season,” Baker said.
The Reds conclude a series in St. Louis on
Aug. 28th, then head to Colorado to start a
series on the 30th. The Giants wrap up a
series in Colorado on the 28th, so the teams
are considering playing the makeup game at
Coors Field on the 29th.
That option would eliminate having them
fly back to Cincinnati for one game, then
back out West.
Another option would be to make up the
game as part of a day-night doubleheader in
San Francisco when the Reds visit from July
22-24.
Continued from page 11
GIANTS
A’s triumph in Kansas City
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Tommy Milone
carried a shutout into the ninth inning and
Grant Balfour held on for the save, securing
the Oakland Athletics’ 6-3 victory over the
Kansas City Royals on Friday night.
Milone (8-7) was in complete control
before Alcides Escobar and Eric Hosmer
drove in runs with one out in the ninth.
Balfour came on and gave up a run-scoring
single to Billy Butler, but he managed to
retire Lorenzo Cain and Mike Moustakas to
end the game.
It was the 22nd save of the season and the
40th straight for Balfour, which matched
the Oakland record for consecutive saves set
by Dennis Eckersley from Sept. 15, 1991-
Aug. 7, 1992.
Milone, who had been battered in his last
three starts, outpitched Wade Davis (4-7),
who gave up three runs in seven innings in
a respectable outing of his own.
Josh Reddick doubled, tripled and drove in
a pair of runs for the A’s (51-36), who have
won seven of nine to move a season-best 15
games over .500.
Much of that success has been due to
pitching. The A’s staff went 18 1-3 innings
without allowing a run before the Royals
plated two in the ninth Friday night, and
Milone was two outs shy of racking up the
A’s third shutout in their last eight games.
A.J. Griffin allowed two hits in throwing
his first career shutout last Wednesday
against the Reds. Dan Straily and the
Oakland bullpen beat the Cubs 1-0 on
Thursday.
The recent history for Milone and Davis
pointed to runs-a-plenty on Friday night.
Milone had been pounded in his last three
starts, and Davis was yanked after one-plus
inning last Saturday.
So naturally, the two of them took turns
mowing through hitters.
Milone retired his first 11 batters, and
only twice allowed a ball to get out of the
infield through the first three innings. The
left-hander finally gave up a single to
Hosmer with two outs in the fourth, but that
was it until David Lough’s two-out single in
the sixth.
It was quite the turnaround from his last
three starts, when Milone allowed 14 runs
and 21 hits while failing to make it into the
seventh inning in games against Texas,
Cincinnati and St. Louis — an ugly period
that caused his ERAto balloon from 3.61 to
4.17.
Davis had an even uglier performance his
last time out, when he threw 69 pitches and
allowed six runs and walked five without
getting an out in the second inning against
Minnesota.
The right-hander only needed 10 pitches
to get through the first inning against
Oakland, and Davis set down nine straight
before Reddick’s double in the third. Eric
Sogard came through with a timely single to
shallow left field that gave the scrappy A’s a
1-0 lead.
Davis cruised through the fourth, and then
issued a leadoff walk to John Jaso in the
fifth. Reddick followed with a triple to
right, and he scampered home on Coco
Crisp’s sacrifice fly.
The A’s added three more in the ninth, tak-
ing advantage of an error on right fielder
Lorenzo Cain to score a pair of unearned
runs off J.C. Gutierrez.
The Royals tried to rally behind back-to-
back doubles by Lough and Escobar, and
consecutive singles by Hosmer and Butler.
But the unflappable Balfour managed to get
Cain and Moustakas on harmless ground-
outs.
NOTES: Royals OF Alex Gordon passed
his concussion tests after colliding with the
wall while trying to make a catch
Wednesday night.
ALL ELECTRIC SERVICE™
650-322-9288
FOR ALL YOUR ELECTRICAL NEEDS®
SERVICE CHANGES
SOLAR INSTALLATIONS
LIGHTING / POWER
FIRE ALARM / DATA
GREEN ENERGY
FULLY LICENSED
STATE CERTIFIED
LOCALLY TRAINED
EXPERIENCED
ON CALL 24/7
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
SPORTS 15
Weekend • July 6-7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 49 37 .570 —
Washington 44 42 .512 5
Philadelphia 42 45 .483 7 1/2
New York 36 47 .434 11 1/2
Miami 32 53 .376 16 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Pittsburgh 53 32 .624 —
St. Louis 51 34 .600 2
Cincinnati 49 37 .570 4 1/2
Chicago 36 48 .429 16 1/2
Milwaukee 34 51 .400 19
West Division
W L Pct GB
Arizona 45 41 .523 —
Colorado 42 45 .483 3 1/2
Los Angeles 41 44 .482 3 1/2
San Diego 40 47 .460 5 1/2
San Francisco 39 46 .459 5 1/2
Friday’s Games
Pittsburgh 6, Chicago Cubs 2
Philadelphia 5, Atlanta 4
Washington 8, San Diego 5
Seattle 4, Cincinnati 2
N.Y. Mets 12, Milwaukee 5
St. Louis 4, Miami 1
Arizona 5, Colorado 0
L.A. Dodgers 10, San Francisco 2
Saturday’s Games
Miami (Eovaldi 1-0) at St. Louis (J.Kelly 0-3), 11:15
a.m.
Pittsburgh (Morton 1-1) at Chicago Cubs
(E.Jackson 4-10), 1:05 p.m.
San Diego (Marquis 9-4) at Washington
(Zimmermann 12-3), 1:05 p.m.
Seattle (Bonderman 1-2) at Cincinnati (Latos 7-
2), 1:10 p.m.
Atlanta (Hudson 4-7) at Philadelphia (K.Kendrick
7-5), 4:15 p.m.
East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 54 34 .614 —
Baltimore 48 39 .552 5 1/2
New York 47 39 .547 6
Tampa Bay 47 40 .540 6 1/2
Toronto 42 44 .48811
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 47 38 .553 —
Cleveland 45 41 .523 2 1/2
Kansas City 40 43 .482 6
Minnesota 36 47 .434 10
Chicago 34 49 .410 12
West Division
W L Pct GB
Oakland 51 36 .586 —
Texas 50 36 .581 1/2
Los Angeles 41 45 .477 9 1/2
Seattle 38 48 .442 12 1/2
Houston 31 56 .356 20
Friday’sGames
N.Y.Yankees 3, Baltimore 2
Detroit 7, Cleveland 0
Toronto 4, Minnesota 0
Tampa Bay 8, Chicago White Sox 3
Seattle 4, Cincinnati 2
Texas 10, Houston 5
Oakland 6, Kansas City 3
Boston 6, L.A. Angels 2
Saturday’sGames
Baltimore (Tillman 10-2) at N.Y.Yankees (Pettitte 5-
6), 10:05 a.m.
Minnesota (Pelfrey 3-6) at Toronto (Dickey 8-8),
10:07 a.m.
Oakland (J.Parker 6-6) at Kansas City (E.Santana 5-
5), 11:10 a.m.
AMERICAN LEAGUE NATIONAL LEAGUE
BASEBALL
AmericanLeague
BOSTON RED SOX—Placed SS Stephen Drew on
the15-dayDL(retroactivetoJune29).RecalledRHP
Jose De La Torre from Pawtucket (IL).
CHICAGO WHITE SOX — Designated C Hector
Gimenez for assignment. Optioned OF Jordan
Danks to Charlotte (IL). Recalled C Josh Phegley
and OF Blake Tekotte from Charlotte.
DETROITTIGERS—ReinstatedOFMattTuiasosopo
from the 15-day DL. Optioned OF Avisail Garcia to
Toledo (IL).
HOUSTON ASTROS — Agreed to terms with LHP
Kent Emanuel on a minor league contract.
KANSASCITYROYALS—Requestedunconditional
release waivers on OF Jeff Francoeur.
MINNESOTA TWINS — Designated RHP P.J.Walters
for assignment. Reinstated RHP Mike Pelfrey from
the 15-day DL.
NEW YORK YANKEES — Sent 3B Alex Rodriguez to
Tampa (FSL) for a rehab assignment.
TEXAS RANGERS-Announced that RHP Kyle Mc-
Clellan accepted an outright assignment to Frisco
(SL).
TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Sent 3B Brett Lawrie to
Lansing (MWL) for a rehab assignment.
National League
ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS—Optioned RHP Chaz
Roe and OF Tony Campana to Reno (PCL).Recalled
LHP Tyler Skaggs and RHP Charles Brewer from
Reno.
ATLANTABRAVES—OptionedRHPCoryGearrinto
Gwinnett (IL).Transferred LHP Jonny Venters to the
60-day DL. Reinstated RHP Luis Ayala from the 15-
day DL.
LOS ANGELES DODGERS — Assigned RHP Carlos
Marmol outright to Albuquerque (PCL).Reinstated
OF Carl Crawford from the 15-day DL.Optioned OF
Scott Van Slyke to Albuquerque (PCL).
NEW YORK METS — Recalled RHP Greg Burke and
1B Ike Davis from Las Vegas (PCL).Designated RHP
Brandon Lyon for assignment.
SAN DIEGO PADRES — Optioned RHP Burch Smith
toTucson(PCL).ReinstatedINFEverthCabrerafrom
the 15-day DL.
SANFRANCISCOGIANTS—CalledupOFColeGille-
spie from Fresno (PCL).Optioned OF Juan Perez to
Fresno.Transferred OF Angel Pagan to the 60-day
DL.
TRANSACTIONS
Giants romped by Dodgers
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Juan Uribe
matched his career high with seven
RBIs, helping the Los Angeles
Dodgers rout the struggling San
Francisco Giants 10-2 on Friday
night.
Uribe chased Matt Cain with a
bases-clearing triple in the third
and also had a two-run homer in
the seventh. He also had seven
RBIs in a 2004 game when he
played for the Montreal Expos.
The Dodgers won for the 11t h
time in 13 games. Hanley Ramirez
had two hits to extend his hitting
streak to 16 games, and Hyun-Jin
Ryu pitched into the seventh
inning in his first win since May
28.
There was a bit of a downer to the
big victory, with center fielder
Matt Kemp departing due to an irri-
tated left shoulder.
San Francisco also lost its cen-
ter fielder when Andres Torres
departed with a right calf strain.
The Giants have dropped four
straight and 12 of 14. Hunter
Pence and Tony Abreu each drove
in a run for the World Series cham-
pions.
Cain (5-5) was charged with six
runs and eight hits in 2 1-3
innings, matching his career low.
The right-hander was 5-0 in his
previous 11 starts against the
Dodgers.
Ryu (7-3) allowed two runs and
four hits over 6 2-3 innings. The
left-hander was 0-1 with a 2.70
ERAin his previous five outings.
Ryu retired 11 straight between
Pablo Sandoval’s double in the
third and Brandon Belt’s double
leading off the seventh. He also
had an RBI single in the Dodgers’
six-run third inning.
Pence had a run-scoring fielder’s
choice in the first, but Uribe hit a
two-run double in the second
before Los Angeles broke it open
in the third. Ramirez singled in
Yasiel Puig and A.J. Ellis drove in
Adrian Gonzalez with a base hit in
the big inning.
Uribe’s fifth homer gave him the
most RBIs in a game for the
Dodgers since James Loney drove
in nine in 2006.
Abreu ended the Giants’ 0-for-20
streak with runners in scoring
position with his seventh-inning
single.
