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JENKINS TWP.

A Jenkins Township
man makes crosses and sends them world-
wide for free.
Well, he does charge the Holy Spirit a
blessing for all he serves.
Billy Emmanuel, 68, blind in one eye
and an amputee, toils for long hours in his
garage/workshop to craft crosses that he has
sent to places like the Vatican, in churches in
New York City and to Newtown, Conn.
Emmanuel mixes holy water and oil that he
has gathered from various places around the
world Lourdes, Fatima, the River Jordan,
Loch Ireland, India and others into the
stain he uses for every cross.
He said he sends the crosses to people
who need something to hold onto, like the
families of victims of tragedies like the 9/11
terrorist attacks and the shootings at Sandy
Hook Elementary School in Newtown last
December.
Faith is the greatest part of recovery, he
said. Without faith, were lost.
Emmanuel started making the crosses in
1988 shortly after his mother passed away.
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EXETER First time homeowner
Matt Stuka planned to turn a single-fami-
ly house into a rental unit with two apart-
ments.
Easy enough, the 29-year-old thought,
until he hired a contractor to remodel the
house built in the early 1930s on Harland
Street.
Stuka hired George Poplawski as the
contractor to completely renovate the
house turning the rst and second oors
into separate apartments. A hand-written
contract Poplawski drafted was signed
Feb. 27, 2012.
Nearly 16 months after the agreement,
the house at 231 Harland St. remains
empty of tenants due to unnished con-
struction and broken promises.
Poplawski, 41, last known address as
Carey Street in Plains Township, was
charged by Exeter police with theft and
deceptive business practices. After being
arraigned May 18, Poplawski spent two
days at the Luzerne County Correctional
Facility before he was released after post-
ing $25,000 bail.
Attempts to reach Poplawski for com-
ment were unsuccessful last week.
Stuka is not alone.
Other homeowners in the area have
been victimized by contractors, accord-
ing to court records.
A Swoyersville woman hired Lemire
Brown, owner of Brown and Brown Home
Improvement, to replace the roof on her
Noyes Avenue house that was damaged by
Hurricane Sandy in October. The woman
paid a $4,000 deposit as Lemire ripped
Homeowners taken by contractors
Edward Lewis
elewis@timesleader.com
Pete G. Wilcox | The Times Leader
Matthew Stuka of Exeter looks at the kitchen of his new home being patched
up by a contractor fixing the work of a previous contractor who is facing
charges of theft and deceptive business practices.
WILKES-BARRE A data-
base run by the Luzerne County
District Attorneys Ofce that
has been instrumental in hun-
dreds of arrests will now be
extended into Lackawanna
County.
The Precious Metals and
Second Hand Goods Database,
which operates in Luzerne and
Carbon counties, began opera-
tion in Lackawanna County last
week.
Monroe County will jump on
board soon, District Attorney
Stefanie Salavantis said.
The database keeps track of
precious metals and second-hand
items, such as cameras or tools,
sold in local pawn shops.
If that item is reported stolen,
police departments and the dis-
trict attorneys ofce can access
the database to see who sold the
item, which typically leads to an
arrest.
Database led to arrest
Including an arrest in Hazleton
city on July 1 where police
charged 19-year-old city resident
Joseph Genetti with receiving
stolen property after pawning
jewelry removed from a city resi-
dence.
Police said the jewelry was
identied through the database
after the items were pawned at
Johns Pawn Shop on Alter Street
LAC-MEGANTIC, Quebec A train carrying
crude oil derailed Saturday in eastern Quebec, spark-
ing several explosions and a blaze that destroyed the
center of the town of Lac-Megantic and killed at
least one person. An unspecied number of people
were reported missing.
Witnesses said the eruptions sent local residents
scrambling through the streets under the intense
heat of towering reballs and a red glow that illumi-
nated the night sky.
Quebec provincial police Lt. Michel Brunet con-
rmed that one person had died. He refused to say
how many others might be dead, but said authorities
have been told many people have been reported
missing.
Up to 1,000 people were forced from their homes
in the middle of the night in the town, which is about
155 miles (250 kilometers) east of Montreal and
about 10 miles (16 kilometers) west of the Maine
border.
The derailment caused several tanker rail cars to
explode in the downtown core, a popular area known
for its bars that is often bustling on summer weekend
nights. Police said the rst explosion tore through
the town shortly after 1 a.m.
The re spread to a number of homes in the lake-
side town of 6,000 people, and witnesses said the
ames shot up highter than the steeple on a nearby
church.
Flames and billowing black smoke could be seen
more than 12 hours after the derailment, which
involved a 73-car train.
When you see the center of your town almost
destroyed, youll understand that were asking our-
selves how we are going to get through this event,
an emotional Mayor Colette Roy-Laroche told a tele-
vised news brieng.
The cause of the derailment was not immediately
known.
Dozens of residents gathered hours after the
explosion at the edge of a wide security perimeter
and many feared the worst. About a kilometer (0.6
miles) down the towns main street, ames danced
around a railway tanker that sat at the edge of the
road.
On a beautiful evening like this with the bar, there
were a lot of people there, said Bernard Demers,
The Associated Press
County precious metals database expanding
Program, which police credit with numerous arrests, is adopted by Lackawanna County.
Sheena Delazio
sdelazio@timesleader.com
Aimee Dilger Photos | The Times Leader
Billy Emmanuel measures up the size of a spear he will be sending to the Vatican.
His cross to build
Giving themsomething to hold on to
Jenkins Twp. mans faith,
passion drive him to
donate handmade crosses
Bill OBoyle
boboyle@timesleader.com
See HOMEOWNERS | 11A
See TRAIN | 12A
See CROSS | 11A
See METALS | 11A
CHECK OUT
CONTRACTORS
The Building Industry Association of
Northeastern Pennsylvania, Kingston:
287-3331
Pennsylvania Builders Association,
Harrisburg: 717-730-4380
Pennsylvania Attorney General, Home
Improvement Registration, Harrisburg:
1-888-520-6680
Better Business Bureau: www.bbb.org.
Crude oil train
derails, 1 dead,
many missing
in Quebec town
AP Photo
Smoke rises fromrailway cars that were carrying crude oil after
derailing in downtown Lac Megantic, Quebec, on Saturday.
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Issue No. 2013-170 2013-188
POLICE BLOTTER
HANOVER TWP. A
Diamond Avenue woman reported
her home was burglarized between
10 p.m. Friday and 2:30 a.m.
Saturday, police said.
A Toshiba laptop computer,
cigarettes and cash from the apart-
ment was reported stolen, police
said.
NANTICOKE An 11-year-
old boy was struck by a car while
riding his bicycle around 9:30
p.m. on Apollo Circle, police said.
Police have not named the boy or
driver and say an investigation is
ongoing.
The boy was thrown from his
bicycle and landed on the cars
hood. The boy was treated at
Geisinger Hospital for facial inju-
ries and other abrasions. The
female driver was uninjured.
WILKES-BARRE City
police reported the following:
A Wilkes-Barre man was
arrested on charges of aggravated
assault and making terroristic
threats Tuesday.
Steven Fox, 25, was arraigned
before district Judge Donald
Whittaker on six felony counts of
aggravated assault, three misde-
meanor counts of making terror-
istic threats and three summary
counts of reckless endangerment,
according to court documents.
Fox was jailed for lack of
$100,000 cash bail. A pre-trial
hearing is scheduled for Thursday.
While driving on East Main
Street, a Wilkes-Barre man struck
a boy who reportedly ran into the
street Wednesday, police said.
The boy was treated at Geisinger
Wyoming Valley for moderate inju-
ries.
A Monroe Street home was
reportedly burglarized and an
unidentied thief stole copper
pipe and wiring.
An unidentifed thief stole
six hair clippers, ve blades and a
bag of lollipops from Phils Barber
Shop Friday along Park Avenue.
The value of items stolen is esti-
mated to be about $950.
A Scranton woman reported
she was robbed of a half-carat dia-
mond ring on a white gold band
after she went to Wilkes-Barre to
sell it Monday.
The woman, whose name was
not released, had advertised the
ring using the Craigslist website
and said she met an unidentied
black male who appeared to be in
his 20s, about 5 feet, 7 inches tall
and wearing blue and white Nike
Jordan high-top sneakers, police
said.
The man lured the woman
behind a home at 261 N. Main
Street, police said. After claiming
he did not have a key, took the ring
and ran, police said.
A 2010 blue and white ATV
was reportedly stolen from a home
along Bruce Lane, police said.
A man was assaulted and
robbed of his mobile phone around
10:15 p.m. Friday near Turkey Hill
on George Avenue, police said.
The victim described his attacker
as a large white male. Police have
no leads in this case.
A Kingston man was arrested
on retail theft charges Wednesday
after he allegedly stole a T-shirt
from Boscovs along South Main
Street.
Nathaniel Miller, 26, was
arraigned before district Judge
Rick Cronauer for one count of
misdemeanor retail theft and jailed
at Luzerne County Correctional
Facility for lack of $7,500 bail,
court records show. A pre-trial
hearing has been scheduled for
Tuesday.
Linda Vincent, 42, was arrest-
ed Wednesday on Madison Street
after police noticed she was highly
intoxicated. She was held at police
headquarters until she sobered,
cited for public drunkenness and
released, police said.
An unidentifed thief robbed
Outsiders Saloon, South Main
Street, around 9 a.m. Friday taking
a cash drawer and a metal change
box after smashing the bars glass
door, police said. Police did not
know the total loss from the theft
and damage.
A central air conditioning unit
reportedly was stolen Wednesday
from behind a a Mundy Street
property, police said.
Samuel Gomez, 24, of
Scranton was cited for urinating in
public Thursday near the Luzerne
National Bank building, Public
Square, police said.
A silver GT Nomad bicycle
was stolen Thursday from a New
Market Street, police said.
Mark Sherman
Associated Press
WASHINGTON When the
Supreme Court struck down
part of an anti-gay marriage law,
Justice Anthony Kennedy took
pains in his majority opinion to
say the ruling applied only to
legally married same-sex cou-
ples seeking benets from the
federal government.
But judges and lawyers rep-
resenting same-sex couples are
already using Kennedys lan-
guage and reasoning in other
cases about the right to marry.
Its a predictable next step in
a long-term, incremental legal
strategy that is being used at
both the state and federal lev-
els, and in state legislatures and
executive mansions as well as
the courts, to build public and
ofcial acceptance of gay mar-
riage. Much the same approach
was used decades ago by civil
rights lawyers ghting state-
sanctioned discrimination; one
decision becomes a stepping-
stone to the next.
In the fght over gay marriage,
Kennedys words also fgured in
an earlier example. He insisted
in June 2003 that his opinion
overturning state sodomy laws
had nothing to do with govern-
ments recognition of same-sex
marriage. Five months later, lan-
guage from his opinion showed
up in the second paragraph of
a state court ruling that made
Massachusetts the frst state to
allow gay and lesbian couples to
marry.
In the June 26 decision in U.S.
v. Windsor, Kennedy said the
provision denying federal ben-
ets to legally married same-sex
couples relegates those marriag-
es to second-class status, and
it humiliates tens of thousands
of children now being raised by
same-sex couples.
He framed his argument with
reference to states historic
and essential authority to dene
the marital relation.
But it doesnt take too much
creativity to reframe his opin-
ion to challenge state bans on
same-sex marriage, said Jon
Davidson, legal director of the
gay rights group Lambda Legal.
Its stigmatizing and its
harmful to people and particu-
larly harmful to children when
their parents relationship is
treated as inferior by the govern-
ment. Those points are points
we will be making in all of our
marriage cases, Davidson said.
Davidsons group is rely-
ing on the invalidation of the
Defense of Marriage Act provi-
sion in a state lawsuit to force
New Jersey to allow same-sex
couples to wed. In that case, the
new argument is that the New
Jersey Constitution does not
allow the state to essentially
keep same-sex couples from
receiving federal benets by
prohibiting them from marry-
ing.
Like the Massachusetts
Supreme Judicial Court, other
state court rulings in favor of
gay marriage have relied on
provisions of their state consti-
tutions. That has not happened
by accident. The litigation plan
had been to pursue marriage
in liberal states, based on state
constitutions, and generally
avoid federal courts where judg-
es appointed by conservative
Republican presidents had, until
recently, been in the majority.
Federal courts in California
are so far the only ones that
have said that a state same-sex
marriage ban violates the U.S.
Constitution. The Supreme
Court did not decide that issue
one way or the other in its gay
marriage rulings, and instead
relied on a technical legal argu-
ment to resolve the California
case and clear the way for same-
sex marriage in the state, which
resumed at the end of June.
Same-sex marriage is legal,
or soon will be, in 13 states and
the District of Columbia, rep-
resenting about 30 percent of
the U.S. population. The states
are: California, Connecticut,
Delaware, Iowa, Maine,
Maryland, Massachusetts,
Minnesota, New Hampshire,
New York, Rhode Island,
Vermont and Washington.
But now federal challenges
are popping up as well, in
Nevada, Hawaii and Michigan,
among other states.
The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of
Appeals in San Francisco, which
struck down the California pro-
hibition on same-sex marriage,
will consider the Hawaii and
Nevada bans together, but that
case is in its early stages.
In Michigan, a federal judge
prominently cited the Windsor
decision in allowing a challenge
to the states marriage ban and
its prohibition on same-sex cou-
ples jointly adopting children to
go forward.
U.S. District Judge Bernard
Friedman, appointed by
President Ronald Reagan, quot-
ed Kennedy in concluding that
plaintiffs are entitled to their
day in court and they shall have
it.
A separate case in Michigan
also might cast a large shadow
over a state law limiting mar-
riage to opposite-sex couples,
Georgetown University law pro-
fessor Marty Lederman wrote
on scotusblog.com.
In that dispute, public employ-
ees are challenging a Michigan
law that cuts off domestic part-
ner benets for unmarried cou-
ples.
U.S. District Judge David
Lawson, appointed by President
Bill Clinton, partly relied on the
recent Supreme Court case in
saying, It is hard to argue with
a straight face that the primary
purpose, indeed, perhaps the
sole purpose, of the statute is
other than to deny health ben-
ets to the same-sex partners
of public employees. But that
can never be a legitimate gov-
ernmental purpose. Lawson
blocked the law for now, pend-
ing a trial.
When civil rights lawyers
began their decadeslong quest
to end ofcial discrimination
against black Americans, they
pursued cases in state and feder-
al courts that typically stopped
short of the ultimate goal of
overturning the Supreme Court
decree in Plessy v. Ferguson in
1896 that separate but equal
treatment of the races was per-
mitted by the Constitution.
In a series of cases, the court
chipped away at discrimination
in higher education, including
its 1950 decision in Sweatt v.
Painter that said the University
of Texas had to admit a black
student to its law school
because the one it created for
black students did not offer an
equivalent education. But even
in June 1950, the court refused
to re-examine the Plessy case.
Four more years elapsed
before the court issued its semi-
nal ruling in Brown v. Board of
Education outlawing discrimi-
nation in public schools.
The prominent odd-cou-
ple lawyers who brought the
California case to the Supreme
Court, Republican Theodore
Olson and Democrat David
Boies, hoped the court would
in one fell swoop get rid of 30
state constitutional bans on gay
marriage and a few state stat-
utes and declare that the right
to marry cannot be abridged on
the basis of sexual orientation
and gender.
They failed to win that big
victory, although their clients
got married two days after the
court decision.
For a time, Olson and Boies
were at odds with many gay
rights advocates who feared
that asking the court to rule too
broadly too soon could backre.
It turned out that the California
case helped focus attention on
gay marriage and perhaps sped
up the shift in public opinion
that now shows a majority in
favor of same-sex marriage in
most polls.
The different approaches have
sometimes coexisted uneas-
ily. That, too, is reminiscent of
the civil rights movement, said
Harvard Law School professor
Mark Tushnet, who has written
about the legal strategy of civil
rights lawyers. There were
lawsuits that the NAACP didnt
want because they were seen
as sure losers, but local lawyers
went ahead and brought them
anyway. They werent part of
the plan, Tushnet said.
Ten years ago, 13 states still
had laws against sodomy when
the court said that states have
no right to intrude on the pri-
vate, personal conduct of peo-
ple, regardless of sexual orienta-
tion.
Interracial marriage still
was illegal in 16 states in 1967
before the high court outlawed
race-based state marriage bans.
In 1954, when the court
issued its landmark Brown deci-
sion, 17 states had formally seg-
regated school systems.
No one is sure what the magic
number needs to be for the
court to set a nationwide rule.
Tushnet predicts that when
roughly 40 states allow same-
sex marriage, it is going to
seem all right to tell Mississippi
that it has to recognize gay mar-
riage.
Justice Antonin Scalia, a dis-
senter in 2003 and again this
year, saw the seeds of same-sex
marriage in the courts 2003
decision and he saw them again
in the Windsor case, despite
Kennedys insistence that the
opinion was limited.
How easy it is, indeed how
inevitable, to reach the same
conclusion with regard to state
laws denying same-sex couples
marital status, Scalia said.
Gay marriage ruling already in use in other cases
NEW YORK One makes a video
with Steve Buscemi and rockers Vampire
Weekend. Another gets shout-outs from
Whoopi Goldberg and Brooke Shields. A
third hobnobs over cocktails with an actor
from The Sopranos.
No, its not an awards show weekend. Its
the New York City mayors race, featuring a
cast of celebrities like few other municipal
elections.
Last weekend, Democratic mayoral con-
tender Christine Quinn unfurled a star-
dusted list of pro-gay-rights backers of her
bid to become the citys rst female and
rst openly gay mayor. Among them: singer
Lance Bass, actor Neil Patrick Harris, direc-
tor Rob Reiner and Project Runway style
czar Tim Gunn, who said Quinn would
make the position of mayor the bully pulpit
it needs to be to ght for all New Yorkers.
Ten days earlier, Alec Baldwin announced
that hed rafe off two dinner invites to any-
amount donors to Democratic candidate
Bill de Blasio.
There are few things I enjoy more than a
good meal with good company, particularly
when an issue as urgent as the New York
City mayoral election is up for discussion,
the 30 Rock actor told de Blasio support-
ers in an email, saying the candidate under-
stands the inequality crisis facing our city.
And in May, a fundraiser for Republican
hopeful Joe Lhota spotlighted as special
guest Steve Schirripa, best known as
gentle-spirited goodfella Bobby Bacala
Baccalieri on The Sopranos.
With the super-competitive campaign to
lead the nations biggest city in high gear
since spring, the day-to-day menu of candi-
date forums, policy speeches and endorse-
ments from political gures and interest
groups has increasingly been sprinkled
with a healthy dash of glitz.
One day, its a video from hip-hop impre-
sario Russell Simmons praising de Blasio,
now the city public advocate. Another
day, its Goldberg posting on her Facebook
page to cheerlead for City Council Speaker
Quinn, who also counts Shields as a backer.
Or salsa star Willie Colon tweeting a link
to a song he wrote lauding Democratic con-
tender Bill Thompson, a former city comp-
troller.
Indeed, the race can sometimes seem like
something of a ballot-box version of Battle
of the Network Stars. De Blasios LGBT
for BdB gala is headlined by Sarah Jessica
Parker and Cynthia Nixon of Sex and
the City fame and Tony Award-winning
actor Alan Cumming? Well, here comes
the LGBT for Quinn team, with actor-
playwright Harvey Fierstein and actors
Cheyenne Jackson and George Takei, along
with Bass, Harris, Reiner and Gunn.
Republican candidate George McDonald,
meanwhile, has links to actor Ethan Hawke,
a longtime supporter of the Doe Fund, the
homelessness-services nonproft McDonald
runs. GOP rival John Catsimatidis has
been cultivating a theatrical tie of his
own the billionaire businessman has
been underwriting performances of The
Little Flower, actor Tony Lo Biancos one-
man show about former New York Mayor
Fiorello La Guardia.
Entertainers, athletes and other pop cul-
ture icons have lent star power to national
politics since at least 1920, when singer and
comedian Al Jolson wrote a campaign song
for Republican nominee Warren Harding
and ushered dozens of theater performers
to a rally at Hardings Ohio home. Later,
show business would pave the path for sev-
eral stars to win ofce themselves, most
prominently President Ronald Reagan.
And celebrities politics can be local, too,
particularly in such fame havens as New
York and Los Angeles, where the recent
mayoral contest drew in Salma Hayek,
Moby, Jimmy Kimmel and Magic Johnson,
among other buzzerati.
In places where voter rolls are stuffed
with boldface names, candidates can almost
feel pressed to get celebs on their side, says
former New York mayoral candidate Tom
Allon, a newspaper publisher who dropped
his campaign in March. He doesnt think
stars political opinions carry much weight
with New Yorkers, but if hed kept running
and could tap some famous endorsers, Im
sure I would have tried, he said.
While celebrities imprimatur may not
sway voters, stars can help campaigns more
indirectly, political observers say.
The crude notion that celebrities are
persuasive, most of the time, for how peo-
ple vote is just wrong. But I think celebrities
are very important in certain situations:
fundraising, attracting crowds and interest
where it otherwise might not exist, says
North Carolina State University political
science professor Michael Cobb, who has
researched whether celebrity endorsements
affect voters.
A star might get more people to a rally or
fundraiser, generate press coverage or write
checks and round up wealthy friends to
do likewise. (Several celebrities are bring-
ing their pocketbooks to bear on the New
York mayoral campaign, including Quinn
donors Tom Hanks and Jon Bon Jovi and
de Blasio contributors Paul Simon and John
Turturro.)
And a celebrated backer can contribute to
voters view of a candidate, especially if the
stars known for political activism.
Heated NYC mayors race is a star-studded afair
JENNIFER PELTZ
Associated Press
How easy it is, indeed how inevitable, to reach the same con-
clusion with regard to state laws denying same-sex couples
marital status,
Justice Antonin Scalia,
United States Supreme Court Justice
Daily Number, Midday
Sunday: 8-7-8
Monday: 8-2-4
Tuesday: 1-0-8
Wednesday: 1-2-6
Thursday: 3-5-5
Friday: 4-7-6
Saturday: 8-9-1
Big Four, Midday
Sunday: 7-7-4-1
Monday: 7-5-4-7
Tuesday: 6-9-3-4
Wednesday: 7-1-8-3
Thursday: 9-9-8-0
Friday: 2-4-7-2
Saturday: 2-3-6-7
Quinto, Midday
Sunday: 7-9-7-9-3
Monday: 0-2-0-6-8
Tuesday: 2-9-6-7-0
Wednesday: 1-6-4-1-3
Thursday: 0-4-7-7-3
Friday: 7-0-1-0-7
Saturday: 1-5-2-2-2
Treasure Hunt
Sunday: 08-19-20-25-29
Monday: 05-11-12-22-30
Tuesday: 04-16-21-22-23
Wednesday: 02-16-24-26-30
Thursday: 07-14-19-26-30
Friday: 02-10-12-17-18
Saturday: 05-06-15-16-24
Daily Number, 7 p.m.
Sunday: 2-8-9
Monday: 7-3-1
Tuesday: 1-5-2
Wednesday: 3-2-7
Thursday: 2-9-0
Friday: 0-3-6
Saturday: 0-1-4
Big Four, 7 p.m.
Sunday: 9-6-0-8
Monday: 7-7-4-7
Tuesday: 3-8-8-7
Wednesday: 5-8-4-1
Thursday: 4-5-2-9
Friday: 5-5-7-6
Saturday: 7-0-1-7
Quinto, 7 p.m.
Sunday: 2-6-4-4-3
Monday: 0-5-2-1-6
Tuesday: 2-2-8-8-3
Wednesday: 8-0-6-1-0
Thursday: 4-4-9-0-3
Friday: 6-5-8-7-4
Saturday: 5-4-2-9-6
Cash 5
Sunday: 12-13-15-21-39
Monday: 01-26-29-32-37
Tuesday: 09-12-20-32-34
Wednesday: 15-18-20-36-43
Thursday: 05-14-18-23-33
Friday: 16-17-27-37-39
Saturday: 08-23-25-31-40
Match 6 Lotto
Monday: 10-11-23-30-35-49
Thursday: 09-28-29-33-37-44
Powerball
Wednesday: 03-06-29-40-51
powerball: 04
Saturday: 02-13-35-36-52
powerball: 11
Mega Millions
Tuesday: 36-42-51-52-53
MegaBall: 40
Megaplier: 04
Friday: 02-23-41-47-54
MegaBall: 42
Megaplier: 04
Millionaire Rafe Drawing:
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00285673
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LOCAL
IN BRIEF
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER SUNDAY,JULY 7, 2013 PAGE XX
Newface in familiar space on Harveys Lake
Jerry Lynott
jlynott@timesleader.com
HARVEYS LAKE The guy busing
tables at the Boathouse Bar & Grill just
might be Joe Amato, one of the owners.
Since it opened in the former
Dominics location at the intersection of
Carpenter Road and Lakeside Drive, he
and his co-owners have been helping out
where needed.
Whether its righting an overturned
ower pot near the entrance or turn-
ing on the lights in the stairwell leading
to the second-oor bar, the 69-year-old
businessman and former drag racing
champion has been hands-on early on.
Im learning something new, Amato
said during a recent busy Sunday after-
noon.
The tables at the tiki bar overlook-
ing Lakeside Drive were lled. Inside, a
50th birthday party was underway in a
private dining area. Downst ai rs
the restaurant was getting ready for its
4 p.m. opening. The Boathouse is open
daily except Monday.
A few bumps have been smoothed
over during the rst week.The impor-
tant thing is you take care of people,
Amato said.
He has other business ventures
such as the Gateway Shopping Center
in Edwardsville and the City Centre
in downtown Wilkes-Barre, but the
Boathouse is a rst for him. He and his
companion, Andrea Donten, joined with
restaurateurs Mike and Andy Partash to
put a new face on a familiar place.
We love Harveys Lake, all of us,
Amato said.
He and the Partash brothers own boat-
houses nearby, and hes been coming to
the lake for more than 20 years. Hes
been at the Dominics and its predeces-
sor Damiens on the Lake.
When the property became available,
they bought it last year. Its a great loca-
tion and venue, he said, adding, It ts
the lake.
Hes relied on the Partash brothers
who own Brews Brothers in Jenkins
Township and several other bars and
restaurants for their expertise. Theyve
invested about $750,000 in equipment
and improvements in the building. The
ground-oor restaurant and bar seats
about 100 people and offers a dinner
menu including steaks, lobster and
chicken. The second-oor also has a
bar and indoor and outdoor seating.
Combined theres room for up to 300
people.
Theres room for a new restaurant
too. Grotto Pizza and Jones Potato
Pancakes are nearby.
The other places around, thats a
good thing, Amato said. Everybodys
happy were here.
Co-owner Joe Amato stands on the patio of the recently opened Boathouse Bar & Grill on
Lakeside Drive at Harveys Lake.
Bill Tarutis | For The Times Leader
Patrons pack the recently opened Boathouse Bar & Grill on the corner of Carpenter Road and Lakeside Drive at Harveys Lake on Sunday afternoon.
Getting
smart about
parking in
Scranton
Jerry Lynott
jlynott@timesleader.com
Scranton has been a quick
study on using the Pango smart-
phone app for metered parking in
the downtown, according to the
head of the company providing
the service.
During the rst four weeks
since the no-fee, pay-by-phone
app was launched in the city, its
been used 2,750 times, said Dani
Shavit, chief executive ofcer of
Pango Shyyny USA of Baltimore.
In comparison, the more popu-
lous Chattanooga, Tenn., record-
ed just 323 transactions over a
similar time frame.
The rst month is important
because it indicates how the ser-
vice is accepted, Shavit said.
We got a very denite answer
that the Scranton parkers are
ready and willing to be smart
parkers, he added.
Shavit gave a breakdown of the
customers usage: approximately
25 percent used the service more
than twice a week; another 25
percent more than two times a
month; and 50 percent more than
once a month.
The mobile payment park-
ing service is available in near-
ly 50 cities around the world.
Shavit would like to promote its
success in Scranton, the only
Northeastern Pennsylvania city
to have it, to attract business
elsewhere.
The service provides real-
time, online reporting so parking
enforcement can verify payment
has been made for a meter.
The service does not cost the
city any money. Pango receives
a share of the assessed fees from
the more than 800 app-enabled
meters. Shavit said he would
like to see all of the citys meters
equipped for smart parking.
People can register on the com-
panys web site, www.mypango.
com, or download the app from
the App Store. They also can
register by calling toll-free 1-877-
697-2646.
The company charges $1.99 a
month for the reminder service
that sends a notice 15 minutes
before the meter runs out. Pango
users can extend the parking ses-
sion without having to go back to
the meter.
To date, 650 people who use
the Scranton meters have signed
up for the payment system. As an
incentive to join, customers who
register before the end of this
month will receive 10 hours of
free parking worth $10.
Merchants can also benet,
and 10 of them are participating
in a free mobile advertising pro-
gram that provides store coupons
to parkers, Shavit said. Theres
an incentive for them, too. Every
merchant that joins before the
end of September will get one
year of participation for free.
WILKES-BARRE
Sem to host jazz
concert
The Riverfront Parks Committee and
the Wyoming Seminary Performing Arts
Institute presents An Evening of Jazz
on the River Common Tuesday at 7:30
p.m. at the Wilkes-Barre River Common
Amphitheatre, Northampton and River
Street Portal.
The Wyoming Seminary Performing
Arts Institute Brass Quintet, guest singers
and drummers are to perform Dixie-style
jazz and other light, entertaining music
from Broadway musicals, standard jazz
charts and others.
WAPWALLOPEN
Campground to
hold fair
The Moyers Grove Campground is
hosting its second annual Christmas
in July Craft and Vendor Show to raise
money for the Make-A-Wish Foundation,
a non-prot group that helps children with
terminal illness fulll personal wishes.
The event is free to the public and will
have family-geared activities like face-
painting and a scavenger hunt. Vendors
are to sell novelty handmade jewelry,
home decor and personal items as well as
homemade food and candies.
The campground has donated more
than $200,000 to the foundation since
1991.
HARRISBURG
Gov. Corbett gets
aggressive
Republican Gov. Tom Corbett is start-
ing to wade into a re-election campaign
after the collapse of three major agenda
items in the state Legislature.
His campaign aides say they plan to be
aggressive in telling his story and pointing
out contrasts with the Democrats seeking
their partys nomination to oppose him in
November 2014.
Observers say Corbett will be able to
raise campaign money and hell have the
status of being the incumbent. But polls
show weak public support for the rst-
termRepublican.
Corbett has a record of opposing new
taxes and handling dwindling revenues
fromthe economic downturn.
But opponents say hes shown weak
leadership, citing the failure of his liquor
privatization, transportationinfrastructure
and public pension overhaul initiatives.
BINGHAMTON
Zoo celebrates
new features
A special ribbon cutting ceremony will
take place on Wednesday at 12:30 p.m.
to showcase the renovations and new-
est additions to the upper portion of the
Binghamton Zoo. The Zoo has completed
The Leopards Spot Snack Shack, New
World Tropics rain forest building, pen-
guin viewing area, and the welcomed two
newtigers and an Amur leopard.
Starting this week, zookeepers are kick-
ing off Roaring Thursday Nights being
held every Thursday from July 11 to Aug.
29 whenthe zoo will stay openuntil 8 p.m.
on Thursday.
The reZOOvenation project also
includes the additions of a Nile monitor,
arctic fox, and Asian black vulture. In the
newly renovated Barn Yard attraction,
Shetland sheep, Jacobs sheep, Flemish
Giant rabbits and barn owls have arrived.
BARNESVILLE
Agency leads hike
in state park
Naturalist Robin Tracey is to lead hik-
ers Wednesday, July 17, through the Oak
Loop Trail at Locust Lake State Park.
The grueling four-mile hike will follow
the Eagle Scout Tree Identication Trail
and traverses up a mountain to end at a
scenic overlook into the forest below.
Dogs are welcome, but must be friendly
and on a leash. Hikers are advised to bring
water, appropriate shoes and bug spray.
Jennifer Learn-Andes
jandes@timesleader.com
The former Hottles
Restaurant on South Main
Street in Wilkes-Barre is
among more than 350 prop-
erties slated for Luzerne
Countys Aug. 22 free-and-
clear, back-tax auction, county
records show.
The popular dining estab-
lishment closed in the fall of
2010 after 73 years in busi-
ness.
Property owners William
and Lynn Kravits, who took
over the eatery in 1994, owe
$26,717 in property taxes
from 2010 through 2012,
county records show. The
couple could not be reached
for comment.
Properties are eligible for
auction if real estate taxes are
unpaid for two years.
The August sale is for prop-
erties that werent snatched
up in a rst-stage September
auction, when liens were still
attached.
Free-and-clear auctions
typically draw large crowds
of bidders because back taxes,
mortgages and other liens
tied to the properties are for-
given. Most properties will be
listed at starting bids under
$1,000 to recoup only the tax
claim ofce costs to bring the
parcels to auction.
Among the other proper-
ties scheduled for the August
auction, according to county
records:
The Four Seasons Golf
Club in Exeter owned by
Amita and Ragesh Patel,
which has $194,600 in taxes
owed on two parcels from
2010 through 2012.
Keystone Garden Estates,
an assisted-living facility in
Larksville, with a back-tax
debt of $367,919 dating back
to 2007.
The former Coal Crackers
bar and restaurant on Alter
Street in Hazleton. Owner
Carol Sheman owes $12,881
in taxes from 2010 to the pres-
ent.
Six properties owned by
Hazle Township business-
man James Lagana, including
his 6,600-square-foot man-
sion on Butler Terrace Drive
in the township, which is
assessed at $675,000. Lagana
owes $38,000 in taxes on the
residence from 2010 through
2012.
A 2,700-square-foot resi-
dential property on Wyoming
Road in Dallas Township
assessed at $481,900. Frank
M. Henry Jr. owns the 10.3-
acre property and owes
$31,942 in taxes from 2010 to
the present.
Property owners may get
properties removed from the
auction if they pay the back
taxes before the sale, le for
bankruptcy or convince a
judge that the property should
be pulled.
A representative of
Keystone Garden Estates said
that property will be removed
from the sale because taxes
will be paid through a pending
renancing.
Northeast Revenue Service
LLC, the countys tax-claim
operator, oversees back-tax
auctions. A list of available
parcels and information on
bidding will be posted in the
near future at www.luzerne-
countytaxclaim.com.
County prepares for August back-tax auction
Aimee Dilger | The Times Leader
The sign is still on the Hottles
Restaurant building.
PAGE 4A SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013 NEWS www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER
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On tour, Giffords actions speak on gun control
Steve Peoples
Associated Press
DOVER, N.H. Thirty
months after she was shot
through the head, former
Arizona Congresswoman
Gabrielle Giffords sits in a
New Hampshire restaurant
facing parents of children
killed in the nations latest
school shooting.
They are here to talk
political strategy, but
Giffords doesnt say much.
She doesnt have to.
The 43-year-old
Democrat has become the
face of the ght for gun con-
trol a woman nowknown
as much for her actions as
her words as she recovers
from a 2011 attack that for-
ever changed her life and
ended six others. Giffords
has already traveled more
than 8,000 miles this week,
her husband, retired astro-
naut Mark Kelly, at her side,
encouraging political lead-
ers from Alaska to Maine to
have the courage to defy the
National Rie Association.
I dont think any of us
thought this was going to
be easy, Kelly tells three
parents of children killed in
the Newton, Conn., school
shootings, with Giffords
next to him, nodding her
agreement. This is not
going to be a quick x. But
were trying.
The couple is nearing the
end of a seven-state-in-sev-
en-day tour across America,
meeting with allies and
opponents alike to generate
momentum for federal leg-
islation that would expand
background checks on gun
purchases. Its a scaled-back
version of a broad legisla-
tive package to ban assault
weapons and high-capacity
magazines proposed in the
aftermath of the Newtown
shooting rampage that left
20 children dead. But even
scaled back, the measure
was defeated in the Senate
in April and has stalled in
a divided Congress now
preparing for its summer
recess.
AsGiffords tourstretched
into Maine on Saturday,
the couple shared a private
lunch with former President
George H.W. Bush and his
wife, Barbara, at their estate
in Kennebunkport, Maine.
Its unclear if Giffords and
Kelly discussed gun control
with the Bushes, who are
personal acquaintances.
Giffords cross-country
trek is the centerpiece of
a summertime campaign
designed to pressure elected
ofcials in their own back-
yards. At the same time,
her recently formed super
PAC and related nonprot
group have ambitious plans
to expand their political
clout through the 2014 mid-
term elections and beyond.
Organizers say that the
group, known as Americans
for Responsible Solutions,
is expected to raise at least
$20 million to fuel paid
television ads and political
activities to coincide with
the next election, the next
gun control vote or both.
So far, New York City
Mayor Michael Bloomberg
has bankrolled much of the
campaign to expand back-
ground checks through his
own organization, Mayors
Against Illegal Guns, pour-
ing more than $12 million
into advertising designed
to pressure lawmakers in
places like New Hampshire,
Arizona and Arkansas.
But this week, Giffords
and Kelly are playing a more
personal role. They are eat-
ing pie, sharing hugs and
having frank conversations
to connect with voters in
traditional gun-owning
states whose leaders have
been largely reluctant to
support expanded back-
ground checks in the face of
NRA opposition.
And they are shooting
guns to help make their
point.
Kelly, a former Navy
pilot whose parents were
police ofcers, purchased
a new rie he said it
was his sixth or seventh
gun at the Village Gun
Shop in New Hampshires
north country on Friday.
He waited less than ve
minutes for a background
check and later tested his
Savage .30-06 bolt-action
rie at a nearby shooting
range. Giffords joined him
at a Nevada shooting range
earlier in the week, ring a
gun for the rst time since
a mentally ill man took
aim at her and opened re
in a Tucson, Ariz., shop-
ping center as she met
with constituents. Jared
Lee Loughner, 24, was
sentenced in November
to seven consecutive life
sentences, plus 140 years,
after he pleaded guilty to
19 federal charges in the
case.
Its an attack that Kelly
refers to often, using phras-
es like, what happened to
Gabby and when my wife
was shot. The couple is
traveling with a handful of
guns packed in a suitcase
all for personal use on
their trip.
Sandy Holz, the shops
owner in Whiteeld, N.H.,
says shes reluctant to
endorse broad gun con-
trol legislation but would
support a bill to requir-
ing background checks for
sales at gun shows and on
the Internet, as the failed
Senate bill would have
done.
A Washington Post-ABC
News poll in mid-May
found that 67 percent of
Americans felt the Senate
wrongly rejected the back-
ground check bill.
A Pew Research Center
poll conducted in early May
found 81 percent favor mak-
ing private gun sales and
sales at gun shows subject
to background checks, sup-
port that transcends party
lines. Another 73 percent of
respondents said that if the
background check bill were
brought up for another vote,
Congress should pass it.
But there is little sign of
movement in Washington.
Despite Giffords and
Bloombergs continued
lobbying, none of the bills
proponents report winning
a single new vote since the
measures April defeat. If
anything, their task may
have grown more difcult
since the death last month
of Sen. Frank Lautenberg,
D-N.J., who supported
the checks. He has been
replaced by Republican Sen.
Jeff Chiesa, whose view on
the subject is unclear.
Giffords and Kelly say
they will not give up despite
obvious health issues.
More than two years
after the attack, Giffords
travels with nurses and a
speech therapist, a rarely
used wheelchair in tow. Her
right leg and arm are par-
tially paralyzed. She walks
on her own, her right leg
dragging slightly, and she
climbs stairs, often with
Kelly or a staff member
holding her left hand.
The brain injury has also
affected her ability to speak.
Giffords offers enthusi-
astic, but slightly slurred
stump speeches on the tour,
in a halting style that some-
times brings tears to the
eyes of her audience and
her staff.
We must never stop
ghting. Fight. Fight. Fight.
Be bold, be courageous,
the nation is counting on
you, she said at a Portland,
Maine press conference.
The entire speech, just 62
words, lasted less than two
minutes.
The cross-country tour
is run with the efciency
and detail of a presidential
campaign, with schedules
planned down to the min-
ute. Surrounded by a hand-
ful of young staffers and
her service dog, Nelson,
Giffords and Kelly use pri-
vate planes and at times
helicopters, visiting venues
usually frequented by politi-
cians.
Zimmerman jury to ponder conficting testimony
Prosecution rested its case
Friday, same day judge denied
request for acquittal.
AP PHOTO
Trayvon Martins mother, Sybrina Fulton, takes the stand during George
Zimmermans trial in Seminole County circuit court, on Friday in Sanford, Fla.
By KYLE HIGHTOWER and
MIKE SCHNEIDER
The Associated Press
SANFORD, Fla. Jurors in
the G
eorge Zimmerman trial are
heading into their weekend
with a lot of courtroom drama
and conicting testimony to
digest.
Fridays action-packed ses-
sion saw the prosecution rest
its case, and the judge reject
a defense request to acquit
Zimmerman of second-degree
murder in the fatal shooting of
17-year-old Trayvon Martin last
year.
The mothers of both Martin
and Zimmerman listened to the
same 911 recording of someone
screaming for help, and each
said she was convinced the
voice was that of her own son.
The question of whose voice
is on the recording could be cru-
cial to the jury in deciding who
was the aggressor in the con-
frontation between the neigh-
borhood watch volunteer and
the teenager.
I heard my son scream-
ing, Martins mother, Sybrina
Fulton, said rmly after she was
played a recording in which dis-
tant, high-pitched wails could
be heard in the background as
a Zimmerman neighbor asked
a dispatcher to send police.
Moments later on the call, there
was a gunshot and the crying
stopped.
Gladys Zimmerman, though,
testied she recognized the
voice all too well: My son.
Asked how she could be certain,
she said: Because its my son.
Martins half brother, 22-year-
old Jahvaris Fulton, testied
that the cries came from the
teen. And Zimmermans uncle,
Jose Meza, said he knew it was
Zimmermans voice from the
moment I heard it. I thought,
that is George.
After Fridays session was
over, defense attorney Mark
OMara told reporters there
will be a lot of other witnesses
who will testify that the voice on
the call is George Zimmermans.
But well just present the
case, he said. Were just get-
ting started.
Gladys Zimmerman was the
defenses rst witness. OMara
said he expects to call sev-
eral of the states 38 witnesses
back as well when trial resumes
Monday, and he left open the
possibility that he would try to
introduce toxicology evidence
showing Martin had marijuana
in his system at the time he
died. Judge Debra Nelson has
denied the admission of that
evidence for the time being.
OMara may also call wit-
nesses who he says have stated
that Zimmerman was not a rac-
ist. Part of the prosecutions
theory is that Zimmerman
proled Martin as one of the
young black men hed called law
enforcement about as being pos-
sible suspects
in burglaries in his townhome
community weeks prior to the
shooting.
OMara said he could rest his
case as soon as next week.
Immediately after the state
rested Friday, he asked Nelson
to acquit Zimmerman, arguing
that the prosecution had failed
to prove its case.
OMara said an enormous
amount of evidence showed
that Zimmerman acted in self-
defense, and he argued that
Zimmerman had reasonable
grounds to believe he was in
danger, and acted without the
ill will, hatred and spite nec-
essary to prove second-degree
murder.
But prosecutor Richard
Mantei countered: There are
two people involved here. One
of them is dead, and one of
them is a liar.
Mantei told the judge that
Zimmerman had changed his
story, that his account of how
he shot Martin was a physical
impossibility, and that he exag-
gerated his wounds.
After listening to an hour and
a half of arguments from both
sides, Nelson refused to throw
out the murder charge, saying
the prosecution had presented
sufcient evidence for the case
to go on.
Earlier in the day, Sybrina
Fulton introduced herself to
the jury by describing herself as
having two sons, one of whom
is in heaven. She sat expres-
sionless on the witness stand
while prosecutors played the
911 recording.
Who do you recognize that
to be? prosecutor Bernie de la
Rionda asked her.
Trayvon Benjamin Martin,
she replied.
During cross-examination,
OMara suggested haltingly,
in apparent recognition of the
sensitivity of the questioning
that Fulton may have been inu-
enced by others who listened to
the 911 call, including relatives
and her former husband.
POTISKUM, Nigeria
Islamic militants attacked a
boarding school before dawn
Saturday, dousing a dormito-
ry in fuel and lighting it ablaze
as students slept, survivors
said. At least 30 people were
killed in the deadliest attack
yet on schools in Nigerias
embattled northeast.
Authorities blamed the
violence on Boko Haram, a
radical group whose name
means Western education
is sacrilege. The militants
have been behind a series of
recent attacks on schools in
the region, including one in
which gunmen opened re
on children taking exams in a
classroom.
We were sleeping when we
heard gunshots. When I woke
up, someone was pointing a
gun at me, Musa Hassan, 15,
told The Associated Press of
the assault on Government
Secondary School in Mamudo
village in Yobe state.
He put his arm up in
defense, and sustained a gun-
shot that blew off all four n-
gers on his right hand, the one
he uses to write. His life was
spared when the militants
moved on after shooting him.
Hassan recalled how the
gunmen came armed with
jerry cans of fuel that they
used to torch the schools
administrative block and one
of the dormitories.
They burned the children
alive, he said, the horror
showing in his wide eyes.
He and teachers at the
morgue said dozens of chil-
dren from the 1,200-student
school escaped into the bush,
but have not been seen since.
On Saturday, at the morgue
of PotiskumGeneral Hospital,
a few miles from the scene of
the attack, parents screamed
in anguish as they attempted
to identify the victims, many
charred beyond recognition.
Some parents dont know
if their children survived or
died.
Farmer Malam Abdullahi
found the bodies of two of his
sons, a 10-year-old shot in the
back as he apparently tried to
run away, and a 12-year-old
shot in the chest.
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER NATION & WORLD SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013 PAGE 5A
CAIRO Egypts new
president moved to assert his
authority Saturday by naming
a chief rival of ousted leader
Mohammed Morsi as interim
prime minister and holding cri-
sis talks with security ofcials
on efforts to reclaim control of
the streets.
The steps by the untested
Adly Mansour, however, are
likely to deepen the deance by
Islamist opponents who have
turned parts of the Cairo into
vigilante-guarded strongholds
and have issued blood oaths to
battle until Morsi is restored.
After a night of clashes that
claimed at least 36 lives, both
sides appeared to be prepar-
ing for the possibility of more
violence as Egypts political
unraveling increasingly left lit-
tle room for middle ground or
dialogue.
In the eastern suburb of Nasr
City near the main rally-
ing point for Morsis Muslim
Brotherhood lines of ght-
ers brandished homemade
weapons and body armor at
road blocks afxed with Morsis
picture.
Next door in the relatively
upscale Heliopolis district, peo-
ple chanted against Morsi and
honked car horns in apprecia-
tion of roadblocks manned by
Egypts military whose snub
of Morsis authority earlier this
week tipped the scales against
Egypts rst elected leader.
Mansours decision to bring
pro-reform leader and Nobel
laureate Mohamed ElBaradei
into the key government role of
prime minister is also certain to
help cement the loyalties of the
anti-Morsi forces.
The president planned
to swear-in ElBaradei later
Saturday, said Khaled Dawoud,
an ofcial with the main oppo-
sition National Salvation Front.
ElBaradei, a former director
of the U.N.s nuclear watchdog
agency, led the protests against
President Hosni Mubarak dur-
ing the Arab Spring uprising
that ended his autocratic rule in
February 2011.
The revolution also opened
the way for the political rise
of the Muslim Brotherhood,
which was long under pres-
sure from Mubaraks Western-
backed regime. Elections last
year brought Morsi to the presi-
dency, but ElBaradei remained
a voice of dissent, once saying
the Brotherhood lived in a
delusion for thinking its mem-
bers could manage the country
on their own.
Egypts new president
chief justice of the countrys
constitutional court is
little-known in international
circles. But the choice of the
71-year-old ElBaradei gives the
administration and prominent
global gure to make its case to
Washington and other Western
allies trying to reassess policies
after what Morsis backers have
described as a coup. Morsi
remains under detention in an
undisclosed location.
There were no reports of
major clashes in Egypt after
dawn Saturday, following a
night of street battles that
added to an overall death toll of
at least 75 in the past week.
Later, in the northern part of
Sinai peninsula, gunmen shot
dead a Christian priest while he
shopped for food in an outdoor
market on Saturday.
DIMOCK
Another entry in Gasland
saga due Monday
Josh Fox galvanized the U.S. anti-
fracking movement with his incendiary
2010 documentary Gasland. Now hes
back with a sequel and this time, hes
targeting an audience of just one.
We want the president to watch the
movie, and we want him to meet with
the people who are in it, says Fox,
whose Gasland Part II makes its HBO
debut Monday.
He contends President Barack
Obamas professed support of drilling
and fracking for natural gas ignores the
environmental and public health toll
of the drilling boom: It looks like hes
really sincere and earnest in his desire
to take on climate change, but hes got
the completely wrong information and
thus the completely wrong plan.
Part II covers a lot of the same
ground as the Emmy-winning and
Oscar-nominated original, as Fox takes
his banjo and camera on the road again
to interview residents who say their air
and water were contaminated by drill-
ing.
Whats new here is the focus on what
Fox sees as the drilling industrys cor-
rupting inuence on politicians and
regulators. In Gasland Part II, the
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
is cast in the role of protector and
defender.
OTISFIELD, Maine
Campers watch Egypt
changes fromafar
Nearly two-dozen Egyptians who
arrived in Maine last month at a special
camp aimed at helping Israeli and Arab
teens overcome their differences will
return home to a country that ousted its
leader following the largest demonstra-
tions seen in their homeland.
From more than 5,000 miles away,
Egyptians at the Seeds of Peace camp
have been trying to stay abreast of the
latest developments, including Fridays
clashes that killed 30.
Counselor Mostafa Ismail, 22, from
Cairo, said people were unhappy with
the presidential ballot choices after the
Arab Spring demonstrations led to the
election of Morsi. He said the country
now needs to take a deep breath to
ensure history doesnt repeat.
SIMI VALLEY, Calif.
Fireworks mishap
injures about 40
For many people gathered to watch
July Fourth reworks at a Southern
California park, it took time to realize
the wild chain of explosions werent just
part of the show.
But those up close Thursday night
knew immediately that something was
wrong. They included Paulina Mulkern,
who had to shove her 4-year-old cousin
under a lawn chair as shrapnel came
ying then shielded a 7-year-old cousin
with her body as scorching debris ew
overhead.
You feel the big old heat come right
over your back, Mulkern said Friday,
still shaking a day after the chain reac-
tion of accidental explosions at an annu-
al reworks show that had been put on
since 1970 in Simi Valley northwest of
Los Angeles. Thirty-nine people ranging
in ages from 17 months to 78 years old
were injured.
DANIABEACH, Fla.
Crews rescue dog
trapped under car hood
South Florida reghters came to
the rescue of a dog that traveled 5 miles
while trapped under the hood of a car.
The Broward Sheriffs Ofce says re-
ghters were called Thursday afternoon
to Dania Beach to free the dog. The ani-
mal had been trapped between the cars
axle and steering mechanism.
A sheriffs ofce spokesman says
the dog suffered no injuries. It wasnt
immediately clear how the dog became
trapped.
AP Photo
Supporters of Egypts ousted President Mohammed Morsi hold pictures
of him as they protest in front of a Republican Guard headquarters, in
Cairo, Egypt, Saturday.
AP Photo
Winning this contest is the pits
Matt Krause, fromLansing, Mich., competes
during the annual International Cherry
Pit-Spitting Championship held Saturday at
Tree-Mendus Fruit Farmin Eau Claire, Mich.
Krause won the event and was named cham-
pion with a spit of 41 feet, 6 1/2 inches.
Egypt: Opposition leader named interimPM
Mohamed ElBaradei
had led protests against
ex-President Hosni
Mubarak in 2011.
Hamza Hendawi
Associated Press
Ex-prisoner
chosen to
lead Syrian
opposition
group
BEIRUT A former Syrian
political prisoner with close
links to Saudi Arabia was picked
Saturday to lead Syrias main
Western-backed opposition
group, lling a post long vacant
due to divisions among President
Bashar Assads opponents.
Inside Syria, government
troops advanced into rebel-held
areas of the central city of Homs,
pushing into a heavily contested
neighborhood after pummeling
it with artillery that drove out
opposition ghters, an activist
said.
The election of Ahmad al-Jarba
as the head of the Syrian National
Coalition came during a meeting
in Turkey in what was the sec-
ond attempt in recent months by
Assads opponents to unify their
ranks.
The opposition bloc is primar-
ily composed of exiled politicians
with little support among Syrians
back home who are trying to sur-
vive the third summer of conict
that has killed more than 93,000
people and forced millions to ee
their homes.
Al-Jarbas election suggests
the opposition is trying to unite
despite its differences after
Assads forces gained ground last
month in and around the strate-
gic town of Qusair near the bor-
der with Lebanon.
It also underscored the rivalry
between Saudi Arabia and Qatar
who are vying for inuence
among the Sunni-dominated
Syrian opposition. Both have
been prominent backers of forces
struggling to oust Assad.
The Saudi-backed al-Jarba
won 55 votes, edging out Qatar-
endorsed businessman Mustafa
Sabbagh who got 52 votes,
according to a statement from
the 114-member SNCin Istanbul,
where many of Syrian opposition
gures are based. The SNC state-
ment did not say who the remain-
ing members voted for.
Al-Jarba, a 44-year-old law-
yer with a law degree from
Beiruts Arab University, is from
Syrias northeastern province
of Hassakeh and is a member of
the powerful Shammar tribe that
extends into Iraq. He was a little-
known anti-Assad gure before
Syrias civil war though he was
detained in March 2011 days
after the uprising against Assad
began. It was his second arrest,
following one in 1996 when he
was held for two years because of
anti-government activities.
After his release, al-Jarba left
Syria in August in 2011 and
became active in the opposition.
He is close to secular politician
Michel Kilos Democratic Bloc,
which recently joined the SNC.
Al-Jarba could not be immedi-
ately reached for comment after
his election Saturday.
An SNC statement quoted him
as saying that his priorities will
be to follow-up on the situation
inside Syria, especially in Homs,
and that all efforts should be in
this direction.
Bassem Mroue
Associated Press
Ofcials say more than 60 people unaccounted for fromtheAsianaAirlines fight.
SAN FRANCISCO An Asiana
Airlines ight from Seoul, South Korea,
crashed while landing at San Francisco
International Airport on Saturday, kill-
ing at least two people, injuring dozens
of others and forcing passengers to jump
down the emergency inatable slides to
safety as ames tore through the plane.
More than 60 passengers were also
unaccounted for, said San Francisco Fire
Chief Joanne Hayes-White. It wasnt
immediately clear where they were, but
she said they werent all presumed dead
at this time.
This is a work in progress, she
said, adding the investigation has been
turned over to the FBI and that terror-
ism has been ruled out. She said at least
48 people were initially transported
from the scene to area hospitals.
The Federal Aviation Administration
said Flight 214 crashed while landing
before noon PDT. A video clip posted
to YouTube showed smoke coming from
a jet on the tarmac. Passengers could
be seen jumping down the emergency
slides.
Television footage showed the top
of the fuselage was burned away and
the entire tail was gone. One engine
appeared to have broken away. Pieces of
the tail were strewn about the runway.
Emergency responders could be seen
walking inside the burned-out wreck-
age.
It wasnt immediately clear what hap-
pened to the plane as it was landing,
but some eyewitnesses said the aircraft
seemed to lose control and that the tail
may have hit the ground.
Stephanie Turner sawthe plane going
down and the rescue slides deploy, but
returned to her hotel room before see-
ing any passengers get off the jet, she
told ABC News. Turner said when she
rst saw the ight she noticed right
away that the angle of its approach
seemed strange.
I mean we were sure that we had just
seen a lot of people die. It was awful,
she said. And it looked like the plane
had completely broken apart. There
were ames and smoke just billowing.
Kate Belding was out jogging just
before 11:30 a.m. on a path the water
from the airport when she noticed the
plane approaching the runway in a way
that just didnt look like it was coming
in quite right.
Then all of a sudden I saw what
looked like a cloud of dirt pufng up and
then there was a big bang and it kind of
looked like the plane maybe bounced
(as it neared the ground), she said. I
couldnt really tell what happened, but
you saw the wings going up and (in) a
weird angle.
Not like it was cartwheeling, she
said, but rather as though the wings
were almost swaying from side to side.
Doug Yakel, a spokesman for the air-
port, said he did not yet knowhowmany
passengers were aboard the ight. We
also dont have any information at this
time to the status of those passengers,
he said at a brief news conference.
San Francisco General Hospital
spokeswoman Rachael Kagan said the
adult patients range in age from 20 to
their 40s. It was not immediately clear
the ages of the children.
AP Photo
This aerial photo shows the wreckage of the Asiana Flight 214 airplane after it crashed at the San Francisco International Airport on Saturday.
Fiery plane crash leaves 2 dead
Terry Collins
Associated Press
Thirty killed in Nigerian boarding school attack
The Associated Press
IN BRIEF
AP Photo
A doctor attends to a student Saturday at a Nigerian hospital following
an attack by gunmen at a boarding school.
VIDALIA, Ga. Two years after
Georgia and Alabama passed laws
designed to drive away people living
in the country illegally, the states agri-
cultural areas are still heavily popu-
lated with foreign workers, many of
whom dont have legal authorization
to be here.
There are still concerns over
enforcement and lingering fears
among immigrants, but in many ways
it appears that people have gone on
with life much as it was before the laws
were enacted.
Farmers say many of the foreign
workers have returned because the
laws are not heavily enforced and it
once again seems safe to be here.
But the story is more complicated
than that: Some are still staying away
or have gone underground, accord-
ing to community activists, and some
farmers say they are lling labor short-
ages not with returning immigrants
but with workers hired through a pro-
gramthat grants temporary legal visas.
Meanwhile, employers and work-
ers in both states are watching as
Congress wrestles over plans that aim
to simultaneously prevent future ille-
gal immigration and offer a chance at
citizenship for millions now living in
the country illegally.
Georgia and Alabama were two of
ve states to pass tough crackdowns
on illegal immigration in 2011, a year
after Arizona made headlines for a
hard-line immigration enforcement
law that ended up being challenged in
the U.S. Supreme Court.
Immediately after the laws were
passed, farmers in both states com-
plained that foreign workers who lived
there had left and that the itinerant
migrants who generally came through
were staying away. American workers
werent stepping forward to perform
the back-breaking work immigrants
had done for years, and crops were rot-
ting in the elds because of a lack of
laborers, they said.
An informal survey conducted in
Georgia showedthat farmers of onions,
watermelons and other hand-picked
crops lacked more than 11,000 work-
ers during their spring and summer
harvests of 2011, Georgia Department
of Agriculture Commissioner Gary
Black told a U.S. Senate subcommittee
hearing on immigration enforcement
and farm labor.
But then as courts began block-
ing signicant elements of the law
and some loopholes became appar-
ent, some of the workers who had
ed for fear of arrest and deportation
returned. Others were drawn back by
their longstanding ties to the commu-
nities.
Victor Valentin, 25, and his wife,
Maria Gonzales, 23, came to the
Vidalia onion growing region in south
Georgia ve years ago and found work
quickly. But when the state passed its
law cracking down on illegal immigra-
tion, they feared they would be caught
and deported, and left for neighboring
North Carolina.
They didnt last long. With two
young children and no support net-
work there, life was difcult. At the
same time, the situation in Georgia
seemed to have calmed down.
We still talked to people here, and
we heard there werent really any
problems, that things hadnt really
changed, Valentin said, explaining
that the family decided to return to the
Vidalia area after about nine months.
Hes found work harvesting pine straw
since his return.
This year, Black and a number of
industry leaders in Georgia told The
Associated Press they havent heard of
any labor shortages.
The situation in Alabama is similar.
No one seems to be having any
problems, said Alabamas agricul-
ture commissioner, John McMillan,
who added that he has spoken with
farmers who saw migrants return
once it became clear the law passed
in Alabama was, in practice, mostly
toothless. Courts blocked most of the
laws toughest sections, including one
that required public schools to check
students citizenship status, and the
massive arrests envisioned by some
simply didnt happen.
PAGE 6A SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013 NEWS www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER
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Two years later, immigration
laws impact difcult to see
Initially, legislation in Ga.,
Ala., drove workers away.
But many have since returned.
Kate Brumback
Associated Press
LAS VEGAS Most peo-
ple still think of the U.S. gam-
bling industry as anchored in
Las Vegas. They might think
of vestiges of the mob, or the
towns ill-advised irtation
with family-friendly branding
in the 1990s.
But they would be wrong.
The center of the gambling
world has shifted 16 time
zones away to a tiny spit of
land on the southern tip of
East Asia.
An hours ferry ride from
Hong Kong and an afternoon
ight from half the worlds
population, Macau is the
only place in China where
casino gambling is legal.
Each month, 2.5 million
tourists ood the glitzy
boomtown to try their luck
in neon-drenched casinos
that collect more winnings
than the entire U.S. gambling
industry. The exploding
ranks of the Chinese nouveau
riche sip tea and speak in
hushed tones as they play at
baccarat, a fast-moving game
where gamblers are dealt two
cards and predict whether
they will beat the banker.
The textile factories that
stood shoulder to shoulder
with small-time gambling
halls as recently as the early
2000s have given way to
hulking American-run enter-
prises larger than anything
found in the states. The
gangs, prostitutes and mon-
ey-launderers that once oper-
ated openly in this town half
the size of Manhattan have
at least receded from public
eye.
It was a swamp, said
Sheldon Adelson, CEO
of Las Vegas Sands, as he
looked back on his early,
risky venture in the forgotten
colonial outpost.
They wanted to change
the face of Macau from the
gambling dens to that of
conventions and resorts,
he added during recent tes-
timony, ashing a jack-o-lan-
tern grin and boasting that
it would have taken a genius
to imagine the prots that he
could reap there.
The quest for Asian riches
is changingLas Vegas as well.
Casino bosses are tweaking
their agship casinos to look
andoperate more like Macau-
style properties. As they
succeed, hints of organized
crime are returning, this time
in the formof Chinese gangs.
Chinese
enclave
remakes
Vegas
Hannah Dreier
Associated Press
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER OBITUARIES SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013 PAGE 7A
NOTICE
TO ALL
VETERANS
and ex-service personnel who have loyally served
their country in peace and in war.
If you were honorably discharged and
live anywhere in the State of
Pennsylvania, you are now entitled to a
burial space at no cost in the veterans
memorial section at
Chapel Lawn Memorial Park
RD 5 Box 108, Dallas, PA 18612
Tis ofer is available for a limited time
only. Special protection features are
available for your spouse and minor
children with National Transfer
Protection. Tis limited time ofer is also
extended to members of the
National Guard and Reserve.
Space is limited.
Conditions - Burial spaces cannot be for
investment purposes. You must register
for your free burial space.
1-800-578-9547 Ext. 6001 And you dont have to buy a casket.
Kniffen OMalley
Wilkes-Barre & Avoca
823-7157 457-2801
BestLifeTributes.com
Viewing before
Cremation
Brian Leffer
Happy Birthday in Heaven
Joseph J. Stankus
07- 07- 45 - 10 -21- 09
Its hard to believe its your Birthday
and youre not here. Not a day goes
by that I dont think of you.
Its not only my heart you touched
but friends and neighbors too, and
just like me they miss you so much.
Sadly missed and loved by wife Tanya,
Beloved dogs Rudy and Bella,
Friends and Family
OBITUARY POLICY
The Times Leader publishes free obituaries, which have a
27-line limit, and paid obituaries, which can run with a pho-
tograph. Afuneral home representative can call the obituary
desk at 570-829-7224, send a fax to 570-829-5537 or email
to ttlobits@civitasmedia.com. If you fax or email, please call
to confirm. Obituaries must be submitted by 7:30 p.m. for
publication in the next edition. Obituaries must be sent by a
funeral home or crematory, or must name who is handling
arrangements, with address and phone number.
JOSEPHINE
WISNIEWSKI,
of West Union Street,
Nanticoke, passed away
peacefully Saturday, July 6,
2013 at her home.
Funeral arrangements are
pending at the Grontkowski
Funeral Home P.C.,
Nanticoke.
LOUISE R. COLEMAN,
82, of Mountain Top,
passed away on Friday, July
5, 2013 at the Wilkes-Barre
General Hospital. Born in
Bethlehem, she was the
daughter of the late Frank
and Ruth Oliver. Prior to
her retirement, Louise
taught painting and ceramic
arts. Preceding her in death,
in addition to her parents,
were her husband, Albert
Coleman, and her son
Joseph Stanley Coleman.
Surviving is her son David
Coleman, with whom she
resided.
Private services were held
at the convenience of the
family. In lieu of owers,
memorial donations may
be sent to David Coleman,
3770 Nuangola Road,
Mountain Top, PA 18707.
McCune Funeral Service
Inc. handled the arrange-
ments.
BRENDA L. BREESE,
of Wilkes-Barre, passed
away Friday, July 5, 2013 at
The Johns Hopkins Medical
Center, Baltimore, Md.,
with her loving husband at
her bedside.
Funeral arrangements
are pending from the Nat &
Gawlas Funeral Home, 89
Park Ave., Wilkes-Barre.
SALLY S. HORNY,
78, of White Haven, passed
away Friday morning, July
5, 2013 at her home follow-
ing a lengthy illness.
Funeral arrangements
are pending from the Nat &
Gawlas Funeral Home, 89
Park Ave., Wilkes-Barre.
TERESA GONGLEFSKI,
86, a resident of
Swoyersville, passed away
peacefully surrounded
by her loving family on
Saturday morning, July 6,
2013, at the Wilkes-Barre
General Hospital, following
a brief illness. Her beloved
husband was the late Joseph
R. Chooch Gonglefski.
Together, Chooch and
Teresa shared 63-1/2 beauti-
ful years of marriage.
Funeral arrangements
are pending and have been
entrusted to the care of the
Wroblewski Funeral Home
Inc., 1442 Wyoming Ave.,
Forty Fort.
CHARLES H. ENGLER
will have graveside ser-
vices at 11 a.m. Monday
in Stairville Cemetery,
Stairville Road, Dorrance
Township, with the Rev.
Edward Gospodinsky ofci-
ating.
Arrangements are by the
Stanley S. Stegura Funeral
Home Inc., Nanticoke.
ROSE LICATA
July 5, 2013
Rose Licata, 92, a resi-
dent of Apollo Apartments
and formerly of Pine Street,
Pittston, died Friday at
VNA Hospice-St. Lukes
Villa, Wilkes-Barre. Rose
would have turned 93 on
July 26, 2013.
Born on July 26, 1920,
she was the daughter of
the late Sam and Mary
(Castellino) Licata. She
lived on Railroad Street
in Pittston up to the age
of 15, until she moved to
Pine Street in 1935, where
she lived for 67 years, until
she moved to the Apollo
Apartments in June of
2002.
She attended Pittston
schools and was a 1938
graduate of Pittston High
School. She worked in
Buffalo, N.Y., during World
War II as a press operator
and lived with her Aunt
Carmella and Uncle Reggie
during her time there. She
enjoyed going to Niagara
Falls on the weekends while
she lived out there.
Upon her return to
Pittston, Rose worked in
the garment industry for
many years working in
Pittston, West Pittston,
Exeter, and at Country
Maid in Plains as a oor
person, retiring in 1982.
During her years in the
garment industry, she took
part in minstrel shows
where she would act and
sing and always liked to
make people laugh.
For a brief period, she
worked at the Luzerne
County Courthouse in the
prothonotarys ofce.
Along with her mother,
she was a volunteer worker
at the White Haven Center,
where her brother Frank
was a resident.
She enjoyed spend-
ing time with her family
and friends, going on bus
trips to Atlantic City, New
York City, Bethlehem, and
Buffalo and playing bingo
at various bingo halls. She
liked to take the train from
Pittston to Buffalo to visit
her relatives and friends,
especially her brothers Fred
and Buddy.
She was a member of
St. Joseph Marello Parish
and previously St. Roccos
Church in Pittston. She
was a member of the
International Ladies
Garment Workers Union
and the Montedoro Society.
She was the last surviv-
ing member of her immedi-
ate family. Those who knew
her and loved her will miss
her, especially her fam-
ily, friends and many close
friends. The family would
like to thank Dr. Mauer
Biscotti and the staff at St.
Lukes Villa for their kind-
ness and care during Roses
stay.
In addition to her par-
ents, she was preceded in
death by her brothers Fred,
Frank, and Sam (Buddy)
Licata; sisters Mary Traglia,
Carmella (Millie) Malletz,
nephew Sam Traglia.
Surviving are her neph-
ew James Traglia Jr. and
his wife, Elizabeth, Pittston
andtheir children, Anthony,
Anita, and Joseph; niece
Helene Traglia and her
partner, Richard Palmer,
Pittston and her children,
Marcy and Joseph Dweck;
nephew Joseph Licata
and his wife, Stacy, and
their children, Christian
and Madilyn; niece Gena
Licata and her son, Blair
Clark; niece Lisa Licata, all
of Buffalo, N.Y.; ve great-
great-nephews; brother-
in-law James Traglia Sr.,
Scranton; numerous cous-
ins.
Funeral services have
been entrusted to Graziano
Funeral Home Inc., Pittston
Township. Viewing hours
will be held at the funeral
home from 5 to 7 p.m. on
Monday. Funeral services
will begin at 9 a.m. Tuesday
at the funeral home. A
Mass of Christian Burial
will be held at 9:30 a.m. in
St. Joseph Marello Parish,
William Street, Pittston.
Interment services will
be held in St. Roccos
R.C. Cemetery, Pittston
Township.
For further informa-
tion or to express your
condolences to Roses
family, please visit www.
Grazi anoFuneral Home.
com.
VICTORIA R. DORRANCE
July 5, 2013
Victoria R. Dorrance,
88, of Dallas, passed away
Friday at Little Flower
Manor, Wilkes Barre.
Born in Pittston, she
was the daughter of the
late Victor and Monica
Narsavage. She was a
graduate of Pittston High
School. Before retiring,
Victoria was a secretary
and bookkeeper for Orange
Dairy. She was a member
of Gate of Heaven Church,
Dallas.
She was preceded in
death by her husband,
Leonard A., in 1981; six
brothers and four sisters.
Surviving are son
Leonard A., Jr. and wife,
Linda; daughters Charlotte
Kelley and husband,
Joseph, Barbara Yanchick
and husband, Danie, all
of Dallas; sister Regina
Hudacko, Dewey, Ariz.
Private funeral will be
held from the Richard H.
Disque Funeral Home Inc,
2940 Memorial Highway,
Dallas, with Mass of
Christian Burial in Gate of
Heaven Church. Interment
will be in Mount Olivet
Cemetery, Carverton.
There will be no calling
hours.
Memorial donations may
be made to the Alzheimers
Foundation.
RONALD P. KARASEK
July 2, 2013
Ronald P. Karasek, 49, a
resident of FortyFort, passed
away peacefully on Tuesday
morning at ManorCare
Health and Rehabilitation
Center, Kingston, following
a courageous battle with
cancer.
Born on Dec. 14, 1963, in
Kingston, Ronald was the
son of Stanley and Roberta
Karasek, of West Wyoming.
Ronald was a graduate of
Wyoming Area High School,
class of 1981. Prior to his ill-
ness, Ronald was employed
by Jerrys Sporting Goods,
Pittston. Ronald was very
artistic and had a great love
for music. He was also an
avid car and motorcycle
enthusiast.
Most of all, Ronald was
a loving son and brother.
His presence will be greatly
missed by all of his family
and friends.
In addition to his par-
ents, Stanley and Roberta
Karasek, Ronald is survived
by his brother, Gary Karasek
and his wife, Lisa, of Las
Vegas, Nev. Also surviving
are aunts, uncles, cousins;
and his little buddy Rusty.
The family would like to
extend their sincere thanks
to the staff of ManorCare
Health and Rehabilitation
Center for the kind and
compassionate care they
bestowed upon Ronald.
A private family graveside
service was heldat the conve-
nience of the family in Saint
Mary of the Annunciation
Cemetery, Pringle.
Funeral arrangements
for the Karasek family have
been entrusted to the care
of the Wroblewski Funeral
Home Inc., 1442 Wyoming
Ave., Forty Fort.
For additional information
or to send the Karasek fam-
ily an online message of con-
dolence, you may visit the
funeral home website www.
wroblewskifuneralhome.
com.
IRENE B. HUFFMAN
July 5, 2013
Irene B. Huffman, 93,
of West Union Street,
Shickshinny, died Friday
afternoon at the Berwick
Hospital Center. She had
been in ill health for the past
two years.
Born May 16, 1920
in Northumberland, she
was a daughter of the late
Clarence and Pearl (Cragle)
Hontz.
She was a graduate of
the former Harter High
School in West Nanticoke.
She was rst employed at
the former Viti Shoe Store
in Shickshinny and was last
employed at the former Rea
and Derick Drug Store in
Shickshinny.
She was a member of
First Presbyterian Church,
Shickshinny, where she used
to teach Sunday School.
She was precededindeath
by her husband, Charles W.
Huffman, who died Aug.
24, 2002, and a sister, Pearl
Keiper.
Surviving are her son,
Gene Huffman and wife,
Sandra, Shickshinny; a
grandson, Randy Huffman;
and a great-grandson
Joshua.
Funeral services will be
at 11 a.m. Tuesday at the
Mayo Funeral Home Inc.,
77 N. Main St., Shickshinny,
with the Rev. James Parks
ofciating. Burial will be in
Sorber Cemetery, Reyburn.
Visitation will be from 10
to 11 a.m. For additional
information, or to send con-
dolences, please visit www.
mayofh.com.
FUNERALS
ALLABAUGH- Phillip Jr., funeral
services 10 a.m. Tuesday at the
Jendrzejewski Funeral Home,
21 N. Meade St., Wilkes-Barre.
Friends may call 5 to 7 p.m.
Monday at the funeral home.
CIECZKO- Edward, funeral
services 3 p.m. today at the
Kopicki Funeral Home,
263 Zerbey Ave., Kingston.
Friends may call 1 to 3 p.m.
COLARUSSO- Carl, Jr., funeral
1 p.m. Monday with military
honors at the Hugh B. Hughes
& Son Inc. Funeral Home, 1044
Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort. Friends
may call 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m.
today at the funeral home.
COLBORN- Phyllis, funeral
services with public viewing
9 a.m. Tuesday. Services to follow
10 a.m. at the Thomas P. Kearney
Funeral Home Inc., 517 N. Main
St., Old Forge.
KOTULA - Anna, funeral
9:30 a.m. Monday at the
Kiesinger Funeral Services Inc.,
255 McAlpine St., Duryea. Funeral
Mass 10 a.m. in Holy Mother of
Sorrows Church, 212 Wyoming
Ave., Dupont. Friends may call
5 to 8 p.m. today at the funeral
home.
MAKOWSKI - Helen, Mass
of Christian Burial 9:30 a.m.
Monday in St. Ignatius of Loyola
Church, 339 N. Maple Ave.,
Kingston. Friends and family are
asked to go directly to the church
for the Mass. There will be no
calling hours.
PIAZZA - Martha, Mass of
Christian Burial 11 a.m. Monday
in Holy Family Parish, Luzerne.
Friends may call 9 to 10:30 a.m.
at Betz-Jastremski Funeral Home
Inc,. 568 Bennett St. Luzerne.
PHILLIP R. ALLABAUGHJR.
July 4, 2013
Mr. Phillip R. Allabaugh
Jr., of Wilkes-Barre
Township, passed away
Thursday, the Fourth of
July, 2013, at the Veterans
Affairs Medical Center,
Plains Township.
Born June 15, 1933, in
Wilkes-Barre Township, he
was a son of the late Phillip
and Dixie Allabaugh Sr.
Phillip worked for the
Royer Foundry, Kingston,
the Lord Plant in New
Jersey, and also in area coal
mines.
Dad served with the
7th Infantry Division as
a rieman during the
Korean War. He received
the Bronze Star Medal for
Valor, Combat Infantry
Badge, National Defense
Service Medal, United
Nations Service Medal,
Korean Service Medal with
2 Bronze Service Stars and
the Purple Heart.
Phillip belonged to
the Korean War Vets of
Wyoming Valley; Veterans
of Foreign Wars Post
283, Kingston; Catholic
War Veterans, Ashley;
and the American Legion
Post 815, Wilkes-Barre
Township, where he was
commander for one year.
Phillip also was the cub
master for the Cub Scouts
in Wilkes-Barre Township.
He was very involved with
all services for veterans,
including placing ags
on veterans graves, visit-
ing schools, and all other
vet activities. He enjoyed
very much going with his
friends George Handzo and
Louis Wiernusz to all vet-
eran activities. They were
musketeers known as the
Three. Phillip loved hunt-
ing, working in his yard
and visits with his children,
grandchildren and great-
grandchildren.
He was preceded in
death by a grandson, Ryan
Allabaugh; sisters, Betty
and Virginia; and brother,
Bobby.
Phillip will be sadly
missed by his wife of 58
years, Mary Catherine
Babula Allabaugh; their
nine children, Phyllis Nixon
and her husband, John of
Wilkes-Barre Township;
Joyce Cannon and her hus-
band, John, of Wilkes-Barre
Township; Debbie Franklin
and her husband, Steve,
of Fullerton, Calif.; Phillip
Allabaugh III and his wife,
Sandy, of Mountain Top;
Theresa Stefanski and her
husband, John, of Wilkes-
Barre Township; Jeanie
Bitler and her husband,
Mike, of Factoryville;
Brenda Karnacki and her
husband, Wayne, of New
Albany, Pa.; Beth Zawatski
and her husband, Mark,
of Dushore; and Donna
Mendoza and her husband,
Chris, of Wilkes-Barre
Township; 23 grandchil-
dren; 27 great-grandchil-
dren; brothers, Charles
Allabaugh and his wife,
Rose, of Sunbury; Richard
Allabaugh and his wife,
Linda, of Sunbury; Thomas
Allabaugh and his wife,
Marta, of Monet, Mo. and
Henry Allabaugh and his
wife, Barbara, of Ashley;
sister, Patsy Endler and
her husband, Phillip, of
Hanover Township.
Funeral services
will be held at 10
a.m. Tuesday at
the Jendrzejewski
Funeral Home, 21 N. Meade
St., Wilkes-Barre. The Rev.
Mike Kloton, of St. Andre
Bessette Parish, will be
celebrant. Committal ser-
vices with military hon-
ors will follow in Maple
Hill Cemetery, Hanover
Township. Friends may call
from 5 to 7 p.m. Monday
at the funeral home. In
lieu of owers, memorial
donations may be made
in Phillips name to the
American Cancer Society
or the American Lung
Association.
Mr. William E. Bill
Jakubowski, 80, of Grove
Street, Mountain Top,
passed into Eternal Rest
early Friday morning in
the Smith Health Care
Center, Ltd., Mountain
Top, where he had recent-
ly been residing.
Born Aug. 2, 1932 in
Edwardsville, he was
a son of the late John
and Margaret (Colwell)
Jakubowski. As a young
child, the family relocated
to Mountain Top, where
he would live the rest of
his life.
Attending Crestwood
schools, Mr. Jakubowski
was a graduate of the for-
mer Fairview High School,
Mountain Top. Until his
retirement, Bill worked
over twenty years for
Crestwood High School,
where he was affectionate-
ly known as Jake as one
of the best custodians the
Crestwood School District
ever employed. He was
an avid follower of the
Crestwood High School
girls eld hockey team.
He was a faithful mem-
ber of Saint Matthew
Evangelical Lutheran
Church, North Wilkes-
Barre.
He and his wife, the for-
mer Betty Ann Machina,
recently celebrated 54
years of married life
together on June 27.
Bill is remembered by
those who knew and loved
him as being a very devot-
ed family man who had a
special place in his heart
for all children.
He was preceded
in death by brothers
John, Robert and Miles
Jakubowski and by a sis-
ter June Coleman and an
infant sister, Patricia.
Surviving, in addition
to his wife Betty, at home,
are their children, William
Jakubowski and his wife,
Gina; Paul D. Jakubowski
and his wife, Susan, all of
Mountain Top; Elizabeth
Hockenbury of Wilkes-
Barre; grandchildren, Paul
John and Sarah, Noah and
Joshua Jakubowski; broth-
er James Jakubowski and
his wife, Ruth of Mountain
Top; a sister, Anna E.
Hartmann-Zukowski of
Florida; numerous nieces
and nephews.
Funeral services will
be conducted at 11 a.m.
Monday in the North
Wilkes-Barre location of
the John V. Morris Family
Funeral Homes Inc., 625
N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre
with the Rev. Gary John
Scharrer, pastor of Saint
Matthew Evangelical
Lutheran Church, as cel-
ebrant.
Interment will be pri-
vate and at the conve-
nience of the Jakubowski
family in Albert Cemetery,
Wright Township.
Relatives and friends
may join Mrs. Jakubowski
and her children for visi-
tation and remembrances
from 10 a.m. until the time
of services Monday at the
funeral home.
Bills family would like
to gratefully acknowledge
the staff of Fritzingertown
Senior Living Community
Evergreen Unit, Drums;
the Smith Health Care
Center, Mountain Top
and Heartland Hospice of
Pittston for their care and
professionalism.
In lieu of oral tributes,
memorial contributions
may be made in Bills
memory to Saint Matthew
Evangelical Lutheran
Church operating fund,
663 N. Main St., Wilkes-
Barre, PA 18705, the
Alzheimers Association
of Wyoming Valley at
Kirby Health Center, 57 N.
Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre,
PA 18701 or to Heartland
Hospice, 38 N. Main St.,
Pittston, PA 18640.
To send online words
of comfort, support and
friendship, please visit
our familys website at
www.JohnVMorrisFuneral
Homes.com.
WILLIAM E. BILLJAKUBOWSKI
July 5, 2013
To view
Legacy obituaries
online visit
www.timesleader.com
More OBITUARIES | 8A
WASHINGTON
Three months before unin-
sured people can start shop-
ping for coverage, some
big unknowns loom over
President Barack Obamas
health care overhaul.
The surprise announce-
ment this past week that
the White House is delay-
ing a requirement that
many employers offer
coverage raised questions
about other major parts of
the biggest expansion of
societys safety net since
Medicare nearly 50 years
ago.
One delay may not mat-
ter much in the end. People
will judge Obamas law on
three main points: premi-
ums, choice and the overall
consumer experience.
Only partial answers can
be gleaned now, and they
dont necessarily fall along
predictable lines.
Basic economics sug-
gests premiums will be
higher than what many peo-
ple who buy their own cov-
erage pay now, especially
the young and healthy. The
new policies provide better
benets, and starting next
year, insurers wont be able
to turn away the sick. But
the pocketbook impact will
be eased by new tax cred-
its and other features that
people soon will discover.
As for choice, Obamas
plan isnt likely to deliver
the dozens of options avail-
able to seniors through
Medicare. But limited
choices may not be seen as
a step backward because in
most states the individual
health insurance market is
now dominated by a single
insurer.
The consumer experi-
ence shopping online for
insurance remains the big-
gest unknown and a risk.
Squads of technology
experts federal, state,
insurer and contractor
employees are trying
to mesh government and
private computer systems
together in ways that havent
been tried before. It may
not feel like Amazon.com.
Many people could default
to enrolling the low-tech
way, through call centers or
even through the mail.
Health care politics
divided the nation even
before the passage of the
Affordable Care Act in
2010, and the laws full
implementation four years
later is shaping up as a tale
of two Americas.
The rollout might go
well in mostly Democratic
states that prepared, while
it clatters and clunks in
mainly Republican ones
that resisted Obamas law.
Millions of poor people will
be denied coverage next
year because they live in
states that are refusing the
laws Medicaid expansion.
But most workers now cov-
ered on the job should not
see major changes.
With political strategists
already honing health care
attack lines for next years
congressional elections, a
former U.S. health secre-
tary has an admonition for
both parties. Mike Leavitt
put in place the Medicare
prescription drug plan for
President George W. Bush
in 2006 and now heads a
consulting rm that advises
states on Obamas law.
Its important for all of
us to remember that its
not political parties who
are affected in the long run,
its people, Leavitt said
recently. It will be millions
of people many of whom
are the less fortunate, and
those who have dramatic
health problems.
A closer look at the three
big questions:
Premiums
The Obama administra-
tion sees encouraging signs
in states that have released
premiums for next year,
as well as from rates led
directly with the federal
government but not yet
publicly revealed.
We are seeing increased
choice and affordable pre-
miums, said Mike Hash,
head of the Department
of Health and Human
Services health reform
ofce.
But what will consumers
see?
The data-crunching com-
pany Avalere Health found
that in nine states that have
released premiums, the
rates appear to be lower
than the Congressional
Budget Ofce estimated
when the law was being
drafted in 2009.
But Avalere vice presi-
dent Caroline Pearson
acknowledges that doesnt
represent the cost com-
parison a consumer might
make. Most people who
now buy policies individu-
ally could see an increase
from what theyre now pay-
ing.
The benet design is
going to be richer than
what is typically purchased
and available today and
the rules require insurers
to sell a policy to whoever
wants it, regardless of
health status, she said.
That still doesnt get you
to the bottom line because
most consumers will be
eligible for income-based
tax credits to help pay pre-
miums. The plan they pick
also could make a big differ-
ence.
Jeremy Gilchrist, a self-
employed meteorologist
from Winooski, Vt., has
been uninsured about four
years. In his mid-30s, hes
in good health, and he says
he cant afford premiums on
a skimpy budget.
For most people, its
going to be a nancial deci-
sion, Gilchrist said.
According to the online
Kaiser Family Foundations
health reform subsidy cal-
culator, Gilchrist would be
eligible for a tax credit of
nearly $2,000 on a standard
silver policy that costs
$3,000, leaving him with
$1,000 to pay.
But he can also take that
$2,000 tax credit and use
it to buy a cheaper policy
called a bronze plan, leav-
ing him with only about
$500 to pay annually. The
bronze plan meets the new
requirement that virtu-
ally all people in the United
States have health insur-
ance. But if you get seri-
ously sick or injured youll
wind up paying more out of
your own pocket.
Still, the premium would
come to $42 a month for
Gilchrist. The bronze plan
would be lower than my car
insurance, he said.
But wait.
If Gilchrist were a smok-
er, which he is not, the law
would allow insurers to
tack on a penalty of up to
50 percent of the premium.
With time, the decisions
of millions of individual
consumers will reveal a
true bottom line.
The typical Medicare
recipient has about 30 pri-
vate insurance plans from
which to choose. There
may not be nearly as much
choice for families and indi-
viduals under the health
care law. How much that
will matter remains to be
seen.
Its partly because in
most states a single insur-
ance company currently
controls more than half the
market for individual cover-
age.
The administration says
thats going to change for
the better. In three-quarters
of the markets the federal
government will run, there
will be at least one new
insurer.
But areas of concern are
emerging. New Hampshire
could end up with just
one insurance company
offering plans through the
new marketplace. In 36 of
Mississippis 82 counties,
no insurer has yet signed
up to offer coverage. Bigger
states, however, dont seem
to be having problems
attracting insurers.
The individual market
for 2014 will look a lot like
the individual market today
one or a handful of car-
riers dominant in most
states, said Larry Levitt,
a leading expert with the
nonpartisan Kaiser Family
Foundation.
But people will be able
to move more easily from
insurer to insurer, he
added, which should bring
more competitive pressure.
Consumer
Experience
For people without job-
based coverage, shopping
for insurance under the
new system is supposed
to be as smooth as using
a major online site such as
Travelocity or Expedia.
But in a recent
report, the Government
Accountability Ofce
raised concerns about the
sheer technological com-
plexity of the task and the
short time left to accom-
plish it.
The goal is for consum-
ers to be able to nd out
the amount of the tax cred-
it theyre entitled to and
sign up for a plan in real
time or close to it. For that
to happen, the computer
systems of several major
federal agencies, the states
and dozens of insurance
companies have to be able
to talk to each other, and
the information exchanged
must be accurate.
Testing the connections
is underway. We really feel
very much on target for
Oct. 1 and ready for open
enrollment, said Chiquita
Brooks-LaSure, a top HHS
ofcial overseeing the roll-
out. We are meeting criti-
cal implementation dead-
lines.
My guess is some of
these states are not going
to be up and running on
time, said Dan Maynard,
president of Connecture, a
health technology company
building three marketplac-
es.
That wouldnt necessar-
ily mean some consumers
will have to wait. People
could sign up through call
centers.
You could have a very
light online (marketplace)
and have a lot of things drop
to the call center and claim
success, said Maynard.
PAGE 8A SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013 NEWS www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER
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CarleyJ. Davis
July 3, 2013
Miss Carley J. Davis, 89,
of Smyrna, Del., formerly of
Luzerne, died Wednesday
morning.
She was born in Wilkes-
Barre , a daughter of the late
Russell and Argenta Linskill
Davis. She graduated from
Luzerne High School in
1942 and attended the
Wyoming Seminary Dean
School of Business.
Miss Davis was a mem-
ber of the Luzerne United
Methodist Church, and
a former member of the
United Methodist Womens
Society.
She was last employed
by the Department of
Health Education and
Welfare, Social Security
Administration in Wilkes-
Barre before retiring in
1981. Shewas alsoemployed
by the Department of
Commerce in Washington,
D.C., and the Selective
Service System in Kingston.
In addition to her par-
ents, she was preceded in
death by a twin sister Clara
Jean and a brother Russell.
She is survived by sis-
ters, Emma Lou Atherholt
and her husband, Earl,
Wallingford, Conn.; Argenta
Krasavage and her husband,
Martinof Smyrna, Del., with
whom she resided; several
nieces and nephews, Carlie
Wolff, Beth Atherholt, Gary
Atherholt, Kim McDonald,
Martin Krasavage Jr., Paul
and Phillip Davis and sev-
eral great-nieces and great-
nephews.
A funeral service will be
held at 11 a.m. Tuesday
in the Luzerne United
Methodist Church, Bennett
Street, Luzerne, with the
Rev. Carol Coleman ofciat-
ing. Friends may call from
10 a.m. until time of ser-
vice. A private family inter-
ment will be in held at the
Lehman Center Cemetery,
Lehman Township.
Arrangements are by the
William A. Reese Funeral
Chapel, rear 56 Gaylord
Ave., Plymouth. Memorial
contributions may be sent
to the Luzerne United
Methodist Church, 440
Bennett St., Luzerne, PA
18709.
(Mary) Dolores Drago
July 5, 2013
(Mary) Dolores Drago,
78, of Swoyersville, passed
away Friday.
Born Aug. 8, 1934 in
Scranton, she was the
daughter of the late Frank
and Mary Fedora Stachun.
Dolores was a devoted
wife and mother. She was
the beloved wife of 58 years
to her late husband, Joseph
T. Drago, who preceded her
in death on June 16, 2013.
She was a 1952 gradu-
ate of Pringle High School.
In earlier years, she was
employed as a bookkeeper
and then raised a family
of ve children. After rais-
ing her family, Dolores
enjoyed her employment
by Spiegels in the customer
service department.
Surviving are her chil-
dren Joseph T. Drago III,
Thomas J. Drago, Dolores
Robertson, Anthony F.
Drago, Connie Dalessio;
eight grandchildren; sis-
ters, Olga Kachmarsky,
Mildred Siles and Nancy
Navin; brothers John Evans
and Michael Evans.
Funeral services will
be held at 1 p.m. Tuesday
at the Bednarski Funeral
Home, 168 Wyoming Ave.,
Wyoming, with the Rev.
Leo McKernan ofciating.
Family and friends may call
11 a.m. until the time of
service at the funeral home.
In lieu of owers, memo-
rial contributions may be
made to a charity of donors
choice.
Martin DaviD (Junior) DesiDerio
July 4, 2013
Ma r t i n
D a v i d
( J u n i o r )
Desiderio,
83, of
Mountain
T o p ,
p a s s e d
away Thursday peacefully
at the Geisinger Wyoming
Valley Medical Center after
a short battle with CNS
Lymphoma.
Born June 30, 1930 in
Wilkes-Barre, he was the
son of the late Marziano
and Marie (Annichiarico)
Desiderio.
He was educated in
Wilkes-Barre schools and
attended Meyers High
School. He was a U.S. Army
veteran serving his country
in the Korean Conict and
a member of the American
Legion Post 609, Hanover
Township.
Prior to his retirement,
Martin was employed for
many years as a foreman for
the Desiderio Construction
Co. Inc., Larksville. He
was a gold card member of
The International Union of
Bricklayers and Allied Craft
Workers Local 5 PA.
Martin was associated
with his sons in Desis
Pizza Inc., located in
Wilkes-Barre, Dallas, and
Wildwood, N.J., where on
a Friday night you would
always see him behind the
counter making pizza and
serving customers. Junior
never actually retired, and
was always helping family
members and friends with
masonry and any building
issue.
He was a loving husband
to his late wife, Dorothy
Barbara Desiderio, who
passed away Sept. 20,
2001.
In addition to his wife
and parents, he was pre-
ceded in death by brothers,
Nicholas, Anthony, Basil
and James; sisters, Sadie
De Guisto, Mariette Di
Nicola, and Nancy Walker.
Survivors are a daugh-
ter, Deboraha Desiderio,
Wilkes-Barre; sons, Mark,
Afghanistan; Frank and
wife, Tricia, Lain; grand-
children, Ashley, Amber
and Frankie; sisters,
Florence (Mem) McCue,
New Jersey; Michaelene
Baranski and Rita Rovinski,
Hanover Township;
Josephine Ostaszewski,
Mountain Top; numerous
nephews and nieces.
A Mass of
Christian Burial will
be held at 10 a.m.
Tuesday in All Saints
Parish, Willow Street,
Plymouth, with interment
to follow at St. Marys
Cemetery, Plymouth. The
family requests all those
wishing to attend the funer-
al to assemble at the church.
Military honors will be per-
formed by the American
Legion Mountain Post 781,
Mountain Top.
In lieu of owers, the
family requests memorial
donations to be made to the
St. Judes Building Fund,
422 S. Mountain Blvd.,
Mountain Top PA 18707.
Relatives and friends are
invited to join his family for
visitation from 4 to 8 p.m.
Monday at The Desiderio
Funeral Home Inc., 436 S.
Mountain Blvd., Mountain
Top. Online condolences
may be expressed at www.
desideriofh.com. More OBITUARIES | 7A
Obamas health lawwill be judged on 3 questions
ricardo alonso-Zaldivar
Associated Press
Claire Mcandrew, left, and Donny Kirsch, both of Washington, celebrate outside the supreme Court
in Washington after the high court upheld President Barack obamas health care overhaul June 28,
2012. three months before uninsured people can start shopping for coverage, some big unknowns
loom amid the surprise announcement last week that the White House is delaying a requirement that
many employers offer coverage.
AP File Photo
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PAGE 10A SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013 www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER
7 GEORGE AVE.
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WILKES-BARRE Homeowners looking to


remodel their homes or add a deck should do their
homework, a representative from the Pennsylvania
Builders Association said.
Below is a list of warning signs that should indicate
a contractor is not on the level:
A contractor approaches you about damage to
your property.
Youre told youve been chosen as a demonstration
project at a special price.
Youre told a contract wont be necessary.
Youre asked to pay for the entire job upfront.
Youre told the price is only good for today.
The contractor cant provide references.
You cant verify a business address.
You cant fnd the contractor in the Home
Improvement Contractor list through the
Pennsylvania Attorney Generals offce.
High pressure sales tactics.
Homeowners are reminded to ask contractors they
hire for their state-required registration number any
time they get a quote for home repairs or remodeling.
In 2008, PBA worked with the state General
Assembly to pass the Home Improvement Contractor
Protection Act, which went into effect on July 1,
2009. Contractor registration is intended to provide
another layer of consumer protection and to authorize
criminal penalties for home improvement fraud.
Unregistered home improvement contractors are
breaking the law, and we need the help of homeown-
ers to alert the Attorney Generals offce any time they
get a visit from an unregistered contractor, said PBA
President Larry Eberly. Consumers who use unregis-
tered home improvement contractors for remodeling
or repairs are taking the risk of being ripped off by
someone who is skirting the law.
Although contractors are required to register under
the law, their appearance in the registry does not
mean the Attorney Generals offce endorses their
work. Registration is not a license or seal of approval.
A retired carpenter, Emmanuel
said he has sent crosses to Pope
John Paul II, the family of Jackie
Kennedy Onassis and to actor Jim
Caviezel, who played Jesus in the
2004 movie, The Passion of the
Christ.
Emmanuel said he is ashamed
of our country and our people
because people are getting away
from the church and morality con-
tinues to decline.
God needs people like me to
show His love. And theres no bet-
ter way than to make these crosses
the symbol of Gods love for
everybody.
The Rev. Richard J. Cirba, assis-
tant pastor at Emmanuels par-
ish St. John the Evangelist in
Pittston said Emmanuel has
a charitable heart and is always
looking to reach out to bring Gods
love to people, especially those
who are suffering.
I think the making of the cross
is a way of showing people the
love and suffering of Jesus, Cirba
said. He feels by his making these
crosses, it brings some comfort
and peace to those who are suffer-
ing, like the families in Newtown.
Local cross recipients
Emmanuel has made crosses for
the parish First Holy Communion
recipients and Confrmation can-
didates. Hes made them for other
parishes as well. And he attaches
a card with a message that Cirba
said makes a positive impression
on everyone, especially children.
He really believes in his heart
that its the Holy Spirit who is
guiding his work, Cirba said.
Its an act of love on his part to
be able to share this gift with oth-
ers, especially children. The bot-
tom line is the love and charity of
his work.
Emmanuel said he doesnt
decide who to make the crosses
for God does that for him. He
includes a card with a sincere
message of his mission with every
cross he makes.
Ive made them for the poorest
of the poor and the richest of the
rich, he said. Theres no power
in what I do; no power in me. The
power is in everybody. God asks
us to love each other and take
care of one another.
Emmanuel is making a spear
with a cross on it to send to the
Vatican. He said it will commem-
orate St. Longinus, the Roman
centurion who pierced the side of
Jesus while he was hanging on the
cross.
Emmanuel will send the special
spear to Pope Francis.
This is how Emmanuel decides
what to make and for whom.
I have a vision for everything I
do, he said. Ive made between
90,000 and 100,000 crosses.
He said Angelo Descul, an art-
ist from Berwick, painted every
face of Jesus on every cross, and
Joseph Amity donates all the
wood for the crosses.
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER NEWS SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013 PAGE 11A
Metals
over a several-month period.
Its led to many charges (being fled)
and has helped us locate and verify
stolen items, said county Detective
Charles Balogh, who implemented the
database in 2008 under then-District
Attorney Jackie Musto Carroll. Its
very benefcial.
Balogh said about 200 entries are put
into the system every week, monitored
by 235 law enforcement agencies.
Balogh said the old way the process
would work is that an individual would
sell an item to a local pawn shop. They
would provide their identifcation, sig-
nature and amount of money paid out,
and that information would be mailed
to the district attorneys offce.
Balogh said soon, fling cabinets
were piling up, as records are kept for
a two-year period.
At an average of 1,000 transactions a
week, Balogh believed there could be a
better way a more streamlined way.
And so, the online database was
born. A test run worked out better than
expected and the system became price-
less.
Its a nice system. It can help us iden-
tify a unique piece of jewelry through
a detailed description, Salavantis
said. As long as pawn shops are doing
their job, we can have instant access to
those items.
Balogh said the system was the driv-
ing force behind an arrest in a recent
burglary ring in Dunmore, and has
helped make recent arrests in West
Pittston and Hazleton.
For most people, items taken in a
burglary have no value, they are price-
less and sentimental pieces, Salavantis
said. It means everything when we can
provide that piece back to a victim. It
means the world to them.
Balogh said most items taken from
peoples homes and sold at pawn shops
are from trusted individuals, such as
those doing work painting, installing
carpets, contractors, housekeepers and
others.
Items are taken, sold at pawn shops
and identifcation of that person and
the item they sold immediately go into
the database.
More counties, more efective
Now that several other counties are
getting on board with Luzerne Countys
database, Salavantis said enforcement
will be easier.
Criminals have no boundaries. Now,
well be able to track them across multi-
county jurisdictions, Salavantis said.
Balogh added he hopes some day
to have every county in Pennsylvania
participate in the database so that the
entire state can beneft from its impact.
Balogh said currently 92 pawn shops
participate in using the database,
and some municipalities, including
Wilkes-Barre, Hazleton and Hanover
Township, have enacted ordinances
that require businesses in municipali-
ties to participate in the database.
If a vendor fails to participate in
providing information to the District
Attorneys Offce, they could be
charged with a misdemeanor and lose
their license for fve years.
Though, Balogh said, vendors can
also be victims in the case because they
are losing merchandise and income.
Times Leader photo
Luzerne County Detective Charles Balogh talks to District Attorney Stefanie Salavantis about
the Precious Metals and Second Hand Goods database.
From page 1A
Before hiring contractor,
do your homework
Edward Lewis
elewis@timesleader.com
A finished cross made by Billy Emmanuel with a piece of the World Trade Center.
From page 1A
Cross
Aimee Dilger Photos | The Times Leader
away shingles.
Swoyersville police Cpl.
Adam Christian charged
Brown in June with failing
to fnish the job. Christian
said Lemire left a huge hole
in the roof exposing inte-
rior rooms.
Tarps cover the womans
roof.
West Pittston police
said Joseph Lombardo,
of Luzerne Avenue,
paid $1,800 to William
Thomas Laird of
Lairds Renovations and
Remodeling to paint his
house in April. Laird
cashed the check, made
out to a woman, and never
started the job, police said.
Police charged Laird
with theft, deceptive busi-
ness practices and receiv-
ing payment for services he
failed to perform.
Precautions
necessary
While the spring and
summer seasons are ripe
for remodeling and build-
ing projects, homeowners
who sustained damage
from a natural disaster also
need contractors services.
The state Offce of
Attorney General had
offcials throughout
Northeastern Pennsylvania
in the weeks after the
historic September 2011
ood verifying contractors
were registered with thier
offce as required by state
law and to make sure they
werent raising prices for
materials and labor.
Janet Campis, offcer
manager at The Building
Industry Association of
Northeastern Pennsylvania
in Kingston, warns home-
owners to be extra cautious
when hiring a contractor to
avoid being victimized.
The frst thing home-
owners should do is call
their insurance company;
they have a list of contrac-
tors they will recommend,
Campis said. The next
thing homeowners can do
is get referrels and check
for the contractors regis-
tration number with the
(Pennsylvania) Attorney
Generals Offce.
A law adopted in 2009
requires contractors to
register their business
with the attorney generals
offce.
Optimismfaded
Stuka said he purchased
the house in February
2012 when the previous
homeowners had died. The
house is next to his par-
ents home where he was
raised.
Stuka said he hired
Poplawski on a recommen-
dation from the previous
owners family. Poplawski
installed a fence on the
Stuka property and demol-
ished a garage behind his
new home.
Im a frst time home
owner, I didnt know much
better, Stuka said. It
wasnt suppose to be this
way; I trusted him.
Stuka said Poplawski
promised to obtain the nec-
essary permits to remodel
the house and to replace
the roof. Permits also were
required for containers to
haul away debris.
Stuka said he frst sus-
pected problems when he
noticed the lack of permit
cards in the window. He
did not know separate
permits are required for
electrical, plumbing and
roof replacement.
At the time, I didnt feel
I was being cheated, Stuka
said. When he kept ask-
ing me for more money, I
started to question him and
he stopped showing up,
he only showed up when
I wasnt around and he
stopped returning calls.
Stuka hoped the remodel
would be fnished in May
2012 allowing him to rent
the two apartments and
earn income. With the
apartments still under
construction in July 2012,
Stuka gave Poplawski an
ultimatum.
I told him to get this
fnished by October. Every
cent I had has gone into
the house, Stuka said.
Stuka said he fnally
had enough, ending his
working relationship with
Poplawski in October. By
that time, Stuka said he
was in the hole for more
than $73,000.
Troubles not over
Stukas troubles did not
end there.
An inspection of the
unfnished apartments led
to serious problems costing
Stuka more money:
Stuka learned he was
billed him for new materi-
als when existing and used
windows, pipes and electri-
cal wires from other jobs
were used.
Fittings for the 4-inch
waste pipe in the basement
were incorrectly connected
to the main sewer line.
Drywall that was
installed did not meet fre
code standards.
Walls were closed with
drywall before the electrical
system was inspected.
The front porch was
not replaced.
Electrical panel boxes
and the wrong ceiling
fan junction boxes were
installed.
Stuka said he learned of
the shoddy construction
by new contractors he was
forced to hire to fnish the
apartments. Drywall had to
be removed to install new
electrical lines and junc-
tion boxes, waste pipes had
to be moved and reftted,
and new water lines had to
be installed to service the
kitchens and bathrooms.
Stuka predicts the house
will be fnished in late sum-
mer.
Judgement
against contractor
Sheila Nicholson and her
husband, Mark, of Harveys
Lake, had Poplawski work
for them.
The Nicholsons fled
a civil lawsuit against
Poplawski attempting to
recoup $33,000 for work
they paid him to remodel
a rental unit on Rhodes
Terrace in 2009.
We hired him to do
the work and we gave
him $7,000 for cherry
From page 1A
Homeowners
cabinets, Nicholson
explained. He called three
days later and said he
needed another $8,000. He
starts throwing up a deck
on the back of the house.
We soon found out he
never ordered the cabinets
and never got permits,
not even a permit for the
deck, Nicholson said.
Nicholson said the
Harveys Lake Code
Enforcement Offce
ordered Poplawski to cease
working on the house.
Nicholson said she learned
Poplawski billed her for
insulation that was not
installed.
Poplawski was charged
by Harveys Lake police
with theft and deceptive
business practices. Those
charges were dismissed
when Nicholson said she
accepted $5,000 from
Poplawski.
We had to pay more
money to redo all the work
he did, Nicholson said.
The civil lawsuit was
fled in an attempt to
recover their losses. A
$38,732 judgment was
fled in Luzerne County
Court in October 2009
in the Nicholsons favor
when Poplawski failed to
respond to the lawsuit.
No money has been
paid.
Pete G. Wilcox photos | The Times Leader
MatthewStuka of descends the steps leading to an upstairs apartment in his newhome he purchased
in Exeter. Stuka claims he was bilked out of $75,000 from contractor George Poplawski, who was
renovating Stukas home.
Matthew Stuka of Exeter stands in front of his new home recently
while renovations are being done to rectify shoddy work of a con-
tractor who bilked Stuka out of $75,000.
MOSCOW Edward Snowden has
found supporters in Latin America,
including three countries who have
offered him asylum. But many obsta-
cles stand in the way of the fugitive
NSA leaker from leaving a Russian air-
port chief among them the power
and inuence of the United States.
Because Snowdens U.S. passport
has been revoked, the logistics of him
departing are complicated. Venezuela,
Nicaragua and Bolivia have made asy-
lum offers over the past two days, but
the three countries havent indicated
they would help Snowden by issuing a
travel document, which he would need
to leave Russia.
The former NSA systems analyst,
who is charged with violating U.S.
espionage laws, is believed to be stuck
in the transit area of Moscows main
international airport after arriving
June 23 from Hong Kong.
Russia doesnt appear willing to help
him leave the airport, with Kremlin
spokesman Alexei Pavlov saying
Saturday the issue of Snowdens travel
documents is not our business. On
Monday, President Vladimir Putin
said Snowden would be offered asylum
in Russia if he stopped leaking U.S.
secrets. Snowden then withdrew his
Russian asylum bid, a Russian ofcial
said.
While President Barack Obama has
publicly displayed a relaxed attitude
toward Snowdens movements, saying
last month that he wouldnt be scram-
bling jets to capture him, other senior
U.S. ofcials have used unusually harsh
language that they want him back.
White House spokesman Jay Carney
said China had unquestionably dam-
aged its relationship with Washington
for not returning Snowden, who
recently turned 30, from semi-auton-
omous Hong Kong while he was still
there.
The Chinese have emphasized the
importance of building mutual trust,
Carney said last month. We think that
they have dealt that effort a serious
setback. If we cannot count on them
to honor their legal extradition obliga-
tions, then there is a problem.
who owns a restaurant near
the blast site. It was a big
explosion. Its a catastrophe.
Its terrible for the popula-
tion.
Demers, who ed his
home, said the explosion was
like an atomic bomb. It was
very hot. Everybody was
afraid.
Charles Coue said he and
his wife felt the heat as they
sprinted from their home
after an explosion went off
a couple of hundred yards
(meters) away.
It went boom and it came
like a reball, he said.
Another resident Claude
Bedard described the scene
of the explosions as dread-
ful.
The Metro store,
Dollarama, everything that
was there is gone, he said.
Environment Quebec
spokesman Christian
Blanchette said a large but
undetermined amount of
fuel had also spilled into the
Chaudiere (Ah-DER-Re)
River. Blanchette said the 73
cars were lled with crude
oil, and at least four were
damaged by the explosions
and re.
We also have a spill on
the lake and the river that
is concerning us. We have
advised the local municipali-
ties downstream to be careful
if they take their water from
the Chaudiere River.
He added that a mobile
laboratory had been set up to
monitor the quality of the air.
Fireghters and rescue
workers from several neigh-
boring municipalities, includ-
ing Sherbrooke and Saint-
Georges-de-Beauce, were
called in to help deal with the
disaster.
Fireghters from northern
Maine were also deployed to
the Quebec town, according
to a spokesman at the sher-
iffs ofce in Franklin County.
Prime Minister Stephen
Harper expressed his sympa-
thy in a statement.
Our thoughts and prayers
go out to the families and
friends of those affected
by this mornings tragic
train derailment and subse-
quent res in Lac-Megantic,
Quebec, Harper said.
We hope evacuees can
return to their homes safely
and quickly. The people of
Lac-Megantic and surround-
ing areas can rest assured
that our government is moni-
toring the situation and we
stand by ready to provide any
assistance requested by the
province.
The train, reportedly head-
ing toward Maine, belongs to
Montreal Maine & Atlantic.
According to the railroads
website, the company owns
more than 500 miles (800
kilometers) of track serving
Maine, Vermont, Quebec and
New Brunswick.
Last week a train carrying
petroleum products derailed
in Calgary, Alberta, when a
ood-damaged bridge sagged
toward the still-swollen Bow
River. The derailed rail cars
were removed without spill-
ing their cargo.
The Quebec accident is
likely to have an impact
across the border. In Maine,
environmentalists and state
ofcials have previously
raised concerns about the
threat of an accident and a
spill from railroad tank cars
carrying crude oil across the
state.
The Montreal, Maine and
Atlantic Railway carried
nearly 3 million barrels of oil
across Maine last year. Each
tank car holds some 30,000
gallons (113,600 liters) of oil.
The Maine Department
of Environmental Protection
has begun developing protec-
tion plans for the areas where
the trains travel, spokeswom-
an Samantha Warren said
recently.
PAGE 12A SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013 NEWS www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER
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INDEPENDENCE DAY
SALE!
INDEPENDENCE DAY
SALE!
Monterrey
89/71
Chihuahua
87/64
Los Angeles
78/64
Washington
93/76
New York
92/77
Miami
90/79
Atlanta
82/70
Detroit
83/69
Houston
90/76
Kansas City
94/73
Chicago
86/72
Minneapolis
89/70
El Paso
97/77
Denver
94/65
Billings
86/63
San Francisco
69/54
Seattle
79/57
Toronto
82/67
Montreal
82/68
Winnipeg
70/57
SEVEN-DAY FORECAST
HIGH
LOW
TEMPERATURES
ALMANAC NATIONAL FORECAST
PRECIPITATION
Lehigh
Delaware
Sunrise Sunset
Moonrise Moonset
Today Today
Today Today
Susquehanna Stage Chg Fld Stg
RIVER LEVELS
ACROSS THE REGION TODAY
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation today. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Shown is
todays weather.
Temperatures are
todays highs and
tonights lows.
SUN & MOON
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy,
c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
Wilkes-Barre
Scranton
Philadelphia
Reading
Pottsville
Allentown
Harrisburg
State College
Williamsport
Towanda
Binghamton
Syracuse
Albany
Poughkeepsie
New York
PHILADELPHIA
THE JERSEY SHORE
MON WED
THU FRI
TUE
SAT
TODAY
90
70
A couple
of thun-
derstorms
86 64
Clouds
and sun, a
t-storm
90 69
A t-storm
in the
morning
86 66
Mostly
sunny
84 60
Thunder-
storm
89 68
Partly
sunny
80 58
A thun-
derstorm
this after-
noon
COOLING DEGREE DAYS
Degree days are an indicator of energy needs. The more the
total degree days, the more energy is necessary to cool.
Yesterday 15
Month to date 75
Year to date 275
Last year to date 289
Normal year to date 185
Anchorage 62/52/r 63/54/sh
Baltimore 94/73/t 90/72/t
Boston 91/74/t 86/70/t
Buffalo 82/68/t 80/68/t
Charlotte 86/72/pc 86/72/t
Chicago 86/72/pc 88/73/t
Cleveland 78/68/t 85/72/t
Dallas 97/77/s 95/79/pc
Denver 94/65/s 97/66/s
Honolulu 87/71/pc 87/74/s
Indianapolis 82/68/t 86/72/t
Las Vegas 106/88/s 107/89/s
Milwaukee 82/70/pc 84/70/t
New Orleans 86/76/t 87/74/t
Norfolk 90/73/pc 89/74/t
Okla. City 96/72/s 96/74/pc
Orlando 91/74/t 91/72/pc
Phoenix 111/92/s 110/92/s
Pittsburgh 82/67/t 82/67/t
Portland, ME 87/68/t 79/67/t
St. Louis 88/74/pc 94/76/pc
San Francisco 69/54/s 70/55/pc
Seattle 79/57/s 77/59/s
Wash., DC 93/76/t 89/75/t
Bethlehem 3.42 -0.87 16
Wilkes-Barre 9.34 -1.64 22
Towanda 5.77 -1.49 16
Port Jervis 4.29 -0.68 18
In feet as of 7 a.m. Saturday.
Today Mon Today Mon Today Mon
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. 2013
July 8 July 15
July 22
New First
Full Last
July 29
5:38 a.m.
5:13 a.m.
8:39 p.m.
8:01 p.m.
THE POCONOS
Highs: 87-93. Lows: 64-70. Humid today with clouds and sun, then not
as warm with a thunderstorm.
Highs: 82-88. Lows: 71-77. Humid today with clouds and sunshine.
Mostly cloudy tonight. A shower or thunderstorm around tomorrow.
THE FINGER LAKES
Highs: 85-91. Lows: 66-72. Sun and clouds today with a couple of
showers and a thunderstorm; humid.
NEW YORK CITY
High: 92. Low: 77. Hot and humid today with clouds and sun; an after-
noon thunderstorm in spots.
High: 94. Low: 75. Hot and humid today with clouds and sun; a thun-
derstorm around in the afternoon.
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton International Airport
through 7 p.m. Saturday
High/low 89/71
Normal high/low 82/61
Record high 96 (1988)
Record low 43 (1979)
24 hrs ending 7 p.m. 0.00"
Month to date 0.38"
Normal m-t-d 0.67"
Year to date 15.58"
Normal y-t-d 18.50"
90/70
90/69
94/75
93/71
92/69
92/70
92/71
86/68
88/69
88/67
86/67
88/69
88/72
90/70
92/77
Summary: Heavy rain and storms will continue along the Gulf Coast today.
Strong storms will develop in the afternoon in the Dakotas while muggy
conditions and afternoon storms continue in the Northeast.
Train
From page 1A
Snowdens fate unclear
Nataliya Vasilyeva
Associated Press
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER FEATURES SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013 PAGE 1B
EXTRA
Mary Therese Biebel
mbiebel@timesleader.com
After the tragic shooting in
Connecticut claimed the lives of 20
schoolchildren in December, musi-
cian Doug Hutchings expressed his
anguish and confusion about the
hardest questions.
Where is God when terrible
things happen? I started to write a
song about that well before Sandy
Hook happened, he said, explaining
the loss of innocent lives prompted
him to complete the piece.
The best way to describe it is in
the lyrics of the chorus. Theres so
much beauty in this world, especial-
ly in the young, the innocent. Why
are there people who think beauty is
something to destroy?
The song basically says I dont
have the answers, Hutchings said in
a telephone interview. Im not sure
why God allows bad things to hap-
pen to good people. What I do know
is tragedy makes us more human. It
draws us closer to God, and when we
lean into him, the answer isnt always
clear, but he grows closer to us and
touches our hearts.
Touching hearts is a goal shared by
Hutchings and the other members of
Full Armor, a Catholic/Christian band
scheduled to play acoustic-driven, folk-
style music during a 4 p.m. Saturday
Mass at All Saints Parish in Plymouth.
A concert of the groups music,
including selections from the recent
album None the Same, will follow
immediately. The public is welcome,
and admission is free.
Calling themselves a band of best
friends, members of Full Armor
have been playing together since
they were high-school students in the
Middletown, N.Y., area. The musi-
cians include Tara Lakeman, Kyle
Hancharick and Doug Hutchings as
vocalists with Hancharick also play-
ing acoustic guitar and Hutchings on
keyboards. Rounding out the sound
are Francis Zelinka with his electric
guitar, Matt Juliano on drums and
Matthew Lee occasionally providing
violin harmony.
Their name came from a letter of St.
Paul, in which he advised the Ephesians
to put on the full armor of God.
Does that mean the musicians, all
of them in their 20s, feel as if theyre
going into battle?
Jesus won the battle, Hutchings
said. All we have to do is go out and
show Jesus to other people through
the way we love and treat each other.
Members of the group do try to
treat everyone as a friend.
During one concert in a small
venue, Hutchings remembered,
There were about seven kids, high-
school age, all up front. They didnt
seem to be as joyful, or having a good
time, as I would have expected. I
told myself, This is the Holy Spirit.
You just have to be courageous. We
approached them and asked what
was going on and found out that a
year ago, a good friend of theirs had
died in a car accident.
We said, Come step aside and
pray with us really quick. Tara and I
put our arms around them. We cried
together. We prayed together. We
tried to show our faith in action.
No stranger to larger venues,
Full Armor received national atten-
tion when the band played for Pope
Benedict XVIs youth rally in New
York, which was attended by 25,000
young people in April 2008.
There was so much energy there,
Hutchings remembered. It was real-
ly intense. When (the pope) came
in, he was such a humble, quiet pres-
ence, and he spoke very gently but
very powerfully about peace.
Spreading peace is one of Full
Armors goals, as Hutchings
expressed in the song Let Me Sow
Love, which he wrote based on the
prayer of St. Francis.
Let me sow the love that youve put
into me, he wrote, to make me an
instrument of your joy and your peace.
Courtesy photo
The Christian band Full Armor will perform at All Saints Church in Plymouth on Saturday.
AnArmor of faith and love
IF YOU GO
What: Full Armor Band concert
When: After 4 p.m. Mass on
Saturday
Where: All Saints Church, 66
Willow St., Plymouth
Admission: Free. Donations
will be accepted.
Howbest to behold
Lady Liberty
10 options you might not have considered
AP file photos
Staten Island ferry passengers look out at the Statue of Liberty in New York. For
tourists who want a photo of the famous statue without visiting the island, there
are many options and vantage points, including rides on the free Staten Island Ferry.
Beth J. Harpaz
The Associated Press
NEW YORK The Statue of Liberty reopened to visitors on July
Fourth for the rst time since Superstorm Sandy. But for those who
just want a photo op with the statue, there are many other vantage
points, from Red Hook, Brooklyn, and Governors Island, to a walk
across the Brooklyn Bridge. The Staten Island ferry takes you right
past the statue for free, while those on bigger budgets can reserve a
room with a view at the luxury Ritz-Carlton hotel.
Here are 10 ways to get a great look at the Statue of Liberty, start-
ing with the cruises that resumed service to Liberty Island on July
Fourth.
STATUE CRUISES TO LIBERTY ISLAND
Statue Cruises http://www.statuecruises.com is the sole
operator for boats that take visitors to Liberty Island, where the
Statue of Liberty is located. Boats were scheduled to resume depart-
ing from the Battery in Lower Manhattan on July 4, when Liberty
Island reopened to the public for the rst time since Superstorm
Sandy in October. The statue itself was not damaged by the storm,
but landing docks and infrastructure, including electrical, phone and
sewage systems, required months of repair work by the National Park
Service, which operates the statue.
Ellis Island also was damaged by the storm, and no reopening date
has been set, so cruises to the Statue of Liberty will not be stopping
there yet, NPS spokesman John Warren said. But Warren added that
the park service is hopeful that boats to Liberty Island soon will
resume departures from Liberty State Park in New Jersey.
You can buy Statue Cruises tickets in person at the Battery, but
the cruises do sell out, so advance online purchase is strongly rec-
ommended. There are three types of tickets: access to the statues
crown, $20 ($17 for seniors, $12 for ages 4-12); or access to the
pedestal of the monument or the grounds of Liberty Island, $17 ($14
for seniors, $9 ages 4-12).
Visit http://www.nps.gov/stli/planyourvisit/statue2012reopening.
htm for more information.
STATEN ISLAND FERRY
Take the subway to Bowling Green or South Ferry and hop on a
Staten Island ferry for a free ride across New York Harbor. The boats
run 24 hours a day. Theres always a crowd of tourists on deck taking
photos as the boat passes the Statue of Liberty.
OTHER CRUISES
Many vessels offer sightseeing cruises of New York Harbor and
Manhattan that sail right past the Statue of Liberty. They include
the Circle Line, Manhattan by Sails schooners, Hornblower Cruises,
Spirit Cruises, New York Water Taxi and Bateaux New York. Some
offer live music or fancy lunch or dinner cruises that can top $100.
BATTERY AND LOWER MANHATTAN
To see the Statue of Liberty without getting on a boat, just head to
the southern tip of Lower Manhattan, an area known as the Battery
(subway to South Ferry or Bowling Green).
While youre there, consider exploring other parts of Lower
Manhattan, which includes the nancial district and the 9/11
Memorial. NYC & Company, the citys ofcial tourism agency, offers
a guide at http://www.nycgo.com/lower-manhattan.
BROOKLYN BRIDGE
A walk across the Brooklyn Bridge is one of the classic New York
experiences. In addition to giving you a close look at the bridges
Gothic arches and delicate ligree of cables, it offers a magical view
of Lower Manhattan and the Statue of Liberty. To get the full impact
of the skyscraper canyon coming into view, take the subway to the
Brooklyn side (A or C to High Street) and walk back.
See LIBERTY | 12B
Chill out with
do-it-yourself
wine coolers
The wine cooler has a bit of an identity problem.
Is it a wine spritzer? A wine cocktail? Sangria? And
what about that wild child moment in the 80s when
it was the hottest thing on the party scene?
Luckily, this cocktail conundrum is easily solved.
As Gertrude Stein might put it, wine cooler is wine
spritzer is wine cocktail is sangria.
And the versions being whipped up today have
nothing in common with the cheap, mass-produced
products of 30 years ago (which thankfully went the
way of shoulder pads).
Mixology has been raised to this new chef-like
heights and wine, in a way, is the bartenders hottest
ingredient right now, says Mike Dawson, senior edi-
tor at Wine Enthusiast. Cutting-edge bartenders are
taking these wine-based drinks to new heights, and
creating these New Age coolers, along with countless
variations of the sangria and classic wine cocktails
like the New York Sour.
Summer is the perfect time for wine coolers, because
its the one time of year even the most dedicated vino-
phile toys with dropping a stful of ice in a glass.
Switching to a cooler makes wine a little bit eas-
ier to drink, says Chad Furuta of Del Friscos Grille
in New York. At the Grille, bartenders are making
spritzers with a house white wine, mixed with ginger
ale or a lemon-lime soda and served with a lemon twist
or wedge. Whether you want to call it wine cooler or
spritzer, it really is a great summer drink, he says.
What should you use when making your own wine
coolers? Well, dont reach for the bottom-shelf wine
that just doesnt taste good, advises Cappy Sorentino,
bar director of Spoonbar restaurant at the h2hotel in
the wine-country town of Healdsburg, Calif. On the
other hand, dont go crazy and uncork an expensive
bottle of wine, either.
It doesnt have to be the best stuff because youre
basically using it as a base, he says.
Look for a wine that has a fair amount of
acidity to it, i.e. yes to sauvignon blanc or
pinot grigio, no to chardonnay thats spent
a lot of time in oak barrels. For red wines,
See COOLERS | 2B
Watermelon bellinis, front, and a dark island cooler, rear, hit the
summer spot.
by
355 Market Street in Kingston, PA
570. 763.0044 | ArchComfort.com
Tues Thur 10AM - 7PM Fri, Sat, Mon 10AM - 5PM
The Look You Love
PAGE 2B SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013 NEWS www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER
Spanish wines are, not
surprising, a good choice
because sangria is a Spanish
invention. Tempranillo
makes a good choice.
He has an interesting take
on sangria, which is usually
wine fortied with some-
thing a little stronger and
augmented with sugar and
spices.
At Spoonbar, hes using
a rose wine with pisco
(Peruvian brandy), plus
a little sugar, some water,
fresh pineapple juice, cin-
namon and a touch of clove.
Its really refresh-
ing, which is good for
Healdsburg, where tempera-
tures can get toasty.
Joe Campanale, beverage
director of four New York
City neighborhood restau-
rants, encourages cocktail
enthusiasts to get creative
by mixing up their favorite
single-serving cocktail in a
pitcher for a group dinner
or celebration.
Keep the ingredients
light, he advises, as in his
Blame it on the Aperol cock-
tail served at the dellanima
restaurant which combines
Aperol, Blue Coat gin,
lemon juice in a pitcher with
plenty of ice.
Give it a stir, pour into
ute glasses and top off
with sparkling wine for a
bright effervescence.
Here are a few more sug-
gestions on ways to make
your wine cooler-spritzer-
sangria-cocktail pitcher per-
fect.

WHITE CHILLER
Start to nish: 5 minutes
Servings: 1
Ice
4 ounces sauvignon blanc
wine
1 ounce silver or blanco
tequila
Juice of 1 lime
3 ounces grapefruit soda
Combine all ingredients
in a tall, ice-lled glass. Stir
gently, then serve immedi-
ately.

DARKISLAND
COOLER
Start to nish: 5 minutes
Servings: 1
1/2 vanilla bean
4 ounces cabernet sauvi-
gnon wine
1 ounce spiced rum
2 ounces pineapple juice
Ice
Seltzer water
Split the vanilla bean in
half lengthwise and scrape
the seeds into a tall glass.
Add the wine, rumand pine-
apple juice, stirring to com-
bine. Add ice and top with
seltzer water.

WATERMELON
BELLINI
Start to nish: 10 min-
utes
Servings: 2
3/4 cup watermelon
chunks
1/3 cup frozen peach
chunks
1/2 ounce lemon juice
6 ounces prosecco spar-
kling wine
In a blender, combine
the watermelon, peaches
and lemon juice.Puree until
smooth. Using a mesh
strainer, strain into 2 spar-
kling wine utes, then top
with prosecco.