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Equity Based Direct Lender
Homes • Multi-Family • Mixed-Use • Commercial
Good or Bad Credit
Purchase / Refinance / Cash Out
Investors Welcome • Loan Servicing Since 1979
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker, CA Dept. of Real Estate #746683
Nationwide Mortgage Licensing System ID #348288 650-348-7191
Easy to Use • Stylish • Comfortable
Offer of Sale
of Historic Structure
for One Dollar ($1.00)
In accordance with Resolution No. 13-06 of the Planning Commission of
the City of Redwood City, the purpose of this notice is to Offer for sale
the historic structure located at 303 Fuller Street in the City of Redwood
City, California for a purchase price of One Dollar ($1.00), subject to the
following general terms and conditions:
1. The offer is valid for a 90 day period (i.e., to September 30, 2013);
2. Buyer must remove and relocate the historic structure (preferably,
but not mandatorily, to a site in the City of Redwood City) at its
sole expense;
Agreemen between Buyer and Seller (Classic RWC 1856, L.P),
a copy of which will made available upon Buyer’s request.
The dwelling is a cross gabled Craftsman Style bungalow constructed about 1922,
rectilinear in plan and sited perpendicular to the street. It is sided with wood shingle
shingled porch supports and rail, and wood porch deck. There are one-over-one square
windows, one side bay window, 2 sets of 3 hopper windows are at the west and north-
west elevations, and a wood vent at the front gable end. A rear free-standing garage is
at the rear of the property. The dwelling is sited on a suburban corner lot with mature
plantings, and fenced with wood posts and twisted wire fencing. The property is intact,
State of California Department of Parks and Recreation Primary Record, dated
February 23, 2005.
Any party interested in purchasing the historic structure based on the general terms
and conditions outlined above should contact Adam Kates, Vice President of Classic
Communities, Inc. at akates@mozartdev.com or 650-213-1120.
REAL ESTATE 16
Weekend • July 7-6, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Sandy Cohen
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — “The Lone
Ranger” seems to be already riding
off into the sunset on its debut
weekend.
The Disney Western starring
Armie Hammer as the titular char-
acter and Johnny Depp as Tonto
was outpaced 3 to 1 by Universal’s
“Despicable Me 2,” which also
opened Wednesday. The animated
sequel collected $59.9 million in
ticket sales so far, while “The
Lone Ranger” earned a paltry
$19.5 million.
While Disney is likely to recov-
er based on its other strong offer-
ings this summer, including
Pixar’s “Monsters University” and
Marvel’s “Iron Man 3,” the
masked man’s dismal box-office
showing may spell trouble for
Depp and all but ends any hope for
a Lone Ranger franchise.
“This is one and done,” said
Stuart Oldham, editor of the indus-
try trade site Variety.com. “You’re
not going to see another Lone
Ranger movie after this.”
It’s a “big disappointment” for
Disney, said media and entertain-
ment analyst Martin Pyykkonen
of Wedge Partners. Although the
film had been set up for a sequel,
“it’s obviously not even going to
come close to covering the pro-
duction costs,” the analyst said.
Years in the making, “Lone
Ranger” filming was shut down for
weeks in 2011 because of soaring
costs that ended up in the $250-
million range.
Poor reviews for the film may
have contributed to the sluggish
ticket sales. Chicago Sun-Times
critic Richard Roeper called it
“slick trash,” while the AP’s Jake
Coyle said the two-and-a-half hour
spectacle “finally, exhaustingly
collapses in a scrap heap of train
wreckage.”
““The Lone Ranger’ is, alas, a
runaway train,” Coyle writes.
It’s a serious misstep for block-
buster producer Jerry Bruckheimer,
director Gore Verbinski and
megastar Depp, who partnered
profitably on the first three
“Pirates of the Caribbean” films.
Depp’s take on Tonto has been
compared unfavorably to Captain
Jack Sparrow in face paint.
“(The studio thought) if we have
Johnny Depp and we transfer him
over to another funny hat and call
him Tonto, we’re going to be OK,
but it’s not OK,” said Gene Del
Vecchio, author of “Creating
Blockbusters.
Part of the problem, he said, is
that children aren’t nearly as
familiar with the Lone Ranger as
they are with the animated charac-
ters in “Despicable Me 2” and last
week’s first-place film, “Monsters
University. ”
“Kids really need to be reintro-
duced to the Lone Ranger,” he said.
“Instead, they were introduced to
Tonto in the marketing.”
The failure of “The Lone
Ranger” could impact studio deci-
sions about what to green-light
going forward, and not just at
Disney.
“From a film-industry stand-
point, when you peel back the
onion, you’re not going to take a
big risk on a big-production film
that doesn’t have a proven fran-
chise,” Pyykkonen said, especial-
ly in light of other recent bombs
including “John Carter, ”
“Battleship” and “After Earth.”
“What’s going to take a hit is
creativity in Hollywood,” Oldham
said. “You’re going to see more
sequels and more remakes after
these big bombs.”
Pyykkonen said the future of the
proven “Pirates” franchise could
even be in question.
“There’s probably going to be
some head-scratching in the
Disney film studio board rooms,”
he said. “Like, ‘We’ve had a few in
a row here that didn’t win at the
box office, do we really want to do
a ‘Pirates’ 5?”
Animation sensation
Travel back to
the old West
Susan Cohn revisits
the California Trail
in Elko, Nev.
SEE PAGE 18
Pixar’s ‘Dispicable Me 2,’ above, trampled Disney’s ‘Lone Ranger’ 3 to 1 at
the box office over the Independence Day holiday.
Shaw heroine inspires new musical,‘A Minister’s Wife’
By Judy Richter
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
Ahusband who deeply loves his
wife and believes his marriage is
secure finds his belief shaken by a
much younger man who also pro-
fesses to love his wife.
That’s the premise of “A
Minister’s Wife,” a 2011 musical
based on “Candida,” a relatively
early play by George Bernard
Shaw.
In this West Coast premiere pre-
sented by San Jose Repertory
Theatre, the husband is the 30-
something Rev. James Morell
(Christopher Vettel), who has
become renowned for his eloquent
lectures about Christian social-
ism.
His wife is Candida (Sharon
Rietkerk), who returns home with
18-year-old poet Eugene
Marchbanks (Tim Homsley) after
being gone for a while. Initially
quite shy, the idealistic Eugene
soon declares his love for Candida
and challenges the practical James
to ask her to choose between
them.
Like many other Shaw heroines,
Candida can be regarded as an early
feminist, a woman who has a
strong sense of herself and easily
asserts herself. She also has a deep
understanding of James and their
marriage.
Set in an English parsonage in
1894, the show includes two other
characters, the Rev. Alexander
“Lexy” Mill (Jarrod Zimmerman),
a young curate who is James’s
assistant; and Miss Proserpine
“Prossy” Garnett (Liz Baltes),
James’ efficient secretary. This
musical version of the play omits
a sixth character, Candida’s father.
Conceived and directed by
Michael Halberstam, the show has
PHOTO COURTESY OF SAN JOSE REPERTORY THEATRE
The Reverend James Mavor Morell (Christopher Vettel), and his wife,
Candida (Sharon Rietkerk), in San Jose Rep's West Coast premiere of A
Minister's Wife. See ‘MINISTER’, Page 19
Walk with a Doc
Walk with a Doc encourages
healthy physical activity for
county residents of all ages.Walk-
ers enjoy one-hour walks with
physician volunteers and can ask
questions about general health
topics along the way. Sponsored
by the San Mateo County Medical
Association’s Community Service
Foundation.The event takes place
10 a.m. Saturday at Red Morton
Community Park,1120 Roosevelt
Ave. in Redwood City. Free.
Musical petting zoo
San Francisco Symphony musi-
cians stage an instrument “petting
zoo”Sunday from noon to 1 p.m.
before its 2 p.m. concert at the
Stern Grove Festival. The 2 p.m.
program includes Gershwin’s “An
American in Paris.” Soprano
Measha Brueggergosman per-
forms Henri Duparc’s “L’invitation
au voyage,”“Phidlylé,”“La vie an-
térieure,” “Au pays où se fait la
guerre,” and Gershwin’s “Em-
braceable You,”“By Strauss,” and
“Summertime.”Concert is free;no
tickets required. It takes place at
Stern Grove, 19th Avenue and
Sloat Boulevard in San Francisco.
Celebrate with
music from The Beatles
The Plastic Onion plays music cel-
ebrating the Beatles as part of the
Belmont Summer Concerts. The
concert is 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday
at Twin Pines Meadow in Belmont.
Admission is free and refresh-
ments will be sold. 595-7441.
Best bets
By Mike Silverman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
KATONAH, N.Y. — It’s been
called the “missing link” among
Giuseppe Verdi’s operas, composed
right after his three mid-career
mega-hits — “Rigoletto,” “Il
Trovatore” and “La Traviata” — and
pointing the way toward the mas-
terpieces of his later years.
Why “missing”? It’s not as if
“Les vepres siciliennes” (“The
Sicilian Vespers”), first performed
in Paris in 1855, was lost or had to
be reconstructed by scholars. Yet,
despite its importance in the Verdi
canon, the opera has remained a
relative rarity.
Now, in the great Italian com-
poser’s bicentennial year, “Les
vepres” is getting renewed atten-
tion, with performances this sum-
mer in Frankfurt, Germany, and at
the Caramoor Festival outside New
York City, plus a much-anticipated
production at London’s Covent
Garden this fall.
“Those three works right before
it are shorter, perfectly propor-
tioned, the summing up of every-
thing he already knew how to do,”
said Will Crutchfield, Caramoor’s
director of opera. “After that, he
felt a need for taking in some other
possibilities.”
Paris in those days represented
the pinnacle of success for an
opera composer, with lucrative
contracts and a history of produc-
tions that were heavy on spectacle,
Verdi gaining
new attention
See VERDI, Page 19
By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL SENIOR CORRESPONDENT
WAGONS, HO: THE WAY WEST UNFOLDS AT THE
CALIFORNIA TRAIL INTERPRETIVE CENTER IN
ELKO, NEV. Modern travelers driving across the United
States pass gas stations, rest stops and restaurants at con-
venient intervals. But in the mid-1800s, westbound pio-
neers who left civilization in Kansas had virtually no
opportunities to resupply, other than what they might get
in Salt Lake City. After that, they faced hundreds of miles of
desert, sagebrush and mountains before reaching California
or Oregon. The California Trail Interpretive Center, just off
Interstate 80 in Elko, Nev., vividly tells of those 1840s and
1850s crossings with a variety of intriguing displays and
dramatic dioramas that depict who these pioneers were,
what prompted them to set out on such a difficult and life-
changing trip, how they prepared for their journey, and
what life on the trail brought them.
Interpretive Park Ranger Mike Blunk said, “Since its
opening in June of 2012, over 20,000 visitors have
enjoyed the exhibits, programs, presentations, and cos-
tumed interpreters at The California Trail Interpretive
Center in Elko, Nev. The exhibits range from a cutaway
‘prairie schooner’ wagon with the necessary items to strike
out on the trail, to an exhibit showing the hardships and
misery at the California gold diggings. Outside, the visi-
tors enjoy a trail wagon encampment, a Shoshone village
and approximately one mile of handicapped accessible hik-
ing trails that lead to beautiful overlooks of the Humboldt
River and the western junction of the Hastings cutoff and
the California trail.”
The California Trail was one of a number of routes created
as people of all ages and backgrounds crossed the plains to
seek new opportunities and a better life. Those trails still
attract thousands of visitors annually. Center Manager Gary
Koy said, “The National Trails System Act designated the
California National Historic Trail and gave the National
Park Service over all jurisdiction over historic trails.