ROSE TINTED
GLASSES
Start to nish: 10 min-
utes
Servings: 2
1 cup fresh strawberries,
hulled
2 ounces St. Germaine
elderower liqueur
8 ounces rose wine
Seltzer water
2 sprigs fresh mint
In a blender, puree the
strawberries until smooth.
Using a mesh strainer,
strain into a cocktail shaker.
Add the elderower liqueur
and rose wine. Add ice, then
shake to combine. Strain
into 2 tall glasses lled with
ice. Top with seltzer water
and garnish each with a
mint sprig.
(Wine cooler recipes by Alison
Ladman)
COOLERS
From page 1B
The Commission on
Economic Opportunity
recently honored local stu-
dents who achieved aca-
demic distinction during
their high school years.
Thirty-four graduates
of Luzerne and Wyoming
County high schools
received scholarships and
were guests at an awards
reception at Kings College.
The scholarships are
funded by the Northeastern
Resources Development
Corporation and named in
honor of Monsignor Andrew
J. McGowan, a former board
member and president of
both the Commission on
Economic Opportunity and
Northeastern Resources
Development Corporation.
Since the inception of the
award in 1984, there have
been 225 scholars chosen
from candidates nominated
by the local high schools.
Some of the award win-
ners and participants,
from left, first row,
are Nadia Gentilesco,
Brandylynn Macierowski,
Kendra Innocenti, Michael
Lewandowski, Veronica
Zimmerman and Joseph
Prednis. Second row: Gary
Lamont, Michael Sparks,
Dan McGowan and Jolene
Bradford, all members of
the CEO board of direc-
tors; Judge Hugh Mundy,
president, CEO board of
directors; and attorney Tom
Kennedy, board member,
Northeastern Resources
Development Corporation.
McGowan Scholars honored by Commission on Economic Opportunity
Wyoming Area Catholic School
1690 Wyoming Avenue Exeter, Pennsylvania 18643
570-654-7982 www.wacsh.com
Messy concoctions, experiments, and zzy
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Early Drop-off option available.
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through music and games.
Session costs $85. Late pick-up option available.
July 15-19, 9am-12pm Ooey, Gooey, Science
Pre-K through 1
st
graders taught by Mrs. Eileen Barney;
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nd
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rd
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July 15-19, 1pm-4pm Around the World
Pre-K through 1
st
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2
nd
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rd
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Registration Form can be found online at www.summerlearningatwac.com
Space is limited.
Wyoming Area Catholic School
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rd
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Ofering a Mom and Tots Program (ages 3-5) this summer free!!!
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Te Mom and Tots program will be
held on the following dates:
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Thursday July 11th 9:00 11:30 A.M.
Tuesday, July 16th 9:00 11:30 A.M.
Thursday, July 18th 9:00 11:30 A.M.
Tuesday, July 23rd 9:00 11:30 A.M.
Thursday, July 25th 9:00 11:30 A.M.
Tuesday, July 30th 9:00 11:30 A.M.
Thursday, August 1st 9:00 11:30 A.M.
Wyoming Area Catholic School is a Catholic School in the Diocese of Scranton, and part
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Presidents List
MMIPreparatorySchool
Thomas G. Hood, head of school, MMI Preparatory School, recently announced
thenamesof studentswhohavebeennamedtothePresidentsList duringthesecond
semester.
Grade 12: Ashley Acri, Anthony Alfieri, Ashmeen Bains, Cassie Caldwell, John
Driscoll, SeanDucaji-Reap, BriannaDzurishin, KatlynFrey, SandrineGibbons, Trebor
Hall,AlexisHaupt,LindseyJoseph,MeganKlein,CindiLandmesser,GabriellaLobitz,
Casey McCoy, Brianna Nocchi, Rebecca Noga, Nicholas OClair, Casey Olszewski,
ChiarraOverpeck, DavidPolashenski, BeauSamonte, DeryaSari, LoraSchell, Justin
Sheen, DevonSherwood, MarianneVirnelson, GregoryYannesandKirstenYoung.
Grade 11: Alec Andes, Jeffrey Careyva, Maria Carrato, Paige Darrow, Jonathan
DeJesus, Elijah Dove, Patrick Driscoll, Alexander Drusda, Alexander Haber, Kevin
Hysenbegasi, SarahJamack, Druva Kansara, Roger Knittle, Robert Kupsho, Hannah
Lesitsky, Sara Lucas, DevanMcCarrie, Eleni Moustardas, Stephanie Pudish, Kristen
Purcell, RobertRosamelia, MariahSerra, HayleShearer, KaitlynSitch, AlexisWilliams
andJosephYamulla.
Grade 10: Gabriellia Becker, Chiara DeMelfi, Jared Dasher, Kelsy Donaldson,
Llewellyn Dryfoos, Michael Eisenhart, Keegan Farrell, Collin Finkel, Annika Fisk,
Hayden Francis, Collin Frey, James Gabrielle, Tristan Gibbons, Soprina Guarneri,
SamHarman, HayleeKirschner, MadisonLuchi, Eleanor Maduro, KatelynMcGuire,
EmilyMorrison,JessePlaksa,SyedQadri,CoryRogers,MedinaSaeed,EmilySeratch,
ClaireSheen, ChristopherSnyder, Rachel Stanziola, JosephSynoski andAlexzandriea
vanHoekelen.
Grade 9: Andrew Alday, Indkaran Bains, Tyler Barilla, Charles Bower, William
Bower, Samanta Cottone, Mikayla Dove, Brendan Drusda, Alyssa Famalette, Brian
Galbiati, ShaelynHeft, EdwardHerbener, TJ Jankouskas, Aries Klesh, VictoriaKline,
Allison Maso, Joseph Marushin, Sarah Moyer, Taylor Peluso, Jessica Pileggi, Jay
Solgama, JonathanStish, LindsayWalko, NashWennerandLukeYamulla.
Grade 8: Ali Aijaz, Evie Allport, Sereina Brenhofer, Niklas Byriel, Dana Carrato,
Anirban Chowdhury, Kevin Cibak, Gabriella DeMelfi, Evan Dryfoos, Joey Kress,
Megan Marchetti, Allison McGeehan, Olivia Minzola, Joshua Narrow, Quentin
Novinger, Keenan Overa, Kisan Patel, Samuel Sessock, Ryan Touey and Nicholas
Young.
Grade 7: Angelica Alday, Lauren Babinetz, David Caldwell, Kyle Falatko, Aaron
Harman, Tara Hohn, Joshua Kalada-Kania, Sydney Karpowich, Chava Kornblatt,
Caitlyn Kline, Gabriella Kupsho, Marc Lobitz, John Malay, Caelyn McGran, Julia
Snyder, ColeWennerandStephanieZellner.
Grade 6: Brandon Ascencio, Elliot Blasko, Elizabeth Borchick, Nicholas Carrato,
Tyler Degenhart, Daniel DeMelfi, Madeline Dryfoos, Lauren Herman, Allison
Hohn, Elise Hreha, Amanda Kalada-Kania, Alexander Kline, Morgan Long, Jessica
McClellan, Kaitlyn McGeehan, Frederick Mejia, Christine Park, Alexander Sessock,
ColeSmith, EthanWarnerandZacharyYoung.
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER NEWS SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013 PAGE 3B
Ive often said
that genealogists
shouldnt be afraid
to spend time
studying history.
Knowledge of the
milieu in which
ancestors lived
could open a lot of
doors.
Thats why a new push
among local historical
societies to compile
oral history in a coordi-
nated way is good news
for the areas genealo-
gists, most of whom are
already members and/
or patrons of those very
same historical groups
and routinely use their
services.
You have the oppor-
tunity to fill in those
gaps in history, in the
written record, said Dr.
John H. Hepp of Wilkes
U n i v e r s i t y
at the recent
Summit of
Luzerne County
H i s t o r i c a l
Societies.
Hepp, a pro-
fessor of his-
tory, addressed
36 people, representing
14 local historical and
genealogical organiza-
tions. His purpose was
to provide a rationale
for oral history and
explain how to do it
from a technical and
legal standpoint.
What is oral history?
Essentially it is record-
ing the recollections of
older people about the
lives theyve led and
the experiences theyve
had. Todays high-
capacity, voice-activat-
ed digital recording
technology makes that
kind of recording easily
do-able.
But specifically how
might widely scat-
tered recording efforts
become available to
genealogists? The
answer lies in tech-
nology and coordina-
tion, as explained by
Tony Brooks, executive
director of the Luzerne
County Historical
Society.
A modern recorder,
such as will soon be
distributed to local
historical groups, can
move the material
perhaps an interview
with a survivor of the
Great Depression or a
veteran of World War II
to a central location.
There all the histories
can be indexed, ready
for use by researchers
targeting specific eras
or events. Eventually,
even distance from
the collection will not
be a barrier, because
researchers will be
able to log in from any-
where.
Efforts are already
under way. Hepp said
that Kings College has
been compiling oral his-
tories from coal mining
days and from the 1972
Tropical Storm Agnes
disaster.
Hepp urged the local
groups to waste no time
in deciding on their
focuses and joining in
the effort while people
who remember times
past are still with us.
Get the stories
before the stories dis-
appear, he said.
Update: Reader Bill
Runner recently point-
ed out that one of the
areas schools no lon-
ger in existence was a
Wilkes-Barre extension
of the famous Wharton
School, a division
of the University of
Pennsylvania. Wharton
offers degrees in the
business and finance
fields and enjoys a
worldwide reputation.
The local extension
operated from 1913 to
the 1950s, with classes
held at Coughlin High
School, Runner said.
Runner is a gradu-
ate of Wharton in
Philadelphia and for-
mer president of Penns
regional alumni group.
News Notes:
Fashions and Funeral
Practice of Yesteryear
will be on the agenda for
the next meeting of the
Genealogical Research
Society of Northeastern
Pennsylvania. The
meeting is set for 7
p.m. on July 17 at the
societys offices, 1100
Main St., Peckville.
Presenting will be Julie
Esty and Wendy Belski.
The Northeast
P e n n s y l v a n i a
Genealogical Society
recently acquired many
volumes of the old
Daily Bulletin news-
paper of Hazleton.
Those volumes date
from the late 19th and
early 20th centuries.
The group will digitize
the crumbling pages,
part of its ongoing proj-
ect of preserving local
records of all kinds.
Congratulations to
the incoming slate
of officers elected
by the brand-new
Kingston Historical
Society recently. They
are President Sandra
Kase, Vice President
Joe Grimes, Secretary
Andrea Petrasek
and Treasurer Ralph
Rusty Seltzer. The
group will begin its first
full season of meetings
in the fall.
Tom Mooney is a Times Leader
genealogy columnist. Reach
him at tmooney2@ptd.net.
OUT ONA LIMB
Oral histories could make historical record more complete
Tom Mooney
PoconoWurst
Festival planned
for Shawnee-
on-Delaware
Attention, meat lovers.
The Pocono Wurst Festival
will be held from11 a.m. to 6
p.m. July 20-21 at Shawnee
Mountain Skie Area, Holly
Road, Shawnee-on-Delaware.
A variety of wursts, wie-
ners, kielbasa, pierogies and
crafted brews will be avail-
able for tasting. The event
will also include polka and
German oom-pah bands,
Polish and German dancers
and craft vendors.
Performers include Jimmy
Sturr & His Orchestra, the
Chardon Polka Band, Eddie
Derwin&the Polka Naturals,
the Austrian Boys and Joe
Stanky &the Cadets.
Tickets are $12 advance;
$15 at the gate. For more
information, call 421-7231.
*
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PAGE 4B SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013 OCCASIONS www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER
Woodruf, Kazinetz
Announcement is made of the engagement and upcoming
wedding of Heather K. Woodruff to Paul Kazinetz III, both of
Dickson City.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of Patricia Benzi, Kingston,
and Dennis Benzi, Plains Township.
She is a graduate of Pittston Area High School and earned
a bachelors degree in business administration from Kings
College. She also attended Florida Coastal School of Law,
Jacksonville, Fla., where she earned her Juris Doctorate. She
is licensed to practice law in Florida and Pennsylvania. She is
employed at Fidelity Deposit and Discount Bank as an assis-
tant vice president and special assets officer.
The prospective groom is the son of Paul and Rose Kazinetz,
Dickson City. He is the grandson of the late John Malicki.
He is a graduate of Mid Valley High School and earned
a bachelors degree in elementary education from East
Stroudsburg University. He is employed as an account execu-
tive for Buzz Points, Scranton.
The wedding is set for Oct. 12 in Holy Mother of Sorrows
Church, Dupont.
Tessy Wesolowski and Jeffrey Lingle, together with their
families, announce their engagement and upcoming wedding.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of Mark Wesolowski,
Plymouth, and Trisha Powell, Pflugerville, Texas. She is
the granddaughter of John and Gail Brown, Swoyersville;
Josephine Wesolowski, Plymouth; and the late Edward
Wesolowski.
Tessy is a 2007 graduate of Wyoming Valley West High
School. She graduated from Penn State University in 2011
with a degree for physical therapy assistant and is employed
full time with Aegis Therapies.
The prospective groom is the son of Edward and Holly
Lingle, Larksville. He is the grandson of Edward Lingle,
Larksville; Joan Malicki, Wilkes-Barre; and the late Gertrude
Lingle.
Jeff is a 2007 graduate of Wyoming Valley West High School
and earned an associates of applied science degree in electri-
cal construction from Luzerne County Community College
in 2012. He is a full-time employee for Alexandria Moulding.
The couple will exchange vows on Sept. 7, 2013, at the
Penn State Lehman Campus.
Wesolowski, Lingle
Jessica Yaracz and Michael Lukatchik, together with their
families, announce their engagement and upcoming marriage.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of Lloyd and Beverly Parry,
Hanover Township. She is the granddaughter of the late Joseph
and Mary Yaracz, Nanticoke.
The prospective groom is the son of Michael and Judy
Lukatchik, Larksville. He is the grandson of Eleanor Basta,
Plymouth; the late Joseph Basta, Plymouth; and the late
Nicholas and Delores Lukatchik, Edwardsville.
The bride-to-be is a 2004 graduate of Greater Nanticoke
Area High School and earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in
education from Kings College in 2008 and a masters degree
in reading from Kings College in 2012. She is employed as a
substitute teacher in local area school districts.
The prospective groom is a 2001 graduate of Wyoming Valley
West High School and earned a Bachelor of Science degree in
information technology from Misericordia University in 2005.
He is employed as an application developer at United One
Resources, Inc.
The couple resides in Shavertown with their dog, Bart. The
couplewill exchangevowlsAug. 3, at All SaintsParish, Plymouth.
Lukatchik, Yaracz
Patrick and Renee Bly, Plains Township, Pa., are honored
to announce the engagement and upcoming marriage of their
daughter, Brittany Christina Bly, to Zak Errol Baker, Lacey,
Wash.
The bride-to-be is the granddaughter of John and Dolores
Hocko, Bald Mountain Road, Wilkes-Barre Township.
The bride-to-be was a Broad Street Entertainer with Miss
Cindys School of Dance and won Miss Performing Arts 2008
in Philadelphia, Pa. She graduated from James M. Coughlin
High School with honors in 2009. She is an ocean engineer-
ing major at the United States Naval Academy and will be
commissioned an Ensign in May, 2014. She is the captain of
the United States Naval Academy Cheerleading Team and has
been asked to represent the State of Maryland in the Miss
Maryland Pageant.
The prospective groom is the son of Lance and Christine
Baker, Lacey, Wash. He is the grandson of Errol and Jane
Brown and Bernard and Frances Baker, also of Lacey, Wash.
Zak graduated in 2009 from North Thurston High School
with honors and was an all-state baseball player. He was also a
search and rescue team leader. He was commissioned on May
24, 2013, from the United States Naval Academy as a Second
Lieutenant in the Marine Corps, graduating with a Bachelor
of Science degree in political science, receiving his diploma
from President Barack Obama. He will be attending Marine
Corps Ofcer Training beginning in December of 2013 and
will receive orders after completion.
The couple will exchange vows on Aug. 31, 2014, at the
Thornwood Castle, Tacoma, Wash.
Baker, Bly
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Gavio, Mountain Top, announce the
engagement of their son, Jeffrey Francis Gavio, to Ashley Nicole
Doyle, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Michael Doyle, Warrington,
Pa.
The couple met while studying abroad in London through a
program at the University of Delaware.
The prospective groom is a 2004 graduate of Crestwood
High School and a 2008 graduate of the University of Delaware
with a bachelors degree in history. He works as a proposal
consultant for Reliance Standard Health in Philadelphia.
He is the grandson of Frank and Ann Gavio and Eugene
Hudock and the late Eleanore Hudock.
The bride-to-be is a 2005 graduate of Central Bucks South
High School and a 2009 graduate of the University of Delaware
with a bachelors degree in elementary and special education.
She works as a middle school special education teacher in
Havertown, Pa., and is completing her masters degree at Saint
Josephs University.
She is the granddaughter of Robert Gonnella and the late
Lois Gonnella and Felice Doyle and the late William Doyle.
A November wedding is planned in Bucks County, Pa.
Doyle, Gavio
Savitz, Matyas
Rich and Alice Matyas, Slocum Township, are happy to
announce the engagement of their son, Matthew, to Cassie
Savitz, daughter of Paul and Sharon Savitz, Titusville, Pa.
Matthew and Cassie met as freshmen at Elizabethtown
College, where they both graduated from last spring.
Matthew studied social studies education with a minor in
history. Cassie studied health and human occupation. She will
complete her masters degree in occupational therapy in July
of this year.
The couple is excited to begin their new adventure as hus-
band and wife in New River Gorge National Recreation Area,
W. Va., on Aug. 11, 2013.
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER OCCASIONS SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013 PAGE 5B
Births
Geisinger Wyoming
Valley Medical Center
McBee, Deidre and
Jacob Hill, Tunkhannock, a
son, June 15.
Hernandez, Ruby, Old
Forge, a son, June 15.
Stricker, Mollie and
James Gafford, Wilkes-
Barre, a daughter, June 17.
Costello, Amber and
Joseph, Dallas, a daughter,
June 17.
Boock, Jodi and Robert,
Tunkhannock, a son, June
17.
Maguschak, Victoria
and Keith, Weatherly, a son,
June 18.
Zambino, Tatiana and
Derek, Dallas, a daughter,
June 18.
Broody, Sara and Paul
Michael, Kingston, a
daughter, June 18.
Combarro, Marsha
and Thomas Woodard,
Stillwater, a daughter, June
19.
Calderon, Elizabeth and
Jesse Koncewicz, Plains
Township, a son, June 20.
Engle, Beth and Clayton
III, Larksville, a daughter,
June 20.
Rivera, Malta, Taylor, a
daughter, June 20.
Leodonis, Kathleen and
Dave Wenninger, White
Haven, a daughter, June 21.
Gronski, Falon and
Exodus Defreitas, Wilkes-
Barre, a daughter, June 21.
Labbe, Alicia and Allen
Bowman, Lawton, a
daughter, June 21.
Disalvatore, Marisa and
Albert, Drums, a son, June
21.
Dixon, Keri and Andrew
Croughn, West Pittston, a
son, June 21.
Warner, Samantha and
William Trevouledes,
Canadensis, a son, June 21.
Drozda, Kristina and
William Moyer, Wilkes-
Barre, a daughter, June 23.
Ricci, Kaitlyn and
Christopher Rivera,
Pittston, a son, June 23.
Logatto, Angela
and Joseph Gubitosi,
Wyoming, a daughter, June
23.
McKenzie, Jamie and
Craig Daniels, Hanover
Township, a daughter, June
23.
Cook, Angelaand Jesse,
Plains Township, a daugh-
ter, June 24.
Mintzer, Shala and Eric
Kelly, Tunkhannock, a
daughter, June 24.
Pericci, Patricia and
Joseph, Hanover Township,
a daughter, June 24.
Argenio, Marisa and
Adam, El Paso, Texas, a
daughter, June 25.
Chulada, Crystal,
Plymouth, a son, June 25.
Ely, Heather and Munier
Snyder, West Pittston, a
daughter, June 25.
Williams, Tiffany,
Pittston, a daughter, June
25.
Batista, Yariza and
Yose Castano, Hazleton, a
daughter, June 25.
Buzzard, Amy and
Dennis Joye, Plains
Township, a daughter, June
25.
Rice, Courtney and
David Wolfe, Swoyersville,
a daughter, June 26.
Salinas, Ashley and
Enrique, Tunkhannock, a
daughter, June 26.
Wasley, Jamie and Graig,
Kingston, a son, June 26.
Toluba, Megan and
Joshua Maines, St. Clair, a
daughter, June 26.
Schaeffer, Lisa and
Stephan, Larksville, a son,
June 27.
Janki, Dipa and Daniel,
Tobyhanna, a daughter,
June 27.
Leigh, Megan and Kevin
Lokuta Sr., Nanticoke, a
daughter, June 27.
Serrano, Kashla and
Eddie Cruz, Wilkes-Barre,
a son, June 28.
Polney, Elizabeth
and Gregory Mustakas,
Wilkes-Barre, a son, June
28.
Jones, Kristi and
William, Tunkhannock, a
son, June 28.
Denniston, Angel and
John Saul, Pittston, a
daughter, June 29.
Spahle, Shavonne and
NaimBarber, Edwardsville,
a son, June 29.
Meres, Ivy and Jeremy
Richardson, Pittston, a
son, June 29.
Conahan,
Brozowski
Marie Brozowski and Patrick Conahan, together
with their families, are pleased to announce their
engagement and approaching marriage.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of Marcia
Brozowski and the late Robert Brozowski, Plains
Township. She is the granddaughter of Irene
Brozowski and the late Stanley Brozowski, Wilkes-
Barre Township, and the late Mr. John and Celia
Mrak, Plains Township.
Marie is a 2004 graduate of James M. Coughlin
High School. She is a 2008 graduate of Misericordia
University, where she earned a Bachelor of Science
degree in nursing. She is pursing her masters degree
in nursing at Wilkes University. Marie is employed
as a registered nurse for Geisinger Wyoming Valley.
The prospective groom is the son of Joseph and
Maryann Conahan, Ashley. He is the grandson of
the late Joseph and Nell Conahan, Ashley, and the
late Robert and Mary Mullen, Pittston.
Patrick is a 2004 graduate of Bishop Hoban High
School. He is a 2008 graduate of Kings College,
where he earned a Bachelor of Science degree in
accounting. He is enrolled at Wilkes University to
pursue a masters degree in business administra-
tion. Patrick is employed in accounting for Mericle
Construction, Wilkes-Barre.
The couple has a July 27, 2013, wedding planned
at SS. Peter and Paul Parish, Plains Township.
Williamson, Kowalski
Suchecki, OReilly
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Suchecki, Pittston Township, are
happy to announce the engagement of their daughter,
Shawna, to Kevin OReilly, son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas
OReilly, Shaumburg, Ill.
Miss Suchecki is a graduate of Pittston Area High School,
Temple University, Philadelphia, and Nova Southeastern
University, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., where she earned her
Doctorate of Osteopathic Medicine. She is a neurology resi-
dent at Albany Medical Center, Albany, N.Y.
She is the granddaughter of the late Lawrence and
Elizabeth Kelly and the late Joseph and Helen Suchecki.
Mr. OReilly is a graduate of Conant High School,
Illinois, Wesleyan University, Loyola University and Nova
Southeastern University, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., where he
earned his Doctorate of Osteopathic Medicine. He is an
internal medicine resident at Albany Medical Center,
Albany, N.Y.
Their wedding will take place on July 20 at Sacred Heart
Church, Dupont.
Heather Kowalski and Keith Williamson, together
with their families, announce their engagement and
approaching marriage.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of Thomas and
Teresa Kowalski, Larksville. She is the granddaugh-
ter of Frank and Patricia Skudalski and Albert and
Ladisla Kowalski, both of Larksville.
The prospective groom is the son of Patricia
Williamson and the late Bernard Williamson,
Wyoming. He is the grandson of the late John and
Anne Oleski, Wyoming, and the late Donald and
Bertha Williamson, Wilkes Barre.
Heather is a 2000 graduate of Wyoming Valley
West High School. She graduated from Wilkes
University in 2004 with a degree in psychology
and elementary education. She is employed by the
Liquor Control Board.
Keith is a 1999 graduate of Wyoming Area High
School. He attended Luzerne County Community
College and is now employed by the Liquor Control
Board.
The couple will exchange vows June 21, 2014, in
St. John the Baptist Church, Larksville.
Marsh, Thompson
Megan Thompson and Carl Marsh recently announced
their engagement and upcoming wedding.
Megan and Carl are 2003 graduates of West Side
AVTS. They started out as middle-school sweethearts.
They will be wed on July 13, 2013, at D.I.S. Scooter
Rally Wedding Edition, hosted at Moyers Grove
Campground.
Piazza, Hughes
Kimberly Piazza and James Hughes were united in mar-
riage on July, 22, 2012, at the Waterfront Banquet Facility,
Plains Township, by the Honorable Judge Andrew Barilla.
The bride is the daughter of Anthony and Pamela Piazza,
Pittston. She is the granddaughter of Gladys Dale and the
late Thomas Dale, West Pittston, and the late Concetta and
John Piazza, Swoyersville.
The groom is the son of Jay Hughes, Myrtle Beach,
S.C., and the late Deborah Hughes. He is the grandson of
Virginia Smith and the late Robert Smith, Mountain Top,
and the late Marian and John Hughes, Wilkes-Barre.
The bride was escorted down the aisle and given in mar-
riage by her father. She chose her sister, Kristen Piazza, as
her maid of honor. Bridesmaids were cousin of the bride,
Maria Piazza, and friends of the bride and groom, Jennifer
Leptuck, Kathryn Lokuta and Andrea Collins. Junior
bridesmaid was Randall Walek, cousin of the bride. The
ower girl was Jordan Walek, cousin of the bride.
The groom chose Brad Munley, friend of the bride and
groom, as best man. Groomsmen were friends of the bride
and groom, Brandon Hughes, Bob Hahn, Mike Lokuta
and Brandon Collins. Junior groomsmen was Christopher
Ribar, cousin of the groom. The ring bearer was Lucas
Lokuta, son of Kathryn and Mike Lokuta.
Following the ceremony, an evening cocktail hour and
reception were held at the Waterfront Banquet Facility.
The bride was honored with a bridal shower given by the
mother of the bride at The Melting Pot Catering Service,
Scranton. The rehearsal dinner was hosted by the bride
and groom at Rodanos, Wilkes-Barre.
The bride is a 2003 graduate of Pittston Area High
School. She graduated fromKings College with a Bachelor
of Arts degree and certicate in elementary education
in 2007 and earned a masters degree in curriculum and
instruction in 2011 from Kings College. Kimberly is
employed by the Pittston Area School District as a kinder-
garten teacher.
The groomis a 2003 graduate of Crestwood High School.
He graduated from Kings College in 2007 with a Bachelor
of Science degree in biology and teaching certications in
biology and middle school math in 2009. He earned his
masters degree in instructional technology from Wilkes
University in 2011. He is employed by CVS Caremark as
principal lead tech-desktop support.
The couple honeymooned on a cruise to Bermuda. They
reside in Wilkes-Barre.
The Brislins
Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Brislin, West Wyoming, cel-
ebrated their 50th wedding anniversary on June 22,
2013.
They were married in Holy Saviour Church, Wilkes-
Barre. Their attendants were Beverly Ackoureg and
Robert Brislin.
Mrs. Brislin is the former Peggy Lewis, daughter of
Margaret Lewis Klukoske and step-daughter of the late
Walter Klukoske.
Dennis is the son of the late Dennis and Eleanor
Kearns Brislin.
They are the parents of three daughters, Suzanne and
her husband, John Vitanovec; Sandra and her husband,
David Price; and the late Carolyn Donovan Bromack.
They are blessed to have seven grandchildren,
Elizabeth and Nicholas Vitanovec; Kaitlyn, James and
Courtney Donovan; and David and Ryan Price.
Mrs. Kukoske hosted a dinner party at Marianaccis
Restaurant, Wyoming. A luau was also enjoyed by
many family members and friends.
The Thomases
Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Thomas, Hanover Township,
are celebrating their 60th wedding anniversary,
Thursday, July 11, 2013.
They were married in the Salem Evangelical Church,
Wilkes-Barre, by the late Rev Gordon Oplinger. Alice
Malacarne Bonomo was maid of honor. Ethel ODonnell
Pappas and Gloria McGowan Weale were bridesmaids.
John Jopling was best man. Raymond Eckenrode and
Fred Weale, brother of the bride, were ushers.
Mrs. Thomas is the former Lois Weale, daughter of
the late Archie and Florence Weale.
Mr. Thomas is the son of the late Elias and Dorothy
Thomas and is retired from the U.S. Postal Service.
The couple are the parents of two children, the late
Ronald Thomas and Susan L. Robins, Lebanon, Pa.
They have seven grandchildren and ve great-grand-
children.
The couple will be celebrating their anniversary with
a cruise to Bermuda and a family gathering in Lebanon.
Arleen L. Ebert, Hanover Township, celebrated her
90th birthday on April 19.
The former Arleen L. Phillips, Hanover Township,
is the daughter of the late Evan and Diana Phillips.
She survives a sister, Hannah Phillips Edwards, and a
brother, Evan J. Phillips.
Mrs. Ebert is the widowof John A. Ebert and the moth-
er of two daughters, Ann Jayne Reh, Mechanicsburg,
and Beth Ann Nealon, Hanover Township.
She has seven grandchildren, Kathryn, Nathan, Karl
and John Reh and Thomas, Daniel and Stephen Nealon.
She also has two great-grandsons, Aiden and Braxston
Nealon.
Mrs. Ebert was honored at a tea with her family and
friends at Miss Mollys Tea Room.
Arleen Ebert
celebrates 90th
birthday
PAGE 6B SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013 COMMUNITY NEWS www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER
Sean Murach
Sean Murach, son of Alesandra
Skirmont and Ronald Murach, is
celebrating his eighth birthday
today, July 7. Sean is a grandson
of Annette Skirmont and the late
Alex Skirmont and Edward and Jan
Murach, Tunkhannock.
HAPPYBIRTHDAY!
Lucas W. McDougal
Lucas William McDougal, son
of Michelle and Bill McDougal,
Plains Township, is celebrat-
ing his eighth birthday today,
July 7. Lucas is a grandson of
Jeanette and Elvan Jones, Plains
Township; George and Sandra
Hrabousky, Florida; Frank and
Eileen Roth, Wilkes-Barre; and
the late Dale McDougal. He
is a great-grandson of George
and Pearl Hrabousky, Plains
Township; Joan Cunningham,
Wilkes-Barre; Susie McDougal,
South Carolina; the late Edward
Cunningham; the late William
McDougal; and the late Peter
and Anna Walski. Lucas has a
sister, Anna Grace, 4.
Ava S. Colarusso
Ava Sophia Colarusso, daughter
of Lisa Heck and John Colarusso,
West Pittston, is celebrating her
rst birthday today, July 7. Ava is
a granddaughter of Walter Heck
and the late Betty Heck, West
Pittston. She has a sister, Samantha
Williams, and a brother, John
Daniel Colarusso.
Madison E. Savage
Madison Elizabeth Savage,
daughter of Amanda Millett-
Savage and Mark Savage, Wilkes-
Barre, is celebrating her fourth
birthday today, July 7. Madison
is a granddaughter of Susan
Millett and the late Keith Millett,
Theresa Ungureit-LaMotta
and Robert LaMotta and John
Savage and June Womer. She has
a sister, Kathleen Millett, and
two brothers, Christian Savage
and Zachery Savage.
Kaylee Kovaly
Kaylee Kovaly, daughter
of John and Sandy Kovaly,
Shavertown, is celebrating her
seventh birthday today, July
7. Kaylee has three sisters,
Danielle, 21, Marisa, 20, and
Alexa, 12, and three brothers
Tyler, 20, Daymond, 11, and
Carter, 9.
Noah E. Yokavonis
Noah Edward Yokavonis,
son of Damien Denman,
Edwardsville, and Dustin
Yokavonis, Dallas, celebrated
his rst birthday July 4. Noah
is a grandson of Bill and Ellie
Denman, Larksville, and Calvin
Eckrote, Shickshinny. He has a
sister, Serenity, 5.
Gabriel J. Snyder
Gabriel Joseph Snyder, son
of Gary and Jennifer Snyder,
West Pittston, celebrated his
fourth birthday July 6. Gabriel
is a grandson of Donna Mack,
Exeter, and Ronald and Carol
Gallo, West Pittston.
Dr. Brian Miller, Waterfront Orthodontics, is the lunch sponsor for Rock
Solid Academys Golf for Education Tournament to be held at noon on July 22
at Edgewood in the Pines. The tournament benets students that would like to
attend Rock Solid Academy, but the families do not have the resources to provide
an independent school education for their children. Rock Solid Academy opened in
August of 2012 in Dallas with 27 students in kindergarten through eighth grade. As
the lunch sponsor, Miller will be providing a lunch bag lled with snacks for all of
the golfers that participate the day of the tournament. For more information, con-
tact Mark DiPippa at 675-7625 or mdipippa@rocksolidacademy.org. Golf commit-
tee members, from left: Ed Kowalski, M&T Bank; Miller; Joyce Hoban, Amerprise
Financial; Mark DiPippa, Rock Solid Academy; and Pastor Andy Jerome, Parsons
Dr. Brian Miller donates
to Rock Solid Academy
A county-wide overview of the intellectual disability system in Pennsylvania
was recently presented by The Pennsylvania Training Partnership for People
with Disabilities and Families and hosted by the Anthracite Region Center for
Independent Living and the Luzerne-Wyoming Counties Training Council on
Quality. The training, held at the Luzerne County West Side Annex, Forty Fort,
outlined what the intellectual disability system has to offer, how to register and who
is eligible for services. For more information on available services call 825-9441 or
1-800-816-1880 or email mhmr@mhmr.luzerne.pa.us. At the session, from left: Ned
Whitehead and Mary Saunders, The Pennsylvania Training Partnership; Michelle
Hawk, Goodwill Industries; Janet Kus, Pennsylvania Mentor; Gina Galli, Luzerne-
Wyoming Counties Mental Health and Developmental Services; and Diana Morris
Disability system session held
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www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER NEWS SUNDAY, JULY 7 , 2013 PAGE 7B
Names aNd Faces
Danielle Bagonis, for-
merly of Kingston, will
be spending ve weeks in
China and Taiwan. She
was awarded a Fulbright
Scholarship, along with 11
other award winners from
across the United States.
They will be touring eight
different locations in China
and Taiwan, including
Shanghai, Hong Kong and
Taipei. Bagonis will attain a
wealth of knowledge, includ-
ing all types of Chinese cul-
ture. She will present the
informationtothe Baltimore
City School District and her
students for the upcom-
ing school curriculum.
Bagonis is a seventh- and
eighth-grade social studies
teacher for Baltimore City,
Md. She is a 2001 gradu-
ate of Wyoming Valley West
High School and attended
Temple University, where
she graduated with degrees
in psychology and criminal
justice. She earned her mas-
ters degree in education at
John Hopkins University.
Bagonis plans on attending
Towson University for the
fall and winter semesters to
achieve her Administration
Certicate. She is the
daughter of Dan and Linda
Bagonis, Kingston, and has
a sister, Amber, Northern
California.
Alaina Schukraft,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Scott Schukraft, Dallas,
received the Presidents
Award for Outstanding
Service during Wyoming
Seminarys commence-
ment. She received the
award in recognition of her
outstanding special service
to the school community,
leadership and academic
and artistic performance.
Prior to commencement,
she received the Brooks
Christian Citizenship Prize
and was named to the
Deans List for the spring
term.
Brianne Smithonic
earned the degree of Doctor
of Veterinary Medicine. She
graduated with high honors
fromRoss University School
of Veterinary Medicine at a
ceremony on June 10 at the
Lincoln Center in New York
City.
She is a 2005 graduate of
Pittston Area High School.
In 2009, she earned a bach-
elors degree in biology from
Penn State University.
Dr. Smithonic pursued
veterinary studies at Ross
University in St. Kitts, West
Indies. While at Ross, she
worked as an teaching assis-
tant in anatomy. She also
spent time in Guatemala
working with Volunteers for
Intercultural and Denitive
Adventures, an organization
that provides free veterinary
assistance to needy commu-
nities in Central America.
As part of her studies,
she returned to the United
States to complete a year of
clinical rotations at Auburn
University in Alabama.
Dr. Smithonic has accept-
ed a position with Animal
Care and Animal Care East,
Greenville, N.C.
She is the daughter of
Ron and Sandy Smithonic,
Dupont.
Bryce Partlow, an
upcoming senior at Holy
Redeemer High School,
attended the National
Youth Leadership Forum
of Medicine in June in
Boston, Mass. Partlow had
the opportunity to examine
state-of-the-art diagnostic
tools andfuture medical spe-
cialties in detail. He also met
and interacted with some
of the nations most distin-
guished medical leaders and
researchers and more than
350 other students from
across the United States.
Partlow would like to pur-
sue a career in the medical
engineering eld upon his
graduation. The National
Youth Leadership Forum is
sponsoredby George Mason
University. Some of the
participating institutions
included Boston University
School of Medicine,
Harvard Medical School,
Massachusetts General
Hospital and the University
of Massachusetts Medical
School. Partlow is the son
of Jordan and Traci Partlow,
Newport Township.
danielle Bagonis alaina schukraft Brianne smithonic
HONOR ROLLs
Bonnie R. Gregory, principal,
Crestwood Middle School, recently
announced the Honor Roll for the
fourth quarter.
Grade 7: Principals Honors:
Shane Angle, Jacob Antosh, Ameen
Bader, Alyssa Bennett, Gianna
Brogna, Brandon Brozena, Samantha
Brumagin, Patrick Colo, Katherine
Coslett, Carina DSouza, Justin
Darden, Brian Dwyer, Luke Evans,
Julia Fey, Abigail Glynn, Makena
Gormley, Owen Grigas, Sara Hopkins,
Sarah Kalada, Kathryn Karpinski,
Kevin Klusewitz, Lauren LaMarca,
Sarah Macko, Julia Makowski, Kurtis
Orrson, Kaitlyn Roberts, Caden
Rozitski, Lauren Shiplett, Andrea
Shipton, Sydney Sobolewski, Kiara
Tereska, Taylor Tomalinas, Nicholas
Toronzi, Megan Wood, Matthew
Zwiebel. High Honors: Zarqua Ansari,
, Christopher Argenziano, Vanessa
Atie, Brett Caladie, Sydney Cantwell,
Andrew Dean, Dylan Gesford, Paige
Gould, Holly Jones, Aaron Kleger,
Evan Knapp, Anthony Kovalchik,
Madison Krawontka, Kayla Kulp,
Gabriella Leri, Wesley Mahler, Ifrah
Mehran, Audralaine Mentrikoski,
Arden Morgans, Genevieve Osterhout,
Shiv Patel, Sean Phelan, Emily
Phillips, Abby Post, Jordan Rinehimer,
Sebastian Rucco, Anthony Ruggeri,
Jeffrey Schmude, Michael Schwab,
Yamina Sid Mohand, Victoria
Smolenak, Wyatt Steltz, Matthew
Taleroski, Zachary Trischitta, Brandon
Whitman, Michael Wyda, Braden
Zlockie. Honors: Kaitlyn Bobeck,
Robert Briggs, Jennifer Brown,
Matthew Brunetti, Nicholas Brunetti,
Corey Chalk, Grant Cormier, Michael
Golden, Ronnie Grevera, Elizabeth
Harding, Harry Haydt, Michelle Heller,
Joseph Judge, Connor Kaminski,
Matthew Kelly, Shea Kilbourn, Natasha
Koslop, Chloe Lacoste, Michael Macri,
Liam Martinchek, Juliauna Mason,
Jared McCune, Timothy Mikolaichik,
Laura Miller, Edward Morrison,
Mahad Muhammad, Prit Patel,
Matthew Phillips, Robert Reed, Lauren
Reidinger, Thomas Roberts, Joshua
Rusinko, Corinne Smith, Elizabeth
Sulkowski, Jacob Swartwood. Matthew
Tirpak, Ethan Van Gorden, Kayla Van
Kirk, Eric Witner, Justin Yackiel, Yasin
Yapis, Abigail Zaleppa.
Grade 8: Principals Honors: Paige
Allen, Lauren Anderson, Anna Clark,
Alyssa Cuono, Suraj Dalsania, Marlee
Dillon, Joshua Edwards, Maria Ellis,
Kimberly Floyd, Samantha Forgatch,
Alexa Gaetano, Madeline Heller, Cara
Henahan, Megan Hudock, Danielle
Jones, Schyler Kelsch, Michael
Kozelsky, Cataldo Lamarca, Emily
Lehman, Mychaela Neal, Madison
Quijano, Jake Rosner, Rachel Speck,
Emily Traficante. High Honors: Alyssa
Allen, Hannah Barry, Lance Blass,
Gregory Chang, Noah Dean, Natalie
Everett, Siri Fredmund, Kate Garcia,
Amanda Goss, Madisyn Granoski,
Huntier Hashagen, Taylor Herron,
Elizabeth Hines, Nicholas Jones,
Aaron Keller, Sarah Klush, Noah Kulp,
David Lackenmier, John McGroarty,
Azare Mercer, Rebecca Navin, Jordan
Olenginski, Alexandra Olszyk, Kelsey
Price, Hunter Rinehimer, Quinn
Roberts, Lauren Rowski, Gwyneth
Shermanski, Neil Simasek, Nicole
Teberio, Curtis Tokach, Taylor Wells.
Honors: Zachary Anderson, Nicholas
Andrews, Ashton Balliet, Kenneth
Brush, Noah Coffin, Sara DeSino,
Matthew Dopp, Alexis-Taylor Ermish
Gattuso, Eric Garren, Paige Good,
James Graves, Kara Grenzberg, Alexa
Hady, Emily Hiott, Brianna Hischak,
Jai Hoover, Brandy Jones, Kyle Katra,
Adam Keil, Kayla Kohlert, Mackenzie
Koslop, Bradley Kotarsky, Jordan
Kotowski, Ashley Lewis, Samuel
Majdic, Marissa Margalis, Abigail
Martino, Garrett Mcafee, Stephanie
McGlynn, Kaitlyn McLaughlin,
Nicholas Miller, Kaytlyn Miscavage,
Alyson Muse, William OBoyle, Amelia
Prezkop, Christian Rickrode, Kyle
Sarluca, Troy Simko, Kristen Skatuler,
Alexandria Smolenak, Kaitlin Snipas,
Jennifer Soto, Stephanie Thorpe,
Daniel Tron, Andrew Tuck, Gianna Uhl,
Emily Van Fossen, Justin Whetstone,
Hannah Williams, Christian Zero.
CMS students named to 4th
quarter Principals list
Claire McCallick
Crestwood
Best of luck in college!
Love, Mom & Tom
Megan Johnson
Dallas High School
Congratulations Megan!
We are so proud of you!
Love Mom, Dad & Brad
Nicholas J. Dopko
Crestwood High School
Congratulations! Were very proud of you!
Good Luck at Wilkes!
Love, Nanny & Pop Pop.
Kristen Santey
Pittston Area
Best of luck at Wilkes!
Love Mom, Dad & Bobby
Michael Scott
West Side CTC
Congratulations
Michael!
Were so proud of you!
Love, Mom and Dad
Christina Springer
Holy Redeemer High School
Congratulations
& Good Luck at Penn State!
Love, Mom, Dad
& Brian
PAGE 8B SUNDAY, JULY 7,, 2013 FEATURES www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER
Tree-climbing gains popularity as full-bodyworkout
Markia A. Hart
St. Louis Tribune-Dispatch
ST. LOUIS Tree-
climbing is emerging as a
recreational sport, similar
to rock climbing.
St. Louis instructor Guy
Mott says tree-climbing
builds muscles and can
lead to improved tness
and weight loss.
If you engage in a tree
climb, it is a full-body
workout. It is much more
interactive and therapeutic
to be outside as opposed
to a gym, said Mott. It
helps people to gain an
appreciation for nature.
Because of the rope
and harness system, par-
ticipants need only basic
physical ability, such as
being able to easily climb a
ight of stairs, he said.
Mott is a certied
arborist who teaches a
class in climbing that has
been offered since last
fall through St. Louis
Community College.
Each class is three
hours.
Students get one hour of
orientation during which
they learn about trees, pro-
cedures to climb them and
the gear that is required.
With the help of a rope
and a harness, participants
spend the next two hours
reaching great heights and
accessing parts of the can-
opy typically unreachable.
Heather Allen, 34, is
a St. Louis Community
College staff member who
took the course in April.
We learned about tree
biology, how to tie various
types of rope knots and, of
course, how to maneuver
through the tree branch-
es, said Allen. With the
help of the harness, we
were able to get really
high up in the trees. It was
amazing.
Climbing begins by care-
fully placing ropes over
branches in tree crotches,
providing strong anchor
points. Each rope goes
through a leather sleeve to
protect the tree. Students
then don a tree climbers
saddle and helmet.
Participants also have
the option to wear gloves,
which improves grip and
guards against rope burns.
Mott has a lot of outdoor
experience and a mas-
ters of education degree
in adventure learning from
Clemson University.
Through his business,
Adventure Tree, he has
been teaching tree climb-
ing and orchestrating
ground-based outings for
ve years.
He organizes team-
building activities for cor-
porations, camps, schools
and other groups.
Bill Henske, 42, is a
t e a c h -
er at
Maplewood Richmond
Heights School District
whom Mott trained to
work with his students.
Tree-climbing, he said,
acts as a powerful meta-
phor teaching students to
conquer challenges and
their fears.
Mott also provides train-
ing to entry-level arborists.
Mott started out as an
electrical engineer but
decided he wanted to
direct his energy toward
helping others directly.
By teaching tree-climb-
ing and being an advocate
for exploring the outdoors,
Mott aspires to be a posi-
tive inuence.
My focus and mission
is education and therapy,
he said.
MCT PHOTOS
T.J. Davenport pulls his way to the top of a 100-foot oak tree during a recreational tree climbing course at Camp Wyman in
Instructor Guy Mott, left, secures the rope and harness for T.J. Davenport during a recreational tree climbing course.
What goes up must come down. Instructor Guy Mott, left, helps lower Kelley Moulton during a recreational tree climbing course at
Camp Wyman in Eureka, Mo.
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***3D features are the regular admission price plus a surcharge of $2.50
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First Matinee $5.50 for all features (plus surcharge for 3D features).
Man Of Steel in RealD 3D/DBox
Motion Code Seating - PG13 - 150 min -
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**Man Of Steel in RealD 3D - PG13
- 150 min - (12:15), (3:55), 7:10, 10:10
*Man Of Steel 2D - PG13 - (12:00), (1:45),
(3:40), (5:00), 7:00, 8:30, 10:00
*This Is The End - R - 110 min - (1:30),
(4:00), 7:15, 9:40
The Internship PG13 125 min
(1:00), (1:45), (3:35), (4:20), 7:00, 7:40, 9:35,
10:15
The Purge R 95 min
(12:40), (2:45), (4:50), 7:30, 9:45
Now You See Me PG13 120 min
(1:30), (4:15), 7:05, 9:35
After Earth PG13 105 min
(2:00), (4:20), 7:25, 9:45
Fast & Furious 6 PG13 135 min
(12:50), (1:30), (3:40), (4:20), 7:00, 7:25,
9:50, 10:10
Epic PG 110 min
(12:30), (3:00), 7:15, 9:40
The Hangover 3 R 105 min
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*Star Trek Into Darkness RealD 3D
PG13 140 min
(1:15), (4:15), 7:30, 10:20
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World War Z & World War Z RealD 3D -
8pm on Thursday, June 20th
Monsters University & Monsters University in RealD 3D -
8pm on Thursday, June 20th
*Despicable Me 2 PG 105 min
(12:00),(2:00), (2:20), (4:40), (5:00),
7:00, 7:50, 9:20, 10:05.
**Despicable Me 2 in RealD 3D
105 min (1:30), (4:00), 7:20, 9:45.
*The Lone Ranger PG13 155
min (12:00), (1:30), (3:10), (4:45),
7:00, 8:00, 10:05.
The Lone Ranger in DBox Motion
Code Seating PG13 155 min
(12:00), (3:10), 7:00, 10:05.
The Heat R 125 (1:00), (2:00),
(3:40), (4:40), 7:20, 7:45, 10:00, 10:20.
*White House Down PG13 145
min (12:15), (1:10), (3:15), (4:10),
7:00, 7:20, 10:00, 10:15.
This Is The End R 110 min
(1:30), (4:00), 7:15, 9:40.
Monsters University G 120 min
(12:45), (3:20), 7:00, 9:35.
**Monsters University in RealD
3D G 120 min (1:15), (4:00),
7:30, 10:05.
World War Z PG13 125 min
(12:30), (3:10), 7:15, 10:00.
Man of Steel PG13 143 min
(12:00), (3:15), 7:05, 10:05.
Friday July 5th through
Wednesday July 10th
LONERANGER, THE(XD) (PG-13)
12:45 PM, 4:00PM, 7:15PM,10:30PM
newMovie
You must be 17 with iD or accompanied by a parent to attend R rated features.
Children under 6 may not attend R rated features after 6pm
**note**: Showtimes marked with a \\ indicate reserved seating.
DESPICABLEME2 (3D) (PG)
11:40aM1:20PM2:10PM4:40PM6:20PM
7:10PM9:40PMnewMovie
DESPICABLEME2 (DIGITAL) (PG)
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newMovie
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11:00aM,12:25PM,1:50PM,3:15PM,4:40P
M.6:05PM,7:30PM,8:55PM,10:20PM
INTERNSHIP, THE(DIGITAL) (PG-13)
2:35PM8:40PM
KEVINHART: LET MEEXPLAIN
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9:35PMnewMovie
LONERANGER, THE(DIGITAL)
(PG-13) 10:35aM11:40aM1:50PM
2:55PM5:05PM6:10PM8:20PM9:25PM
newMovie
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12:45PM4:00PM7:15PM10:30PM
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MANOF STEEL(3D) (PG-13)
12:15PM3:45PM7:00PM10:10PM
MANOF STEEL(DIGITAL) (PG-13)
10:50aM2:05PM5:25PM8:45PM
MONSTERSUNIVERSITY(3D) (G)
11:35aM2:20PM5:05PM7:50PM10:35PM
MONSTERSUNIVERSITY(DIGITAL)
(G)10:20aM1:10PM4:10PM6:55PM
9:30PM
NOWYOUSEEME(DIGITAL)
(PG-13) 10:55aM(notonweD. JulY
10) 1:45PM(notonSun. JulY7 oR
weD. JulY10) 4:35PM(notonweD.
JulY10) 7:25PM(notonweD. JulY
10) 10:40PM
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(notonweD. JulY10)
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(PG-13) 11:20aM12:55PM2:30PM
4:05PM5:40PM7:20PM9:00PM10:25PM
WORLDWARZ (3D) (PG-13)
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WORLDWARZ (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
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570.287.9999 www.goshyarnitshop.com
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER BOOKS SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013 PAGE 9B
Like any decent history,
Pepper: A History of the
Worlds Most Inuential
Spice can make one feel
horrible about being of
European descent.
But the upside is, the
book most enjoyably
opens ones eyes about a
food that most of us com-
pletely take for granted.
Shakers and grinders
of black pepper are on
almost every Western
table and kitchen counter.
Just about every savory
recipe in every cookbook
calls for pepper these
days, freshly ground or
cracked. We waste packets
of pepper left in bags of
fast food.
Yet how much do any of
us know about the stuff?
Marjorie Shaffer, a sci-
ence writer and editor
at New York University
School of Medicine, knew
a good topic for a popular
book when she found one.
With solid research and
solid writing, but without
overdoing it, she delivers
228 pages that make for an
easy and quite spicy sum-
mer read.
Ive seen pepper grow-
ing, on large vines, in
India, one of the tropi-
cal locales where pepper
thrives. Ms. Shaffer writes
that its stubborn inability
to grow elsewhere is one
of the reasons it has had
such an impact on world
history.
Thats because once
wealthy Europeans got a
taste for this exotic dried
berry of genus Pipers,
people would do just
about anything to get
their hands on it, and do
anything to make as much
money as possible on it.
Ms. Shaffer sets it up
by laying out a completely
different time, when pep-
per represented the lost
Garden of Eden, and sauc-
iers used 20 pounds of it,
and pounds of other spic-
es of the mythical east, in
a single sauce.
The meat of the book
is the race, led by the
Portuguese in the 1500s,
and taken up by the Dutch
and the English in the
1600s, to monopolize the
pepper trade in the Indian
Ocean.
Its a sordid tale of
cheating scales and xing
prices, attacking and sub-
jugating natives, and rap-
ing distant landscapes.
I was fascinated to think
about the sailors stuck
on voyages that would
last more than two years.
So bad were the condi-
tions that companies used
convicts, many of whom
never made it back.
Many ships did not, and
not just because of storms
and pirates. Other ships
had to be scuttled because
they were infested with
centipedes, scorpions,
cockroaches, and innu-
merable white ants, Ms.
Shaffer points out. Amasa
Delano, an American sail-
or who joined the East
India Company, describes
putting in at Benkoolen in
1792 and having to sink
his ship, the Endeavor,
because it was overrun
with vermin and insects.
But a relative few made
huge fortunes on pepper.
That included many
Americans, once our
young nation got in on
the pepper trade, which
remained tumultuous
up to the U.S. Civil War.
The book tells of Boston
black-pepper trader Elihu
Yale, who for a time was
president and governor
of Madras, and who later
donated the money to
establish Yale University.
Ms. Shaffer tacks on
a cringe-worthy chapter
about how hungry sailors
in pepper boats helped
make the Dodo extinct,
and another, in which
mankind looks a little bet-
ter, that explores peppers
medicinal properties.
In the end, she suc-
ceeds, as she sets out to
do, to tell not so much the
history of pepper, but rath-
er to depict how pepper
shaped so much human
history.
Youll be amazed by all
thats in that black dust
youre sprinkling on so
much of your food.
Pepper history is
nothing to sneeze at
Last Night the perfect fnale
in four-part romance series
Lezlie Patterson
McClatchy-Tribune News Service
Last Night by
Christina Dodd;
Amazon Digital (2013),
85 pages, $2.99 (e-book)
Legend has it that
Christina Dodds husband
had the idea to write
about an antique bed and
the stories it could tell.
Great idea. And it was
cleverly executed by Dodd
and Connie Brockway,
who collaborated to write
four novellas set in four
different time periods,
starting with a knight just
home from the Crusades
and ending with a con-
temporary couple.
The last story, Last
Night, focuses on Laurel,
the curator who shared
the rst three stories
with visitors in her last
tour group of Masterson
Manor. The passionate
historian has thrived with
her research about gener-
ations of Mastersons and
is sad that the new owner
of the manor is closing
the museum and return-
ing it to a private home.
In the rst three novel-
las, she shared stories of
past lovers nding their
happily-ever-afters. Now
its her turn.
Throughout the rst
three stories, handyman
Max annoyed Laurel with
his mere existence. In the
nale, we nd out why.
Max and Laurel have a
history, and Max wants to
have a future. But he must
rst convince Laurel that
hes worthy of a second
chance.
He also must keep
her safe from smugglers
and thieves who want
some of the valuables in
Masterson Manor.
There really arent
enough pages to fully
investigate the smug-
gling mystery, delve into
Laurel and Maxs history
and explore their future.
Rightly so, its the mys-
tery that gets shorted.
Last Night can be
enjoyed alone, but it real-
ly is the perfect nale for
a four-part series that was
clever, entertaining and
exquisitely written.
Jonathan
Bauman
Wyoming Valley West High School
Congratulations Jonathan!
Best of luck and good luck in college!
Love Mom, Dad & Thomas, Grandma
& Grandpa Jarreto
Kelly Cloak
Wyoming Valley West
Congratulations, Kelly! We are so proud!
Love Mom, Dad,
Kris & Caitlyn
Benjamin DeSarro
Humpty Dumpty Kollege
Congratulations on your
preschool graduation!
Love always, Mommy,
Daddy & Olivia
Matthew Diaco
Dallas High School
Congratulations! We are so proud of
you! Good luck at Temple!
Mom, Dad, Nick, Mike
Karli Doran
Lake-Lehman
Love, Mom and Padre,
Gram and Pop
Much success at
Long Island University!
Joseph Evans
St. Josephs University
Philadelphia, PA
Joe... We are so
proud of you!
Love,
Mom & Claude
Joshua A. Dopko
Crestwood High School
Congratulations! Were very proud of you!
Good Luck at Penn State!
Love, Nanny & Pop Pop.
PAGE 10B SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013 NEWS www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER
MCT Photo
Performers from The Israeli Scouts: Caravan Ariel entertain at the Shaw Jewish Community Center
in Akron, Ohio, recently.
Erin Katz Ford (second from left), of Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, and Todd Rockoff, director of the Shaw
Jewish Community Center, dance with performers from The Israeli Scouts: Caravan Ariel, at the cen-
ter recently in Akron, Ohio.
Cultural caravan takes Israeli
teens across the states
Colette M. Jenkins
Akron Beacon Journal
AKRON, Ohio Iael Kuperstein is on a mission to share her Israeli culture
with people across the U.S. Midwest.
You can bring a country, bring a culture without talking about politics, said
Iael, 17. This is an amazing experience to be able to meet so many people and
make connections that leave them knowing a little bit more about Israel.
Iael is one of 10 teens from Israel who performed a musical program as part
of The Israeli Scouts: Caravan Ariel, at the Shaw Jewish Community Center in
Akron, Ohio.
The troupe of 17-year-old teens made up of five girls and five boys is trav-
eling across the Midwest with two adult leaders this summer to share Israeli cul-
ture, music and dance. Since arriving in the United States on May 26, the group
has also performed in New York, New Hampshire, Maine, Tennessee, Arkansas
and Indiana.
Caravan Ariel is one of four groups of scouts that are traveling across North
America to represent Israel in a show of goodwill and friendship between the
countries via performances at churches, schools, camps, community centers, syn-
agogues, senior centers and hospitals.
All of the teens are part of Friends of Israel Scouts Inc.s Tzofim Friendship
Caravan. The scout program is akin to the Boy and Girl Scouts of America and is
part of the World Organization for the Scout Movement. The Friendship Caravan,
which performs songs in both Hebrew and English, is celebrating its 40th anni-
versary.
Asaf Peled, one of the leaders of the troupe, said the Scouts go through a highly
competitive selection process and are chosen based on their maturity, fluency in
English, and performance skills. Hundreds of young people compete annually for
one of the spots. The teens who are selected train with professionals for a year.
The scouts stay with host families while traveling.
This program is really important to help connect us with Jews in America and
with people in America, in general, said Peled, 24. We are able to share our
experiences of living in Israel with people who know nothing about Israel, people
who know little about Israel and even people who know a lot about Israel. It gives
people a chance to connect with someone who is Israeli and helps them see that
Israel is more than what they might see on the news.
In addition to their community performances, the scouts will spend time with
summer campers at local Jewish Community Centers. During their time with the
campers, the Israeli delegates will play games, make crafts and share their experi-
ences and backgrounds in Israel.
We invite them back annually because it is such an enriching experience for
our community, said Todd Rockoff, executive director at the JCC. For us, it is
a dual benefit the community gets a wonderful, high-energy, feel-good perfor-
mance and our campers get a unique educational opportunity. Its a wonderful
way to introduce people to Israel, by giving them an opportunity to interact with
Israeli youth.
More information about the Israeli Scouts is online at www.israelscouts.org.
Quiet Valley celebrates 50th
Quiet Val l ey Living Historical
Farm wil l hol d a weekend- l ong cel -
ebration Jul y 13- 14 in honor of its
anniversary of 50 years as an his-
toric farm museum.
Festivities wil l incl ude a French
and Indian War Encampment , cour-
tesy of the New Jersey Frontier
Guard; horse- drawn wagon rides,
storytel l ing, puppet shows and an
outdoor brick bake oven in use. A
cake- cutting ceremony wil l take
pl ace at 1: 30 p. m. Saturday.
Saturday wil l al so incl ude Quiet
Val l eys annual Music in the
Val l ey presentation, showcasing
traditional music and concl uding
with a j am session from 4 to 5 p. m.
On Jul y 14, there wil l be a hymn
sing in the school house from 1 to
2 p. m. , fol l owed by an ice cream
social from 2: 30 to 4 p. m.
For m ore information, cal l 570-
992- 6161 or see the website at
www. quietval l ey. org.
Dr. Jason Stankiewicz
Jefferson Medical College
Dr. J Congratulations
& Good Luck
Gerry, Greg,
Mom & Dad
Justin and Eric
Rinehimer
Congratulations! We are so proud of
you! As your next journey
begins at Kings College we wish you
the best!
Love, Mom, Dad & Kelsey
Nana, Grandpa, Nana & Pop Rinehimer,
Jim, Brenda, Jim, Little Jimmy, Brooke,
Brandi, Uncle Danny, Allisia, Alyse,
Uncle Walt and Great Grandpa!
Daniel Flaherty
Wyoming Valley West
We are so proud of you!
Love Mom,
Dad & Amanda
Brianne Frascella
Holy Redeemer
Were so proud of you!
Best Wishes at
Wilkes University
Love Mom,
Dad, & Daniel
Jeremy Heiser
Holy Redeemer
Congratulations!
We are so proud of you!
Love, Mom & Dad
Eilish
Hoban
E.L. Meyers
High School
We are so proud of you!
On to N.Y. & F.I.T.
Love Mom, Dad,
Colleen & Kendra
E.L. Meyers
High School
Congratulations!
Best of luck at
Scranton University
Love Mom
& Dad
Kelly E. Mahalak
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER NEWS SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013 PAGE 11B
Johnny Depp at 50: Just happy to be around
Nicole Evatt
Associated Press
SANTA FE, N.M. It may be difficult to separate Johnny Depp
from his Pirates character Jack Sparrow, but the actor recalls a
time before the boozy buccaneer became a household name.
The films that I did prior to Pirates, not everything but a
lot of it, was sort of by industry standards, not blockbuster stuff.
So I wasnt ever blockbuster material, Depp said in a recent inter-
view.
But thats not to say he didnt
have fun during those years.
Ive been lucky enough to
be involved in some very small
and different independent films
throughout my career, and Ive
been able to be involved in, you
know, a couple of films that
shocked everybody, especially
me, he said.
Since 2003, Depp has played the flamboyant captain in four
hugely successful Pirates of the Caribbean films, with a fifth
installment slated for 2015.
At age 50, he is still one the hottest names in Hollywood and
about ready to launch another big-budget summer flick, The
Lone Ranger.
The only thing I can equate it with is luck. Theres no other
reason, he said of his career longevity. The fact that I was able
to survive through that 15 years of just bouncing around doing
(indie) movies and now still to end up here is amazing.
The Golden Globe-winning actor plays the famed Native
American character Tonto in the Disney reboot of The Lone
Ranger. He said his children, Lily-Rose, 14, and Jack, 11, cant
wait to see it.
Theyre pretty excited about this one, Depp said while pro-
moting the film in Santa Fe, N.M., where part of the movie was
filmed. You know, of course, they thought it was insane when
they watched me play Tonto, but now theyre looking forward to
this one.
Despite his success, Depp recognizes that life on Hollywoods
A-list can be fleeting.
I certainly wouldnt
expect that it is one of those
things that is going to stick
around forever and ever, he
said. The clock ticks, the
times up and the next guy
steps in or whatever, and
thats how it goes.
When hes not busy mak-
ing films, Depp said music continues to be his main inspiration.
Writing, playing guitar and one-off performances with artists like
Keith Richards, Aerosmith, Black Keys, Alice Cooper and Marilyn
Manson keep his creative juices flowing.
Depp says that in the past couple of years, hes had sort of a
rebirth of my relationship with music. So Ive been playing more
and writing more and its led to invitations to play with people.
Depp, who celebrated his milestone birthday June 9, refuses to
take a single day for granted.
Just to be here still is pretty amazing, he said. Every day
should be some sort of celebration. So yeah, I guess when you hit
50 finally its just happy to still be around.
AP photo
Ive been lucky enough to be involved in some very small
and different independent films throughout my career, and
Ive been able to be involved in, you know, a couple of films
that shocked everybody, especially me.
Johnny Depp,
Are reusable bags increasing shoplifting? One city says its so
Julie Chang
Austin American-Statesman
AUSTIN, Texas
Shoplifters are taking
advantage of recent
bans on single-use bags,
prompting stores and
police in places like
Austin, Texas, to more
closely monitor reus-
able-bag-toting custom-
ers.
Store managers and
police say the ban,
which went into effect in
Austin on March 1, has
made it more difficult
for them to distinguish
between customers
and shoplifters. They
say people place items
in their reusable bags
while shopping and walk
out of the store without
paying.
While statistics in
Austin dont show a rise
in theft, officials say the
bag ban makes it easier
for people to steal.
We are getting a new
type of offender that is
taking advantage of the
system, said Austin
police officer David
Silva, who worked off-
duty in March at the Wal-
Mart in South Austin.
He said shoplifters
from neighboring cit-
ies might have come to
Austin to take advan-
tage of the ban. He was
working off-duty one
night when a group of
juveniles from Taylor,
Texas, tried to push a
cart of merchandise out
of the store. Silva said
they could have gone
to a closer Wal-Mart to
shoplift but he specu-
lated that they targeted
Austin because of the
bag ban.
Many shoplifters
might be going unde-
tected, he said, because
a store official must see
a person steal to ques-
tion him.
Before the ban, a per-
son exiting a store with
loose items in a shop-
ping cart was considered
suspicious, Silva said,
but now its the norm,
especially among cus-
tomers who forget their
reusable bags.
Several recent arrest
affidavits have shown
that these kinds of shop-
lifters have been caught
in Austin at Wal-Mart,
Target, Whole Foods,
Randalls and H-E-B,
among other large retail-
ers.
Store managers have
said they like the bag
bans environmental ben-
efits, but that they have
had to be more vigilant,
making sure people are
going through check-
out lines and are show-
ing proper receipts upon
exiting.
The only downside
is that we have to get
used to the ban, said a
manager at one of those
retailers, who didnt
want to be identified
because he wasnt autho-
rized to speak on the
topic.
According to police
data, stores that police
say are among the busi-
est, such as Wal-Mart
and H-E-B, show that
the number of thefts
hasnt changed signifi-
cantly since March 1.
Wal-Mart in Austin saw
three cases of shoplift-
ing in January, 11 in
March and nine in April,
according to police
records. The H-E-B there
saw 26 cases in January,
17 in March and 31 in
April.
The city hasnt
received any complaints
about shoplifting and
didnt consider it a pos-
sible downside of the
ban before it went into
effect, said Courtney
Black, a spokeswoman
for Austin Resource
Recovery, the citys trash
and recycling depart-
ment.
It might be some-
thing that we do more
research to see if it is
a problem, how to go
about preventing it, she
said.
The Texas Retailers
Association, which sued
the city over the bag ban
in February and was the
only organized group
that opposed the ban,
said that, after an infor-
mal survey of their mem-
bers, retailers dont have
enough data to make the
correlation between the
bag ban and a rise in
thefts.
There is a lot of
speculation we can make
based on the bag ban,
but we dont like to do
that without the hard
data, said association
spokeswoman Jennifer
Storm. Were just wait-
ing it out, seeing how
the numbers come in.
In other cities, increased
theft has been attributed
to a similar ban. Less
than a year after it went
into effect in Seattle, 1
in 5 businesses reported
an increase in shoplift-
ing due to the bag ban,
according to a survey
conducted by Seattle
Public Utilities.
Brownsville, Texas,
police spokesman J.J.
Trevino said that in the
two months after a bag
ban went into effect
there in January 2011,
shoplifters were rolling
shopping carts filled
with merchandise out of
store doors.
He said after more
stores started offering
paper bags and more
people started bringing
reusable bags, thefts
of those kinds started
dropping.
Some of the stores
were not handing out
any type of bags ini-
tially, Trevino said. So
theft was a problem.
Trevinos department
does not have data to
back up what he suspect-
ed was an increase in
shoplifting nor do three
other police depart-
ments in cities with bag
bans.
Plus, simply looking
at shoplifting statistics
before and after a ban
isnt enough, officials
said.
Seattle police spokes-
man Jeffrey Kappel said
it would be a lot of work
to sift through every
shoplifting case to deter-
mine if there was a link
to the plastic bag ban.
If you showed an
increase since the bag
ban, does that mean its
because of the bag ban
or is it other factors like
the economy or fewer
loss-prevention people?
he asked. I dont know
how you can possibly
make that connection.
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PAGE 12B SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013 NEWS www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER
LIBERTY
From page 1B
GOVERNORS ISLAND
Governors Island, a
former Coast Guard facil-
ity now used for public
recreation, offers invit-
ing lawns, old forts, con-
certs, art exhibits and
food vendors, along with
great views of Lower
Manhattan and the Statue
of Liberty. Get there by
ferry, weekends through
Sept. 29 from Manhattan
or Brooklyn, then walk or
bike around the island,
http: //www. govi sl and.
com/ ht ml / vi si t /di rec-
tions.shtml .
RED HOOK, BROOKLYN
One of the best views
of the Statue of Liberty
is from Red Hook, an
up-and-coming water-
front neighborhood in
Brooklyn. A cruise ter-
minal where the Queen
Mary 2 homeports is in
one corner of the neigh-
borhood, and lots of
popular eateries like the
Fort Deance Bar and
Red Hook Lobster Pound
line the main street, Van
Brunt.
Oddly enough, one of
the best spots for view-
ing the Statue of Liberty
is from the parking lot of
the local Fairway super-
market, 480-500 Van
Brunt, as well as from
Fairways rear patio,
which sells ready-to-eat
fare. Another great van-
tage point is from Red
Hooks Louis Valentino
Jr. Pier and Park, on
Ferris Street between
Coffey and Van Dyke, one
of the few places where
you can get a rare head-
on view of the statue,
instead of from the side.
A free ferry runs week-
ends this summer to Red
Hook from Pier 11 in
Lower Manhattan, http://
www.nywatertaxi. com/
tours/redhook. Red Hook
is also fun to explore
by bike, and its one of
those rare neighborhoods
where you can often nd
street parking.
MUSEUM OF JEWISH
HERITAGE A LIVING
MEMORIAL TO THE
HOLOCAUST
The Museum of
Jewish Heritage A
Living Memorial to the
Holocaust at 36 Battery
Place has tall picture win-
dows that look directly
out onto the Statue of
Liberty. While you look,
you can listen to the
museums Voices of
Liberty sound installa-
tion, in which Holocaust
survivors, refugees and
others discuss why they
chose to make the U.S.
their home, http://www.
mjhnyc.org/ .
RITZ-CARLTON NEWYORK,
BATTERY PARK
The majority of guest
rooms at the Ritz-
Carltons Battery Park
hotel offer views of the
Statue of Liberty, and
they even come equipped
with telescopes for an
up-close look. For July
Fourth weekend, prices
for a room with a king or
two double beds started at
$420, going up to $7,500
for a 2,100-square-foot
(195-square-meter) suite;
http://www.ritzcarlton.
c o m/ e n / P r o p e r t i e s /
NewYorkBatt eryPark/
Default.htm.
LIBERTY STATE PARK, NEW
JERSEY
Thi s waterf ront park
on the New Jersey si de
of the harbor of f ers the
cl osest vi ew you can
get of the st atue f rom
l and. There are three
ways to get there:
Dri ve; t ake the PATH
trai n f rom Manhatt an,
fol l owed by a l i ght
rai l and a hal f - mi l e
(. 8- ki l ometer) wal k
i nto the park; or t ake
a f erry f rom the Worl d
Fi nanci al Center i n
Lower Manhatt an,
h t t p : / / www. l i b e r t y -
l andi ngf erry. com .
Whi l e youre there,
check out the Li berty
Sci ence Center, a
great museum for chi l -
dren, http: //www. l sc.
org.
AP file photos
The Statue of Liberty is shown in the background as visitors to Governors Island picnic in the shade in New York. Tourists who want a
photo of the famous statue without visiting the island can use Governors Island as a good vantage point.
The Staten Island Ferry passes the Statue of Liberty as it crosses
New York Harbor.
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TAYLOR SWIFT IN
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The Times LeaderWelcome
In 1962, Helen and Albert Riggle traveled
from Punxsutawney Pa to Luzerne County
looking for a location to build a Dairy Queen
Store. They found the ideal location in
Kingston at 473 Wyoming Avenue. It was
an empty lot owned by Percy Brown.
It was only used to sell Christmas trees at the holiday
season. They purchased the lot and within the next year built a Dairy Queen.
The rest is history. For 50 years, it has been a landmark in Kingston dispensing Dairy
Queen Treats and now Orange Julius too. The seasonal opening of the Dairy Queen in
Kingston is a highly anticipated event each year and signals that spring is on the way!
In 1969, they sold the store to Fred Crouse, a lifelong resident of Kingston. He was an
Elementary School Principal in the Wilkes-Barre School District at that time.
When Hurricane Agnes hit in 1972, the Dairy Queen received extensive damage. All
the equipment was destroyed as
well as all of the paper and food
products. But with the help of
his loyal employees, his parents,
and his sister and brother-in-
law, Vivian and Russ Taylor, he
was able to open the store in 17 days. International
Dairy Queen rushed in equipment and supplies and on July 10, 1972, the store
reopened to large crowds. It was the only business reopened at the time.
In 1986, the drive thru was added and business continued to build to the present rate.
Today, Mr. Crouse divides his time between Kingston and the Daytona Beach area.
The store is currently managed by Cheryl Lewis-Manager and Kevin Murphy-Assistant
Manager. They are two longtime and loyal employees supported by a staf of around
30 employees.
The Times Leader
timesleader.com
473 Wyoming Ave Kingston
For home delivery call 829-5000 or toll free 1-800-252-5603 Monday through Friday 6:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Saturday and Sunday 7:00 a.m.-12:00 noon
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timesleader.com
THETIMES LEADER SunDAy, JuLy7, 2013
SPORTS
AP Photo
Marion Bartoli smiles as she holds the trophy after winning the womens
singles final match against Sabine Lisicki at the All England Lawn Tennis
Championships in Wimbledon, London, on Saturday.
Doing it her way, Frances Bartoli wins Wimbledon
Howard Fendrich
APTennis Writer
LONDON Ever since she
was a kid, practicing until mid-
night with her father, Marion
Bartoli went about playing
tennis her own way.
The two-handed strokes for
backhands, forehands, even
volleys. The hopping in place
and practice swings between
points, which help her focus.
The unusual setup for serves
no ball-bouncing, arms
crossed, right wrist resting
on her left thumb before the
toss.
Whatever works, right? This
unique Wimbledon, appro-
priately enough, produced a
unique champion in the ambi-
dextrous Bartoli, the 15th-
seeded Frenchwoman who
won her rst Grand Slam title
by beating 23rd-seeded Sabine
Lisicki of Germany 6-1, 6-4
Saturday in an error-lled,
one-sided nal that was far
from a classic.
Its always been a part of
my personality to be different.
I think being just like the other
one is kind of boring. I really
embrace the fact of being a
bit different and doing some-
thing that not everyone is,
said the 28-year-old Bartoli,
who plays tennis right-handed
but signs autographs with her
left. I actually love that part
of my game, being able to have
something different.
She certainly stands alone.
This was Bartolis 47th
Grand Slam tournament, the
most ever played by a woman
before earning a champion-
ship.
She is the only woman in
the 45-year Open era to win
Wimbledon playing two-sted
shots off both wings (Monica
Seles, Bartolis inspiration for
that unusual style, collected
her nine major titles else-
where).
Until Saturday, it had been
more than 1 years since
Bartoli won a tournament at
any level.
Until these last two weeks,
Bartolis record in 2013 was
14-12, and she had failed to
make it past the quarternals
anywhere.
Asked how to explain how
she went from that sort of
mediocre season to winning
seven matches in a row at
Wimbledon, never dropping a
set, Bartoli briey closed her
eyes, then laughed heartily.
Well, Bartoli said, spread-
ing her arms wide, thats me!
Unlike Lisicki, a rst-time
major nalist who was admit-
tedly overwhelmed by the
occasion and teared up in the
second set, Bartoli already
had been on this stage, with
the same stakes. Back in 2007,
Bartoli won only ve games
during a two-set loss to Venus
Williams in the Wimbledon
nal.
See BARTOLI | 7C
AP Photo
Tony Kanaan sits in his car during a practice session for Sundays
Pocono IndyCar 400 on Saturday in Long Pond.
Joe Soprano
jsoprano@timesleader.com
LONG POND Tony Kanaan
has a million reasons why he
would want to win todays Pocono
IndyCar 400 Fueled by Sunoco.
As winner of the Indianapolis 500
backinMay, Kanaanis the only driver
in the eld who can win the Fuzzys
Triple Crown $1 million bonus.
All the Brazilian driver has to
do is win todays race and then
take the season ending MAD TV
500 on Oct. 19 in Fontana, Calif.,
and the cash is his.
Kanaan hoping for a
win thats a little Fuzzy
Brazilian driver in hunt for $1 million Triple Crown bonus
See KANAAN | 4C
See TRADITION | 4C
Paul Sokoloski
psokoloski@timesleader.com
LONG POND It took less
than 82 seconds Saturday for
Pocono Raceway to win Marco
Andrettis heart.
Thats the amount of time in
which the grandson of Mario
Andretti and the son of Michael
Andretti drove his RC Cola
Chevrolet around Pocono twice
while capturing the pole position
for todays Pocono IndyCar 400
Fueled by Sunoco during a couple
of electric qualifying runs.
The tradition continues
Marco Andretti becomes 3rd generation of
family to take the pole at Pocono Raceway
Solid Pineda leads
RailRiders to victory
Fred Adams | For The Times Leader
Rehabing Yankees pitcher Michael Pineda was on the mound for
the RailRiders with rehabbing teammate, shortstop Derek Jeter, in
the background during the game against the IronPigs on Saturday
night at PNC Field.
Dave Rosengrant
drosengrant@timesleader.com
MOOSIC Derek
Jeters rehab appearance
attracted all the hoopla on
Saturday night.
But there was another
rehabbing Yankee who
didnt want to be forgot-
ten about. Right-hander
Michael Pineda made his
fth start as he attempts
to reach the major leagues
for the rst time since
2011 when he pitched for
Seattle.
Acquired from the
Mariners before the
2012 season in the Jesus
Montero deal, Pineda
missed all of last season
with shoulder issues,
eventually needing sur-
gery for a torn labrum.
After a rough first
inning, he rebounded
to toss four scoreless
frames, leading the
RailRiders to a 4-2 vic-
tory over Lehigh Valley
at PNC Field.
The IronPigs got to
Pineda in the first inning
for two runs, taking
advantage of the 24-year-
olds command issues.
After a leadoff infield
single, Pineda got an
out then allowed a walk,
uncorked a wild pitch,
got the second out and
walked another to load
the bases. Thats when
Leandro Castro blooped
a two-run double to put
Lehigh Valley in front
2-0.
Pineda settled down
a bit in the second, get-
ting the first two bat-
ters on strikeouts. A few
batters reached on an
error and a single in the
inning, but no runs were
scored.
After the second, he
only gave up one hit
the rest of the way and
faced just one batter
over the minimum. In
his five innings of work,
he gave up just four hits,
two runs, two walks and
fanned seven to pick up
the win.
The RailRider offense
helped out Pineda, scor-
ing a run in the second
and three more in the
third. Thomas Neal was
the big bat for SWB in
both frames. In the sec-
ond, he drove in Dan
Johnson with a double
to trim Lehigh Valleys
lead to 2-1. Then in the
third, he knocked in two
Dave Rosengrant
drosengrant@timesleader.com
MOOSIC The
RailRiders sure know
how to mark a special
occasion.
And Saturday marked
the biggest event for
the Scranton/Wilkes-
Barre baseball team this
season as it welcomed
rehabbing future Hall of
Fame shortstop Derek
Jeter to Northeastern
Pennsylvania.
A sellout crowd of
10,000 at PNC Field
was electric and saw the
Yankees captain go 0-for-2
with a walk in three plate
appearances. Defensively,
he played ve innings on
his surgically-repaired
left ankle, elding just
one grounder.
It felt ne. I didnt do
much, Jeter said about
his ankle.
Jeter, who last visited
the area in 1996 as a
member of the Columbus
Clippers, was treated like
royalty for the outing. He
will be the RailRiders des-
ignated hitter for todays
1:05 p.m. game.
The RailRiders went
all out, hanging ceremo-
nial red, white and blue
banners off the second
deck and using a record-
ing of late Yankee public
address announcer Bob
Sheppard to announce
Jeter prior to his at-bats
instead of normal PA
announcer Dean Corwin
doing the honors to make
him feel right at home.
Jeter drew a ve-pitch
walk in his rst at-bat,
leading off the game for
the RailRiders against
Lehigh Valley left-hander
Raul Valdes. He didnt get
a chance to run the bases
in the inning, though,
as the next three batters
struck out.
In his second plate
appearance, Jeter took a
rst-pitch ball before hit-
ting a hard liner to the
right side that was caught
by the second baseman.
His third plate appear-
ance was similar to the
second. In the bottom of
the fourth, he looked at
another ball to start the
at-bat before hitting a
hard grounder to third.
He was out on the play,
but showed good hustle
running out of the bat-
ters box.
It was maybe the only
time I got a standing ova-
tion for grounding out,
the perennial all-star
said. But its going to be
like that getting cheered
every time.
His only assist in the
ineld came in the top of
the fth with two outs.
He moved to his left and
ipped underhanded to
get a force out at second.
Next time I go out it
might be 10 groundballs,
he said. You never know.
I tested it (elding) a
little bit during batting
practice.
Jeters last visit to the
area came during the 1995
Triple-A All-Star Game
played at then-named
Lackawanna County
Stadium. He doesnt
recall much from that
appearance when he went
1-for-3 with a run scored.
Jeter gets royal treatment in frst rehab outing
See PINEDA | 8C
Photos by Fred Adams | For The Times Leader
ABOVE: Rehabbing NewYork Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter runs to back up RailRiders third baseman Josh Bell on a foul ball in the second inning of play Saturday at PNC
Field against the Lehigh Valley IronPigs. BELOW: Derek Jeter autographs a jersey for a fan hanging over the dugout wall before the game against the IronPigs on Saturday
night.
See JETER | 8C
PAGE 2C SUNDAY, JUNE 30, 2013 SCOREBOARD www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER
LOCAL CALENDAR
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round, at White Sulphur Springs, W.Va.
3 p.m.
CBS PGA Tour, The Greenbrier Classic, fnal
round, at White Sulphur Springs, W.Va.
MLB
1 p.m.
TBS, YES Baltimore at N.Y. Yankees
1:30 p.m.
WQMY Atlanta at Philadelphia
2 p.m.
ROOT, WGN Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs
WPIX N.Y. Mets at Milwaukee
8 p.m.
ESPN Boston at L.A. Angels
SOCCER
3 p.m.
ESPN MLS, Kansas City at Chicago
TENNIS
9 a.m.
ESPN The Wimbledon Championships,
mens championship, at London
POCONO DOwNS RESULTS
wednesday
First - $30,000 Trot 1:55.4
5-Amped Up Hanover (Ma Miller) 10.40 4.00 2.80
7-Uva Hanover (Da Miller) 2.60 2.20
2-Who Wants Soup (Jo Campbell) 2.20
EXACTA (5-7) $26.60
50 CENT TRIFECTA (5-7-2) $84.60
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $21.15
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (5-7-2-1) $248.80
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $12.44
Second - $6,000 Pace 1:53.1
6-You Little Rascal (An McCarthy) 19.00 7.60 6.80
7-Missmaximus (Ma Kakaley) 7.60 4.60
3-Oye Vera Bizzie (Jo Drury) 4.40
EXACTA (6-7) $141.00
50 CENT TRIFECTA (6-7-3) $1,651.40
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $412.85
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (6-7-3-1) $5,104.40
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $255.22
DAILY DOUBLE (5-6) $131.00
Third - $30,000 Trot 1:58.3
2-Kapow Hanover (Da Miller) 2.60 2.20 2.10
4-Auspicious Hanover (Ch Norris) 4.80 3.20
7-Ronato (Ji Oscarsson) 2.80
EXACTA (2-4) $11.20
50 CENT TRIFECTA (2-4-7) $34.80
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $8.70
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (2-4-7-3) $125.20
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $6.26
PICK 3 - 15% TAKEOUT (5-6-2) $294.40
PICK 3 - 15% TAKEOUT (5-6-6) $294.40
Scratched: Paparazzi
Fourth - $30,000 Trot 2:00.3
5-G Force Hanover (Romano) 106.60 30.00 29.80
4-Explosive De Vie (Ke Oscarsson) 5.00 4.80
7-Kumbaya De Vie (Jo Campbell) 11.20
EXACTA (5-4) $396.00
50 CENT TRIFECTA (5-4-7) $1,427.60
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $356.90
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (5-4-7-2) $27,904.80
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $1,395.24
Fifth - $8,500 Pace 1:52.4
1-Riverdancer (Ya Gingras) 17.60 8.40 5.00
6-Twin B Passion (Jo Drury) 19.80 7.60
3-Passion Starlet (An McCarthy) 3.80
EXACTA (1-6) $171.20
50 CENT TRIFECTA (1-6-3) $943.00
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $235.75
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (1-6-3-9) $8,918.80
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $445.94
Sixth - $30,000 Trot 1:55.4
7-Ravenclaw (Ya Gingras) 4.40 2.80 2.40
4-Faust (Ji Raymer) 10.40 8.00
2-Donatos Wish (Mi Simons) 11.20
EXACTA (7-4) $48.80
50 CENT TRIFECTA (7-4-2) $237.40
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $59.35
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (7-4-2-3) $674.80
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $33.74
PICK 3 - 15% TAKEOUT (5-ALL-7) $92.40
PICK 3 - 15% TAKEOUT (ALL-1-7) $92.40
Scratched: Nuncio
Seventh - $4,500 Pace 1:53.4
3-Skyway Hanover (Au Siegelman) 9.40 4.00 2.80
7-Another Dawn (Ge Napolitano Jr) 3.80 2.60
8-Hally (Jo Pavia Jr) 3.00
EXACTA (3-7) $32.60
50 CENT TRIFECTA (3-7-8) $135.60
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $33.90
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (3-7-8-1) $576.20
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $28.81
Eighth - $30,000 Trot 1:56.0
3-Father Patrick (Ya Gingras) 2.40 2.10 2.10
5-Sjs Encore (Ho Parker) 2.10 2.10
2-Sarcastic Man (Jo Campbell) 2.40
EXACTA (3-5) $4.00
50 CENT TRIFECTA (3-5-2) $6.20
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $1.55
No superfecta wagering
Scratched: Dunks Brother
Ninth - $12,000 Pace 1:51.3
2-Island Shark (An Napolitano) 20.60 12.40 8.00
1-Banging The Drum (Jo Antonelli) 33.20 10.20
6-Lumiere (Ma Miller) 5.40
EXACTA (2-1) $482.60
50 CENT TRIFECTA (2-1-6) $5,363.80
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $1,340.95
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (2-1-6-5) $28,599.80
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $1,429.99
PICK 3 - 15% TAKEOUT (3-3-2) $151.40
Tenth - $15,000 Trot 1:52.4
6-Coco Lindy (Ma Kakaley) 6.20 3.40 3.00
5-Keystone Wyatt (Ge Napolitano Jr) 2.80 3.00
4-Sonny Mcdreamee (An McCarthy) 7.80
EXACTA (6-5) $16.60
50 CENT TRIFECTA (6-5-4) $102.60
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $25.65
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (6-5-4-3) $339.20
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $16.96
Scratched: Lindy Mcdreamy
Eleventh - $14,000 Pace 1:52.1
5-Cheyenne Patti (An Miller) 8.00 3.20 2.80
8-Smokin N Grinin (Ge Napolitano Jr) 3.60 2.80
1-Picked By An Angel (Ma Miller) 4.80
EXACTA (5-8) $31.20
50 CENT TRIFECTA (5-8-1) $87.80
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $21.95
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (5-8-1-3) $354.80
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $17.74
Twelfth - $13,000 Trot 1:54.1
5-Commander K (Ma Kakaley) 14.80 10.00 3.40
8-Proud Moment (An Miller) 7.80 4.40
3-Paisley (Da Miller) 3.40
EXACTA (5-8) $103.40
50 CENT TRIFECTA (5-8-3) $359.20
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $89.80
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (5-8-3-2) $1,095.40
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $54.77
PICK 3 - 15% TAKEOUT (6-5-5) $412.80
Scratched: Dream Lake
Thirteenth - $12,000 Pace 1:51.0
2-Sir Jack (Ge Napolitano Jr) 8.20 3.60 2.60
6-Cage Fighter (An McCarthy) 10.60 5.20
1-Sky Desperado (Jo Drury) 5.60
EXACTA (2-6) $92.40
50 CENT TRIFECTA (2-6-1) $796.00
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $199.00
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (2-6-1-4) $3,220.00
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $161.00
Fourteenth - $13,000 Pace 1:50.1
2-Bullet Speed (An Miller) 6.40 3.60 2.80
3-Windsong Gorgeous (Ma Kakaley) 4.20 3.20
4-Master Of Desire (Er Carlson) 7.60
EXACTA (2-3) $22.80
50 CENT TRIFECTA (2-3-4) $251.80
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $62.95
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (2-3-4-1) $757.00
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $37.85
Fifteenth - $13,000 Pace 1:53.1
4-Think Pink (Ma Kakaley) 2.40 2.10 2.10
9-Juice Hanover (Ma Romano) 9.60 5.20
8-Senorita Bella (Da Miller) 3.60
EXACTA (4-9) $25.40
50 CENT TRIFECTA (4-9-8) $141.00
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $35.25
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (4-9-8-5) $951.80
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $47.59
LATE DOUBLE (2-4) $18.80
Scratched: Paramelons Hanover
Total Handle-$455,486
oNTHE MArK
Mark dudek
For The Times Leader
A Preferred Mares Pace and Trot are the featured attractions
on a solid 15-race Sunday night slate at The Mohegan Sun at
Pocono Downs. The mares will be led to post by locally stabled
Economy Terror. This classy 4-year-old millionaire just seemed
to be rounding into form before her bout with sickness. Judging
by her outstanding qualier, this Chris Oakes-trained pacer is
ready to go.
Sevruga leads a eld of six others to the gate in the co-featured
12th race. The 5-year-old gelded son of SJs Caviar has made a
living on both the small tracks and the mile oval. Trained by
Julie Miller, Sevruga has had some marvelous miles in his career.
Perhaps his nest moment was his 1:51 victory over a superb
eld in the $180,000 Cutler Final back on May 18.
Look for both these horses to make a statement and gain qual-
ity track time leading to the Breeders Crown in October.
BEST BET: BLISSFULL DREAMER (8TH)
VALUE PLAY: COOKING THE BOOKS (14TH)
Post time 6:30 p.m.
All races 1 mile
First-$6,000 Clm.Pace;clm.price $7,500
3 Artsbred Camotion R.Pierce 5-2-3 Drops and pops 3-1
5 Lucky Land G.Napolitano 1-8-4 Just dusted cheaper 5-2
9 Zarachino A.McCarthy 2-1-2 First start off the claim 10-1
6 I Scoot For Cash M.Kakaley 4-6-8 Scoots home fourth 4-1
7 Absolutely Michael K.Wallis 1-2-6 Dead game in career mile 15-1
2 Tyber King J.Drury 2-2-1 Newcomer from Canada 6-1
8 Winbak Prince T.Buter 3-7-6 Post a major hurdle 20-1
4 Mr Thompson J.Pavia 7-1-4 Has raced all over 5-1