However the Bureau of Land Management manages more
public land in the west than any other agency and many of
the remaining original segments of several National
Historic Trails can be found on BLM land. In addition to the
California Trail Center, the BLM operates the National
Historic Oregon Trail Interpretive Center in Baker City,
Ore. and the National Historic Trails Interpretive Center in
Casper, Wyo., which celebrates the Pony Express Trail, the
Mormon Trail, the Bozeman Trail, the Bridger Trail as well
as the Oregon and California Trails.”
The California Trail Interpretive Center is located on the
north side of Interstate 80 at Hunter Exit 292, eight miles
west of Elko, Nev. Open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., seven days
a week. 3900 E. Idaho St. Elko, Nev. www.californiatrail-
center.org or 775-738-1849.
HAVE YOU SEEN THE ELEPHANT? American pio-
neers talked of the excitement and anticipation of heading
west to “see the elephant.” The expression may have come
from going to the circus in the 1840s when elephants were
a rarity in America. “Seeing the elephant” made the circus
experience complete and so it became a commonly under-
stood way for emigrants to say they had traveled the trail,
and for the lucky ones to say they had completed the jour-
ney. The California Trail Interpretive Center has its own
very special elephant that visitors will certainly want to
see. http://www.californiatrailcenter. org/#/our-ele-
phant/4550047290.
GOOD EATS IN ELKO. Ongi Etorri. Welcome. Sit
down to a family style dinner at The Star Hotel, opened in
1910 as a home away from home for Basques who came to
work as shepherds in the remote areas around Elko. The Star
Hotel is justly famous for its steaks, pork chops and lamb
chops. Loosen your belt, the portions are huge. All entrees
come with homemade soup, tossed green salad, fresh baked
French bread, Basque beans, pasta, vegetables and French-
fried potatoes. Save room for bread pudding, churro sundae
or tiramisu. For the adventuresome: The Star Hotel serves up
“Picon Punch,” a drink most closely associated with the
Basque country. It includes grenadine, club soda, a bit of
brandy and Amer Picon, a bittersweet aperitif made in
France with herbs and a peel of orange. 246 Silver St.,
Elko, Nev. www.elkostarhotel.com.
AND REMEMBER: “Take the regular wagon track and
never leave it.” — James Clyman to the Donner Party,
1846.
Susan Cohn is a member of the North American Travel Journalists
Association and Bay Area Travel Writers
18
Weekend • July 6-7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WEEKEND JOURNAL
EXPIRES: July 31, 2013
JACK’S RESTAURANT & BAR: SAN BRUNO
1050 Admiral Court, Suite A
San Bruno, CA 94066
Phone: (650) 589-2222 | Fax: (650) 589-5042
iLoveJacks.com
As we have just celebrated another 4th of July holiday and the indepen-
dence of our great country, one of the freedoms that we enjoy is the
ability to purchase and own property. This maybe not be the reality in
some countries.
www.UNrealestate.info
A blog dedicated to UNreal events in Real Estate
The UN reality of Homeownership
John King has been serving home sellers and buyers on The Peninsula and Silicon Valley for almost 30 years.
Top 1% of Keller Williams agents.
Although in recent years
home ownership has had a
bumpy road the American
Dream is still alive and
well. The UNreal low
interest rates continue to
support home buying.
This is evidenced by a
significant rebound in
home prices over the last 6
to 12 months. Happy
Birthday America!
SUSAN COHN/DAILY JOURNAL
The California Trail Interpretive Center in Elko, Nev. is located
on the historic California Trail,the route taken by over 250,000
pioneers on their trip across the frontier to the promised lands
of California and Oregon.The facility features trail art, life-size
dioramas and educational programs. Interpretive Center
Ranger Mike Blunk stands before ‘Wagon Full of Hope,”’a dis-
play showing typical emigrant supplies.Blunk holds a block of
tea that would have been among the provisions.
LOCAL/WEEKEND JOURNAL 19
Weekend • July 6-7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
melodic music by Joshua Schmidt, sometimes repetitious
lyrics by Jan Levy Tranen and a strong book by Austin
Pendleton.
In general, it follows the play closely and incorporates
some of Shaw’s dialogue, yet manages to consolidate
everything into 95 minutes with no intermission.
The band also is consolidated with musical director
Dolores Duran-Cefalu conducting a violin, cello and bass
clarinet from the piano. The musicians sit upstage in
Collette Pollard’s elaborate drawing room set (lit by
David Lee Cuthbert).
Everyone in the cast sings and acts well. However,
Homsley’s foppish Eugene slumps, cowers or glares
throughout most of the show, in sharp contrast to James’
forceful bearing. This difference alone could determine
Candida’s decision.
Overall, though, it’s a pleasant, enjoyable production.
“A Minister’s Wife” continues at San Jose Repertory
Theatre, 101 Paseo de San Antonio, San Jose, through
July 14. For tickets and information, call (408) 367-
7255 or visit www.sjrep.com.
Continued from page 17
‘MINISTER’
like Rossini’s “William Tell” and the operas of Giacomo
Meyerbeer.
“He wanted something with big, grandiose effects, and
that’s what he did,” Crutchfield said in an interview after a
rehearsal this week. “And he did a great job of it. The
music is fantastic.”
Indeed it is. Beyond the best-known numbers, like the
heroine’s bolero and “Et toi, Palerme” for the bass, the
entire score teems with inspired arias, duets and ensem-
bles.
Verdi enlisted a frequent Meyerbeer collaborator,
Eugene Scribe, to write the libretto, based on historical
events of the 13th century when the Sicilians rose up to
overthrow their French rulers. Tradition says the rebel-
lion was signaled by the ringing of bells for sunset
prayers known as vespers. In the opera, the bells mark
the wedding of the lovers Helene and Henri, who support
the uprising even though Henri is the son of the French
governor, Montfort.
“I think it’s the most political opera that Verdi wrote,”
said Norbert Abels, chief dramaturg of Oper Frankfurt,
where a new production has been drawing packed houses.
“Sure, there’s a love story, but it’s not the main point.
What the opera really is about is the connection of his-
torical and family catastrophe.”
Verdi was in his early 40s and had composed 19 operas
when he wrote “Les vepres.” After that his output slowed
— in his remaining 45 years, just eight more operas. But
most are on a level surpassing anything he had done
before.
When the Metropolitan Opera first performed “Les
vepres” in 1974 (in Italian as “I Vespri Siciliani,”), crit-
ic Irving Kolodin wrote in The Saturday Review that it
“emerges as . a missing link in the chain between ‘La
Traviata,’ which precedes, and ‘Un Ballo in Maschera,’
which follows.”
Crutchfield agrees, and points to another opera that
“would have been impossible” without “Les vepres” —
“Don Carlos,” which premiered in Paris 12 years later and
is now regarded by many as Verdi’s profoundest work.
Crutchfield will lead a performance of that at Caramoor on
July 20.
Ironically, the very qualities that most drew Verdi to
grand opera are the ones that make “Les vepres” difficult
to perform.
“It’s long, it’s hard, it’s expensive,” Crutchfield said.
“And for every tenor who can sing Henri there are 10 who
can sing Alfredo in ‘Traviata.”’
Still, companies are finding ways. The Covent Garden
production, opening in October, will mark the house
debut of Stefan Herheim, a Norwegian whose revelatory
stagings have made him one of the most sought-after
directors in Europe. Soprano Marina Poplavskaya and
tenor sensation Bryan Hymel star as Helene and Henri.
Initially, the entire half-hour Four Seasons ballet was to
be included, but those plans fell through.
The Frankfurt production, starring Elza van den Heever
as Helene, Alfred Kim as Henri and baritone Quinn Kelsey
as Montfort, trimmed the score a bit and updated the
action to a populist revolt against a modern-day police
state.
Continued from page 17
VERDI
“At the same time, there have been very few voices express-
ing support for the turf conversion, and that number has
declined as each public meeting has proceeded,” Walter wrote.
Going ahead with the fake turf in light of the lackluster sup-
port makes the project “a risky venture at best” that might drag
out the much-needed park improvements because of legal
action, according to Walter.
Crestview neighbors met the recommendation with relief and
Mike Thompson, who helped organize the group Save San
Carlos Parks and collected more than 2,000 petition signa-
tures, said he and others are optimistic the council understands
the majority preference for natural grass.
“However, we know this fight is not over until the actual vote
is taken and we’re continuing to present our case to the City
Council members,” Thompson wrote in an email to the Daily
Journal.
Resident Bob Dehner also said there still needs to be consid-
eration of other factors in the renovation plan, mainly the
preservation of several mature trees, the reduction of parking
lot spaces and the “eroding and overgrown hill on the north
side of the park.”
The city of San Carlos is no stranger to controversy over the
turf in its parks. The debate over synthetic grass on any field —
which finally ended with artificial turf installed in Highlands
Park — took roughly a decade. Despite that conversion ulti-
mately happening with little vocal complaint once installed,
the Crestview neighbors opposing the latest plan said this idea
is different.
Crestview is a 1.1-acre park located on Crestview Drive
north of Brittan Avenue and some residents argued artificial turf
would change the now-equal balance of uses between sports,
open space and other needs because the extra playing hours will
keep the others away. Some speakers at the June meeting also
pointed out that artificial turf prohibits picnics and dog walk-
ing.
Councilman Matt Grocott did not vote in favor of turf at
Highlands and said the use at Crestview is an even weaker argu-
ment because the former was once a high school so the athlet-
ic facilities were already in place.
“Crestview has always been a park and a park must meet the
needs of all users equally well. In my estimation, artificial fails
to meet that criteria,” Grocott said.
The possibility of extra traffic to an already congested area
was also a worry to opponents.
In initially recommending synthetic grass, city staff noted
that the material would drop the $45,000 in annual park main-
tenance to $8,000, which saves $370,00 over the 10-year
expected life span of the turf field.
But Collins said the council needs to consider the installa-
tion and replacement costs, too.
Councilman Mark Olbert sees the issue not as synthetic ver-
sus natural but one of the city lacking enough park or field
space which pits groups against each other for priority.
Although the answer is beyond Monday night’s meeting,
Olbert said it is a start.
“We can take the first step on that path by keeping Crestview
natural which will encourage the factions in our community to
work together towards a common end. That’s why I support
staff’s recommendation,” Olbert wrote in an email to the Daily
Journal.
The San Carlos City Council meets 7 p.m. Monday, July 8 at
City Hall, 600 Elm St., San Carlos.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Continued from page 1
TURF
July 11. Among other topics, he plans to talk about the
rough and vigorous training that produces an effective
SEAL, principles of leadership that can apply in every situ-
ation and the role of special ops in present and future war-
fare.
Q: Rorke, you grew up in Los Gatos, in the Bay Area. How
did that background shape you?
A: The Silicon Valley phenom was still getting underway
in the ’70s and ’80s, but it already had set a tone. Almost
any accomplishment seemed possible, as long as you were
intellectually ready to jump in there, be creative and com-
pete. This is a hyper-bright part of the world, and I couldn’t
help but feel inspired.
Q: And how did California at large nurture you?
A: Oh, I rambled all over the place with my dad and broth-
er, fishing on the Klamath, camping and skiing in the
Sierra, working and playing on ranches south of San Juan
Bautista. I really found my center through intense physical
activity. Playing water polo on a championship team in
high school was huge, and I went on to compete at champi-
onship lacrosse in college.
Q: Sounds ideal.
A: Big parts of my youth weren’t so easy. I was hyperac-
tive, probably would be diagnosed with ADHD today. I strug-
gled with math, and still have problems with numbers today.
Let me put it this way — when I was on active duty, I made
sure I was not the one to call in grid coordinates for an air
strike.
Q: How did you decide to join the SEALs?
A:My senior year in college — I was a fine arts major at
Syracuse — my dad sent me a copy of Winston Churchill’s
“My Early Life.” And it felt like Churchill was talking right
to me, about the importance of doing service to earn your
citizenship, about taking one’s place in the fighting line.
As I say in my book, my first thought was, where do I sign
up?
Q: Over your 14 years and 200 missions with the Teams,
you have fought against drug cartels in Latin America,
defended citizens from rampaging mobs in Africa, and con-
fronted jihadis in Iraq and Afghanistan. How does one handle
the stress of combat?
A: To start with, guys in the SEAL brotherhood are war-
riors, they stress over things like not doing a job well, let-
ting a teammate down or failing to complete the mission,
not any physical danger. We train so intensely, and to such
an extreme degree of realism, that moments of actual fight-
ing become just a natural response, it’s what we’ve trained
to do. Beyond that, it varies from person to person. One
thing we all do is tactical breathing. You inhale slowly to a
count of four, hold for a count of four and exhale to a count
of four. Afew iterations of that, and you’re pretty much guar-
anteed to bring your heart rate down.
Q: You not only commanded a Team in combat, you wound
up in charge of basic and advanced training on the base at
Coronado. Any tips you can provide on leadership?
A: Many books out there talk about character, which is
fine. But it’s not enough to be, you also have to do. My num-
ber one thing? Develop judgment. Evaluate a situation and
make a good choice, and you’ve got a better chance of
attaining a good result. Another huge element is trust. If
your folks don’t trust you, there’s little you can do to get
past that. But establish trust, and it goes both ways. You
empower them to do a job without micromanaging — which
is you trusting them back. How do you build it? Set an exam-
ple. If you want your people to look sharp in uniform, be the
sharpest one in the line. If you want them to be early, you be
the earliest. If fit, make sure that you’re the fittest.
Q: Even though you were a college athlete and on SEAL
Teams, both famed as hard-drinking, hard-partying groups,
you reveal in “Damn Few” you’ve always been a teetotaler.
Why?
A: In my youth, I saw talented men and women complete-
ly derail their lives and the lives of their families through
alcohol. I decided not to touch it. Sometimes I feel jealous of
those who can enjoy a glass of fine wine with dinner — it
looks like a good pairing. But I need to acknowledge that
mine is an intense personality. If I drank, I don’t think I’d
turn into the jovial, garrulous type of Irishman. I’d be more
the mad and brawling type. It wouldn’t be good.
Q: The U.S. military seems intent on allowing women to
join the Special Forces. What’s your opinion on that devel-
opment?
A: The brotherhood of SEAL Teams is a living entity that
few understand. We may be gentlemen around our wives and
civilians, but once among ourselves it gets rough and
Spartan real fast, with hard jokes and constantly soaking
each other in toughness and fire. My opinion is that that
spirit just won’t come out of a coed locker room, and we must
think long and hard before we do anything to impair it.
Proceed with caution. Maybe the way to go is to make an all-
female tactical unit, see how that works out first.
There will be three opportunities to see Rorke Denver
speak and read:
• Tuesday, July 9, 7:30 p.m., Kepler’s Books, 1010 El
Camino Real, Menlo Park, (650) 324-4321,
www.keplers.com.
• Wednesday, July 10, 7:00 p.m., Books Inc., Opera Plaza
store, 601 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco, (415) 776-1111,
www.booksinc.net/SFOpera.
• Thursday, July 11, 6 p.m., The Commonwealth Club,
595 Market St., second floor, San Francisco. Admission: $7
(students), $8 (club members), $20 (non-members).
Evening starts with reception at 5:30 p.m., ends after book-
signing, 7 p.m. (415) 597-6705, www.commonwealth-
club.org.
Continued from page 1
SEAL
LOCAL/CALENDAR 20
Weekend • July 6-7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SATURDAY, JULY6
Walk with a Doc. Red Morton
Community Park, 1120 Roosevelt Ave.,
RedwoodCity.Afreeprogramof theSan
Mateo County Medical Association’s
Community Service Foundation that
encourages healthy physical activity for
county residents of all ages. Walkers
enjoy one-hour walks with physician
volunteers and can ask questions about
general healthtopicsalongtheway.Free.
To sign up visit www.smcma.org.
AlanMcGee’s“AWalkintheWoods—
LandscapeasMetaphor”Reception.1
p.m.to 4 p.m.Portola Art Gallery at Allied
Arts Guild, 75 Arbor Road, Menlo Park.
The exhibition is open July 1-31 and
features a collection of images by
photographer Alan McGee of Portola
Valley. Free. For more information email
frances.freyberg@gmail.com.
SUNDAY, JULY7
Sunday Farmers’ Market. 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. San Mateo Avenue between
JeneveinandSylvanavenues,SanBruno.
For more information go to
www.westcoastfarmersmarkets.org.
Summer Concert. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Washington Park, Burlingame, on the
Recreation Center Patio. Free
entertainment and fitness demos.
Buy one, get one free at the Book
Nook. Noon to 4 p.m. 1 Cottage Lane,
Twin Pines Park, Belmont. All proceeds
benefit the Belmont Library. Prices vary.
For more information call 592-5650 or
go to www.thefobl.org.
ThePlasticOnion. 1 p.m.to 4 p.m.Twin
Pines Meadow, Belmont. This is the
fourth concert of the Belmont Summer
Concerts. The music played will
celebrate the Beatles. Admission is free
and refreshments will be sold. For more
information call 595-7441.
First Sunday Line Dance with Tina
Beare&JeanetteFeinberg. 1 p.m.to 4
p.m. San Bruno Senior Center, 1555
Crystal Springs Road, San Bruno. $5. For
more information call 616-7150.
MONDAY, JULY8
SummerEnrichmentSeries: ArtWeek.
2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. Free.
This event will run until July 10.
Registration is required. For more
information and to register call 591-
8286.
What’s the buzz? 3 p.m. San Mateo
Public Library, Hillsdale branch, 205 W.
HillsdaleBlvd.,SanMateo.Learnall about
honeybees and beekeeping from
beekeeper Kendal Sager. Free. For more
information call 522-7848.
Self-healingtechniqueclass. 5:45 p.m.
to6:45p.m.SanCarlosAdult Community
Center, 601 Chestnut St., San Carlos.
Stephanie Capodanno, CHTP, will lead
self-healing techniques that relieve
stress. The lessons will take place over
four classes. $43 for San Carlos resident
and $50 for non-residents for all four
classes. For more information and to
register call 802-4382 or go to
www.RecConnect.net.
TUESDAY, JULY9
FreeForumforCaregivers.5:30 p.m.to
7:30 p.m. Senior Focus Center, 1720 El
CaminoReal,Suite10,Burlingame.Space
is limited.Theforumwill cover anupdate
ondementiacareandmindful moments
in caregiving. The event is not for
professional caregivers. Free. For more
information and to register call 696-
3660.
MimeTroupe: Oil andWater. Music at
6:30 p.m., show at 7 p.m. Mitchell Park,
South Field,600 East Meadow Drive and
Cowper St., Palo Alto. Free. For more
information go to sfmt.org.
WEDNESDAY, JULY10
RSVP deadline for San Mateo
Newcomers Club. Luncheon on
Tuesday July 16 at Noon. Spices
Restaurant,929AEdgewater Blvd.,Foster
City. The program for the luncheon will
be a speaker of Freedom House, San
Francisco. This is an independent, non-
profit organization whose mission is to
bring hope, restoration and new life to
survivors of human trafficking by
providing housing and long-term after-
care services. Checks must be received
by Wednesday July 10.$25.Sent to Janet
Williams, 1168 Shoreline Dr., San Mateo.
For more information call 286-0688.
San Mateo Professional Alliance
WeeklyNetworkingLunch. Noon to 1
p.m. Spiedo Ristorante, 223 E. 4th Ave.,
San Mateo. $17 for lunch. For more
information call 430-6500 or go to
sanmateoprofessionalalliance.com.
JVS Orientation and Enrollment
Session.1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Peninsula JCC,
800 Foster City Blvd., Foster City.We will
provide you with an overview of the
services, programs and resources that
will support you in your job search. We
can help you with finding a job, making
a resume, interviewing, networking,
staying motivated and writing your
summary for LinkedIn. We work with
people from all backgrounds and all
levels of experience and expertise.Free.
For more information email
jcowan@jvs.org.
DWWilson Magic Show. 2 p.m. San
Mateo Public Library Marina branch,
1530 Susan Court, San Mateo. DW
Wilson’s ultimate magic show combines
audience participation,comedy and real
live animals. Free. For more information
call 522-7838.
MusicinthePark-BundyBrowneand
theEspressoRhythmSection. 6p.m.to
8 p.m.Stafford Park,corner of King Street
and Hopkins Avenue, Redwood City.
Free.
The Loudest Man on Earth —
Preview.8p.m.LucieSternTheatre,1305
Middlefield Road, Palo Alto. The show
will run until Aug. 4. Tickets start at $19
for ages 30 and under.Savings available
for educators, seniors and patrons 30
and under.A $5 convenience fee will be
assessed for online and telephone
orders. For more information call 463-
1960 or go to theatreworks.org.
THURSDAY, JULY11
RetiredPublicEmployeesAssociation
Chapter 46 Meeting. 10:30 a.m. Elks
Lodge, 229 W. 20th Ave., San Mateo.
Guest speaker Scott Yates will share the
latest news from CalPERS and will
discuss how we can protect our pension
rights. $14 for lunch. For more
information call 207-6401.
Free Lecture on Conservatorship.
Noon. San Mateo County Law Library,
710 Hamilton St.,Redwood City.Free.For
more information call 363-4913 or go to
www.smclawlibrary.org.
MoviesforSchool AgeChildren:Willy
Wonka and the Chocolate Factory.
3:30 p.m. San Mateo Public Library-Oak
Room, 55 W.Third Ave., San Mateo. Free.
For more information call 533-7838.
TheCottontails. 6 p.m.to 8 p.m.Central
Park, 50 E 5th Ave., San Mateo. Come
enjoy a band that can belt out some old
gin-house blues, riff on a Charlie Parker
tune, and rock out on a Smokey
Robinson song, all in a single set. For
moreinformationvisit ci.sanmateo.ca.us.
Melissa Peabody’s new film — San
Francisco: Still WildatHeart. 6:30 p.m.
South San Francisco Municipal Services
Building, 33 Arroyo Drive, South San
Francisco. Following the showing,
Peabodywill talkabout howmakingthis
film came about and what impact her
film has made. Free. For more
information call 829-3876.
The Loudest Man on Earth —
Preview. 7:30 p.m. Lucie Stern Theatre,
1305 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto. The
show will run until Aug. 4. Tickets start
at $19 for ages 30 and under. Savings
available for educators, seniors and
patrons 30 and under.A $5 convenience
fee will be assessed for online and
telephone orders.For more information
call 463-1960 or go to theatreworks.org.