1 American Romance A.Napolitano 8-2-6 Finding no takers 12-1
Second-$13,000 N/w Clm.Pace;clm.price $18,000
4 Courageous Cat R.Pierce 1-2-6 Has more in the tank 5-2
2 Buckeye Baddler M.Kakaley 3-2-3 Newcomer from Scioto 7-2
1 Bettors Choice F.Davis 4-4-2 Fast off the gate 5-1
3 Nathaniels Big Boy A.McCarthy 2-4-4 Chased the Cat last out 4-1
8 Lil Miss Snowfake K.Wallis 3-8-1 Mare tackles the boys 12-1
9 Balladeer Hanover T.Buter 4-1-4 Not from the nine hole 8-1
6 Skyway Poncho H.Parker 8-1-7 Look another direction 6-1
7 Fox Valley Leo M.Simons 7-5-2 2nd time lasix user 15-1
5 High Stake Hanover J.Pavia 6-2-3 Pushed away 20-1
Third-$9,000 Cond.Trot;n/w $4,000 last 5
5 Casanova Lindy R.Pierce 6-6-7 Takes weak group 3-1
2 Victors Future H.Parker 8-2-4 Much better on the draw 7-2
3 Judith A.Napolitano 7-5-4 A Nap trains and steers 4-1
7 The Bronx Bumper T.Jackson 5-5-5 One better than ffth 9-2
4 Trickledowntheory M.Simons 7-4-5 Yet to hit the board 6-1
8 Katie Done Did It M.Miller 2-6-8 Not doing it 8-1
9 Enflade T.Buter 2-7-7 Remains winless in 2012 15-1
1 Somolli Crown M.Kakaley 5-9-7 Showing very little 10-1
6 Mr Caviar G.Napolitano 8-9-3 Fallen on hard times 20-1
Fourth-$6,000 Clm.Pace;clm.price $7,500
6 Mcmarvel R.Pierce 1-1-3 Keeps on winning 3-1
4 Allamerican Daddy G.Napolitano 2-2-2 Once again grabs the place 5-2
5 Lost Bliss A.McCarthy 3-3-1 Flying on the end of it 4-1
9 Only In America T.Jackson 5-4-1 First time on lasix 12-1
8 Ar Ed M.Kakaley 2-5-3 Lack of speed a killer 10-1
1 General Mack A.Napolitano 2-4-4 Again draws the pole 6-1
3 Caviart Spencer H.Parker 4-3-5 Missed a few turns 5-1
2 Alexpanderthegreat T.Buter 7-6-5 Dull 15-1
7 Cams Yankee Pride M.Miller 8-8-8 Last yet again 20-1
Fifth-$9,000 Cond.Trot;n/w $4,000 last 5
2 Explosive Fashion J.Taggart 2-5-6 Taggart overdue for a win 8-1
7 Eagle Say T.Buter 3-4-6 Raced better with hopples 3-1
6 Smokn Muscles A.McCarthy 2-4-2 Good 2nd against similar 6-1
5 My Love Bi R.Pierce 4-6-8 Little else remains 9-2
1 Keystone Tempo E.Carlson 3-5-5 Rail cant hurt 7-2
4 Sunland Dakota G.Napolitano 5-5-7 Raced awful as chalk 4-1
3 The Big Thea Thea M.Simons 6-8-3 Back from Tioga 10-1
9 Corky Duke M.Romano 4-9-8 Cork is stuck 15-1
8 No Money No Fun M.kakaley 5-3-7 Gone broke 20-1
Sixth-$13,000 Cond.Pace;n/w 2 pm races life
3 Archetto Hanover M.Miller 2-4-3 Stakes tested and ready 3-1
5 Beach Blast K.Wallis 1-1-x Well bred lady 4-1
8 Aris Turn A.McCarthy 3-2-x Art Major frster 8-1
4 Howabout Hanover M.Simons 7-4-1 Down from PAAll Stars 7-2
7 Jimy Beach B.Simpson 1-7-x Won his prep 10-1
1 Pembroke Scorpio T.Buter 4-3-x Mark Ford trainee 6-1
6 Dragon Seelster M.Kakaley 6-4-x Buter opted off 9-2
2 Big Bud A.Miller 8-3-5 Very small 20-1
9 Hurrican Breeze R.Pierce 8-3-4 Blown away 15-1
Seventh-$8,500 Clm.Pace;clm.price $10,000
1 Bagel Man R.Pierce 3-2-3 Allard-Pierce lethal 5-2
6 Tyree M.Kakaley 3-4-2 Versatile veteran 3-1
2 Highland Hellion G.Napolitano 9-3-8 Been burning cash 4-1
7 P L Earl A.Napolitano 1-9-7 Inherited win at Saratoga 6-1
9 Cam East M.Miller 2-6-5 Nostadt having career year 10-1
3 U Bettor Watch Out J.Drury 4-7-5 Couldnt handle lesser 5-1
8 Keep On Flyin A.McCarthy 4-7-8 Clipped 20-1
4 Night Train Shane H.Parker 6-6-4 Out to lunch 12-1
5 Needles And Pins E.Carlson 8-6-9 Stuck 15-1
Eighth-$10,000 Clm.Pace;clm.price $12,500
1 Blissfull Dreamer R.Pierce 1-1-6 Can name her distance 5-2
7 Traveling Jeanie G.Napolitano 3-1-2 Race is for place 4-1
2 Marymac Is A Whack E.Carlson 2-6-8 Chased the Dreamer last out 5-1
4 Katherine B M.Kakaley 2-2-4 Speed coming up a tad short 7-2
5 Kendyl B.Simpson 7-1-5 Bounced off big upset 6-1
6 Rag Doll A.McCarthy 4-5-9 Shredded 8-1
3 Ashlees Cool Gal M.Romano 8-6-3 Iced down 12-1
9 Day Traker M.Miller 5-8-8 Easy toss 20-1
8 Miss Old Vines M.Simons 9-2-7 First try for a tag 15-1
Ninth-$18,000 Clm.Hndcp Trot;clm.price $25-30,000
9 Blomkvist A.Miller 1-8-1 Stays fat and wiresem 3-1
5 JL Rockin Jake J.Morrill 3-3-1 Come back to life 7-2
4 April Sunshine M.Kakaley 4-7-4 Beaten favorite last few 4-1
3 Frisky Strike A.Napolitano 2-8-1 Proven he belongs 9-2
7 Bay Lightning E.Carlson 5-1-4 Tough level for him 8-1
8 Gaslight J.Pavia 2-5-7 Ready for a refuel 6-1
2 Ballykeel Mike R.Pierce 7-6-8 Not even with Pierce 10-1
1 Bossy Volo M.Simons 6-8-2 Save your coin 15-1
6 Mr Orlando G.Napolitano 6-4-2 Going south fast 20-1
Tenth-$25,000 Mares Preferred Handicap
6 Economy Terror J.Morrill 1-4-1 No one is close 3-1
7 Rock N Soul M.Kakaley 2-2-1 A trip horse 5-2
2 All Spirit J.Marohn Jr 1-3-1 Nice to see Marohn here 6-1
3 Enduring Delight R.Pirece 1-1-4 Big move up ladder 9-2
5 Bullet Point K.Wallis 5-1-7 In from the Bronx 7-2
1 Dont Blame Her B.Simpson 5-1-2 Solid at Saratoga 8-1
4 Jeremes Sweetheart G.Napolitano 7-4-4 Fills out the feld 12-1
Eleventh-$8,500 Clm.Pace;clm.price $10,000
3 Zander Massimo G.Napolitano 2-3-6 Steady at this level 5-2
5 My Fella J.Morrill 1-4-4 Cruised vs much easier 4-1
7 Standupnkissme A.Miller 4-7-9 Note the driver change 6-1
6 D M Bodatious M.Miller 9-1-1 Bounced off the upset 7-2
1 Three Artist A.Santeramo 9-4-6 Santeramo with the lines 8-1
2 Raging Grin M.Simons 5-5-6 Free legged pacer 5-1
4 Western Artwork R.Pierce 8-4-7 Still overclassed 15-1
8 Gritty Millie Boy M.Romano 7-7-7 No moves 12-1
9 Rockrockwhosthere M.Kakaley 6-5-4 Not home 20-1
Twelfth-$25,000 Preferred Trot
6 Sevruga A.Miller 3-1-4 Dominant 5-2
2 Modern Family D.Bier 6-3-4 Toss last, still quality 3-1
3 Traverse Seelster R.Pierce 1-3-5 Won Open at Harrington 9-2
1 Holy Halibut M.Kakaley 3-2-1 Burke student 6-1
7 Stormont Lancelot J.Drury 3-1-1 Plenty of speed 12-1
4 Mystical Starlight A.McCarthy 2-4-5 Lone gal in the feld 7-2
5 Upfront Billy G.Napolitano 5-2-1 In with tough stock 8-1
Thirteenth-$10,000 Clm.Pace;clm.price $12,500
1 Golden Time R.Pierce 1-9-1 Looked super in that win 3-1
5 Tamayo T.Buter 1-3-1 Scores 2 of last 3 5-2
8 Keystone Neptune G.Napolitano 3-1-1 Penas newest 5-1
6 Dry Gulch S.Allard 7-6-1 Second start since the purchase 4-1
4 Card Hustler K.Wallis 3-8-1 Shuffed back a bit 6-1
2 Theetownlittleguy M.Kakaley 4-7-7 Looking to remain on stride 15-1
7 Countyline Cam J.Morrill 4-2-2 Back in for a price 10-1
3 Gogo Buckeye A.McCarthy 4-1-4 No go left 12-1
9 Allstar Shark M.Romano 6-3-2 Gets no votes 20-1
Fourteenth-$21,000 Cond.Pace;n/w $22,000 last 5
3 Cooking The Books R.Pierce 4-1-1 Kicks off late double 5-1
2 Delta Dawn Hanover G.Napolitano 1-1-2 Loves to win 3-1
1 Bettor B Lucky M.Kakaley 4-4-6 Takes a sharp drop in class 5-2
5 Miss Annie J A.Miller 1-1-1 Hard one to knock 4-1
7 Billmar Scooter T.Buter 3-1-5 Plenty of class 10-1
4 Cat Cora M.Miller 2-6-2 Almost got there at 14-1 6-1
6 Arctic Fire N A.McCarthy 2-4-6 Very tough feld 12-1
8 Shawnee Dancer J.Morrill 6-5-3 Morrill remains top driver 15-1
9 Queen Of Royalty E.Carlson 6-8-1 One more race to go 20-1
Fifteenth-$12,000 Cond.Pace;n/w 1 pm race life
2 Somekindamonster R.Pierce 5-4-4 Its Pierce in fnale 3-1
6 Beach Treasure E.Carlson 3-2-8 Very weak maiden group 9-2
5 The Right Move A.McCarthy 4-7-7 Use in exotics 6-1
3 Skin The Cat J.Pavia 3-7-8 Lightly raced 4yr old 7-2
1 Kiss My Artist M.Kakaley 6-5-4 Got that pole position 4-1
9 Pan Turismo M.Miller 6-4-4 Marks 3rd career start 8-1
4 Come On Cala J.Antonelli 8-7-6 .next 10-1
7 Upfront Magic J.Taggart 7-5-6 Maiden for life 15-1
8 Seeyouatthefnish M.Romano 8-6-5 See you on Tuesday 20-1
POCONO DOwNS RESULTS
Friday
First - $30,000 Trot 1:56.4
1-Struck By Lindy (Ro Pierce) 29.80 3.80 3.80
2-Broadway Socks (Da Rawlings) 2.10 2.10
7-Outsourced Hanover (Ma Kakaley) 3.20
EXACTA (1-2) $50.80
50 CENT TRIFECTA (1-2-7) $233.20
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $58.30
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (1-2-7-5) $1,079.60
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $53.98
Second - $9,000 Pace 1:54.3
4-Dirty Girty (Ma Kakaley) 4.60 3.80 3.40
7-Scirocco Caliegirl (Er Carlson) 8.80 7.20
9-Sexy Card Shark (Th Jackson) 8.00
EXACTA (4-7) $50.60
50 CENT TRIFECTA (4-7-9) $741.40
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $185.35
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (4-7-9-2) $7,491.60
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $374.58
DAILY DOUBLE (1-4) $71.60
Scratched: Terror In Motion
Third - $30,000 Trot 1:58.3
4-Juniata Hanover (Ma Kakaley) 4.20 2.20 2.20
2-Chipperoo (Ty Buter) 3.20 2.20
7-Silent Opera K (Ho Parker) 3.00
EXACTA (4-2) $10.60
50 CENT TRIFECTA (4-2-7) $78.40
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $19.60
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (4-2-7-3) $438.00
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $21.90
PICK 3 - 15% TAKEOUT (1-3-4) $914.40
PICK 3 - 15% TAKEOUT (1-4-4) $914.40
Fourth - $30,000 Trot 1:57.4
4-Designed To Be (Ty Buter) 13.00 5.80 14.00
5-Sally Savannah (Mi Simons) 6.40 16.00
7-Violet Eyes (Ho Parker) 22.40
EXACTA (4-5) $48.80
50 CENT TRIFECTA (4-5-7) $205.20
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $51.30
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (4-5-7-3) $2,456.40
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $122.82
Fifth - $4,500 Pace 1:54.1
4-Captain Greg (Th Jackson) 8.80 3.20 2.40
3-Carpe Diem (Ro Pierce) 4.60 2.80
8-Mr Hallowell (Ge Napolitano Jr) 2.80
EXACTA (4-3) $50.20
50 CENT TRIFECTA (4-3-8) $175.00
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $43.75
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (4-3-8-5) $887.80
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $44.39
Scratched: Jolt Demanded, Lifetime Louie
Sixth - $30,000 Trot 1:57.0
7-Honor Thy Daughter (Ro Pierce) 2.10 2.10 2.10
6-Royal Tabs (Ma Kakaley) 3.20 2.10
4-Chez Mahmo (Ty Buter) 4.00
EXACTA (7-6) $5.40
50 CENT TRIFECTA (7-6-4) $20.60
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $5.15
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (7-6-4-5) $61.20
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $3.06
PICK 3 - 15% TAKEOUT (4-4-7) $55.00
Seventh - $30,000 Trot 1:54.4
3-Shake It Cerry (Ro Pierce) 4.00 2.20 2.20
4-A Perfect Gem (Ma Miller) 2.20 2.20
6-Fashion Huntress (Jo Campbell) 2.60
EXACTA (3-4) $7.20
50 CENT TRIFECTA (3-4-6) $16.80
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $4.20
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (3-4-6-1) $31.40
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $1.57
Eighth - $30,000 Trot 1:57.1
4-Lifetime Pursuit (Ro Pierce) 2.40 2.10 2.10
1-Abettajetta (Jo Campbell) 2.80 2.20
2-Fay (Ra Schnittker) 2.80
EXACTA (4-1) $5.40
50 CENT TRIFECTA (4-1-2) $15.40
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $3.85
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (4-1-2-3) $46.20
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $2.31
Ninth - $12,000 Pace 1:54.2
3-Jv Hanover (Er Carlson) 48.60 24.60 11.00
5-Obligations (Fr Del Cid) 60.60 15.00
1-Employess Go Wild (Ma Kakaley) 4.80
EXACTA (3-5) $483.60
50 CENT TRIFECTA (3-5-1) $1,177.40
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $294.35
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (3-5-1-6) $4,854.40
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $242.72
PICK 3 - 15% TAKEOUT (3-4-3) $54.20
Scratched: R T Lange, Tri-Boro, Mogul Hanover
Tenth - $19,000 Trot 1:51.1
5-Summer Indian (Ma Kakaley) 3.80 2.60 2.20
2-Trustworthy Kid (Ty Buter) 4.40 3.00
1-Sand Wyndham (Jo Pavia Jr) 2.80
EXACTA (5-2) $15.60
50 CENT TRIFECTA (5-2-1) $45.20
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $11.30
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (5-2-1-3) $196.00
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $9.80
Scratched: Flashbacks
Eleventh - $9,000 Pace 1:53.0
8-Two Beers Away (Ro Pierce) 6.00 2.80 3.00
7-American General (Jo Campbell) 3.60 3.00
4-Instant Refund (Ge Napolitano Jr) 3.40
EXACTA (8-7) $25.00
50 CENT TRIFECTA (8-7-4) $136.60
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $34.15
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (8-7-4-6) $400.00
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $20.00
Scratched: Lifes A Ponder
Twelfth - $6,000 Trot 1:56.1
2-Nordic Venture (Ge Napolitano Jr) 6.40 3.80 3.60
4-Grace N Charlie (Au Siegelman) 4.80 5.40
5-Broadway Victory (Ro Pierce) 4.00
EXACTA (2-4) $43.00
50 CENT TRIFECTA (2-4-5) $228.60
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $57.15
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (2-4-5-7) $496.00
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $24.80
PICK 3 - 15% TAKEOUT (5-8-2) $54.60
Thirteenth - $13,000 Pace 1:52.2
4-Gonna Rock N Roll (Napolitano) 6.00 3.60 3.00
9-Millenium Wheel (Ro Pierce) 6.20 3.60
3-Lupara (Mi Simons) 2.60
EXACTA (4-9) $31.00
50 CENT TRIFECTA (4-9-3) $150.00
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $37.50
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (4-9-3-8) $675.40
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $33.77
Scratched: Knocking Around
Fourteenth - $9,000 Pace 1:51.0
7-Diablo Seelster (Br Simpson) 19.00 7.80 5.00
5-Saywhatuneedtosay (Mi Simons) 8.00 5.00
4-Caerleon Hanover (Ro Pierce) 7.00
EXACTA (7-5) $159.20
50 CENT TRIFECTA (7-5-4) $784.00
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $196.00
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (7-5-4-6) $3,266.60
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $163.33
Fifteenth - $30,000 Trot 1:57.2
7-Vanity Matters (An McCarthy) 5.60 3.40 2.10
4-Martini Master (Ro Pierce) 3.00 2.20
3-Noon Tea Party (Jo Campbell) 2.20
EXACTA (7-4) $22.20
50 CENT TRIFECTA (7-4-3) $30.80
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $7.70
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (7-4-3-2) $197.60
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $9.88
Sixteenth - $30,000 Trot 1:56.2
2-Global Magic (An McCarthy) 5.20 2.60 2.40
3-Keepsake Hanover (Ma Kakaley) 4.60 2.40
6-Great Gwen (Ch Norris) 3.00
EXACTA (2-3) $20.80
50 CENT TRIFECTA (2-3-6) $38.80
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $9.70
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (2-3-6-7) $142.00
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $7.10
LATE DOUBLE (7-2) $14.80
Total Handle-$331,571
TODAYS EVENTS
AMERICAN LEGION BASEBALL
Senior Division
(All games 1 p.m. unless noted)
Greater Pittston vs. Plains at Hilldale
Hazleton vs. Mountain Post B at Mountain Post
Mountain Post A vs. West Side at Atlas Field
Swoyersville vs. Back Mountain at Misericordia
Tambur Field
Mountain Post A vs. Greater Pittston at Atlas
Field, 4 p.m.
LITTLE LEAGUE
District 16 10-11 Baseball
Mountain Top at South Wilkes-Barre, 2 p.m.
Nanticoke at Hanover, 2 p.m.
District 31 10-11 Baseball
West Side vs. West Pittston winner at Exeter,
2 p.m.
Kingston/Forty Fort at Back MountainAmerican,
2 p.m.
District 16 Senior Baseball
Avoca/Dupont-Pittston at Duryea/Pittston Twp.,
1 p.m.
Nanticoke at Plains/North Wilkes-Barre, 1 p.m.
District 31 Senior Baseball
Swoyersville at Northwest, 1 p.m.
Back Mountain at Greater Wyoming Area, 1
p.m.
District 16 9-10 Softball
Jenkins Twp. vs. Plains/North W-B winner at
Duryea/Pittston Twp., 6 p.m.
District 31 9-10 Softball
Back Mountain at Greater Wyoming Area, 6
p.m. (Exeter feld)
District 31 10-11 Softball
West Side at Bob Horlacher, 6 p.m.
MONDAY
AMERICAN LEGION BASEBALL
Senior Division
(All games 5:45 p.m.)
Nanticoke vs. Greater Pittston at Atlas Field
Mountain Post B vs. Wilkes-Barre at Gibby Field
Hazleton vs. Plains at Hilldale Field
Back Mountain vs. Tunkhannock at Tunkhan-
nock H.S.
Swoyersville vs. Mountain Post A at Mountain
Post
LITTLE LEAGUE
District 16 Junior Baseball
(5:45 p.m.)
Plains at North Wilkes-Barre
Hanover/South W-B at Pittston/Jenkins Twp. vs.
Avoca/Dupont winner
District 31 Junior Softball
West Side at Kingston/Forty Fort, 6 p.m.
Greenbrier Classic
At The Greenbrier Resort, The Old white TPC
Sulphur Springs, w.Va.
Purse: $6.3 million
Yardage: 7,287; par 70
Third Round
Johnson Wagner 62-70-64196 -14
Jimmy Walker 69-65-64198 -12
Jonas Blixt 66-67-67200 -10
Matt Jones 69-66-66201 -9
Jordan Spieth 67-67-67201 -9
Steven Bowditch 65-67-69201 -9
Pat Perez 71-65-66202 -8
Bill Haas 68-67-67202 -8
Rory Sabbatini 70-65-67202 -8
D.H. Lee 66-68-68202 -8
Tag Ridings 65-69-68202 -8
Tommy Gainey 62-71-69202 -8
Gary Woodland 69-70-64203 -7
Morgan Hoffmann 69-67-67203 -7
Bill Lunde 66-66-71203 -7
Nick Watney 72-67-65204 -6
Cameron Percy 71-68-65204 -6
Bryce Molder 71-67-66204 -6
Tim Petrovic 69-68-67204 -6
Scott Stallings 70-67-67204 -6
Brian Stuard 71-66-67204 -6
David Lingmerth 71-66-67204 -6
Louis Oosthuizen 67-68-69204 -6
Ted Potter, Jr. 69-66-69204 -6
Ben Curtis 67-66-71204 -6
Russell Henley 67-65-72204 -6
Troy Matteson 69-70-66205 -5
Graham DeLaet 69-70-66205 -5
Brad Fritsch 68-71-66205 -5
Justin Leonard 68-70-67205 -5
Charlie Wi 73-65-67205 -5
Peter Hanson 66-71-68205 -5
George McNeill 66-71-68205 -5
Davis Love III 67-70-68205 -5
Jason Kokrak 66-71-68205 -5
Brian Davis 67-68-70205 -5
James Driscoll 66-68-71205 -5
Greg Owen 67-66-72205 -5
NEw YORk - PENN LEAGUE
McNamara Division
w L Pct. GB
Hudson Valley (Rays) 11 8 .579
Aberdeen (Orioles) 10 8 .556
Staten Island (Yankees) 9 8 .529 1
Brooklyn (Mets) 6 12 .333 4
Pinckney Division
w L Pct. GB
Jamestown (Pirates) 11 6 .647
Williamsport (Phillies) 10 7 .588 1
State College (Cardinals) 10 8 .556 1
Batavia (Marlins) 8 8 .500 2
Mahoning Valley (Indians) 7 12 .368 5
Auburn (Nationals) 6 11 .353 5
Stedler Division
w L Pct. GB
Tri-City (Astros) 13 6 .684
Lowell (Red Sox) 10 7 .588 2
Vermont (Athletics) 7 11 .389 5
Connecticut (Tigers) 6 12 .333 6
Fridays Games
Tri-City 5, Lowell 4, 10 innings
Batavia 4, State College 3
Aberdeen 6, Brooklyn 5, 11 innings
Williamsport 6, Mahoning Valley 3
Staten Island 6, Hudson Valley 0
Connecticut 7, Vermont 1
Jamestown 1, Auburn 0, 3 innings, susp., rain
Saturdays Games
Jamestown 15, Auburn 5, comp. of susp. game
Jamestown at Auburn, (n)
Hudson Valley at Staten Island, (n)
Lowell at Tri-City, (n)
Batavia at State College, (n)
Williamsport at Mahoning Valley, (n)
Vermont at Connecticut, (n)
Brooklyn at Aberdeen, (n)
Sundays Games
Connecticut at Staten Island, 4 p.m.
Batavia at Jamestown, 4:05 p.m.
Aberdeen at Tri-City, 5 p.m.
Lowell at Brooklyn, 5 p.m.
Auburn at Williamsport, 5:05 p.m.
Hudson Valley at Vermont, 5:05 p.m.
Mahoning Valley at State College, 6:05 p.m.
EASTERN LEAGUE
Eastern Division
w L Pct. GB
Binghamton (Mets) 52 31 .627
Portland (Red Sox) 44 41 .518 9
New Britain (Twins) 43 44 .494 11
Trenton (Yankees) 42 44 .488 11
New Hampshire (Blue Jays)41 45 .477 12
Reading (Phillies) 38 48 .442 15
western Division
w L Pct. GB
Harrisburg (Nationals) 47 40 .540
Erie (Tigers) 44 42 .512 2
Bowie (Orioles) 42 42 .500 3
Akron (Indians) 42 45 .483 5
Richmond (Giants) 41 45 .477 5
Altoona (Pirates) 39 48 .448 8
Fridays Games
Harrisburg 4, Bowie 2, 1st game
New Britain 7, Portland 5
Altoona 7, Erie 6
Akron 6, Richmond 2
Trenton 8, Reading 0
New Hampshire 6, Binghamton 5
Harrisburg 5, Bowie 4, 2nd game
Saturdays Games
Erie 6, Altoona 0
New Britain 9, Portland 4
Akron at Richmond, (n)
Bowie at Harrisburg, (n)
Reading at Trenton, (n)
Binghamton at New Hampshire, (n)
Sundays Games
Bowie at Harrisburg, 1 p.m., 1st game
New Britain at Portland, 1 p.m.
Reading at Trenton, 1:05 p.m.
Akron at Richmond, 2:05 p.m.
Bowie at Harrisburg, 3:35 p.m., 2nd game
Binghamton at New Hampshire, 5:05 p.m.
Erie at Altoona, 6 p.m.
Mondays Games
New Britain at Portland, noon
Erie at Altoona, noon
Bowie at Harrisburg, noon
Binghamton at New Hampshire, 12:05 p.m.
Akron at Richmond, 12:05 p.m.
Reading at Trenton, 12:05 p.m.
Thursday: RailRiders 5, Buffalo 2
BUFFALO AB R HRBI 2B 3B HR
McCoy lf 4 1 2 2 0 0 1
Goins ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 0
Pillar cf 4 0 1 0 1 0 0
Gomez dh 3 0 1 0 0 0 0
Negrych 2B 3 0 0 0 0 0 0
LaRoche 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 0
Ochinko 1b 4 0 1 0 1 0 0
Goss rf 4 1 2 0 0 0 0
Nickeas c 3 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals 33 2 7 2 2 1 1
RAILRIDERS AB R HRBI 2B 3B HR
Garcia cf 5 1 2 0 0 1 0
Lillibridge 2b 2 2 1 2 0 0 1
Martinez rf 4 0 1 0 0 0 0
Ruiz dh 3 1 1 1 0 0 1
Johnson 1b 4 0 3 2 0 0 0
Neal lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 0
Bell 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 0
Maruszak ss 4 1 1 0 1 0 0
Wilson c 4 0 1 0 0 0 0
Totals 34 5 11 5 1 1 2
Buffalo 000 020 000 - 2
RailRiders 202 100 00x - 5
LOB - Buffalo 6, RailRiders 8. DP - Buffalo 1,
RailRiders 1. E - Goins. SB - Gose, Martinez. SF
- Lillibridge.
BUFFALO IP H R ER BB SO
Romero, L (0-3) 6 9 5 3 2 3
Stilson 2 2 0 0 0 2
RAILRIDERS IP H R ER BB SO
Marshall, W (4-6) 8 7 2 2 1 7
Betances, S (3) 1 0 0 0 0 2
HBP - Negrych (by Betances). WP - Stilson.
Umpires - HP John Tumpane, 1B Toby Basner,
2B Andy Dudones, 3B Sean Barber.
Time: 2:17
Attendance: 10,000
Friday: RailRiders 3, Bisons 2
Buffalo RailRiders
ab r hbi ab r hbi
McCoy 3b 3 0 0 0 Patterson cf 4 0 0 0
Goins ss 2 1 0 0 Neal lf 4 0 0 0
Pillar rf 3 1 0 0 Martinez rf 3 1 0 0
Gomez dh 4 0 1 0 Ruiz dh 3 1 1 0
Negrych 2b 4 0 1 2 Maruszak pr 0 0 0 0
Velez lf 3 0 1 0 Johnson 1b 4 0 1 0
Hernandez c 4 0 0 0 Murphy c 3 1 1 2
Gose cf 2 0 0 0 Lillibridge 2b 3 0 1 1
Ochinko 1b 3 0 0 0 Bell 3b 3 0 0 0
Ibarra ss 3 0 1 0
Totals 28 3 3 2 Totals 30 3 5 3
Buffalo 200 000 000 2
RailRiders 000 000 201 3
LOBBUF 5, SWB 4. TEAM RISP BUF 1-for-
5, SWB 2-for-9. 2B Negrych (25), Johnson (15),
Ibarra (5), Ruiz (2. SB McCoy (17), Lillibridge (3).
CS Gose (8). SF Murphy. GIDP BUF 2 , SWB
0. PB Hernandez
IP H R ER BB SO
Buffalo
Germano 7 5 2 2 0 7
Carreno (L, 2-2) 1 0 1 0 1 2
Hottovy .1 0 0 0 0 0
Lincoln .1 0 0 0 0 0
RailRiders
Ramirez 5 2 2 2 2 6
Whitley 3 0 0 0 1 4
Zagurski (W,4-1) 1 1 0 0 0 1
Balk Carrenol IBB Ruiz (by Carreno)
HBP Goins (by Ramirez), Pillar (by Ramirez),
Gose (by Whitley), Martinez (by Carreno)
Umpires Home, Toby Basner; First, Andy Du-
dones; Second, Sean Barber; Third, John Tump-
ane
T 2:38. A 7,253 (10,000)
Matt Every 69-62-74205 -5
Daniel Summerhays 65-67-73205 -5
Cameron Tringale 73-66-67206 -4
Michael Kim 70-69-67206 -4
Billy Horschel 69-70-67206 -4
K.J. Choi 71-67-68206 -4
Bubba Watson 68-69-69206 -4
Kevin Chappell 67-68-71206 -4
Chez Reavie 70-69-68207 -3
James Hahn 72-67-68207 -3
Luke List 71-67-69207 -3
John Senden 70-68-69207 -3
Webb Simpson 64-73-70207 -3
Chad Campbell 69-66-72207 -3
Brendon de Jonge 66-68-73207 -3
Andres Romero 68-71-69208 -2
Brian Harman 68-70-70208 -2
Jin Park 64-73-71208 -2
Richard H. Lee 68-70-70208 -2
Jeff Overton 68-68-72208 -2
Brendan Steele 66-70-72208 -2
Kenny Perry 68-67-73208 -2
D.A. Points 70-65-73208 -2
Andres Gonzales 71-68-70209 -1
Ryan Palmer 68-71-70209 -1
Shawn Stefani 70-69-70209 -1
Carl Pettersson 69-70-70209 -1
Robert Streb 69-70-70209 -1
Tom Gillis 67-71-71209 -1
Tom Watson 68-69-72209 -1
William McGirt 69-70-71210 E
Jim Herman 72-67-71210 E
Martin Flores 71-65-74210 E
Made the cut, did not fnish
D.J. Trahan 70-69-72211 +1
Scott Brown 66-72-73211 +1
Dicky Pride 72-66-73211 +1
Alistair Presnell 68-69-74211 +1
Neal Lancaster 65-71-76212 +2
Fabian Gomez 70-69-74213 +3
Gary Christian 71-67-75213 +3
Ben Crane 66-70-77213 +3
Erik Compton 69-67-79215 +5
Brad Adamonis 68-71-77216 +6
PHYSICALS
Wyoming Area Sports Physicals will
take place on the following dates for the
following sports: Football grades 7-12 on
July 10 at 3:15 p.m. Girls Volleyball 9-12,
Girls Field Hockey grades 7-12, Cross
Country grades 7-12 and Golf grades
9-12 on July 17 at 3:15 p.m. Girls and
Boys Soccer grades 7-12, Cheerleading
grades 9-12 and Girl Tennis grades 9-12
on July 24 at 3:15 p.m. All physicals
will be done in the feld house at the
football stadium. No physical will be
done without a complete PIAA/CIPPE
physical formsigned by a parent/
guardian. If you have not returned a
completed physical formyou may
pick one up at the Principals ofce or
Nurses ofce and bring it on the day
of your physical. If you are unable to
attend your scheduled physical day, you
may attend another day.
uPCoMING EVENTS/oTHEr
backyard Wife ball League is
hosting a Wife Ball and Horse Shoe
Tournament on Saturday, July 20, at 9
a.m. Its open to anyone age 12 and up.
Deadline to register is July 13.
business Association of the Greater
Shickshinny Area will be holding its
14th annual golf tournament at the
Rolling pines in Berwick on July 16
from1-5 p.m. Registration begins at
12:30 p.m. with a 1 p.m. shotgun start.
Registration fee is $70 per golfer, $280
per foursome. For more information or
to register contact Rich Lapinski 542-
7620, Brian Philips 542-5330, fax 542-
4045 or email brian.harvis@epix.net.
butler Township Police ofcers
Association will have its annual golf
tournament Friday, July 19, at Sand
Springs Country Club. The tournament
will have a shotgun start at 8:30
a.m. and the format will be four-man
scramble. The cost per player is $70
and the cost per teamis $280, which
includes green fees, cart, bufet dinner
after party, beverages, snacks, door
prizes, gifts and cash awards. The
tournament is limited to 100 golfers
and the deadline to enter is July 15.
Mail checks to Butler Township Police
Ofcers Association, 415 W. Butler Drive,
Drums, PA, 18222. For more information
or to reserve a spot in the tournament,
call 233-6664.
Crestwood Comet Football Golf
Tournament will be held Saturday, July
13, at Sand Springs Country Club with
a shotgun start at 8 a.m. Following golf
there will be food and refreshments
inside the clubhouse. Cost is $80 per
player and $320 per foursome and
includes golf cart, prizes, food and
refreshments, and a gift. The booster
club is also seeking hole sponsors for
$50 and $100. For further information
call Ken Givens at 201-294-9673 or
kgivens@atlanticirrigation.com.
Crestwood Wrestling booster Club
will be hosting a golf tournament held at
Sugarloaf Golf Club on Sunday, July 21.
Registration will be at 9 a.m. with a 10
a.m. shotgun start. This tournament is
a captain and crewformat and the cost
is $90 per player which includes cart &
greens fees. Dinner and drinks will be
provided to all golfers at Cavanaughs
Grill in Mountain Top following the
tournament. Guests may join golfers for
dinner at a cost of $30 per person. To
register for this event or inquire about
hole sponsorship please contact Randy
Swank at 678-7913 or email rrswank@
msn.com.
Hazleton Chapter of Penn State
Alumni Association will hold its annual
dinner at Sand Springs Country Club
on Tuesday, July 9, featuring Penn State
alumnhi Matt McGloin. There will be
a 6 p.m. meet and greet with dinner
beginning at 7 p.m. Cost is $30 per
person for Hazleton Alumni Chapter
Members and $35 for non members.
Jonathan Grula Memorial Foundation
Golf Tournament will be held Sunday,
July 28, at the Blue Ridge Trail Golf Club
in Mountain Top. Registration is at noon
and the tournament starts at 1:30 p.m.
The format will be captain and crew.
The cost is $100, which includes green
fees, cart, awards dinner, prizes and
golfer gifts, snacks and refreshments.
To date, the foundation has raised over
$241,000 for the Four Diamonds Fund,
which benefts children with cancer and
is active in pediatric cancer research.
For more information, call 829-0971 or
823-1992.
Keystone Volunteer Fire Company
No. 1 will have a golf tournament
Saturday, July 13 at Sand Springs
Country Club. The tournament will be
a four-man scramble with registration
from12:30 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. The
tournament begins at 1:30 p.m. The
cost is $75 per person and all proceeds
will beneft the equipment fund. For
more information, call Scott Card at
956-3916.
Northwest Junior rangers will be
hosting a golf tournament Friday, July
26, at Mill Race Golf and Camping
Resort in Benton. It is an 8 a.m.
shotgun will proceeds helping the
Junior Rangers. The tournament is
captain and crewformat and will be
$65 per golfer. Hole sponsorship are
$100, while co-sponsors are $50. We
are still seeking sponsors and golfers.
Any donation counts. Please call Don at
336-0082, Casey at 256-4353 or Mill
Race pro shop at 925-2040 to register
or sponsor.
Penn State Wilkes-barre Alumni
Constituent Society will have its
18th annual Penn State Masters Golf
Tournament at Blue Ridge Trail Golf
Club in Mountain Top on Friday, July 12.
Registration and lunch begin at 11:30
a.m., while the tournament begins at
1 p.m. with a shotgun start. An awards
banquet will begin at 6:30 p.m. where
tournament and prize winners will be
announced. For more information, call
Karen Brace-Hodle in the Penn State
Wilkes-Barre Development Ofce at
675-9228 or email klb14@psu.edu.
Dave Rosengrant
drosengrant@timesleader.com
It was just two weeks ago that
Hazletons Russ Canzler was at
PNC Field helping Norfolk take two
games out of four from Scranton/
Wilkes-Barre.
Just two years removed from
being International League MVP
and just a few months after going
through a whirlwind of an offsea-
son in which he spent time with
four organizations, the 27-year-old
was designated for assignment by
Baltimore on Saturday.
Canzler was hitting .276 with 11
home runs and 49 RBI for the Tides
playing in 86 of their 88 games this
season seeing time at designated
hitter, rst base and the outeld.
In the four games he played at PNC
Field at the end of June he went 7-for-
16 with a home run, two doubles,
four RBI and four runs scored. That
had been one of the bright spots for
the normally slow starter.
Over his last 10 games he started
to pick things up with three multi-
hit games in that span. He became
expendable when the Orioles acquired
rst baseman/third baseman Alex
Liddi from Seattle on Saturday. To
make room on the 40-man roster for
the 24-year-old Liddi, Canzler was the
odd man out. Liddi was designated for
assignment last week by the Mariners.
Thats a process Canzler will have
to go through now.
The Orioles will have 10 days to
trade or release the 2004 Hazleton
Area grad. If hes claimed off waiv-
ers, the Orioles will try to work out
a deal with that team. If he clears
waivers, he will have to accept an
outright assignment to the minors.
It seems unlikely that Canzler will
pass through waivers as he was in
high demand during the offseason.
When he was DFAd during that
time on four different occasions he
was picked up nearly immediately.
He was ofcially part of Cleveland,
Toronto and the New York organi-
zations before getting picked up by
Baltimore.
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013 PAGE 3C
RAILRIDER TEAM STATISTICS
BATTING
Casey Stevenson .417
Fernando Martinez .338
Brent Lillibridge .333
Thomas Neal .317
Randy Ruiz .309
J.R. Murphy .299
Ronnier Mustelier .280
Addison Maruszak .277
Walter Ibarra .253
Dan Johnson .249
Melky Mesa .248
Cody Grice .246
Corban Joseph .239
Corey Patterson .234
HOME RUNS
Dan Johnson 12
Melky Mesa 9
Randy Ruiz 7
Corban Joseph 6
Brent Lillibridge 5
Josh Bell 4
Ronnier Mustelier 4
Bobby Wilson 4
RBI
Dan Johnson 43
Zoilo Almonte 36
Bobby Wilson 29
Addison Maruszak 29
Thomas Neal 24
Ronnier Mustelier 23
Melky Mesa 22
Corban Joseph 19
Josh Bell 18
Fernando Martinez 15
DOUBLES
Addison Maruszak 21
Dan Johnson 15
Thomas Neal 13
Zoilo Almonte 12
Melky Mesa 10
Bobby Wilson 10
Corban Joseph 9
Josh Bell 8
Ronnier Mustelier 8
Fernando Martinez 7
TRIPLES
Melky Mesa 3
Cody Grice 2
Addison Maruszak 1
Zoilo Almonte 1
David Adams 1
Adonis Garcia 1
STOLEN BASES
Melky Mesa 7
Zoilo Almonte 4
Ronnier Mustelier 4
Brent Lillibridge 3
Dan Fiorito 2
Cody Grice 2
Corban Joseph 2
Thomas Neal 2
Corey Patterson 2
PITCHING
Sam Demel 1-1, 1.41
Vidal Nuno 2-0, 1.44
Mike Zagurski 4-1, 2.57
Matt Daley 0-0, 2.92
Mark Montgomery 1-1, 3.06
David Huff 3-4, 3.38
Chris Bootcheck 7-2, 3.46
Jose Ramirez 1-1, 3.68
Dellin Betances 5-4, 4.05
Jim Miller 0-5, 4.50
Chase Whitley 2-1, 4.50
Josh Spence 0-1, 4.68
Graham Stoneburner 3-4, 4.84
Brett Marshall 4-6, 5.83
Caleb Cotham 2-5, 7.49
STANDINGS
International League
North Division
W L Pct. GB
Pawtucket (Red Sox) 52 35 .598
Lehigh Valley (Phillies) 46 43 .517 7
Rochester (Twins) 45 45 .500 8
Bufalo (Blue Jays) 43 44 .494 9
RAILRIDERS (Yankees) 42 46 .477 10
Syracuse (Nationals) 37 51 .420 15
South Division
W L Pct. GB
Durham(Rays) 55 34 .618
Norfolk (Orioles) 47 41 .534 7
Charlotte (White Sox) 40 49 .449 15
Gwinnett (Braves) 37 52 .416 18
West Division
W L Pct. GB
Indianapolis (Pirates) 58 32 .644
Louisville (Reds) 43 46 .483 14
Columbus (Indians) 40 49 .449 17
Toledo (Tigers) 36 54 .400 22
Fridays Games
Rochester 1, Pawtucket 0, 10 innings
Syracuse 5, Lehigh Valley 0
Indianapolis 4, Toledo 2
Norfolk 5, Durham1
Charlotte 2, Gwinnett 0, 8 innings
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre 3, Bufalo 2
Columbus 7, Louisville 3
Saturdays Games
Louisville at Columbus, DH, (n)
Pawtucket at Rochester, (n)
Indianapolis at Toledo, (n)
Syracuse at Bufalo, (n)
Durhamat Gwinnett, (n)
Lehigh Valley at Scranton/Wilkes-Barre,
(n)
Norfolk at Charlotte, (n)
Sundays Games
Syracuse at Bufalo, 1:05 p.m., 1st game
Lehigh Valley at Scranton/Wilkes-Barre,
1:05 p.m.
Pawtucket at Rochester, 1:05 p.m.
Norfolk at Charlotte, 2:15 p.m.
Syracuse at Bufalo, 3:35 p.m., 2nd game
Durhamat Gwinnett, 5:05 p.m.
Indianapolis at Toledo, 6 p.m.
Louisville at Columbus, 6:05 p.m.
CRAIN GAME
Our weekly look at the work of
RailRiders president Rob Crain, who has
given us back our baseball with a side
order of promotions and entertainment.
BEST OF THE WEEK: There were
just three home games last week and
the best was hands down the appear-
ance by future Hall of Famer Derek
Jeter. Crain and the RailRiders rolled
out the red carpet for the Yankee cap-
tain with everything but the red car-
pet. Jeter was treated to a recording
of deceased Yankee PA announcer Bob
Sheppard doing the honors of letting
the sellout crowd aware of who was at
bat. Ceremonial red, white and blue
banners hung from the second deck
and the night was capped with the
third straight reworks show.
MISSED OPPORTUNITY: When
you have two sellouts in three home
games and another game attracting
more than 7,000 fans, theres not much
to miss out on.
If there was one thing that possibly
could have been improved it would
have been to literally roll out the red
carpet for Jeter. How about a red path
leading from the dugout to the batters
box prior to each of his at bats giving
one of the greatest shortstops in the
history of Major League Baseball the
whole royal treatment?
COMING UP: Theres nearly a
full week of games at PNC Field as
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre heads into the
all-star break. There are six games at
the ballpark as the longest homestand
of the season continues.
Tuesday is a camp day game with a
special start time of 12:05 p.m. Perhaps
the best promotion of the week ahead is
on Thursday when adult softball is also
celebrated. It doesnt seem like a coin-
cidence that adult softball night hap-
pens to fall on Thirsty Thursday. If that
promotion seems aimed mainly at men
dont worry, Friday is a special night for
the females with Ladies Night.
THE WEEK AHEAD
RAILRIDERS EXTRA
By now just about everyone is aware
that Yankees captain Derek Jeter could
be in a RailRider uniform during the
duration of the homestand that runs
through Friday. Theres more reasons
than the perennial all-star possibly
being at PNC Field for six more games.
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre looks to remain
hot over the next seven days to try to
keep gaining ground in the I.L. North
Division standings. The RailRiders
will have a good opportunity to do so
playing divisional teams until the All-
Star break.
Heres a look at what the Scranton/
Wilkes-Barre RailRiders will encounter
in the next seven days.
Rochester Red Wings
Once the IronPigs leave PNC Field
after this afternoons contest, the
Triple-A afliate of the Minnesota Twins
comes to Moosic for the next three days.
The Red Wings, who have had their
struggles this season, have been on a
roll lately, entering Saturday with a .500
record and have climbed out of the divi-
sions basement and into third place, two
games ahead of the RailRiders.
Having won 15 of their last 24 games,
the Red Wings inelder Chris Colabello
continues to rake, leading the league in
two of the Triple Crown categories. His
.359 batting average and 67 RBI pace
the I.L., while his 21 home runs are sec-
ond in the league and just three behind
the league leader. With the Twins drop-
ping in the American League Central
standings beginning Saturday on a six-
game losing streak, it may be a matter
of time before Rochesters slugger gets
called up to the majors once again.
Syracuse Chiefs
The Chiefs, who are currently in
last place in the division, have been
as hot as the RailRiders; both teams
have won seven of their last 10 begin-
ning play on Saturday. The top afliate
of the Nationals, though, is still 15.5
games out of rst place and ve behind
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre. The teams
square off on Thursday and Friday to
close out the RailRiders longest home-
stand of the season.
Jeff Kobernus, recently sent back
to Syracuse from Washington, is hav-
ing a solid season for the Chiefs. The
outelder is batting .333 in 49 Triple-A
games. His biggest asset has been on
the basepaths where hes been causing
problems. Not only has he been getting
on base at a good clip with an on base
percentage of .385, hes a speed demon
having stolen 23 bases for Syracuse.
Buffalo Bisons
Right before the All-Star break, the
RailRiders take a trip to Buffalo to
face Torontos afliate for two games
starting on Saturday. The teams just
wrapped up a two-game stint at PNC
Field with SWB claiming both contests
to improve their season record against
the Bisons to 5-3.
Canzler designated for assignment by Orioles
AP Photo
Baltimore Orioles third baseman Russ Canzler warms up before an exhibition spring train-
ing baseball game against the Toronto Blue Jays in March. The Hazleton native was desig-
nated for assignment by the Orioles on Saturday.
THIS WEEKS GAMES LAST WEEKS GAMES
Sunday
at Pawtucket
W, 9-6
Monday
at Pawtucket
L, 0-1
Tuesday
at Pawtucket
W, 6-4
Wednesday
at Pawtucket
L, 5-11
Thursday
Bufalo
W, 5-2
Friday
Bufalo
W, 3-2
Saturday
Lehigh Valley
(n)
Today
Lehigh Valley
1:05 p.m.
Monday
Rochester
7:05 p.m.
Tuesday
Rochester
12:05 p.m.
Wednesday
Rochester
7:05 p.m.
Thursday
Syracuse
7:05 p.m.
Friday
Syracuse
7:05 p.m.
Saturday
at Bufalo
6:05 p.m. (DH)
AP Photo
Corey Patterson slides safely into third on a first-inning stolen base for the Toronto Blue Jays against
the New York Yankees in a 2011 spring training game in Dunedin, Fla.
Dave Rosengrant
drosengrant@timesleader.com
MOOSIC Less than a
month ago, the RailRiders
were nine games under
.500 the worst for
the Scranton/Wilkes-
Barre franchise since the
Yankees took over in 2007.
The team was ailing
in the standings a season-
high 14.5 games out of rst
place in the International
League North Division
with a roster full of several
newcomers.
The roster was in such
limbo that the team was
part of a transaction for
13 out of 14 days from
June 13-25 with 29 play-
ers involved being signed,
disabled, activated, called
up, sent down or acquired
via trade. Its understand-
able that with that much
movement a team could
struggle.
Its not always easy when
you have new guys popping
in and out, but I think its
been pretty easy because
of the personalities that are
in here, said RailRiders
catcher J.R. Murphy, who
is one of those new faces
after getting promoted
from Double-A Trenton on
June 13. Nobodys selsh
and everybodys just kind
of a team guy. Even though
everybodys separately in
their careers at different
levels and different times in
their careers, were all here
for the same reason. Its
pretty easy getting along
when guys are like that.
Murphys advancement
to Triple-A was the start
of the roster reformation.
And as New York was hit
with more injuries that
meant more turnover as
outelders Thomas Neal
and Zoilo Almonte and
pitcher Chris Bootcheck
soon earned the call to the
big leagues. That trio was
all performing well at the
time and a promotion was
expected at some point.
Neal and Bootcheck, who
will represent the I.L.
in the Triple-A All-Star
Game, have since returned
to the club.
What wasnt expected
was who took their places.
Outelder Cody Grice
and inelder Dan Fiorito,
who hadnt played above
Single-A in their profes-
sional careers, started to
see signicant playing
time. While those two
did execute for the most
part when called upon for
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, it
was probably too much to
ask of those youngsters.
And so other additions
began. Randy Ruiz, a vet-
eran 35-year-old slugger
who had spent time with
11 other organizations,
arrived on the scene,
being lured away from
the Mexican League. He
offered much-needed pro-
tection for Dan Johnson,
who was getting pitched
around nearly every
game. That has paid huge
dividends as hes slugged
seven home runs in just 21
games prior to Saturday.
Then came veteran out-
elder Corey Patterson,
who signed by the Yankees
after he was released by
Seattle. His speed has
been a big boost for the
RailRiders as hes con-
stantly trying to reach
base using his bunting
skills. Hes also hit a home
run and reached base in 10
of the 14 games in which
hes played and scored
nine runs.
Left-handed reliever
Mike Zagurski, known
best for his time with
Philadelphia, was signed
the same day as Patterson
after being released by
Pittsburgh. Trades began
as well with the rst
acquisition being reliev-
er Yoshinori Tateyama
from Texas. Outelder
Fernando Martinez, a
once prized prospect in
the Mets organization,
was traded from Houston,
and veteran inelder
Brent Lillibridge was
acquired from the Chicago
Cubs.
Zagurski has gone 3-1
for the RailRiders, while
Tateyama has added a
win and whiffed nine
over his eight innings
of work. Martinez, who
is only 24-years-old, has
shown why he was a top
prospect, reaching base
in 15 of 17 games with
the RailRiders and bat-
ting .338 with three home
runs, 15 RBI and eight
runs scored while playing
a stellar right eld.
Add in Lillibridge, who
has hit ve home runs in
13 games for SWB with
a .333 average and the
RailRiders have been
streaking lately winning,
10 of 15 games to pull
within 10.5 games of rst-
place Pawtucket.
A lot of guys are say-
ing that theyre the rea-
son were starting to play
well, Murphy added.
Because weve had so
many new faces so its
fun.
After the sluggish
stretch in June, the
RailRiders may have dug
too deep of a hole to get
out of in order to reach
the playoffs. They have
just 56 games remaining
on the schedule and in
order to reach 84 wins,
which earned Pawtucket
the wild card spot last
year, SWB would have to
go 42-14 the rest of the
way.
Thats not an impossible
mark to reach since more
help will be on the way.
The RailRiders received
rehabbing Yankees Derek
Jeter and Michael Pineda
on Saturday. Its possible
they get other rehab-
bing stars such as Alex
Rodriguez and Curtis
Granderson. When those
assignments conclude that
means moves will have to
be made in New York and
that likely means addi-
tions to the roster from a
Yankees team that is start-
ing to get hot.
All that could be the
perfect recipe to get the
RailRiders on the playoff
track.
Roster shufe rejuvenating RailRiders
Thomas Neal
is seen in the
dugout during
an New York
Yankees spring
training game
against the
Detroit Tigers in
March.
AP Photo
PAGE 4C SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013 AUTO RACING www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER
But Kanaan knows that
winning at Pocono wont
be easy.
Its going to be dif-
cult, Kanaan said
after qualifying fth on
Saturday, but my boss
keeps telling me all the
time thats why I get paid
the big bucks.
The big bucks for win-
ning the Triple Crown
comes from former pro
golfer Fuzzy Zoellers vodka
company. But the idea for
the competition came from
Pocono Raceway CEO
Brandon Igdalsky.
When the conversa-
tion started about bring-
ing Indy cars back (to
Pocono), I said if we are
going to do this, we have
to bring the Triple Crown
back, Igdalsky said.
The Triple Crown
included the races at
Indianapolis, Pocono and
Ontario, Calif., from 1971
through 1980 and Indy,
Pocono and Michigan
from 1981 through 1989.
But when the Indy cars
left Pocono after the 1989
season, the Triple Crown
bonus ended.
None of that history will
mean much to Kanaan
once the green ag drops
today just after noon. He
will just be trying to gure
out a way to win the race.
And like he said, its not
going to be easy.
They dont call it the
Tricky Triangle for noth-
ing, Kanaan said of the
track. Its exciting.
Three different cor-
ners around this track, its
denitely tricky. You are
not going to have a good
car in all (the corners).
Kanaans season has
been a bit tricky itself.
He hasnt won since
Indianapolis, but does
have top-10 nishes in
the last three races.
He currently sits in
fth place in the race
for the championship, 79
points behind series lead-
er Helio Castroneves.
And for a while on
Saturday, it looked like he
would take the pole of top
qualier Marco Andretti,
but he ran into tire prob-
lems on his second quali-
fying lap.
I overcooked them,
Kanaan. I opened my lap
too quick.
When you are running
this level of downforce,
you have to save your
tires on the opening lap
and I didnt.
Still, starting in the
second row of the three-
wide starting grid doesnt
bother Kanaan. Even with
Andretti and his team-
mates Ryan Hunter-Reay
and James Hinchcliffe in
front of him, Kanaan is
condent.
I won Indy from Row
4, so I can win from Row
2 here, he said.
The three-wide start
doesnt concern Kanaan,
either.
This straight away is
longer than Indy, Kanaan
said. Its wide. I dont see
a problem doing it.
But its denitely
going to be different.
Kanaan added that the
drivers are going to have
to remember that its a
400-mile race. It cant be
won in the rst laps.
We cant get greedy,
he said. We have to
respect each other.
A little respect and a
little luck and Kanaan
will be one step closer to
$1 million.
The Sunoco Car is pret-
ty good, so were going for
the Triple Crown, he said.
Kanaan
From page 1C
Tradition
From page 1C
AP Photo
E.J. Viso hits the wall in Turn 1 during qualifying for todays Pocono IndyCar 400 on Saturday in Long
Pond.
Joe Soprano
jsoprano@timesleader.com
LONG POND
Andretti Autosport won
just about everything
there was to win Saturday
at Pocono Raceway.
First, Marco Andretti
took the pole for todays
Pocono IndyCar 400
Fueled by Sunoco and
watched as his teammates
locked down the rest of
the rst row.
Then in the Indy Lights
race Saturday afternoon,
Andretti driver Carlos
Munoz dominated, scor-
ing an easy wire-to-wire
victory.
Im sure hes really
happy to be back on the
podium, Munoz said.
Munoz, who earlier
this year nished sec-
ond at the Indianapolis
500, won by over 16 sec-
onds over second-place
nisher Sage Karam, a
high school senior from
Nazareth.
I was just really fast
all week, said Munoz. I
was just really consistent
all race.
It was the third win of
the season for Munoz,
and one that Karam knew
he was going to get all
along.
Carlos had a really great
car all weekend, Karam
said. I just really couldnt
keep up with him.
The victory enabled
Munoz to overtake
Karam in the Indy Lights
point race. He now leads
Karam by four points.
DANICA WHO?
Even though Danica
Patrick raced in Coca
Cola 400 at Daytona
Saturday night, there are
still a couple of drivers
for young women with
dreams of climbing into a
race car to look up to at
Pocono today.
Simona De Silvestro
will start on the inside
of the fourth row in her
Nuclear Energy Areva
Chevrolet.
Unfortunately for De
Silvestro, shes not a huge
fan of racing on ovals.
It is just really tricky all
the way around, said the
24-year-old from Mont-
Sur-Rolle, Switzerland,
and teammate of Indy 500
winner Tony Kanaan.
She currently sits in
18th place in the champi-
onships points race.
Also in the race is Pipa
Mann, who will start
19th.
NOT BORING AT
ALL
Helio Castroneves has
something to say about
fans that dont think
Poconos layout makes for
exciting racing.
They dont know what
they are talking about,
according to the current
IndyCar points leader.
Its extremely dif-
cult to drive this type of
track, he said. You have
to be very particular and
keep the same line for
nearly 200 laps. And the
car is very unforgiving.
For those people that
dont realize that, they
just want to see a big
mess out there.
EYE ON THE BENCH
Driver Ed Carpenter
took time out from prep-
ping for the Pocono 400
on Friday to check out
the Boston Celtics new
coach.
The Celtics hired Butler
coach Brad Stevens.
Carpenter, a Butler grad-
uate and a close friend
of Stevens, wasnt about
to miss the coachs rst
press conference with his
new team.
He did a great job, he
always does, the driver
of the No. 20 Fuzzys
Vodka Chevrolet said
Saturday morning. Im
eager to see who the next
Butler coach is.
He didnt have to wait
long.
The school named
Brandon Miller, a former
point guardfor the Bulldogs,
coach later in the day.
Carpenter was happy
for his friend.
I feel great for Brad,
he said. Its a great
opportunity for him.
HELPING HAND
A.J. Foyt may not be
at Pocono this weekend,
but that doesnt mean he
didnt give his driver any
insight on Poconos tri-
oval layout.
We talked about it
before I came here, know-
ing A.J. is the master of
it, said Takuma Sato,
who drives Foyts No.
14 ABC Supply Honda.
Obviously its a differ-
ent time and the track
has been resurfaced, but
overall the characteristics
are the same.
He gave me little tips
on how you set up the
car targeting Turn 1 and
Turn 3.
Foyt is recovering from
hip surgery at his home in
Houston. He was released
from the hospital on
Wednesday, and doctors
say it will be six to eight
weeks before he can trav-
el. He has won four times
at Pocono, including his
last victory in an Indy car
in 1981.
Sato is just glad that
Foyt had a chance to
share his wisdom.
Im happy to take
any advice he gives me
because he has great
eyes to see really whats
happening, Sato said.
Even though he drove in
a different time, his com-
ments are really accurate
and I love it.
Andretti teamcleans up at track
Its just tremendous,
said Andretti, 26, who
lives near his grandfather
in Bushkill Township. Ive
taken a huge liking to this
place the second I rolled
off here at the rst test. I
really think the IndyCar
was built for this track.
It became my favorite
track.
In the blink of an eye,
its easy to see why.
Andretti zipped around
Pocono in 40.6547 sec-
onds during his second
time around the track
Saturday, giving him the
days fastest lap and solid-
ifying his No. 1 start spot
for today with a cumula-
tive time of 1:21.3437.
His average speed was
221.273 mph, the fastest
among the eld of 24 cars.
Its so different end
to end and lap to lap,
Andretti said of the
Pocono track, which will
welcome back IndyCar
racing today for the rst
time since 1989. You real-
ly have to chase the tools
in the car. And that was
on my own, without any
other cars on the track.
A couple of his Andretti
Autosport teammates will
be chasing the leader at
the start.
Ryan Hunter-Reay and
James Hinchcliffe joined
Andretti for a sweep of
the three front-row start-
ing spots for todays 160-
lap race, which begins at
12:15 p.m.
Golng great Fuzzy
Zoeller will serve as the
races grand marshal and
honorary starter, trading
fairways for the Pocono
straightaways for a day.
I am looking forward to
that, Zoeller said. As far
as this grand marshal stuff,
what are my duties? Its
Drivers, start your engines,
right? I can do this.
Hunter-Reay did a cred-
ible job in qualifying, as
he nished with an aver-
age speed of 220.892
mph, while Hinchcliffe
averaged 220.431 mph.
I always know my
teammates are going to
be strong, Andretti said.
Some guys came out a
little too strong.
E.J. Viso, whos also
a member of Andretti
Autosport, wiggled mid-
way through Turn 1, did
a half-spin and struck the
SAFER Barrier.
The rear of the car
stepped out, said Viso,
who climbed from the car
without assistance. I con-
trolled it for a little bit and it
stepped out again. The sec-
ond time, there was nothing
I could do. I would like to
review what happened.
Alex Tagliani of Bryan
Herta Autosport also
crashed on Turn 1, brush-
ing the SAFER barrier
rst before spinning and
hitting it with the back
of his Barracuda Racing
Honda.
Herta was helped from
the wreck, but cleared to
drive today. Hell start at
the back of the eld along
with Viso.
They dont call it the
Tricky Triangle for noth-
ing, said driver Tony
Kanaan, who wll start
fth in his Verizon Team
Penske Chevrolet.
The Andrettis con-
quered it long ago.
Mario Andretti actually
ran the rst lap in an Indy
car at Pocono Raceway
long before it was paved
for racing, taking the con-
tractor for a ride to point
out some problems that
needed to be xed. The
racing legend also ran the
rst lap of the rst paved
race at Pocono and won
the Pocono pole in 1987
at 200.915 mph.
Michael Andretti won
the Pocono pole in 1986
at 205.724 mph.
Now Marco Andretti
keeps the family tradition
of pole position alive at
Pocono.
Im sure its going to
help, said Pocono Raceway
president andCEOBrandon
Igdalsky, expecting a boost
in attendance for the race
with Andretti leading it off.
Well denitely see a spike.
That name in this part of
the woods means a lot.
Knowing his grandfather
was the rst person to turn
a lap here, its pretty excit-
ing.
Not as thrilling as a vic-
tory today would be to
Marco Andretti.
It means a lot to me,
Marco said of continuing the
Andretti legacy at Pocono.
This is the rst place
where, besides Milwaukee, I
was able to get a pole where
they did. But (today) is the
one we want.
That would be icing on
the cake.
AP Photo
James Hinchcliffe, left, talks to a smiling Marco Andretti in the pits
after Andretti qualified on the pole for todays Pocono IndyCar 400
on Saturday in Long Pond.
At Pocono Raceway
Lap length: 2.5 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (25) Marco Andretti, Dallara-Chevrolet, 221.273.
2. (1) Ryan Hunter-Reay, Dallara-Chevrolet, 220.892.
3. (27) James Hinchclife, Dallara-Chevrolet, 220.431.
4. (12) Will Power, Dallara-Chevrolet, 220.286.
5. (11) Tony Kanaan, Dallara-Chevrolet, 219.625.
6. (3) Helio Castroneves, Dallara-Chevrolet, 219.581.
7. (9) Scott Dixon, Dallara-Honda, 219.5.
8. (14) Takuma Sato, Dallara-Honda, 219.124.
9. (77) Simon Pagenaud, Dallara-Honda, 218.859.
10. (78) Simona de Silvestro, Dallara-Chevrolet, 218.59.
11. (55) Tristan Vautier, Dallara-Honda, 218.575.
12. (7) Sebastien Bourdais, Dallara-Chevrolet, 218.517.
13. (83) Charlie Kimball, Dallara-Honda, 218.345.
14. (16) James Jakes, Dallara-Honda, 218.24.
15. (20) Ed Carpenter, Dallara-Chevrolet, 218.1.
16. (67) Josef Newgarden, Dallara-Honda, 217.832.
17. (15) GrahamRahal, Dallara-Honda, 217.457.
18. (10) Dario Franchitti, Dallara-Honda, 217.047.
19. (18) Pippa Mann, Dallara-Honda, 216.98.
20. (19) Justin Wilson, Dallara-Honda, 216.872.
21. (6) Sebastian Saavedra, Dallara-Chevrolet, 215.57.
22. (5) E.J. Viso, Dallara-Chevrolet.
23. (4) Ryan Briscoe, Dallara-Chevrolet.
24. (98) Alex Tagliani, Dallara-Honda.
PoCono IndyCAR 400 LInEuP
John Erzar
jerzar@timesleader.com
HELIO CASTRONEVES
No. 3
Chevrolet
Hometown:
Sao Paulo, Brazil
Points
Position: 1st
(332 pts.)
Career
Starts: 268
Career Wins:
28
Career Top-10s: 173
Notable: Castroneves paired
with dance professional Julianne
Hough to win the Dancing With
The Stars title in 2007.
RYAN HUNTER-REAY
No. 1
Chevrolet
Hometown:
Ft. Lauderdale,
Fla.
Points
Position: 2nd
(323 pts.)
Career
Starts: 142
Career Wins: 11
Career Top-10s: 70
Notable: In 2012 he became
the rst American to win the
unied IndyCar title since Al
Unser Jr. in 1994.
MARCO ANDRETTI
No. 25 Chevrolet
Hometown: Nazareth, Pa.
Points Position: 3rd (277
pts.)
Career Starts:
124
Career Wins:
2
Career Top-
10s: 58
Notable:
Andretti is the
son of Michael
Andretti and the grandson of
Mario Andretti, who won at
Pocono in 1986.
JAMES HINCHCLIFFE
No. 27 Chevrolet
Hometown: Toronto, Ontario
Points
Position: 4th
(266 pts.)
Career
Starts: 41
Career Wins:
3
Career Top-
10s: 20
Notable: Hinchcliffes three
victories this season are the
most in the series after going
winless his other two years in
IndyCar.
TONY KANAAN
No. 11 Chevrolet
Hometown: Salvador, Brazil
Points
Position: 5th
(253)
Career Starts:
267
Career Wins:
16
Career Top-
10s: 173
Notable: His
victory in the Indianapolis 500
was his rst since winning at
Iowa in 2010.
SIMON PAGENAUD
No. 77 Honda
Hometown: Montmorillon,
France
Points
Position: 6th
(241 pts.)
Career Starts:
42
Career Wins:
1
Career Top-
10s: 17
Notable: Pagenauds rst
career victory came earlier this
season at the road course in
Michigan.
SCOTT DIXON
No. 9 Honda
Hometown: Auckland, New
Zealand
Points
Position: 7th
(240)
Career Starts:
211
Career Wins:
29
Career Top-
10s: 146
Notable: Dixon has won at
least one race every year since
2005 entering this season. He is
winless this season.
TAKUMA SATO
No. 14 Honda
Hometown: Tokyo, Japan
Points Position: 8th (233)
Career Starts: 59
Career Wins: 1
Career Top-
10s: 17
Notable: Sato
raced in Formula
One from 2002-
2008, with a best
nish of third in
90 races.
JUSTIN WILSON
No. 19 Honda
Hometown: Shefeld, England
Points
Position: 9th
(227)
Career Starts:
141
Career Wins:
7
Career Top-
10s: 79
Notable:
Wilson was one of the drivers
on the winning team in the 2012
Rolex 24 Hours at Daytona.
WILL POWER
No. 12 Chevrolet
Hometown: Toowoombia,
Austrailia
Points
Position: 10th
(209)
Career Starts:
112
Career Wins: 18
Career Top-
10s: 70
Notable:
Power is seeking
his rst win of the year after win-
ning three or more races in each
of the previous three seasons.
A look at the top-10 IndyCar drivers
Wilson
Sato
Power
Pagenaud
Kanaan
Hunter-Reay
Hinchcliffe
dixon
Castroneves
Andretti
John Erzar
jerzar@timesleader.com
Race Pole Winner Second Third Fourth Fifth
1. St. Petersburg Power Hinchclife Castroneves Andretti Kanaan Dixon
2. Alabama Hunter-Reay Hunter-Reay Dixon Castroneves Kimball Power
3. Long Beach Franchetti Sato Rahal Wilson Franchetti Hildebrand
4. Sao Paulo Hunter-Reay Hinchclife Sato Andretti Servia Newgarden
5. Indianapolis Carpenter Kanaan Munoz Hunter-Reay Andretti Wilson
6. Detroit-1 Viso Conway Hunter-Reay Wilson Dixon Castroneves
7. Detroit-2 Conway Pagenaud Jakes Conway Dixon Franchetti
8. Texas Power Castroneves Hunter-Reay Kanaan Carpenter Andretti
9. Milwaukee Andretti Hunter-Reay Castroneves Power Viso Hinchclife
10. Iowa Power Hinchclife Hunter-Reay Kanaan Carpenter Rahal
Race date Laps Miles 2012 Pole 2012 WinnerTV Coverage
11. Pocono Today 160 400 no race no race noon, ABC
12. Toronto-1 July13 85 148.75 Franchetti Hunter-Reay 3p.m. NBCSports
13. Toronto-2 July14 85 148.75 onerace onerace 3p.m. NBCSports
14. Mid-Ohio Aug. 4 90 202.5 Power Dixon 3p.m. NBCSports
15. Sonoma Aug. 25 85 202.3 Power Briscoe 4p.m. NBCSports
16. Baltimore Sept. 1 75 153 Power Hunter-Reay 2p.m. NBCSports
17. Houston-1 Oct. 5 90 153 norace norace 3p.m. NBCSports
18. Houston-2 Oct. 6 90 153 norace norace 1 p.m. NBCSports
19. Fontana Oct. 19 250 500 Andretti Carpenter 8p.m. NBCSports
IZod IndyCAR RESuLTS And SCHEduLE
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER BASEBALL SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013 PAGE 5C
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Boston 54 34 .614 9-1 W-5 31-16 23-18
New York 48 39 .552 5 6-4 W-6 25-18 23-21
Baltimore 48 40 .545 6 5-5 L-3 25-17 23-23
Tampa Bay 47 40 .540 6 1 7-3 W-2 26-18 21-22
Toronto 42 45 .483 11 6 3-7 L-1 24-21 18-24
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Detroit 48 38 .558 6-4 W-5 26-16 22-22
Cleveland 45 42 .517 3 3 5-5 L-4 24-17 21-25
Kansas City 41 43 .488 6 5 6-4 W-1 22-21 19-22
Minnesota 37 47 .440 10 9 3-7 W-1 21-23 16-24
Chicago 34 49 .410 12 12 3-7 L-1 19-20 15-29
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Texas 50 36 .581 6-4 W-2 26-18 24-18
Oakland 51 37 .580 7-3 L-1 28-14 23-23
Los Angeles 41 45 .477 9 6 8-2 L-1 22-25 19-20
Seattle 38 49 .437 12 10 4-6 L-1 21-22 17-27
Houston 31 56 .356 19 17 2-8 L-2 17-32 14-24
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Atlanta 49 37 .570 6-4 L-3 29-13 20-24
Washington 45 42 .517 4 5 6-4 W-3 26-18 19-24
Philadelphia 42 45 .483 7 8 6-4 W-2 20-18 22-27
New York 36 47 .434 11 12 6-4 W-1 17-27 19-20
Miami 32 54 .372 17 17 6-4 L-2 18-24 14-30
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Pittsburgh 53 33 .616 7-3 L-1 29-15 24-18
St. Louis 52 34 .605 1 5-5 W-2 24-16 28-18
Cincinnati 50 37 .575 3 5-5 W-1 30-15 20-22
Chicago 37 48 .435 15 12 6-4 W-1 18-23 19-25
Milwaukee 34 51 .400 18 15 2-8 L-2 19-24 15-27
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Arizona 45 41 .523 4-6 W-3 22-16 23-25
Colorado 42 45 .483 3 8 3-7 L-1 26-21 16-24
Los Angeles 41 44 .482 3 8 8-2 W-1 25-21 16-23
San Francisco 39 46 .459 5 10 1-9 L-4 24-16 15-30
San Diego 40 48 .455 6 10 1-9 L-8 25-18 15-30
MLB standings stats
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Fridays Games
N.Y. Yankees 3, Baltimore 2
Detroit 7, Cleveland 0
Toronto 4, Minnesota 0
Tampa Bay 8, Chicago White Sox 3
Seattle 4, Cincinnati 2
Texas 10, Houston 5
Oakland 6, Kansas City 3
Boston 6, L.A. Angels 2
Saturdays Games
N.Y. Yankees 5, Baltimore 4
Minnesota 6, Toronto 0
Kansas City 4, Oakland 3
Detroit 9, Cleveland 4
Cincinnati 13, Seattle 4
Chicago White Sox at Tampa Bay, (n)
Houston at Texas, (n)
Boston at L.A. Angels, (n)
Sundays Games
Baltimore (Hammel 7-5) at N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda
7-6), 1:05 p.m.
Detroit (Fister 6-5) at Cleveland (Kluber 6-5),
1:05 p.m.
Minnesota (Diamond 5-7) at Toronto (Redmond
0-1), 1:07 p.m.
Seattle (J.Saunders 6-8) at Cincinnati (Arroyo
7-6), 1:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Joh.Danks 2-5) at Tampa
Bay (Price 2-4), 1:40 p.m.
Oakland (Griffn 6-6) at Kansas City (Mendoza
2-4), 2:10 p.m.
Houston (Bedard 3-4) at Texas (Grimm 7-6), 3:05
p.m.
Boston (Lackey 6-5) at L.A. Angels (Weaver 2-4),
8:05 p.m.
Mondays Games
Detroit at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
Kansas City at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Oakland at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
Texas at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Minnesota at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m.
Boston at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Fridays Games
Pittsburgh 6, Chicago Cubs 2
Philadelphia 5, Atlanta 4
Washington 8, San Diego 5
Seattle 4, Cincinnati 2
N.Y. Mets 12, Milwaukee 5
St. Louis 4, Miami 1
Arizona 5, Colorado 0
L.A. Dodgers 10, San Francisco 2
Saturdays Games
St. Louis 5, Miami 4
Chicago Cubs 4, Pittsburgh 1
Washington 5, San Diego 4
Cincinnati 13, Seattle 4
Atlanta at Philadelphia, (n)
L.A. Dodgers at San Francisco, (n)
N.Y. Mets at Milwaukee, (n)
Colorado at Arizona, (n)
Sundays Games
Seattle (J.Saunders 6-8) at Cincinnati (Arroyo
7-6), 1:10 p.m.
Atlanta (Medlen 6-7) at Philadelphia (Pettibone
4-3), 1:35 p.m.
San Diego (Erlin 1-1) at Washington (Strasburg
4-6), 1:35 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Hefner 3-6) at Milwaukee (Gorzelanny
1-1), 2:10 p.m.
Miami (Fernandez 5-4) at St. Louis (Lynn 10-3),
2:15 p.m.
Pittsburgh (A.J.Burnett 4-6) at Chicago Cubs (Vil-
lanueva 2-4), 2:20 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 7-5) at San Francisco
(Gaudin 2-1), 4:05 p.m.
Colorado (Oswalt 0-3) at Arizona (Corbin 9-1),
4:10 p.m.
Mondays Games
Oakland at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
Washington at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Miami, 7:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m.
Cincinnati at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
Colorado at San Diego, 10:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.
Yankees 5, Orioles 4
Baltimore New York
ab r hbi ab r h bi
Markks rf 4 0 0 0 Gardnr cf 4 0 0 0
Machd 3b 4 0 1 0 ISuzuki rf 4 0 1 1
A.Jones cf 4 1 2 0 Cano 2b 3 0 1 1
C.Davis 1b 4 1 1 2 Hafner dh 3 1 0 0
BRorts dh 4 0 1 0 Almont lf 3 1 1 0
Hardy ss 4 1 1 0 V.Wells ph-lf 1 0 0 0
Reimld lf 3 1 1 0 Overay 1b 4 1 3 0
McLoth ph 1 0 0 0 L.Cruz 3b 3 0 1 1
ACasill 2b 3 0 2 1 Nunez ss 3 1 2 2
Flahrty ph 1 0 1 0 CStwrt c 2 1 1 0
Tegrdn c 3 0 1 1
ChDckr ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 36 411 4 Totals 30 510 5
Baltimore 210 100 000 4
New York 020 021 00x 5
EPettitte (2). DPBaltimore 1, New York 1.
LOBBaltimore 5, New York 8. 2BMachado
(39), Hardy (16), A.Casilla (4). HRC.Davis (33).
SBA.Casilla (6). CSTeagarden (1). SGard-
ner, L.Cruz. SFNunez.
IP H R ER BB SO
Baltimore
Tillman L,10-3 5 1-3 10 5 5 2 3
Matusz 1 0 0 0 1 1
Gausman 1 2-3 0 0 0 1 1
New York
Pettitte W,6-6 6 2-3 9 4 3 0 4
Kelley H,4 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
D.Robertson H,20 1 1 0 0 0 1
Rivera S,29-30 1 1 0 0 0 1
PBTeagarden.
UmpiresHome, Jerry Meals; First, Gerry Da-
vis; Second, Chris Conroy; Third, Gary Darling.
T3:11. A42,678 (50,291).
Nationals 5, Padres 4
San Diego Washington
ab r hbi ab r h bi
EvCarr ss 5 0 0 0 Span cf 3 2 2 0
Venale cf 4 0 0 0 Dsmnd ss 4 1 2 0
Quentin lf 4 1 2 0 Harper lf 2 0 1 3
Headly 3b 4 1 1 0 Zmrmn 3b 4 0 2 1
Guzmn 1b 4 1 2 3 AdLRc 1b 4 1 2 1
Denorf rf 4 0 0 0 Werth rf 3 0 1 0
Forsyth 2b 3 1 1 0 Rendon 2b 4 0 1 0
Grandl c 1 0 0 0 KSuzuk c 4 1 1 0
Hundly c 3 0 2 0 Zmrmn p 2 0 0 0
Marqus p 2 0 1 1 Ohlndrf p 0 0 0 0
Ciriaco ph 0 0 0 0 Berndn ph 1 0 0 0
Vincent p 0 0 0 0 Storen p 0 0 0 0
Thtchr p 0 0 0 0 RSorin p 0 0 0 0
Grgrsn p 0 0 0 0
Kotsay ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 35 4 9 4 Totals 31 512 5
San Diego 000 013 000 4
Washington 001 110 20x 5
DPSan Diego 3. LOBSan Diego 6,
Washington 6. 2BQuentin (15), Guzman (11),
Marquis (1), K.Suzuki (11). HRGuzman (5),
Ad.LaRoche (13). SBForsythe (3), Span (9),
Ad.LaRoche (3). SCiriaco. SFHarper.
IP H R ER BB SO
San Diego
Marquis 6 8 3 3 3 3
Vincent L,2-1 H,2 1-3 2 2 2 0 1
Thatcher BS,2-2 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Gregerson 1 1-3 2 0 0 0 1
Washington
Zimmermann 5 1-3 5 3 3 1 4
Ohlendorf W,2-0 BS,1-11 2-3 2 1 1 0 1
Storen H,12 1 0 0 0 0 1
R.Soriano S,24-27 1 2 0 0 0 0
WPThatcher.
UmpiresHome, Bruce Dreckman; First,
Quinn Wolcott; Second, David Rackley; Third,
Tim Welke.
T3:15. A33,314 (41,418).
Cardinals 5, Marlins 4
Miami St. Louis
ab r hbi ab r h bi
Ruggin lf 4 0 0 0 MCrpnt 2b 4 1 1 1
Polanc 3b 2 1 0 0 Beltran rf 4 0 1 1
Stanton rf 3 0 1 0 Hollidy lf 3 0 0 0
Morrsn 1b 4 1 1 2 Craig 1b 3 0 1 0
Ozuna cf 4 0 0 0 Freese 3b 4 0 0 0
Dietrch 2b 4 2 2 1 Descals ss 3 0 0 0
Hchvrr ss 4 0 1 1 T.Cruz c 4 1 1 0
Brantly c 4 0 1 0 Jay cf 3 1 1 0
Eovaldi p 2 0 0 0 J.Kelly p 2 1 1 0
MDunn p 0 0 0 0 Maness p 0 0 0 0
Qualls p 0 0 0 0 MAdms ph 1 1 1 2
Dobbs ph 1 0 0 0 Rosnthl p 0 0 0 0
ARams p 0 0 0 0 Mujica p 0 0 0 0
SRonsn ph 1 0 1 0
Totals 32 4 6 4 Totals 32 5 8 4
Miami 012 100 000 4
St. Louis 002 000 201 5
Two outs when winning run scored.
EStanton (7), Descalso 2 (7). DPMiami 2,
St. Louis 1. LOBMiami 5, St. Louis 5. 2BDiet-
rich (9). 3BM.Carpenter (4). HRMorrison (4),
Dietrich (8), Ma.Adams (7). SEovaldi.
IP H R ER BB SO
Miami
Eovaldi 6 2-3 5 3 3 3 3
M.Dunn BS,2-3 2-3 1 1 1 0 0
Qualls 2-3 1 0 0 0 1
A.Ramos L,3-3 2-3 1 1 0 1 0
St. Louis
J.Kelly 6 5 4 4 2 4
Maness 1 1 0 0 0 0
Rosenthal 1 0 0 0 1 1
Mujica W,1-1 1 0 0 0 0 0
UmpiresHome, Bill Welke; First, Adrian
Johnson; Second, Brian ONora; Third, Fieldin
Culbreth.
T2:44. A45,475 (43,975).
Reds 13, Mariners 4
Seattle Cincinnati
ab r hbi ab r h bi
BMiller 2b 2 1 0 0 Choo cf 4 2 2 1
EnChvz rf 4 1 2 0 DRonsn lf 5 1 1 0
Seager 3b 3 1 2 3 Votto 1b 3 1 0 0
KMorls 1b 5 0 0 0 Phillips 2b 4 1 1 1
MSndrs lf 5 0 0 0 Bruce rf 4 4 2 3
Zunino c 5 0 1 0 Hannhn 3b 4 2 3 2
Ackley cf 4 1 2 0 CIzturs ss 4 0 2 3
Ryan ss 2 0 1 1 LeCure p 0 0 0 0
Bndrm p 2 0 0 0 Simon p 0 0 0 0
Frnkln ph 1 0 0 0 Heisey ph 1 0 0 0
Capps p 0 0 0 0 Ondrsk p 0 0 0 0
Smoak ph 1 0 0 0 Hanign c 3 1 1 1
Farqhr p 0 0 0 0 Latos p 3 1 1 2
MParr p 0 0 0 0
Cozart ph-ss 2 0 0 0
Totals 34 4 8 4 Totals 37131313
Seattle 201 001 000 4
Cincinnati 010 323 04x 13
EEn.Chavez (2), B.Miller (1). LOBSeattle
11, Cincinnati 8. 2BAckley (6), Ryan (8), Bruce
(26), Hannahan (4), C.Izturis (4), Hanigan (6), La-
tos (2). HRSeager (13). SFSeager, Phillips.
IP H R ER BB SO
Seattle
Bonderman L,1-3 5 7 6 6 5 4
Capps 2 4 3 3 0 0
Farquhar 1 2 4 2 2 2
Cincinnati
Latos W,8-2 6 6 4 4 4 11
M.Parra 1 1 0 0 0 2
LeCure 2-3 1 0 0 2 1
Simon H,3 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Ondrusek 1 0 0 0 1 0
WPBonderman, Latos, M.Parra, Ondrusek.
UmpiresHome, Alan Porter; First, Mike Esta-
brook; Second, Jerry Layne; Third, Hunter Wen-
delstedt.
T3:21. A34,965 (42,319).
Twins 6, Blue Jays 0
Minnesota Toronto
ab r hbi ab r h bi
Dozier 2b 4 1 2 4 Reyes ss 4 0 0 0
Carroll 3b 4 1 1 1 Bautist rf 4 0 0 0
Mauer c 4 0 1 1 Encrnc 1b 3 0 0 0
Mornea 1b 4 0 0 0 Lind dh 3 0 0 0
Arcia lf 2 0 0 0 ClRsms cf 2 0 0 0
Thoms lf 1 0 0 0 RDavis lf 3 0 1 0
Plouffe dh 4 0 0 0 MIzturs 3b 3 0 3 0
Parmel rf 3 0 2 0 Thole c 3 0 0 0
Hicks cf 3 2 1 0 Kawsk 2b 3 0 0 0
EEscor ss 4 2 0 0
Totals 33 6 7 6 Totals 28 0 4 0
Minnesota 003 000 300 6
Toronto 000 000 000 0
EE.Escobar (4). DPMinnesota 2, Toronto
1. LOBMinnesota 3, Toronto 4. 2BCarroll (5),
Parmelee 2 (12). HRDozier (8). SBArcia (1).
CSReyes (1), R.Davis (3).
IP H R ER BB SO
Minnesota
Pelfrey W,4-6 6 3 0 0 3 2
Thielbar 1 0 0 0 0 0
Burton 1 1 0 0 0 0
Perkins 1 0 0 0 0 1
Toronto
Dickey L,8-9 7 7 6 6 2 3
Oliver 1 0 0 0 0 1
J.Perez 1 0 0 0 0 2
HBPby Dickey (Arcia). PBThole.
UmpiresHome, Brian Knight; First, Paul Em-
mel; Second, Dan Iassogna; Third, Mark Carlson.
T2:33. A37,034 (49,282).
Cubs 4, Pirates 1
Pittsburgh Chicago
ab r hbi ab r h bi
SMarte lf 4 0 2 0 Borbon cf 2 1 0 0
Walker 2b 2 0 0 0 StCastr ss 4 0 0 0
Inge 2b 2 0 0 0 Rizzo 1b 4 1 1 0
McCtch cf 4 0 2 0 ASorin lf 4 2 2 4
GJones 1b 3 0 0 0 Valuen 3b 3 0 2 0
PAlvrz 3b 4 1 1 1 Schrhlt rf 3 0 0 0
McKnr c 4 0 0 0 Barney 2b 4 0 0 0
Tabata rf 2 0 0 0 Castillo c 2 0 2 0
Mercer ss 3 0 0 0 EJcksn p 2 0 0 0
Morton p 2 0 0 0 Russell p 0 0 0 0
JuWlsn p 0 0 0 0 Hairstn ph 1 0 0 0
Snider ph 1 0 0 0 Guerrir p 0 0 0 0
Morris p 0 0 0 0 Gregg p 0 0 0 0
Totals 31 1 5 1 Totals 29 4 7 4
Pittsburgh 000 100 000 1
Chicago 000 220 00x 4
EMcKenry (2). DPPittsburgh 2. LOB
Pittsburgh 5, Chicago 6. 2BRizzo (25), Cas-
tillo (15). HRP.Alvarez (22), A.Soriano 2 (12).
SBS.Marte 2 (27), Tabata (2), Borbon 2 (6).
CSS.Marte (9).
IP H R ER BB SO
Pittsburgh
Morton L,1-2 6 7 4 4 3 6
Ju.Wilson 1 0 0 0 0 0
Morris 1 0 0 0 1 0
Chicago
E.Jackson W,5-10 5 2-3 4 1 1 2 3
Russell H,12 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Guerrier H,4 2 0 0 0 0 2
Gregg S,15-16 1 1 0 0 0 0
HBPby Morton (Schierholtz). WPE.Jack-
son.
UmpiresHome, Gary Cederstrom; First, Ker-
win Danley; Second, Lance Barksdale; Third, Vic
Carapazza.
T2:54. A36,590 (41,019).
Royals 4, Athletics 3
Oakland Kansas City
ab r hbi ab r h bi
Crisp cf 4 0 0 0 AGordn lf 2 0 0 0
Jaso c 4 1 1 0 Hosmer 1b 3 0 0 1
Cespds dh 3 0 1 0 BButler dh 4 0 0 1
Moss 1b 4 0 0 0 S.Perez c 4 0 0 0
Dnldsn 3b 3 2 2 2 Lough rf 4 0 0 0
S.Smith lf 4 0 1 0 MTejad 2b 4 0 1 0
Reddck rf 4 0 1 1 AEscor pr-ss 0 1 0 0
Rosales ss 3 0 1 0 Mostks 3b 3 1 1 1
Lowrie ph 1 0 0 0 EJhnsn ss-2b 3 1 1 0
Sogard 2b 4 0 1 0 Dyson cf 3 1 3 1
Totals 34 3 8 3 Totals 30 4 6 4
Oakland 011 001 000 3
Kansas City 001 100 11x 4
ERosales (6), J.Parker 2 (2), Dyson (2).
DPOakland 1, Kansas City 1. LOBOakland 6,
Kansas City 9. 2BSogard (12), Dyson (6). HR
Donaldson (15), Moustakas (6). SBA.Gordon
(5), A.Escobar (12), Dyson 2 (12). SFHosmer.
IP H R ER BB SO
Oakland
J.Parker 6 1-3 5 3 2 3 4
Blevins BS,4-4 1-3 0 0 0 1 0
Cook L,1-2 1 1 1 0 2 0
Doolittle 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Kansas City
E.Santana 7 7 3 3 2 5
Crow W,6-3 1 1 0 0 0 2
G.Holland S,20-22 1 0 0 0 0 3
UmpiresHome, Chad Fairchild; First, Mar-
ty Foster; Second, Eric Cooper; Third, Paul
Schrieber.
T2:46. A16,606 (37,903).
Tigers 9, Indians 4
Detroit Cleveland
ab r hbi ab r h bi
AJcksn cf 3 2 2 1 Bourn cf 3 0 1 1
TrHntr rf 5 1 3 3 Raburn rf 1 1 1 2
MiCarr 3b 4 1 1 2 ACarer ss 3 0 0 0
D.Kelly 3b 0 0 0 0 Aviles ss 2 0 0 0
Fielder 1b 5 1 1 1 Kipnis 2b 4 0 0 0
VMrtnz dh 4 1 1 0 Swisher 1b 3 1 2 1
JhPerlt ss 5 0 2 1 Brantly lf 4 0 0 0
Dirks lf 5 1 2 0 CSantn c 4 0 0 0
Avila c 3 1 1 0 Giambi dh 3 0 0 0
RSantg 2b 4 1 0 0 MrRynl ph 1 0 0 0
Chsnhll 3b 3 1 2 0
Stubbs rf-cf 3 1 2 0
Totals 38 913 8 Totals 34 4 8 4
Detroit 004 302 000 9
Cleveland 001 001 002 4
EMi.Cabrera (10), Carrasco (2). DPDetroit
2. LOBDetroit 9, Cleveland 7. 2BA.Jackson
(12), Tor.Hunter (22), V.Martinez (15), Chisenhall
(10), Stubbs (15). 3BTor.Hunter (2). HRTor.
Hunter (5), Mi.Cabrera (27), Fielder (15), Raburn
(10), Swisher (9). SBStubbs (9). SR.Santia-
go. SFA.Jackson.
IP H R ER BB SO
Detroit
Ani.Sanchez W,7-5 5 3 1 1 1 4
Coke 1 2-3 2 1 1 0 1
Putkonen 1-3 0 0 0 2 0
Smyly 1 1 0 0 0 1
D.Downs 1 2 2 2 0 1
Cleveland
Carrasco L,0-4 3 1-3 10 7 6 1 2
R.Hill 2-3 0 0 0 0 2
Albers 2 2 2 2 0 1
Shaw 1 0 0 0 2 1
Pestano 1 0 0 0 1 1
C.Perez 1 1 0 0 1 0
HBPby Ani.Sanchez (Swisher). WPPut-
konen, D.Downs.
UmpiresHome, Joe West; First, Sam Hol-
brook; Second, Andy Fletcher; Third, Rob Drake.
T3:16. A28,054 (42,241).
THURSDAYS LATE BOXES
Athletics 1, Cubs 0
Chicago Oakland
ab r hbi ab r h bi
Valuen 3b 3 0 0 0 Crisp cf 4 0 0 0
StCastr ss 3 0 1 0 Lowrie 2b-ss 3 0 0 0
Schrhlt rf 4 0 0 0 Dnldsn 3b 4 0 1 0
ASorin lf 4 0 1 0 Cespds lf 4 0 0 0
Rizzo 1b 2 0 0 0 Freimn 1b 2 0 1 0
DNavrr dh 3 0 0 0 Moss ph-1b 1 0 0 0
Bogsvc cf 1 0 0 0 CYoung rf 3 0 1 0
Borbon cf 2 0 0 0 DNorrs c 2 1 1 0
Barney 2b 3 0 0 0 S.Smith dh 3 0 1 0
Castillo c 3 0 0 0 Rosales ss 2 0 0 0
Sogard ph-2b 0 0 0 0
Totals 28 0 2 0 Totals 28 1 5 0
Chicago 000 000 000 0
Oakland 000 000 10x 1
ELowrie (12). LOBChicago 4, Oakland 6.
CSA.Soriano (4), C.Young (2).
IP H R ER BB SO
Chicago
Tr.Wood 6 3 0 0 1 5
Guerrier L,2-4 1 2 1 0 2 0
Strop 1 0 0 0 0 0
Oakland
Straily W,5-2 7 1 0 0 3 6
Cook H,12 1 0 0 0 0 0
Balfour S,21-21 1 1 0 0 0 1
PBCastillo.
UmpiresHome, Brian Gorman. First, Manny
Gonzalez. Second, Tony Randazzo. Third, Larry
Vanover.
T2:42. A26,967 (35,067).
Angels 6, Cardinals 5
St. Louis Los Angeles
ab r hbi ab r hbi
MCrpnt 2b 4 0 0 1 Shuck lf 3 0 1 0
Beltran rf 5 1 2 0 Trout cf 4 0 1 2
Hollidy dh 3 1 0 0 Pujols dh 4 1 1 0
Craig lf 4 1 2 3 Hamltn rf 3 1 1 2
YMolin c 4 0 1 0 HKndrc 2b 4 1 1 0
MAdms 1b 4 1 0 0 Trumo 1b 4 1 2 1
Freese 3b 4 0 1 0 Callasp 3b 4 1 1 0
Descals ss 4 1 3 1 Conger c 4 0 0 0
Jay cf 3 0 1 0 Aybar ss 4 1 3 1
Totals 35 510 5 Totals 34 611 6
St. Louis 000 311 000 5
Los Angeles 002 100 003 6
Two outs when winning run scored.
ETrumbo (4). DPSt. Louis 2, Los Angeles
2. LOBSt. Louis 6, Los Angeles 4. 2BDescal-
so (14). HRCraig (10), Hamilton (11), Trumbo
(19). SBJay (3). SShuck. SFM.Carpenter.
IP H R ER BB SO
St. Louis
Wainwright 8 7 4 4 1 3
Mujica L,0-1 BS,1-22 2-3 4 2 2 0 0
Los Angeles
Blanton 5 2-3 9 5 4 1 7
Kohn 1 1-3 0 0 0 1 2
Jepsen 1 0 0 0 0 2
S.Downs W,2-2 1 1 0 0 0 1
Wainwright pitched to 1 batter in the 9th.
UmpiresHome, Adam Hamari. First, Bill
Miller. Second, Todd Tichenor. Third, Dale Scott.
T2:51. A42,707 (45,483).
Rockies 9, Dodgers 5
Los Angeles Colorado
ab r hbi ab r hbi
M.Ellis 2b 4 0 0 0 LeMahi 2b 4 1 3 0
Puig rf 5 1 1 1 Rutledg ss 4 2 2 1
AdGnzl 1b 5 1 4 2 CGnzlz lf 3 1 1 1
HRmrz ss 4 0 1 0 CDckrs ph-lf 1 0 0 0
Ethier lf 5 1 2 0 Cuddyr rf 3 3 2 3
Kemp cf 5 1 2 2 WRosr c 3 1 1 2
Fdrwcz c 5 0 1 0 Helton 1b 3 0 1 1
Punto 3b 3 1 1 0 Arenad 3b 4 0 0 0
Capuan p 2 0 0 0 Colvin cf 4 0 1 1
League p 0 0 0 0 Chacin p 3 1 1 0
Howell p 0 0 0 0 Outmn p 0 0 0 0
Schmkr ph 1 0 0 0 Escaln p 0 0 0 0
Withrw p 0 0 0 0 Belisle p 0 0 0 0
HrstnJr ph 1 0 1 0 Pachec ph 1 0 0 0
Belisari p 0 0 0 0 RBtncr p 0 0 0 0
Totals 40 513 5 Totals 33 912 9
Los Angeles 020 002 001 5
Colorado 104 030 10x 9
EH.Ramirez (3). LOBLos Angeles 11, Col-
orado 5. 2BAd.Gonzalez (19), Hairston Jr. (5),
LeMahieu (10), Rutledge (5), C.Gonzalez (21),
Cuddyer (17). HRAd.Gonzalez (13), Kemp (4),
Cuddyer (15). CSLeMahieu (2). SRutledge.
SFW.Rosario.
IP H R ER BB SO
Los Angeles
Capuano L,2-6 4 1-3 7 6 5 1 3
League 1-3 2 2 2 1 0
Howell 1-3 1 0 0 0 0
Withrow 2 1 1 1 1 4
Belisario 1 1 0 0 0 0
Colorado
Chacin W,8-3 5 2-3 9 4 4 3 4
Outman 2-3 1 0 0 0 1
Escalona 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
Belisle 1 1 0 0 0 1
R.Betancourt 1 2 1 1 0 0
UmpiresHome, Mark Wegner. First, Laz Diaz.
Second, Tim Timmons. Third, Mike Winters.
T3:19. A48,794 (50,398).
Rangers 5, Mariners 4
Seattle Texas
ab r hbi ab r hbi
Bay rf 4 0 1 0 Kinsler 2b 4 0 1 1
Ackley ph-cf 1 0 0 0 DvMrp lf 4 0 0 0
Frnkln 2b 5 1 2 0 N.Cruz rf 4 0 0 0
Ibanez lf 5 1 4 3 ABeltre 3b 4 2 3 2
KMorls dh 3 0 0 0 Przyns c 4 1 1 0
Seager 3b 5 1 3 0 Brkmn dh 2 0 0 0
Smoak 1b 5 0 2 0 EBeltre pr-dh 0 1 0 0
EnChvz cf-rf 3 0 1 0 Morlnd 1b 3 1 1 1
HBlanc c 4 0 0 0 Andrus ss 2 0 1 1
MSndrs ph 1 0 0 0 LMartn cf 3 0 1 0
Ryan ss 3 0 0 0
BMiller ph-ss 1 1 1 0
Totals 40 414 3 Totals 30 5 8 5
Seattle 000 001 210 4
Texas 010 000 40x 5
EFranklin (6), Kinsler (9), Andrus (8). DP
Seattle 2, Texas 1. LOBSeattle 13, Texas 3.
2BSeager (24), Smoak (9). HRIbanez (21),
A.Beltre 2 (16). SFAndrus.
IP H R ER BB SO
Seattle
Iwakuma L,7-4 6 5 4 4 1 2
Furbush BS,3-3 1-3 1 1 0 0 0
Farquhar 1 2 0 0 0 0
O.Perez 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Texas
M.Perez 5 1-3 8 1 0 2 4
Frasor 1 0 0 0 0 1
Cotts 0 3 2 2 1 0
Lindblom W,1-2 2-3 0 0 0 1 1
Scheppers H,17 1 2 1 0 0 2
Nathan S,28-29 1 1 0 0 0 2
Yankees slip
past Orioles
The Associated Press
NEW YORK Andy
Pettitte stopped the Orioles
once again, Eduardo Nunez
returned with a go-ahead hit
and the New York Yankees beat
Baltimore 5-4 Saturday for a
season-high sixth straight win.
The Yankees overcame Chris
Davis major league-leading
33rd home run and yet another
double from Manny Machado,
who was celebrating his 21st
birthday. The Orioles have lost
four of ve.
The 41-year-old Pettitte
(6-6) earned his 251st win,
tying Hall of Famer Bob
Gibson for 44th place on the
all-time list.
Pettitte stretched his unbeat-
en streak against Baltimore
to 11 starts dating to 2007,
winning eight times. Overall,
he is 28-6 against the Orioles
only Yankees great Whitey
Ford (30) has beaten the Birds
more often since the fran-
chise moved from St. Louis to
Baltimore for the 1954 season.
Mariano Rivera worked the
ninth for his 29th save.
Nunez came off the 60-day
disabled list before the game
and played for the rst time
since a strain on his left side
slowed him in early May. His
key hit helped end a seven-
game winning streak by Chris
Tillman (10-3). Nunez had a
sac y in the second, singled
and scored in the fth and
knocked in the go-ahead run
with a single in the sixth.
tigers 9, indians 4
CLEVELAND Torii
Hunter drove in three runs,
Miguel Cabrera cracked a two-
run homer and Detroit domi-
nated Cleveland for its fth
straight win.
Hunter hit a two-run homer,
tripled and doubled as the
Tigers won their seventh
straight over the Indians and
increased their lead in the AL
Central to 3 games. Detroit
is 8-2 against Cleveland, and
the Tigers have outscored the
Indians 16-4 in winning the
rst two of the four-game set.
Anibal Sanchez (7-5)
returned from the disabled list
and pitched ve innings for his
rst win since June 4.
twins 6, Blue Jays 0
TORONTO Brian Dozier
hit a three-run home run, Mike
Pelfrey and three relievers
combined for a four-hitter and
Minnesota beat Toronto.
Dozier had two hits and four
RBIs, connecting off knuck-
leballer R.A. Dickey for his
eighth homer as the Twins
snapped a six-game skid and
won for just the fourth time in
14 games.
Minnesota came in hav-
ing lost 17 of 23 to Toronto,
including eight of nine at
Rogers Centre.
Pelfrey (4-6) snapped an
eight-start winless streak to
earn his rst victory since May
5 at Cleveland. He allowed
three hits in six innings,
walked three and struck out
two.
Dickey (8-9) gave up six
runs and seven hits in seven
innings. He struck out three.
Royals 4, athletics 3
KANSAS CITY, Mo.
Jarrod Dyson delivered an
ineld single with the bases
loaded and two outs in the
eighth inning, giving Kansas
City a scrappy victory over
Oakland.
The Royals had rallied to tie
the game on a sacrice y by
Eric Hosmer in the seventh,
and then loaded the bases on
an error and a pair of walks by
reliever Ryan Cook.
natiOnaL LEagUE
Cubs 4, Pirates 1
CHICAGO Alfonso
Soriano hit two-run homers in
consecutive innings to lead the
Chicago Cubs to a victory over
the Pittsburgh Pirates.
Edwin Jackson and three
relievers combined on a ve-
hitter, and the Cubs handed
the Pirates their third loss in
14 games. Pittsburgh came in
with baseballs best record and
a seven-game, road-winning
streak.
Soriano hit a drive off
Charlie Morton in the fourth
and a shot into the bleachers
in left to make it 4-1 in the
fth.
That was enough for
Jackson (5-10), who won his
second straight start. He held
the Pirates to one run and four
hits in 5 2-3 innings.
Matt Guerrier worked two
scoreless innings, and Kevin
Gregg came on in the ninth for
his 15th save in 16 chances.
Morton (1-2) pitched six
innings for Pittsburgh, allow-
ing four runs and seven hits.
He struck out six and walked
three.
Cardinals 5, Marlins 4
ST. LOUIS Jon Jay scored
from rst on right elder
Giancarlo Stantons throwing
error on Shane Robinsons sin-
gle with two outs in the ninth
inning, giving St. Louis a win
over Miami.
Edward Mujica (1-1) worked
a scoreless ninth for the
Cardinals after Matt Adams
pinch-hit, two-run homer tied
it two innings earlier.
Jay drew a full-count walk off
A.J. Ramos (3-3) with two outs
in the ninth and took third eas-
ily on Robinsons pinch-hit sin-
gle. He scored without a play
after Stanton hesitated before
throwing a relay that skipped
under Logan Morrisons glove
at rst base.
nationals 5, Padres 4
WASHINGTON Bryce
Harper drove in three runs
after talking his way into the
lineup, Ryan Zimmerman
knocked in the go-ahead run,
and Washington rallied to beat
San Diego.
Adam LaRoche homered,
and Denard Span and Ian
Desmond added two hits
apiece as the Nationals won
their third straight. Since
returning from the disabled
list and homering in his rst
at-bat Monday night against
Milwaukee, Harper had gone
0 for 18 before his RBI single.
Jesus Guzman hit a three-
run homer and doubled for
San Diego.
Ross Ohlendorf (2-0) got
the win and Rafael Soriano
pitched the ninth for his 24th
save.
intERLEagUE
Reds 13, Mariners 4
CINCINNATI Cesar
Izturis drove in three runs,
matching his season total, and
Mat Latos doubled home two
more for Cincinnati, which ral-
lied for a win over Seattle.
The Reds earned only their
second victory over Seattle.
The Mariners are 9-2 overall in
the interleague series.
Cincinnati manager Dusty
Baker decided to give Izturis
his ninth start at shortstop so
he could get some at-bats.
new York Yankees Lyle Overbay (55) dives past Baltimore Orioles catcher
taylor teagarden to score on a single by Eduardo nunez during the sixth inning
saturday in new York.
AP photo
Cotts pitched to 4 batters in the 7th.
Iwakuma pitched to 3 batters in the 7th.
UmpiresHome, Eric Cooper. First, Paul
Schrieber. Second, Chad Fairchild. Third, Marty
Foster.
T3:13. A46,476 (48,114).
WEDNESDAYS LATE BOXES
Yankees 3, Twins 2
New York Minnesota
ab r hbi ab r hbi
Gardnr cf 3 1 0 0 Dozier 2b 3 1 1 0
ISuzuki rf 4 1 1 0 Mauer dh 5 0 1 1
Cano 2b 3 1 2 2 Doumit c 4 0 1 0
Hafner dh 4 0 1 0 Mornea 1b 4 0 0 0
Almont lf 4 0 0 0 Plouffe 3b 4 1 1 1
Overay 1b 3 0 0 1 Arcia lf 4 0 1 0
CStwrt c 4 0 0 0 Hicks cf 3 0 0 0
L.Cruz ss 3 0 0 0 Thoms rf 4 0 2 0
DAdms 3b 2 0 0 0 Flormn ss 3 0 0 0
Parmel ph 1 0 1 0
EEscor pr 0 0 0 0
Totals 30 3 4 3 Totals 35 2 8 2
New York 000 003 000 3
Minnesota 001 010 000 2
EL.Cruz (1). DPNew York 1. LOBNew
York 4, Minnesota 9. 2BI.Suzuki (8), Cano (17),
Mauer (25). HRPlouffe (8). SBDozier (7),
Hicks (5). SFOverbay.
IP H R ER BB SO
New York
Sabathia W,9-6 7 7 2 2 3 9
D.Robertson H,19 1 0 0 0 0 1
Rivera S,28-29 1 1 0 0 0 1
Minnesota
Walters L,2-5 5 4 3 3 3 3
Thielbar 2 0 0 0 0 3
Fien 1 0 0 0 0 1
Perkins 1 0 0 0 0 1
Walters pitched to 4 batters in the 6th.
UmpiresHome, Jeff Nelson. First, Ed Hickox.
Second, Jim Joyce. Third, Cory Blaser.
T2:49. A38,457 (39,021).
Diamondbacks 5, Mets 3
Arizona New York
ab r hbi ab r hbi
Campn cf-lf 4 1 0 0 EYong lf 4 0 2 0
A.Hill 2b 5 1 2 0 DnMrp 2b 4 1 2 1
ErChvz 1b 5 0 2 1 DWrght 3b 4 1 2 1
MMntr c 2 1 2 1 Byrd rf 4 0 1 0
Prado 3b 4 1 1 0 Parnell p 0 0 0 0
Kubel lf 3 0 0 0 Satin 1b 4 1 1 1
Pollock pr-cf 1 0 0 0 Niwnhs cf 4 0 1 0
C.Ross rf 4 1 1 3 Buck c 4 0 1 0
Pnngtn ss 4 0 1 0 Quntnll ss 3 0 0 0
Delgad p 3 0 1 0 Edgin p 0 0 0 0
Gldsch ph 1 0 0 0 ABrwn rf 1 0 0 0
DHrndz p 0 0 0 0 Harvey p 2 0 0 0
Bell p 0 0 0 0 Rice p 0 0 0 0
Ardsm p 0 0 0 0
Vldspn ss 1 0 0 0
Totals 36 510 5 Totals 35 310 3
Arizona 000 003 200 5
New York 000 200 010 3
ED.Wright (8). DPArizona 1, New York 1.
LOBArizona 10, New York 5. 2BEr.Chavez
(8), D.Wright (18). HRC.Ross (5), Dan.Murphy
(6), D.Wright (13), Satin (1). SBCampana (1).
SFM.Montero.
IP H R ER BB SO
Arizona
Delgado W,1-2 7 7 2 2 0 9
D.Hernandez H,10 1 2 1 1 0 0
Bell S,15-18 1 1 0 0 0 1
New York
Harvey L,7-2 6 9 5 5 3 9
Rice 1-3 0 0 0 2 0
Aardsma 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
Edgin 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 1
Parnell 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Harvey pitched to 3 batters in the 7th.
UmpiresHome, Quinn Wolcott. First, Tim
Welke. Second, Mike Everitt. Third, Bruce Dreck-
man.
T3:17. A41,257 (41,922).
Astros 4, Rays 1
Tampa Bay Houston
ab r hbi ab r hbi
DJnngs cf 3 1 1 0 Altuve 2b 3 0 1 0
Joyce lf 3 0 2 0 Wallac 1b 3 0 1 0
Zobrist 2b 3 0 0 1 Elmore pr-lf 1 1 0 0
Longori dh 4 0 0 0 JCastro c 4 1 1 0
Loney 1b 4 0 2 0 Carter lf-1b 3 2 2 4
WMyrs rf 4 0 0 0 C.Pena dh 3 0 0 0
KJhnsn 3b 3 0 1 0 JDMrtn rf 3 0 1 0
JMolin c 3 0 1 0 BBarns cf 3 0 0 0
Scott ph 1 0 0 0 MDmn 3b 3 0 0 0
YEscor ss 3 0 1 0 RCeden ss 3 0 1 0
Totals 31 1 8 1 Totals 29 4 7 4
Tampa Bay 100 000 000 1
Houston 010 000 30x 4
DPHouston 3. LOBTampa Bay 7, Hous-
ton 2. 2BLoney (20), Wallace (1), J.D.Martinez
(13). HRCarter 2 (17). SBDe.Jennings (11),
K.Johnson (7). CSJ.Molina (1), Altuve (6). S
Altuve. SFZobrist.
IP H R ER BB SO
Tampa Bay
Ro.Hernandez L,4-10 6 4 3 3 0 1
McGee 1 2 1 1 0 2
J.Wright 1 1 0 0 0 0
Houston
B.Norris W,6-7 7 6 1 1 3 5
Cisnero H,5 1 1 0 0 0 1
Veras S,17-20 1 1 0 0 0 1
Ro.Hernandez pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.
UmpiresHome, Bob Davidson. First, Jim
Reynolds. Second, John Hirschbeck. Third,
James Hoye.
T2:45. A14,143 (42,060).
Red Sox 2, Padres 1
San Diego Boston
ab r hbi ab r hbi
Forsyth 2b 4 0 0 0 Ellsury cf 4 0 1 0
Denorf rf 4 0 0 0 Victorn rf 4 0 1 0
Quentin lf 4 1 3 0 Pedroia 2b 4 0 2 0
Headly 3b 3 0 1 0 D.Ortiz dh 2 0 0 0
Blanks dh 4 0 1 1 Nava lf 4 0 1 0
Guzmn 1b 3 0 0 0 Carp 1b 4 1 2 0
Grandl c 4 0 1 0 Sltlmch c 4 0 1 1
Ciriaco ss 3 0 0 0 BSnydr 3b 3 0 0 0
Amarst cf 3 0 0 0 JGoms ph 1 1 1 1
Iglesias ss 2 0 0 0
Totals 32 1 6 1 Totals 32 2 9 2
San Diego 100 000 000 1
Boston 000 100 001 2
No outs when winning run scored.
DPSan Diego 1, Boston 1. LOBSan Diego
6, Boston 9. 2BQuentin (14), Grandal (8), Victo-
rino (11), Pedroia (23), Carp (11), Saltalamacchia
(20). HRJ.Gomes (6). SBPedroia (13).
IP H R ER BB SO
San Diego
Volquez 6 7 1 1 1 6
Vincent 1 1 0 0 1 1
Gregerson L,4-4 1 1 1 1 0 2
Boston
Lester 7 6 1 1 1 5
Tazawa 1 0 0 0 0 3
Uehara W,2-0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Vincent pitched to 2 batters in the 8th.
Gregerson pitched to 1 batter in the 9th.
HBPby Volquez (Iglesias).
UmpiresHome, Doug Eddings. First, Dana
DeMuth. Second, Angel Hernandez. Third, Paul
Nauert.
T3:05. A36,911 (37,499).
Reds 3, Giants 2, 11 innings
San Francisco Cincinnati
ab r hbi ab r hbi
GBlanc cf-lf 3 1 0 0 Choo cf 6 0 2 1
Abreu 2b 5 1 2 2 Cozart ss 5 0 1 0
Posey c-1b 3 0 0 0 Votto 1b 5 0 1 0
Pence rf 5 0 0 0 Phillips 2b 4 0 0 0
Sandovl 3b 5 0 0 0 Bruce rf 4 1 0 0
Belt 1b 4 0 1 0 Frazier 3b 4 1 1 0
J.Lopez p 0 0 0 0 Heisey lf 3 1 1 2
AnTrrs lf 2 0 1 0 Mesorc c 4 0 3 0
Affeldt p 0 0 0 0 Cingrn p 2 0 1 0
Dunnng p 0 0 0 0 Ondrsk p 0 0 0 0
HSnchz ph 0 0 0 0 Hannhn ph 0 0 0 0
SRosari p 0 0 0 0 LeCure p 0 0 0 0
Quiroz c 1 0 0 0 Simon p 0 0 0 0
BCrwfr ss 3 0 0 0 MParr p 0 0 0 0
Arias ph-ss 2 0 1 0 Chpmn p 0 0 0 0
Zito p 2 0 0 0 DRonsn ph 1 0 0 0
Mijares p 0 0 0 0 Hoover p 0 0 0 0
Kontos p 0 0 0 0 Hanign ph 1 0 0 0
J.Perez cf 3 0 0 0
Totals 38 2 5 2 Totals 39 310 3
San Francisco 000 020 000 00 2
Cincinnati 010 001 000 01 3
Two outs when winning run scored.
DPCincinnati 1. LOBSan Francisco 12,
Cincinnati 11. 2BAbreu (7), Belt (20), Arias (2),
Votto (16), Cingrani (1). HRAbreu (1), Heisey
(3). SBChoo (9). SHeisey. SFHeisey.
IP H R ER BB SO
San Francisco
Zito 4 7 1 1 1 3
Mijares 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Kontos 1 1-3 1 1 1 0 2
Affeldt 1 0 0 0 0 0
Dunning 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
S.Rosario 2 1 0 0 0 3
J.Lopez L,1-1 1 2-3 1 1 1 2 0
Cincinnati
Cingrani 5 2-3 4 2 2 4 5
Ondrusek 1-3 0 0 0 1 0
LeCure 1 0 0 0 0 3
Simon 2-3 0 0 0 1 2
M.Parra 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Chapman 1 0 0 0 1 2
Hoover W,2-5 2 1 0 0 1 4
Zito pitched to 2 batters in the 5th.
HBPby Zito (Bruce), by Affeldt (Hannahan),
by Simon (H.Sanchez). WPS.Rosario, Simon 2.
UmpiresHome, Brian ONora. First, Fieldin
Culbreth. Second, Bill Welke. Third, Adrian John-
son.
T4:35. A40,757 (42,319).
PAGE 6C SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013 www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER
READY TO GO SPACE
25 Naus Way, Bloomsburg
8,000 SF+/- offce building
Commercial kitchen
Radionics fre control panel
Spacious rooms must see!
For Sale Al Guari
BROKERAGE DIVISION
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Corner Blakely & Drinker Sts, Dunmore
6,000 SF+/- offce/retail
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683 S. Mountain Blvd, Dorrance Twp.
Offce/warehouse space available
Newly constructed building
1,580 SF+/- professional offce space
5,000 SF+/- whse + 1,000 SF+/- offce
For Lease ... Steve Barrouk
30 E. Rittenhouse Mill Rd., Berwick
5,000 SF+/- garage/warehouse
2.49+/- acres
3 overhead doors
Includes small apartment
For Sale ... John Rokosz
20 Montage Mountain Rd., Moosic
11,000 SF+/-
Turnkey restaurant
FF&E, PA liquor license included
Great location on Montage Mountain!
For Sale ... Dan Naylor
Developing Pennsylvanias I-81 / I-78 Corridor Since 1985
570.823.1100
mericle

com
East Mountain Corporate Center
100 Baltimore Drive
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
0
JOBS
0
BUILDINGS
0
COMPANIES
0
OCCUPANCY
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JOBS
13
BUILDINGS
22
COMPANIES
99.6%
OCCUPANCY
BE PART OF THE CENTERPOINT
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Wilkes-Barre/Scranton International Airport
Phase I, 2006 Phase I, 2012
201-221 Research Drive
CenterPoint East
Jenkins Township, PA
6,631 Sq. Ft. to 21,085 Sq. Ft.
3,239 Sq. Ft. offce
2911 to 336 ceilings
6 reinforced concrete foor
Energy effcient T-bay lighting
3 loading doors
1 drive-in door
Wet sprinkler
Quick access to I-81 and I-476
320-330 Stewart Road
Hanover Industrial Estates
Hanover Township, PA
108,000 Sq. Ft. existing building
Expandable to 162,000 Sq. Ft.
30 to 3211 ceilings
29 loading doors, 1 drive-in door
Racking, conveyer available
ESFR fre protection
Close to I-81
Employee break room
Large parking areas
1110 Hanover Street
Hanover Industrial Estates
Hanover Township, PA
10,046 Sq. Ft. to 133,000 Sq. Ft.
15.64 acres
Will combine and/or subdivide to suit
Includes 2,340 Sq. Ft., 6,703 Sq. Ft.,
8,800 Sq. Ft. and 9,226 Sq. Ft. offces
Features 28,130 Sq. Ft. Plug N Play
30 to 336 ceilings
20 loading doors, 1 drive-in door
1200 E. Lackawanna Ave.
Mid Valley Industrial Park
Olyphant, PA
365,114 Sq.Ft. existing building
Expandable to 1,132,040 Sq. Ft.
63.66 acres
Near I-81, I-380 and I-84
402 ceilings
20 loading doors
8 reinforced concrete foor
Abundant parking
INDUSTRIAL FLEX
NEW
150 Welles Street
Cross Valley W. Professional Bldg.
Forty Fort, PA
1,625 Sq. Ft. to 5,850 Sq. Ft. available
Major renovation underway
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Class A fnishes
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Natural gas heat
Abundant on-site parking
Will customize to tenants exact needs
240-258 Armstrong Road
CenterPoint East
Jenkins Township, PA
16,844 Sq. Ft. available
6.82 acres
2910 to 342 ceilings
3 loading doors
6 thick concrete foor
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Close to I-81 and I-476
600 Baltimore Drive
East Mountain Corporate Center
Plains Township, PA
2,773 Sq. Ft.
Second foor, Class A offce space
with premium offce fnishes
Space can be reconfgured to suit
new tenant
Light Hazard Wet Sprinkler system
Fiber & copper telecommunications
Located (1) mile from I-81
OFFICE
359-395 Enterprise Way
CenterPoint West
Pittston Township, PA
32,500 Sq. Ft. Class A facility
4.06 acres
Fully improved and approved site
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Will customize to your exact needs
Abundant parking
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AN ACE
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER TENNIS SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013 PAGE 7C
1757 Sans Souci Parkway, Hanover Township
Wilkes-Barre, PA (570) 824-3050
200 yds. South Of Hanover Area High School
Joe Lasecki Proprietor
Your Bass Fishing Your Bass Fishing Your Bass Fishing
LACKAWANNA COUNTY
Hazleton
970 North Church St.
570-455-9591
Down the Street from Rite Aid
Wilkes-Barre
452 Kidder St.
570-829-2155
Across From Pet Supply Plus
Edwardsville
92 S. Wyoming Ave.
570-288-9329
Next Door to Ollies Restaurant
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OPEN: Mon.-Fri. 8:00AM-6:00PM, Sat. 8:00AM-5:00PM NOW OPEN TILL 5:00PM ON SATURDAYS!!!
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220 W. Market St.
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94
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104
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134
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109
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79
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92
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69
74
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102
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77
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73
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105
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138
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104
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152
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72
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72
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69
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79
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72
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225/45-17.............
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68
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77
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72
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$
73
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215/70-16.............
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73
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225/70-16.............
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79
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225/65-17.............
$
87
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235/65-17.............
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84
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235/60-18.............
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235/55-18.............
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245/65-17.............
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255/55-18.............
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112
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* To qualify for Buy 3 get 1 Free promotion, all 4 new tires must be balanced and the vehicle aligned. Buy 3 Get 1 Free is, buy 3 at regular price, get 1 free.
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124
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99
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104
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AP Photo
Bob Bryan and Mike Bryan celebrate after beating Ivan Dodig and Marcelo Melo to win the mens dou-
bles final match at the All England Lawn Tennis Championships in Wimbledon, London, on Saturday.
Eddie Pells
AP National Writer
LONDON The
Bryan brothers got big
air at Wimbledon on
Saturday.
Yes, there was a little
more room than usual
between their feet and
the ground for their lat-
est version of the Bryan
Bump the famed
chest bump they use to
celebrate their victories
because of what that
victory meant.
Their 3-6, 6-3, 6-4, 6-4
win over Ivan Dodig and
Marcelo Melo wrapped
up the Bryan Slam, mak-
ing the 35-year-old identi-
cal twins from California
the rst mens doubles
team in the history of
Open-era tennis to hold
all four major titles at the
same time.
It just feels like were
adding nuts and whipped
cream and cherries to our
great career, Bob Bryan
said. We said that a few
years ago: If we retire
today, we feel like weve
done it all. Lets go have
some fun and add to
whatever this is.
They now have 15
Grand Slam tournament
victories, improving on
the record they broke
at the Australian Open
when they surpassed
John Newcombe and
Tony Roche as the win-
ningest mens pairing of
all time. Its their third
Wimbledon title and the
victory made the Bryans
the rst team to hold all
the slams along with an
Olympic gold medal.
If they win the U.S. Open
in September, theyll join
Ken McGregor and Frank
Sedgman as the second
mens team to complete a
calendar Grand Slam. The
Aussie duo did it in 1951,
17 years before the Open
era began, and ended up
winning seven titles in a
row before the streak was
snapped at the 1952 U.S.
Open.
I didnt think anything
could feel as sweet as
the gold medal, but this
one just feels like theres
a cap, a lid, or a ribbon
around our career, Mike
Bryan said. Its pretty
cool. Its something we
never dreamed of, to try
to win four in a row. Its
too hard to dominate in
doubles.
Taking Centre Court
against a new doubles
pairing of the Croatian,
Dodig, and the Brazilian,
Melo, the top-seeded
Bryan brothers came out
shaky. Lowlighted by a
whiff on a volley attempt
by Mike, they fell behind
5-0 on their way to losing
the rst set.
But they got a pair of
breaks in the second to
even things up, then got
a break apiece in the next
two sets for the win. The
nal one came when Mike
Bryan, the right-hander,
hit a forehand down the
middle for a clean winner,
then high-stepped it off
the court to the sideline
for one, nal change of
ends.
His brother served out
the match and after match
point a 129-mph ace
the brothers jumped as
high as they can remem-
ber while performing
their chest bump.
Its a move they bor-
rowed from the Jensen
brothers the popu-
lar 1993 French Open
champions who, like the
Bryans, had their own
rock band and liked to
play to the crowd. They
Bryans started using
it regularly when they
played college tennis at
Stanford.
The fraternity guys
were calling for it, Mike
Bryan said. I think it
was on the cover of the
Stanford Daily. They
called it the Bryan
Bump. We kept doing it.
Brothers wrap up theBryan Slam
I know how it feels,
Sabine, Bartoli said dur-
ing the on-court trophy
ceremony. And Im sure,
believe me, youll be there
one more time. I have no
doubt about it.
Bartoli became the rst
woman in the Open era to
win Wimbledon without
facing anyone seeded in
the top 10 her highest-
rated opponent was No.
17 Sloane Stephens of the
United States in the quarter-
nals. Thats in part because
of all of the injuries and sur-
prises, including exits for
No. 2 Victoria Azarenka,
No. 3 Maria Sharapova,
No. 5 Sara Errani, No. 7
Angelique Kerber, No. 9
Caroline Wozniacki and No.
10 Maria Kirilenko by the
end of the second round.
Lisicki, meanwhile, used
her game built for grass
fast serves, stinging
returns, superb court cov-
erage to end defending
champion and top-seeded
Serena Williams 34-match
winning streak in the fourth
round. Lisicki also eliminat-
ed past major champions
Francesca Schiavone and
Sam Stosur, along with No.
4 Agnieszka Radwanska,
last years runner-up.
But Lisicki was an
entirely different player
Sunday, rattled by every
little thing, even the walk
downstairs from the lock-
er room to Centre Court
and the nal-afternoon
ritual of players carrying
bouquets of owers when
they enter the arena.
Everything is a little
bit different. Youve been
here for two weeks; the
feeling, atmosphere,
gets different, said
Lisicki, who is based
in Bradenton, Fla., and
marked her rare winners
Saturday with yells of
Yes! or Come on!
I felt ne this morn-
ing, but its an occasion
that you dont get every
day, she said. So its
something completely
new for me. But I will
learn and take away so
much from it.
When play began under
a sunny sky, it was Bartoli
who looked jittery, dou-
ble-faulting twice in a
row to drop the opening
game.
Then it was Lisickis
turn to serve, and she
returned the favor, dou-
ble-faulting on break
point her last serve
barely reaching the bot-
tom of the net to make
it 1-all.
From there, Bartoli took
over, winning 11 of 12
games, and doing exactly
what her father, a doctor
who taught his daughter
how to play, used to hope
and imagine could hap-
pen in such an important
match. Standing inside the
baseline another sign of
individuality Bartoli got
back serves that topped
110 mph. She won the
point on 9 of 11 trips to the
net. She dictated the ow
of baseline exchanges,
thinking one or two moves
ahead, the way one tries
to do in chess, her fathers
favorite pastime.
I was doing every-
thing well, Bartoli said.
I was moving well. I was
returning well. I mean, I
really played a wonderful
match.
It was not exactly
the greatest theater or
a How To guide for
young players. Bartoli
and Lisicki combined for
more unforced errors, 39,
than winners, 36. They
nished with 11 doubles-
faults and eight aces.
When Lisicki double-
faulted twice in one game
while getting broken to
trail 4-1 in the second set,
she covered her face with
her racket as her eyes
welled.
Bartoli
From page 1C
PAGE 8C SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013 SPORTS www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER
M .J. JUD G E
M ON UM EN T CO.
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The Times Leader Staf
DALLAS Christina
Schappert hit a walk-off RBI
single in the bottom of the sixth
inning as Back Mountain edged
Duryea/Pittston Township 14-13
Saturday to win the Section 5
Little League Major Softball
championship.
The victory puts Back
Mountain into the state tour-
nament at Stroudsburg Little
League. Its rst game is sched-
uled for 7:30 p.m. Wednesday
against the Section 6 champion.
Schappert nished 3-for-4
with a triple. Also going 3-for-4
were Olivia Johnson (double),
Cassandra Konopki (double) and
Peyton Ross. Bailey Slacktish
was the winning pitcher.
Kerry Shamnoski had four hits
for DPT. Alex McHugh had three
hits, including a double. Lauren
Cawley and Mackenzie Gable
had two hits each, while Bella
Gorzkowski added a double.
DISTRICT 31 9-10
BASEBALL
Back Mtn. National 15, Back
Mtn. American 9
Back Mountain National
banged out 15 hits as it defeated
Back Mountain American to win
the championship.
Winning pitcher Connor
Morgan, Zach Holthaus and
Kyle Sincavage had three hits
each, with Morgan having a
double. Max Paczewski and
Michael Ropietski had two hits
each, while Aidan Conrad and
Ty Osipower also added to the
offensive attack.
Jack Shaver had an RBI triple
and Hunter Dixon doubled for
American. Also recording hits
were Ryan Collins, Zack Luksic,
A.J. Bednar, Cooper Lewis and
Drew Lojewski.
DISTRICT169-10BASEBALL
Plains 14, South Wilkes-
Barre 13
Connor Kane and Pat Delbosa
combined in pitching to lift
Plains to victory and the title.
Dylan Bronack had multiple
hits in the win while Jeremy
Rozell, Andrew Smigiel, Joe
Monohan and Tony Edigio had
hits for Plains.
Darren Clark had multiple hits
in the effort for South Wilkes-
Barre.
DISTRICT 31 10-11
BASEBALL
Exeter 2, Wyoming/West
Wyoming 1
Ethan Kozden struck out eight
and allowed only three hits in
Exeters victory
over Wyoming/
West Wyoming on
Friday evening.
Corey Mruks home
run provide to be
the difference.
Caleb Graham
added a double for
Exeter.
Riley Rusyn and
Adam Wisnewski
doubled for
Wy o mi n g / We s t
Wyoming.
D I S T R I C T
31 JUNIOR
BASEBALL
Swoyersville 9,
Greater Wyoming
Area 4
Jared Perdkis
pitched six solid
innings to lead
Swoyersville to a
win over Greater
Wyoming Area.
Mitchell Forgash,
Bryden Rukstalis,
Dom Bayo, Dave
Gavlick and Mike
Pollick all had hits
for Swoyersville.
D16 JUNIOR BASEBALL
Hanover/South W-B 14,
Duryea/Pittston Twp. 3
Kevin Rimmer threw a ve-
inning no-hitter for Hanover/
South Wilkes-Barre.
Austin Gately had a triple and
single. Joey Wheeler added two
singles and Lloyd Deno doubled.
AMERICAN LEGION
BASEBALL
Mountain Post A 11,
Mountain Post B 1
Curt Yenchick went 3-for-4
with one RBI and one triple in
game one of a doubleheader for
Mountain Post A.
Elliot Snyder went 2-for-3 with
two runs and one RBI in the win.
Josh Grzech led Mountain
Post B, going 1-for-2 with one
run scored.
Mountain Post B AB R H BI 2B 3B HR
Josh Grzech cf 2 1 1 0 0 0 0
Justin Rinehimer c 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
Josh Dotzel 2b 3 0 2 1 0 0 0
Matt Madry ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 0
Chase Jones 1b 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
Nick Gavio rf 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
Jared Smigelski 3b 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
Eric Rinehimer p 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
John Chupka dh 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
Joe Grzech lf 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals 20 1 3 1 0 0 0
Mountain Post A AB R H BI 2B 3B HR
Elliot Snyder ss 3 2 2 1 0 0 0
Ryan Murphy rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Jake Gallagher rf 1 1 1 0 0 0 0
Tom Goyne p 4 1 2 2 0 0 0
Matt Dacey dh 3 0 1 0 0 0 0
Abhay Matgud cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
John Wychock 3b 2 3 1 1 0 0 0
Brian Markowski lf 2 1 0 1 0 0 0
Curt Yenchik c 4 2 3 1 0 1 0
Dom Sartini 1b 2 1 1 3 1
Ethan Markowski 2b 2 0 0 1 0 0 0
Totals 24 11 11 10 1 1 0
Mountain Post B 100 000 0 1
Mountain Post A 010 712 x 11
Mountain Post B IP H R ER BB SO
Eric Rinehimer (L) 4 8 8 2 3 2
Tyler Jones 1 2 1 1 2 0
Donny Hopkins 1 1 2 2 0 0
Mountain Post A IP H R ER BB SO
Tom Goyne (W) 6 3 1 1 0 2
Mountain Post A 8, Wilkes-
Barre 5
Matt Kaster struck out eight
batters to help lead Mountain
Post A to its second win of the
day.
Elliot Snyder batted 3-for-3
with an RBI, a triple and three
runs scored.
Wilkes-Barre AB R H BI 2B 3B HR
Yurkowski 2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 0
Shorts ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Zazola ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Preston c 4 0 0 1 0 0 0
Demarco ss 2 0 1 0 0 0 0
Conrad 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 0
Kerr cf 3 1 1 0 1 0 0
Zionce lf 3 2 2 0 0 1 0
Lavecchio rf 3 0 0 1 0 0 0
Kendra rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Amesberry p 2 0 0 1 0 0 0
Leighton p 2 1 0 1 0 0 0
Williamson 3b 1 1 1 1 0 0
Hoggarth 3b 2 0 1 0 0 0 0
Totals 31 5 6 5 1 1 0
Mountain Post A AB R H BI 2B 3B HR
Elliot Snyder ss 4 3 3 1 0 1 0
Ethan Markowski 2b 1 0 1 0 0 0 0
Tom Goyne rf 3 1 1 2 0 0 0
Jake Gallagher rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Kurt Yenchik c 3 2 1 2 1 0 0
Dom Sartini dh 2 0 1 0 0 0 0
Matt Kaster p 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
John Wychock 3b 3 0 0 1 0 0 0
Brian Markowski lf 3 0 1 1 0 0 0
Dan Ritz lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Matt Dacey 1b 3 1 0 0 0 0 0
Abhay Metgud cf 3 1 1 0 0 0 0
Totals 27 8 9 6 1 1 0
Wilkes-Barre 000 012 2 5
Mountain Post A 300 221 x 8
Pitching
Wilkes-Barre IP H R ER BB SO
Amesberry (L) 4 6 5 5 3 0
Leighton 2 2 3 3 2 4
Mountain Post A IP H R ER BB SO
Matt Kaster (W) 6 4 3 3 5 7
Tom Goyne 1 3 2 2 0 2
Back Mountain wins Section 5 softball title
Photos by Bill Tarutis | For The Times Leader
ABOVE: Duryea/Pittston Townships Lauren Cawley, right, beats the tag of Back Mountain shortstop
Kendra Saba at second base during the Section 5 softball championship game Saturday afternoon
in Dallas. BELOW: Back Mountain catcher Peyton Ross, left, looks for the umpires call after tagging
out Duryea/Pittston Townships Bella Gorzkowski during the Section 5 softball championship game
Saturday afternoon in Dallas.
Fred Adams | For The Times Leader
Derek Jeter signs autographs for local fans before a game against the Lehigh Valley IronPigs on
Saturday night.
It was 18 years ago.
Once I got on the eld,
some things looked famil-
iar to me but that was a
long, long, time ago,
Jeter added. I dont
remember too much. I
remember it was turf and
the stadium is a lot better
looking now.
He knows he has to get
ready after nine months
of playing competitively,
but hes chomping at the
bit to get back to New
York.
It was good to get back
out there. I miss playing.
I miss being around my
teammates, he added.
Its fun to be out there, but
I want to be back to New
York as soon as I can.
There is no timetable
for his return to the
Yankees, but speculation
is that he will be with the
RailRiders for the rest
of the teams homestand
that runs through Friday.
I want to play. Im
ready to play, but I under-
stand I have to play some
games here. But I forward
to getting back as soon as
I can.
Jeter
From page 1C
on a single to give the
RailRiders a 4-2 lead.
Randy Ruiz added an
RBI single in the third
to tie the game 2-2. For
the game, Neal ended
2-for-3 with three RBI.
The RailRiders bull-
pen worked four score-
less innings to preserve
the win for Pineda and in
Jeters rst rehab game.
Yoshinori Tateyama
pitched two scoreless frames,
while Jim Miller and Mike
Zagurski each went a score-
less inning. Zagurski picked
up his second save against
one of his former teams.
Pineda
From page 1C
John Raby
AP Sports Writer
WHITE SULPHUR
SPRINGS, W.Va. Amid
a disappointing season,
Johnson Wagner has
found a comfort zone
not far from his college
stomping grounds.
Wagner shot a 6-under
64 Saturday to take a two-
stroke lead after the third
round of the Greenbrier
Classic.
Wagner was at 14 under
on the Old White TPC
course. Jimmy Walker
also shot 64 and was sec-
ond at 12 under.
Wagner has yet to post
a top 10 nish this year.
At the Greenbrier, he
broke a string of seven
consecutive early exits.
In his two previous
tournaments, he had
three birdies combined.
He had seven of them on
Saturday.
I felt really comfort-
able all day, Wagner
said. I hit a lot of good
golf shots. Ive got a really
clear picture of what Im
trying to do on every
swing.
Sometimes when
youre playing bad, you
forget who you are and
you get down on your-
self. The last couple of
weeks, Ive just trying to
be positive and remember
that Ive won three times
out here. Im a little more
comfortable with myself
right now.
Wagner played golf at
Virginia Tech less than
two hours from The
Greenbrier resort. Several
members of his wifes fam-
ily have joined them for
the weekend, and hoots
from Hokies fans could
be heard around the golf
course.
Its great seeing a
bunch of maroon-and-
orange in the crowd,
Wagner said.
He hopes they can see
him wrap up his rst
win since the 2012 Sony
Open.
The other two times
Wagner held the lead
going into the nal round
on tour, he won the 2008
Houston Open and the
OHL Classic at Mayakoba
in Mexico.
But no third-round
leader has gone on to win
the Greenbrier Classic,
now in its fourth year.
The tournament has been
decided by playoffs the
past two years, and Stuart
Appleby shot 59 in the
nal round to win by a
stroke in 2010.
Wagner said he isnt
going to stop being
aggressive Sunday unless
the wind picks up.
Im just going to try to
make as many birdies as I
can, he said. This golf
course, when its rm and
fast, may be one of my
favorite places we play on
tour.
Like Wagner, Walker
also gets a cozy feeling
at The Greenbrier. He
nished one stroke out
of a playoff in the 2011
Greenbrier Classic and
tied for fourth in 2010.
Wagner takes
lead afer
three rounds
AP Photo
Johnson Wagner reacts to a
birdie putt on the 18th hole
during the third round of the
Greenbrier Classic in White
Sulphur Springs, W.Va., on
Saturday.
The RailRiders won
their third straight game,
defeating Lehigh Valley
4-2 on Saturday night.
RailRiders at the plate:
Dan Johnson and Thomas
Neal each had two hits for
the RailRiders, while Neal
plated three runs.
RailRiders on the
mound: Rehabbing
Michael Pineda went
ve innings, striking out
seven and allowing just
two earned runs on four
hits. Yoshinori Tateyama
(two), Jim Miller and
Mike Zagurski (one each)
nished off the game with
scoreless innings.
Attendance: 10,000
Time of Game: 2:43
Todays Game: The
RailRiders and IronPigs
hook up this afternoon at
1:05 at PNC Field.
Todays Probables:
RailRiders LHP David
Huff (3-4, 3.38) vs.
Lehigh Valley LHP Tom
Cochran (3-3, 4.65)
Captain RailRider:
Derek Jeter went to
bat three times for the
RailRiders. He walked,
lined out and grounded
out. Hes expected to
DH for Scranton/Wilkes-
Barre this afternoon.
On Deck: The nine-
game homestand for
SWB continues through
July 12. On Monday,
the RailRiders welcome
Rochester to town for a
three-game set.
Today at PNC Field: Its
Sunday so that means its
Family FUNDay at the ball-
park with select autographs
available before the game
and kids allowed to run the
bases after the game.
On The Radio: All
games can be heard on
WYCK 1340-AM, 1400-
AM, 100.7-FM
On TV: Tonights game
will also be televised live
by WQMY (My Network).
How They Scored
IRONPIGS FIRST:
Cesar Hernandez singled.
Freddy Galvis grounded
out as Hernandez moved
to second. Hernandez
to third on a wild pitch.
Cody Asche walked and
then stole second. Cody
Overbeck struck out.
Josh Fields walked to
load the bases. Leandro
Castro doubled to score
Hernandez and Asche.
Steve Susdorf grounded
out. IRONPIGS 2-0
R A I L R I D E R S
SECOND: Dan Johnson
singled and then scored
on a double by Thomas
Neal. Josh Bell struck out.
Corey Patterson popped
out. Addison Maruszak
ied out. IRONPIGS 2-1
R A I L R I D E R S
THIRD: Derek Jeter lined
out. J.R. Murphy struck
out. Brent Lillibridge
singled and then stole
second. Randy Ruiz sin-
gled to score Lillibridge.
Dan Johnson doubled;
Ruiz to third. Thomas
Neal singled driving
home Ruiz and Johnson.
Josh Bell walked. Corey
Patterson grounded
out. RAILRIDERS 4-2
ThE T.L. ExPRESS
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER SPORTS SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013 PAGE 9C
The Associated Press
PHILADELPHIA
Center Vinny Lecavalier, a
likely future Hall of Famer,
said the Flyers are Claude
Girouxs team, but added
he will try to bring his
experience and leadership
to his new team.
Ive been through some
tough years and Ive been
through some really great
years, Lecavalier, 33, said
in a conference call with
reporters Saturday. So Ill
bring that in the room, and
denitely at my age, (as)
older players, we have to
bring that leadership. Its
not just having one leader
you need a lot of good
leaders to make sure that
the team goes in the right
direction, and Im going to
try to do that.
Lecavalier signed a
ve-year, $22.5 million
free-agent deal with the
Flyers. He is expected to
center the second line,
with Brayden Schenn and
Wayne Simmonds as his
wingers.
A four-time all-star,
Lecavalier revealed that
Flyers ofcials asked him
if he could play wing if
placed on Girouxs unit,
and he told them he would
feel comfortable playing the
right side.
If he changes positions,
its not something I really
worry about, especially
when youre being told you
might play with Claude
Giroux, Lecavalier said.
Im really open to that and
Id be really excited about
that.
Lecavalier was bought
out of his contract by
Tampa Bay. He helped
lead the Lightning to the
Stanley Cup in 2004.
I was part of an organi-
zation for 14 years so it was
a tough few days, he said,
adding his parents and wife
took the news of leaving
Tampa pretty hard.
But after meeting with
general manager Paul
Holmgren and coach Peter
Laviolette, Lecavalier said,
I really liked what they
had to say and where the
organization is going. So
that made my decision a lot
easier.
JAGRS SEARCH
Jaromir Jagrs agent says
three teams are very inter-
ested in his 41-year-old cli-
ent.
Petr Svoboda, though,
told The Associated Press
on Saturday he expects it
to take some time for the
NHLs active scoring leader
to sign a contract.
Jagr might have com-
pany waiting for a new job.
J.P. Barry, whorepresents
two of the top free agents
available, Daniel Cleary
and Mason Raymond, says
he thinks decision-makers
are taking a breath after a
frenzy of activity Friday.
Day 1 of the free agency
urry included Jarome
Iginla signing a one-year
deal worth as much as
$6 million with Boston,
which almost acquired him
last season from Calgary.
Nathan Horton cashed
in on his postseason per-
formance for the Eastern
Conference champions
Bruins with a $37.1 mil-
lion, seven-year contract in
Columbus.
BLUES
Derek Roy has agreed to
terms on a one-year deal
with the St. Louis Blues,
pending a physical for the
veteran forward.
The Blues have been
looking for a top center
since before the trade dead-
line, and they hope they
found one in Roy. The pend-
ing deal was announced by
the team Saturday.
The 30-year-old Roy split
last season between the
Dallas Stars and Vancouver
Canucks and nished with
seven goals and 21 assists.
The 5-foot-9 playmaker
spent the bulk of his NHL
career with the Buffalo
Sabres, with whom he had
a career-high 81 points in
the 2007-08 season.
STARS
The Dallas Stars have
signed top draft pick Valeri
Nichushkin to a three-year
entry-level contract.
The 18-year-old Russian
winger was the 10th overall
pick in the draft last week-
end. He played 18 regular-
season games and 25 play-
off games last season for the
KHL club in Chelyabinsk,
his hometown.
Nichushkin scored nine
points (six goals, three
assists) in the playoffs and
was the KHLs top rookie.
Terms of the deal
announced Saturday
werent released.
Nichushkin scored the
winning goal in the bronze
medal game against
Canada in the world junior
championships in January.
He also was on two other
world junior teams with
Russia, including one that
took the goal medal in an
under-17 tournament in
2012.
CANADIENS
The Montreal Canadiens
have signed free agent for-
ward Stefan Fournier to a
three-year contract.
Fournier had 35 goals
and 72 points for Memorial
Cup-champion Halifax of
the QMJHL this past sea-
son. He added 16 goals
and 13 assists in 17 play-
off games, including three
points in the tournament
nal in May.
The 6-foot-3, 212-pound-
er from Dorval, Que.,
also led Halifax with
100 penalty minutes
in the regular season
and maintained a +17
plus/minus differential.
JETS
The Winnipeg Jets have
signed defenseman Adam
Pardy.
The 29-year-old Pardy,
who reached a deal with
the Jets on Saturday,
played in 17 games last
season with the Buffalo
Sabres. He had four assists
and 14 penalty minutes.
Lacavalier wants to bring intangibles to Flyers
Pete G. Wilcox | The Times Leader
Joey Mormina (3) skates the puck out of trouble in front of
Penguins teammates Alex Grant below and goalie Brad Thiessen
and Adirondack Phantoms forward Mike Testwuide (8) during a
2011 game at Mohegan Sun Arena.
Tom Venesky
tvenesky@timesleader.com
If Joey Mormina was in
his early 20s and without
a wife and kids, he may
still be a Wilkes-Barre/
Scranton Penguin.
But at age 31 with a
wife and two young chil-
dren, job security is as
important to Mormina
as getting a shot at the
NHL. Thats why the vet-
eran defenseman opted to
sign a two-year contract
with the Syracuse Crunch
on Wednesday, leaving a
Wi l kes- Barre/Scranton
team where he spent the
last three years and last
season was named cap-
tain for the rst time in
his eight-year pro career.
Overall, Mormina spent
four seasons in Wilkes-
Barre/Scranton, posting
13 goals and 53 points in
233 games.
It denitely wasnt an
easy decision, Mormina
said on Saturday. I spent
four tremendous years in
Wilkes-Barre and both of
my kids were born and
raised there.
Its denitely hard to
move on, but with two
young kids job security
was at the top of the list.
Topping the list of
Morminas Wilkes-Barre/
Scranton memories are
being named captain last
season and the move by
the club to resign him for
a second stint with the
team three years ago after
a deal to play in Europe
fell through.
That decision three
years ago essentially gave
Mormina a chance to
rejuvenate his career.
The opportunity they
gave me to come back and
re-establish myself is the
biggest thing. I became a
better player and a better
person, and Ill forever be
thankful to the Penguins
organization for that,
Mormina said.
In addition to his solid
play on the blueline,
being named captain is
another attribute that
may have made Mormina
more appealing to other
clubs as a free agent. The
title is a reection of his
character and ability to
lead two elements
that are sought after in a
player.
Once you get the C on
the jersey its a message
to the rest of the league
that you can be trusted to
make the important deci-
sions, Mormina said.
And when youre a cap-
tain with Wilkes-Barre/
Scranton, it carries a lot
of weight.
As a member of the
Crunch, Mormina will
remain in the East
Division, guarantee-
ing a few return trips to
Wilkes-Barre during the
2013-2014 season. Hows
it going to feel to skate
on the ice at the Mohegan
Sun Arena as a member
of the visiting team?
A little difcult, for
sure, Mormina said.
But I hope the people in
Wilkes-Barre are as gra-
cious to me then as they
were when I was there.
NOTES
Mormina is the fth
player from last seasons
team to exit, including
wingers Chad Kolarik and
Phil Dupuis along with
defenseman Dylan Reese,
all of whom signed in
Europe. Forward Trevor
Smith signed with the
Toronto organization on
Friday.
Pittsburgh signed
four players to two-way
deals on Friday, including
last seasons team pen-
alty minute leader Bobby
Farnham. Forward Chris
Connor returns to the
organization as well. He
played with Pittsburgh
and Wilkes-Barre/
Scranton during the 2009-
2010 and 2010-2011 sea-
sons. Newcomers include
forward Nick Drazenovic,
who spent most of last
season with Springeld
where he registered
53 points, and Andrew
Ebbett, who played in 28
games with the Vancouver
Canucks last season.
All were signed to one-
year contracts except
for Ebbett, who agreed
to a two-year deal.
Mormina leaves Wilkes-Barre/Scranton
AP Photo
Former Los Angeles Lakers center Dwight Howard has moved on to
join the Houston Rockets after agreeing to a free agent deal with
the Western Conference team.
TheAssociatedPress
HOUSTON Last off-
season, the Houston Rockets
were an afterthought, a
young team with little star
power.
Now, after trading for
James Harden just before
this past season and adding
Dwight Howard on Friday,
Houston is suddenly primed
to contend sooner than
almost anybody expected.
Still, Houstongeneral man-
ager Daryl Morey knows nab-
bing Howard is only the rst
step in a long process for his
team.
We havent accomplished
anything yet, but were put-
ting something pretty cool
together, I think, Morey said
in an interviewwith Comcast
SportsNet Houston.
Howard is the Rockets lat-
est superstar center, follow-
ing Hall of Famer Hakeem
Olajuwon and eight-time All-
Star Yao Ming.
They reached the playoffs
for the rst time since 2009
this season and battled back
froma 3-0decit before being
eliminated by the Oklahoma
City Thunder in Game 6.
Their returntothepostsea-
son showed they have plenty
of speed and long-range
scoring power with Harden,
Jeremy Lin and Chandler
Parsons. Omer Asik was a
solid rebounder in the playoff
run and averaged 12.3 points
in the series, but it was clear
that the team needed a more
potent scoring threat inside.
The addition of Howard
gives them just that, as the
6-foot-11 star has averaged
more than 18 points and
almost 13 rebounds in his
nine-year career.
His one season in Los
Angeles was lled with
unrest, including what many
believedtobe a less thanposi-
tive relationship with Kobe
Bryant. Bryant unfollowed
Howard on Twitter on Friday
night after he announced his
decision to join the Rockets
with a tweet.
HAWKS
The Atlanta Hawks have
agreed to contracts with free-
agent forwards Paul Millsap
and DeMarre Carroll, con-
tinuing their makeover
under general manager
Danny Ferry.
Two people close to the
negotiations conrmed
the deals for Millsap and
Carroll, who were team-
mates on the Utah Jazz last
season. The people spoke
to The Associated Press on
Saturday on condition of
anonymity because contracts
cannot become ofcial until
Wednesday when the NBAs
freeagencymoratoriumends.
The deals for Millsap
and Carroll were struck late
Friday night, after free agent
Dwight Howard informed
the Hawks he was going to
go elsewhere. Howard later
went to Twitter to announce
he was headed to the
Houston Rockets.
Millsap was selected by
Utah in the second round of
the 2006 draft. The 6-foot-8
power forward has career
averages of 12.4 points, 7.0
rebounds and 1.8 assists in
seven seasons in the NBA.
Although he was Utahs
longest-tenured player,
Millsaps minutes declined
last season with the emer-
gence of young players
Derrick Favors and Enes
Kanter both part of a
core group for the Jazz.
Howard could launch
Rockets to contenders
TomVenesky
tvenesky@timesleader.com
Sandy Goodwin saw
her rst bald eagle years
ago at the Philadelphia
Zoo.
At the time, places such
as zoos provided about
the only opportunity to
see a bald eagle, especial-
ly in Pennsylvania.
The effects of pesti-
cides such as DDT, along
with water pollution and
other factors, decimated
the bald eagle population
a few decades ago. In the
early 1980s only three
nesting pairs of eagles
remained in the state.
You never thought
youd see one in the wild,
said Goodwin, who is vice
president of the Greater
Wyoming Valley Audubon
Society.
Today, one doesnt have
to go to a zoo to see a
bald eagle, thanks to a
remarkable turnaround.
Last week the
Pennsylvania Game
Commission released its
preliminary count of bald
eagle nests statewide, and
the numbers chart yet
another high point in an
impressive upward trend.
So far this year, 252
eagle nests have been
conrmed throughout
the state, with nesting
eagles present in 56 of
Pennsylvanias 67 coun-
ties.
Thats a sharp increase
from the previous mid-
year report, which the
Game Commission typi-
cally releases just before
the Fourth of July.
A year ago, there were
206 conrmed eagle
nests in 51 counties.
Since the PGC began
its seven-year bald eagle
restoration program in
1983 and released 88
eaglets over the course of
the program, the recov-
ery has been marked with
success.
By 1998, Pennsylvania
was home to 25 pairs of
nesting bald eagles, and
that gure doubled three
years later. In 2005, the
Game Commission took
the bald eagle off the
states endangered list
and reclassied it as a
threatened species.
A year later, more than
100 nests were conrmed
statewide. And now, the
number stands at 252.
Thats good news for
those who enjoy seeing
the nations symbol in the
wild.
If youre out and about
you have a pretty good
chance of seeing one,
Goodwin said. When we
do our bird counts, we
never used to get a bald
eagle. Now, we often get
at least one.
Theres a chance that
the current nest g-
ure could continue to
rise, according to Patti
Barber, a biologist with
the Game Commissions
Endangered and
Nongame Birds sec-
tion. While the mid-year
update on nests provides
a good indicator of how
bald eagles are doing
statewide, Barber said its
a preliminary number and
additional nests typically
are conrmed as the year
goes on.
In 2012, for instance,
206 nests were reported
preliminarily, but the
year-end total was 237
statewide. In 2011 the
preliminary total revealed
203 nests but the g-
ure increased to 217
by the end of the year.
PAGE 10C SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013 www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER
OUTDOORS
Tom
Venesky
Outdoors
Columnist
Capture anything interesting on your
handheld or trail camera? A nice buck, bear,
coyote or anything unique? Wed love to see
it. Each week, well run photos from a read-
ers trail camera on the Sunday Outdoors
page. Email your photo, along with date and
area it was taken (township is ne), and any
other details to tvenesky@timesleader.com.
This photo of the turkey vulture landing,
above, is a good example of the wingspan
these powerful birds possess. Often over-
looked, these birds can have wingspans of up
to 6 feet in length. Rick Pavloski of Hanover
captured the vulture on a trail camera last
August on Luzerne County game lands.
Totally unrelated to the vulture, but also
a typical sight of summer, is this baby red
fox, right, captured on a trail cam set out by
Camille Daniels in the Mountain Top area.
The photo was taken in late May. The fox is
sitting on a stone culvert, and Daniels said
she has photos of the mother with the pup.
She said the location has also generated
several photos of barn cats, and many were
taken after the fox were in the area. Is one
attracted to the other?
CaughT on Camera
Hal Korber | Pennsylvania Game Commission
The Pennsylvania game Commission has confirmed 252 eagle nests in the state this year, evidence that the national symbol is continu-
ing its comeback.
Apatriotic comeback
be onThe lookouT
To report a bald eagle nest, contact the Game Commission
through its public comments email address: pgccomments@
pa.gov, and use the words Eagle Nest Information in the subject
feld. Reports also can be phoned in to a Game Commission
Region Ofce or the Harrisburg headquarters.
Barber said its important that those encountering nests keep a
safe distance away. Disturbing eagles is illegal under the federal
Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act. Some pairs are tolerant
of human activity, while others are sensitive. Their reaction
often depends on the activity and approach of the individual, the
nesting cycle stage, and if the eagles are used to seeing people.
Where there is regular public access and established viewing
areas, some pairs can be very tolerant if visitors are predictable
and nonthreatening, Barber said. But when someone sneaks to
the base of a nest tree, most eagles become alarmed.
Barber said there have been cases where people purposely
fushed eagles fromnests in attempts to get pictures of themin
fight. Such behavior not only is illegal, but runs the risk of killing
unhatched or recently hatched birds, she said.
Adults that are scared froma nest could abandon it, or might not
return in time to keep unhatched eggs at the proper incubating
temperature. Frightened eaglets also could jump fromthe safety
of the nest, then have no way to return, Barber said.
There are all types of problems associated with getting too close
to a nest, Barber said. For the sake of eagles, use you binoculars
or a spotting scope. They are after all, still on the comeback trail
frombeing an endangered species.
TomVenesky
tvenesky@timesleader.com
The number of bald
eagle nests in the
Northeast region is grow-
ing, and there is still plen-
ty of room for more.
Kevin Wenner, a biolo-
gist with the Pennsylvania
Game Commission, said
most of the new nests in
the area are reported by
the public. Gaps between
traditional nest sites on the
Susquehanna and Delaware
rivers are now becoming
occupied, Wenner said, but
there is still plenty of room
for more expansion.
Weve also received
reports of a half-dozen
to a dozen immature bald
eagles hanging out on
bodies of water. There
are a lot of immatures
out there and thats your
up-and-coming breeding
pairs, Wenner said.
Most of the nests are
discovered in the winter
or early spring, before
they are hidden from
view by foliage. Its also
a time when eagles are
active around the nests.
From November
through March, eagles
are busy repairing exist-
ing nests or building new
ones, and later incubating
eggs which hatch in mid
to late March, Wenner
said. Quite frequently
the public is bringing a
new nest to our attention,
so I wouldnt be surprised
to see the numbers con-
tinue to grow.
The following is a
breakdown of bald eagle
nests in the Northeast
region for 2013:
Total - 66 (61 in 2012)
New nests - 12 (8 in
2012)
Nests by county:
Bradford - 6
Carbon - 5
Columbia - 2
Lackawanna - 2
Luzerne - 3
Monroe - 6
Montour - 3
Northumberland - 3
Pike - 18
Sullivan - 1
Susquehanna - 4
Wayne - 8
Wyoming - 6
While there havent
been any reports of eagles
being shot in the region,
Wenner said the agency does
nd dead bald eagles in the
area. Some are killed when
they perch on wires and
spread their wings between
two wires are are electro-
cuted, Wenner said. Others
are dying from high levels
of lead, which Wenner said
may results from eating sh
with lead sinkers or unrecov-
ered game with lead shot.
We are studying the
lead issue and any dead
eagles we nd are sub-
mitted to a lab for a lead
screening, Wenner said.
Bald eagle numbers soar in Northeast region
The trail was easy.
It offered a clear path
through the summertime
woods and the thick tan-
gle of underbrush. The
edges of the trail
were guarded by a
wall of thorn-laden
briars eager to tear
clothing and esh.
Behind the briars
the forest was full of
face-whipping, eye-
poking tree limbs,
rocks to trip over
and uneven terrain
perfect for sprain-
ing an ankle.
I had to get in
there.
Sure, the trail offered
easy, hazard-free walking
as I ventured out on a
combination trout shing
excursion/nature walk.
But the worn pathway
was also limiting. Many
other have taken this
same route. The trail
offered the same sights
to everyone that walked
it, and it led to the same
destination.
While most people
opted for the ease of the
trail, I wondered what
was I missing on the other
side of the wall of briars.
I raised my shing rod
over my head and gently
waded into the thorns.
Theres a method to
walking through a briar
patch. It requires a toler-
ance of pain, obviously,
but also a good deal of
agility.
Head for the thin-
ner spots between the
branches, go slow and let
the thorns gently slide
across your clothing, If
you do get stuck and
you will dont try to
push straight through the
thorns. Gently turn and
twist to prevent the briar
branches from wrapping
around you.
A few harmless scratch-
es later, I made it through
the wall of briars into the
cool shade of the forest
oor.
Right away it felt like
a different world com-
pared to the man-made
path I had followed. In
the woods there was a
comfortable stillness.
Giant tree trunks dwarfed
low-growing saplings and
bushes.
The ies and gnats that
buzzed above me on the
trail had vanished and
the hot sun was rendered
harmless by the thick tree
canopy.
Lacking a path, I had
to make my own. On my
right, the forest oor
was strewn with rocks
and boulders as it made a
steep descent into a hol-
low.
The hollow was my des-
tination as it contained a
small, shaded stream that
I knew held native brook
trout. But the rocks and
boulders would make for
a tough trek.
On my left, the ground
sloped gently downward
and was generally clear
of rocks and other debris,
aside from a few logs. I
chose the gentle slope as
my new path and made
my way toward the hol-
low.
Halfway down I
encountered a doe
standing in the
clearing created by
a fallen tree.
I stopped and
watched as the doe
paced nervously
to each side of the
clearing, snort-
ing and occasion-
ally shooting me an
annoyed glare.
She had a fawn
nearby and wanted me to
leave, or at the very least
focus my attention on her.
As tempting as it was
to look for the new spot-
ted fawn curled up some-
where on the forest oor,
I decided to let the doe
have some peace of mind
and turned back to make
a wide loop around the
clearing.
Doing so required me
to walk through a por-
tion of the area covered
with rocks, and this
section also featured
plenty of low growing
trees with limbs at just
the right height for an
annoying poke in the
eye.
I stepped from rock to
rock, and hunched over
to spare my eyes and face
a beating from the limbs,
and along the way I spot-
ted a papery thin snake
skin wedged between two
stones.
This was copperhead
territory, and I gently
picked up the delicate
skin to see if it was left
behind by one of the ven-
omous snakes.
It has long scales the
stretched in a neat row
across the width of the
belly, and large, diamond-
shaped scales on the sides
and back. But the skin
lacked the color pattern
of a copperhead, so I sur-
mised it was from a north-
ern racer a harmless
but sometimes aggressive
snake.
After carefully nish-
ing my trek through the
stones, I made it to the
small stream. Up and
down the stream were
small pools in between
stretches of at, cool
water.
The mud along the
bank showed tracks of
raccoon, mink and deer,
but no people.
It was too far off the
beaten path.
As I cast my spinner
into a clear pool and
watched the little brook
trout give chase, I knew
that sometimes its the
place without a path
that yields the greater
reward.
Tom Venesky covers the
outdoors for The Times
Leader. Reach him at
970-7230 or tvenesky@
timesleader.com.
The place without a path
Fish and Boat
Commission to meet
The Pennsylvania Fish
and Boat Commission
will hold its quarterly
business meeting on July
15-16 at its Harrisburg
headquarters, located at
1601 Elmerton Avenue,
Harrisburg, PA 17110.
As part of the
Commissions quarterly
meeting, committees will
meet beginning at 9:45
a.m. on Monday, July 15,
and again at 8:15 a.m. on
Tuesday, July 16. Formal
consideration of the agen-
da by the full Commission
will begin at approximate-
ly 11 a.m. on Tuesday,
July 16. All committee
meetings and the formal
meeting are open to the
public.
A complete copy of the
meeting schedule and the
full agenda for the meet-
ing can be found on the
PFBCs web site at www.
shandboat.com/minutes.
htm.
Antlerless licenses go
on sale tomorrow
Pennsylvania deer hunt-
ers who want to better
their chances of obtain-
ing an antlerless license
will want to send in appli-
cations during the rst
round of sales set to kick
off on Monday, July 8.
During the rst
three weeks applica-
tions are accepted, only
Pennsylvania residents
may apply. Nonresidents
may apply beginning
Monday, July 29. Then
beginning on Monday,
Aug. 5, residents and non-
residents alike may apply
for any unsold licenses
that remain.
The second round of
unsold license sales is set
to begin on Monday, Aug.
19.
Applications received
before the Monday
start of any round will
be returned to sender.
ouTdoor noTes
See NOTES | 11C
See COMEBACK | 11C
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER SPORTS SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013 PAGE 11C
While applications wont be accepted before a given
sales period begins, Game Commission Executive
Director Carl G. Roe said its a good idea for hunters
to send in their applications as early as theyre
permitted.
The number of tags allocated for each wildlife-
management unit is diferent, and in some units,
licenses traditionally have sold out fairly quickly,
Roe said. The sooner you send your application
in, the better your chance of coming away with a
license in the management unit thats your top
choice.
Hunters applying for 2013-14 antlerless deer
licenses will followthe same process that has been
in place during recent years. License fees also
remain unchanged.
Antlerless deer license applications must be mailed
directly to a county treasurers ofce, with the
exception of the Philadelphia and Lehigh county
treasurer ofces, which no longer issue antlerless
deer licenses. Treasurers across the state will accept
applications for antlerless licenses covering any
wildlife-management unit (WMU), but hunters
should note that only county treasurers issue tags.
The Pennsylvania Game Commission does not
accept applications.
Alist of participating treasurers and their mailing
addresses, as well as the number of licenses
allocated for each WMU, appear in the 2013-14
Hunting &Trapping Digest, which hunters can pick
up froma licensing agent.
Applications must be mailed in the ofcial pink
envelope issued to hunters at the time they
purchase their general hunting licenses.
Hunters who are Pennsylvania residents need to
submit with each application a check or money
order to cover the $6.70 license fee. The license
fee for nonresidents is $26.70. If an application
is rejected due to licenses being sold out, the
uncashed check or money order will be returned to
the hunter by mail.
For most management units, hunters may apply for
only one license in each round. However, hunters
are allowed during each round to select their top
three WMU preferences. If antlerless licenses are
sold out for the WMU that is the hunters top choice,
for example, a license for the second choice will be
issued if available.
Applications fromup to three separate hunters
may be submitted in the same envelope. If the
WMU preferences for all applications mailed in
the same envelope are exactly the same, payment
may be made with a single check or money order.
If the applicants have diferent WMU preferences,
payment by separate checks or money orders is
strongly recommended.
Applying early during the frst round of sales also
helps to ensure hunters will get their antlerless
licenses by the start of archery season. Archery
season begins Sept. 21 in WMUs 2B, 5C and 5D.
Statewide, the season begins Oct. 5.
Ahunter, except for in WMUs 2B, 5C and 5D, can
purchase no more than three antlerless licenses
includingunsold licenses per license year. In
WMUs 2B, 5C and 5D, there is no antlerless license
limit for hunters, and beginning Aug. 5 in these three
WMUs, hunters can apply for up to three licenses
per mailing until the allocation is exhausted.
Antlerless licenses for WMUs 2B, 5C and 5D also are
sold over the counter beginning Aug. 26.
Over-the-counter sales for licenses covering other
WMUs begin Oct. 7. Hunters may apply over the
counter to county treasurers for any other WMU
with antlerless licenses remaining.
Alisting of antlerless licenses allocated by WMU, as
well as the remaining allocation, can be viewed on
the Game Commissions website (www.pgc.state.
pa.us), by clicking onDoe License Update in the
Quick Clicks box in the right-hand column of the
homepage.
Illegal bat removal
The owner and one employee of a Scranton-based
business pleaded guilty to conducting nuisance
wildlife control activities without a permit, in
violation of state law.
Ace Bat and Wildlife Control owner Nelson E. Carter,
of Susquehanna, and employee Ralph J. Frederick,
of Dunmore, each were ordered to pay $300 in fnes,
plus court costs.
Additionally, Magisterial District Judge Paul Ware
ordered the men pay $750 in restitution to a
Scranton family for medical expenses incurred
because a bat removed fromtheir home was not
submitted for rabies testing as required by the state
Department of Health.
AGame Commission nuisance wildlife control
operator permit is required for any individual to
ofer or conduct nuisance wildlife control services
in Pennsylvania, explained Game Commission
Northeast Region LawEnforcement Supervisor
Mark Rutkowski. Prospective agents are required to
pass a written examination that covers the subject
areas of control methods, euthanasia, laws and
regulations, wildlife diseases, and public relations.
This companys permit was revoked in 2011 and
any work performed after that date was in direct
violation of the law, added Rutkowski.
Charges were fled by Wayne County District Wildlife
Conservation Ofcer James McCarthy after a
lengthy investigation into the operations of the
company.
The guilty pleas were accepted June 25.
The Game Commission will be taking action to have
its agency logo, and verbiage indicating that the
company is licensed to conduct nuisance wildlife
control activities in the state of Pennsylvania,
removed fromthe companys website.
DMAP permits
also available
The licenses county treasurers will place on sale
Monday arent the only option hunters have for tags
to harvest antlerless deer.
Pennsylvania Game Commission Executive Director
Carl G. Roe reminds hunters that antlerless permits
through the Deer Management Assistance Program
(DMAP) remain available for some properties,
and can be purchased through the Pennsylvania
Automated License System(PALS).
DMAP is a Game Commission programdesigned
to help landowners manage deer numbers on
their properties. Eligible landowners include those
owning: public lands; private lands where no fee is
charged for hunting; and hunting clubs established
prior to Jan. 1, 2000 that are owned in fee title and
have provided a club charter and list of current
members to the agency.
Hunters may obtain up to two DMAP antlerless
deer permits per property, and DMAP permits do
not impact a hunters eligibility to apply for and
receive antlerless deer licenses issued for Wildlife
Management Units (WMUs).
DMAP permits went on sale June 10, along with
general hunting licenses, and are sold out for some
properties. Hunters purchasing the remaining
permits may do so at any time and do not have to
followthe regular antlerless license schedule.
DMAP permit fees are $10.70 for resident hunters;
and $35.70 for nonresident hunters. The permit
can be used to harvest one antlerless deer on
the specifc DMAP area. Maps for the properties
are to be provided to hunters by the landowners.
Landowners may not charge or accept any
contribution froma hunter for DMAP permits or
coupons.
Hunters may not use DMAP permits to harvest an
antlered deer. Hunters may use DMAP permits to
harvest an antlerless deer anytime antlerless deer
are legal, including during the entire statewide two-
week frearms deer season (Dec. 2-14). However,
WMU-specifc antlerless deer licenses may only be
used only during the last seven days of the season
(Dec. 7-14) in WMUs 2A, 2C, 2D, 2E, 2F, 2G, 2H, 3B,
3C, 4B, 4D and 4E.
All DMAP permits are available through PALS. For
DMAP unit numbers, the Game Commission has
posted a listing of all public landowners and those
private landowners who did not request DMAP
coupons.
Those private landowners who requested DMAP
coupons to present to hunters to redeemfor DMAP
permits will not appear on the website. However,
these landowners generally have a limited number
of coupons available and already have identifed a
sufcient number of hunters to receive their allotted
coupons.
The website provides an alphabetical listing of
DMAP properties for each county in which DMAP
properties are located. Each listing will provide
the following information: DMAP property
number; contact information, including name,
address, telephone number and e-mail address
(when available); total number of acres for the
property; and total number of coupons issued
for the property.
Notes
From page 10C
Suskie Bassmasters Wednesday Night
Tournament
Last weeks tournament on July 3 was cancelled
due to high river conditions. Tournaments are held
only if the river level does not exceed a dpeth of 7
feet and falling. For more information on the status
of the July 10 tournament, visit www.facebook.
com/SuskieBassmaster or www.facebook.com/
groups/343787919082535
Harveys Lake Wednesday Night Bass Tournament
July 3 results:
1. James Wright, 3.01-pound largemouth
2. Cody Cutter, 2.67-pound largemouth
3. Dwayne Craig, 2.62-pound largemouth
4. John Niezgoda, 2.57-pound largemouth
5. JefYagloski, 2.54-pound smallmouth
Top fve standings:
1. Dave Andrews, 8.29 pounds
2. Mike Peranto, 7.47 pounds
3. Nat Lussi, 6.55 pounds
4. Charles Duddeck, 6.36 pounds
5. Cody Cutter, 5.89 pounds
To submit results from a tournament, email them to
tvenesky@timesleader.com.
Upcoming area bass tournaments (If you would like
to add a tournament to the list, email TomVenesky at
tvenesky@timesleader.com):
The Suskie Bassmasters will host a Wednesday
tournament each week on the Susquehanna River
through Sept. 1. The tournament will be held at the
boat launch in Nesbitt Park and registration begins at
4:30 p.m. Launch is at 6 p.m. and weigh-in is at 9 p.m.
For more information, visit www.teamrosencrans.org.
The Harveys Lake Wednesday Night Bass
Tournament will run weekly through Sept. 11. The
championship round will include the top-30 anglers
based on total weight over 12 weeks and will be worth
$1,200. The lunker tournament (each angler weighing
one fsh) will begin at 6 p.m. with weigh-in at 9 p.m.
at the launch. Registration is at 4:30 p.m. Entry fee
is $15 with a one-time $10 fee to be eligible for the
championship round. For more information, call Duke
Dalley at 991-0080 or visit www.dukedalley.com.
PA Bass Casters will hold an open tournament
at Lake Carey on July 14, launching out of Franks
Marina at safe light with a 1:30 p.m. weigh-in. For
more information call Dan at 762-1469 or visit mysite.
verizon.net/vzerytf.
The Eastern PA Deaf Bass Anglers will host an
open bass tournament today at White Oaks in
Wayne County at the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat
Commission boat launch. Entry fee is $40 per boat
(two people) plus an optional $10 big bass fee.
Start is safe light and weigh-in is at 1 p.m. For more
information, contact Vincent Sabatini at 309-0243 or
email basslunker40@aol.com.
WEEkLy BASS
TourNAmENT rESuLTS
AND STANDiNgS
The Associated Press
SOUTHAMPTON, N.Y. Hundreds of
bluesh are turning up dead off the coast
of Long Island and nobody knows why.
Researchers at the Marine Animal
Disease Laboratory at Stony Brook
University are investigating what could
be killing hundreds of cocktail bluesh
discovered this week in and around the
Shinnecock Bay.
Professor Christopher Gobler of Stony
Brooks School of Marine and Atmospheric
Sciences tells Newsday hes puzzled as to
why just bluesh are turning up dead. The
Shinnecock Reservation is also home to
mackerels, sand sharks and dog sh. None
of them are turning up dead.
The paper reports that most of the bluesh
recovered are too decomposed to test, but a
live one showed no obvious signs of disease.
Researchers expect preliminary test
results later in July.
Bluefsh mysteriously
dying of Long Island
AP Photo
Fans line up to exchange their New England Patriots Aaron Hernandez football jerseys at
gillette Stadium in Foxborough, mass., on Saturday. The Patriots are offering a new jersey
to all fans who want to get rid of the one they bought with Hernandezs name on it.
The Associated Press
FOXBOROUGH, Mass.
Hundreds of one-time fans are trad-
ing in their Aaron Hernandez jerseys.
The New England Patriots are let-
ting fans trade in their No. 81 jer-
seys for a different one on Saturday
and Sunday.
The ex-Patriots tight end has
been charged with the murder in
the death of 27-year-old semi-pro
football player Odin Lloyd. He has
pleaded not guilty.
The Patriots released Hernandez
shortly after he was arrested on
June 26.
Team spokesman Stacey James
says children love wearing Patriots
gear but may not understand why
their parents dont want them wear-
ing Hernandezs jersey.
The jerseys must have been pur-
chased at the team shop at Gillette
Stadium or its online store.
Meanwhile, Ohio State coach
Urban Meyer said it is wrong and
irresponsible to connect him or his
former Florida staff to the murder
charge facing Aaron Hernandez.
In texts to The Columbus
Dispatch and The Gainesville Sun
on Saturday, Meyer said there was
no cover-up of drug tests during
Hernandezs time at Florida. Meyer
coached Florida from 2005 to 2010.
These were Meyers rst comments
about Hernandez after he declined to
comment earlier this week.
The coach said in the texts he
received an email from a friend
where there is an accusation of mul-
tiple failed drug tests covered up
by the university or the coaching
staff. Meyer said that is absolutely
not true and Hernandez was held
to the same drug testing policy as
every other player.
Hernandez played three years
under Meyer at Florida. The former
New England Patriot is charged
in the shooting death of semi-pro
football player Odin Lloyd. He has
pleaded not guilty.
Prayers and thoughts are with
the family and friends of the vic-
tim, Meyer texted. Relating or
blaming these serious charges to the
University of Florida, myself or our
staff is wrong and irresponsible.
During Meyers time with the
Gators, Florida had at least 31
arrests involving 25 players. Many
involved alcohol possession and
disorderly conduct, but a dozen
involved initial charges of felonies
or violent misdemeanors.
Hernandez was never arrested
during his three seasons with the
Gators. He was, however, suspend-
ed for the 2008 season opener and
later acknowledged the suspension
was punishment for testing positive
for marijuana.
In other Hernandez develop-
ments Saturday:
A man charged as an acces-
sory in the murder case is to be
arraigned Monday in Attleboro,
Mass. Ernest Wallace, of Miramar,
Fla., was turned over on Friday to
Massachusetts ofcials.
Ex-fans line up to dump Hernandez jersey
Tim reynolds
AP Sports Writer
CORAL GABLES, Fla.
This stretch of years for Miami
athletics will likely be best
remembered for the Nevin
Shapiro booster scandal and
the stigma that came as part
of the lengthy NCAA investiga-
tion that it sparked.
In the eyes of Hurricanes ath-
letic director Blake James, it
could also be remembered for
something else.
Even as another year passed
under the cloud of the Shapiro
mess which may actually
end in the coming weeks, if
all goes right for Miami the
Hurricanes emerged with more
reasons to be bullish about
their future than ever before.
One year after sending nine
teams to NCAA tournament
play, the Hurricanes sent 15
teams there in the academic
year that just ended, something
Miami ofcials are touting as a
record showing for the school.
I wouldnt say its as much
about where we are, James
said in an interview with The
Associated Press. I would say
its more about where we can go.
A printout on the conference
table where he sat told the story.
It was a simple chart, with the 18
varsity sports that Miami offers
listed down the left side of the
page, and columns for the last
15 or so years stretched across
the top. Baseball which has
been to 41 consecutive NCAA
tournaments had an X in
each of its columns.
And that program had plenty
of company on the NCAA-
bound list.
Mens and womens basketball,
mens and womens cross coun-
try, mens diving, womens golf,
womens soccer, womens swim-
ming and diving, womens ten-
nis, mens and womens indoor
track, mens and womens out-
door track and volleyball all qual-
ied for NCAA play. Football,
had it not been subjected to a
self-imposed postseason ban for
a second straight year because of
the Shapiro scandal, would have
made it 16 teams on that list.
Out of a possible 18, James
knows it was a good year, even
though while it was happen-
ing the Hurricanes themselves
werent exactly aware of the
signicance of it all. James said
he half-seriously asked one of
his staff members this spring if
every Miami team during this
academic year had been NCAA-
bound, and a quick check of the
records showed the Hurricanes
were closer to that goal than
ever before.
When I look at this and see
the success we had in putting
teams in postseason, and rec-
ognizing that number would
be bigger if not for the self-
imposed situation with football,
it has me excited, James said.
Even though the summer is
now in full swing, it still might
be considered a somewhat
unnerving time for Miami ath-
letics.
Theres plenty of opti-
mism about what awaits this
fall, especially with football
which, if not for the self-
imposed ban, would have
been in the Atlantic Coast
Conference championship game
last season expected to be in
the mix for the ACC title. By
the time the Hurricanes open
camp, there is a chance that the
Shapiro scandal might essen-
tially be a thing of the past.
Hurricanes hope to build on
NCAAtourney momentum
Theres a chance that this years
total could increase as well.
Its hard to say, but in all likeli-
hood more remain to be counted,
Barber said. Our tally was 249 just
a week or two ago, and three more
were reported since that time, so Id
be surprised if the preliminary num-
ber doesnt grow.
Locally, eagles can be found
virtually anywhere along the
Susquehanna River or other large
bodies of water. Professional natu-
ralist Rick Koval said he has counted
four nesting pairs in a single year in
Luzerne County and as many as 25
eagles in one day while surveying
migratory birds ying over Council
Cup near Wapwallopen.
Ive been birding in Luzerne
County for almost 30 years and back
then seeing an eagle was almost
unheard of, Koval said. Now, you
can take a boat ride on any stretch
of the river and almost gaurantee a
sighting.
Sightings arent limited to places
along the Susquehanna River either.
Diane Madl, environmental educa-
tion specialist at Nescopeck State
Park, said she has seen eagles y
over the park and the Lehigh Gorge
area over the last wo months.
Its certainly a lot more common
to see than it was years ago, Madl
said.
While the bald eagle popula-
tion grows stronger each year in
Pennsylvania, the birds remain clas-
sied as a threatened species state-
wide.
Koval said despite the suc-
cess, bald eagles still face chal-
lenges from wind turbines places
on migration routes, timbering
of nest trees in riparian corridors
and even a threat to a food source
with the die-off of smallmouth
bass in the lower stretches of the
Susquehanna River.
The recovery plan in the endan-
gered species act works, and the
bald eagle is an example of that,
Koval said. But we need to contin-
ue to protect and respect this spe-
cies to make sure we dont end up
listing it again.
Comeback
From page 10C
Bald eagle
numbers are
increasing in the
state, including
the northeast
region where
nests have been
confirmed along
the Susquehanna
river.
Joe Kosak |
Pennsylvania Game
Commission
rEWArD oFFErED
Poaching is a threat faced by all wildlife,
including the bald eagle. In May the
Pennsylvania Game Commission began
investigating the killing of two bald eagles
one in Cambria County and the other
in Butler County. Both birds died from
gunshot wounds.
Because the incidents occurred in May,
ofcials said its possible the eagles
couldve been tending nests.
The Pennsylvania Federation of Sportsmen
and the Humane Society of the United
States, have joined the commission to ofer
a reward in the Cambria case. It topped
$7,250 at last count.
PAGE 12C SUNDAY, JULY 3, 2013 www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER
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CREOLE QUEEN
GRANULATED SUGAR
5 LBS.
TRIDENT SALMON BURGERS
3 LBS.
COBBLESTREET
SLICED MEAT
OVEN ROASTED TURKEY,
HONEY HAM OR SMOKED
HAM - 2.5 LBS.
KRAFT BBQ SAUCE
80 OZ.
USDA CHOICE BLACK
CANYON ANGUS BONELESS
FLAT IRON STEAKS
HORMEL COOKED
PULLED PORK
5 LBS.
POST HONEY ROASTED
BUNCHES OF OATS
48 OZ.
EMINENCE MARCAL
BELLA DINNER NAPKINS
17X15
100 CT.
BRISK LEMONADE OR
TEA DRINKS
ALL FLAVORS
1 GALLON
HERR'S PRETZELS OR
TORTILLA CHIPS
13-16 OZ.
SIGNATURE SELECT
CORN ON THE COB, POTATO
WEDGES, SAUSAGE
BISCUITS, CORN DOGS OR
MINI CHEESEBURGERS
HELUVA GOOD
CHEESE STICKS
EXTRA SHARP OR SHARP
WHITE CHEDDAR -2 LBS.
GREEN LABEL
PAPER PLATES
9 INCH
LIGHT WEIGHT
100 CT.
ADIRONDACK SODA
ALL VARIETIES
2 LITER
ON THE VINE TOMATOES
BOUNTIFUL HARVEST
VEGETABLES
CUT CORN, DICED PEAS &
CARROTS OR SWEET GARDEN
PEAS - 2.5 LBS.
$
2
79
$
5
99
$
10
49
$
6
99
$
10
99
$
9
99 $
3
99 $
5
99 $
4
99
$
16
99
$
5
49
$
3
99 $
5
99
$
21
99
$
3
99 $
2
69
$
6
49
99
$
6
99
$
1
49
$
2
39
/LB.
/EA.
/LB.
/LB. /LB.
USDA CHOICE BLACK
CANYON ANGUS WHOLE
BONELESS SIRLOIN TIPS
8-10 LB. AVG.
SILVERBROOK
SOUR CREAM
5 LBS.
FRESH ANGUS
GROUND BEEF
10 LB. TUBE AVG.
CALIFORNIA RED
SEEDLESS GRAPES
$
2
49
/LB.
/LB.
$
2
99
CORN FED BONELESS
CENTER CUT PORK LOINS
8-10 LB. AVG.
CHOCK FULL ONUTS
ORIGINAL OR
GOURMET BLEND
26 OZ.
/LB.
/LB.
89
$
2
29 $
2
59 $
2
19
99