FRIDAY, JULY12
Presentation on Preservation of
Family Photos. 1 p.m. San Mateo
County History Museum, 2200
Broadway, Redwood City. Photograph
Conservator Gawain Weaver makes a
presentation on preserving family
photographs.Weaver will discuss types
of photographs found in family
collections, clues to dating them and
procedures to preserving them. Free
with prices of admission. Admission $5
for adults, $3 for students and seniors.
For more information call 299-0104.
Members’ Exhibit and TakingDigital
Art to the Streets. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Pacific Art League, 227 Forest Ave., Palo
Alto. The PAL will host an opening
receptionfor twonewexhibitions which
will be on display from July 1 to July 25.
Free.For more information call 321-3891
or go to www.pacificartleague.org.
Jewelry on the Square and Surfin
Safari: Beach Boys Tribute. 5 p.m. to
8:30 p.m. Courthouse Square, 2200
Broadway, Redwood City. Music will
begin at 6 p.m. Free. For more
information call 780-7311.
SouthSanFranciscoOpenMic. 7 p.m.
to11p.m.116El CampoDrive,SouthSan
Francisco.Free.For more information call
451-2450.
ArtOpening.7 p.m.Sanchez Art Center,
1220 Linda Mar Blvd, Pacifica. Come
enjoy “The Works of Wanxin Zhang,”an
exhibition of ceramic sculptures curated
by Jerry Ross Barrish. Other exhibits
currentlyshowingare“ShiftingtheBody:
Explorations from the Female
Perspective”and“RegretsOnly.”For more
information call 355-1894.
Calendar
include alternative investments will produce
better returns or reduce risk. The board also
agrees that financial reporting on SamCERA
in the county’s annual financial report can
be better and that it hasn’t yet committed
any of its Measure A sales-tax revenue to
paying down the liability.
Other than that, the formal response by
County Manager John Maltbie coming
before the Board of Supervisors for approval
Tuesday is a laundry list of disagreements.
Along with estimating the unfunded lia-
bility at twice what the county reports, the
April civil grand jury report concluded that
elected officials have failed to monitor or
significantly reduce retirement costs. The
report also found the association lost more
than $11 million on its investments for fis-
cal year 2012 and on average has failed to
achieve its assumed rate of return over the
past one-, five- and 10-year periods.
Maltbie wrote in his response that the
county has closely monitored SamCERA’s
investment policy, even exceeding funding
requirements for the last two years, and is
paying down the unfunded liability at a
faster rate than anticipated by contributing
an extra $11.5 million in fiscal year 2011-
2012.
As for the estimates of that liability,
Maltbie wrote that the Governmental
Accounting Standards Board prevents
SamCERAfrom using the same calculations
as the grand jury which is why the figures
differ.
The response also fights the jury’s conclu-
sion that SamCERA’s investment perform-
ance the last decade is poor, instead calling
it “commendable” at 7.6 percent because of
the widespread losses suffered by other funds
in the wake of the shaky economy.
The response also partially disagrees with
the jury’s conclusion that county taxpayers
rather than SamCERA’s beneficiaries bear
the economic burden of its performance
because tax increases or slashed county
services pay for the unfunded liability.
Maltbie wrote that in addition to tax rev-
enue, retirement costs are funded by member
contributions and investment earnings.
In addition to opposing most of the jury’s
findings, the official county response also
bristles at a number of recommendations.
Among those, the Board of Supervisors will
not formally review SamCERA’s investment
performance in an open meeting every quar-
ter. The idea is “unreasonable,” the response
states, adding that SamCERA CEO David
Bailey is available to attend Board of
Supervisors’ meetings and the website posts
information including reports. The
response also shoots down the suggestion
of more highly prioritizing the unfunded lia-
bility over new or expanded programs.
Doing so could limit essential services to
the county’s most needy residents, the
response concludes.
The response does agree to bring public
pension accounting more in line with the
private sector rules and states the county has
already implemented the recommendation to
appoint to the Board of Retirement only
individuals with substantial experience in
financial analysis and management.
The civil grand jury reports carry no legal
weight although recipients are required to
respond in writing within 90 days.
The Board of Supervisors meets 9 a.m.
Tuesday, July 9 in Board Chambers, 400
County Government Center, Redwood City.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Continued from page 1
PENSION
And he is pushing two infrastructure proj-
ects that could saddle the state with additional
debt for decades to come — a $68 billion high-
speed rail system and a $24 billion water plan
that includes freeway-sized water tunnels under
the Northern California delta.
Despite the criticism over long-term spend-
ing, Brown has managed to turn the national
conversation about California, which was
often portrayed as a sort of “paradise lost” dur-
ing the recession.
In a May profile, The Atlantic called Brown
a “ruthlessly practical” governor who was
“embracing his inner politician to restore the
California dream.” Journalist and Ronald
Reagan biographer Lou Cannon, in an essay
posted late last month on realclearpolitics,
noted the “remarkable comeback” of both
Brown — the former “Governor Moonbeam”
— and his state.
The latest incarnation of Jerry Brown is a far
cry from the unfocused maverick who served
from 1975 to 1983, when his presidential
ambitions often distracted him from the job of
managing the nation’s most populous state.
At 75, the approach of the former Jesuit semi-
narian is softer and some say more congenial.
Regarded as aloof during his first two terms,
Brown has made small gestures to avoid his
earlier mistakes, such as inviting lawmakers
from both parties to catered dinners at the his-
toric governor’s mansion.
By comparison, his predecessor,
Republican Arnold Schwarzenegger, often had
a strained relationship with rank-and-file law-
makers. Members of his own party once wore
name tags when he attended a caucus meeting.
Nearly everything about the way Brown
operates is different than Schwarzenegger,
who was more interested in broad, sweeping
policy ideas than the minutia that excites
Brown. As a political novice, Schwarzenegger
often sought to prove his gravitas, while
Brown at times seeks to soften his, partly
through the clever deployment on social
media of the docile family dog, Sutter, a Welsh
corgi.
Schwarzenegger installed a smoking
tent in the courtyard of the governor’s
office so staff, visitors and invited law-
makers could kick back with a cigar. Last
month, members of Brown’s staff used the
courtyard to practice yoga.
Brown also is married now, to a former cor-
porate counsel for the Gap, Anne Gust Brown,
who serves as his chief adviser. Gust Brown
also has helped her husband understand the
effect of state policies on the business com-
munity.
“I have a husband who thinks that his job is
like a vacation,” Gust Brown told a luncheon
crowd in May. “He loves what he does, so to
come home and talk about it incessantly is
just nirvana for him.”
Schwarzenegger’s public appearances were
meticulously arranged for maximum TV
impact and his handlers were quick to respond
to relevant news reports. Brown sometimes
gives just 30 minutes of notice before holding
an event, and his small press office often
leaves reporters’ calls unreturned.
“He’s not really one to be managed. He likes
to pretend he’s managed, but he’s not very eas-
ily managed. He does what he wants most of
the time,” Gust Brown said.
Brown also operates in a far easier political
landscape than Schwarzenegger did, beyond
being a Democrat in a Democratic-controlled
state.
Thanks to a voter-approved initiative, the
Legislature can now pass a budget on a simple
majority vote rather than the two-thirds
majority that was previously required, and law-
makers lose pay if they do not pass a balanced
budget by their constitutional deadline.
Democrats also have had a supermajority in
both houses of the Legislature this year,
allowing easier passage of bills that still
require a two-thirds vote.
Even so, Brown does not avoid confronta-
tion with his party or its core supporters.
Environmentalists are upset with him over
his proposed delta water tunnels, support for
oil drilling and willingness to overhaul the
state’s environmental quality act so it cannot
be used as a hammer to stop development.
Matt Cate, who served as corrections secre-
tary under Schwarzenegger and then Brown,
said Brown is always looking for creative
solutions.
“He expects you to know not only what’s
happening in your agency, also what’s hap-
pening in the rest of the country, the world, in
your policy area,” said Cate, now executive
director of the California Association of
Counties. “You need to bring new and thought-
provoking ideas to the forefront, and that’s
what he expects. And that’s not easy when
you’re running an agency at the same time.”
Continued from page 1
BROWN
COMICS/GAMES
7-06-13
friday’s PUZZLE sOLVEd
PrEViOUs
sUdOkU
answErs
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
K
e
n
K
e
n
®
is
a
r
e
g
is
te
r
e
d
tr
a
d
e
m
a
r
k
o
f N
e
x
to
y
, L
L
C
. ©
2
0
1
3
K
e
n
K
e
n
P
u
z
z
le
L
L
C
. A
ll r
ig
h
ts
r
e
s
e
r
v
e
d
.
D
is
t. b
y
U
n
iv
e
r
s
a
l U
c
lic
k
fo
r
U
F
S
, In
c
. w
w
w
.k
e
n
k
e
n
.c
o
m
7
-
6
-
1
3
aCrOss
1 — Hari
5 Extra
10 Volcanic rock
12 Miami baseballer
13 Engineless plane
14 Nervous
15 “Hawkeye” Pierce
portrayer
16 Dear Abby’s sister
18 Coral habitat
19 Pasta dish
23 Mao — -tung
26 Valentine mo.
27 Holy cow!
30 Custard-flled cream puff
32 Bowling lanes
34 Rock coverers
35 Team list
36 Lament
37 Coffee brewer
38 Tokyo, to shoguns
39 Envelope info
42 Egos’ companions
45 Team cheer
46 Libya neighbor
50 Game fsh
53 Blue moon, e.g.
55 Lead on
56 Postpone
57 Intended
58 Leather punches
dOwn
1 Ruminate
2 During
3 Kind of wave
4 Receive a high score
5 — Antonio, Texas
6 Opposite of post-
7 Woe is me!
8 Swell, as a river
9 New Age chanteuse
10 Links org.
11 Blackboard needs
12 Bean for sprouting
17 Catch a crook
20 Off the beaten path
21 Synthetic fabrics
22 Feels awful
23 Speaker pro —
24 Flat-bottomed boat
25 Movie lioness
28 Musician Seeger
29 Gazed
31 Vast region
32 In — (overdue)
33 B’way posting of yore
37 Suffx for forfeit
40 Physics unit
41 Fastening device
42 Thing
43 Hamlet, for one
44 Baja Ms.
47 Knoll
48 Off-road vehicles
49 Add color to
51 Sewing kit item
52 Autumn mo.
54 Just as I thought!
diLBErT® CrOsswOrd PUZZLE
fUTUrE sHOCk®
PEarLs BEfOrE swinE®
GET fUZZy®
saTUrday, JUnE 6, 2013
CanCEr (June 21-July 22) -- Finally, you’ll get the
chance to disengage from an unproductive situation
that you’ve been waiting for. It’s time to get while
the getting’s good.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Your intuition will be in fne
fettle. If you get a strong hunch about something,
play it for all it’s worth.
VirGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Today’s events could
awaken much hope in you. There are strong
indications that a signifcant cycle is starting to
develop.
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- If you haven’t been
pushing yourself lately, you’re not living up to your
potential. Start setting some lofty goals and/or
objectives for yourself.
sCOrPiO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Take advantage of any
opportunity you get to acquire some new, practical
knowledge. What you discover could be exactly what
you need to get ahead.
saGiTTariUs (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Someone with
whom you have close, emotional ties is involved in a
project that could turn out to be very proftable. Try
to get yourself in the picture.
CaPriCOrn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- This is a good
day to start revising an agreement that has gone
dormant. Something can be worked out that would
rejuvenate the matter and prove benefcial to all
parties.
aQUariUs (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Work as hard as
necessary for something you hope to achieve,
because your possibilities for success look good.
If you’re motivated enough, even your labor will be
fun.
PisCEs (Feb. 20-March 20) -- If you’ve been
seeking greater participation in a current project,
don’t wait around to be asked. Make your move
today.
ariEs (March 21-April 19) -- It should be a good
day in general, but your greatest benefts are likely
to come about when you go out of your way to help
others. Do good things when and where you can.
TaUrUs (April 20-May 20) -- There is a good
chance you will have some fun today. Recent
acquaintances whom you liked a lot will likely invite
you to join them in a get-together.
GEMini (May 21-June 20) -- Something could occur
that would have an effect on your work or career. Be
alert for opportunities for gain and advancement.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Weekend • July 6-7, 2013 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Weekend • July 6-7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CALL CENTER Positions - Internet Car
Parts, Adam McCoy, (415)999-9823
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
110 Employment
AUTMOTIVE -
NOW HIRING
SERVICE TECHNICIANS
OILSTOP DRIVE-THRU
OIL CHANGE
• Excellent benefits
• No experience necessary
• Complete training program
• Retirement program
• Advancement opportunities
• Competitive pay
APPLY IN PERSON AT
2009 El Camino Real, San Mateo
Monday-Saturday 8-6
For more info: www.oilstopinc.com
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
GREAT CLIPS
@ Sequoia Station
Redwood City
Now Hiring
Stylists & Managers.
Call Flo/Randy
408 247-8364 or 408 921-9994
Grand Opening Soon!
110 Employment
CLEANING -
HOUSE CLEANERS
NEEDED
Excellent pay. Company car.
Must have valid CDL and cleaning ex-
perience. Call Molly Maids, (650)
837-9788. 1700 S. Amphlett Blvd,
#218, San Mateo
HOTEL -
A Front Desk Agent, and A Maintenance
Person position available. Experience
preferred Fax resume: (650)589-7076. or
Email: ac@citigardenhotel.com
EXPERIENCED COOKS, Avanti Pizza. .
3536 Alameda, MENLO PARK, CA
(650)854-1222.
23 Weekend • July 6-7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
110 Employment
CUSTOMER SERVICE/
SEAMSTRESS -
YOU ARE INVITED
Are you:
Dependable
Friendly
Detail Oriented
Willing to learn new skills
Do you have:
Good English skills
A Desire for steady employment
A desire for emplployment benefits
Sewiing skills
If the above items describe you,
please call (650)342-6978.
Immediate opening available for
Customer Service/Seamstress.
Call for appointment.
Crystal Cleaning Center
San Mateo CA, 94402
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256111
The following person is doing business
as: Golden 1 Plumbing, 62 E. 39th Ave
#B, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Mous-
tafa Elattar, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Moustafa Elattar /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/29/13, 07/06/13, 07/13/13, 07/20/13.)
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
110 Employment
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
120 Child Care Services
AGAPE VILLAGES
Foster Family Agency
Become a Foster Parent!
We Need Loving Homes for
Disadvantaged Children
Entrusted to Our Care.
Monthly Compensation Provided.
Call 1-800-566-2225
Lic #397001741
127 Elderly Care
FAMILY RESOURCE
GUIDE
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.
Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in today’s paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 521602
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Vanessa M. Gianelli
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Vanessa M. Gianelli filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Vanessa M. Gianelli
Proposed name: Vanessa M. Jaco
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on July 24,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J , at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 06/07/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 06/06/2013
(Published, 06/22/13, 06/29/13
07/06/2013, 07/13/2013)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256566
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Quality Cleaning Services, 740
Masson Ave., #1, SAN BRUNO, CA
94066 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owners: Ceasar Omontes, same ad-
dress and Daniel D. Jimenez, 4632 Al-
hambra Dr., Freemont, CA 94536. The
business is conducted by a General Part-
nership. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Ceasar Omontes /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/28/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/29/13, 07/06/13, 07/13/13, 07/20/13.)
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 521692
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Justin Makepeace James
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Justin Makepeace James filed
a petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Justin Makepeace James
Proposed name: Justine Makepeace
James
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on July 23,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J , at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 06/07/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 06/06/2013
(Published, 06/15/13, 06/22/13
06/29/2013, 07/06/2013)
CASE# CIV 522489
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Hector Javier Alcala and Paula Alcala
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Hector Javier Alcala and Pau-
la Alcala filed a petition with this court for
a decree changing name as follows:
a: Present name: Lourdes Margarita Al-
cala-Enriquez
a: Proposed name: Lourdes Margarita
Alcala
b: Present name: Javier Alcala-Enriquez
b: Proposed name: JavierAlcala
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on August 13,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room , at 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 06/25/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 06/25/2013
(Published, 06/29/13, 07/06/2013,
07/13/2013, 07/20/2013)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255754
The following person is doing business
as: Kiosko Mexicano, 726 Grand Ave.,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Maria Luz Gonzalez, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on .
/s/ Maria Luz Gonzalez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/15/13, 06/22/13, 06/29/13, 07/06/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255898
The following person is doing business
as: Gold Rush Limo, 2575 Galway Pl.,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
AA Royale, LLC, CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Rizza Allas /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/15/13, 06/22/13, 06/29/13, 07/06/13.)
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256304
The following person is doing business
as: Los Andes Smart Services, 45 Studio
Circle #7, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Ninfa De Terceros and Eber H. Terceros.
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by a Married Couple. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Eber Terceros /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/12/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/15/13, 06/22/13, 06/29/13, 07/06/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256189
The following person is doing business
as: Bay Area Aesthetic Surgery, 66 Bo-
vet Road, Suite 101, SAN MATEO, CA
94402 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Joel B. Beck, M.D., Inc, CA.
The business is conducted by a Corpora-
tion. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on .
/s/ Joel B. Beck /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/22/13, 06/29/13, 07/06/13, 07/13/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256560
The following person is doing business
as: Koa Boxing, 1129 Capuchino Ave.
#4, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Aaron
Laqua Kaheaku, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Aaron Laqua Kaheaku /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/27/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/29/13, 07/06/13, 07/13/13, 07/20/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256561
The following person is doing business
as: Jerry’s Pool Service, 11 Inyo Place,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94061 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Jerry
Lindley, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 01/01/2006
/s/ Jerry Lindley /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/27/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/29/13, 07/06/13, 07/13/13, 07/20/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256522
The following person is doing business
as: TLC’S Services, 833 Hillside Blvd.,
DALY CITY, CA 94014 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Benjamin
R. Luna, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Benjamin R. Luna /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/29/13, 07/06/13, 07/13/13, 07/20/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256516
The following person is doing business
as: 1) The Hioh Company, 2) Xian2, 146
Oxford Ln., SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Hoey Cheung, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 01/01/2013.
/s/ Hoey W. Cheung /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/29/13, 07/06/13, 07/13/13, 07/20/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256453
The following person is doing business
as: Topps Handyman Services, 1202
Carlisle Dr., SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Troy Ocampo same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on .
/s/ Troy Ocampo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/19/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/29/13, 07/06/13, 07/13/13, 07/20/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256554
The following person is doing business
as: Gold Tree Happy Spa, 471 El Cami-
no Real, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Helen Wang Hao, 532 San Antonio Ave.,
CA 94066. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ Helen Wang Hao /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/27/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/29/13, 07/06/13, 07/13/13, 07/20/13.)
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256079
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Petals Florist, 1600 El Camino
Real, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby
registered by the following owners: Maria
Loreto Hernandez-Valdivia, 51 N. Dela-
ware St., San Mateo, CA 94401 and
Juan Gabriel Ramirez Manuel, 435 N.
San Mateo Dr., Apt. 5, San Mateo, CA
94401 . The business is conducted by a
General Partnership. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Maria L.Hernandez-Valdivia /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/29/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/29/13, 07/06/13, 07/13/13, 07/20/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256627
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: The Shane Group, 2309 Woos-
ter, BELMONT, CA 94002 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owners: 1) Hugo
Shane, Trustee Owner, 2309 Wooster,
BELMONT, CA 94002, 2) Karen Shane,
Trustee-Co, 2014 Mezes Ave., Belmont
CA 94002, 3) Robert Shane, Successor
Trustee, 126 14th ave. Kirkland, WA
98033, 4) Jo Ann Shane Trustee-Co,
6261 Collier Canyon Rd., Livermore, CA
94551. The business is conducted by a
Trust. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on .
/s/ Karen Shane /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/01/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/03/13, 07/10/13, 07/17/13, 07/24/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256580
The following person is doing business
as: Immaculate Property Group, LLC,
1308 Madera Ave., MENLO PARK, CA
94025 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Immaculate Property Group,
LLC, CA. The business is conducted by
a Limited Liability Company. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Steven Daniel Jackson /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/28/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/06/13, 07/13/13, 07/20/13, 07/27/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256291
The following person is doing business
as: Fluffy Doggy, 1247 Broadway, BUR-
LINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Jie Yan,
988 Fraklin St, Apt. 1501, Oakland, CA
94507. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
06/12/2013.
/s/ Jie Yan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/06/13, 07/13/13, 07/20/13, 07/27/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256569
The following person is doing business
as: Imperial Craftsman, 1001 Bayhill Dr.,
Ste. 200, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
One on One BBA, Inc, CA. The business
is conducted by a Corporation. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 06/24/2013.
/s/ Richard A. Fivis /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/28/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/06/13, 07/13/13, 07/20/13, 07/27/13.)
210 Lost & Found
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST JORDINIAN passport and Green
Card. Lost in Daly City, If found contact,
Mohammad Al-Najjar (415)466-5699
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
294 Baby Stuff
SOLID OAK CRIB - Excellent condition
with Simmons mattress, $90.,
(650)610-9765
296 Appliances
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
HAIER 5200 BTU window air conditioner
- never used, in box, $95. obo, (650)591-
6842
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
JENN-AIR 30” downdraft slide-in range.
JES9800AAS, $875., never used, still in
the crate. Cost $2200 new.
(650)207-4664
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor,
(650)726-1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
WEBER BRAND Patio Refrigerator,
round top load, for beer, soda, and wa-
ter. $30 obo (650)591-6842
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
"OLD" IRON COFFEE GRINDER - $90.,
(650)596-0513
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
16 OLD glass telephone line insulators.
$60 San Mateo (650)341-8342
1940 VINTAGE telephone guaranty
bench Salem hardrock maple excellent
condition $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
67 USED United States (50) and Europe-
an (17) Postage Stamps. Most issued
before World War II. All different and de-
tached from envelopes. All for $4.00,
(650)787-8600
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
$100., (650)348-6428
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MENORAH - Antique Jewish tree of life,
10”W x 30”H, $100., (650)348-6428
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
PRISMS 9 in a box $99 obo
(650)363-0360
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
24
Weekend • July 6-7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THE SAN Bruno Planning Commission will meet Tuesday, Ju-
ly 16, 2013 at 7:00 p.m., at the Senior Center, 1555 Crystal
Springs Road, San Bruno, CA and take action on the following
items. All interested persons are invited to attend.
173 San Benito Avenue. Request for a Use Permit to allow
the construction of a new home which increases the gross
floor area of the existing structures by greater than 50% per
SBMC Section 12.200.030.B.1. Environmental Determination:
Categorical Exemption
2790 Cottonwood Drive. Request for a Use Permit to allow
an addition which increases the gross floor area of the existing
home by greater than 50% and exceeds the 44% lot coverage
requirement per SBMC Sections 12.200.030.B.1 and
12.200.040.B.3. Environmental Determination: Categorical
Exemption
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal, July 6, 2013.