99

GREAT LAKES
SLICED CHEESE
MONTEREY JACK, PEPPER
JACK OR PROVOLONE
24 OZ.
KRAFT SALAD DRESSING
ALL VARIETIES
16 OZ.
HY TOP PAPER TOWELS
8 CT.
$
4
99 $
4
49
EXTRA LARGE
HONEYDEW OR SEEDLESS
WATERMELON
CHEF PIERRE CREAM PIE
CHOCOLATE, BANANA OR
COCONUT
27 OZ.
GOLDEN CRISP BATTERED
MOZZARELLA STICKS
2 LBS.
MANCINI THREE PACK
FRIED ONIONS, ROASTED
PEPPERS & FRIED ONION
AND PEPPERS
3/12 OZ.
FRESH CALIFORNIA
JUMBO CELERY
BUNCH
2
$
5
F
O
R
4
$
5
F
O
R
$
1
29
/LB. /LB.
/EA.
3
$
5
F
O
R
80008120
K
SundayBuSInESS
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, July 7, 2013 PAGE 1D
Most of us have experienced bad
service or a defective product and have
been tempted to go off on the company.
But think twice before doing that.
Thats because there really is some-
thing to the saying, You can catch
more ies with honey than with vin-
egar. But more important, you can get
better results if you act more strategi-
cally.
So be the squeaky
wheel, but squeak
smartly.
Your rst smart
move is to be mindful
of where you shop.
Your rst step to
resolving a problem
comes before there
even is one when
making a purchase,
Anthony Giorgianni,
associate nance editor
at Consumer Reports,
wrote in an article on speaking up to
resolve complaints.
The place to start is by picking
a responsible vendor, added Micah
Solomon, a customer service consul-
tant, speaker and author of High-Tech,
High-Touch Customer Service.
If you went into a store with a ter-
rible reputation and purchased from
them, Solomon said, to some extent,
you know what youre getting into, or
you should. Ideally, you want to start
with a company that is responsive to
customers.
Also, examine the details before you
buy.
Review the terms, looking beyond
the price, warranty, or other basics,
Giorgianni wrote. And dont forget to
read the ne print, even if companies
often make it long and difcult to read.
Though its sure to be tedious, you
should comb through the companys
refund policies, frequently asked ques-
tions, and terms and conditions,
Giorgianni said.
If youve done your homework
beforehand and theres still a problem,
heres what you need to know to com-
plain effectively:
WHAT WENT WRONG? First off,
ask yourself if your complaint is valid.
Are you justied in complaining and
if so, what is an appropriate response
or action that youre seeking, the result
youre hoping to get out of your com-
plaint? said Todd Mark, vice presi-
dent of education at Consumer Credit
Counseling Service of Greater Dallas,
who teaches a class on knowing your
rights.
Next, Consumer Action, which pub-
lishes a guide on how to complain,
advises that you ask yourself these
questions:
Why are you dissatised? Is it a
question of losing money because
goods or services you received werent
what was promised, or was there out-
right fraud? Did a representative of the
company treat you rudely?
GO TO THE SOURCE: Dont run
right away to a third party, like a gov-
ernment agency. Instead, complain
directly to the source rst.
Often, people will escalate immedi-
ately, Mark said. Dont be afraid to
ght back, but start with the normal
chain of command.
Dont immediately think, Who is
the biggest dog I can call in this ght?
he said. Theres a time to escalate
and theres a time not to.
If the company continues to ignore
your complaint, then consider going to
a government agency.
Government agencies will not
always intervene to settle your case,
but some will contact the company to
open up communication, Consumer
Action said.
Just being contacted by the govern-
ment may be enough to get the com-
pany to resolve your complaint.
BE REALISTIC, BE SPECIFIC:
Make your demands realistic. If you
lost your cable TV for a week, for
example, dont demand the cable com-
pany pay you $1 million.
That would be rather asinine, Mark
said. But you could say, if you lost
cable for a week through no fault of
your own, at the very least youre not
going to pay one-fourth of your bill for
that month.
Also, be specic about what you
want. Are you looking for a refund, a
replacement or something else?
And let the company know if youre a
repeat customer.
A company is more likely to try to
satisfy good customers, so let it know
that you and your family are frequent
shoppers and that you like its products
or services, Giorgianni said. If you
go in guns blazing, the company might
gure it has already lost you as a cus-
tomer.
Think
strategically
whencomplaining
about a business
Pamela Yip
Personal
Finance
See YIP | 5D
Patrick McAvoy knew his
job had some drawbacks.
As a contract employee at
the University of Maryland-
Baltimore, he lacked ben-
ets and long-term stabil-
ity, but he stayed on as an
events coordinator for three
years, hoping to be hired full
time and seeing little oppor-
tunity elsewhere.
This year, the job market
shifted, and by spring, he
had two offers.
It was pretty stunning.
You send out resumes so
many times and dont hear
anything back. Then you
hear back from multiple
places, and all of them are
good opportunities for your
future, said McAvoy, 28,
who turned down an infor-
mation technology job at the
Johns Hopkins University to
be an events planner for the
Downtown Partnership of
Baltimore.
McAvoys good fortune
illustrates a signicant shift
in the slowly recovering
job market. As hiring picks
up across the nation, more
people are leaving their jobs
voluntarily a promising
sign for workers, companies
and the economy.
The quit rate the
percentage of American
workers who leave jobs vol-
untarily has risen to the
highest level in four years.
That shows that workers are
more condent about nd-
ing new jobs, said Sophia
Koropeckyj, an economist
with Moodys Economy.
com.
When people change jobs,
they (usually) change to bet-
ter jobs and change to high-
er-paying jobs, Koropeckyj
said. When people dont
change jobs, they can be
dissatised, and morale is
low. If theyre there because
theyre afraid to leave the
job, that could have an effect
on productivity. The ability
to change jobs is a good sign
in the economy.
The number of available
jobs, which plummeted
to less than 2.2 million in
July 2009 during the reces-
sion, has averaged nearly
3.8 million since the begin-
ning of 2013, according to
the federal Bureau of Labor
Statistics.
Despite the nations job
growth, the economic recov-
ery has been slow and
its prospects remain uncer-
tain. Many job seekers have
been forced to accept lower-
paying jobs than they held
before the recession.
Sequestration, the auto-
matic federal spending cuts
designed to reduce the de-
cit, as well as the expiration
of the payroll tax holiday
have prevented the economy
from growing more quickly,
said Richard P. Clinch, direc-
tor of economic research for
the University of Baltimores
Jacob France Institute.
Additionally, the global
recession and the slower
growth of Chinas economy
have reduced exports.
Until consumers become
more optimistic about the
Job turnover
increases in
recovering
market
Lorraine MirabeLLa
The Baltimore Sun
MCT photo
Patrick Mcavoy, 28, is leaving his
job with the University of Maryland
baltimore in baltimore, Maryland,
for a event coordinator position
with the Downtown Partnership of
baltimore.
WorkPLace
See WORK | 5D
I know the calendar just
turned into July but back
to school sales have already
sprung up. Toys R Us is
hitting the ground running
with its offers including
a free lunch kit with any
backpack priced $12.99 or
higher. While youre there, if
you have childrens birthday
parties coming up, grab a
gift such as Crayola wonder
and extreme coloring items,
which are buy-one, get-two
free. All Crayola crayons,
markers and paper products
are also buy-one, get-two
free.
Kmart is having a huge
buy-one, get-one free ath-
letic footwear sale for the
entire family. If you need
some shoes, especially
for the little tykes that go
through them often, stock
up.
Are you sick of ring up
that grill and eating vari-
ous forms of pork and beef?
If so, head over to Burger
King today and snag an
original chicken sandwich
for just $1.04.
If indeed you are not tired
of meat, head to
Weis and grab three
packages of Weis
Quality cooked baby
back ribs for $12.
Theyre typically $5
per package if you
buy them solo.
Shur Save has
blueberries and
strawberries on sale
for $1.98 as part of
its week-long pro-
duce sale. Also on
the menu, a pound of peach-
es, a four-ounce package of
sliced mushrooms, a pound
bag of baby carrots and a
head of Romaine lettuce,
all for 98 cents. And whole,
seedless watermelons are
$3.98 each. Youll need a
Gold Card to take advantage
of each of these offers.
There are some nice
glossy coupons in todays
Times Leader but one of
the better ones can be found
at CVS when you scan your
Extra Care Card at the in-
store coupon center. Get a
$2 off Softsoap or
Irish Spring body
wash coupon this
week. The items
are already on sale
for $2.99 so get the
product for just 99
cents.
Even though there
arent many coupons
in newspapers today
because its a holi-
day weekend, Price
Chopper is running
its popular Coupon Doubler
promotion. Find four cou-
pon doublers on the front
of the circular in todays
Times Leader. They can be
coupled with most $1 manu-
facturer coupons to get you
$2 in savings.
If you have a baby or one
on the way, etailer Magic
Beans is in the midst of its
annual 31 gifts in 31 days
promotion where you can
enter each day this month
for an awesome prize. They
include cribs, car seats,
strollers and more. Go to
http://mbeans.com/31days/
to learn more and enter.
Speaking of baby items,
Rite Aid is having a big
Procter & Gamble sale
including Pampers super
pack of diapers for $24.49.
Theres a $1.50 off coupon
in todays paper. The store
is also running a promo-
tion that gets you $10 in
+Up Rewards when you
spend $30 in select Procter
& Gamble items found on
todays circular cover and
pages 7 and 8. The Pampers
alone will get you more than
two-thirds of the way there.
AndrewM. Seder, a Times Leader staf
writer, may be reached at 570-829-
7269. If you knowof any local steals
or deals, send themto aseder@times-
leader.com. FollowAndrewon Twitter
@TLAndrewSeder for news, steals and
deals throughout the week.
Back to school savings have already begun
andrew M.
Seder
Steals & Deals
It used to be youd circle the airport
loop, get chased away from baggage
claim by police, or park precariously on
the shoulder of ramps and roadways.
That was before Philadelphia
International Airport opened a conve-
nient 150-space cellphone waiting lot in
December 2009 on airport property _
just one minute from the terminals.
Great. Terric. Handy. Easy to nd.
And, best of all, free.
Since tighter post-Sept. 11, securi-
ty, cellphone lots _ free parking areas
where people picking up travelers can
wait _ have sprung up at many of the
largest U.S. airports.
The word has gotten out, and its
been very well-received, said Keith
Brune, deputy director of Philadelphia
airport operations.
Drivers interviewed recently among
about 80 to 100 cars streaming into the
lot were enthusiastic.
Its wonderful to have this and not
have to go into short-term parking,
and worry that if the ight is delayed,
you will have to pay extra, said Jamie
Kravec of West Chester, Pa., waiting for
the Im here call from her boyfriend,
ying in from Seattle.
Theres less hassle. We used to sit
out on the highway waiting for peo-
ple, said Joyce Miller of Townsend,
Del., who with her husband, Arthur,
was picking up a family member from
Tennessee.
Its beautiful that theyve got all
these ight display boards, she said.
Its a sign of the times. We all use cell-
phones.
Improving trafc safety and con-
gestion was a key motive for the lots.
Since 9/11, the Transportation Security
Administration has not allowed cars to
dwell at baggage claim.
Cellphone lots range from a paved lot
to a complex with portable toilets, elec-
tronic ight display screens, food, and
free Wi-Fi.
The Charlotte, N.C., airport has two
cellphone lots; Phoenix Sky Harbor
Airport has three.
Pittsburgh International offers the
rst hour of parking for free in the
extended-term parking lot; the sec-
ond hour costs $1.
Some airports impose a time limit
to discourage drivers from lingering.
Others require drivers to be with their
cars at all times.
The airport in Portland, Ore., is seek-
ing a developer to build a fuel, conve-
nience store, and fast-food travel cen-
ter where those waiting for ights can
grab coffee and ll up their gas tank
while keeping tabs on a ights status.
Cincinnatis airport plans to put a gas
station at its entrance road with a larg-
er waiting area, convenience store and
a Subway or Dunkin Donuts, said Paul
Hegedus, the airports vice president of
commercial management.
Denver International Airport will
relocate its cellphone lot next to a gas
station and a Wendys. When the new
waiting area opens this fall, it will have
a food court with a Subway, Dunkin
Donuts, Baja Fresh Mexican Grill, and
Zpizza, said airport spokeswoman
Julie Smith.
The Tampa, Fla., airports cellphone
lot features food trucks, Wi-Fi, and a
pavilion with restrooms and vending
machines.
Some people will come just for the
food truck, not even to pick up a pas-
senger, said airport spokeswoman
Janet Zink. A list of food trucks is post-
ed weekly on the airports Facebook
page.
Many cellphone lots are basic
parking areas, lighted at night and
patrolled by police but without con-
cessions or restrooms. They include
Baltimore-Washington International,
Los Angeles, Washington Dulles, and
Reagan National airports.
Between 4 and 10 p.m., when
Philadelphia airport is busiest, the cell-
phone lot consistently has 75 or 80 cars
_ and is 100 percent full around holi-
days.
The lot was packed before 5 p.m. on
a recent weekday and an overow of a
dozen cars were parked on Route 291,
just outside the cellphone lot. In one of
them, Derrick Gray of Lumberton, N.J.,
said he drove through the lot once and,
not nding a space, looped around and
parked on 291.
Its an overow crowd here. I think
it could have been a little bigger, he
said, referring to the lot. It beats rid-
ing around the airport.
With a dozen signs directing motor-
ists to the spot, Pennsylvania state
police are issuing fewer tickets to driv-
ers parked illegally on ramps.
But old habits die hard _ and some cars
still congregatehaphazardlyonroadways.
LinDa LoYD
The Philadelphia Inquirer
Cellphone lots become a key airport feature
MCT photo
big signs guide people to the cell phone lot at Philadelphia international airport in June.
MCT photo
Jamie kravec (not in photo) brought dog Max along to pick up her boyfriend at the airport. They waited in the cell phone lot at Philadelphia international
airport.
See CELL | 5D
PAGE 2D Sunday, July 7, 2013 BUSINESS www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER
Howto neutralize a colleagues one-upmanship
Q. I have an older co-
worker who constantly
tries to prove that hes
smarter than I am. Tom
never went to college,
while I have an advanced
degree. Although I never
mention my education,
he brings it up all the
time.
Because we work in a
scientic eld, Tom likes
to search for obscure
pieces of information and
quiz me about them. If I
dont know the answer,
he says, Well, youre the
one that went to college.
But if I do know the
answer, he immediately
goes online to nd a way
to contradict me.
These ridiculous
debates are a complete
waste of time. Even
though I spent six years
of my life studying this
eld, Tom will never
accept anything I say.
I am so frustrated that
I have considered com-
plaining to our boss. Do
you have any other sug-
gestions?
A.: Although you prob-
ably dont realize it, you
are actually encouraging
Toms childish behavior.
In the language of ofce
politics, your insecure
colleague is playing
a superiority game.
Superiority players com-
pensate for feelings of
inadequacy by trying to
appear more important
or informed than others.
The best way to shut
down such a game is sim-
ply to stop playing. Since
Toms underlying objec-
tive is to aggravate you,
expressing annoyance
or engaging in point-
less arguments will only
motivate him to continue.
Therefore, you must
break this communication
pattern by switching to a
neutral response.
For example, when
Tom points out that
you went to college,
just reply, Thats true.
If he contradicts you,
say, Thats an interest-
ing point. Then drop
the subject. Should you
unwittingly become
trapped in a verbal con-
test, end the interaction
by saying, We could
probably debate this for
a long time, but I have to
get back to work.
The secret to success is
delivering all these com-
ments calmly and with
a smile. To reduce your
irritation, keep reminding
yourself that Toms obvi-
ous insecurity is actually
rather pathetic. Once his
verbal jabs stop produc-
ing the desired result, he
will eventually abandon
the game because it will
no longer be rewarding.
Finally, please resist
the urge to take this petty
complaint to your boss.
Managers need to deal
with business problems,
not personal squabbles.
Besides, if you report
that Tom is annoying you
by trying to act superior,
you will sound exactly
like a tattling 10-year-old.
Q: Our new manager
said that I look like the
Wendys hamburger girl
because of my red hair.
I didnt know what she
meant, so I emailed a co-
worker and said I think
this manager is crazy.
Who is Wendy?
My co-worker showed
the email to our boss,
who came to my desk and
asked why I thought she
was crazy. Is the lesson
that you should not share
your thoughts with co-
workers?
A: There are actually
three lessons here. Dont
share personal opinions
with colleagues who
have no common sense.
Dont ever put negative
remarks about others in
an email. And nally, if
you ever become a man-
ager, dont make idiotic
observations about your
employees physical attri-
butes.
Marie G. McIntyre is a workplace
coach and the author of Secrets
to Winning at Ofce Politics. Send
in questions and get free coaching
tips at http://www.yourofce-
coach.com, or followher on Twitter
ofcecoach.
Marie G. Mcintyre
McClatchy-Tribune News Service
OFFice cOacH
cOrpOrate Ladder
GeiSinGer WyOMinG
VaLLey MedicaL center
Dr. Mark M. Bernardi has been appoint-
ed director of the cardiac catheterization
laboratory at The Richard
and Marion Pearsall Heart
Hospital. He is a graduate
of the Philadelphia College
of Osteopathic Medicine;
completed fellowships in
cardiovascular disease and
interventional cardiology
at the Cleveland Clinic and
served as the chief fellow at
the Cleveland Clinic Foundation; completed
an internal medicine residency at Geisinger
Medical Center, Danville; and a rotating
internship at the University of Medicine &
Dentistry.
HOWeLL BeneFit
SerViceS, inc.
Brian Sickler has
joined the company as an
employee benets consul-
tant. He specializes in pro-
viding health and welfare
benet plans and business
technology solutions. He is
licensed in Pennsylvania for
the sale of life, accident and
health insurance products.
a J LUpUS
inSUrance aGency
Michelle Mikitish has
joined the agency as a
commercial lines producer.
Mikitish received her BS
in Biochemistry from Penn
State University.
tHe WyOMinG cOUnty
cHaMBer OF cOMMerce
Gina Severcool Getts has been hired as
the new executive director effective July 8.
She brings extensive experience working
for non- prot organizations, including as a
fund raising coordinator for the Muscular
Dystrophy Association, and event planning.
She lives in Jessup and is a 2001 graduate
of Kings College.
Open FOr BUSineSS
Bellas Sub
Shoppe & More
at 310 Wyoming
Avenue in
Wyoming will
hold its grand
opening Monday
at 11 a.m. Owned
by Gallo the
shops hours of
operation will be
Monday through
Friday, 11 a.m.
to 6 p.m. There
is limited seat-
ing in-house but
pick-up and free
local delivery
will be offered.
To place an order or to have a menu faxed,
call 693-2005.
Shoe Show, Inc. announces the opening
of a Shoe Dept. Encore store at Wyoming
Valley Mall in Wilkes-Barre.The store is
open Monday through Saturday from 10
a.m. to 9 p.m. and Sundays from 11 a.m.
to 6 p.m. Its phone number is 822-3830.
This brings the total number of stores
in the chain to 1,124.The company also
operates a Shoe Dept. store in the Arena
Hub Plaza in Wilkes-Barre Township and a
Shoe Show store in the Pittston Crossings
in Pittston Township.
According to the Concord, N.C.-based
company, a Shoe Dept. Encore store aver-
ages approximately two-to-three times
the square footage of a standard Shoe
Dept. store. Shoe Dept. Encore caters to
a broader range of customers by offering
a wider variety of shoes and price points,
the company said.
dr. Bernardi
Sickler
Mikitish
charles, Bellina and charlie
Gallo stand in front of the
soon-to-open Bellas Subs in
Wyoming.
Each year, Andy Ruben bought
his daughter new shinguards for
soccer, stashing the old gear and
waiting for the replacements to
labor through the delivery system
to his door. But as he watched local
girls outgrow their own sports
equipment, Ruben realized that the
items he wanted were gathering
dust in garages and closets around
his neighborhood.
Our whole retail model over the
last 50 years has focused on keep-
ing the industrial machine churn-
ing out items, said Ruben, who
until 2007 had an up-close view as
the head of sustainability at Wal-
Mart Stores Inc., the king of mass-
produced goods. But if my friend
already has shinguards that hes not
using, I dont need to buy them for
myself.
So Ruben and environmentalist
Adam Werbach dreamed up Yerdle,
a website they launched during
last years Black Friday shopping
swarm. Members use the platform
to offer underutilized goods _
clothing, electronics, even pianos _
to friends and acquaintances free of
charge. Ruben said the setup, which
now has 18,000 participants, is less
anonymous than Craigslist and
more eco-minded than Facebook.
The young San Francisco compa-
ny is one of the newest manifesta-
tions of whats known as collective
consumerism, or the circular or
sharing economy. Instead of trying
to shrink a products environmen-
tal footprint from the production
side by making it with less mate-
rial, advocates _ especially cloth-
ing and shoe companies _ are try-
ing to extend its usefulness on the
consumer end. Retailers such as
Hello Rewind are selling goods and
products reworked from discarded
scraps. Textile makers are experi-
menting with longer-lasting fabrics.
Some businesses are asking
shoppers to scale back their buy-
ing. It ts perfectly with the new
movement toward sustainability in
the fashion industry, said British
designer Orsola de Castro, whose
From Somewhere brand is consid-
ered an eco-apparel pioneer. Hyper
production and the sheer availabil-
ity of cheap clothing has made us
forget the value of maintaining and
repurposing clothes and textiles.
Each year, Americans trash a
prodigious portion of their closets:
26 billion pounds of apparel, tex-
tiles and footwear, according to the
Environmental Protection Agency.
The amount thrown out by con-
sumers surged 40 percent in 2009
from 1999 and is expected to zoom
up another 40 percent by 2019, the
agency said. The effort to scale it
all back has been around for years
via thrift stores, clothing swaps and
resale shops.
In 23 years of operation, Nike
Inc.s Reuse-a-Shoe program has
turned 28 million pairs of used
athletic footwear into coatings for
playing courts, running tracks and
other sports surfaces. Despite its
do-gooder glow, the circular econ-
omy isnt free of detractors. They
say it encourages green washing,
a phenomenon in which companies
claim to be eco-friendly but end
up contributing the same amount
of waste as their peers or more.
Others are skeptical of the move-
ments prot-earning potential.
Even Yerdles Ruben, who antici-
pates $1.3 million in angel investor
funding by year-end, said hes still
experimenting with how to make
money. Potential tactics include
paid transactions between users,
from which Yerdle would take a
commission, or moving services
with a fee, he said.
Still, collective consumerism
has gained traction as more com-
panies tout quality over quan-
tity amid rising textile prices and
fast-fashion fatigue. Theres also
the problem of tragic accidents in
foreign sweatshops, such as the
recent Bangladeshi factory build-
ing collapse that killed more than
1,000 people, many of them sew-
ing garments for Western retailers.
In addition, global warming and
other environmental concerns have
piqued Americans curiosity about
their consumption patterns.
Many major retailers are start-
ing with the easiest tactic: recy-
cling. H&M started its Long Live
Fashion program this year, giving
customers a 15 percent-off voucher
for each bag of old clothing brought
into stores. Garments too ratty to
be worn are reincarnated as new
material such as insulation and
carpet padding. Intact garb is sent
abroad as secondhand goods. North
Face has a similar setup, known as
Clothes the Loop. Gap ran its own
version in 2010. And Levi Strauss
& Co., through a partnership with
Goodwill, uses its product care tags
to encourage customers to donate
unwanted clothing.
But even with discounts and
other incentives, 64 percent of
Americans dont want to drive
more than ve miles to drop off
their old clothing or shoes, accord-
ing to USAgain, which recycles
textiles. Many prefer the conve-
nience of a nearby trash can. So
some companies are trying to add
extra value to worn-out fabrics and
unwanted scraps by using them to
create products that improve on the
original, a concept known as upcy-
cling. Liz Bordessa and her daugh-
ter, Christina Johnson, launched
Upcycle It Now to give Bordessas
tailoring and alterations business
a boost after the recession. The
Long Beach, Calif., company now
partners with Patagonia to make
yoga mat slings from old board
shorts and dog jackets out of used
rain gear and eece outerwear. Last
summer, Topshop featured a small
collection of clothing made from
discarded materials. Looptworks
of Portland, Ore., offers repur-
posed goods such as laptop sleeves
built from scrap wet-suit neoprene.
Reuse, remake, refrain
tiFFany HSU
Los Angeles Times
Anewconsumerism:
MCT photos
alice Schoenau, who works at Just alterations, shows pieces of deconstructed outerwear that will be used to create dog attire in Long Beach, calif.
alice Schoenau, who works at Just alterations, shows pieces of deconstructed outerwear
that will be used to create dog attire.
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER BUSINESS Sunday, July 7, 2013 PAGE 3D
STRONG START
The last time the stock market had this strong a January-through-
June run, Seinfeld was still making new episodes. The S&P 500
rose 12.6 percent in the first half of 2013, its best first-half of a
year since a 16.8 percent climb in 1998. Although it may be
worrisome for the market to pack a years worth of gains into six
months, it doesnt mean the index will necessarily run out of gas.
In 1998, the S&P 500 rose another 7.2 percent from July
through December. Thats similar to other times that the index has
gained more than 10 percent in the first half of a year: In the 20
times that its happened since 1945, the index has gained an
average of 7.5 percent in the second half of the year.
MarketPulse
JULY HIGH?
Summer hasnt historically been a
vacation for stock investors, and this
years has seen another rough start.
The Standard & Poors 500 index fell
1.5 percent in June for its first
monthly loss since October. That fits
with history: Since 1945, June has
been the fourth-worst month of the
year for the S&P 500, with a nearly
break-even average performance.
August has historically been the
third-worst month for the index, and
September has been the worst. But
July has been an exception, offering
some summertime relief. Its average
climb of 0.9 percent beats the
average gain of 0.7 percent for the
index across all 12 months, accord-
ing to S&P Capital IQ.
SAME LANGUAGE
How much does oil cost? De-
pending on where you are, the
answer is different. In New
York, traders talk about West
Texas Intermediate crude,
which is different from the Brent
crude that is traded in London.
The prices can diverge sharply.
Earlier this year, the U.S. price
was more than $20 per barrel
cheaper because of higher sup-
ply levels at U.S. distribution
points. But the difference has
narrowed in recent weeks. On
Monday, it was just $5. Much of
that is due to recent flooding in
Canada, which has cut off
some supplies to the U.S., Bar-
clays Research says. Source: S&P Capital IQ
Average monthly price change
of the S&P 500, since 1945
S A J J
0.87
-0.04
4.7
-0.01% -0.60
AP
Who he is: Deputy Chief U.S.
Economist, UBS
His outlook:
Expect more volatility
Interviewed by Christopher S.
Rugaber. Answers edited for con-
tent and clarity.
Drew Matus
Although many economists expect
sluggish growth for the rest of this
year, Drew Matus, deputy chief
U.S. economist at UBS, is more
optimistic. He expects growth will
accelerate and top an annual rate
of 3 percent in the next six months,
after growing at less than a 2
percent rate in the first half of this
year. Matus has previously worked
as an economist at Bank of America
Merrill Lynch and as a markets
analyst at the Federal Reserve.
What factors do you think will
accelerate growth?
Theres a lot of forward momentum
in the economy right now,
particularly with regard to the U.S.
consumer. So incomes adjusted
for inflation are doing OK. Theres
good job growth, theres improving
consumer confidence, and were
beginning to see signs of more
credit availability. All those factors
should be supportive of U.S.
consumption growth.
How will housing contribute to
faster growth?
Theres a pickup in demand for
homes, youve got a pickup in
home prices, which are all good,
and then we have all the secondary
effects. When people buy a home,
they might have to buy a TV, they
might have to buy bedding, they
might have to buy a car, and so
you begin to see all these second
level orders of activity occurring.
For most people, their home is
their single biggest asset and for
most people, theyre beginning to
see their home price inch up a bit,
whereas in the past few years the
news wasnt as good. Higher home
prices will encourage people to
spend more.
The Federal Reserve has
recently indicated that it may
slow its bond purchases and
mortgage and other interest
rates rose in response. Are you
worried that will slow growth?
We should bear in mind that those
increases in rates might also make
banks more willing to lend. Before,
with rates at a very, very low level,
you would be that much more
cautious about lending to someone
if you could charge them only 3
percent, rather than 4.5.
Theres no real indication that it
has impacted peoples willingness
to buy a home. Were still seeing
very healthy levels of housing
activity, which begs the question
of whether or not an increase in
mortgage rates actually prompted
people to move off the sidelines
and get into the housing market
while the getting was good.
How will changes to the Feds
stimulus impact markets?
As we head toward the year end
theres going to be a transition in
Fed policy, and as we start the
new year, there is likely going to
be a transition in Fed leadership.
Usually, either one of those events
in and of themselves creates some
volatility, and youre going to have
both happening at the same time.
We should expect more volatility in
the financial markets as we move
into year-end.
On the
economy
InsiderQ&A
AP
Total
return
Thursdays Price $30.88
YTD 19 14
1-yr 25 20
Assets $284 million
Investing in Dogs doesnt sound like a good strategy,
but it can be an easy starting point for new investors.
The Dogs of the Dow are the 10 stocks in the
Dow Jones industrial average with the highest
dividend yields at the start of the year. The yield is the
annual dividend divided by the stock price. Following
the Dog strategy can help you buy blue chip stocks at
bargain prices. Thats because a stocks yield is often
high because its price has dropped.
To follow the strategy, investors buy the Dogs in
January. At the end of the year, they adjust their
portfolio to reflect the 10 highest yields at that point in
time. The Dogs have beaten the Dow for the last
three years. Their 10.3 percent return in 2012 edged
out the Dow by less than 1 percent.
Trevor Delaney; Jenni Sohn AP
An ETF twist
The ALPS Sector Dividend Dogs ETF invests in
five of the highest-yielding stocks in each of the 10
sectors of the Standard & Poors 500 index.
Sources: FactSet; Morningstar
Checking on the Dogs
ALPS Sector
Dividend Dogs
ETF (SDOG)
S&P 500
Dividend
yield
Total
return
YTD
Hewlett-Packard (HPQ) 2.3% 79
Johnson & Johnson (JNJ) 3.0 26
Verizon (VZ) 4.0 21
DuPont (DD) 3.4 19
Intel (INTC) 3.8 18
Merck (MRK) 3.7 16
McDonalds (MCD) 3.1 16
Pfizer (PFE) 3.4 12
General Electric (GE) 3.3 11
AT&T (T) 5.1 8
Average of the Dogs 3.5 22
DowJones industrial average 2.3 16
%
Dogs of 2013
Investors in the Dogs have enjoyed a 22 percent
return so far this year.
Air Products APD 76.78 8 97.12 91.88 0.31 0.3 t s 9.4+18.14 3 1.2 19 3.1
Amer Water Works AWK 34.05 7 43.09 40.29 -0.94 -2.3 s t 8.5+18.29 3 15.4 19 2.8
Amerigas Part LP APU 37.63 9 50.45 48.40 -1.03 -2.1 s s 24.9+25.22 2 15.0 71 6.9
Aqua America Inc WTR 24.06 8 33.28 31.05 -0.24 -0.8 s t 22.1+22.50 2 17.2 21 2.4
Arch Dan Mid ADM 24.38 0 35.16 34.88 0.97 2.9 s s 27.3+24.95 2 4.1 17 2.2
AutoZone Inc AZO 341.98 0435.36 428.52 4.83 1.1 s s 20.9+16.91 3 29.0 17 ...
Bank of America BAC 6.90 9 13.99 13.06 0.20 1.6 t s 12.5+67.52 1 -8.7 30 0.3
Bk of NY Mellon BK 20.13 9 30.85 29.26 1.21 4.3 t s 13.9+35.64 2 -3.0 21 2.1
Bon Ton Store BONT 6.22 9 22.68 19.72 1.67 9.3 t s 62.2+155.37 1 33.6 ... 1.0
CVS Caremark Corp CVS 43.65 9 60.70 58.64 1.46 2.6 s s 21.3+23.50 2 9.7 18 1.5
Cigna Corp CI 39.01 0 73.59 73.94 1.45 2.0 s s 38.3+73.13 1 16.6 16 0.1
CocaCola Co KO 35.58 7 43.43 40.52 0.41 1.0 t s 11.8 +6.03 3 11.9 21 2.8
Comcast Corp A CMCSA 31.04 9 43.74 41.70 0.15 0.4 s s 11.6+34.86 2 19.2 18 1.9
Community Bk Sys CBU 25.50 0 31.73 32.66 1.81 5.9 s s 19.4+23.73 2 13.0 16 3.3
Community Hlth Sys CYH 22.51 9 51.29 45.87 -1.01 -2.2 t s 49.2+68.88 1 6.2 15 ...
Energy Transfer Eqty ETE 39.91 9 62.50 59.92 0.10 0.2 s s 31.8+53.48 1 20.6 79 4.3
Entercom Comm ETM 5.28 9 10.13 9.58 0.14 1.5 t s 37.2+51.58 1 8.5 14 ...
Fairchild Semicond FCS 11.14 8 15.75 14.65 0.85 6.2 s s 1.7 +2.16 4 5.7 98 ...
Frontier Comm FTR 3.59 3 5.15 3.98 -0.07 -1.7 t t -7.0 +9.23 3 -7.4 25 10.1
Genpact Ltd G 14.18 0 20.29 19.77 0.53 2.8 s s 27.5+31.17 2 9.9 24 0.9
Harte Hanks Inc HHS 5.14 0 9.81 9.41 0.81 9.4 s s 59.5 +5.98 3 0.2 ... 3.6
Hershey Company HSY 68.09 0 91.99 90.02 0.74 0.8 s s 24.6+26.90 2 24.1 29 1.9
Lowes Cos LOW 24.76 0 43.84 42.78 1.88 4.6 s s 20.4+57.43 1 17.4 25 1.7
M&T Bank MTB 82.29 0114.06 116.40 4.65 4.2 s s 18.2+42.19 1 12.8 15 2.4
McDonalds Corp MCD 83.31 9103.70 99.86 0.86 0.9 s t 13.2+15.20 3 14.4 19 3.1
Mondelez Intl MDLZ 24.31 6 32.10 28.78 0.25 0.9 t t 13.1+14.79 3 11.4 33 1.8
NBT Bncp NBTB 18.92 9 22.89 22.30 1.13 5.3 s s 10.0 +5.67 3 5.9 16 3.6
Nexstar Bdcstg Grp NXST 6.00 0 36.02 36.32 0.86 2.4 s s 243.0+453.94 1 59.1 47 1.3
PNC Financial PNC 53.36 0 74.33 75.92 3.00 4.1 s s 30.2+26.96 2 8.1 14 2.3
PPL Corp PPL 27.72 3 33.55 29.35 -0.91 -3.0 s t 2.5+10.53 3 -6.8 12 5.0
Penna REIT PEI 13.25 7 22.54 19.44 0.56 3.0 s s 10.2+30.73 2 1.3 ... 3.7
PepsiCo PEP 67.39 8 84.78 80.80 -0.99 -1.2 t s 18.1+18.26 3 6.4 21 2.8
Philip Morris Intl PM 82.10 4 96.73 87.51 0.89 1.0 t t 4.6 +2.17 4 14.4 17 3.9
Procter & Gamble PG 60.78 9 82.54 78.34 1.35 1.8 s s 15.4+31.42 2 6.7 20 3.1
Prudential Fncl PRU 44.96 0 74.20 75.60 2.57 3.5 s s 41.8+61.89 1 6.1 14 2.1
SLM Corp SLM 15.07 8 26.17 22.99 0.13 0.6 t s 34.2+46.94 1 5.5 9 2.6
SLM Corp flt pfB SLMBP 44.28 9 71.98 67.21 0.21 0.3 t s 26.8 ... 0.0 ... 3.1
TJX Cos TJX 40.08 0 51.84 50.92 0.86 1.7 s s 20.0+16.60 3 27.5 19 1.1
UGI Corp UGI 29.52 8 42.11 38.82 -0.29 -0.7 s s 18.7+32.73 2 10.1 17 2.9
Verizon Comm VZ 40.51 8 54.31 51.30 0.96 1.9 s s 18.6+18.83 3 12.7 \>99 4.0
WalMart Strs WMT 67.37 7 79.96 75.21 0.72 1.0 t t 10.2 +8.25 3 7.7 15 2.5
Weis Mkts WMK 37.65 8 47.92 45.36 0.29 0.6 s s 15.8 +1.77 4 8.2 15 2.6
52-WK RANGE FRIDAY $CHG%CHG %CHG%RTN RANK %RTN
COMPANY TICKER LOW HIGH CLOSE 1WK 1WK 1MO 1QTR YTD 1YR 1YR 5YRS* PE YLD
Notes on data: Total returns, shown for periods 1-year or greater, include dividend income and change in market price. Three-year and five-year returns
annualized. Ellipses indicate data not available. Price-earnings ratio unavailable for closed-end funds and companies with net losses over prior four quar-
ters. Rank classifies a stocks performance relative to all U.S.-listed shares, from top 20 percent (far-left box) to bottom 20 percent (far-right box).
LocalStocks
The biggest
dividend hikes
Stock
Screener
data through July 3 Sources: FactSet; S&P Dow Jones Indices
Capital One Financial (COF) $63.92 $50 $65 $1.20 $0.20 500%
First Horizon Nat'l. (FHN) 11.84 8 12 0.20 0.04 400
Southern (SO) 43.40 42 49 2.03 1.96 357
Southwest Airlines (LUV) 12.71 8 15 0.16 0.04 300
Zions Bancorp (ZION) 29.69 18 30 0.16 0.04 300
Helmerich & Payne (HP) 63.82 42 69 2.00 0.60 233
Regions Financial (RF) 9.88 6 10 0.12 0.04 200
Hess Corp (HES) 67.20 42 74 1.00 0.40 150
Fastenal (FAST) 45.29 39 53 0.80 0.40 100
Ford Motor (F) 16.43 9 16 0.40 0.20 100
MasterCard (MA) 586.18 405 592 2.40 1.20 100
Nat'l. Oilwell Varco (NOV) 70.31 63 90 1.04 0.52 100
Oracle (ORCL) 30.70 29 36 0.48 0.24 100
SunTrust Banks (STI) 32.92 22 33 0.40 0.20 100
Wynn Resorts (WYNN) 126.14 90 145 $4.00 2.00 100
NEWANNUAL
DIVIDEND
OLDANNUAL
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
GROWTH CLOSE COMPANY
52-WK
LOW HIGH
Companies keep sending bigger checks to their investors.
Dividend payments made by companies in the Standard &
Poors 500 index were 13.9 percent higher
in the first six months of the year than in the
year-ago period, according to S&P Dow
Jones Indices. That puts the index on track for its third
straight year of dividend growth above 10 percent. The
longest such streak is four years. It happened from 2004
through 2007 and from 1947 through 1950. This screen
shows the companies in the S&P 500 that have at least
doubled their dividends so far this year.
The biggest rise came from Capital One Financial, which
increased its quarterly dividend in May to 30 cents from 5
cents. Its one of several financial companies to
significantly increase its dividend, including Zions Bancorp
and Regions Financial.
American Funds BalA m ABALX 22.23 +.15 +16.3/A +7.8/A
American Funds BondA m ABNDX 12.34 -.13 -2.7 -1.6/D +3.6/E
American Funds CapIncBuA m CAIBX 54.50 +.02 -.8 +10.5/B +4.0/C
American Funds CpWldGrIA m CWGIX 39.49 +.14 -.8 +19.4/C +3.4/C
American Funds EurPacGrA m AEPGX 42.04 -2.1 +15.0/D +1.7/A
American Funds FnInvA m ANCFX 46.31 +.67 +1.2 +23.9/B +5.9/D
American Funds GrthAmA m AGTHX 39.13 +.67 +2.1 +24.3/A +5.7/D
American Funds IncAmerA m AMECX 19.12 +.07 -.3 +14.0/B +7.1/A
American Funds InvCoAmA m AIVSX 34.08 +.43 +1.0 +21.0/D +6.4/C
American Funds NewPerspA m ANWPX 34.16 +.43 +.4 +20.7/B +5.6/B
American Funds WAMutInvA m AWSHX 35.88 +.43 +1.6 +21.8/D +7.7/B
BlackRock GlobAlcI MALOX 20.87 +.16 -.2 +11.5/B +4.4/B
Dodge & Cox Income DODIX 13.39 -.09 -2.1 +1.1/A +6.6/A
Dodge & Cox IntlStk DODFX 36.66 +.15 -1.1 +23.9/A +2.2/A
Dodge & Cox Stock DODGX 145.00 +2.94 +3.4 +33.5/A +7.5/B
Fidelity Contra FCNTX 87.39 +1.75 +2.3 +17.7/C +6.8/C
Fidelity GrowCo FDGRX 107.86 +2.79 +2.8 +19.1/B +8.4/B
Fidelity LowPriStk d FLPSX 46.24 +.70 +2.3 +27.7/B +10.8/A
Fidelity Spartan 500IdxAdvtg x FUSVX 57.84 +.66 +1.6 +22.0/C +7.6/B
Fidelity Spartan 500IdxInstl x FXSIX 57.84 +.66 +1.6 +22.0/C NA/
FrankTemp-Mutual Euro Z MEURX 22.77 +.29 -.7 +20.8/C +4.5/A
FrankTemp-Templeton GlBondA m TPINX 12.98 +.03 -2.1 +7.1/A +9.4/A
FrankTemp-Templeton GlBondAdv TGBAX 12.94 +.03 -2.0 +7.4/A +9.7/A
Harbor IntlInstl HAINX 62.11 -.24 -4.0 +13.4/E +1.2/A
PIMCO AllAssetI PAAIX 11.86 -.11 -4.1 +3.9/D +6.0/A
PIMCO LowDrIs PTLDX 10.17 -.08 -2.0 +.3/D +4.2/A
PIMCO TotRetA m PTTAX 10.62 -.14 -3.7 -.9/C +6.6/B
PIMCO TotRetAdm b PTRAX 10.62 -.14 -3.7 -.8/C +6.8/A
PIMCO TotRetIs PTTRX 10.62 -.14 -3.7 -.6/C +7.0/A
T Rowe Price EqtyInc PRFDX 30.35 +.43 +1.4 +25.1/C +8.0/B
T Rowe Price GrowStk PRGFX 42.97 +.98 +3.4 +17.8/C +8.1/B
T Rowe Price HiYield d PRHYX 6.95 +.01 -1.6 +10.3/A +9.9/A
T Rowe Price MidCpGr RPMGX 66.54 +1.63 +4.0 +23.0/B +10.4/A
T Rowe Price NewIncome PRCIX 9.35 -.09 -3.0 -1.3/C +5.5/C
Vanguard 500Adml VFIAX 150.46 +2.41 +1.6 +22.0/C +7.7/B
Vanguard 500Inv VFINX 150.46 +2.40 +1.6 +21.9/C +7.5/B
Vanguard EmerMktId VEIEX 24.15 -.47 -6.4 -1.8/D -.3/C
Vanguard GNMAAdml VFIJX 10.30 -.18 -2.8 -3.9/D +4.8/B
Vanguard HltCrAdml VGHAX 71.72 +.85 +3.1 +28.2/D +12.4/C
Vanguard InstIdxI VINIX 149.47 +2.39 +1.6 +22.0/C +7.7/B
Vanguard InstPlus VIIIX 149.48 +2.40 +1.6 +22.0/C +7.7/B
Vanguard InstTStPl VITPX 37.17 +.65 +2.0 +22.9/B +8.3/A
Vanguard IntlGr VWIGX 19.49 +.06 -3.3 +14.8/C +1.9/B
Vanguard MuIntAdml VWIUX 13.75 -.06 -2.8 -.3/B +4.7/B
Vanguard PrmcpAdml VPMAX 86.13 +1.19 +1.8 +28.5/A +7.9/B
Vanguard STGradeAd VFSUX 10.63 -.03 -1.1 +1.4/B +3.7/B
Vanguard TgtRe2015 VTXVX 13.96 +.06 -.6 +9.6/B +5.8/A
Vanguard TgtRe2020 VTWNX 25.17 +.14 -.4 +11.5/B +5.9/A
Vanguard Tgtet2025 VTTVX 14.50 +.10 -.2 +13.1/C +5.8/A
Vanguard TotBdAdml VBTLX 10.56 -.11 -2.6 -2.1/D +5.0/D
Vanguard TotBdInst VBTIX 10.56 -.11 -2.6 -2.1/D +5.0/D
Vanguard TotIntl VGTSX 14.71 +.03 -2.4 +13.1/E -.3/C
Vanguard TotStIAdm VTSAX 41.02 +.71 +2.0 +22.7/B +8.2/A
Vanguard TotStIIns VITSX 41.03 +.72 +2.0 +22.7/B +8.3/A
Vanguard TotStIdx VTSMX 41.01 +.72 +2.0 +22.6/C +8.1/A
Vanguard WellsIAdm VWIAX 59.38 -.13 -1.5 +7.6/B +8.7/A
Vanguard Welltn VWELX 36.55 +.22 +15.6/A +7.6/A
Vanguard WelltnAdm VWENX 63.13 +.39 +15.7/A +7.7/A
Vanguard WndsIIAdm VWNAX 59.94 +.72 +1.1 +24.2/C +7.9/B
Vanguard WndsrII VWNFX 33.78 +.41 +1.1 +24.1/C +7.8/B
MutualFunds
FRIDAY WK RETURN/RANK
GROUP, FUND TICKER NAV CHG 4WK 1YR 5YR
Dow industrials
+1.5%
-0.7%
Nasdaq
+2.2%
+0.3%
S&P 500
+1.6%
-0.7%
Russell 2000
+2.9%
+1.8%
LARGE-CAP
SMALL-CAP
p
q
p
p
p
p
p
q
p
p
p
p
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
+15.5%
+15.2%
+14.4%
+18.4%
Mortgage rates ease
Mortgage rates fell last week, giving up some of
their sharp run-up from June. The average rate
on a 30-year fixed mortgage dropped to 4.29
percent, according to Freddie Mac. Thats down
from 4.46 percent a week earlier, but its still
above its 3.81 percent rate at the end of May. Its
also well above the record-low rate of 3.31
percent set in November.
InterestRates
MIN
Money market mutual funds YIELD INVEST PHONE
3.25
3.25
3.25
.13
.13
.13
PRIME
RATE
FED
FUNDS
Taxablenational avg 0.01
Invesco MMF/Cash Reserve Shares0.09$ 1,000 min (800) 659-1005
Tax-exemptnational avg 0.01
Invesco Tax-Exempt Cash Fund/Cl A0.13$ 1,000 min (800) 659-1005
Broad market Lehman 2.39 0.03 s s 0.45 2.47 1.56
Triple-A corporate Moodys 4.28 -0.10 s s 0.70 4.46 3.22
Corp. Inv. Grade Lehman 3.35 -0.01 s s 0.13 3.47 2.58
FRIDAY
6 MO AGO
1 YR AGO
FRIDAY CHANGE 52-WK
U.S. BOND INDEXES YIELD 1WK 1MO 3MO 1YR HIGH LOW
Municipal Bond Buyer 4.83 0.10 s s 0.38 5.19 3.89
U.S. high yield Barclays 6.60 -0.13 s s -0.66 7.35 4.95
Treasury Barclays 1.70 0.15 s s 0.75 1.70 0.80
FRIDAY CHANGE 52-WK
TREASURYS YIELD 1WK 1MO 3MO 1YR HIGH LOW
3-month T-Bill 0.04 0.01 r t -0.04 0.12 0.01
1-year T-Bill 0.17 -0.01 s s -0.08 0.25 0.13
6-month T-Bill 0.07 -0.02 r t -0.07 0.15 0.06
2-year T-Note 0.40 0.04 s s 0.09 0.41 0.20
5-year T-Note 1.61 0.21 s s 0.91 1.61 0.54
10-year T-Note 2.74 0.25 s s 1.11 2.74 1.39
30-year T-Bond 3.71 0.21 s s 0.97 3.71 2.45
Money fund data provided by iMoneyNet Inc.
Rank: Funds letter grade compared with others in the same performance group;
an A indicates fund performed in the top 20 percent; an E, in the bottom 20 percent.
PAGE 4D Sunday, July 7, 2013 BUSINESS www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER
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OB/GYN Associates | Wilkes-Barre, PA
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Fools School
Dont Over-Concentrate
Its good to be focused, but when
it comes to parking your hard-earned
dollars in stocks, dont put too many
eggs in too few baskets. Here are a
few ways that we investors fall short
of effective diversification:
(1) Owning too much company
stock of our employer. The ben-
efits of owning our company stock
often include the ability to purchase
it at a discount and to be
able to easily dollar-cost
average into the position.
Employees also tend to know a lot
about their company and industry,
which can give them an edge.
Nevertheless, too much of a good
thing is still too much. Enron serves
as a classic example of how own-
ing company stock can go horribly
wrong. Remember that you already
depend on your employer for your
income. Its kind of risky to depend
on it for the bulk of your invest-
ments, too.
(2) Investing too heavily in an
industry with which we are very
2013 THE MOTLEY FOOL/DIST. BY UNIVERSAL UCLICK 7/4
In urban revival beer creates small business hubs
NEW YORK To see how
a small business can transform
a neighborhood, just follow the
barrels.
About 30 years ago, beer
lovers wanting to create their
own drinks started taking over
abandoned old buildings in
rundown city districts, retted
them with tanks, kettles and
casks, and started churning
out beer. The byproduct was
a boom in craft beer drinkers:
Barrels shipped have more than
doubled in the past decade,
according to trade publication
Beer Marketers Insights. Craft
beer now makes up nearly 7
percent of the slow-growing
U.S. beer market.
But beer drinkers werent the
only beneciaries. The arrival
of a craft brewery was also
often one of the rst signs that
a neighborhood was changing.
From New England to the West
Coast, new businesses bubbled
up around breweries, drawing
young people and creating a
vibrant community where fami-
lies could plant roots and small
businesses could thrive.
It happened in Cleveland.
Once an industrial power-
house, the Rust Belt city has
been losing residents since the
1950s. Manufacturing jobs dis-
appeared. The city nearly went
bankrupt in 1978.
Marred by abandoned build-
ings and boarded-up stores
after several hard decades, the
downtown Ohio City neighbor-
hood, just west of the Cuyahoga
River, which divides Cleveland,
was perceived as dangerous
and blighted into the 1980s,
says Eric Wobser. He works for
Ohio City Inc., a nonprot that
promotes residential and com-
mercial development while try-
ing to preserve the neighbor-
hoods older buildings.
Enter Great Lakes Brewing,
which opened in 1988. Over
the years, its built a brewery
and a brewpub from structures
that once housed a feed store, a
saloon and a livery stable.
We resurrected all of them,
says Pat Conway, who founded
Great Lakes with his brother,
Daniel. Weve beautied the
neighborhood, provided a stun-
ning restoration.
Other breweries and busi-
nesses a pasta maker, a bike
shop, a tortilla factory, as well
as restaurants and bars fol-
lowed. Newcomers are ock-
ing to the neighborhood, even
though Clevelands overall pop-
ulation is still declining. The
city repaved the quiet street
next to the brewery, Market
Ave., with cobblestones, and
poured millions into renovat-
ing the West Side Market,
whose origins date back to
the 19th century. Today, more
than 100 vendors sell produce,
meat, cheese and other foods
there.
Whats going on in Cleveland
is happening across the coun-
try. Trendy small businesses
like breweries and younger
residents have been returning
to downtown neighborhoods
in many cities across the U.S.
The biggest cities are growing
faster than the suburbs around
them, according to Census
data.
Another benet of the brew-
ery boom: Manufacturers like
brewers typically pay workers
more than service businesses
like restaurants or shops do.
Thats good for local econo-
mies.
But for some, the bubbles
are bursting. In Brooklyn, N.Y.,
breweries are feeling the heat
from rising real estate costs.
When Brooklyn Brewery
opened in the Williamsburg
section of the borough in 1996,
its neighbors were mostly
deserted warehouses and facto-
ries. Today, Brooklyn Brewery
is surrounded by modern apart-
ment buildings, trendy bars,
shops and restaurants. Theres
still some grafti, but that
hasnt deterred the inux of
new residents willing to spend
a lot of money to live there. In
the past decade, home values
in the Brewerys neighborhood
have more than doubled up
145 percent, according to real
estate appraiser Miller Samuel.
TALI ARBEL
AP Business Writer
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER BUSINESS Sunday, July 7, 2013 PAGE 5D
KEEP YOUR TEMPER:
Losing your temper can
really work against you.
When you let passion,
emotion and anger be the
source of your energy as
you write, thats not going
to serve you very well,
Mark said. If you just say
nasty, nasty things about
somebody, that doesnt
necessarily encourage
them to want to work
with you.
DONT VENT
ONLINE: Its not uncom-
mon these days for con-
sumers to vent their frus-
tration at a company on
the Internet. But watch
what you say on social
media because you could
nd yourself on the other
end of a lawsuit.
Due to the rapid
growth of online and
social media over the past
few years, the number of
defamation cases involv-
ing online content has
increased signicantly,
said Mark Johansen, a
commercial litigator at
Gruber Hurst Johansen
Hail Shank LLP in Dallas.
While companies solic-
it customers comments
and reviews on products
Yip
From page 1C
and services that the com-
panies offer, a customer
certainly can have some
exposure for defamation
if the statements are
proven to be false and
defamatory, he said.
So always state the
truth and stick to the
facts.
People should only
post things that are true,
and not call people liars
and dishonest because
it comes off badly, said
Peter Vogel, a partner
at the Gardere Wynne
Sewell LLP law rm.
You never know that
somebodys not going
to sue you for libel and
then you end up having
to spend a lot of time and
energy defending your-
self.
KNOW YOUR
RIGHTS: If you know
what your rights are
and you sound like you
understand what youre
entitled to, you have a
better chance of win-
ning the argument with a
company than if you just
go in screaming and yell-
ing, sounding like youre
being unreasonable,
Giorgianni said.
Basic warranty rights
are very important to
know, Giorgianni said.
Be sure to keep your war-
ranty documents.
DONT SETTLE FOR
LESS: Businesses may
offer you a discount on
another product instead
of xing or replacing the
item youre dissatised
with. Make sure that
satises your problem
before you accept.
Dont settle for
an inadequate solu-
tion to your problem,
Giorgianni said. Dont
let a company buy you
off by offering something
less than youre entitled
to.
Fight back, but make it
count.
Pamela Yip is a personal fnance
columnist for the Dallas Morning
News. Readers may send her email
at pyip@dallasnews.com; she can-
not make individual replies.
I am told that we are still hav-
ing an issue with people parking
on the side of roads, said State
Police Capt. James P. Raykovitz.
Our guys consistently are moving
people along and occasionally writ-
ing tickets.
Philadelphia airport has no plans
to add bathrooms or refreshments.
Our position is its a short-term,
safe, off-the-road, convenient wait-
ing lot, Brune said. First off, we
are very land-constrained.
Minutes from the cellphone lot
is a Wawa convenience store with
gasoline and food. Drivers can also
park in an airport garage and go
into a terminal, or head to nearby
Tinicum Township, Pa., and there
are amenities there, Brune said.
Did motorists waiting recently
for passengers have suggestions for
the Philadelphia cellphone lot?
Potentially put in a rest area
_ bathrooms of some sort, said
Leigh Walker of Manahawkin, N.J.,
waiting to pick up his girlfriend. A
lot of people would really appreci-
ate it.
Dan Rapak of Reading, Pa.,
would like to see the no idling
signs come down because in 90- or
100-degree weather, you are going
to sit here with no air-condition-
ing. The signs ask parked motor-
ists to turn off car engines.
Joshua Kocses of Princeton, N.J.,
said that if there were more space,
hed like to see a concession stand.
Other than that, its denitely con-
venient. Its nice to drive and not
pay for parking. Plus, I can just sit
here and eat or work, do whatever
Ive got to do.
Cell
From page 1D
MCT direct
Joe McGuriman, of Lansdale, was sure to park in front of one of three electronic flight status boards at the cell phone lot at Philadelphia
International Airport.
economys future, they wont be spend-
ing; businesses, in turn, wont reinvest
prots until customers return, Clinch
said. Even as conditions improve, job
openings must grow another 10 percent
to 20 percent to get back to pre-recession
levels, he added.
With the expansion of the job market,
more than half of the 153 organizations
surveyed by consulting rm OI Partners
reported higher turnover, according
to research released in May. And that
involved all types of jobs, including mid-
dle managers and senior-level executives.
Employers are responding espe-
cially to supervisors and those tagged as
future leaders by offering job coach-
ing and increasing pay and benets, said
Patty Prosser, chair of OI Partners. Front-
line employees are being given improved
training and perks such as tuition reim-
bursement and exible hours and sched-
ules.
Companies are getting aggressive
with counteroffers of more money or
better quality of life, said Patrice Rice,
founder of Patrice & Associates, a hospi-
tality recruiting agency near Annapolis,
Md. A lot are starting to put together
packages for employees that are more
attractive. The job seekers are using
the new job offers to get a better oppor-
tunity at their current position.
Finding replacement workers, mean-
while, can be difcult.
In the restaurant industry, which tra-
ditionally has high turnover, replacing a
manager can take two months, Rice said.
The restaurant must advertise the job,
screen candidates and conduct in-person
interviews, background checks and per-
sonality tests, she said. Candidates are
plentiful, but qualied ones are not, she
added.
Even within the past year, employees
were afraid to change jobs because of
the nationwide nancial instability, Rice
said. People were worried about wheth-
er a restaurant or hotel chain would be
able to stay open or have to close a loca-
tion.
But now condence among workers
in the hospitality industry is rising, she
said. Restaurants are opening new loca-
tions, hotels are expanding, and compa-
nies are seeking managers, shift leaders,
cooks and servers.
Some workers have become less will-
ing to wait for raises.
If youre told to wait a year, you
dont want to wait a year, said Emily
Testerman, a 2010 graduate of Stevenson
(Md.) University who has found oppor-
tunities whenever she has looked into
changing jobs. You work hard and want
to make more, so you look.
Testerman, 24, left a job in November
to work as a retail marketing manager
for Diamond Comic Distributors in
Timonium, Md. Its the third company
shes worked for out of college. She land-
ed her rst full-time job in fall 2010 as a
public relations coordinator for Vitamin,
a Canton, Md.-based graphic design and
public relations rm, and worked there
for a year.
I ended up leaving because it really,
really delved into the PR stuff, and it
wasnt my thing, she said. I was super-
grateful for working there but started
looking 10 months in.
She was hired as an account manager
at Adcieo LLC, a Baltimore agency that
works with nonprot groups on email
campaigns. After working there for a
year, she thought about looking else-
where once again. Before she could start,
she got a call from Diamond, which had
interviewed her previously.
Her job with Diamond, for which she
writes a column and newsletter aimed at
comic shop owners, came with a bigger
salary and more opportunity. For the rst
time, Testerman feels she wont need to
start looking again anytime soon.
Testerman believes she has progressed
because shes realistic and open-minded
about her options. As an English major
in college, she originally wanted to write
for magazines.
I dont scour the job sites search-
ing for something thats exactly what
I thought I wanted to do, she said.
I dont just search entertainment
writer, because thats not going to be
there. You have to be flexible and real-
ize you could end up somewhere that
you could make work. If you can use the
skills youve learned or youre good at,
youll do OK as long as you can move
along there.
Many job seekers who applied for the
more than 2,000 openings at Maryland
Live casino in Hanover were hoping to
use skills they had learned elsewhere to
move into positions with more poten-
tial for advancement, said Howard
Weinstein, the casinos senior vice presi-
dent overseeing human resources.
Carol Pennachio, a 48-year-old
Frederick, Md., native, had been working
in hotel hospitality when she showed up
at Maryland Lives hiring center the day
it opened in January 2012. Recruiters
there suggested that she interview for an
entry-level steward position, and hinted
at the potential for quick promotion.
Shes twice been given more responsibil-
ity and is now executive steward, manag-
ing six other supervisors.
I just wanted to join a company that
was growing, so that I could grow with
it, Pennachio said. Here was a chance
to use skills I had learned elsewhere in a
position that has better salary and better
hours.
Work
From page 1D
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Supreme Court completes a despicable assault on civil rights
Governors School back,
thanks to private donors
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER Sunday, July 7, 2013 PAGE 6D
Editorial
OTHER OpiniOn
SUMMER SCHOLARS
Dont blame state Dems
for failed GOP agenda
Boosting transportation fund-
ing, pension reform and privatiz-
ing the state liquor store system
were among Gov. Tom Corbetts
top priorities when he unveiled
his 2013-14 budget plan in
February.
It was an ambitious plan.
Too ambitious for a governor
who clearly lacks the clout he
thinks he has.
Even with his Republican col-
leagues in control of both the
state House and Senate, not one
of those items reached his desk
for a signature by Sundays bud-
get deadline.
We have to wonder if Corbett
could lead lemmings off a cliff.
It didnt help that his lem-
mings couldnt agree on a cliff.
GOP leaders in the House sent
the Senate a liquor store priva-
tization plan, while the Senates
leadership sent the House a
transportation plan.
Neither caucus wanted the
other to tinker much with the
bills, and the resulting standoff
doomed both. (Corbetts pension
reform bill never gained traction
in either chamber.)
How did this fiasco happen?
If you ask state Rep. Ron
Miller, the Jacobus Republican
lays the blame for the transpor-
tation bills demise squarely on
Democrats.
There was not a single vote
coming out of the Democratic
caucus, he said.
Again, Republicans control
both chambers and set the agen-
das.
Since when do they need
Democratic votes to pass laws?
They didnt need them to pass
last years controversial voter
ID law, for example, or the lame
natural gas extraction fee law
a year earlier. Those were both
mostly party-line votes.
Granted, it would have been
helpful if some Democrats had
supported the $2 billion House
bill to deal with Pennsylvanias
crumbling transportation infra-
structure.
But did the Republican leader-
ship seriously try to work with
any Democrat to earn his or
her vote? We find that unlikely,
given the difficulty it had with
its own rank and file.
No, this mess belongs to
Corbett and Republicans legisla-
tors and the House members
shoulder more blame than the
senators.
The Senate took the initiative
on a safety issue that affects
every resident of Pennsylvania.
The House, on the other hand,
made liquor store privatization
its priority.
While we believe the state
should get out of the booze busi-
ness no ones life is at risk if
it doesnt.
The same cant be said about
the sorry state of our roads and
bridges.
Some Republicans say they
believe they can get the job done
on both bills in the fall.
We hope so, for all our sakes.
But after this, we dont share
that optimism.
The York Dispatch
In 2009 when Gov. Ed
Rendell defunded the
Governors Schools of
Excellence, the residential sum-
mer program for high school
students, it was more than
a $3.2 million budget cut. It
was an incalculable loss to the
educations of the states top
academic achievers.
The Governors Schools were
scattered about the state at col-
leges and universities including
Carnegie Mellon, Pitt, Penn
State and Drexel. Each offered
a program in a specific field:
the arts; agricultural science;
global entrepreneurship; infor-
mation, society and technol-
ogy; health care; international
studies; sciences and teaching.
Some of the schools dated back
to the 1970s.
Although Gov. Tom Corbett
and the Legislature have yet to
act and resurrect the program,
even though its cost would be
a tiny part of the states $28.4
billion budget, the Governors
School for the Sciences has
returned this summer due
to the generosity and smart
thinking of alumni and corpo-
rate sponsors. The five-week
program for 60 students will
return to Carnegie Mellon
because of $150,000 in dona-
tions from EQT Corp., AT&T,
PPG, Teva Pharmaceuticals and
others. The state Education
Department provided a match-
ing grant of equal amount.
With a shortage of American
students who are not just pro-
ficient but truly excellent in
math and science, programs
like this are necessary. For the
four years that the Governors
School for the Sciences was
dark, imagine the hundreds of
young Pennsylvanians whose
passions to become future
doctors, scientists, engineers
or mathematicians were not
set on fire. Last year, it was
reported that 3 million jobs in
the United States were unfilled,
many of them for lack of skilled
workers in science, technology,
engineering and math.
Even beyond science, enrich-
ment programs strengthen the
academic and social skills of
Pennsylvania students. Giving
young people such opportuni-
ties keeps them from being
idle during the summer and
extends their learning and
development.
The private donors who
revived the Governors School
for the Sciences deserve to be
applauded. Now, if only state
officials would show similar
enlightenment and bring the
other schools back.
Another day at work, another rodeo
A FEW YEARS ago a young woman
was hired to design news and feature
pages for the Times Leader. The usual
hiring and vetting procedure was
ignored. The new editor/publisher at
the time announced, here she is.
Well, change is never easy and we
were thoroughly put off. She was from
Texas and to us seemed as familiar as a
cactus in a valley cabbage patch.
We suffered through her cheer-
ful Texas demeanor and she suf-
fered our Rust Belt suspicions.
Guess who won?
Lindsey Jones had an indomi-
table spirit, enthusiasm and a
bright eye reected in her work.
Her pages brought light to The
Times Leader. She won awards
for her work. Her designs won
praise from readers and advertis-
ers. She won over the staff.
Sweet but forceful, collabora-
tive but opinionated, Lindsey proved
herself a team player. Her colorful
colloquialisms were a welcome coun-
terpoint to the dark humor of our
newsroom. Tasked with a project, shed
dismiss the challenge. Weve ridden
that rodeo before.
Lindsey was dependable, creative
and optimistic. She was a keeper.
Wouldnt you know it, after nearly
four years a life change made Texas
more appealing than Pennsylvania and
Miss Lindsey left us. She may have left
but she kept on working here. We kept
Lindsey on staff and she continued to
design pages in Pennsylvania through
an Internet connection from her home
in Texas.
We dedicated a computer in the
newsroom to her and she patched in
and designed pages here, from there.
She worked from our budgets, com-
municated by email, text and phone.
She designed complete features sec-
tions every day, as well as special sec-
tions, the Guide, the Prole section
and in a pinch she even designed the
entire Times Leader news section - on
deadline - when the scheduled page
designer called in sick. Shed do all 8
or so pages, working with reporters
and editors and photographers here,
turning out a professional section on
deadline. The designed conformed to
our style and the expectations of
our readers.
Several times when I felt at a
loss to get things done, Lindsey
came through.
I cite Lindseys work to people
these days when I explain that
The Times Leader and its asso-
ciated community papers have
moved to page pagination the
layout and assembly of pages
through a pagination hub in
Miamisburg, Ohio. It is the plan
of our new company Civitas
Media to have papers through-
out North Carolina, South Carolina,
Ohio, Illinois, Missouri, Virginia,
West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Georgia,
Kentucky and Tennessee assembled in
this fashion.
Its not a new concept the Gannett
chain has design hubs. Two of our for-
mer award-winning page designers
employees who worked with Lindsey
here took their careers to a new
level by taking jobs at Gannett hubs.
One went to a hub in Arizona, another
to New Jersey. They create pages for
many different papers. They post their
work online and it is good.
So it can be done.
The transition here has not been
without some pain. Since we started in
June most of the pages of The Times
Leader, The Sunday Dispatch, The
Dallas Post, The Abington Journal and
The Weekender have been paginated at
the hub. And at the same time, weve
switched letter fonts and layout styles.
Those familiar fonts we have used for
more than 12 years Cheltenham,
Sun Display and Helvetica have
been replaced with Benton Sans and
Miller Banner. They are as unfamiliar
to us as they are to our readers. We
are adjusting to writing headlines with
these new styles.
Page layout is different than what
readers previously saw in The Times
Leader and associated papers. Our
page designers had developed a style
honed over years and at the training
of numerous professionals. Our page
designers were mostly journalism
school grads and all were seasoned
journalists copy editors and word-
smiths. They did great work.
They are also local folks. When the
design work moved to the hub they
were all invited to keep their jobs with
the same benets if they moved to
Ohio.
Just as Lindsey did, they felt the tug
of home. Rich, Joe, Irene and Rick said
no to jobs in Ohio in order to stay
here in Pennsylvania without a job, but
with friends and family.
Thats a loss to our newsroom and
our readers and a tale familiar through-
out the news business and many other
businesses that are navigating change.
That change is rarely easy and it is for-
ever inevitable.
In the meantime, pardon our dust.
Editors here who do the assigning and
assembling have an idea of what needs
to be gathered for the presentation of a
story in print and online. Getting our
vision onto that nal page has been
elusive.
But we continue to try. Weve all
been in a few rodeos before.
Joe Butkiewicz is executive editor of The Times
Leader. Reach himat jbutkiewicz@timesleader.com
Last week was bittersweet
for the cause of human dig-
nity.
On one hand, the Supreme
Court gave us reason for
applause, striking down
barriers against the full
citizenship of gay men and
lesbians. On the other, it gave
us reason for dread, gutting
the 1965 Voting Rights Act.
The 5-4 decision was stun-
ning and despicable, but not
unexpected. The country has
been moving in this direction
for years.
The act is sometimes called
the crown jewel of the Civil
Rights Movement, but it was
even more than that, the most
important piece of legisla-
tion in the cause of African-
American freedom since
Reconstruction. And in shred-
ding it, the court commits
its gravest crime against that
freedom since Plessy v.
Ferguson in 1896.
That decision ratified
segregation, capping
a 30-year campaign by
conservative Southern
Democrats to overturn
the results of the Civil
War. Given that the
Voting Rights Act now
lies in tatters even as
Republicans embrace
Voter I.D. schemes
to suppress the black
vote, given that GOP star
Rand Paul has questioned the
constitutionality of the 1964
Civil Rights Act, one has to
wonder if the results of the
Civil Rights Movement do
not face a similar fate.
Or, as Georgia Rep. John
Lewis put it when I spoke
with him Monday, Can his-
tory repeat itself?
Lewis was the great hero
of the battle for voting
rights, a then-25-year-
old activist who had
his skull broken by
Alabama state troop-
ers on Edmund Pettus
Bridge in Selma, while
leading a march against
the use of poll taxes,
literacy tests, morals
tests, economic intimi-
dation, clubs, guns and
bombs to deny black
people the ballot. The
law he helped enact required
states and counties with his-
tories of voting discrimina-
tion to seek federal approval
before changing their voting
procedures. (Those that
behaved themselves for a
decade could be released
from that requirement.)
The court struck down
the formula the law uses to
determine where discrimina-
tion lives (and therefore,
which jurisdictions should
be covered), saying the
dates are too old to be reli-
able. As Chief Justice John
Roberts noted in writing for
the majority, the country has
changed dramatically since
that era. African-American
electoral participation is at
levels undreamt of in 1965.
And so it is. Because. The
Act. Worked.
Using that success as an
excuse to cripple it, noted
Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg
in her dissent, is like throw-
ing away your umbrella in a
rainstorm because you are
not getting wet. Indeed, had
the nation not changed dra-
matically since 1965, would
that not have been cited as
evidence of the acts failure?
Damned if you do, damned
if you dont, then: the Voting
Rights Act never had a
chance.
This court, said Lewis,
plunged a dagger in the
heart of the freedom move-
ment. Nor is it lost on him
that the majority which
struck down this bedrock
of black freedom included
a black jurist: Clarence
Thomas. The brother on the
court, said Lewis, I think
hes lost his way.
So what now? Lewis says
we must push Congress for
legislation to put teeth back
in the Voting Rights Act.
Given that this Congress is
notorious for its adamantine
uselessness, that seems far-
fetched, but Lewis insists
bipartisan discussion is
already underway.
Fine. Let us demand that
bickering, dysfunctional body
do what is needed. But let us
African-Americans and all
believers in freedom also
serve notice that, whatever
lawmakers do, we will not
stand placidly by as history
repeats and citizenship is
repealed, but that we will
energetically resist by every
moral means.
Saying that, I hear the
ghostly echo of those who,
once upon a generation,
marched into southern jails,
singing Aint gonna let
nobody turn me around. It
is an ancient song of defiance
that feels freshly sadly
relevant to our times.
Leonard Pitts Jr., winner of the 2004
Pulitzer Prize for commentary, is a
columnist for the Miami Herald, 3511
N.W. 91 Avenue, Doral, Fla. 33172.
Readers may write to him via email at
lpittsmiamiherald.com.
Leonard
pitts
Contributing
Columnist
Joe
Butkiewicz
Executive
Editor
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER FORUM Sunday, July 7, 2013 PAGE 7D
The economy stagnates. Syria
burns. Scandals lap at his feet.
China and Russia mock him,
even as a 29-year-old hacker
revealed his nations spy secrets
to the world. How does President
Obama respond? With a
grandiloquent speech on
climate change.
Climate change? It
lies at the very bottom
of a list of Americans
concerns (last of 21
Pew poll). Which
means that Obamas
declaration of unilateral
American war on global
warming, whatever the
cost and it will be
heavy is either highly
visionary or hopelessly solipsis-
tic. You decide:
Global temperatures have been
at for 16 years a curious
time to unveil a grand, hugely
costly, socially disruptive anti-
warming program.
Now, this inconvenient nd-
ing is not dispositive. It doesnt
mean there is no global warming.
But it is something that the very
complex global warming mod-
els that Obama naively claims
represent settled science have
trouble explaining. It therefore
highlights the presidents pre-
sumption in dismissing skeptics
as at-earth know-nothings.
On the contrary. Its at-
earthers like Obama who refuse
to acknowledge the problematic
nature of contradictory data. Its
at-earthers like Obama who cite
a recent Alaskan heat wave a
freak event in one place at one
time as presumptive evidence
of planetary climate change. Its
at-earthers like Obama who cite
perennial phenomenon such as
droughts as cosmic retribution
for environmental sinfulness.
For the sake of argument,
nonetheless, lets concede that
global warming is precisely
what Obama thinks it is. Then
answer this: What in Gods name
is his massive new regulatory
and spending program which
begins with a war on coal and
ends with billions in more subsi-
dies for new Solyndras going
to do about it?
The U.S. has already radically
cut CO2 emissions more than
any country on earth since 2006,
according to the International
Energy Agency. Emissions today
are back down to 1992 levels.
And yet, at the same time,
global emissions have gone up.
Thats because surprise!
we dont control the energy
use of the other 96 percent of
humankind.
At the heart of Obamas pro-
gram are EPA regulations that
will make it impossible to open
any new coal plant and will sys-
tematically shut down existing
plants. Politically, the White
House is hesitant to say theyre
having a war on coal, explained
one of Obamas climate advisers.
On the other hand, a war on
coal is exactly whats needed.
Net effect: tens of thousands of
jobs killed, entire states
impoverished. This at a
time of chronically and
crushingly high unem-
ployment, slow growth,
jittery markets and deep
economic uncertainty.
But thats not the
worst of it. This massive
self-sacrice might be
worthwhile if it did actu-
ally stop global warming
and save the planet.
What makes the whole
idea nuts is that it wont. This
massive self-inicted economic
wound will have no effect on cli-
mate change.
The have-nots are rapidly
industrializing. As we speak,
China and India together are
opening one new coal plantevery
week. We can kill U.S. coal and
devastate coal country all we
want, but the industrializing
Third World will more than make
up for it. The net effect of the
Obama plan will simply be dis-
mantling the U.S. coal industry
for shipping abroad.
To think we will get these
countries to cooperate is sheer
fantasy. Weve been negotiating
climate treaties for 20 years and
gotten exactly nowhere. China,
India and the other rising and
modernizing countries point
out that the West had a 150-year
industrial head start that made
it rich. They are still poor. And
now, just as they are beginning
to get rich, were telling them to
stop dead in their tracks?
Fat chance. Obama imagines
hes going to cajole China into a
greenhouse-gas emissions reduc-
tion that will slow its economy,
increase energy costs, derail
industrialization and risk enor-
mous social unrest. This from a
president who couldnt even get
China to turn over one Edward
Snowden to U.S. custody.
Im not against a global pact to
reduce CO2 emissions. Indeed,
I favor it. But in the absence of
one and there is no chance
of getting one in the foreseeable
future there is no point in
America committing economic
suicide to no effect on climate
change, the reversing of which,
after all, is the alleged point of
the exercise.
For a president to propose this
with such aggressive certainty is
incomprehensible. It is the stark-
est of examples of belief that is
impervious to evidence. And the
word for that is faith, not sci-
ence.
Charles Krauthammers email address is
letters@charleskrauthammer.com.
Obamas fat-earthers folly:
An assault on global warming
Charles
Krauthammer
Contributing
Columnist
Writer
remembers
grim days
of war
In his letter to the editor
(June 12), Harold Rosenn
recalls one of the most memo-
rable days of my life, when he
participated in the massive air
raid on Berlin in February of
1944, when 1,200 heavy bomb-
ers, each carried 10 500-pound
bombs, to be released over
every section of Berlin.
It was also one of my most
memorable days, albeit from a
different view point: not from
the skies, but from the air raid
shelter of my parents Berlin
apartment house. I was a
young girl shaking in fear from
the explosions thundering all
around us and shuddering our
house. My mother, my sister
and I survived that night,
because, although severely
damaged, our house was
spared a direct hit. But thou-
sands of Berliners died that
night, and many thousands
more were to lose their lives
during subsequent American
and British air raids that even-
tually would turn my home-
town into a pile of rubble.
That rst major air raid, not
only a vivid, but also the rst
grim war memory of my child-
hood, resulted in the evacua-
tion of mothers and their chil-
dren into safer territory east of
the Oder/Neisse line, annexed
by Hitler and returned to
Poland at the end of the war.
The Red Army occupied
this eastern section in January
1945, leaving more indelibly
horrid memories on a young
mind. The soldiers of the Red
army destroyed wantonly, plun-
dered and raped. One night,
a couple of drunken soldiers
entered our room, which we
shared with other mothers
and their children, My mother
hid me under a pile of heavy
German-type bed covers. The
soldiers did not nd me, but I
almost suffocated.
Inevitably, in each war and
since World War Two human-
ity has never been at peace
the innocent must suffer with
the guilty. Hitler had to be
defeated. But in retrospect, I
have often wondered, whether
it was necessary to bomb into
oblivion so many civilians.
At the time, when the city of
Dresden and most of its inhab-
itants were inundated in a
restorm of incendiary bombs,
it was already obvious that the
war was won for the Allies.
Recently, and with my help,
my sister chronicled her life-
long experience as a teacher in
Berlin in her book Sisyphos
Heir. The book describes
her frustrating efforts with
the difculties of keeping the
memory of the Holocaust alive.
It is, as many other Germans
have done andhopefully will
continue to do an individual
attempt at atonement for the
unspeakable crimes of Hitlers
Germany, where I spent my
childhood. Once known as das
Land der Dichter und Denker,
the land of my birth is tar-
nished for all times.
Anneliese Moghul
Fairview Township
Controlling
people through
religion
Sun Tzu says you must know
your enemy.
Although Mr. Obama keeps
reminding us that we are not at
war with Islam, parts of Islam
are at war with us. Letting
them build a mosque, being
nice to them or apologizing
will not placate the radical
amongst them. The Muslim
extremists do not hate our
Republic. They hate that our
freedom and greed has infected
their theocracy. Their fanatic
leaders care nothing for the
Koran save for its ability to let
them keep up appearances and
brainwash vulnerable minds.
Theirs is a struggle for power.
When the Catholic Church
was at its peak power, it
was called the Dark Ages.
Uneducated people are easy
to control. Fearful people are
even easier. The radicals are
using the same ideology that
was used during the Crusades
to bolster their ranks. Religion
makes it easy: A) Bad things
happening to good people?
Youre being tested. B) Good
things happen to bad people?
God works in mysterious
ways. C) Tragic deaths or
natural disaster? Gods will.
D) Contradictory evidence or
opinion? Satan trying to tempt
you.
Religion can be manipulated
to t any scenario to provide
an unassailable position from
which to tout ones beliefs.
The terrorists Allah is not a
god of mercy like the Christian
god. He is a god of submission
to the law. You cannot apply
humane principles of right and
wrong to radical Islam. Just
as the Old Testament God
killed rst-born babies and lev-
eled cities, the radicals Allah
demands submission or death.
This is not the Muslim god, but
the radical god. Amazing how
interpretation can turn a cre-
ators will 180 degrees.
In the case of the Taliban,
heres how the anger works;
1) We go to their country for
oil, trade, to beat their neigh-
bors up or whatever.
2) We get their leaders to
kiss our butt and use their own
people for our benet.
3) Their women see other
women with rights, treated
equal to men. Fundamentalists
cant have that. It is a threat to
their male dominance.
3) Their children may learn
something other than the
Koran, which is all they are
allowed to learn. Remember,
ignorant people are easy to
control and will not question
what theyre told.
4) Their absolute control
over society begins to crumble
and were to blame.
Learn the history of the
Catholic Church. It reads
exactly the same. Now they
hate us.
With the religious fervor
comes the desire to die a mar-
tyr. Most terrorist recruits live
a destitute life, their families
starving, learning nothing of
the outside world other than
what theyre told. They live
on the edge of death everyday,
they eat small bugs and amuse
themselves with pretty rocks.
They have no concept of the
outside world other than what
they are told by those who
would turn them into suicide
bombers for their own agenda.
We help a great deal by pay-
ing their leaders to keep them
submissive.
Like America, the leaders
have all the power and money.
But unlike America there is
no hope to change it, so being
exalted as a martyr in the
eternal afterlife seems a pretty
good deal.
Michael Mozeleski
Mountain Top
Theres no need
to eat that meat
Every year on the Fourth of
July Americans celebrate their
independence from Colonial
Britain. Many do so by dining
on the slain bodies of fac-
tory farmed animals who have
never known freedom or had
the opportunity to live out
their lives free from depriva-
tion and suffering.
In intensive agribusiness,
animals live miserable lives to
satisfy the tastes of esh-eating
consumers. As vegetarians
we object to the unnecessary
killing of animals for food, but
also to the modern methods of
raising them by the thousands
in huge connement sheds,
which causes severe physical
and psychological suffering.
The greatest amount of animal
cruelty is in this industry.
A meat-centered diet also
contributes to world hunger,
because the feeding of protein
crops to animals is an inef-
cient use of food resources.
There are also the issues of
deforestation, heavy water
usage, and soil erosion from
water run off.
As Americans become more
health conscious, many are
taking the advice of contem-
porary medical professionals
and holistic practioners who
advocate cessation of meat con-
sumption and endorse a plant
based diet. Some feel they
should be commended because
they only eat birds and sh,
however, birds endure tremen-
dous suffering at slaughter and
sh die slow agonizing death
from asphyxiation. Humans
can also become immune to
antibiotics since the animals
are injected to combat the high
stress factor of intensive con-
nement.
Consider the many available
and healthy alternatives to
meat. Contact goveg.com
Patricia Marks
Wilkes-Barre
YOUR OPINION: LETTERS FROM READERS
Another View
Even a bad day on the links is better than a good day in the ofce, or so they say. So lets get an early start!
One week ago, I got into a taxi. It
was a hot and humid Sunday morning
in Bristol, Conn. I was heading to the
airport.
How you doing? I said, sliding in.
The man behind the wheel only nod-
ded. He was foreign looking with bald-
ing black hair and
heavy jowls.
We drove in
silence for half a
minute. Then, with-
out turning around,
he spoke.
My son is miss-
ing. He fall into
river. Nobody nd
him.
At rst, I thought
I misheard him.
Your son fell into a river?
Yes. They no nd him. I look for
him today, after I take you.
Im so sorry, I said. What hap-
pened?
He go tubing. Six people with him.
All them get out, but they no nd my
son. Police, nothing. The water very
fast. Big wind. Everybody roll like ve,
six time in the tube, one there, one
there. They get out. Only my son no.
He shook his head.
Today, maybe I get a boat.
There are moments when a conversa-
tion leaves you utterly without reply.
Here was a tragic story. Totally unex-
pected. And I could not comprehend
how a man whose son was missing in
a river had managed to come to work
at all.
But I could tell that Shah Alam,
an immigrant from Bangladesh, who
said he was a father of six kids one
of whom was either dead or alive
wanted to talk.
So I listened.
He spoke about his son, Nasir, a
good kid, 25 years old, who have a
good job and who spent several years
in college studying to be a medical
technician. He still lived at home with
his father, stepmother and siblings.
He just buy a new car, Shah said.
The previous Tuesday, Nasir had
gone with friends to ride tubes down
the rain-swollen Farmington River.
They had barely gotten into the water
before realizing it was too high and too
rough. The others bailed out, grabbing
onto tree branches or rocks.
Nasir was, according to his father,
out of his tube and being drawn down
by the fast current. One of the group
grabbed onto him, but the water too
strong, Shah said, he let go.
Since then, no one had seen him.
The taxi rolled on, heading north
on I-84. Shah Alam sighed. He talked
about his frustration with the police.
It had been ve days. Rather than sit
and do nothing, he had spent Saturday
walking miles along the river banks,
hoping to nd Nasir, perhaps lost or
hurt, but alive.
I gonna go look today in the woods
area, he said. Who knows? Maybe
he hiding in the woods and he passed
out.
Shah said in his gut he knew his son
was alive. That a father just knows
when thats true.
If I nd somebody who have a boat,
maybe I can see better, he said.
How many times, in the course of
a day, do we encounter people with
whom we exchange a few words?
Behind a counter? On a bus? Maybe
they look sour. Maybe they seem cross.
How often do we consider the burdens
they might be hiding?
Shah Alam said his son couldnt
swim. He said he didnt know why he
got in such dangerous water at 4 p.m.
in the afternoon. He said he was only
driving the cab today because some-
body has to work (in the family). If I
go down, what happens to them?
He looked out the windshield. I
have house, have good life, I dont
know what happen, why it happen like
this?
We reached the airport. I got out. I
took his information. He thanked me
and shook my hand.
Once inside, I immediately checked
the Internet to verify his story. I
read multiple news reports from
Connecticut newspapers and TV sta-
tions. It was all true. Nasir Alam.
Missing. Searches yield nothing. I
looked out the airport windows, but
the taxi was long gone.
In a perfect world, I end this column
with the sons recovery. But this is not
a perfect world. Less than 48 hours
after our ride together, Nasirs body
was found oating in the river, by a
park, four miles from where he was
last seen.
One week ago, I got in a taxi. Today,
I will encounter someone else. We rare-
ly know what sadness people drag with
them to work. If we did, wed probably
be nicer to one another.
Mitch Albomis a columnist for the Detroit Free Press.
Readers may write to himat: Detroit Free Press,
600W. Fort St., Detroit, Mich. 48226, or via email at
malbom@freepress.com.
Aheartfelt lesson as a father looks for his son
Mitch Alborn
Contributing
Columnist
HOw MANY TIMES, in the
course of a day, do we encounter
people with whom we exchange
a few words? Behind a counter?
On a bus? Maybe they look sour.
Maybe they seem cross. How
often do we consider the bur-
dens they might be hiding?
Mitch Alborn,
Pete Wilcox | Times Leader
PAGE 8D Sunday, July 7, 2013 FORUM www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER
Holodick
deserves
W-B Area
position
As a retired secondary public
school teacher and higher educa-
tion administrator, I promised
myself that I would try to go
gentle into that good night; but,
alas, a recent commentary in The
Times Leader by Dr. Richard
Holodick (June 21 There
are reasons schools dont make
grade) resonated with me suf-
ciently to move me to respond.
I have read many of Dr.
Holodicks columns and nd that
I strongly identify with positions
he has taken on topics related
to education. Although I do not
reside in the Wilkes-Barre Area
School District, I care deeply
about the issue of education
throughout our region.
I seem to recall that Dr.
Holodick expressed an interest
in serving on the Wilkes-Barre
School Board. From the articles
he has written, he seems to be
purely motivated by ethics rather
than politics. If that is the case, I
hope that he continues to pursue
his goal of serving as a member
of the school board.
Someone who is as informed
about educational issues and is
as honorable as he seems to be
deserves to occupy a seat on the
moard. More importantly, the
students (particularly those who
are at risk) in the Wilkes-Barre
Area School District deserve to
have a person of his character,
intelligence and commitment to
education in their corner.
P. S. I do not know, have never
met nor am I related to Dr.
Holodick.
Elly Miller
Shavertown
Firefghters
mistreated,
says Rice Twp.
woman
I live in Rice Township.
Recently the decertication of
our local volunteer re depart-
ment made headlines. A won-
derful group of seless young
volunteers attended the meeting
thar was held regarding their
decertication. They quietly
led into the room wearing their
reghter pants and shirts and
stood in the back row. They
requested to speak by checking
the block under the column on
the sign-in sheet.
They showed themselves to
have tremendous grace and for-
titude. I was very proud of them.
Some of the public are under
the impression that this group
of volunteers did not want what
was best for the community by
accepting the merger. This was
not the problem and certainly
was not the truth. The meeting
wasnt about bringing everyone
together to discuss a merger. It
was instead a meeting to decerti-
fy, basically re them, from being
able to be a re department. It
was an attempt to belittle them
in the worst possible way by
embarrassing them publicly.
Adults are supposed to set an
example for younger people on
how to conduct yourself. Many
of our ofcials failed miserably.
I spoke to the entire group
of reghters outside after the
supervisors had the police throw
us out of the meeting hall. I said
that a merger, due to economics,
could be a great idea, but it had
to be handled differently. If it
brought a few re departments
together, then it should no lon-
ger be called Wright Township,
but a different name. And that
every chief from each depart-
ment that united should be
represented on a type of board
to oversee the newly merged
department. None of them
objected to this; as a matter of
fact, they were very pro-merger.
The thing they objected to was
being decertied. The thing they
objected to was being made the
laughing stock of the community
and surrounding areas by cruel
remarks and comments. I dont
blame them.
I come from a background
deeply entrenched in politics and
I have never seen any politician
ever treat people in the manner
in which they treated the re-
ghters.
I think that our leaders in Rice
Township cater to a handful of
people instead of the majority.
And I think that they have actu-
ally embarrassed the residents to
such a degree that when we tell
anyone we are from Mountain
Top we shudder, because inevi-
tably the person will say to us,
Are you from that township
that has all the problems all the
time? Some individuals have
given our community a black
eye to the public and I think it is
time for it to stop.
Mary Anne Whitonis
Rice Township
High Court ruling
ignored majority
I truly believed in the
American principle that the
majority rules was the deciding
factor in any vote decided by the
American people. This appar-
ently is not so after the Supreme
Court overturned the will of the
people in California. They did
the same thing in Indiana when
the people voted no to outsourc-
ing the turnpike contracts to
some foreign company. The poli-
ticians did what they wanted and
outsourced the contract to some
foreign entity anyway. Closer to
home is the fact that the majority
voted no for that arena we now
have.
I dont care if a man wants to
sleep with another man or vice
versa with women. In my opin-
ion this is not normal behavior,
but I do believe in equality for
everyone.
Marriage I dont give a darn
about, but I draw the line on
same sex couples adopting chil-
dren. You think we have bullying
problems in schools now! Just
watch what we create.
What really ticks me off is
the fact that I am now in the
wrong because of my religious,
moral values, and my opinion.
The Supreme Court should
have never entertained the case
of of proposition 8 because the
people of California voted and
let their wishes be known.
Normal is becoming the abnor-
mal in this country.
I wonder whats next.
Ernest Schuldaski
Wilkes Barre
Good Samaritans
thanked for help
I would like to thank the three
young ladies who came to my
assistance on the morning of
Tuesday, June 25.
I was at the Luzerne County
Courthouse buying a dog license.
Upon my departure I took a
nasty fall on North River Street,
Wilkes-Barre. Three young ladies
helped me get up.
Unfortunately, I didnt get
their names. But God bless them
for going out of their way!
Al John
Wilkes-Barre
Writer ofers take
on the N word
Enough is enough!
If the Food Network can re
Paula Deens contract for using
the N word it is time we sup-
port her in banning all recording
artists from publishing Rap and
other forms of music containing
the same word. As a black senior
citizen my generation fought too
long and hard to have that word
deleted from being used.
Now to hear the heirs of our
blood sweat tears and even death
use it is outrageous. If they want
to use the Constitution to defend
their right then I ask it be used
to defend hers.
John T. Banks
Wilkes-Barre
YOUR OPINION: LETTERS FROM READERS
No servant can serve
two masters.
Those are the words
of Jesus in the Gospel of
Luke. And yet how imper-
fectly have his followers
taken them to heart.
Throughout the history
of Christianity, some of
the most painful moments
have been when church
leaders cocked
their ear toward
Mammon when
godliness would
have dictated oth-
erwise.
Other, more
recent painful
moments, espe-
cially for Catholic
Christians, came
when church
authorities put
institutional prestige
ahead of justice and con-
sideration for victims of
sexual abuse by clergy
members.
The damage done by
the clerical abuse scandals
to the Catholic Church,
and to countless millions
of its faithful, has been
profound and worldwide.
Although Catholic bish-
ops and the Vatican have
sought to atone and to
reform the institutional
practices that enabled the
abuse, those efforts have
often been admixed with
less upright impulses.
Consider the case of the
Archdiocese of Milwaukee
and of Cardinal Timothy
Dolan, who once served
as its prelate. Some of
the most notorious cases
of abuse took place there
well before Dolan was
archbishop and, as
a consequence of legal
settlements with victims,
the archdiocese filed for
bankruptcy in 2011, after
Dolan had left to become
archbishop of New York.
A charismatic person-
ality, Dolan is the most
recognizable face of the
Roman Catholic faith in
America. With much justi-
fication, Dolan is regarded
as one of the good guys in
this grim chapter, highly
aware of the growing
scandal and struggling
to get a sluggish church
hierarchy to address the
problem.
Here is Dolan at his
best, pressing the Vatican
to act decisively:
The liability for the
Archdiocese is great, as is
the potential for scandal if
it appears that no defini-
tive action has been taken.
Our newfound awareness
of the severity of damage
caused by sexual abuse
at the hands of clergy
makes it impossible for
us to ignore this situation
or allow any longer the
unresolved nature of this
case.
Much of Dolans
correspondence
was addressed to
Cardinal Joseph
Ratzinger, who
later became Pope
Benedict XVI.
Yet while the
public would
like to see a hero
emerge from
his scandal a
stalwart in the
hierarchy who fought
relentlessly for the victims
of the priests abuse, who
put their needs before
concerns for the churchs
reputation or its finances
that person does not
appear to be Dolan. Not
quite.
A new collection of
documents made public
by the Archdiocese of
Milwaukee shows that
Dolan is emblematic of
the decades-long struggle
of the church to manage
priests accused of sexual
abuse.
The documents reveal
Dolan in multiple, often
conflicting roles: financial
protector of the churchs
patrimony, overseer and
disciplinarian of priests,
advocate for leniency
toward pedophile priests
who were aging and frail,
leader wading through the
processes of the church
and civil and criminal
courts. And, yes, he also
attempted to soothe the
pain of victims and survi-
vors of the abuse, along
with the outrage of parish-
ioners.
In a statement upon the
release of the documents,
Dolan remarked that his
encounters with victims/
survivors and abusive
priests were some of the
most difficult, challeng-
ing and moving events of
his more than six years in
Milwaukee. Indeed, Dolan
has reason to be proud of
the mediation process by
which nearly 200 survi-
vors received settlements
under his watch.
Yet in a June 2007 let-
ter to the Vatican, Dolan
requested permission to
funnel $57 million from
the archdiocese into a
trust he had created one
month prior. A little over
a month later, the transfer
was approved. Thats a
swift decision from Rome,
the same authority that
often took years of daw-
dling to decide the fate
of individual priests who
abused.
By transferring these
assets to the Trust, I fore-
see an improved protec-
tion of these funds from
any legal claim and liabil-
ity, Dolan wrote.
Dolan maintains that
the funds were set aside
for perpetual care of
Catholic cemeteries. The
churchs harshest critics
argue Dolan committed
bankruptcy fraud. A court
can settle the question of
legality, but its hard not
to regard this action as
ethically suspect.
Another $90 million
was transferred to indi-
vidual parishes, separate
legal entities. A judge
has already ruled those
funds are safe from being
claimed by those suing the
diocese in civil court for
abuses.
The documents also
show that consultants and
attorneys had to intervene
to maintain the right tone
of humility and contrition
on the part of the arch-
diocese. Public updates
were edited to keep the
churchmen from sounding
too self-forgiving for
past actions and mini-
mizing the issue. A line
in a draft communication
from the archdiocese that
apologized to priests was
removed because, as an
adviser pointed out, this
was about victims, not
about priests.
To read these docu-
ments is to see a worldly
organization at work
massive, bureaucratic,
self-interested. Dolan is
but one man at work with-
in it. A good man, more or
less, and an energetic ser-
vant, but one with many
masters.
Mary Sanchez is an opinion-page
columnist for The Kansas City
Star. Readers may write to her
at: Kansas City Star, 1729 Grand
Blvd., Kansas City, Mo. 64108-
1413, or via email at msanchez@
kcstar.com.
Adisenchanting inside viewof the
church responding to sexual abuse crisis
Mary Sanchez
Contributing
Columnist
K
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Sunday, July 7, 2013 PAGE 1E
Smith Hourigan Group
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Casey Martin
Advertising Projects Writer
Tis sprawling 5,428 sq. f. multi-level
well constructed home is located at 3
Crestview Drive in Shrine Acres, Dal-
las Township. It is listed by Joe Moore of
M.E. Moore and Son Realtors. Listed at
an asking price of $525,000. Te lot size
is 232 x 420 or 2.04 acres of land.
Te front is adorned with a half circle
driveway and a two car garage. Te brick
and frame exterior has been well kept
and beautifully landscaped with a view
anyone would want to come home to.
At 25 x 15 the living room also has plenty
of room to entertain or relax with a
large family. One wall provides complete
shelving for a mini library. A two-way
gas freplace connects the dining room.
Mahogany foors are in the living room
and dining room. Both rooms have a so-
phisticated atmosphere for formal family
events or holiday gatherings.
Te kitchen is welcoming at 25 x 14.
Natural and white woodwork intertwine
with the main kitchen area. An island
in the kitchen adds to the counter space
already in place, and included with the
sale are two refrigerators and the win-
dow treatments. A small four seat dining
area provides a stunning view of the rear
yard. Tere is also a Florida room with a
beautiful fagstone foor.
Te house has 13 rooms, including fve
-Continued Page 2
Lewith&Freeman
Real Estate, Inc.
www.lewith-freeman.com
Kingston: 288.9371
Hazleton: 788.1999
Shavertown: 696.3801
Mountain Top: 474.9801
Wilkes-Barre: 822.1160
Clarks Summit: 585.0600
Trust...Put your trust in a
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Pole 207 Lakeside
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Enjoy this year round home at Harveys Lake
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Private sand beach with boat dock and lake-
side pavillion. Over 1 acre of property with
great views. Plenty of parking for guests.
MLS #13-1872. Call Charlie 829-6200.
Dir: At entrance, turn left at Grotto Pizza, fol-
low to Pole #207.
1281 Main St.
Jenkins Twp. $124,900
This home has many unique features, nice
foor plan, 3 bedrooms with vaulted ceilings,
frst foor laundry, gas freplace, replacement
windows, corner lot, osp, gas heat, extremely
clean and neat.
MLS #13-1824. Call Luann 602-9280.
Dir: From Pittston, travel south on Main St,
at the fork in the road stay right, will turn into
Main St. Jenkins, home on left.
Colleen A. Turant
Realtor, Atlas Realty, Inc.
OPENHOUSETODAY
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New, NewNew! Electrical,
furnace, plumbing, siding,
roof, windows and the list
goes on! Plenty of closet
space, 3BRs, 1.5BA.
Brick 2-story with lots of
charm. Enjoy the outdoor
space with heated in-
ground pool, multiple patio
area, OSP. Plenty of living
and storage space with
many improvements!
This home shows pride of
ownership! Immaculate
ranch with spacious eat-in
kitchen, 3bedrooms,
full landscaped yard with
privacy, 12x30deck and
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Great location! Just one
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3 bedrooms, 2 baths,
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NEW LISTING! NEW LISTING! NEW LISTING! REDUCED! REDUCED!
1848 State Route 29
(Lake SiLkwoRth)
hunLock cReek
Vacation Location Year
around living in this
must see 2/3 Bedroom
Home with Full basement
walkout to your back yard
overlooking the Lake.
(Lake Rights)
$132,000
Your Host
Cherub Straigis
(570) 762-4641
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www.gordonlong.com
3138 Memorial Hwy., Dallas
Across From Agway
(570) 675-4400
Wilkes-Barre 570-825-2468 Shavertown 570-696-2010
info@mksre.com
Darren G. Snyder
Broker/President
80010965
Wilkes-Barre
Updated 4 bed, 4 bath, 2-car garage w/ a fnished basement and in-ground pool located in Barney Farms.
Tiled kitchen has oak cabinets, breakfast bar & sunroom. Formal LR & DR w/ HWF & French Doors
leading to the large deck & private fenced yard. Family room has a Gas FP & built-in shelves. Master
bedroom suite has WIC, double sinks & whirlpool tub.
$249,900 Mls 13-925
laflin
Quality construction throughout this 4 bedroom, 4 bath contemporary with a three car garage. Master
bedroom suite with jaccuzi tub and walk-in closet. Modern kitchen with a beautiful stained glass light
over the island and spacious breakfast area. Large rear deck overlooks private back yard and additional
wooded lot.
$384,900 Mls 13-2046
GreentoWn
Beautifully updated 3000 sq f Wallenpaupack lakefront with 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, 2 freplaces and
picture perfect views of the lake. Modern kitchen has a center island and granit countertops. Master
bedroom w/ WIC & master bath with double sink, shower & garden tub.
$729,900 Mls 13-2440
Wilkes-Barre
Elegant tudor with 4800 sq f in Downtown Wilkes-Barre's Historic District. Te 1st foor ofce
has 1860 sq f w/ central air and 2 restrooms. Te residence upstairs includes 5 bedrooms, 2 baths,
custom kitchen w/ an island & sunny breakfast room, formal dinning room. Te formal living
room has a tray ceiling, picture windows and wet bar. Also, a cozy den. Private drive, OSP for 5 cars.
$289,000 Mls 12- 1525
Price reduced
837 Wyoming Ave., Kingston
288-1401
Impressive 2-story with a contemporary
interior. 9 rooms including a large living
room; formal dining room; family room
(21 x 19) with marble freplace; modern
kitchen with dining area; 3 bedrooms; 2
full and 2 half-baths. Finished lower level.
Covered patio overlooking in-ground pool.
Well-landscaped lot with circular drive.
Sprawling multi-level, well-constructed
and continuously maintained. 5,428 sq.ft.
of living space. Living room and formal
dining room w/two-way gas freplace &
hardwood fooring. Eat-in kitchen with
island. Florida room with fagstone foor.
5 bedrooms, 4 baths, 2 half-baths. Lower
level rec room with freplace & wet bar
leads to heated, in-ground pool. Beautifully
landscaped 2-acre lot.
3 Mercedes Dr.,
W-B
MLS#13-899 $293,500 MLS#13-1309 $525,000
3 CrestviewDr.,
Dallas
MLS#13-841 $249,000
849 Nandy Dr.,
Kingston
Spacious four-bedroom, 2 1/2 bath home
in popular Green Acres. Good foor plan.
Living room with bay window; formal
dining room; kitchen with breakfast room.
2nd foor laundry. Great closets. Covered
rear patio. 2 separate heating systems,
each with central air-conditioning.
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Spacious home in the Wyoming Area School District
w/ 5 bedrooms, 2 kitchens, 2 baths a 2 car oversized
garage &beautiful views fromthe large deck. Updated
roof, windows, seamless gutters, and furnace. Second
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easily be converted into a multi family.
$114,900 MLS#12-4492
Directions: Wyoming Ave to Exeter, right onto
Erie, right onto Susquehanna Ave. Home is on
the left. Sign on property
Bear Creek
$415,000 MLS# 13-2022
Fantastic log home nestled on 4 acres
in Bear Creek Twp. Open foor plan with
natural materials make this home very
special. Beautiful cherry cabinets, slate
countertops and a huge pantry closet in
kitchen. Stunning great room with a stone
wood burning freplace. Second foor is a
master suite with bath, balcony and an
extra bonus room. Finished lower level
with slate foors and a built in sitting area
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The Original
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K
PAGE 2E Sunday, July 7, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
bedrooms, six bathrooms, and two of-
fces. Te heat is radiant heating. In
addition, the majority of the bathrooms
have granite countertops.
Te second level features a master bed-
room with master bath and three ad-
ditional bedrooms and two baths. Te
upper level serves as a guest bedroom
suite with sitting area; and ofce. Te
guest bedroom features a large walk-in
shower.
Te lower level family room, 24 x 15,
features a granite bar, a freplace and an
ofce. A convenient half bath is also
located on this level. Sliding glass doors
open to the rear yard and provide access
to the 29 x 17 in-ground pool. Te heated
pool area is fenced of and has an inviting
and relaxing patio. A portion of the yard
is enclosed for children or pets.
Te basement level provides access to
an additional garage for storage of lawn
equipment and there are also three sec-
tions for general storage, a workshop,
and a possible wine cellar.
For more information on this home
contact Joe Moore, M.E. Moore
and Son and Realtors at (570)288-1401
Commercial
BEAR CREEK
$149,900
1255 Laurel Run Rd.
Bear Creek Twp., large commer-
cial garage/warehouse on 1.214
acres with additional 2 acre parcel.
2 water wel l s. 2 newer under-
ground fuel tanks. May require zon-
ing approval. For more information
and photos visit:
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 12-208
Call Charlie
COMMERCIAL
BUILDING
Luzerne. 2 bay garage & of-
fice. Parking for 30 vehicles.
Current auto dealer lease ex-
pires.
CALL 570-200-1320
COURTDALE
COMMERCIAL
WAREHOUSE LEASE
Multi-combo square foot
available. (2)- 5,000 SF units
(1) 2,300 SF units.
Available for lease or any
combination.
5,000 SF/ $1,500 a month/ no
CAM charges.
Tenant pays utilities. Heated
warehouse space with two
bays, two loading docks,
of f i ce, and bat hrooms.
Pl ent y of parki ng.
Call Cindy King
570-690-2689
570-675-5100
www.cindykingre.com
DURYEA
REDUCED
$29,900
93 Main St.
Four units. 3 residential and
one storefront.Great corner
location, flood damaged home
being sold as is. For more info
visit: www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 12-1948
Call Tom
570-262-7716
Hanover Twp
Parkway Plaza
Sans Souci Parkway
Commercial Space For
Lease 1,200 sq. ft. store-
front starting at $700/
month. Plenty of parking.
Central heat & air. Call
570-991-0706
NANTICOKE
212 E. Main Street
Building on Main St. near Anto-
nio's. Former business & res-
idential combination with 4
floors containing 3000+ sq. ft.
Walk-in street level entry both
front and back. Small off street
parking area in rear. Great op-
portunity with new Main St.
projects and foot traffic nearby.
$ 40,000. 570-760-7888 or
570-735-6879.
WILKES-BARRE
Best $1 sq. ft. leases
YOULL EVER SEE!
Warehouse, light manufacturing.
Gas heat, sprinklers,
overhead doors, parking for 30
cars.
Yes, that $1 sq. ft. lease!
We have 9,000 sq.ft., 27,000 sq.ft.,
and 32,000 sq. ft.
Can combine.
There is nothing this good!
Sale or Lease
Call Larry @
570-696-4000 or 570-430-1565
Commercial
PITTSTON
$69,900
68 William St.
Great investment property with 3
units and separate utilities. Each
unit has 2 entrances and washer
hook up. Roof is 5 years old. For
more info visit:
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
MLS 12-1897
Call Tom
570-262-7716
ATLAS REALTY, INC.
570-829-6200
SWOYERSVILLE
NEW LISTING
Busy, high visibility location. Body
shop, garage, car lot. Situated on
over 1 acre with 9,000 sq. ft. of
Commercial Space. $389,900
Call Joe 613-9080
JJ MANTIONE
613-9080
WEST NANTICOKE
$139,900
30 E. Poplar St.
Multi - Family
5 apartments and a 2 car garage,
all rented. Off street parking for 8
cars. Great investment.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-680
Tom Salvaggio
570-262-7716
WEST SIDE
Well established Italian Res-
taurant on the West Side with
seating for 75. Business only
includes good will, all furniture
and fixtures, all kitchen equip-
ment and del i very van for
$150,000. Building sold separ-
ately. Restaurant on 1st floor
and 2 bedroom luxury apart-
ment on 2nd f l oor f or
$250, 000.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 12-3433
Call Charlie
WILKES-BARRE
$87,500
446 N. Main St.
Best of both worlds...Commercial
space plus 2-3 bedroom home
complete with detached garage and
off street parking with yard. Home
has been nicely remodeled with 1
3/4 baths, hardwood floors, move in
condition. Commercial space is
14x26 with endless possibilities.
www. atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-982
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
For Sale By Owner
DALLAS
Brick 2 story 3,200 sq. ft.
home, 2 acres, 4 bedrooms,
2.5 baths. Fireplace, hard-
wood floors. 20'x40' in-
ground pool with auto cover
and a large yard. $469,000
570-675-8955
PITTSTON TWP.
RENT TO OWN
2 bedroom, clean, needs no work. re-
modeled throughout. Minutes from I-
81 & PA Turnpike. $550/month.
570-471-7175 or 610-767-9456
For Sale By Owner
DRUMS
REALTORS WELCOME
Near I80 & I81. One home,
2 units inside.$165,500 Well
maintained. 3 car garage, 1
acre of land. Near schools
shopping & parks. Country
setting. Pictures on
www.forsalebyowner.com
Listing #23930253
570-359-3010
570-436-2263
EXETER
39 Memorial Street
Great location near schools,
nice yard, 10 rooms, 4 bed-
rooms, 2 bath, gas heat,
private driveway. Detached
2 car garage. Walk-up attic,
f ul l basement . As I s.
$69, 900. 570- 474- 0340
FORTY FORT
1670 MURRAY ST.
FOR SALE
BY OWNER
Qualified buyers only. Very
versat i l e 2 f ami l y home,
ranch style. Large lot. Beauti-
fully landscaped. $162,000.
Call 570-283-3469
leave message.
HANOVER TWP.
REALTORS WELCOME
Exceptional 3,165 sq. ft. home
in Liberty Hills. Heated in
ground pool, deck. Marble
flooring, wainscoting & crown
molding. New kitchen, Cherry
cabi nets & Brazi l i an hard-
wood floors, stainless steel ap-
pliances, granite counter tops.
Master bedroom with built-ins
& walk in closet. 3 fireplaces.
Lower level wet bar, theater,
exercise & laundry rooms.
Central vac & air, security & ir-
rigation systems. New roof,
furnace & pool liner. Pictures
on www.forsalebyowner.com.
L i s t i n g I D # 2 3 9 5 0 9 0 6 .
$318,000. Call 570-814-8010
for appointment.
JENKINS TWP.
Highland Hills
Fabulous view!
3 bedroom, 3.5 bath, bi-level. Stain-
less kitchen with granite counter
tops. Porcelai n ti l e & l ami nate
throughout. In-ground pool .
Economical heating.
$229,900
Call 570-655-8034
KINGSTON
145 James Street
4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths. Large liv-
ing room with fireplace, dining
room with built-n breakfront. Kit-
chen, den & laundry room on 1st
floor. Large master bedroom with
f i r epl ace & wal k i n cl oset .
Screened in porch on side, wood
deck on upper part of yard, cent-
ral air, gas heat. Walk in wine
cooler in basement, two car gar-
age.
$260,000
For an appointment call
570-288-5571
LAFLIN
Move in Ready!
3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, su-
per closet space, attic stor-
age. Open floor plan, with
ki tchen, fami l y & di ni ng
areas. Great room wi t h
cathedral cei l i ngs, hard-
wood floors & wood burning
fireplace. 1st floor, full size
l aundry room. Fi ni shed
basement with wet bar, slid-
ing glass doors to yard. Two
car garage. Design your
own backyard landscaping.
$174,000
570-814-8157 or eims-
tella@yahoo.com
For Sale By Owner
MOUNTAIN TOP
5 Pine Tree Road
Five bedrooms, 2.5 baths, fam-
ily, living, dining & laundry
rooms. Eat in kitchen, finished
basement with storage room,
attached 2 car garage. Re-
duced to $229,900
For appointment call
570-474-5463
PLAINS
39 SLOPE STREET
For sal e by owner, 3 bed-
rooms, 1 1/2 baths, modern
eat-in kitchen, large deck, off
street parking on a 50X150 lot,
nice neighborhood, all appli-
ances i ncl uded. Aski ng
$89, 000
570-310-1697
WEST PITTSTON
PRICE REDUCED!!
33 Delaware Ave.
2 bedroom ranch, completely re-
modeled, includes spare build-
ing lot, $49,000. 570-299-5415
WILKES-BARRE TWP.
Single House, 3 bedrooms. 1
bath, sunroom 10x25, kitchen,
dining room, parlor, & base-
ment. Gas baseboard, hot wa-
ter. 1448 sq ft. 50x130 ft lot,
75% fenced in. Buses to all
area schools nearby. Property
available to make a driveway.
$40,000. Call 570-822-2382
WYOMING
146 East 7th Street
FOR SALE BY OWNER
Two story, 3 bedrooms & 1 bath.
New foyer, tiled kitchen & modern
bath. New laminate floors. Deck
with fenced in yard.
Gas heat. Motivated seller.
Reduced Price
$130,000
570-817-3312
Houses For Sale
BERWICK
Wooded building lot consisting
of 2.64 acres within minutes of
Berwick. Country setting, but
close to conveniences.
Located on Confers Lane.
Price: $60,000
Call Patsy at 570-204-0983
STRAUSSER REAL ESTATE
570-759-3300
DALLAS
Newberry Estate
The Greens
4,000 sq. ft. condo with view of
ponds & golf course. Three
bedrooms on 2 floors. 5 1/2
baths, 2 car garage & more.
$425,000.
MLS# 12-1480
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
DALLAS
Perrins Marsh
106 acres, Approximately, 80
acres of water and 26 acres of
land with ranch home and pole
barn. Full gas lease transfers
with property. Partially located
in Wyoming and Luzerne
Counties. Truly a rare find!
MLS# 12-3026
$419,000
Call Cindy King
570-690-2689
www.cindykingre.com
570-675-5100
Houses For Sale
DALLAS
This 4 bedroom, 2.5 bath Cape
Cod style home has so much
to offer! Plenty of room for
everyone. Master bedroom
with walk in closet & full bath,
family room w/fireplace, rec.
room with half bath in lower
level. hardwood floors on 1st
fl oor, new wi ndows, above
ground poo. sellers offering
#%assist toward buyer's clos-
ing costs.
MLS# 13-1109
$179,900
Call Tracy Zarola
574-6465
DALLAS
19 Glen Riddle Lane
Peaceful surroundings overwhelm
the senses when you step foot on
this lovely property. Tudor style 2
story with 4 bedrooms and 2.5
baths, family room with fireplace.
Accessible outdoor deck from kit-
chen, family room Basement area
can be finished off for
additional living space.
MLS 13-1818
$284,500
Jay A. Crossin
Extension 23
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
DALLAS
Beautiful well kept 2 story Co-
lonial features 3,900 square
feet, 5 bedrooms, 3.5 baths,
hardwood & tile floors, gor-
geous entry foyer, bui l t-i n
POOL, fenced yard, 3 car gar-
age.
ONE YEAR HOME WARRANTY
INCLUDED.
MLS 13-1932
$469,000
Tracy Zarola
574-6465
LEWITH & FREEMAN
REAL ESTATE, INC
570-696-0723
DALLAS
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday, July 7, 12-1;30
Beautiful well kept 2 story Co-
lonial features 3,900 square
feet, 5 bedrooms, 3.5 baths,
hardwood & tile floors, gor-
geous entry foyer, bui l t-i n
POOL, fenced yard, 3 car gar-
age.
ONE YEAR HOME
WARRANTY INCLUDED.
MLS 13-1932
$469,000
Tracy Zarola
574-6465
696-0723
DALLAS
Newberry Estate Exceptional
4 bedroom, 3 bath townhouse.
Hardwood floors. Bright & airy
kitchen. Finished lower level
with walk-out to patio. Enjoy
carefree living with swimming,
golf & tennis amenities.
MLS#13-2185. $199,000
Call Geri 570-862-7432
LEWITH & FREEMAN
570-696-3801
Houses For Sale
DALLAS
PRICE REDUCTION
$109,900
Beautiful home in a lovely set-
ting in the Village of Orange. 2
or 3 bedrooms, 1st floor bed-
room, hardwood flooring, large
eat in kitchen, 1st floor laundry,
2nd floor cedar closet. De-
tached garage, barn style shed
with loft, many upgrades. New
furnace, kitchen floor & re-
cently drilled private well & PIX
plumbing. Dont wait, make
t hi s home your s & enj oy
sereni ty on the back deck.
MLS# 13-283.
Call Donna Cain 947-3824 or
Tony Wasco 855-2424
Weichert Realtors
TradeMark
570-901-1020
DALLAS
3 Crestview Drive
Sprawling multi-level, well-con-
structed and continuously main-
tained. 5,428 sq. ft. of living space.
Living room and formal dining room
with two-way gas fireplace and
hardwood flooring. Eat-in kitchen
with island. Florida room with flag-
stone floor. 5 bedrooms, 4 baths, 2
half-baths. Lower level rec-room
with fireplace and wet bar leads to
heated, in-ground pool. Beautifully
landscaped two-acre lot. $525,000.
MLS#13-1309
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
DRUMS
Bright, sunny raised ranch with
beautifully landscaped yard. Cul-
de-sac location. Large oak kitchen
with skylights and beamed ceiling
in dining area. Wood burning fire-
place in the living room. Large Mas-
ter bedroom suite. Family room,
hobby room, huge garage and
deck.
MLS#13-1638
$164,900
Call Mary Ann Desiderio
570-715-7733
Smith Hourigan Group
Mountain Top
570-474-6307
DUPONT
Reduced
$61,900
424 Simpson St.
Good condition Cape Cod. 3 bed-
room, 1 full bath in quiet neighbor-
hood. For more info and photos vis-
it: www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 12-4357
Brian Harashinski
570-237-0689
DURYEA
Commercial or Residential
Great opportunity to live and work
in the same location OR maintain
current tenant & rent out the store
front! Spacious two floor, 3 bed-
room living quarters with large open
concept commercial/office store
front. Newer roof, separate utilities
&200 AMP electrical service.
$65,000
CALL CHRISTINE
(570) 332-8832
JJ MANTIONE
613-9080
DURYEA
$129,900
136 Pettebone St.
Nice size, 2 bedroom, 2 bath home,
newer roof, vinyl siding, atone front,
replacement windows, fenced in
yard, above ground pool, off street
parking for 4 cars, gas heat, not af-
fected by flood in Sept., 2011.
Owner will look at offers.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-1805
Call Lu-Ann
570-602-9280
Houses For Sale
DURYEA
REDUCED
$82,900
226 Church St.
Large 2 story with 3 bedrooms and
2 full baths. Extra large room sizes,
stained glass and natural woodo-
work. Not flooded in 2011. MLS
#13-190. For more information and
photos visit atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Charlie
EDWARDSVILLE
Priced to sell! Charming home
on a nice tree lined street. 3
bedrooms 1 bath, great room
sizes. Large eat in kitchen, 1
bedroom of f ers a wal k i n
closet, hardwood floors in bed-
rooms, 3 year ol d above
ground pool with deck, pool
comes with an extra, brand
new, liner, modern bathroom.
A great home at a great price
just waiting for its new owner.
Sold as is; inspections are for
buyer information only.
MLS #13-2085. $47,900
Call/text Donna Cain
947-3824 or Tony Wasco
570-855-2424
Weichert Realtors
TradeMark
570-901-1020
EXETER
13 Thomas Street
Handicap accessible. 2 bedroom
rancher with vinyl siding. Modern
kitchen and walk-in shower. Cent-
ral air conditioning. One car gar-
age. 3 season porch. Nice fenced
rear yard.
MLS # 13-2428. $95,000.
Ask for Bob Kopec
Humford Realty, Inc.
570-822-5126.
EXETER
362 Susquehanna Avenue
Completely remodeled, spec-
tacular, 2 story Victorian home,
with 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths,
new rear deck, full front porch,
tiled baths & kitchen, granite
counter tops. All cherry hard-
wood floors throughout, all new
stainless steel appliances &
lighting. New oil furnace, wash-
er/dryer in first floor bath.
Great neighborhood, nice yard.
$174,900 (30 year loan,
$8,750 down, $739/month, 30
years @ 3.25%)
NOT IN FLOOD
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
WALSH REAL ESTATE
EXETER
$64,900
1156 Wyoming Ave.
Large home with 4 bedrooms, yard
with detached 2 car garage, private
yard. Home needs a little updating
but a great place to start!
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-865
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
GOULDSBORO
BIG BASS LAKE
REDUCED $120,000.
This large Chalet has a full kit-
chen on the ground floor with
full bath. Great for two families
to share, or in-laws quarters.
In Big Bass Lake Community
with indoor & outdoor pools,
club house, gym & lakefront
beaches. Conveniently loc-
ated near Rts. 380, 435 & 307.
Call Tom cell 516-507-9403
ONE SOURCE REALTY
570-842-3200
K
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Sunday, July 7, 2013 PAGE 3E
Commercial
Houses For Sale
The Attorney To Call
When Buying A Home
Complete Real Estate Legal
Services
Title Insurance
Rapid Title Search & Closing
Evening & Weekend
Appointments
Angelo C. Terrana Jr.
ATTORNEY AT LAW
Suite 117 Park Building,
400 Third Avenue, Kingston, PA
(570) 283-9500
8
0
5
3
4
1
Commercial
80003008
Rentals
Maple Manor
A Quality Manufactured Housing Community
New and Pre-Owned Homes for Sale!
Rentals Available
Select Homes for Lease with Option to Purchase
Financing Available to Qualified Buyers
18 William Street,
Taylor, Pa. 18517
Rental Office: 570-562-1931
www.umh.com
Licensed by the Pa. Dept. of Banking NMLS 200331
Houses For Sale
GLEN LYON
194-196 E. Main St.
Large home with mother in law
suite that can either be open to the
rest of the house or closed off with
its own entrance and used as an
apartment. This home has vinyl sid-
ing, newer electrical, replacement
windows, large yard and 2 car gar-
age. Home offer a 1st floor master
and bath, 3 fireplaces and tons of
room. Come check out all the pos-
sibilities for yourself.
MLS 13-2419
$87,500
John Polifka
570-704-6846
FIVE MOUNTAINS REALTY
570-542-2141
GLEN LYON
Large 5 bdrm, 2-1/ 2 bat h
move-in condition home with
Home Warranty included. 3rd
floor has separate heat, small
kitchen and can greatly en-
hance home as bonus area or
rental income. Zoning is R-2.
MLS# 13-2241
$59,900
Call Dana Distasio
Lewith & Freeman
Real Estate, Inc.
474-9801
HANOVER
Ideal location in Hanover Township.
Close to high school and shopping.
This duplex offers a new furnace,
newer roof, most replacement win-
dows, large yard, garage with work
area and off-street parking for a
great price. MLS# 13-757
$55,000 Call Cindy King 570-690-
2689 www.cindykingre.com
570-675-5100
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
209 Constitution Avenue
$269,900
Meticulously maintained 4 bed-
room, 2 story, vinyl sided, 5
year old home situated on a
generous lot. Large, modern
kitchen, 3 baths, 1st floor fam-
ily room, 2 car garage, deck
and soooo much mor e!
MLS#11- 2429
Call Florence Keplinger @
715-7737
Century 21
Smith Hourigan Group
570-474-6307
HANOVER TWP
291 Vanessa Drive
Scenic view of the Wyoming
Valley. Located at the end of a
nice private road. Minutes to
Wyoming Valley Country Club,
Industri al Park & school s.
Close to Rtes. 81 & 309. Cus-
tom bui l t, 4 bedrooms & 4
baths. 1st floor family room
with wood burning fireplace.
formal dining room off the liv-
ing room. 1st floor laundry,
large enclosed patio with tile
floor, hardwood floors on first &
second f l oors. Large t wo
vehicle garage. Lower level re-
creation room with bar, extra
room with coal/wood burning
stove which can be used as
5th bedroom. Lots of closet
space.
Must See to Appreciate
MLS #12-4610
$269,900
Louise Laine 283-9100 x 20
KINGSTON
80 James St.
This stately 4 bedroom, 1.5 bath
Ki ngston home has the WOW
factor! Meticulously well cared for
with old world touches throughout.
Like a stained glass window, built
ins and tiled fireplace in living room.
Kitchen is modern eat in with wash-
er/dryer closet for convenience.
Large front porch, rear deck and
detached garage.
MLS 13-1761
$289,000
Jay A. Crossin
Extension #23
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
Houses For Sale
HANOVER TWP.
Extraordinary quality built
4000+ sq. ft. Home - rear
yard with stone patio backs
up to the 8th Fairway of the
Wyoming Valley Country
Club! Custom cherry eat- in
kitchen with island, formal liv-
ing, dining & family rooms
have custom hardwood floors,
1st floor family room has Ver-
mont Stone fireplace & wet
bar, 1st floor Master Suite has
his & her dressing rooms &
powder rooms opening to a
tiled master bath with jetted
tub & separate tiled shower.
Second floor has 3 additional
bedrooms with walk in
closets, 2 full baths & large
attic, gigantic lower level fam-
ily room has stone fireplace,
seated bar area with sink &
mirrored backsplash, workout
area & powder room. Stun-
ning landscaping with an in-
door & outdoor speaker sys-
tem, oversized 2 car garage &
underground sprinkler
system.
$395,000
Call Pat today @
570-287-1196
Smith Hourigan
Group
HANOVER TWP.
227 Red Coat Lane
Liberty Hills
An absolutely wonderful, must see,
home with many desirable features
including hardwood, tile & Pergo
st yl e f l oori ng, oak wood t ri m
t hroughout , mast er bat h wi t h
garden tub & 1st floor laundry,
Lower level is A-1 grade including
family room with fantastic gas fire
place, wet bar, 3/4 bath & addition-
al 4th bedroom. The original own-
ers enjoyed this home for 13 years
and now it's your chance.
MLS# 13-2335
$265,000
Call Jim Banos
570-991-1883
For appointment
COLDWELL BANKER
RUNDLE REAL ESTATE
570-474-2340
HARVEYS LAKE
PRICE REDUCED! $62,900
22 Wood Street
Nice cottage with lake rights, close
to the public boat dock. New kit-
chen & living room ceilings & insu-
lation just completed. Enjoy this
place during the Summer months
or year round. Recently updated
with new roof & floors.
MLS#12-3820.
Call Pat Doty
394-6901
570-696-2468
LAFLIN
New Price
$124,900
111 Laflin Road
Nice 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath Split
Level home with hardwood
fl oors, 1 car garage, l arge
yard and covered patio in very
convenient location. Great curb
appeal and plenty of off street
parking. Rt. 315 to light @
Laflin Rd. Turn west onto Laflin
Rd. Home is on left.
For more info and photos
visit: www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 12-2852
Keri Best
570-885-5082
Houses For Sale
HARVEYS LAKE
PRICE REDUCED!
22 Wood Street
Nice cottage with lake rights,
close to the public boat dock.
New kitchen & living room ceil-
ings & insulation just com-
pleted. Enjoy this place dur-
ing the Summer months or
year round. Recently updated
with new roof & floors.
MLS# 12-3820
$64,900
Pat Doty
394-6901
696-2468
HARVEYS LAKE
37 Marina Drive
Immaculate 3BR, 2.5 bath End
Uni t Townhouse! Cherry &
granite eat-in kitchen with ap-
pliances open to living room
with fireplace and sliders to
patio; large dining area & foy-
er; spacious master bedroom
suite; each bedroom has walk-
in closet; A/C; 1st floor laundry;
garage; Beach Membership &
Boat slip available.
Call Rae 570-899-1209
LEWITH & FREEMAN
288-9371
HARVEYS LAKE
Barnum Street
Awesome lake view double
wi de, Mobi l e vi nyl si ded,
peaked roof, covered deck on
foundation two car detached
paved driveway 100x100 lot.
$120,000 Call: 404-271-6728
HUNLOCK CREEK
Over 36 Acres of trails and views.
This meticulously maintained prop-
erty features 2 Ranch Homes with
Attached Garages, Detached 2-Car
Garage, and ponds. Walk-out base-
ment with coal burner. Additional
30.09 acres can be purchased.
MLS#13-1889
$429,000
Call Cindy King
570-690-2689
570-675-5100
WWW.CINDYKINGRE.COM
JENKINS TWP.
$239,000
Updated bi-level with 2nd story
master suite addition features a
jetted tub, separate shower, water
closet & two huge walk in closets!
Lower level has 2nd kitchen & can
function as an in-law suite. Fire-
place in 1st floor family room, all
new windows, central air & corner
lot.
This is a Must See!
Call Christine
332-8822
JJ MANTIONE
613-9080
KINGSTON TWP.
Bodle Road
2 story older home with up-
gr aded ki t chen & bat h,
Large living room, formal
dining room, lower level fam-
ily room. Hot water heat,
garage & carport. 1.1 acre
lot.
MLS #13-2320
$150,000
Besecker Realty
675-3611
Houses For Sale
JENKINS TWP.
46 Old Mill Road
Stunning English Tudor in a desir-
able neighborhood. Modern kit-
chen with cherry cabinets, stain-
less steel appliances, island with
Jenn air and tile floor. Separate
glass surrounded breakfast room.
Family room with gas fireplace, and
hardwood floors. Formal dining
room with bay window. French
doors throughout. Master bedroom
suite with master bath, walk-in
closet and separate sitting room.
Lower level rec-room and office.
Two car garage. Pi ttston Area
School Di stri ct.
MLS#13-1076
Price Reduced
$298,000
Call
Sandra Gorman:
570-696-5408
Smith Hourigan Group
570-696-1195
KINGSTON
This 3 bedroom, 4 bath brick
town home offers a spacious
floor plan, high ceilings, re-
cessed lighting & rich hard-
wood floors. Cherry cabinets,
a large island, granite coun-
ters, stainless steel appliances
& over sized sink highlight the
kitchen. Corian counters &
European style tile & vanities
accent the baths. Finished
lower level (above ground).
2nd floor has new hardwood
Brazilian cherry floors. New
landscaped patio, all fenced in.
$279,900.
Call Ruth K Smith
570-696-5411
Smith Hourigan Group
570-696-1195
KINGSTON
$139,900
129 S. Dawes Ave.
Three bedroom, 2 bath cape cod
wi th central ai r, new wi ndows,
doors, carpets and tile floor. Full
concrete basement with 9' ceilings.
Walking distance to Wilkes Barre.
Electric and Oil heat. MLS #12-
3283. For more information and
photos visit:
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Tom 570-262-7716
ATLAS REALTY, INC.
570-829-6200
KINGSTON
$139,900
129 S. Dawes Ave.
Three bedroom, 2 bath cape
cod with central air, new win-
dows, doors, carpets and tile
floor. Full concrete basement
with 9' ceilings. Walking dis-
tance to Wilkes Barre. Electric
and Oil heat. MLS #12-3283.
For more information and
p h o t o s v i s i t
www. at l as r eal t y i nc . c om
Call Tom
570-262-7716
Houses For Sale
KINGSTON
58 1st Avenue
Reduced to sell fast. Quiet,
convenient street. 3 bedroom,
1 1/2 bath. Finished family
room, modern t hroughout.
MLS#11-3245. $148, 000
Call Joe Gilroy
Gilroy Real Estate
570-288-1444
570-690-0394
KINGSTON
561 MERCER AVE.
This roomy 2-Story includes a
modern kitchen & bath, living &
dining rooms, 3 bedrooms & a
family room in the lower-level.
The yard is small, but there is
generous off-street parking.
Enjoy the outdoors from your
15 x 10 two-tier deck, or the
new front porch. This home in-
cludes 2 free-standing gas
stoves. For more details & to
view the photos online, go to:
www.prudentialrealestate.com
& enter PRU8N9T9 i n the
Home Search.
Listed at $94,500.
MLS#13-1538.
Call today to
schedule a private showing.
Mary Ellen Belchick 696-6566
Walter Belchick 696-2600
PRUDENTIAL
POGGI & JONES
696-2600
KINGSTON
Double block. Brings in $1,050
per month. Big back yard. Fully
rented. Great ROI. $74,999
570-430-1308
KINGSTON
MUST SEE THIS
KINGSTON GEM!
Charming three bedroom 2
story featuring pretty living
room. Formal dining room.
New ki tchen wi th stai nl ess
steel appliances. Beautiful
hardwood floors. Great third
f l oor mul t i -purpose bonus
room! Gas heat. Charming
front porch. Pri vate dri ve
provides plenty of off street
parking. Call Ruthie for an
appointment today!
MLS #13-754
$111,900
714-6110
Century 21
Smith Hourigan Group
287-1196
KINGSTON
100 Lathrop Street
Charming 2 story home in
desirable neighborhood.
2 bedroom, 1.5 bath with new
Kraft-Mai d ki tchen, quartz
counters & SS GE appliances.
Hardwood & tile, fireplace, sun
room and walk-up attic. 1 car
garage. Call 570-407-1660.
$159,000.
LEHMAN TWP.
477 Trojan Road
Nice 3 bedroom modular, 2
baths, finished basement. All
on six country acres
Offered @ $139,500
Call Jim for details
TOWNE & COUNTRY REAL
ESTATE CO.
735-8932 542-5708
Houses For Sale
LAFLIN
3 bedroom Bi-Level situated on
lovely lot with formal dining
room, lower level family room
with gas fireplace, central air,
conven- iently located to inter-
states & Casino.
A Must See!
MLS #13-1100
$187,500
Marie Montante
881-0103
288-9371
LAFLIN
Impressive home with quality
construction. Two floors of liv-
ing space. double corner lot,
central air. Two complete kit-
chens, l i vi ng/di ni ng rooms.
Each bedroom has pri vate
bath. Lovely back yard with in
ground pool in need of repairs,
enclosed sun room, lots of
storage, and many other fea-
tures.
MLS#12-1441
$229,000
Call Nancy Answini
570-237-5999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
570-288-1444
LAFLIN
PRICE REDUCED
$360,000
10 Fairfield Drive
Exceptional & spacious cus-
tom bui l t cedar home wi th
open floor plan and all of the
amenities situated on 2 lots in
picturesque setting. Create
memories in this 5 BR, 4 bath
home with 18 ceiling in living
room, gas fireplace, granite kit-
chen, large 2 story foyer, huge
finished lower level for enter-
taining with bar/full kitchen &
wine cellar. In-ground pool &
hot tub. Directions: Rt 315 to
Laflin Rd., right onto Oakwood
Dr., right onto Fordham Rd, left
onto Fairfield Dr., home is on
the right. MLS 12-4063
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
NANTICOKE
393 E. Noble St.
Check out this 4 bedroom, 1.5 bath
home with 1 car detached garage.
This home features a Jacuzzi tub,
newer roof, furnace, hot water heat-
er, replacement windows, fenced
yard and large covered deck.
MLS 13-613
$77,900
Call John Polifka
570-704-6846
FIVE MOUNTAINS REALTY
570-542-2141
Houses For Sale
LAFLIN
$229,000
7 Concord Drive
Beautifully maintained 2 story
in Oakwood Park. 3 bedrooms,
2.5 baths with 2 car garage
and private rear yard. Mature
landscaping, gas/electric heat
with central air.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-2215
Call Charlie
LAFLIN
$254,900
24 Fordham Road
Great Split Level in Oakwood Park,
Laflin. 13 rooms, 4 bedrooms, 2 1/2
baths. 2 car garage and l arge
corner lot. Lots of space for the
large or growing family.
www. atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-452
Call Charlie
LARKSVILLE
$149,900
511 E. State St.
Everythi ng you need i s i n thi s
house. 4 bedrooms, lower level
family room, den open, living/din-
ing room, nice yard with above
ground pool and covered patio, ex-
tra parking. 1 car garage. Very well
maintained home. Move right in!
MLS 13-2432
CALL COLLEEN
570-883-7594
MOOSIC
REDUCED
$87,500
R. 1104 Springbrook
Cape Cod home with endless
possibilities. 3-4 bedroom, 1
bath, central air, plenty of stor-
age. Enclosed porch, garage
with carport. Situated on 3 lots.
Di recti ons: 1-81, Exi t 180
Moosic (Rt. 11) L. onto 502,
straight 1/2 mile. Turn R onto
8th St., up hill, turn left, house
3rd on right.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-607
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
NANTICOKE
West Green St.
Nice 2 bedroom ranch style
home, gas heat, finished base-
ment, vinyl siding, deck. Move
in condition.
Reduced to $69,500
Call Jim
TOWNE &
COUNTRY
REAL ESTATE
570-735-8932
570-542-5708
PAGE 4E Sunday, July 7, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Sunday, July 7, 2013 PAGE 5E
KINGSTON/WEST SIDE & SURROUNDS
Swoyersville 115 Hemlock St 2-4PM Atlas Realty Inc
Plymouth 433 Fairview St 12-1:30PM Prudential Poggi & Jones
Courtdale 190 Courtdale Ave 1-2:30PM Prudential Poggi & Jones
PITTSTON/NORTH & SURROUNDS
Lafin 7 Concord Dr 12-1:30PM Atlas Realty Inc
Yatesville 12 Reid St 12-1:30PM Atlas Realty Inc
West Pittston 214 Fremont St 12-1:30PM Atlas Realty Inc
Harding 106 Hex St 12-2PM Atlas Realty Inc
Jenkins Twp Lot 4 Hospital St 2:30-4PM Atlas Realty Inc
Jenkins Twp Unit
#
26 Insignia Point Courtyards 1-3PM Lewith & Freeman
Jenkins Twp Insignia Point Courtyards 1-3PM Lewith & Freeman
West Pittston 128 Linden St 3-4PM Lewith & Freeman
Jenkins Twp 6 Highland Dr 1-2:30PM JJ Mantione Realty Group
MOUNTAINTOP & SURROUNDS
Mountaintop Lot 1 Woodberry Dr 1-3PM Lewith & Freeman
Mountaintop 25 Coplay Pl 1-3PM Classic Properties
Mountaintop 135 Forest Rd 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group
Mountaintop 38 Patriot Cir 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group
BACK MOUNTAIN & SURROUNDS
Harveys Lake 31 Sunset Terrace 1:30-2:30PM Lewith & Freeman
Harveys Lake 102 Pine St 1-2:30PM Lewith & Freeman
Dallas 29 Doe Dr 12-1:30PM Lewith & Freeman
Shavertown 1071 Meadowcrest Dr 2-3:30PM Lewith & Freeman
Harveys Lake 182 Second St 3-4PM Lewith & Freeman
Shavertown 701 Hampton Rd 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group
Dallas Twp 691 Carpenter Rd 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group
Dallas 288 Country Club Rd 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group
Dallas 610 Meadows 12-1:30PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group
Harveys Lake Pole 238 12-2PM Prudential Poggi & Jones
Dallas 739 The Greens 1-4PM Besecker Realty Inc
WILKES BARRE & SURROUNDS
Wilkes Barre 105 Plymouth Ave 12-2PM Atlas Realty Inc
Wilkes Barre 851 S Franklin St 1:30-2:30PM Lewith & Freeman
Wilkes Barre 104 Miner St 1-2:30PM Lewith & Freeman
HANOVER/ASHLEY/NANTICOKE & SURROUNDS
Hanover Twp 128 Lyndwood Ave 12-1PM Lewith & Freeman
Nanticoke 230 Pine St 12-1PM Lewith & Freeman
Hanover Twp 330 Spring St 12-3PM Jack Crossin Real Estate
Nanticoke 1488 S Hanover St 1-2:30PM Prudental Poggi & Jones
SUNDAY, JULY 7, 2013
OPEN HOUSES
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ELEGANT HOMES, LLC.
51 Sterling Avenue, Dallas PA 18612
(570) 675 9880
www.eleganthomesinc.net
New Construction! $198,900
* Approx 2100 Sq. Ft.
* 2 Car Garage
with Storage Area
* 2 Story Great Room
* Cherry Kitchen
with Granite
* Fenced in Yard
with Patio
* Gas Heat/AC
Directions: From Wyo-
ming Ave. take Pringle
St. to the End, take left on
Grove St. Twins on left -
267 Grove St. Kingston
Luxurious Twins in Kingston
Open House Today 1:00-3:00PM
OPEN HOUSE
DAKOTAWOODS - Carefree Condo-Bright
& spacious w/3 BRs, 1st fr master,
study/library, kit w/granite & upscale
appls, 2 car gar.
MLS#11-3208 RHEA 696-6677
10 Dakota Drive
1-2:30 p.m.
OPEN HOUSE
Deer Meadows location - Bright living
room opens to large dining room - Open
foor plan in kitchen & family room,
wonderful screened porch & deck, great
fat backyard, fnished lower level with
wet bar, new roof.
MLS# 13-1930 MARGY
29 Doe Dr.
12-1:30 p.m.
Inviting home in great Deer Meadows
location - Bright living room opens to
large dining room - Open foor plan
in kitchen & family room, wonderful
screened porch & deck, great fat back-
yard, fnished lower level with wet bar,
new roof. MLS# 13-1930 MARGY
Dallas
Distinctive design. Great foor plan.
Stunning ultra modern kitchen, custom
tile baths, beautiful HW foors. Many up-
grades. Minutes to I-81, I-80, Turnpike.
MLS# 13-802 CLYDETTE 696-0897
Bear Creek Top
OPEN HOUSE
NEW INSIGNIA POINTE RANCH UNITS.
Distinctive design and architecture
throughout.Open foor plan with high
ceilings, hardwood foors, tiled baths,
and laundry room. Granite Countertops
and Stainless Appliances. Open stairway
to lower level ofers opport
Insignia Pointe
1-3 p.m.
Magnifcent Estate. 4500SF residence on
10acs, renovated & enlarged w/meticu-
lous craftsmanship. Spacious rms, HW
frs, gourmet kit, stone terrace, gardens
& orchards. LR w/stone FP, 4 lg BRs, 3.5
baths. 1200SF building w/FP used as
ofce & trophy rm.
Benton
OPEN HOUSE
THE TWINS Luxury Condominiums
w/distinctive design & architecture.
Exterior fnishes include hardy plank &
cultured stone. Interior includes, lots of
HW & tile, granite countertops. Luxuri-
ous 1st foor MSTR Ste. Spacious 2nd fr
w/2BRs, lg bath & spaci
Unit 26
1-3 p.m.
Beautiful 4BR, 3 bath lakefront home
on cul-de-sac in Laurel Lakes. Fireplace
in FR, H/W foors, gorgeous kitchen,
attached garage.
MLS# 09-295 MATT 714-9229
Mountaintop
OPEN HOUSE
Preview this 4BR, 3 bath 2 story model w/lots
of HW & tile. Granite counters in Kit, MSTR Ste
w/2 walk-in closets & tiled bath w/dbl vanities,
shower & whirlpool. Hallmark Homes house w/lot
packages available. TERRY D. 715-9317
Lot 1 Woodberry
1-3 p.m.
C
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D
SANDSPRINGSby
570-708-3042 OR 570-593-0050 Tuskes Realty 8
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Featured Home of the Week 85 Stone Ridge Road, Drums, Pa.
1-3 Open House
Sunday,
July 7, 2013
Come Tour this
Incredible home
with Spectacular
vistas of the
Butler Valley..
3100 sq.ft. on
1+ acres
Directions: Rt. 309 to Drums, Right onto Old Turnpike Rd. Rt. Into Sand Springs..continue into
community then make right onto Stone Ridge Road..and look for signs!!
Featuring a gourmet kitchen,
Custom oak frg.
Gas heat/A/C,
4 Brs, 2 1/2 bth.
3 car garg..plus MORE!!
The Linden Farmhouse
But.. the views are second to none. In all of NEPACome See for Yourself!
TUSKES
HOMES
For more information or to schedule an
appointment, contact:
Christine Pieczynski at 696-6569
DIR: South Main St., Hanover to right on
Bunker Drive.
Home and lot packages available!
Bring your house plan and choose your lot!
Construction by:
Premiere Home Builders, Inc.
Dave & John Pieczynski
28 Carverton Road, Shavertown, PA
Phone: 696.2600 ext. 207
Fax: 696.0677
Direct: 696.6569
cpieczynski@poggi-jones.com
www.poggi-jones.com
2013 BRER Afliates LLC, An independently owned and operated broker member of BRER Afliates LLC. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are registered service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions
worldwide. Used under license with no other afliation with Prudential Equal Housing Opportunity.
Fairway Estates Phase II, Hanover
HOMEAND LOT PACKAGES
AVAILABLE!
Only 10 4 Lots Left!!!
Since 1983 Est. 1983
DIRECTIONS; 81 STOTHE NUANGOLA EXIT #159. RIGHT OFF EXIT, PASS
GAS STATIONTO A RIGHT ONTO ASPEN, TO RIGHT ONLAURELTO LEFT
ONTO LAKEVIEW, TO LEFT ONTO OAKMONTTO COPLAY..STRAIGHT AHEAD
Mountaintop Laurel Lakes
25 Coplay Place
Beautiful Lake Front Property
Open House Sunday
1:00 to 3:00
ONE HUNDRED FEET OF LAKE FRONT MOVE IN
CONDITION TWO STORY HOME...FEATURES 3 BRS, 3
BATHS WITH FINISHED LOWER LEVEL, SCREENED IN
PORCH WITH TIERED DECKS LEADING TO A PRIVATE
DOCK....PRICED AT $272,900
Classic Properties (570) 718-4959
Carol A. Shedlock, Associate Broker
(570)407-2314 Classicproperties.com
K
PAGE 6E Sunday, July 7, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Houses For Sale
NANTICOKE
1210 S. Hanover Street
.Large 3 bedroom 1 bath home with
a big yard. Possible off street park-
ing in the back off the alley. This
home has replacement windows on
the second floor and awnings over
the windows. This will be a great
home with a little TLC.
MLS# 13-2093
$59,900
John Polifka
570-704-6846
FIVE MOUNTAINS REALTY
570-542-2141
NANTICOKE
1210 S. Hanover St.
Large 3 bedroom 1 bath home with
a big yard. Possible off street park-
ing in the back off the alley. This
home has replacement windows on
the second floor and awnings over
the windows. This will be a great
home with a little TLC.
MLS# 13-2093
$59,900
John Polifka
570-704-6846
FIVE MOUNTAINS REALTY
570-542-2141
NANTICOKE
Modern, well maintained 4 bed-
room home in move in condition.
Covered patio, in ground pool,
private fenced yard, ductless air,
vinyl siding. Immaculate!
MLS# 13-534
REDUCED TO $149,900
Call Ann Marie Chopick
760-6769
288-6554
NANTICOKE
$124,500
WOW A MODERN RANCH! King
size brick Ranch located on the
outskirts of Nanticoke, Open floor
plan with large sunny sunken living
room, tiled kitchen, formal dining
room 3 bedrooms. Bath with tiled
garden tub and glass shower. Fin-
ished lower level with fireplace, 3/4
bath with laundry area and carport.
Newer roof, furnace and electrical.
Newly landscaped back yard. Prop-
erty is a Must See!
MLS 12-4107
Michele Hopkins
570-540-6046
PARSONS
JUST LISTED
$134,900
35 Wyndwood Dr.
Like new 2 bedroom, 2 bath
attached ranch. Upgraded kit-
chen, vaulted living room,
sunroom, master bedroom.
www.35wyndwood .com
Call Mark
215-275-0487
C-21 TRES
PITTSTON
$134,900
15 High St.
Well kept newly remodeled, 2 story
home, with modern kitchen, central
air, new triple pane replacement
windows and custom made blinds
for each window. Home is in move
in condition, with plaster walls and
design ceilings, plus much, much
more. A MUST SEE!
MLS 13-1088
Fred Mecadon
570-817-5792
PITTSTON
$64,900
62 Pine St.
Enjoy the warm weather in this
3 bedroom, 1 bathroom home
with great curb appeal, sun
room and patio. New roof and
newer windows.(Traveling N.
on Main St. Pittston turn R.
onto Pine St., home is on left).
MLS 13-1897
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
WARRIOR RUN
2 story, 2 bedroom with fenced in
yard, al l appl i ances i ncl uded.
$51, 900 Cal l Ed Appnel
570-817-2500
WALSH REAL ESTATE
570-654-1490
Houses For Sale
PITTSTON
PRICE REDUCTION
$169,900
69 Curtis St.
Spacious 3 bedrooms home, re-
built in 1980 with 2 full baths and a
3/4 master bath. Private pool area
with brand new liner, 2 car garage
with 1/2 bath and full 2nd story for
hobby room, etc. Located at the
end of dead end street, affords lots
of privacy.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-2079
Call Charlie
PITTSTON
REDUCED
$106,900
67 Carroll St.
The WOW factor! Move right in and
enjoy this renovated home with no
worries! 3 bedrooms with lots of
closet space. 2 full baths including
a 4 piece master bath with custom
tile work, open floor plan with mod-
ern kitchen with island, corner lot
with off street parking and nice
yard. Come and take a look!
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-863
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PITTSTON
REDUCED $109,000
25 Swallow St.
Grand 2 story home with Vic-
torial features, large eat in kit-
chen with laundry, 3/4 bath on
first floor, 2nd bath with claw
foot tub, lots of closet space.
Move in ready, off street park-
ing in rear. MLS 12-3926
Call Colleen
570-883-7594
PITTSTON
Reduced
$99,900
328 S. Main St.
3 story Victorial with 10 rooms, 4
bedrooms, 2 baths, 2 car garage
with newer driveway. Central air,
large yard. MLS 13-1073
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
Call Tom
570-262-7716
PLAINS
$57,500
13 Warner St.
Move in ready starter home
with off street parking, fenced
yard, and a large deck! MLS
13-1862
Kevin Sobilo
570-817-0706
PLAINS
REDUCED
$199,900
4 Spruce Ave.
BIRCHWOOD HILLS
3 bedrooms, 3 baths. Hardwood
floors, central air. Finished base-
ment with fireplace, great yard, su-
per location. MLS 13-1251
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Tom 570-262-7716
PLAINS TWP
$189,900
20 Nittany Lane
Affordable 3 level townhome fea-
tures 2 car garage, 3 bedrooms,
3.5 baths, lower level patio and up-
per level deck, gas fireplace, cent-
ral air and vac and stereo system
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-871
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
Houses For Sale
S. WILKES-BARRE
$105,000
43 Richmont Ave.
Near Riverside Park. Motiv-
ated seller, make reasonable
offer. 3 bedroom, 2 bath Cape
Cod, central air, hardwood
f l oor, above ground pool ,
f enced yard.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-789
Tom Salvaggio
570-262-7716
SHAVERTOWN
18 Genoa Lane
NEW LISTING!
For Sale By Owner
Executive downsize home, 4
bedrooms, 2.5 baths, private
back yard with 16 x 36 in
ground pool. Meticulously
maintained. $389,000
www.forsalebyowner.com
ID 23949718
or call 315-382-5295
SUGARLOAF
$309,000
Beautiful home in a beautiful
location. 2003 custom built
Cape Cod offers 4.89 cleared
acres. Heated in ground pool,
3 full baths, 1st floor master
bedroom & laundry & an mod-
ern kitchen. 2 car attached
gar- age wi th bonus room
above. Close to Humboldt In-
dus- trial Park & Eagle Rock
Resort. MLS# 13-894.
Call Donna Cain 947-3824 or
Tony Wasco 855-2424
Weichert Realtors
Trade Mark
570-901-1020
SUGARLOAF
$295,000
Beautiful home in a beautiful
location. 2003 custom built
Cape Cod offers 4.89 cleared
acres. Heated in ground pool,
3 full baths, 1st floor master
bedroom & laundry & an mod-
ern kitchen. 2 car attached
gar- age wi th bonus room
above. Close to Humboldt In-
dus- trial Park & Eagle Rock
Resort. MLS# 13-894.
Call Donna Cain 947-3824 or
Tony Wasco 855-2424
Weichert Realtors
Trade Mark
570-901-1020
SWOYERSVILLE
Great investment property. On
corner lot. Close to all major
hi ghways & conveni ences.
Bring all offers. 1 unit needs to
be updated & you are all done.
MLS #13-1983
$160,000
Call Pat Doty at
570-394-6901
570-696-2468
SWOYERSVILLE
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday, July 7, 2 -4 P.M.
$119,900
115 Hemlock St.
Lots of updates in this roomy Cape
Cod in a desirable neighborhood.
Large eat in kitchen with new floor-
ing. Finished basement with theat-
er/rec room. Large l evel yard.
Pri ced to sel l !
MLS 12-4231
Call Kevin Sobilo
570-817-0706
SWOYERSVILLE
STEEPLECHASE
50 Grandville Drive
Outstanding 3 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath
townhouse out of the flood zone.
Formal dining room, family room,
master bedroom sui te, pri vate
guest suite also on upper level.
Central air and central vacuum.
Deck, garage + many extras.
Freshly painted and carpeted, so
move right in!
$169,900
MLS # 13-195.
Ask for Bob Kopec
Humford Realty Inc
570-822-5126
Houses For Sale
PENN LAKE
This pristine 2 year old log
home is truly an amazing ex-
perience. No expense spared
and the immaculate design in-
cludes, energy efficient Geo-
Thermal heating system, su-
perior wall foundation, 5-inch
wide hardwood plank floors,
42-inch kitchen cabinets, cus-
tom designed quartz counter
top, built-in finished 2 car gar-
age. To top it all off, it sits in a
perfect, private location.
MLS# 13-2048
$349,000
Robert Altmayer
570-793-7999
RUNDLE
REAL ESTATE
570-474-2340
TRUCKSVILLE
Elegance & comfort combine
to give you all you dream of.
1st floor mater,guest suite with
full bath,fabulous breakfast
r oom over l ooki ng pr i vat e
wooded yard. Plenty of built ins
and plantation shutters give
this home wonderful character.
MLS#13-2678
$459,000
Tracy Zarola
570-574-6465
570-696-0723
WAPWALLOPEN
359 Pond Hill
Mountain Road
4 bedroom home features a great
yard with over 2 acres of property.
Situated across from a playground.
Needs some TLC but come take a
look, you wouldnt want to miss out.
There is a pond at the far end of
the property that is used by all sur-
rounding neighbors. This is an es-
tate and is being sold as is. No
sellers property disclosure. Will en-
tertain offers in order to settle es-
tate. MLS 11-962
$49,900
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
WEST PITTSTON
MULTI-FAMILY
Two houses for the price of
one! Two story in front &
double-wide in rear. Great for 2
families or investor opportunity.
Off street parking & NOT in
flood zone. MLS #13-97.
$139,000
Call Cindy King Today!
570-690-2689
www.cindykingre.com
WEST PITTSTON
$109,900
214 Fremont St.
Very well cared for 3 bedroom
home in move in condition. Large
eat in kitchen, nice yard, freshly
painted bedrooms with new carpet.
Newer windows. Not Flooded
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-2032
Colleen Turant
570-237-0415
WEST WYOMING
Delightful 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath
Cape Cod in charming neigh-
borhood i s yours f or onl y
$115,000. Offers oversized liv-
ing room, modern kitchen with
breakfast room, and 1st floor
master bedroom.
Don't miss this one!
MLS #13-2722
Call Barbara Metcalf
570-696-0883
570-696-3801
Houses For Sale
WEST WYOMING
$74,500
384 Tripp St.
3 bedroom, 1 bath, 2 story with
large kitchen, dining room and liv-
ing room. Private rear yard, nice
neighborhood gas heat.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-2179
Call Charlie
WEST WYOMING
Reduced - $89,900
1565 Shoemaker Avenue
Well taken care of Cape Cod with 3
bed, 1 bath, hardwood floors, de-
tached 1 car garage. MLS 13-2280
www.atlas realtyinc.com
Tom Salvaggio
570-262-7716
WHITE HAVEN
NEW LISTING
211 Wilkes-Barre Street
Enjoy this 2 story, 3 bedroom,
2 bath home. Recently up-
dated! Large living room with
stone fireplace. Eat-in kitchen
with new stove Large 1st floor
family room directly off the kit-
chen area with sliding glass
door to backyard. 2 car gar-
age with loft area for a great
workshop or additional living
space when finished. Addition-
al access to backyard alley.
From Mountain Top take 437
to White Haven, LEFT on the
Wilkes-Barre Street. White
Haven is 17 miles from Wilkes-
Barre and 4 miles from I-476
and I-80 interchange.
MLS # 13-2054
$109,900
Craig Yarrish
696-6554
Prudential
Poggi & Jones
REALTORS
696-2600
WHITE HAVEN
501 Birch Lane
Beautiful 4 bedroom, 3 bath. Enjoy
the amenities of a private lake,
boating, basketball courts, etc. The
home has wood floors and carpet-
ing throughout. French doors in the
kitchen that lead you out to the
large rear deck for entertaining.
The backyard has 2 utility sheds for
storage. MLS 12-1695
NEW PRICE
$174,900
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
Wilkes Barre
PRICE REDUCED
$49,900
735 N. Washington Street
Spacious 2 story, 3 bedrooms with
2 car detached garage, good
starter home, needs TLC. MLS
#12-3887. For more information
and photos visit:
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Tom 570-262-7716
WILKES-BARRE
37 Flick Street
Nice 2 possibly 3 bedroom home
with a large driveway and garage.
This home has a newer kitchen and
a full bath with laundry area on the
1st floor. There is a nice yard and
deck for your outside enjoyment.
There is a newer furnace and roof
also. Come and check it out.
MLS# 13-2103
$41,000
John Polifka
570-704-6846
FIVE MOUNTAINS REALTY
570-542-2141
WILKES-BARRE
PRICE REDUCTION
Charming 1,000+ sq. ft. 2 bedroom,
1/1/2 bath with separate driveway
on a quiet street. Lower level was
finished for former business - has
separate entrance, 1/2 bath & elec-
tric baseboard heat (not included in
total sq. ft).
MLS #13-1592 $49,000
Dana Distasio
570-715-9333
LEWITH & FREEMAN
570-474-9801
Houses For Sale
WILKES-BARRE
Very nice home all on one
floor. Large kitchen, 1.5 baths.
Great views of park, dike. &
large open area with lots of
trees. Basement partially fin-
ished with 1/2 bath, commode
& utility sink. convenient loca-
tion.
MLS#13-2283
$118,000
Call Nancy Answini
570-2375999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
570-228-1444
WILKES-BARRE
75 Mercedes Drive
Beautifully kept split level in
desirable Barney Farms. 3 car
attached garage, fin- ished
basement & at t i c. Land-
scaped lot, covered deck with
custom pul l down shades.
Hard- wood living room, form-
al dining room both freshly
painted, cathedral ceilings in
living room & kitchen. Full wet
bar in fin- ished basement,
walk out patio for your
parties/cookouts.
Option to Rent.
MLS#12-1874
Ann Devereaux
570-212-2038
Classic Properties
570-587-7000
790 Northern Blvd.
Clarks Summit, PA 18411
WILKES-BARRE
$174,900
105 Plymouth Ave.
This lovely Bi-level home fea-
tures 3 bedrooms, 1 and 1/2
bathrooms, in ground pool with
pool bar and deck, central air.
Hardwood floors, gas fireplace,
finished lower level, fenced in
yard and 2 year garage with
ONE YEAR HOME WAR-
RANTY. (directions: Old RIver
Road to Dagobert, at 2nd stop
sign turn R onto Plymouth Ave.
Home is on left in 2nd block)
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-2144
Keri Best 570-885-5082
WILKES-BARRE
296 N. Main St.
$133,000
Elegance and charm. Absolutely
pristine, highly polished woodwork,
hardwood fl oors, tri m. French
doors, fireplace, newer roof, fur-
nace, wiring and replacement win-
dows. A uniquely solid home with
conspicuous architectural beauty.
Very refined. MLS 13-1775
Ronald Kozak
570-675-5100
CENTURY 21
SIGNATURE PROPERTIES
WILKES-BARRE
$72,500
319 N. Washington Street.
Large 3 story home with 3 bed-
rooms of each of the 2nd and 3rd
floors. Hardwood floors in living
room and dining room, gas heat,
first floor laundry. 1 3/4 baths, large
eat in kitchen, central vac, alarm
system, low taxes.
MLS 13-2348
CALL COLLEEN
WILKES-BARRE
$99,900
77 Schuler St.
NOTHING to do but move right
in! This home has everything
you need...3 bedrooms, 2.5
baths, large fenced in yard,
screened in porch, off street
parking, quiet neighborhood.
Home recently remodeled in-
side & out. www.atlas
realtyinc.com. MLS 13-467
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
Houses For Sale
HARVEYS LAKE
184 State Route 29
Nice charming home in Har-
veys Lake. Open eat in kit-
chen, 2 bedrooms, 1 1/2 bath
and a nice large private lot.
Home also offers a 2 car de-
tached garage. Home is just
waiting for your personal
touch. $142,900
MLS#13-1787
Call/text Donna Cain
947-3824 or Tony Wasco
855-2424
Weichert Realtors,
Trade Mark
570-901-1020
WYOMING
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday, June 30, 12-1:30
Great income in this 4 unit apt.
building plus building lot in
lovely setting on almost an
acre. Two-2 BR apartments,
and two-1 BR apartments.
MLS 12-4538
Call Nancy Answini
570-237-5999
GILROY REAL ESTATE
570-288-1444
YATESVILLE
$129,900
617 Willowcrest Dr.
End unit. 2 bedroom town-
home with master bath on 2nd
floor. Needs a little TLC.
MLS 13-569
Call Tom
570-262-7716
YATESVILLE
$159,900
12 Reid St.
Spacious Bi-level home in semi
private location with private back
yard, 3 season room, gas fireplace
in lower level family room. Re-
cently updated kitchen, 4 bed-
r ooms, 1 3/ 4 bat hs, gar age.
www. at l asr eal t yi nc. com
MLS 13-1949
Call Charlie
YATESVILLE
$169,900
603 Willowcrest Dr.
Super end unit townhouse, no fees.
2 bedrooms, 3 baths, central air,
electric heat, cathedral ceiling with
skylights. Large family room with
propane stove and its own duct-
less air. MLS 13-482
Call Tom 570-262-7716
Land (Acreage)
BEAR CREEK
LOT FOR SALE
Wonderful opportunity! Beautiful
3.45 acre wooded building lot for
your new home. Has a 200 front-
age on a paved road. Lot needs
well and septic. $37,500
MLS#13-157
Call Mary Ann Desiderio
570-715-7733
SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP
MOUNTAIN TOP
570-474-6307
DALLAS TOWNSHIP
63 acres with about 5,000
roadf ront on 2 roads. Al l
Wooded. $385, 000. Cal l
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
Earth Conservancy
Land For Sale
Price Reduction
61 +/- Acres Nuangola
$88,000
46 +/- Acres Hanover Twp.
$69,000
Highway Commercial KOZ
Hanover Twp. 3+/-
Acres 11 +/- Acres
Wilkes-Barre Twp. Acreage
Zoned R-3
Sugar Notch Lot $11,800
See Additional Land for Sale
at:
www.earthconservancy.org
Call: 570-823-3445
NEWPORT TWP.
LOTS - LOTS-LOTS
1 mile south of L.C.C.C. Estab-
lished development with under-
ground utilities including gas.
Cleared lot. 100 frontage x
158. $30,000.
Lot 210 frontage 158 deep on
hill with great view $30,000.
Call 570-736-6881
K
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Sunday, July 7, 2013 PAGE 7E
Houses For Sale
OPEN HOUSE
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CALL RUTH K. SMITH
570-696-1195 / 570-696-5411
80005241 80011017
1112 Memorial Hwy,
Shavertown Pa 18708
Ofce: 570-901-1020
Fax: 877-202-2103
E-mail: wesellfast@yahoo.com
www.WeichertTradeMark.com
CAREER
NIGHT
Is your current position
less than fexible?
Whatever your job lacks,
you could fnd it in
a career in real estate
Every Tuesday 6 pm
Call Elena for details
570-902-9990
Please call our ofce to confrmyour
reservation at 570-901-1020
OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY, JULY 7 - 11-12:30
OLD FORGE $244,900 Great 4 bdrm, 2 bath home, nice neighborhood. Eat-in
kitchen, formal DR w/sliding doors to deck, level lot w/rear deck for entertaining,
large FR, fnished LL w/bar area and 2 car garage. DIR: Main St, Old Forge, R on Oak
St, R on Church St, L on Tanya Dr, R on Donny Dr...house on R. CALL CHARISSE
MESSINA 570-614-3328. MLS#13-2624
SHAVERTOWN $249,900
Beautiful property - 5 bdrm home with 3 bath, kitchen w/breakfast
nook, DR w/doors to patio. Large FR w/freplace, fnished attic,
HW foors, basement and large 4 car garage with
storage all on 2.76 acres of land.
CALL BARBARA EDWARDS 579-639-5627.
MLS#13-1021
WILKES BARRE $73,900
Nice cape cod in a nice neighborhood, lots of space, 3 bdrm, 1st
foor FR could be used as 1st foor bdrm and updated kitchen,
ceiling fans and porch all on a nice lot. CALL TONY WASCO 570-
855-2424 OR DONNA CAIN 5790947-3824.
MLS#13-1404
$50,000
WILKES BARRE
Need a home at a low low price? Here it is...3 bdrm home w/newer roof, furnace,
carpeting, vinyl siding and rear yard. Close to shopping and highways. CALL DAVE
SUDIMAK 570-406-1488 OR SHARON GALLAGHER 332-2229.
MLS#13-2807
HAZLETON
Large single family home, 4 bdrm, large kitchen, LR, DR, offce,
laundry, FR, basement, attic, gas heat, fenced yard and a 2 car
garage. CALL IGNACIO BEATO 570-497-9094.
MLS#13-674
EDWARDSVILLE $47,900
Priced to sell! Charming home, 3 bdrm, great room sizes, large
eat-in kitchen, HW foors in bedrooms, 1 bdrm w/ walk-in closet,
updated bathroom and a 3 year old above ground pool with
deck. CALL TONY WASCO 570-855-2424 OR
DONNA CAIN 570-947-3824.
MLS#13-2085
COMMERCIAL LAND
BLOOMSBURG $599,900
If your business would beneft from being next to Wall*Mart,
Lowes, Olive Garden, Sears, Comfort Suites, JC Penny, Home
Depot, and Cracker Barrel, you are in luck! For Sale and Fro Long
Term Lease.CALL OFFICE 570-901-1020.
MLS#13-1027
JENKINS TWP $39,500
Need Income? Modern 3 Unit investment. TLC is required.
This corner lot (Laird and Main) has parking and Garages with
separate utilities and large yard. Detached 1.5 Car Garage & 2
Car Attached Garage for extra income. Laundry room in each Apt.
Priced to sell. CALL DAVE SUDIMAK 570-406-1488.
MLS#13-2036
NEW LISTING $88,500
WILKES BARRE
Live large, this home features 5 bdrm, 3 baths and maintains many of the old charms
of the 1880s. Owner wants it sold...so dont wait. This home is a must see! CALL
DAVE SUDIMAK 570-406-1488 OR SHARON GALLAGHER 332-2229.
MLS#13-2808
NEW LISTING $24,900
Reduced
80011296
Land (Acreage)
LAFLIN
$32,900
Lot#9 Pinewood Dr
Build your new home in a great
neighborhood. Convenient loc-
ation near highways, airport,
casino and shopping
156 x 110 x 150 x 45
DIRECTIONS Rt 315 to laflin
Rd; make left off Laflin Rd onto
Pinewood Dr. Lot is on corner
of Pinewood Dr. and Hickory-
wood Dr. MLS 13-23
atlasrealtyinc.com
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
LAFLIN
$99,500
2.44 acres of land zoned R-3 for
townhouse or could be used for
single family building lots (with ap-
proval). Public water and sewer
available. www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-1389
Call Charlie
LEHMAN
9 Acres on Lehman Outlet
Road. 470 front, over 1,000
deep. Wooded. $125,000. Call
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
MOUNTAIN TOP
VACANT LAND
2.87 wooded acres located in the
Ice Lakes MLS #13-1498 $89,900
Call Evelyn Hogan 262-5956
LEWITH & FREEMAN
570-474-9801
MOUNTAIN TOP
S. Main St. & S. Church Rd.
Alberts Corners
Property for Sale
3.5 Commercially
Zoned Acres
Owner 011-44-7741870497
Susan 570-441-3909
SHAVERTOWN
Beautiful 1 acre building lot
located in established back
Mountain sub-division. Buy
now and start building your
dream home in the spring. Lot
has underground utilities, pub-
lic sewer and private well.
MLS #13-137. $62,400
Christine Pieczynski, 696-6569
Prudential
Poggi & Jones
REALTORS
SHICKSHINNY
23+/- acres of wooded land and
farmland with barn in good condi-
tion and a nice travel trailer. Well
on property.
MLS#12-2572
$115,000
Ken Williams
542-8800
Five Mountains Realty
542-2141
SHICKSHINNY LAKE
Build your dream home on this at-
tractive 1.2 acre level lot with lake
privileges. Priced to sell. HOA FEE
IS $140 YEARLY.
MLS#13-40
$50,000
Call Barbara Metcalf
570-696-0883
LEWITH & FREEMAN
REAL ESTATE, INC
570-696-3801
WYOMING/EXETER
BUILDING LOTS
FOR SALE
$35,000 - $39,900
Build your new home here. 2
new developments, prices
range from $35,000 to
$39,900. Public water sewer
& gas available. NOT in flood
zone. Lot sizes range from
50x100 to 80x105. www.at-
lasrealtyinc.com
CALL CHARLIE
Lots
Jenkins Township
Lot for Sale on Cul-De-Sac in
Hi ghl and Hi l l s. 0.88 Acres.
$65,000. Call, 570-947-3375
WEST WYOMING
Fifth Street Manor
Two building lots in beautiful,
established development. Call
for information.
570-814-1316
WILKES-BARRE TWP
Located on Lehi gh Street .
Great neighborhood. Asking
$12,000.
570-430-1308
Open House Directory
Hanover Township
Open House
First Showing
New on the
Market!
Sun. July 7, 2013
1:00-3:00 p.m.
3 Prince St., Hanover
Green/Hanover Twp.
Preferred Location.
3 BR, 2.5 Bath, All-Gas,
Ranch Home.
Quality Construction:
Freshly-Painted Interior &
Exterior. Large Eat-In Kit-
chen with New Flooring,
Plaster Walls, Refinished
Hardwood Floors
throughout, Refurbished
Tile Baths, New Roof, Win-
dows, & Patio Door
(Covered Patio). Finished
Basement with Dry Bar,
Large Laundry Room.with
Custom Cedar Closet,
Workshop & Outside En-
trance. Off street parking
for 6 cars. Large Level,
Fenced-Yard with Stucco
Shed. Professionally-Land-
scaped. Reasonable
Taxes. 1 Owner, Stable
Neighborhood.
570-466-9843
REAL ESTATE RENTALS
PITTSTON
$69,900
68 William St.
Great investment property with
3 units and separate utilities.
Each unit has 2 entrances and
washer hook up. Roof is 5
years old. For more info visit:
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
MLS 12-1897
Call Tom
570-262-7716
Apartments /Townhouses
SHICKSHINNY
(1 mile north of town) Effi-
ciency, on Rte. 11. Includes
heat, air, garbage, satellite TV
& water. Coin-op washer/dry er
available. Tenant pays electric.
$575/ month + security. Appli-
ances. Plenty of parking.
570-793-9530
Back Mountain
2 bedroom, large modern eat in kit-
chen, bath, carpeting, large deck,
ample parking, No Pets. $595.
570-696-1866
DALLAS
3 Bedroom Townhouse, End
Unit. 2 Baths, reserved park-
ing. living & dining rooms,
Modern appliances, hardwood
f l oors. Cent ral A/ C, Heat .
Private outdoor deck, quiet
neighborhood. Lots of storage,
plenty of closets. 1 year lease.
$1,200 per month.
570 762-3640.
DALLAS
HI-MEADOWS APARTMENTS
1075 Memorial Hwy.
Low & Moderate Income
Elderly Rentals Include:
*Electric Range &
Refrigerator
*Off Street Parking
*Community Room
*Coin Operated
Laundry
*Elevator.
*Video Surveillance
Applications Accepted
by Appointment
570-675-5944
8 a.m. - 4 p.m.
TDD Only,
1-800-654-5984
Voice Only,
1-800-654-5988
Handicap Accessible
Equal Housing Opportunity
DALLAS
MEADOWS
APARTMENTS
220 Lake St.
Housing for the elderly & mo-
bility impaired; all utilities in-
cluded. Federally subsidized
program. Extremely low in-
come persons encouraged to
appl y. I ncome l ess t han
$12, 450. 570- 675- 6936
TDD 800-654-5984
8 am-4 pm, Mon-Fri.
Equal Housing Opportunity
Handicap Accessible
DALLAS
Newly remodeled, 2 bedroom.
$600/month Water, sewer &
garbage included. No pets
570- 855- 8783. Cal l af t er
5: 00pm
DALLAS
New 3 Bedroom, 2 l/2 Bath
townhouse, Hardwood floors,
eat in kitchen, 1st floor laundry
room, Deck off kitchen, off
street parking, No Pets, No
Smoking. $1350.00/month plus
utilities. Call Geri:
570-862-7432
LEWITH & FREEMAN
570-696-3801
EDWARDSVILLE
Spacious, luxurious, 2 bed-
rooms, 2nd floor, off street
parking. Brand new, high en-
ergy efficient windows & stove.
Washer/dryer hook up & dish-
washer. $650/month + utilities,
1 year lease, security, refer-
ences & credit check. No pets,
non smoking. Not approved for
Section 8. Call Rudy at
570-288-6889
FORTY FORT
1 bedroom, first floor, off street
parking, $565/month + secur-
ity. Includes heat & water.
570-574-2829.
FORTY FORT
2nd floor, 1 bedroom apt.
$400 plus security & lease.
Call 570-814-8876
FORTY FORT
Large apartment, 2nd floor, 1
bedroom 1 bath, living room,
kitchen. All appliances, includ-
ing washer/dryer. Water/sew-
er paid. Off street parking, fire-
place. Convenient location.
$600/month + security. No
pets and no smoking. Call Don
at 570-814-5072.
GLEN LYON
1 bedroom, 2nd floor apt. Liv-
ing room, kitchen, full bath,
heat, hot water & garbage fee
included. Tenant pays electric.
$575/ month + security.
Call or text 201-304-3469
HANOVER TWP
Lee Park Avenue
Clean 2 bedroom apartment.
stove, refrigerator, washer/dry-
er & porch. No pet s, no
smoking. $500/month + secur-
ity. References. 570-262-6721
HANOVER TWP.
LEE PARK
Freshly painted, spacious, 3
b e d r o o m , 2 n d f l o o r ,
washer/dryer hook- up in kit-
chen, no pets. $625/month +
utilities, 1st, last & security.
TRADEMARK
REALTY GROUP
570-954-1992
KINGSTON
3 bedroom, 1.5 bath, 1st floor
laundry, very clean, all new in-
side. $850. 1st, last month
rent & security. Call
570-817-0601
Apartments /Townhouses
HARVEYS LAKE
1 & 2 bedroom , wall to wall
carpet, appliances, Lake rights.
Off street parking. No pets.
Lease, security and refer-
ences. 570-639-5920
HARVEYS LAKE
1 & 2 bedroom , wall to wall
carpet, appliances, Lake rights.
Off street parking. No pets.
Lease, security and refer-
ences. 570-639-5920
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
1, 2, 3 & 4
Bedrooms
- Light & bright open
floor plans
- All major appliances
included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term leases
available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflowercrossing.com
Certain Restrictions Apply*
KINGSTON
1st fl oor, spaci ous, 2 bed-
rooms, dining room, large liv-
ing room with fire place, mod-
ern kitchen and bath, carpet-
ing, garage available, No pets.
$595. 570-696-1866
KINGSTON
Huge 1st floor, 1 bedroom with
bath, very large living room.
Equi pped wi t h st and- up
shower. Modern. Off-street
parking. Gas heat, washer/dry-
er hook-up. Excellent Location.
$545+Utilities, Security and
references. 610-568-8363
Kingston
1st Floor, recently renovated, 2
bedrooms, with washer & dryer
hook-up, $650 per month, plus util-
ities, water and sewer included. Off
street parking. 570-443-0770
KINGSTON
705 Nandy Drive
Modern, clean 2 bedroom, all
appliances, central air & off-
street parking, No pets/ Non-
Smoking. $670/ month + utilit-
ies. 570-696-3915
KINGSTON
Deluxe, quiet, airy 3 bedroom,
2nd floor, 1.5 baths & office. All
appliances, washer/dryer in unit.
Wall-to-wall, C/A, garage, attic, no
pets/no smoking, lease.
570-287-1733
KINGSTON
E. WALNUT ST.
Light, bright, 3rd floor, 2 bed-
rooms, carpeted. entry sys-
tem, garage Extra storage &
cable TV included. Laundry
facilities. Heat & hot water
furnished. Fine neighbor-
hood. Convenient to bus &
stores. No pets. Refer-
ences. Security. Lease. No
smoker s pl ease. $730.
month. Call 570-287-0900
KINGSTON HOUSE
Nice, clean furnished room, starting at
$340. Efficiency at $450 month fur-
nished with all utilities included. Off
street parking. 570-718-0331
LAFLIN
Stunni ng, 3 bedroom town
home with lots of windows, 2.5
baths, living room, dining room
with deck, galley kitchen with
hardwood floors, family room
with patio, yard. Master bed-
room with cathedral ceiling.
New neutral carpeting. Wash-
er/dryer. 1 car garage, central
air. 2,000 sq. ft. $1,350/month.
570-954-2666.
Apartments /Townhouses
KINGSTON
Location! Remodeled apart-
ment with off street parking.
electric heat. 1 year lease re-
quired. Credit check required.
No pets. $575/month. Call
Nicole 570-715-7757.
SMITH HOURIGAN
GROUP
570-474-6307
KINGSTON
Quiet & bright 2 bedroom, sun
room, hard wood floors, en-
closed back porch. Washer/
dryer hook-up, off street park-
ing. $675/month + utilities &
security. Available 9/1.
570-407-0472
KINGSTON
SDK GREEN
ACRES
HOMES
11 Holiday Drive
A Place To Call Home
Spacious 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom
Apts.
Gas heat included
FREE
24 hr. on-site Gym
Community Room
Swimming Pool
Maintenance FREE
Controlled Access
Patio/Balcony
and much more...
570-288-9019
www.sdkgreen acres.com
Call today for
move-in specials.
KINGSTON
Spacious, calm 2nd floor apt. 1
bedroom, living room, kitchen,
bat h, was her & dr y er .
$395/month + 1 year lease,
month security. No pets. No
smokers.
Call leave name & number
570-287-6587
LUZERNE
1st floor, 5 rooms, 2 bedrooms.
Heat & hot water furnished.
Stove & refri gerator. Non
s m o k i n g , n o p e t s .
$640/month. 570-287-4700
LUZERNE
276 Bennett Street
2nd floor, 2 bedroom, large liv-
ing & dining rooms, den, tile
bath, kitchen with stove & re-
frigerator, washer/dryer hook
up, off street parking, water &
sewer paid. $600 + utilities &
securi ty. No pets/smoki ng.
References. 570-288-7309.
Leave message.
MINERS MILLS
2 br., 1st floor, $575 + $575
security. Refrigerator, range,
wat er & sewer i ncl uded.
Washer hook up $25 extra per
month.
Call Bernie 570-655-4815.
Rothstein Realty
1-888-244-2714
MINERS MILLS/W-B
1 bedroom, 2nd floor, stove/re-
frigerator,. Heat & hot water
paid. Clean & quiet. No pets.
$465/month. 570-472-3681
MOCANAQUA
2 bedroom, water & sewer in-
cluded. $525/month. Section 8 con-
sidered. Call 570-592-3497
Mountain Top
2nd floor. 5 rooms. Sun porch. Wall
t o wal l . Of f st r eet par ki ng.
$750/month - heat, water, sewage
& garbage pai d by owner. NO
PETS! 570-474-5568
Nanticoke
1 bedroom, 1st floor, refrigerat-
or, stove, washer/dryer hook-
up & porch. $400/month + util-
ities, security & references.
Water, sewage, garbage in-
cluded. No smoking. no pets.
570-760-6959.
PARSONS
2 n d f l o o r 2 b e d r o o m,
washer/dryer, refrigerator &
stove. Heat included. Refer-
ences. No pet s Securi t y
$685/month. 570-332-9355
Apartments /Townhouses
PITTSTON
2nd floor, large & modern. 2
bedrooms, living room, com-
puter room, laundry room with
washer & dryer. Full bath, kit-
chen with stove, fridge & dish
washer. Fresh paint & carpet.
Wat er & t r ash i ncl . No
smokers, no pets. $550/month
+ security. 570-881-9789 after
6pm.
PITTSTON
Modern 2 bedroom 2nd floor
apartment with gas heat. New
deck. $500. month plus utilit-
ies. Conveniently located. No
Pets. No Smoking. Call Rae
570-899-1209
LEWITH & FREEMAN
288-9371
PITTSTON TWP.
Newl y remodel ed. 2 bed-
rooms, 1 bath. Full kitchen,
with appliances, living room
with marble fireplace & hard-
wood floors. Washer/ Dryer in-
cluded. Jacuzzi tub. Off street
parking. $800 + utilities. No
pets. Call (570) 540-6779
PLAINS
Modern 2 bedroom, 1 bath,
2nd floor apartment. Kitchen
with appliances. New carpet.
Conveni ent l y l ocat ed. No
smoki ng - no pet s.
$600 PER MONTH.
Call Rae
570-899-1209
LEWITH & FREEMAN
288-9371
PLYMOUTH
Spacious 2 bedroom, 2 floors,
central air, 1 baths, new
kitchen, dishwasher, stove,
refrigerator, washer-dryer, off
street parking, No smoking/No
pets. $550 month plus utilities.
570-814-6620
PLYMOUTH
Large 2nd floor apartment, 5
bedrooms, 2 full baths, 1 is a
master bathroom. All new
flooring, carpets & tile. Fresh
pai nt throughout, No pets,
please. 3 blocks from high
school. $750/month.
570-719-1111, leave message
SHAVERTOWN
One bedroom, living room & kit-
chen apartment. Security required.
No pets. $500/month + util- ities.
Call
Jolyn Bartoli
570-696-5425
Smith Hourigan Group
570-696-1195
SHICKSHINNY
2 or 3 bedroom, deck with
view, fenced yard, section 8
welcome. $575 month.
570-814-8299
SOUTH WILKES-BARRE
Good area Modern kitchen and
bath, 3 bedroom 4 car garage
wal l t o wal l c ar pet i ng,
washer/dryer hookup. $695
mo. call 570-856-3700
SWOYERSVILLE
2 bedroom, gas heat, central
ai r, washer/ dryer hookup,
st ove and f ri dge.
$500 + security. 570-822-7657
TRUCKSVILLE
TRUCKSVILLE
MANOR APARTMENTS
170 Oak Street
Low and Moderate Income Eld-
erly Rentals Include:
*Electric Range & Refrigerator
*Off Street Parking
*Coin Operated Laundry
Applications Accepted
by Appointment
570-696-1201
8a.m. - 4p.m.
TDD only,
1-800-654-5984
Voice Only,
1-800-654-5988
Handicap Accessible
Equal Housing Opportunity
WYOMING
84 Fifth Street.
2 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, off
street parking, nice yard. Large
kitchen, 1st floor laundry with
washer/dryer. Mint condition
$800/month + 1 year lease &
security deposit.
Call Jill Hiscox
696-0875
696-3801
K
PAGE 8E Sunday, July 7, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Apartments /Townhouses
WEST PITTSTON
GARDEN VILLAGE
APARTMENTS
221 Fremont St., Housing for
the elderly & mobility impaired;
all utilities included. Federally
subsidized program. Extremely
low income persons encour-
aged to apply. Income less
than $12,450.
570-655-6555
TDD 800-654-5984
8 am-4 pm
Monday-Friday.
Equal Housing Opportunity
Handicap Accessible
WEST PITTSTON
1st floor, recently renovated, 2
bedrooms, washer/dryer hook
up, carport. Heat & hot water
included. $650/month.
570-881-0546
WEST WYOMING
2nd floor spacious 2 bedroom
apartment, modern kitchen &
bath. Heat & hot water fur-
nished. 1 year lease required,
1st month security. No pets.
off street parking. $600/month.
570-288-9831 after five.
WILKES-BARRE
401 Madison Street, 1st floor,
1 bedroom. $520/month. In-
cludes heat and water. Depos-
it, first months rent and lease.
No Pets. 570-290-9791
WILKES-BARRE
1 bedroom, Second Fl oor,
Heat and Hot Water included.
$460 a month, plus one month
security deposit. References,
No pets and No Smoking.
570-675-7768
WILKES-BARRE
2 bedrooms, Off street parking,
public transportation, church
and schools nearby. 1st & last
months rent + security. Call
570-817-0601 Between 5:30
and 10 p.m.
WILKES-BARRE
Studio Near Wilkes
Wood floors, parking, no pets, short
term OK. $425, all utilities included.
570-826-1934
PARSONS -WILKES-BARRE
1st floor, 1 bedroom, spacious.
Cl ean, remodel ed. $550 /
month. Utilities by tenant. City
rental licensed. 570-825-2901
WILKES-BARRE
2nd floor - 4 nice rooms. Only one
quiet apartment below. Has stove,
new refrigerator, washer & dryer.
All widows are newer vinyl thermal
pane. New mini-blinds and curtains.
Your own private entrance. Small
back porch. Water & sewer in-
cluded. Close to town & bus stop.
$495/month. 570-650-3803
Wilkes-Barre
2nd floor, 2 bedroom, freshly
painted, washer/dryer hook up.
$475+ security and utilities.
No Pets. 570-822-7657
WILKES-BARRE
3 BEDROOM, OFF STREET
PARKING, WASHER & DRY-
E R H OOK U P . N O
PETS.$575 + UTILITIES &
SECURITY. 822-7657
WILKES-BARRE
3 bedrooms, 2nd floor, mod-
ern, new flooring, refrigerator
stove, washer/dryer hookup,
water included. $700 + electric.
Section 8 Accepted
570-301-8200
WILKES-BARRE
142 S. FRANKLIN STREET
BEAUTFUL BROWNSTONE
APT IS A MUST SEE!! 3rd
floor, 2 bedrooms, office, 2 off
street parking spots, 14' ceil-
ings, hardwood & tile floors.
Stove, refrigerator, dishwash-
er, microwave, garabage dis-
posal, washer & dryer. 24 hour
maintenance. $1300 month +
securi ty, + uti l i ti es, 1 year
l ease. Cal l Jani ce at
570-706-6010
Wilkes-Barre
Country Living in the
City
2 bedrooms, Modern. Stove,
fridge, washer, dryer, parking,
deck. No dogs Near Cross
Valley. $495 + utilities.
570-417-5441
WILKES-BARRE
LODGE
Formerly The Travel Lodge
497 Kidder St., Wilkes-Barre
Rooms Starting at:
Daily $49.99 + tax
Weekly $199.99 + tax
Microwave, Refrigerator, WiFi,
HBO. 570-823-8881
www.WilkesBarreLodge.com
WILKES-BARRE
Near General hospital 3 bed-
rooms, 1 bath. $595 + utilities.
1st, last & security.
570-417-3427
WILKES-BARRE
Newly renovated 2 bedroom, 1
bath, refrigerator with ice maker &
stove. washer/dryer hook up. Gas
heat with central air, new carpeting.
$600/month + utilities & 1 month
security. 570-237-5397
WILKES-BARRE
SOUTH
SECURE BUILDINGS
1 & 2 bedroom apartments.
Starting at $440 and up. Refer-
ences required. Section 8 OK
570-357-0712
WILKES-BARRE
VICTORIAN CHARM
34 W. Ross St. Fully furnished,
Delightful 2nd floor, excellent
condition, brand new queen
bed, Secure, private off street
parking. Historic building is
non-smoking/no pets. Base rent
$700/month. Security,
references required. View at
houpthouse.com
570-762-1453
WILKES-BARRE/
NORTH
BY GENERAL HOSPITAL
Newly painted & carpeted. 3
bedrooms, living room, dining
room, eat-in kitchen, 1.5 baths,
office area, 2 porches. Appli-
ances. Parking space avail-
able, ample closets. No pets.
$725 month + uti l i ti es. 1
month security & 1 months
rent. Available immediately.
570-540-5312
Apartments /Townhouses
WILKES-BARRE
Cl ean & comfortabl e front
apartment of front & back du-
plex in nice area. $600/month
includes washer/dry-er hook
up, eat-in kitchen, refrigerator,
stove, dishwasher, front porch
& shared storage shed. Plenty
of off street parking. One year
lease + security required.
Call Michael 570-760-4961
WYOMING
2 bedrooms, 2nd fl oor, re-
cently remodeled. Washer &
dryer hookup. Off street park-
i ng. No pets. $550/mo. i n-
cl udes water & sewer.
570-714-7272
WYOMING
Modern 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath,
Townhouse style, Washer/Dry-
er hookup, Stove and Refriger-
ator, Basement. $750+utilities.
Call or Text 203-969-5650
Commercial
PITTSTON TWP.
$1,750/MONTH
3002 N. Twp Blvd.
Medical office for rent on the
Pittston By-Pass. Highly vis-
i bl e l ocati on wi th pl enty of
parking. $1,800 sq. ft. of beau-
tifully finished space can be
used for any type office use.
$1,750/ mo. plus utilities.
MLS 13-098
Call Charlie
HANOVER TWP.
COMMERCIAL LEASE
8 , 5 0 0 s q . f t . b u i l d i n g
$4,000/month, tenant pays
utilities. Building Ready for
many uses. Owner will build to
suit. Custom Leases Available.
Property has 5 garage bays,
office space & plenty of park-
ing and fenced side yards.
Heated with restrooms. unlim-
ited potential. MLS #13-63
Call Today! Cindy King
570-690-2689
www.cindykingre.com
570-675-5100
KINGSTON
Approx. 1,100 Square Ft. of of-
fices (more if needed) with re-
ception area. First floor. Off
street parking. Central gas
heat with air. Private bath, very
modern. Located in historical
building. $595+.610-568-8363
LEASE SPACE
Kingston Koral Complex Great for
Wellness Center Businesses. Cus-
tom leases are available. 4300SF
Warehouse Space available, can
be divided and are built to Suit.
MLS#12-3041
Call Cindy
570-690-2689
www.cindykingre.com
570-675-4400
NANTICOKE
Working restaurant with 2-Unit
Apartments for additional income.
Restaurant includes all commercial
restaurant equipment, tables and
chairs. Space features take-out
area and additional dining room
with seating for approx. 30. Side lot
can hold up to approx. 6 cars with
expansion. Each Apartments rents
for $475/per month.
MLS#13-1900
$129,900
Call Cindy King
570-690-2689
www.cindykingre.com
570-675-5100
PITTSTON
COOPERS CO-OP
Lease Space Available.
Light manufacturing, ware-
house, office, includes all
utilities with free parking.
I will save you money!
ATLAS REALTY
829-6200
Commercial
WILKES-BARRE
531 Scott St.
After 39 years the owner is retiring!
Turn key night club/bar, with res-
taurant potential in a PRIME loca-
tion. 2 bars with additional licensed
outside patio space. Owner is open
to creative financing. MLS 13-2446
$59,900
John Shelley
570-702-4162
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
Houses For Rent
KINGSTON
PROPERTIES
CURRENTLY AVAILABLE
LARGE 1/2 DOUBLE
full kitchen, living room,
formal dining room & study.
4 bedrooms, 1.5 baths.
****************
1/2 DOUBLE
3 bedrooms, 1 bath
****************
TOWNHOUSE
3 bedrooms, 1 bath
*****************
Quiet residential neighbor-
hoods, utilities & heat by ten-
ant, no pets, no smoking. 1
month security, 1 year lease.
Call Rosewood Realty
570-287-6822
BEAR CREEK
Rent in exchange for labor. 3
bedroom, well water, septic.
$600/month + heat. No pets.
Quiet neighborhood.
973-887-1169
DURYEA
Main Street
1/2double, 3 brs. 1.5 baths, on
st r eet par ki ng, no pet s.
$600/month + $300 security &
utilities. 570-714-5222.
570-954-8401
HARVEYS LAKE
Furnished Home. College stu-
dents welcome after August 20th
Wi-fi, Direct TV, lake rights, wash-
er/dryer. $1,200/month + utilities .
570-639-5041
KINGSTON
Beautiful Single family
313 Wright Ave.
1800 sq ft, 4 large bedroom,
1.5 baths, closets, first floor
bath and laundry room. New
tile floors kitchen, bath,
laundry room, gas heat and hot
water, ceiling fans, new mod-
ern kitchen, new dishwasher,
new gas stove, new windows,
hardwood floors, beautiful in-
side, fireplace, new 200 amp
electric, hardwired smoke
detectors, dead bolt locks, full
basement, full attic storage,
residential street, nice yard,
front covered porch, two car
garage, private driveway, One
year lease, one month secur-
ity, background check, secur-
ity deposit, $1150. plus utilities,
available July 1, great landlord.
Call 215-527-8133.
KINGSTON
Two story, clean, nice neigh-
borhood, on cul-de-sac, 3 bed-
room, 2 full baths, living/dining
combo, semi modern eat in kit-
chen, gas steam heat, ceiling
fans, porch, back yard, kitchen
appl i ances, semi f i ni shed
basement. Sewer & water
paid. Available for purchase or
rent for $850/mo. Call 570-
903-2172 for appointment.
MOUNTAIN TOP
3 bedroom Ranch, 1 acre plus,
hardwood floors, in bedrooms
and large living room, fire-
place, eat in kitchen, 4 season
sun room, fenced yard, perfect
for children and pets. Attached
garage Ful l basement wi th
washer/dryer. Forested back
yard affords privacy. Immedi-
ate access to Rt 309. Crest-
wood School district, $1,050
plus utilities.
570-472-3277
NANTICOKE
Beautiful, spacious one family
house in a quiet neighborhood
wi t h 3 l arge bedrooms, 2
baths, & laundry room.. Large
living & dining rooms. Eat in
ki t chen, l ar ge back yar d.
$725/month + utilities. 1 month
+ security.
Call Rich at 201-424-4513
SHAVERTOWN
2 bedrooms, modern kitchen
and bath, garage, deck and
large yard. $750/month+ se-
curity. Sewer and trash in-
cluded in rent. 570-675-4424
THORNHURST
MUST SEE!!!
Large 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths house
for rent. Perfect for multi-genera-
tion. $900 month + utilities.
2 months security & references.
718-916-9872
THORNHURST
MUST SEE!!!
Large 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths house
for rent. Perfect for multi-genera-
tion. $900 month +
utilities. 2 months security +
references.
718-916-9872
WILKES-BARRE
Safe, stable neighborhood,
beautiful 4 bedroom, 1.5 baths,
nice kitchen, nice back yard.
Off street parking. $775/mo +
utilities, security, references.
No pets. 570-766-1881
Land (Acreage)
DALLAS TOWNSHIP
2 acr es $39, 900 or 7 acr es
$89,900, blacktop road, soil tested
and approved for building. Nice
woods, great views, wide frontage,
great property/neighborhood for
kids, #1 rated Dallas School Dis-
trict.
Call 570-245-6288
Want To Rent
KINGSTON
2 bedroom, 1 bath, central air,
washer/dryer, off street park-
ing, great location, tenant pays
utilities. $500. 917-697-6696
Half Doubles
DALLAS
Newer Half-Double, 2 bed-
rooms, 1.5 bath, Central Air,
Off Street parking. (No Pets).
$700/month. 570-675-4805
HANOVER TWP.
549 S. Main Street
3 bedrooms, kitchen, living
room, dining room, basement.
$595/month. No pets. Call
570-824-4899 or
570-239-4340.
PARSONS
Furnished 3 bedroom across
from park. Modern kitchen &
bat h. Of f st r eet par ki ng.
Fenced in yard. No Pets. $625
+ utilities & security.
570-704-8730
PITTSTON
1/2 DOUBLE, 2 BEDROOMS,
1.5 baths, central air & heat,
off street parking, deck & yard.
Dishwasher, stove & refrigerat-
or. 1st floor washer & dryer
hookup. Spray foam insulation.
New furnace, very cheap utilit-
ies. NO SMOKING. NO PETS.
$800 per month + security, ref-
erences & lease.
Call 570-237-7219
PITTSTON
2 bedrooms, 1 bath, living din-
ing room, kitchen with stove
and fridge. 2nd floor laundry
room. New flooring, fresh paint
and off street parking. Heat
water and sewer incl. $750/mo
+ security and references.
570-237-5478
PLAINS TOWNSHIP
Half-Double Completely ren-
ovated 3 bedroom, 1 bath,
qui et st reet , pri vat e dri ve
$800+utilities. 678-779-1467
WEST PITTSTON
Quiet street, off street parking.
2 bedrooms plus computer room,
washer/dryer hookup, dry base-
ment. NO PETS. Non-smoker.
$625/month plus security and 1
year lease.
Call Mike after 4PM 570-760-1418
WILKES-BARRE
Half-Double
61 Custer Street
3 bedroom, Quiet street, street
parking, Washer/Dryer Hook-
up, Back Yard. $600+utilities.
Section 8, OK. 609-553-3122
WILKES-BARRE/EAST END
3 bedroom, 1.5 bath, wall to
wall carpet. Stove, dishwash-
er, washer/ dryer hook up.
Heat. garbage & sewer in-
cluded. Many Extras!. No
pets. $975 + security & refer-
ences. 570-824-4288
MANUFACTURED
HOUSING
HARVEYS LAKE
(2) Newly remodeled 2 and 3
bedroom, 2 bath. Large kit-
chen with stove, water, sewer
& garbage included. $595 a
month, first and last.
570-332-8922
Sales
DALLAS
4 rooms, no hallways,
new porch. $17,500
570-706-5201
SHAVERTOWN
BACK MOUNTAIN
3 bedrooms, 2 bath, move in
ready home, located at Echo
Val l ey Est at es, i n Back
Mountain. A very reason-
able price at $33,000. Will
help finance if qualified.
570-696-2143
Pets
ROTTIES HUSKIES Yorkies,
Chihuahuas
Labs & More.
Bloomsburg 389-7877
Hazleton 453-6900
Hanover 829-1922
BIEWER YORKIE
PUPPIES
Males & females. Vet checked,
ready to go 7/8.
570-2042549
LAB PUBS
7 weeks ol d, bl ack $300.
Chocol at e $350.
yellow $350. Dewormed.
570-836-1090
POMERANIAN PUPPY
Beautiful, purebred,
16 weeks, white, fe-
male. Shots. $250.
570-579-5207, leave
message.
Want To Buy
BUSINESS
OWNER SEEKS
Lease /Option
on Executive
Mountain Top
home;
3/4 Bedrooms.
440-836-2150
Wanted to Buy
LOCAL SMALL
MANUFACTURING
BUSINESS
570-357-7361
timesleader.com
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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Sunday, July 7, 2013 PAGE 9E
Houses For Sale
Build your own estate . Turn into your
landscaped lot looking forward to your relaxation flled
moments on your rear stamped concrete patio with
built-in BBQ and freplace overlooking one of the most
beautiful views in the valley. Let us build you a custom
home that drinks in the breathtaking views from one of
only three lots remaining. Imagine watching the valley
come alive with freworks from the best seat in the
valley. Watch the leaves turn, the boaters navigate the
island waters, the fresh snow fall and the spring color
from your own home designed by you for you. We can
build when your ready from the high $200s to the mid
$300s- Only 3 remaining.
Call881-2144
In Jenkins Township take Brady St toward the
river then left - lots and views on the right
Home/Lot Packages
80010984
Houses For Sale
80010988
Build this home!! Our friendly designer
will work with you to design-in the perfect
adjustments to make this home perfect for
you. Our homes are all quality and high end
fnishes. This Ranch is no exception and has it
all. 3 bedroom, great master and master bath,
open kitchen, dining room and TWO FAMILY
ROOMS all on one foor!! Vaulting ceilings, fre
place, french doors, patio , granite, hardwood,
tile showers and master suite. All included from
landscape to gutters, to patios and permits
one guaranteed price
$289,900 including the lot
See a version of this home
Sunday 12-3 at River Shores...
Corner of Susquehanna Ave and Erie St
inWest Pittston
OPENHOUSE 12- 3
SUNDAY or anytime
881-2144
Houses For Sale
LAST HOME. available in River Shores!! Great-gated
entrance, beautifully landscaped located in the Garden
Village and in walking distance to shopping, restaurants,
high school sports and the river walk River Shores
is a great place to live. A small 13 home neighborhood
featuring soaring roofines and stone accents all beautiful
custom homes no one builds a nicer home. This Ranch
is no exception and has it all. Vaulting ceilings, fre
place, french doors, deck, nice yard, granite, hardwood,
tile showers and master suite.
Corner of Susquehanna Ave and
Erie St inWest Pittston
OPENHOUSE 12- 3
SUNDAY or anytime
881-2144
(Open House OR showings anytime
call 881-2144 8
0
0
1
0
9
9
0
Houses For Sale
NO MATTER WHAT STAGE IN LIFE YOURE IN,
WE HAVE THE PERFECT HOME FOR YOU.
Sand Springs is the ideal combination of community living, championship
golf, and unspoiled nature for every lifestyle. Whether youre downsizing
or moving up, enjoy luxury homes and activities on over 750 acres, crafted
by Tuskes Homes, PAs most respected homebuilder.
PATIO HOMES | GOLF VILLAS | TOWNHOMES | SINGLE FAMILY
GOLF TENNIS BOCCI HIKING TRAILS ON-SITE RESTAURANT AND
BANQUET FACILITIES NEAR SHOPPING, SCHOOLS, RECREATION AND HIGHWAYS
Priced from$167,900
CALL 570-593-0868 FOR MODEL HOURS.
Sand Springs is located in beautiful Drums, Pennsylvania
ENJOY COUNTRYCLUB
L VING YOUR WAY.
The Jacobsburg Grande
Single Family Home
timesleader.com
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PAGE 10E Sunday, July 7, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Annie Dreesen
905-0253
Joyce Rowlands
788-7521
Mary Donovan
696-0729
Eric Drako
715-9324
Tony Draus
585-0620
Michael Durso
714-9236
Rae Dziak
714-9234
Terry Eckert
696-0871
Deanna Farrell
696-0894
Maureen Edwards
585-0607
Sandy Fraley
970-1110
Edna Freidberg
585-0610
Beverly Flanagan
585-0619
Nicole Fife
585-0608
Patricia Armellino
Mtp. Mgr.
Rhea Simms
CEO
Virginia Rose
President
Emma Kluger
Vice President
Michael Johnson
E.V.P. MGE Mortgage
Mary Anne Orsini
V.P. of Sales MGE Mortgage
Pat Genetti
Drums Mgr.
Marion Gatto
Clarks Summit Mgr.
Sally Rothstein
V.P. of Sales Services
Paula Daley
Marketing Dir.
Marcie Petrucelli
Corp. Relo Dir.
Margy Simms
Corp. Ofcer
Nancy Palumbo
714-9240
Mary Price
715-9341
Gina Petronio
788-7509
Anita Reber
788-7501
David Remetz
970-1117
Judy Rice
714-9230
Deb Roccograndi
696-6671
Cheryl Roman
788-7525
Debra Rosenberg
714-9251
Donna Santoroski
788-7504
Christine Romani
696-0878
Gerald Palermo
788-7507
Ann Lewis
714-9245
Elizabeth Marturano
585-0608
Joan Matusiak
696-0887
Barbara Metcalf
696-0883
Marie Montante
881-0103
Kathleen Murray
696-0877
Mary Mooney
714-9249
Mark Nicholson
696-0724
Bobbie ODonnell
585-0608
Terry Nelson
714-9248
David Lang
585-0615
Charlie Schank
585-0623
Joseph Schirg
585-0624
Cheryl Seelye
696-0728
Pat Sciandra
715-9338
Renee Sherwood
585-0625
Barbara Simpson
696-0885
Kim Skumanick
585-0606
Jaime Stevens
585-0609
Corine Sworen
715-9321
Peg Torbik
714-9247
Benjamin Turrano
715-7516
Clydette Wagner
696-0897
Larry Vojtko
714-9232
Geri Wisnewski
696-0888
Tracy Zarola
696-0723
Betty Brislin
970-1119
Pat Thomas
970-1109
Becky Venesky
715-9316
Appraisal
Team
Realtor

Sales
Professionals
Julio Acosta
714-9252
Andrea Belser
714-9244
Leslie Bullock
696-0878
Rose Marie Butera
714-9231
Shirley Chairge
714-9281
Andy Cisney
714-9225
Lori Cook
788-7503
Beth Coslett
696-0877
Terry Donnelly
715-9317
Becky Davis
696-0885
Dana Distasio
715-9339
Tina Aquilina
714-9251
Matt Hodorowski
714-9229
Evelyn Hogan
715-9336
Lori Jewett
585-0627
Sharon Johnson
970-1106
Noel Jones
696-0721
Lisa Joseph
715-9335
Christina Kane
714-9231
Jim Graham
715-9323
Jennifer Hilla
715-9339
Anna Hiza
788-7517
Susan Klaips
696-0872
Jill Hiscox
696-0875
Christian Saunders
585-0614
Susan Pall
696-0876
Deborah Krohn
696-0886
Frank Golden
585-0612
Kingston: 570.288.9371 Shavertown: 570.696.3801 Mountain Top: 570.474.9801
Wilkes-Barre: 570.822-1160 Scranton: 570.207.6262 Clarks Summit: 570.585.0600
Tunkhannock: 5710.996-0544 Hazleton/Drums: 570.788.1999
WWW.LEWITH-FREEMAN.COM
Maribeth Jones
34 Years of Real Estate Success
Strong Client Focus
Fine Home Certifed
Certifed Relocation Specialist
Certifed Residential Specialist
Certifed Residential Broker
Graduate of the Real Estate Institute of PA
Certifed by the Realtors National Marketing Institute
Luzerne Countys Leading Real Estate Company
Just Got Even Stronger! Always Adapting &
Changing to Better Meet the Needs of Our Clients.
Lewith & Freeman A locally-owned Company with a national
presence focused on meeting the needs of our clients!
Discover the Lewith & Freeman Difference!
Te Entire Lewith & Freeman Team is Proud to
Welcome One of the Areas Premier Real Estate Agents...
Maribeth Jones, GRI, CRB, CRS
direct 570.696.0882
Lewith&Freeman
Real Estate, Inc.
Top Seller In
Luzerne County
NATIONAL STRENGTH
LOCAL COMMITMENT
Actual member statistics for LeadingRE and estimates for other networks using average sales units per agent and
average sales price for frms in each respective network frompublished sources for 2012 production.
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250
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150
100
50
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$272
$188
$126
$119
$107
$53
$37
$23 $17
$11
$200
Leading Real Estate
Companies of the World