ACROSS
1 Onetime college
All-Star football
game
9 “Hasn’t scratched
yet!” cleanser
15 Song played at
the 1920
Olympics when
music for the
Italian national
anthem could not
be found
16 Enmity
17 Colorful
headwear
18 Sorbetto
alternative
19 Sister
20 Blitzes, in old
football lingo
22 RSA neighbor, in
the Olympics
23 Grizzlies, in
Granada
25 Not at all swank
26 “He who hath
many friends
hath __”: Aristotle
27 Did some farm
work
29 “Crusade in
Europe”
memoirist, initially
30 “Bouquet of
Sunflowers”
painter
31 Have a life
33 More unsettled
35 Film based on
junk science, say
39 Delight
40 Czech sci-fi play
41 Pulls down
42 Fire proof
44 Like infant fingers
48 First Nations tribe
49 Skirts that come
in bell and
pancake styles
51 Insignificant
52 Rx instruction
53 Pros
55 Decline
56 Strand, in a way
58 “Absolutely!”
60 Wrap again, as
an ankle
61 Cared for
62 Cut and dried?
63 Premature plot
giveaways, e.g.
DOWN
1 Mingle (with)
2 1992 Dream
Team chant
3 Cambodian
leader ousted by
the Khmer
Rouge
4 City pol.
5 Support
6 Exeunt __: stage
direction
7 Breathless
8 Biased interview
features
9 Like some jeans
10 People
11 Cipher
12 Vast rainforest
13 Bounty rebel
14 Equality of
measure
21 Concert hall
24 Pirate’s hunting
ground
26 Medicine show
elixir
28 Refuse
30 Put on one’s big-
boy pants
32 Old coin with an
accented first
letter
34 Poetic adverb
35 Haunting images
36 Licorice stick in a
pit
37 Trait determinant
38 Brat topper
43 Keep under
wraps
45 Really fancy
46 Teacher, during
exam week
47 “Mercy me!”
49 Stuck up?
50 Prefix in a Dow
trademark
53 Suisse peak
54 “Contact”
acronym
57 Baseball’s Bando
59 Oporto-to-Lisbon
direção
By Bill Thompson
(c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
07/06/13
07/06/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
298 Collectibles
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria
650-873-8167
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertable
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE STOVE, Brown brand, 30",
perfect condition, $75, (650)834-6075
ANTIQUE WALNUT Hall Tree, $800 obo
(650)375-8021
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” high, 40” wide, 3 drawers, Display
case, bevelled glass, $500
(650)766-3024
VINTAGE THOMASVILLE wingback
chair $50 firm, SSF (650)583-8069
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $20 each or both for $35 nice set.
SSF (650)583-8069
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
303 Electronics
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HARMON/KANDON SPEAKERS (2)
mint condition, great, for small
office/room or extra speakers, 4 1/2 in.
high, includes cords $8., SOLD!
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
HP PRINTER - Model DJ1000, new, in
box, $38. obo, (650)995-0012
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
1940 MAHOGANY desk 34" by 72" 6
drawers center draw locks all comes with
clear glass top $70 OBO (650)315-5902
1940’S MAPLE dressing table with Mir-
ror & Stool. Needs loving and refinishing
to be beautiful again. Best Offer.
Burlingame SOLD!
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 PLANT stands $80 for both
(650)375-8021
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
3 MEDAL base kitchen cabinets with
drawers and wood doors $99
(650)347-8061
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
304 Furniture
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CABINET BLOND Wood, 6 drawers, 31”
Tall, 61” wide, 18” deep, $45
(650)592-2648
CHAIR (2), with arms, Italian 1988 Cha-
teau D'Ax, solid, perfect condition. $50
each or $85 for both. (650)591-0063
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
COPENHAGEN TEAK dining table with
dual 20" Dutch leaves extensions. 48/88"
long x 32" wide x 30" high. $95.00
(650)637-0930
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
COUCH. GREEN Cloth with end reclin-
ers on both sides. Beverage holder in the
middle, $50 (650)572-2864
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER - 6 draw dresser 61" wide,
31" high, & 18" deep $50., (650)592-
2648
DRESSER, FOR SALE all wood excel-
lent condition $50 obo (650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
GLASS DINING Table 41” x 45” Round-
ed rectangle clear glass top and base
$85 (650)888-0129
GRANDMA ROCKING chair beautiful
white with gold trim $100 (650)755-9833
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
INDOOR OR OUTSIDE ROUND TABLE
- off white, 40”, $20.obo, (650)571-5790
LIGHT WOOD Rocking Chair & Has-
sock, gold cushions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
304 Furniture
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
ORGAN BENCH $40 (650)375-8021
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
RECLINER ROCKER - Like new, brown,
vinyl, $99., SOLD!
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden, with
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR with wood carving,
armrest, rollers, and it swivels $99.,
(650)592-2648
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TEAK TV stand, wheels, rotational, glass
doors, drawer, 5 shelves. 31" wide x 26"
high X 18" deep. $75.00 (650)637-0930
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
WICKER ENTERTAINMENT CABINET -
H 78” x 43” x 16”, almost new, $89.,
(650)347-9920
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
3 PIECE fireplace set with screen $25
(650)322-2814
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 (650)755-9833
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
JAPANESE SERVER unused in box, 2
porcelain cups and carafe for serving tea
or sake. $8.00, (650)578-9208
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good con-
dition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
TWO 21 quart canning pots, with lids, $5
each. (650)322-2814
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 (650)755-9833
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
308 Tools
1/2 HORSE power 8" worm drive skill
saw $40 OBO (650)315-5902
10" BAN Saw $75.00 (650) 347-8367
308 Tools
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
BLACK & DECKER CORDLESS 18 volt
combo drill, vacuum, saw, sander, two
batteries & charger, brand new, $95.
obo, SOLD!
BLACK AND Decker, 10” trimmer/edger
, rechargeable, brand new, $50
(650)871-7200
BOB VILLA rolling tool box & organizer -
brand new with misc. tools, $40. obo,
(650)591-6842
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTMANS PROFESSIONAL car buf-
fer with case $40 OBO (650)315-5902
CRAFTSMAN 14.4 VOLT DRILL - bat-
tery & charger, never used, $35. obo,
SOLD!
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 3/8” 16.8 volt drill & vac-
uum combo, brand new, with charger,
$45. obo, SOLD!
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., SOLD!
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DREMEL HIGH SPEED ROTARY TOOL
- all attachments, never used, $25. obo
SOLD!
ELECTRIC HEDGE trimmer good condi-
tion (Black Decker) $40 (650)342-6345
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
LADDER - 24' aluminum 2 section ladder
$20., SOLD
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
MAKITA 21” Belt Sander with long cord,
$35 (650)315-5902
NEW DRILL DRIVER - 18V + battery &
charger, $30., (650)595-3933
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
SANDER, MAKITA finishing sander, 4.5
x 4.5"' used once. Complete with dust
bag and hard shell case. $35.00 SOLD!
SMALL ROTETILLER 115 Volt Works
well $99.00 (650)355-2996
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
TORO ELECTRIC POWER SWEEPER
blower - never used, in box, $35. obo,
(650)591-6842
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $65 (650)341-8342
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
2 GALLON Sprayer sears polythene
compressed air 2 1/2 inch opening, used
once $10 San Bruno (650)588-1946
3 LARGE old brown mixing bowls $75
for all 3 (650)375-8021
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History,
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
5 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $9. for all
(650)347-5104
310 Misc. For Sale
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADULT VIDEO 75 with jackets 75 with-
out $100 for all, SOLD!
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99., (650)580-
3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99., (650)580-
3316
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
ASTRONOMY BOOKS (2) Hard Cover
Cambridge Encyclopedia of Astronomy,
World of Discovery, $12., (650)578-9208
BACKPACK- Unused, blue, many pock-
ets, zippers, use handle or arm straps
$14., (650)578-9208
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BATHROOM VANITY light fixture - 2
frosted glass shades, brass finish, 14”W
x 8.75”H x 8.75”D, wall mount, $40,
(650)347-5104
BAY BRIDGE Framed 50th anniversary
poster (by Bechtel corp) $50
(650)873-4030
BELL COLLECTION 50 plus asking $50
for entire collection SOLD!
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY Jake AB Scissor Exercise Ma-
chine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
COPPER LIKE TUB - unused, 16 inches
long, 6 in. high, 8 inch wide, OK tabletop-
per, display, chills beverages. $10.,
(650)578-9208
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GOOD HEALTH FACT BOOK - un-
used, answers to get/stay healthy, hard
cover, 480 pages, $8., (650)578-9208
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HABACHI BBQ Grill heavy iron 22" high
15" wide $25 (650)593-8880
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX 55, repels and kills fleas
and ticks. 9 months worth, $60
(650)343-4461
KIRBY COMBO Shampooer/ Vacuum/
attachments. "Ultimate G Diamond
Model", $250., (650)637-0930
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $10., (650)347-5104
LAUNDRY SORTER - on wheels, triple
section, laundry sorter - $19., (650)347-
9920
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
MATCHING LIGHT SCONCES - style
wall mount, plug in, bronze finish, 12” L x
5”W , $12. both, (650)347-5104
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MEN’S LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MICHAEL CREIGHTON HARDBACK
BOOKS - 3 @ $3. each, (650)341-1861
25 Weekend • July 6-7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
310 Misc. For Sale
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW COWBOY BOOTS - 9D, Unworn,
black, fancy, only $85., (650)595-3933
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
NIKE RESISTANCE ROPE - unopened
box, get in shape, medium resistance,
long length, $8., (650)578-9208
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PRINCESS CRYSTAL glasswear set
$50 (650)342-8436
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUZZLES - 22-1,000 pc puzzles, $2.50
each, (650)596-0513
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SET OF Blue stemwear glasses $25
(650)342-8436
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. White Rotary
sewing machine similar age, cabinet
style. $85 both. (650)574-4439
SLIDE PROJECTOR - Airequipt Super-
ba 66A slide projector and screen.
$50.00 for all. (650)345-3840
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STAINED GLASS panels multi colors
beautiful work 35" long 111/2" wide $79
OBO (650)349-6059
STAINED GLASS,
28”x30” Japanese geisha motif, multi
colored, beautiful. $200 (650)520-9366
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TOM CLANCY HARDBACK BOOKS - 7
@ $3.00 each, (650)341-1861
TYPEWRITER IBM Selectric II with 15”
Carrige. $99 obo (650)363-0360
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLKSWAGON NEW Beatle hub cap,
3, $70 for All SOLD!
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
WEBER GO ANYWHERE GAS BARBE-
QUE - never used, in box, $40., SOLD!
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 (650)341-8342
311 Musical Instruments
GUITAR FOR sale. Fender Accoustic,
with case. $89.00 (415)971-7555
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
MARTIN GUITAR 1971 D-18S Great
shape, Great sound. Price reduced to
$1200. (650)522-8322
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
100% COTTON New Beautiful burgundy
velvet drape 82"X52" W/6"hems: $45
(415)585-3622
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
ATTRACTIVE LADIES trench coat red,
weather proof size 6/8 $35
(650)345-3277
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
316 Clothes
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
DINGO WESTERN BOOTS - (like new)
$60., (408)764-6142
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
FOX FUR Scarf 3 Piece $99 obo
(650)363-0360
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
IONIC BREEZE quadra, Sharper Image,
3 level silent air purifier. 27”h, energy
saver, original box with video. Excellent
condition. $77. (650)347-5104
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
LEVIS JACKET - size XXL, Beautiful
cond., med., $35., (650)595-3933
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
NEW! OLD NAVY Coat: Boy/Gril, fleece-
lined, hooded $15 (415)585-3622
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, beauitful color, megenta, with
shawl like new $40 obo (650)349-6059
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
brand new, never worn for $25
(650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, $30.
each, (808)271-3183
150 COPPER spades for #6 strand.
Copper wire. $50.00 for all.