Coldwell Banker
RE/MAX
Prudential
Keller Williams
Century 21
Sothebys
Real Living
ERA
Realty Executives
Better Homes & Gardens
LEADING RE IS LEWITH & FREEMANS
WORLD WIDE NETWORK
K
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Sunday, July 7, 2013 PAGE 11E
HARVEYSLAKE POINTBREEZE4BR, 2.1bathhome
onlevel lot w/40 primelakefront. LargeopenLR/DRw/terrifcviewof
the lake; FR w/skylights &FP; eat-in kitchen w/all appliances; MBR
Suite; 1st foor laundry; 3 garages & deck PLUS large modern 2BR
apt; 40 feet of lakefront w/dock & boatslip. Lots of extra parking.
Rae: (570) 714-9234
MLS #12-3138 $525,000
HARVEYS LAKE Terrifc modern 3BR brick ranch on
4 acres with 105 lakefront! HW foors throughout! LR
w/FP & great lakeview; DR; modern tile Kit w/all ap-
pliances; FR w/wall of glass; A/C; laundry room; over-
sized heated 2 car garage w/bath; patio; boathouse &
dock! Dont miss this one!! Home Warranty! HANDI-
CAP ACCESSIBLE. Rae: (570) 714-9234
MLS# 13-1768 $495,000
MLS# 13-1558 HARVEYS LAKE TERRIFIC
Immaculate 15yr old 3BR, 2 bath Cape Cod. Spacious
LR w/vaulted ceiling, skylights & FP; large dining area;
modern oak kitchen w/Island & appliances; BR & full
bath on 1st foor;1st foor laundry; 2BRs & full bath on
2nd foor; large deck; house surrounded on 3 sides by
woods & stream; LL ready to be fnished. Beach mem-
bership! Just move-in & start enjoying Harveys Lake!
Rae: (570) 714-9234 MLS# 13-1558 $189,000
HARVEYS LAKE Motivated Seller! Terrifc proper-
ty! 2 homes!!! Modern 3BR, 1.1 bath w/new kitchen;
20x19 3rd foor BR w/skylights; Many, many upgrades;
nice yard, parking PLUS: 1BR, 1 bath guesthouse (or
rental) 1 deck + carport. Beach membership! Dont
miss this one!! **$7,000 CREDIT FOR BASEMENT WA-
TER PROOFING.** Rae: (570) 714-9234
MLS# 12-1777 $134,900
HARVEYS LAKE NEW LISTING Totally renovat-
ed 3BR, 1 bath summer home ; Fully furnished; Just
move-in! LR w/attractive gas FP; eat-in oak kitchen
w/all new appliances; terrifc front porch w/great
view of lake; NEW foors throughout; replacement
windows; walls, roof, gutters, porch! Parking pad 3
deep; Close to swimming area! Dont miss this one!
Rae: (570) 714-9234
MLS# 13-2304 $99,000
HARVEYS LAKE Modern year-round 3BR, 2 full
bath home. Large 1st foor BR & bath w/laundry,
spacious LR; large modern eat-in kitchen w/appli-
ances; 2nd foor recreation room could easily be 4th
BR; offce; garage; replacement windows; gas line
to house; NEW THOMPSON BASEMENT WATER
TREATMENT SYSTEM. Close to lake & boat launch!
Rae: (570) 714-9234
MLS# 12-4095 $84,900
HARVEYS LAKE Two Lots Beech Street. Lots 3
and 5. Nice wooded lots; Public sewer; Lake Lehman
Schools! 100x150. Rae: (570) 714-9234
$21,995 each
HARVEYS LAKEModern 3BR, 2 bath, 2200SF home w/50
of lakefront; large LR w/vaulted ceilings, full glass wall & view of
lake. Charming DR w/FP & lake view. 1st foor BR & bath; modern
eat-in kitchen w/appliances, den, A/C, LL FR. 2nd foor consists
of 2BRs, modern full bath & laundry. 2 car plus garage, deck w/
great lake view PLUS fnished dock w/entertaining area, vaulted
ceilings, FP & 1/2 bath. Rae: (570) 714-9234
MLS# 13-1120 $499,000
MLS# 13-2270 HARVEYS LAKE NEW LISTING
Pole 131; Two Docks. Cozy Lakefront Ranch with 2BR
& 2 lofts, LR/DR, modern, kitchen & bath with terrifc
sunroom w/full lakeview on a 50.5 x 120 lot. Plus 40 of
lakefront w/2 boathouses (one is 2-story) plus parking.
Dont miss this one!! Rae: (570) 714-9234
MLS# 13-2270 $345,000
HARVEYS LAKE Fabulous 3000SF 15yr old Lake house
w/3BR, 3.1 baths & sauna; terrifc great rm w/stone FP, sliders to
deck; Kit w/hickory cabs, SS appls & eating bar open to Great rm;
1st fr FR w/sliders to patio, stone FP & full-wall wet bar; den w/
vaulted ceiling, sliders to deck;1st fr lndry; A/C; beautiful HW frs;
great views of lake from most rooms; parking; 51 lakefront
w/fnished dock. Rear access. Rae: (570) 714-9234
MLS# 12-4430 $475,000
MLS# 13-1488 HARVEYS LAKE TOWNHOUSE
Immaculate 3BR, 2.5 bath End Unit Townhouse!! Cherry
& granite eat-in kitchen w/appliances open to LR w/FP &
sliders to patio; large dining area & foyer; spacious MBR
Suite; each BR has walk-in closet; A/C; 1st foor laun-
dry; garage; Beach Membership & Boat slip available.
Rae: (570) 714-9234
MLS#13-1488 $214,900
80010251
Rae Dziak
714-9234
rae@lewith-freeman.com
(570) 288-9371 Real estate
Erics Career Highlights & Afliations
- Nationally Recognized Top Producing Loan Omcer
- More than 3,000 Northeast Pa. Families Served
- Mortgage Industry Veteran with More Tan 20 Years Experience
- Branch Team with more than 200 Years Combined Experience!
- Past President & Board of Governors Member - Mortgage
Bankers Association
- Seasoned Professional in FHA, PHFA, VA, & USDA Loan Products
- Greater Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Association of Realtors -
Amliate Member
Navigating today's mortgage approval process is challenging and requires the advice of an
experienced Mortgage Professional. Eric McCabe, a life-long resident of Northeast, PA, has
built his career helping area families realize their dream of homeownership. If you would
like to see exactly what it takes to own a new home for your family, Eric is ready
and eager to help.
When it comes to getting you Home...
EXPERIENCE COUNTS!
Company NMLS# 2743. Branch NMLS# 386319. Individual NMLS# 139699. Licensed by the Pennsylvania Banking Department. Guaranteed Rate, Inc. is a private corporation organized under the laws of the
State of Delaware. It has no affiliation with the US Department of Housing and Urban Development, the US Department of Veterans Affairs, the US Department of Agriculture or any other government agency.
o: 570.714.4200 x24 c: 570.954.6145
www.mccabemortgagegroup.com
Eric McCabe
Branch Manager
400 Tird Avenue, Suite 100 - Kingston, PA 18704
80005637
K
PAGE 12E Sunday, July 7, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
View 11,355 Listings classicproperties.com
95 associates. 10 counties. 5 ofces
Clarks summit
570.587.700
poCono
mountain
570.595.3705
north poCono
570.842.9988
kingston
570.718.4959
tunkhannoCk
570.836.6700
mid valley
570.489.4744
Since 1983
Est. 1983
Open House July 7th 1:00-3:00
25 Coplay Place, Mountain Top
MLS#12-40 WBA
Carol Shedlock
cshedlock@classicproperties.com
DIR: Laurel Lakes, 81 S to Nuangola Exit 159, R past gas
station, R on Aspen, R on Laurel, L on Lakeview, L on
Oakmont to Coplay straight ahead
Exeter / Wyoming
MLS#13-2540 WBA
Jesicca Skoloda
jskoloda@classicproperties.com
MLS#13-2689 WBA
Whitney Lopuhovsky
wlopuhovsky@classicproperties.com
$179,900
570-237-0463
$147,500
570-417-1216
Harveys Lake
MLS#13-2686 WBA
Steve Shemo
sshemo@classicproperties.com
$149,900
570-793-9449
Forty Fort
MLS#13-2549 WBA
Paul DeFabo
pdefabo@classicproperties.com
$118,000
570-718-4959
x1357
Nanticoke
MLS#13-2708 WBA
Whitney Lopuhovsky
wlopuhovsky@classicproperties.com
$82,000
570-417-1216
Hughestown
MLS#13-2647 WBA
Michelle Sweeney
msweeney@classicproperties.com
$83,900
570-371-1567
$272,900
570-407-2314
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80010005
View 11,334 Listings classicproperties.com
10+ Prime
Commercial Acres
w/200+ff on RT 315 &
500+ff on Fox Hill Rd.
Surrounded on 3 sides by
Mohegan Sun Casino &
Race Track. Easy access
to RT 81 & PA Turnpike,
(RT 476) MLS#12-3849
ANN LEWIS 714-9245
State of
the art 34,000 SF office
bldg w/open floor plan.
Features 1000 SF data
center, 8000 SF warehouse
space & parking for 165
cars. Zoned C-4 Heavy
Commercial. MLS#12-3565
JUDY RICE 714-9230 OR
RHEA SIMMS 696-6677
3800+
warehouse/office prime
location - minutes from
interstate 81 - 5 acres
w/ refrigeration. Parking
for 30+ cars MLS#13-
2438
TERRY 696-0871 OR
JUDY 714-9230
Great Investment
Opportunity! Price reduced $905,000 from
original list price. Currently priced below
appraisal. MLS#11-1346
VIRGINIA ROSE 288-9371
Now is the time to have your own
beautiful business! This property offers it all:
convience, high traffic, and walking distance to many
stores and restaurants downtown! MLS#08-2790
PEG 714-9247
Turnkey Pizza/Restaurant
business. Seating for 125 patrons, 24 barstools, 2
walk-in coolers, 4 pizza ovens, Garland Stove. Two
apartments on second floor, long-term tenants
MLS#11-4332
MARIBETH 696-0882
Large Commercial Warehouse
& Office space. Over 3.5 acres overlooking
the river & mountains. Developers need to
see! Perfect for Townhouses! MLS#13-737
ANDY 714-9225
Retail, Office, Medical -
Whatever your need - This 4000 SF Bldg can
accommadate it! Parking for 10. NEW PRICE!
MLS#12-276
JUDY RICE 714-9230
High traffic location. 2900 SF
professional office space w/basement
storage. Pkg for at least 12 cars. MLS#12-
416
RHEA SIMMS 696-6677
5100 SF Masonry building
zoned for lumber yard, machine shop, heavy
equip, etc. Over an acre w/parking.
MLS#12-3216
DEANNA 696-0894
4 Story brick office building.
Located in high traffic area. 2 lots
included for parking. MLS#MLS# 13-2075
ANDY 714-9225
PRIME LOCATION - Vacant land
with Penn Dot access already in place. Close
to everything! MLS#12-2517
DAVID 970-1117 or SANDY 970-1110
Residential-Commercial. 12 year
new home with 40x60 pole barn on 19.5 acres.
Work, residence and enjoy nature on this property!
First 200 of property is community Business zoning.
MLS#13-1607
MARIBETH 696-0882
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY - NO
REAL ESTATE. Turn key operation. Ice cream
business. Owner will stay on to assist w/ transition.
Retail bakery as sub-tenant. MLS#13-1390
SHARON 970-1106
Warehouse w/office area.
28,000 SF w/overhead door. Ample parking.
Easy access to Rte 81. Motivated Seller!
MLS#12-2947
JUDY RICE 714-9230
3,235 SF bldg on .816 acre.
Renovated in 2001. Perfect for truck repair shop,
landscaping, contractor, fencing company, etc.
Property is also being offered on a NNN lease at
$1500/month. MLS#MLS# 13-2142
ANDY 714-9225
New on market. Highly visible corner
lot - 1900SF building w/large front windows - OSP
for 8 cars. Gas heat & C/A. Can be used for retail
or office. Ready for occupancy. MLS#13-1772
RHEA SIMMS 696-6677
Bank owned Warehouse with
loading dock, offices, 3 bathrooms.
Additional pole building offers more space.
Over 1 acre. MLS#13-355
TRACY 696-6674
2-Story masonry bldg on
96x180 lot w/pkg for 36 cars. Ideal for apts
or small mfg business. MLS#12-1758
MIKE 970-1100 or MARGY 696-0891
Former automotive repair/gas station
w/tanks removed on .481 acre corner lot. High
visibility, high traffic flow, easy access on/off Cross
Valley, 2 rest rooms, 2 garage bays, parking for 30.
MLS#13-917
CLYDETTE 696-0897
Currently set up for a
business on 1st floor with 3BR apartment on
2nd floor. Rear is a large garage with storage
above. MLS#13-735
ANDY 714-9225
High traffic- Prime location on San
Souci Parkway. Former tire store - office,
garage, auto repair, plenty of parking
MLS#13-2449
TERRY 696-0871
Unique bldg currently used
as single residence. May be converted to
suit your needs (w/zoning approval).
MLS#13-583
DAVID 970-1117
This 2400 SF bldg
features offices & garage w/overhead door.
Across from Hollenback Golf Course.
MLS#11-4561
JUDY RICE 714-9230
6000+ SF furniture
store, plus apt. & lots more space.
High traffic area. MLS#11-3865
RAE DZIAK 714-9234
PRICE REDUCED- Former
restaurant close proximity to turn pike,
secluded location could be used as office.
Visible from Rt 115. MLS#13-108
MIKE JOHNSON 970-1100
Large 8000 SF building looking
for a new lease on life! Zoned Commercial.
MLS#11-4058
SANDY 970-1110 or DAVID 970-1117
Former bar with 2 apartments,
liquor license & equipment included, no
kitchen in bar, osp for 12 cars. Let
apartments pay the mortgage! MLS#13-784
ANDY 714-9225
Spacious building in
high traffic location with ample parking.
Adaptable to many uses. MLS#12-3786
ANN LEWIS 714-9245
Newly remodeled immaculate
office building. Plenty of parking. Reception
areas, 5 offices, kitchenette. Handicap
access. MLS#13-667
DANA 715-9333
1800 SF former church. LL has
approx. 1500 SF, hall & small kitchen; .39
acre rectory, just shell & 1 car garage.
MLS#13-1743
MATT H 714-9229
Efficient floor plan for small
office. Available immediately. Also available
1000SF in Pendragon Building on 2nd floor
w/elevator. MLS#MLS#13-2324
JUDY RICE 714-9230
Parking for 15 cars, interior completely
remodeled, many possibilities, retail or office
space -included basement for storage with a
garage door. MLS#MLS#13-2360
SUSAN 696-0876
FOR LEASE - Modern 2400SF 1st floor Commercial
space. $2750/month plus utilities; Handicap accessible;
Multi-purpose; Had been doctors office; A/C; 50 car
parking lot; owner will retrofit; Terrific location between
Scranton & Wilkes-Barre; Close to Rt 81. MLS#13-1950
RAE 714-9234
Contemporary 1st floor space for
LEASE. Approx 1100SF. Prime location. Plenty
of parking. Lots of possibilities. Tenant pays
utilities. MLS#13-1447
DEB 714-9251
Located in Central City - on site
parking with loading docks, record storage
space, climate controlled, secure building, metal
racks available for organized storage. MLS#
VIRGINIA ROSE
Prime Location -
1900SF - 12 pkg spaces. MLS#09-
3085
MARGY 696-0891
K
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Sunday, July 7, 2013 PAGE 13E
Sunday Wheels
Autos For Sale
1-800-223-1111
339 HIGHWAY 315
PITTSTON, PA
* 24 Months, 10,000 Miles Per Year with $1,396.92 down plus $603.07
fees = $1,999.99 total due at delivery. Residual $22,956.50. Must qualify
tier 1. Zero security deposit. Ofer good through 7/1/2013.
Hours:
Mon-Fri 9-8pm ;
Sat 9-5pm
www.VOLVOofWBS.com
269
LEASE FOR ONLY:
Mo.
Plus Tax
8
0
0
1
1
3
1
7
TAKE A PAYMENT VACATION. PAY NOTHING FOR 3 MONTHS WHEN
YOU BUY OR LEASE ANY NEW 2013 VOLVO.***

NEW 2013 VOLVO S60 FWD T5 SEDAN


LEASE FOR $199/MO + TAX*
or
Take $5,000 OFF
MSRP $32,795** / BUY FOR $27,775
**
*24 month lease with 10k miles per year on a new 2013 Volvo S60 T5 Sedan. MSRP $32,795. $2000 due @ signing, $0 security deposit. Residual
$22,300.60. Based on Tier 1 approval. Tax, title, and license fees extra. **SALE PRICE INCLUDES ALL DEALER DISCOUNTS, VOLVO ALLOWANCE OF
$1,000 AND VOLVO/SAAB OWNER LOYALTY OF $1,000. Tax, title, and license fees extra. Offer expires 7/31/13 *** The value of the rst 3 monthly
payments, up to a maximum total amount of $1,350, will be credited to your VCFS account upon opening. On lease agreements, this value will include
a non cash credit equal to your rst monthly lease payment due at signing. Please contact your retailer for further details. Offer expires 7/31/13..
***
$
269
LEASE FOR ONLY:
Per Mo.
Plus Tax
**
$
199
Autos For Sale
of Scranton - NEPA
www.rjburnecadillac.com
2.5 Liter Engine 4 cyl., Driver & Passenger Heated Seats, Premium Care Maintenance, 4 year/50,000 Miles
Down Payment $0
Security Deposit $0
First Payment $0
Term 39 Months
$
329
2013 ATS Standard by Cadillac
MUST BE A CURRENT LESSEE OF A 1999 OR NEWER NON-GM VEHICLE. OR LESSEE MUST
LEASE A 1999 OR NEWER GM VEHICLE WITH A LEASE END DATE PRIOR TO 7/31/2014.
Lease price based on a Nicely Equipped 2013 ATS Sdn 2.5L $34,440MSRP. $329 per month plus 9% sales tax total $358 per month. 39 month lease 10,000 miles per year. 39 Monthly payments
total $12,502 $.25/mile penalty over 32,500 miles. $329 rst payment plus $0 down payment plus tax and tags, Total due at delivery $0 plus tax and tag fees. MUST BE A CURRENT LESSEE OF A
1999 OR NEWER NON-GM VEHICLE. OR LESSEE MUST LEASE A 1999 OR NEWER GM VEHICLE WITH A LEASE END DATE PRIOR TO 7/31/2014. Lessee responsible for excessive wear and tear.
Must take delivery by 7/31/2013. Requires ALLY Bank credit approval. Please see sales person for complete details.
2013 NORTH AMERICAN
CAR OF THE YEAR
THE ALL- NEW CADILLAC ATS
PURCHASE FOR :60 months @ O% APR
FOR QUALIFIED BUYERS
ON ALL CADILLAC MODELS
37 TO CHOOSE FROM
IN STOCK/IN TRANSIT
R.J. BURNE
1205-1209 Wyoming Avenue, Scranton
(570) 342-0107 1-888-880-6537 www.rjburnecadillac.com
Mon-Thurs 9-8 Fri 9-5 Sat 9-4
*TAX & TAGS EXTRA NC + Non-Certied
From Wilkes-Barre to Scranton
Expressway 8 Blocks on
Wyoming Avenue
E
X
P
W
A
Y
WYOMING AVE.
8
1
Sign & Drive
PURCHASE FOR 60 MOS @ 0% APR FOR QUALIFIED BUYERS
Real Estate Auction
Absolute Real Estate Auction
Bank Owned Property
2-Story Home On Lot
107 Ray Street, Old Forge, PA (Lackawanna County)
Wednesday July 10, 2013 6:30 PM
Auction To Be Held @ Property,
107 Ray St., Old Forge, PA.
2-Story Home On Lot
2-Story, 3 Bedroom, 1 Bath Home On 7,540 sf Lot In Old
Forge! Home Has Nice Curb Appeal, Needs Work & TLC
On The Inside; Located Approx. 18 Miles South West Of
Scranton! Property Sells Absolutely To The Highest
Bidder, Regardless Of Price. Property Sells As-Is, Where-
Is, How-Is. Any Tests Wanted Or Needed, Must Be Done
Prior To Auction. Announcements Made Day Of Auction
Take Precedence Over Printed Material.
www.manasseauctions.com.
Inspection On Real Estate: Day Of Auction,
4:30PM to 6:30PM;
Terms On Real Estate: A 10% Buyers Premium Will Be Ad-
ded To The Final Bid Price, The Total Becomes The Pur-
chase Price. 15% Down of Purchase Price Or A Minimum Of
$3,000, Whichever Is Greater, Required Day Of Auction In
Cash Or Good Check w/ Positive ID. Balance Due On Clos-
ing Within 30 Days.
Property Sells With No Contingencies, Be Prepared.
Owner/Seller Local Bank
Mel & Matt Manasse
Auctioneers & Licensed Real Estate Brokers
PA Auctioneers License # AU571L & AU3517L
PA Brokers License # SBR000462 & ABR000472
607-692-4540 / 1-800-MANASSE
WWW.MANASSEAUCTIONS.COM
Special Notices
IF YOU'RE NOT
SELLING YOUR
JUNK
VEHICLES
or HEAVY
EQUIPMENT
TRACTORS,
TRAILERS,
SCHOOL
BUSES, DUMP
TRUCKS TO
HAPPY TRAILS
YOU'RE LOSING
MONEY
570-760-2035
570-542-2277
FREE PICK UP
ADOPT: Adoring, secure
couple longs to adopt your
newborn. Safe, beautiful
life forever. Love awaits.
Lori & Craig
888-773-6381
Expenses Paid
FOSTER
PARENT(S)
needed immediately
for teens or sibling groups.
Compensation, training, and
24 hour on-call support
provided. Please call
FRIENDSHIP HOUSE
(570) 342-8305 x 2058.
Compensation up to
$1200.00
per month per child.
Free Books: Normal
Christian Life By Watchman
Nee Economy Of God.
By Witness Lee
Www.Bfa.Org/Newbooks
ADOPT: A teacher hopes to
adopt a baby! I promise to
provide a lifetime of uncondi-
tional love & opportunities.
Expenses paid.
1-866-408-1543
www.AdeleAdopts.info
Christian Friends of Brother
Watchman Nee Want to
Meet & Share Thoughts.
Call 570-267-8250,
sdekw@yahoo.com.
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
LEGAL NOTICE
The Regular Board Meeting for
the Housing Authority of the
County of Luzerne scheduled
for July 9, 2013 has been
cancelled. The next Regular
Board Meeting is scheduled for
12:00 noon on Tuesday,
August 13, 2013 at Kingston
Manor, 250 First Avenue,
Kingston, Pa.
David J. Fagula
Executive Director
Lost & Found
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-288-8995
FOUND, Dog, male, Approxim-
ately three years old. Black
and tan. Might be a Tahitian
mi x. No t ags, f ound near
Schuyl er Ave i n Ki ngston
Lost & Found
ALL JUNK
VEHICLES
WANTED!!
-CALL ANYTIME
-HONEST PRICES
-FREE REMOVAL
CA$H PAID
ON THE SPOT
570.301.3602
LOST. German Shepherd,
black & tan female, in vicinity
of Port Griffith, Jenkins Twp.
Very fri endl y, "Mol l y". RE-
WARD 570-654-2972, leave
message.
LOST. Pekinese, small female,
tan, black tip of tongue, "Jupy",
near Antoni o' s Pi zza i n N.
Wi l kes- Bar r e. Two hear t -
br oken gi r l s. REWARD.
899- 3138
Yard Sale
DURYEA
P I C N I C
Germania Hose Co.
430 Foote Avenue
JULY 16TH TO
JULY 20TH
Tues. - Thurs, 6-11
Friday - 6-12
Saturday - 3-12
Family Night Tuesday - 6-10
Ride All Rides
for $15!
Saturday
Matinee - 3-7
Friday, July 19th
Parade
Saturday July 20th
Fireworks at Dusk
Live Entertainment
Tuesday - Mule
Wednesday - Esperanza Band
Thursday -
Fabulous Fortunes
Friday -
Flaxy Morgan
Saturday -
Hillbilly Deluxe
Rides by Nonweiler Amusements
Midway, Inc.
Lehigh, PA
FORTY FORT
YARD SALE!
375 River Street
Sat. & Sun., July 6 & 7, 9 to 3
Basketball hoop, Household
goods, books, clothing and
Something for Everyone!
KINGSTON
GARAGE SALE
620 Charles Ave.
Sun,, July 7, 11-6
Children's clothing, furniture,
household goods, home decor,
toys, small appliances, area
rugs, TV's, video games.
Moving Sale!!!
High-quality items in excel-
lent condition being sold in-
cluding: living room set with
sofa, love seat, ottoman, 2
end tables & sofa table
($875), 50" Vizio LED/LCD
tv & stand ($575), dining
room table, chairs, & hutch
($495), snowblower (only 1
yr.old $395), large patio set
w/ table, 6 chairs, umbrella,
bench, storage bin & cush-
ions ($675), and a re-fin-
ished bar ($550).
Call 570-239-9840 for
additional details.
WEST
WYOMING
6th Street
Open year round
SPACE AVAILABLE
INSIDE & OUT
Acres of parking
OUTSIDE
SPACES
$10
Saturday 10am-2pm
Sunday 8am-4pm
Yard Sale
WILKES BARRE
MULTI FAMILY YARD SALE
Sun, July 7, 9-1
Decoration, household items,
jewelry, LOTS OF STUFF.!
PROCEEDS FOR SPAY &
NEUTER CLINIC.
WILKES-BARRE
217 CARLISLE STREET
Sat. & Sun. July 6 & 7th
9AM-3PM
RED HOT YARD
SALE DEALS
Dishes, holiday decor, DVDs,
CDs, clothes & much more.
Attorney
DIVORCE No Fault
$295 divorce295.com
Atty. Kurlancheek
800-324-9748 W-B
FREE Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans. Carol Baltimore
570-283-1626
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty. Sherry Dalessandro
570-823-9006
Child / Elderly Care
DAYCARE
In my Kingston home. Licensed.
Accepting Co-ordinated Childcare
570-283-0336
Travel Entertainment
Black Lake, NY
Come relax & enjoy great fishing &
tranquility at its finest.
Housekeeping
cottages on the water with all the
amenities of home.
Need A Vacation? Call Now!
(315) 375-8962
daveroll@blacklakemarine.com
www.blacklake4fish.com
BROADWAY
SHOW
BUS TRIPS
BALTIMORE INNER
HARBOR & THE
NATIONAL AQUARIUM
Sat. August 10th $89
MOTOWN THE MUSICAL
Sat., Sept. 21st
$160 (Mezz Seats)
WICKED
Sat., Sept. 21st
$175 (Orchestra seats)
Pick Ups from Pittston &
Wilkes-Barre Park & Rides
CALL ROSEANN @ 655-4247
To Reserve Your Seats
CAMEO HOUSE
BUS TOURS
SUN., JULY 21 NYC
N.Y. Botanical Gardens
Wild Medicine Healing
Plants
From Around The World.
Dinner in the Real Little
Italy - Arthur Ave. - Bronx
Sat., Aug., 24
Wilmington
Docent Tour of Nemours
Mansion & Gardens
Brunch @ The Inn @
Montchanin Village..
and more
Oct., 6 & 7
FALLING WATER
570-655-3420
anne.cameo@verizon.net
Travel Entertainment
FUN GETAWAYS!
Taylor Swift Concert
7/19
9/11 Memorial with
Free Time in NYC
7/27
Kutztown
Folk Festival 7/6
Yankees/Tigers 8/9
Phillies/Dodgers 8/18
Washington DC
2 Day
8/3 & 4
Includes Memorials
& Sightseeing
1-800-432-8069
NEW SHIPS
ON SALE
at TENENBAUMS TRAVEL
NOW!
NCLs BREAKAWAY
from only $734.00 per per-
son
ROYAL CARIBBEAN'S
QUANTUM OF THE SEAS
from only $1074.00
per person
Departs New York
to the Bahamas
Rates are per person,
based on two sharing one
cabin, subject to availability
and change.
Call 570.288.8747
for more info!
Money To Lend
We can erase your bad credit -
100% GUARANTEED. Attorneys
for the Federal Trade Commission
say theyve never seen a legitim-
ate credit repair operation. No one
can legally remove accurate and
timely information from your credit
report. Its a process that starts with
you and involves time and a con-
scious effort to pay your debts.
Learn about managing credit and
debt at ftc. gov/credit. A message
from The Times Leader and the
FTC.
Autos Under $5000
BUICK CENTURY, 95'
Cash Price, $1,500
570-793-9834
CHEVROLET`03
MALIBU
82,000 miles, V6, cold AC, 26
MPG, premium wheels, CD
player, shines and runs like
new. Garage kept, very well
maintained. Same owner,
last 10 years.
$4,975 Firm.
570-592-0997
DODGE 99' Grand
Caravan SE
1 Owner! 99,000 Miles. Cash
price, $3,300. 570-826-1672
1518 8th Street Carverton, PA
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
DODGE '95 RAM 1500
X-CAB 4X4
GOOD WORK TRUCK!
$1,995
Call for details 570-696-4377
Econoline, Ford 92'
Conversion Van, 89,000 miles,
blue, good condition. $3,000 NEG.
570-709-3020
Autos Under $5000
1518 8th Street, Carverton, PA
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
DODGE '04 QUAD
CAB 4X4
LIKE NEW $6,995
Call for details
570-696-4377
FORD
' 97 Taurus
72,868 orginal miles. Engine
and transmission excellent.
Wi l l not pass i nspect i on
(6/2013) Call with questions.
$1000 OBO
570-574-4710
1518 8th Street, Carverton, PA
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
FORD 02 TAURUS
Auto, V6. NICE, NICE CAR!
$3,495. Call for details
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street, Carverton, PA
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
FORD 05 FREE STYLE
3rd seat. AWD. One Owner.
$4,995. Call for details
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street, Carverton, PA
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
MAZDA 02 TRIBUTE
Auto, V6. Sharp Clean SUV!
$3,995. Call for details
570-696-4377
Pontiac '99 Bonneville
Automatic, 4 door, spacious,
with CD player. New anti-
lock brakes & new starter.
Great engine. Runs excel-
lent! Will need new tires &
very minor repair. $975.00
(570)852-7746
Autos For Sale
'05 CHEVY
Aveo LS Hatch
Sharp inside and out. Very well
maintained. Auto, 85K, Red
with privacy tint Pioneer speak-
ers, woofer and bluetooth. New
timing belt, water pump, much
more. 30 mpg highway. Served
as rel i abl e backup vehi cl e.
Save Big!! Local pickup only.
Call to inquire 570-762-7615
'2012 Appalachian
18' car trailer. Diamond Deck
with 4' dove's tail, 5' slide in
ramps Many extras only used
3 times. $2,200. 570-855-5719
Toyota 04 Celica GT
112K miles. Blue, 5 speed. Air,
power windows/locks, CD/cas-
sette, Keyless entry, sunroof,
new battery. Car drives and
has current PA inspection.
Slight rust on corner of
passenger door. Clutch slips
on hard acceleration. This is
why its thousands less than
Blue Book value. $6,500 OBO.
Make an offer! Call
570-592-1629
CADILLAC '04
DEVILLE
Light blue/tan leather,
moon roof, heated/cooled
seats, 102k.
$7,497
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
Autos For Sale
VITOS
&
GINOS
Auto Sales
949 Wyoming Ave,
Forty Fort
288-8995
00 Toyota Corolla
4 door, 4 cylinder, auto.
Runs great. $2,995
Grand Cherokee V8. Runs
great. Power windows &
doors.
$2,495
96 F150 Pickup. auto, runs
good.
$1,995
96 Pontiac Grand Prix.
White, air,
power windows & brakes,
4 door, runs good, 106K.
$2,395
01 Ford Taurus SES
4 door, air, power
doors & windows.
$2,995
99 Chevy S10 Blazer 4
door, power windows,
doors & seats. 126,000
miles.
$2,995
03 Ford Wind-star 4 door,
all power options. 96,000
miles $3,400
04 Nissan Armada, 7 pas-
senger. 4wd. Excellent con-
dition. $10,900
09 Mercedes GL450, 7 pas-
senger. Too many options
to list. 30K miles. Garage
kept. Cream puff. $42,500
FINANCING AVAILABLE
Buying Junk
Cars
Used Cars &
Trucks
Highest Prices
Paid
288-8995
CHRYSLER '04
SEBRING
Convertible, LTD, blue/grey
leather, 77k. Extended War-
ranty. Price Reduced
$7,295
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
Autos For Sale
LEO'S AUTO
SALES
93 Butler Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
570-825-8253
Ford 98 Explorer XLT
4 door, 6 cylinder., auto, sun roof,
leather, 4WD. Good condition
$1,650
Ford '00 Explorer XLS
4 door, 6 cylinder, auto, 4WD.
Excellent condition.
$1,650
Chevy 97 Blazer
4 door, 6 cylinder., auto, 4WD,
new tires. Very good condition.
$1,550
Ford '97 Escort
4 door, 4 cylinder, auto, cold a/c.
Excellent gas mileage
$1,350
Current Inspection
On All Vehicles
DEALER
FORD '04
MUSTANG
Convertible, Anniversary
Edition, V6 engine, maroon/tan
leather, 26k miles.
Extended Warranty
$9,500
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
CADILLAC '07 DTS
Sedan, pearl white/tan leather,
43,958 miles.
Extended Warranty Plan
$17,995
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
LEXUS '06 ES330
Silver/beige leather, moon
roof, 82k. Warranty
$14,995.
Trades Welcome
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
FORD`08 MUSTANG,
COUP,4,250 miles, V8, 5 speed
manual Transmission,Vapor Char-
coal metallic exterior, dark Char-
coal interior. Rear deck spoiler,
hood air scoop. AM/FM stereo, 6
CD, in dash MP3,$20,000.
570-256-3983
K
PAGE 14E Sunday, July 7, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
VALLEYCHEVROLET.COM
MSRP $24,245
Stk. #13020, 3.6L SIDI 6 Speed Manual Transmission, PW, PDL, Air, Rear Spoiler,
Limited Slip Diferential, 18Heritage Steel Wheels, Onstar w/ Turn-By-Turn
Navigation, XM Satellite Radio, Bluetooth, AM/FM/CD
2013 CHEVY
CAMARO LS COUPE
MSRP $22,805
Stk. #13757, ECOTEC 2.5L DOHC 6 Speed Automatic, PW, PDL, Air, P. Mirrors,
Tinted Glass, Stabilitrak, XM Satellite Radio, Onstar w/ Turn-By-Turn Navigation,
Compass Display, 16AluminumWheels, Tilt &Telescopic Steering Column
2013 CHEVY MALIBU LS
MSRP $32,185
#13407, 3.6L V6 6 Speed Auto., A/C, 2nd/3rd Row Split Bench Seat, Rear Vision
Camera, Onstar w/ turn-by-turn navigation, XM Satellite, Color Touch AM/FM
Radio w/ CD Player, Rear Spoiler, Heated Mirrors
2013 CHEVY
TRAVERSE LS FWD
0%APR
For 60 Mos.
Available
MSRP $25,015
Stk. #13730, 2.4L DOHC 4 Cyl., 6 Speed Automatic, A/C, Onstar w/ Turn-By-Turn
Navigation, Bluetooth for Phone, AM/FM/CD, 17AluminumWheels, PW, PDL,
Cruise, Remote Keyless Entry, XM Satellite Radio
2013 CHEVY
EQUINOX LS FWD
0%APR
For 60 Mos.
Available
MSRP $37,390
Stk. #13194, 5.3L V8 6 Speed Auto., A/C, XM Satellite Radio, OnStar w/ Turn-by-
Turn Navigation, Remote Start Pkg., PW, PDL, Cruise, Power Heated Mirrors
2013 CHEVY SILVERADO
1500 CREWCAB 4X4
0%APR
For 60 Mos.
Available
TO GUARANTEE OUR QUALITY, WE BACK IT
100,000-MILE/5-YEAR
POWERTRAIN WARRANTY
WHICHEVER COMES FIRST. SEE DEALER FOR LIMITED WARRANTY DETAILS.
AUTOMATIC CRASH RESPONSE
EMERGENCY
NO MATTER WHAT HAPPENS ON THE ROAD, WE CAN HELP
SECURITY
ONSTAR FMV CAN HELP GET YOU BACK ON THE ROAD QUICKLY
NAVIGATION
GET DIRECTIONS AT THE TOUCH OF A BUTTON
CONNECTIONS
ONSTAR FMV OFFERS BUILT-IN WIRELESS CALLING SERVICE
BLUETOOTH
BLUETOOTH WIRELESS TECHNOLOGY
MSRP $37,355
Stk. #13213, Vortec 5.3L V8, 6 Speed Automatic, Locking Rear Diferential,
Trailering Pkg., AluminumWheels, Dual Zone A/C, Bluetooth, CD w/ USB
Port, PW, PDL, EZ-Lift Tailgate, Onstar, XM Satellite, Cruise & More
2013 CHEVY SILVERADO
1500 EXT CAB 4X4
0%APR
For 60 Mos.
Available
ALL STAR
EDITION
0%APR
For 60 Mos.
Available
VALLEY
CHEVROLET
821.2772 1.800.444.7121
valleychevrolet.com
601 Kidder Street, Wilkes-Barre, PA
SCAN FROM MOBILE
DEVICE FOR MORE SPECIALS
We Accept
ALL Trades!
Cars, Trucks, ATVs, Campers,
Boats, Motorcycles...
You Bring It...
WELL TRADE IT! YOU CAN FIND US
ON FACEBOOK &TWITTER!
* All prices plus tax & tags. All lease payments are plus tax & tags. Prices & lease payments include all applicable rebates; Independence Day Bonus Cash (if applicable); Competitive Lease Ofer (if applicable); Business Choice Rebate (if applicable); All Star Edition incentive
(if applicable); Truck Loyalty Bonus Cash (if applicable);Trade-in Bonus Cash (if applicable); Competitive Lease Private Ofer (if applicable); CRUZE - Lease for $139 per mo. plus tax for 36 mos., 10K miles per year, $2,559 at lease signing to well qualifed buyers; any applicable
lease incentives have been applied. Equinox - Lease for $189 per mo. plus tax for 36 mos., 10K miles per year, $3,119 at lease signing to well qualifed buyers; any applicable lease incentives have been applied. MALIBU- Lease for $159 per mo. plus tax for 36 mos., 10K miles per
year, $3,189 due at lease signing to well qualifed buyers; any applicable lease incentives have been applied. SILVERADO - Lease for $299 per mo. plus tax for 39 mos., 10K miles per year, $2999 (cash or trade) due at lease signing to well qualifed buyers; any applicable lease
incentives have been applied. CAMARO - Lease for $229 per mo. plus tax for 36 mos., 10K miles per year, $2,199 due at lease signing to well qualifed buyers; any applicable lease incentives have been applied. TRAVERSE - Lease for $249 per mo. plus tax for 36 mos., 10K miles
per year, $2,509 (cash or trade) due at lease signing to well qualifed buyers; any applicable lease incentives have been applied. SILVERADO (#14029) - Lease for $369 per mo. plus tax for 36 mos., 10 K miles per year, $4299 (cash or trade) due at lease signing to well qualifed
buyers; any applicable lease incentives have been applied. Not responsible for typographical errors. Pictures for illustration purposes only; See dealer for warranty details. Prices & payment ofers end 7/8/13.
MSRP $17,940
Stk. #13445, 1.8L 4 Cyl., 5 Speed Manual Transmission, Air Conditioning, Tilt
Steering, PW, PDL, Bluetooth for Phone, OnStar w/ Turn-By-Turn Navigation,
XM Satellite Radio, Remote Keyless Entry, Stabilitrak, Premium Cloth Seating
2013 CHEVY CRUZE LS
1.9%
APR
For 48 Mos.
Available
$
29,999*
$
16,599*
$
139*
Sale Price Starting At
OR Lease For Only
PER MO.
FOR 36 MOS.
$
19,899*
$
159*
Sale Price Starting At
OR Lease For Only
PER MO.
FOR 36 MOS.
$
22,699*
$
229*
Sale Price Starting At
OR Lease For Only
PER MO.
FOR 36 MOS.
$
22,999*
$
189*
Sale Price Starting At
OR Lease For Only
PER MO.
FOR 36 MOS.
$
27,999*
$
299*
$
359*
Sale Price Starting At
OR Lease For Only
Lease For Only
PER MO.
FOR 36 MOS.
PER MO.
FOR 36 MOS.
$
28,999*
$
249*
Sale Price Starting At OR Lease For Only
PER MO.
FOR 36 MOS.
Sale Price
Starting At
MSRP $14,995
Stk. #13631. 1.8 VVT DOHC 4Cyl., 5 Speed Manual Trans., Stabilitrak, Air, PW,
PDL, Onstar, XM Satellite, Bluetooth, Tinted Glass, Remote Panic Alarm
2013 CHEVY SONIC LS
1.9%
APR
For 48 Mos.
Available
$
14,499*
Sale Price
Starting At
Stk. #13424, Ecotech 1.2L 4 Cyl., 4 Speed Auto. Trans., Air, PW, Tinted Glass,
Onstar w/ Turn-By-Turn Navigation, Stabilitrak, Rear Spoiler, Rear Defroster
2013 CHEVY SPARK LS
$
13,499*
Sale Price
Starting At
Stk. #14006, Blue Topaz Metallic, Ecotech 2.5L DOHC 6 Speed Automatic, PW,
PDL, Tinted Glass, Extended Range Remote Keyless Entry, Air Conditioning, Power
Driver Seat, OnStar w/Turn-by-Turn Navigation, Color Infotainment Display,
Stabilitrak, Cruise, XM & HD Radio, Bluetooth, Rear Parking Assist w/Camera
ALL NEW 2014
CHEVY IMPALA LS
$
26,980*
Sale Price
Starting At
#14029
MSRP $42,070
CHEVY
SILVERADO 1500
CREWCAB 4X4
2014
ALL STAR
EDITION
HURRY! SALE ENDS
MONDAY, JULY 8TH
K
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Sunday, July 7, 2013 PAGE 15E
www.MattBurneHonda.com
2013 Honda
Civic LX Sedan
Thank You To Our Customers
0
.9%
APR FINANCING
NOWAVAILABLE!
*On select models to qualied
buyers for limited term.
2013 PILOT EX 4WD
MPG
17 City
24 HWY
**Lease 36 Months through AHFC. $0 Down Payment.
1st payment, tax, and tags due at delivery. Residual $19,494.00
Per Mo.
Lease
ease 36 Months through AHFC $0 Down Payment
Per Per
LLea
* *
Model #YF4H4DEW 250-hp (SAE Net),
3.5-Liter, 24-Valve, SOHC i-VTEC

V-6 Engine
Variable Torque Management 4-Wheel Drive
System (VTM-4) 18-Inch Alloy Wheels
Power Windows/Locks Fog Lights
Anti-Lock Braking System (ABS) i-MID with
8-inch WQVGA (480x320) Screen, Customizable
Feature Settings and Rearview Camera with
Guidelines Bluetooth HandsFreeLink

Tri-Zone Automatic Climate Control System


with Humidity Control and Air Filtration
Drivers Seat with 10-Way Power Adjustment,
Including Power Lumbar Support
229-Watt AM/FM/CD Audio System with 7
Speakers, Including Subwoofer 2-GB CD
Library Bluetooth

Streaming Audio
USB Audio Interface
2013 ACCORD LX SEDAN
MPG
27 City
36 HWY
***Lease 36 Months through AHFC. $0 Down Payment.
1st payment, tax, and tags due at delivery. Residual $13,962.00
Model #CR2F3DEW
185-hp (SAE Net), 2.4-Liter,
16-Valve, DOHC i-VTEC

4-Cylinder
Engine with Direct Injection
Vehicle Stability Assist
TM
(VSA

)
with Traction Control Continu-
ously Variable Transmission (CVT)
16-Inch Alloy Wheels Dual-Zone
Automatic Climate Control with
Air-Filtration System Rearview
Camera with Guidelines Blu-
etooth

HandsFreeLink

Pandora

Internet Radio Compatibility USB


Audio Interface MP3/Auxiliary
Input Jack i-MID with 8-inch
WQVGA (480x320) Screen and
Customizable Feature Settings
2013 Honda CR-V LX
LEASES BASED ON APPROVED CREDIT TIER 1 THRU AHFC. MILEAGE BASED ON 2012 EPA MILEAGE ESTIMATES. USE FOR COMPARISON PURPOSES ONLY.
DO NOT COMPARE TO MODELS BEFORE 2008. YOUR ACTUAL MILEAGE WILL VARY DEPENDING ON HOW YOU DRIVE AND MAINTAIN YOUR VEHICLE. OFFERS EXPIRE 7/8/2013.
MPG
28 City
39 HWY
*Lease 36 Months through AHFC. $0 Down Payment. 1st payment, tax, and tags due at delivery. Residual $12,248.10
Per Mo.
Lease
PPP r Per
LLea
*
Model #FB2F5DEW 140-hp (SAE Net), 1.8 Liter, 16 Valve, SOHC i-VTEC

4 Cylinder Engine 5 Speed Automatic Transmission Air


Conditioning with Air Filtration System i-MID with 5 inch LCD Screen and Customizable Feature Settings Rear View Camera with Guide-
lines Bluetooth

HandsFreeLink
3
SMS Text Message Function
4
Power Windows and Door Locks Vehicle Stability Assist
TM
(VSA

) with
Traction Control Anti-Lock Braking System (ABS) Cruise Control Illuminated Steering Wheel Mounted Cruise, Audio, Phone and i-MID
Controls 160-Watt AM/FM/CD Audio System with 4 Speakers Pandora

Internet Radio Compatibility


5
Bluetooth

Streaming Audio
3

USB Audio Interface


6
MP3/Auxiliary Input Jack Exterior Temperature Indicator Security System with Remote Entry and Trunk Release
$0 DOWN
PAYMENT
Per Mo.
Lease
*Lease 36 Months through AHFC $0 Down Payment
Per Mo. Per Mo.
LLease
* **
$0 DOWN
PAYMENT
MPG
22 City
30 HWY
****Lease 36 Months through AHFC. $0 Down Payment.
1st payment, tax, and tags due at delivery. Residual $15,920.00
Model #RM4H3DEW
185-hp (SAE Net), 2.4-Liter,
16-Valve, DOHC i-VTEC

4-Cylinder
Engine Automatic Transmission
Real Time AWD with Intelligent
Control System
TM
Vehicle Stability
AssistTM (VSA

) with Traction
Control Multi-Angle Rearview
Camera with Guidelines
Bluetooth

HandsFreeLink
USB Audio Interface
Remote Entry System
160-Watt AM/FM/CD Audio
System with 4 Speakers
Pandora

Radio Compatibility
Bluetooth

Streaming Audio
Per Mo.
Lease
$0 DOWN
PAYMENT
**Lease 36 Months through AHFC $0 Down Payment
Per Mo. Per Mo.
LLease
* ***
$0 DOWN
PAYMENT
MATT BURNE Honda PRE-OWNED CENTER
Open Monday - Thursday 9-9
Friday & Saturday 9-5
1110 Wyoming Ave,
Scranton, PA
1-800-NEXT-Honda
570-341-1400
MATT BURNE Honda
MATT BURNE Honda MATT BURNE Honda
09 PILOT LX Cherry, 77K ....................................NOW $17,950
08 PILOT EX Gray, 48K ......................................NOW $18,950
11 PILOT EXL Red, 44K .....................................NOW $26,750
08 PILOT EX Silver, 43K .....................................NOW $19,500
12 PILOT LX Silver, 24K......................................NOW $26,500
11 PILOT EX Black, 36K.....................................NOW $24,950
11 PILOT EX Gray, 23K......................................NOW $27,500
11 PILOT EXL-DVD Gray,23K............................NOW $28,950
11 CRV LX Gray, 28K..........................................NOW $19,950
11 CRV EX Silver, 29K.........................................NOW $20,950
11 CRV EXL Red, 13K ........................................NOW $24,500
10 CRV EXL Red, 43K ........................................NOW $20,950
11 CRV EX Black, 37K.........................................NOW $21,500
11 CRV SE titanium, 31K....................................NOW $19,950
11 CRV SE Gray, 26K.........................................NOW $20,500
11 CRV EXL Black, 17K................ ......................NOW$23,950
11 CRV EXL Titanium, 16K.................................NOW $24,500
11 ODYSSEY EXL Black, 36K ...............................NOW $20,500
10 ODYSSEY EX Navy, 32K..................................NOW $25,000
09 ACCORD EX SDN Red, 53K ...........................NOW $16,500
10 ACCORD EX CPE 5SP Red, 15K.....................NOW $16,500
12 ACCORD LX SDN Black, 21K .........................NOW $18,500
10 ACCORD EX SDNNavy, 30K...........................NOW $18,300
10 ACCORD EXL V6 SDN Gray, 30K ...................NOW $19,500
10 ACCORD LX SDN Silver, 19K .........................NOW $17,250
10 ACCORD EXL V6 Diamond, 21K......................NOW $19,500
10 ACCORD LXP SDN Gray, 44K........................NOW $15,950
10 ACCORD LXP SDN Black, 35K......................NOW $16,950
10 ACCORD EXL V6 SDN Silver, 21K..................NOW $19,500
10 CIVIC LX SDN Lt Blue, 32K ............................NOW $14,750
10 CIVIC LXS SDN White, 46K............................NOW $14,500
10 CIVIC EX CPE Black, 42K ...............................NOW $14,500
11 CIVIC EX CPE Red, 20K.................................NOW $15,250
12 CIVIC LX CPE Black, 12K...............................NOW $16,500
10 CIVIC EX SDN Black, 24K...............................NOW $15,750
12 CIVIC EX CPE Gray, 24K ................................NOW $16,950
09 CIVIC LX5 SDN Gray, 50K.............................NOW $13,950
12 CIVIC LX SDN Black, 6K................................NOW $17,950
10 CIVIC LX CPE Black, 46K...............................NOW $13,950
10 CIVIC LX SDN Lt Blue, 20K ............................NOW $15,750
11 CIVIC LX SDN Silver, 25K ..............................NOW $15,950
10 CIVIC EX SDN Navy, 30K ..............................NOW $15,950
10 FIT SPORT Navy, 74K.................................NOW $13,500
ACCORDS
Call: 1-800-NEXTHonda ViewPrices at www.mattburnehonda.com
PILOT 4WD
CRV 4WD
ODYSSEY
CIVICS
FITS
$6,950
04 TOYOTA COROLLAS SDN
AS TRADED
Gray, 132K
$9,999
05 CHRYSLER PACIFICA AWD
NOW
Silver 87k
$11,488
06 HONDA CIVIC LX SEDAN
NOW
Gray, 86K,
Was $11,950
$22,500
NOW
08 MERCEDES C300 AWD SEDAN
Black, 45k
$11,500
NOW
04 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER AWD
Silver, 85K,
Was $13,500
$19,250
NOW
07 HONDA PILOT EX4-DVD 4WD
Burgandy, 58K,
Was $19,750
$11,950
08 PONTIAC G6 SE SDN
NOW
White, 52K
$6,950
06 FORD 500 SE SDN
NOW
Red, 101K
$10,500
NOW
07 HONDA CIVIC LX SDN
Gray, 97K,
Was $10,450
NOW
$10,500
04 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT 4WD
Navy, 73K,
Was $10,950
NOW
$8,950
08 SUZUKI FORENZA SDN
Red, 19K
NOW
$16,950
12 KIA SOUL
Gray, 7K
NOW
$16,500
08 MAZDA CX AWD
Red, 39K
NOW
$17,500
06 CHEVY SILERADO
CREWCAB 4WD 1500
Navy, 62K,
NOW
$12,500
09 HYUNDAI ELANTRA GLS SDN
Black, 39K,
NOW
$15,750
12 NISSAN SENTRA SL
White, 14K,
NOW
$16,950
07 FORD EDGE AWD
Cream, 54K,
NOW
$26,500
10 NISSAN PATHFINDER SL 4WD
Red, 42K,
$15,950
NOW
07 HONDA ODYSSEY EXL-DVD
Silver, 76K,
Was $16,950
$35,750
NOW
12 ACURA MDX AWD
Gray, 14K,
Was $36,500
$15,950
NOW
10 FORD FUSION SE SEDAN
Black, 9K,
Was $16,950
$19,970
NOW
12 HONDA CRZ HYBRID
Under 1000 Miles,
Was $21,135
BUSINESS IS BOOMING
WERE BANGING OUT DEALS AND OUR CARS WILL BRING A SPARKLE TO YOUR EYE!
HONDA ACCORD SEDAN
06 EXL Silver, 107K $10,950
07 SE Silver, 96K $11,500
07 EX Carbon, 27K $15,500
06 CHEVROLET CRUZE 4WD
05 Gray, 55K $14,500
06 Gray, 78K $14,500
TOYOTA CAMRY LE
11 Green, 9K $16,950
12 Gray, 25K $16,950
$7,950
05 HYUNDAI ELANTRA GLS SDN
Silver, 68K
NOW
YOUR
NICE
TRADE
HERE!
K
PAGE 16E Sunday, July 7, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied including Off Lease Rebate. **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $645 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 6/30/13.
$
20, 999
$
20, 999
$
20, 999
$
189
$
189
24
Mos.
Lease
For
3 NEW 2 3 FORD ESCAPE 2 3
WAS. . . . . . . . . . . . $23, 660
FORD REBATE........................... 1,500
FORD BONUS REBATE.................. 500
OFF LEASE REBATE..................... 500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP. . . . . . 161
OO
VV
EE
R R 100
100 100
TO TO
CHOOSE CHOOSE
FROM FROM
2.5L Engine, Auto., Remote Keyless Entry, PL,
CD, PW, 17 Steel Wheels, SYNC, Cruise Control,
Advance Trac w/ Roll Stability Control, Personal
Safety Sys., 6 Speakers
$
20, 499
$
20, 499
$
20, 499
WAS. . . . . . . . . $22, 695
FORD REBATE................................... 1,500
FORD CREDIT REBATE......................... 500
OFF LEASE REBATE............................. 500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP.............. 196
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied including Off Lease Rebate. **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 7/31/13.
24
Mos.
$
189
$
189
$
15, 299
$
15, 299
$
15, 299
. . . . . . $17, 185
FORD REBATE......................................750
OFF LEASE REBATE............................ 500
FORD CREDIT REBATE........................ 500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP. ............. 136
Automatic, Air, Pwr. Mirrors,
Advance Trac w/Electronic
Stability Control, SYNC, Side
Curtains, Sirius Satellite, Pwr.
Locks, Tilt Wheel, CD, Cruise
Control, Remote Keyless Entry
Lease For
24
Mos.
$
119
$
119
2013 NEW
2013
FORD FIESTA SE
2013
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied including off lease rebate. **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $645 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Saleends 7/31/13.
2.5L Engine, Auto., CD, 16 Steel Wheels, Tilt Wheel, PDL, PW, Safety
Pkg., Side Impact Air Bags, 1st & 2nd Row Air Curtains,
Anti-Theft Sys.,
Message Center,
Cruise Control,
Keyless Entry, SYNC,
Auto. Headlamps
SUPPORT
SUPPORT SUPPORT
YOUR
YOUR YOUR
COUNTRY
COUNTRY COUNTRY
COCCIA
COCCIA COCCIA
HAVE YOU
HAVE YOU HAVE YOU
DRIVEN A
DRIVEN A DRIVEN A
Patrick Yearing
Salesperson
1 Yr. at Coccia
Steve Mizenko
Service Manager
17 Yrs. at Coccia
Rudy Podest
Parts & Service
Director
29 Yrs. at Coccia
Pat McGinty
Parts Manager
22 Yrs. at Coccia
Barry Williams
Finance Manager
26 Yrs. at Coccia
George Geiges
Service Manager
26 Yrs. with Ford
Greg Martin
General Manager
23 Yrs. at Coccia
US MARINES
Joe Bobo Nocera
Used Car Manager
27 Yrs. at Coccia
US NAVY
Abdul Alsaigh
Sales Manager
6 Yrs. at Coccia
Terry Joyce
Sales Manager
36 Yrs. at Coccia
Tom Washington
Sales Manager
16 Yrs. with Ford
Jim Bufalino
Salesperson
20 Yrs. at Coccia
US AIR FORCE
Toni Grasso
Salesperson
10 Yrs. at Coccia
Marcus Ossowski
Salesperson
3 Yr. at Coccia
Frank Vieira
Internet Specialist
3 Yrs. at Coccia
US ARMY US ARMY
Victor DeAnthony
Salesperson
6 Yrs. at Coccia
Kevin Uren
Salesperson
3 Yrs. at Coccia
Ginny Kutzer
Salesperson
22 Yrs. at Coccia
US AIR FORCE
Mike Hallock
Salesperson
2 Yrs. at Coccia
Jim Arscott
Salesperson
1 Yr. at Coccia
Len Gierszal
Finance Manager
2 Yrs. at Coccia
Jason Kilduff
Body Shop Manager
2 Yrs. at Coccia
LATELY?
LATELY? LATELY?
40
40 40
M MM
P PP
G GG
2013 NEW
2013
FORD FUSION
2013
37
37 37
M MM
P PP
G GG
WAS. . . . . . . . . . . . $20, 185
FORD REBATE........................... 1,750
OFF LEASE REBATE..................... 500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP. . . . . . 736
2013 NEW 2013 2013
FORD FOCUS
$$
$
129
$
129
24
Mos.
Lease
For
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied including off lease rebate. **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $645 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 6/30/13.
Auto., Air, PL, PW, Tilt Wheel, Side Air Curtains,
Airbags, CD, Remote Keyless Entry, Anti-Theft
Sys., Rear Defroster
40 40
MPG MPG
WAS. . . . . . . . . . . . $25, 995
FORD REBATE.............................. 750
OFF LEASE REBATE..................... 500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP. . . . . . 246
$
24, 499
$
24, 499
$
24, 499
$
239
$
239
24
Mos.
Lease
For
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied including off lease rebate. **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $645 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 6/30/13.
HYBRID, Auto., Speed Control, Dual Zone Auto., Temp Control,
17 Alum. Wheels, CD, Keyless Entry, Rear Spoiler, Electronic
Traction Control, 1st & 2nd Row
Air Curtains
OO
VV
EE
R R7
7 7
TO TO
CHOOSE CHOOSE
FROM FROM
2013 ALL NEW 2013 FORD 2013
HYBRID
C-MAX HYBRID HYBRID
47 47
MPG MPG
35
35 35
TO C M TO CHOOSE FROM
OVER OVER
100
100 100
TO CHOOSE FROM TO CHOOSE FROM
OVER OVER
Lease For
WAS. . . . . . . . . . . . $29, 595
FORD REBATE........................... 2,500
FORD CREDIT REBATE.............. 1,000
FORD BONUS REBATE............... 1,000
OFF LEASE REBATE..................... 500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP. . . 1,346
$
23 499
$
23 499
$
23 499
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied including Off Lease Rebate. **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 6/30/13.
$
249
$
249
24
Lease
For
3 NEW 2 FORD 2
TAU SEL
Auto., 3.5L V6, SYNC, CD, Keyless
Entry with Keypad, PW, PDL, 18
Alum. Wheels, Anti-Theft Perimeter
Alarm, Sirius Satellite Radio, Dual
Climate Control, Remote Start
0
%
0
%
0
%
60 60 60
M
O
S.
A
P
R
PLUS
$
2000
$
2000
$
2000
33 33
MPG MPG
OO
VV
EE
R R 30
30 30
TO TO
CHOOSE CHOOSE
FROM FROM
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied including Off Lease Rebate. **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $645 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 6/30/13.
13 NEW 3 FORD EDGE 3
WAS. . . . . . . . . . . . $29, 795
FORD REBATE........................... 1,500
FORD BONUS REBATE............... 2,000
OFF LEASE REBATE..................... 500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP. . . . . . 796
$
24,999
$
24,999
$
24,999
$
199
$
199
24
Mos.
Lease
For
Pwr. Windows, PDL, Air, Advance Trac
w/Roll Stability Control, Remote Keyless
Entry w/Keypad, MyFord, Convenience
Group, CD, Auto. Headlamps,
Reverse Sensing Sys.
0
%
0
%
0
%
0
2000 2000 2000
OO
VV
EE
RR 20
20 20
TO TO
CHOOSE CHOOSE
FROM FROM
30 30
MPG MPG
0
00
0
0 60
M
O
S.
APR
PLUS
0
0 500
0
%
0
%
0
%
0 0 60
M
O
S.
APR
PLUS
500 0 500
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied including Off Lease Rebate. Sale ends 6/30/13.
$
25, 999
$
25, 999
$
25, 999
2013 NEW 2013 FORD F-150 2013
REGULAR CAB 4X4
COCCIA
COCCIA COCCIA
FORD
LINCOLN
CALL NOW 823-8888 CALL NOW 823-8888
SATURDAY SERVICE HOURS 7 A.M.-1 P.M. SATURDAY SERVICE HOURS 7 A.M.-1 P.M. SATURDAY SERVICE HOURS 7 A.M.-1 P.M.
Overlooking Mohegan Sun Overlooking Mohegan Sun
577 East Main St., Plains 577 East Main St., Plains
Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B
CREDIT HOTLINE CREDIT HOTLINE CREDIT HOTLINE
1-800-817-FORD 1-800-817-FORD 1-800-817-FORD
ASK FOR BARRY OR LEN ASK FOR BARRY OR LEN ASK FOR BARRY OR LEN
WAS. . . . . . . . . . . . $27, 715
FORD REBATE........................... 1,500
FORD BONUS REBATE.................. 500
OFF LEASE REBATE..................... 500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP. . . . . . 916
2013 NEW 2013 FORD 2013
ESCAPE SE AWD
$
24,299
$
24,299
$
24,299
eel Drive eel Drive, SE,1.6 EcoBoost Engine, PL, SYNC.
Auto., Keyless Entry w/Keypad, Auto. Headlamps,
17 Alloy Wheels, Sirius Satellite Radio,
Perimeter Alarm, PW, Tonneau Cover
$
199
$
199
24
Mos.
Lease
For
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied including Off Lease Rebate. **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $645 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 6/30/13.
OO
VV
EE
R R 100
100 100
TO TO
CHOOSE CHOOSE
FROM FROM
33 33
MPG MPG
00
PLUS
WAS. . . . . . . . . . . . $27, 995
FORD REBATE.............................. 500
OFF LEASE REBATE..................... 500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP. . . . . . 496
2013 ALL NEW 2013 FORD 2013
FUSION HYBRID
$
25, 995
$
25, 995
$
25, 995
$
279
$
279
24
Mos.
Lease
For
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied including Off Lease Rebate. **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 6/30/13.
2.0L HYBRID Engine, Auto. Headlamps, CD,
17 Alum. Wheels, Tilt, Safety Pkg., Side Impact Air Bags,
1st & 2nd Air Curtains, Anti-Theft Sys., Sirius Satellite Radio,
Keyless Entry with Keypad, Pwr. Drivers Seat, SYNC
47 47
MPG MPG
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied including Off Lease Rebate. **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $645 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 6/30/13.
WAS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $36, 060
FORD REBATE................................... 2,500
FORD CREDIT REBATE...................... 1,000
OFF LEASE REBATE............................. 500
FORD 5.0 LITER REBATE................... 1,500
FORD REGIONAL DISCOUNT OFF MSRP. . 1,250
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP. ........... 1,311
2013 NEW 2013 FORD F-150 2013
SUPERCAB STX 4X4
$
27, 999
$
27, 999
$
27, 999
$
249
$
249
24
Mos.
Lease
For
STX, 5.0L, V6, Auto., CD, 17 Alum. Wheels,
Cloth Seat, Split Seat, Air, Decor Pkg., Cruise,
ABS, Pwr. Equipment Group
0
%
0
%
0
%
60 60 60
M
O
S.
A
P
R
1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1997, 1999, 2001, 2007, 2012
0
%
0
%
0
%
60
60 60
A
P
R
0
00
0 0 60
S.
PLUS
$$
0
%
0
%
0
%
60 60 60
M
O
S.
APR
PLUS
$
750
$
750
$
750
Power Windows, Power Door Locks, Cruise
Control, Decor Group, Sync, 40/20/40 Cloth Seats
WAS. . . . . . . . . . . . $31, 715
FORD REBATE........................... 2,000
FORD CREDIT REBATE.............. 1,000
OFF TRADE-IN REBATE................. 750
OFF LEASE REBATE..................... 500
FORD REGIONAL DISCOUNT .......... 750
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP. . . . . . 716
John Kuna
Salesperson
Patrick Plastow
Salesperson
2 Yrs. at Coccia
Rob Doran
Salesperson
OO
VV
EE
R R 10
10 10
TO TO
CHOOSE CHOOSE
FROM FROM
OO
VV
EE
R R 80
80 80
TO TO
CHOOSE CHOOSE
FROM FROM
OO
VV
EE
R R 80
80 80
TO TO
CHOOSE CHOOSE
FROM FROM
1000
1,000
1,000
1,316
746
$
23,499
$
23,499
$
25,495
$
25,495
$
23,999
$
23,999
$
20,499
$
20,499
33
MPG
ALL NEW
SUPE
0
%
0
%
0
%
60 60 60
M
O
S.
A
P
R
$
219
FORD CREDIT REBATE........................ 500
FORD CREDIT REBATE........................ 500
FORD BONUS REBATE.
1,000
500
250
136
500
1,000
500
196
FORDREBATE...................................1000
FORD BONUS REBATE...................1000
FORD CREDIT REBATE...................500
OFF LEASE REBATE.....................500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP.......736
139
$
16,499
FORD REBATE...................................500
FORD BONUS REBATE...................1000
FORD CREDIT REBATE.............,....1000
OFF LEASE REBATE.....................500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP.......161
80
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied including Off Lease Rebate. **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $645 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 5/31/13.
WAS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32, 155
FORD REBATE................................... 2,000
OFF LEASE REBATE............................. 500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP. ............. 656
2 NEW 2 FORD 2
EXPL RER 4X4
$
28 999
$
28 999
$
28 999
$
269
$
269
24
Mos.
Lease
For
All Wheel Drive, 3.5L Engine, MyFord
Display, PM, Auto. Climate,17 Steel Wheels,
CD, Keyless Entry, 3rd Row Seat,
MyKey, Cruise Control, PW
23 23
MPG MPG
OO
VV
E E
R R 10
10 10
TO TO
CHOOSE CHOOSE
FROM FROM
0
%
0
%
0
%
60 60 60
M
O
S.
A
P
R
299
$
30,999
FORDREBATE...................................1000
OFF LEASE REBATE.....................500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP.......486
985
80
FORD REBATE...................................500
FORD BONUS REBATE...................1000
FORD CREDIT REBATE..................1000
OFF LEASE REBATE.....................500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP.......1216
FORDREBATE...................................1000
FORD LEASE REBATE.....................500
FORD CREDIT REBATE...................500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP.......496
FORDREBATE...................................1500
FORD BONUS REBATE...................1250
FORD CREDIT REBATE...................500
OFF LEASE REBATE.....................500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP.......1046
60
FORDREBATE...................................1000
FORD BONUS REBATE...................1000
FORD CREDIT REBATE..................1000
OFF TRADE-IN REBATE.....................750
OFF LEASE REBATE.............................500
FORD REGIONAL DISCOUNT...........750
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP.......716
60
69
FORD REBATE.............................................1500
FORD CREDIT REBATE.............................1000
OFF LEASE REBATE.................................500
FORD 5.0 LITER REBATE................................1500
FORD REGIONAL DISCOUNT OFF MSRP 1250
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP...................1311
0.9
$
1000
1.9
$
1500
1.9
$
1500
1.9
$
2000
1.9
$
2000
0
$
1750
7/31/13.
7/31/13.
7/31/13.
7/31/13.
7/31/13. 7/31/13.
7/31/13. 7/31/13. 7/31/13.
40
FORDREBATE...................................1000
FORD BONUS REBATE...................250
OFF LEASE REBATE.....................500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP.......736
FORD REBATE...................................500
OFF CREDIT REBATE......................500
FORD BONUS REBATE...................1000
OFF LEASE REBATE.....................500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP.......196
2014
2014
K
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