(650)345-3840
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all,
(650)851-0878
ELECTRICAL MATERIAL - Connectors,
couplings, switches, rain tight flex, and
more.Call. $50.00 for all (650)345-3840
PACKAGED NUTS, Bolts and screws,
all sizes, packaged $99 (650)364-1374
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
PVC SCHEDULE 80 connectors and
coupling. 100 pieces in all. $30.00 for all
(650)345-3840
STEEL MORTAR BOX - 3 x 6, used for
hand mixing concrete or cement, $35.,
(650)368-0748
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 AIR rifles, shoots .177 pelets. $50 ea
Obo (650)591-6842
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
4 TENNIS RACKETS- and 2 racketball
rackets(head).$25.(650)368-0748.
AB-BUSTER as seen on T.V. was $100,
now $45., (650)596-0513
BIKE TRAINER Ascent fluid $85
(650)375-8021
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
318 Sports Equipment
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
FOR SALE medium size wet suit $95
call for info (650)851-0878
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF BAG with 15 clubs $35. SOLD.
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees good condition $19
(650)365-1797
KELTY SUPER TIOGA BACKPACK -
$40., (650)552-9436
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
ROLLER SKATES - Barely used, mens
size 13, boots attached to 8 wheels, $85.
obo, (650)223-7187
ROWING MACHINE. $30.00
(650)637-0930
SCHWINN STATIONARY RECUMBENT
BIKE, $45., SOLD!
STATIONARY EXERCISE BICYCLE -
Compact, excellent condition, $40. obo,
(650)834-2583
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
TENT - one man packable tent - $20.,
(650)552-9436
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL EXERCISE- Pro Form 415
Crosswalk, very good condition $200 call
(650)266-8025
VOLKI SNOW SKIS - $40.,
(408)764-6142
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
SLEEP APNEA breathing machine com-
plete in box helps you breathe, costs $$$
sacrifice for $75, (650)995-0012
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)595-0805
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
470 Rooms
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
515 Office Space
SAN MATEO DRIVE beautiful Medical
Office space for rent only $75/day.
Paulsurinder1@yahoo.com
620 Automobiles
1996 FORD MUSTANG convertible
coupe automatic with 118k miles,looks
and drives excellent great summer car
#5002 on sale for low price of 4995.00
plus fees. (650)637-3900
1997 LEXUS LX 450 full size SUV with
152k miles 4x4 automatic with all power
& convenient options and 3rd row seat
clean Car Fax in excellent shape
#5011on sale for 8500.00 plus fees.
(650)637-3900
1998 JEEP Grand Cherokee limited 4x4
automatic with164k miles in new condi-
tions,fully loaded clean Car Fax #4507
on sale for only 4750.00 plus normal
fees. (650)637-3900
2000 DODGE Durango SUV slt 4x4 with
156k miles. In great conditions with 3rd
row seat, nice family SUV #5034 on sale
for 3995.00 plus fees. (650)637-3900
2001 TOYOTA Camry LE automatic se-
dan with 101k miles, lots of recent serv-
ices done, all power package clean Car
Fax #4516 sale price 4950.00 plus fees.
(650)637-3900
2001 MBZ ML320 mid size SUV with
133k miles all wheel drive with 3rd row
seat, black on black leather loaded v6
auto #4430 priced to sell quick 6995.00
plus fees (650)637-3900
2001 VW JETTA GLS Turbo stick shift 5
speed manual with 120k miles comes
with lots of safety and power options
#4504 on sale for 4500.00 plus fees.
(650)637-3900
2002 HONDA Civic EX coupe two door
automatic with 161k miles.clean car and
clean Car Fax . Loaded with
options#5047 priced at 5750.00 plus
fees. (650)637-3900
2002 VOLVO S80 sedan 4 door auto-
matic with 107k miles. Safe, roomy with
luxry.great conditions and lots of conven-
ient options #5040 on low price sale of
5995.00 plus fees. (650)637-3900
2004 SATURN Ion 3 sedan with 94k
miles.she comes with stick shift standard
transmission 4 door all power package
and great on gas, clean Car Fax #4521
on sale for 5850.00 plus fees. (650)637-
3900
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
ACCURA 1997 3.0 CL CP Black, Auto-
matic $3300, (650)630-3216
CHEVY 1998 Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$5,000, Call Glen @ (650) 583-1242
Ext. # 2
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 2,000
Good Condition (650)481-5296
620 Automobiles
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
OLDSMOBIL”79Royal Delta 88, 122k
Miles, in excelleny Condition $1,800
(650)342-8510
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
DODGE ‘06 DAKOTA SLT model, Quad
Cab, V-8, 63K miles, Excellent Condtion.
$8500, OBO, Daly City. (650)755-5018
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,200.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 cc’s,
Awesome! $5,950/obo Rob SOLD!
HONDA 1983 ASCOT VT 500 Motorcy-
cle, looks like 2012, must see. $1100,
obo, SOLD!
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $50. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAG with
brackets $35., (650)670-2888
NEW MOTORCYCLE HELMET - Modu-
lar, dual visor, $69., (650)595-3933
645 Boats
‘72 18’ RAYSON V Drive flat boat, 468
Chevy motor with wing custom trailer,
$20,000 obo, (650)851-0878
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 1976 Nova rims with tires 2057514
leave message $60 for all
(650)588-7005
2013 DODGE CHARGER wheels & tires,
Boss 338, 22-10, $1300 new,
(650)481-5296
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
FORD FOCUS steel wheels. 14in. rims.
$100. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
HONDA SPEAR tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
HONDA WHEELS with tires. Four steel
13in rims. Factory Hub Caps. $150. San
Bruno. SOLD!
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
MECHANIC'S CREEPER - vintage,
Comet model SP, all wood with
pillow,four swivel wheels, great shape.
$40.00 (650)591-0063
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
RUBBERMAID 2 Gallon oil pan drainers
(2). Never used tags/stickers attached,
$15 ea. (650)588-1946
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
680 Autos Wanted
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
HOME & GARDEN
Bath
TUBZ
Over 400 Tubs on display!
World’s Largest “Hands-On, Feet-In”
Showroom
4840 Davenport Place
Fremont, CA 94538
(510)770-8686
www.tubz.net
Asphalt/Paving
AIM CONSTRUCTION
John Peterson
• Paving • Grading
• Slurry Sealing • Paving Stones
• Concrete • Patching
We AIM to please!
(650)468-6750
(408)422-7695
Lic.# 916680
Cabinetry Contractors
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
Home repairs &
Foundation work
Retaining wall • Decks • Fences
No job too small
Gary Afu
(650)207-2400
Lic# 904960
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
26
Weekend • July 6-7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Cleaning
Concrete
CHETNER CONCRETE
Lic #706952
Driveways - Walkways
- Pool Decks - Patios - Stairs
- Exposed Aggregate - Masonry
- Retaining Walls - Drainage
- Foundation/Slabs
Free Estimates
(650)271-1442 Mike
Construction
Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
Solas
Electric
Best Rates
On all electrical work
7 days a week
Free Estimates
(650) 302-7906
CA License 950866
Bonded and Insured
Electricians
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
JOSE’S
COMPLETE GARDENING
Complete gardening &
Landscaping
Commercial & Residential
Licensed
Free Estimates
(650)315-4011
LEAK PRO
Sprinkler repair, Valves, Timers,
Heads, Broken pipes,
Wire problems, Coverage,
Same Day Service
(800)770-7778
CSL #585999
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)4581572
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof
Repair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
AAA RATED!
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$40 & UP
HAUL
Since 1988
Licensed/Insured
Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating
(650)341-7482
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
$89 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED DRAIN!
Installation of Trenchless Pipes,
Water Heaters & Faucets,
Also, Electrical, Hauling
Carpet, Tile & Stucco
(650)461-0326
Lic# 983312
HAMZEH PLUMBING
5 stars on Yelp!
$25 OFF First Time Customers
All plumbing services
24 hour emergency service
(415)690-6540
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tree Service
Tile
BELMONT TILE &
FOLSOM LAKE TILE
Your local tile store
& contractor
• Tile • Mosaics
• Natural Stone Countertops
• Remodeling
Free Estimates
651 Harbor Blvd.
(near Old County Road)
Belmont
650.421.6508
www.belmontile.com
M-Sa 8:30 am - 5 pm
CASL# 857517
Window Coverings
RUDOLPH’S INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)685-1250
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame • 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos • 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates • Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
27 Weekend • July 6-7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAY’S
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Cemetery
CRIPPEN & FLYNN FUNERAL
CHAPELS
Family owned & operated
Established 1949
Personalized cremation &
funeral services
Serving all faiths & traditions
Woodside chapel: (650)369-4103
FD 879
Carlmont chapel: (650)595-4103
FD 1825
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
DR INSIYA SABOOWALA DDS
DECCAN DENTAL
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
Cantonese, Mandarin & Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
TACO DEL MAR
NOW OPEN
856 N. Delaware St.
San Mateo, CA 94401
(650)348-3680
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WALLBEDS
AND MORE!
$400 off Any Wallbed
www.wallbedsnmore.com
248 Primrose Rd.,
BURLINGAME
(650)868-0082
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
Special Combination Pricing:
Facials, Microdermabrasion,
Waxing , Body Scrubs, Acu-
puncture , Foot & Body Massage
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
www.LeJuinDaySpa.com
(650) 347-6668
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
Health & Medical
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AUTO • HOME • LIFE
Brian Fornesi
Insurance Agency
Tel: (650)343-6521
bfornesi@farmersagent.com
Lic: 0B78218
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
SEVEN STARS
DAY SPA
615 Woodside Road Redwood City
(650)299-9332
Body Massage $60/hour
$40/half hour,
$5 off one hour w/ this ad
Open Daily 9:30 AM to 9:30 PM
UNION SPA & SALON
Grand Opening
Full Massage and
Brazilian Wax
(650)755-2823
7345 Mission St., Daly City
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT
SENIOR LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
Video
ADULT VIDEOS $99 (415)298-0645
28
Weekend • July 6-7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Coins ª Dental ª Jewelry ª Silver ª Watches ª Diamonds
1Z11 80fll0¶8M0 ß90 ª ëâ0·J4¡·¡00¡
Expert Fine Watch
& Jewelry Repair
Not affiliated with any watch company.
Only Authentic ROLEX Factory Parts Are Used
t%FBMWJUI&YQFSUTt2VJDL4FSWJDF
t6OFRVBM$VTUPNFS$BSF
XXX#FTU3BUFE(PME#VZFSTDPN
Tuesday - Saturday
11:00am to 4:00pm
www.BestRatedGoldBuyers.com
KUPFER JEWELRYsBURLINGAME
(650) 347-7007
MUST PRESENT COUPON.
EXPIRES 7/31/13
WEBUY
$â0 $â0
OFF
Established 1979
ROLEX SERVICE
OR REPAIR

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful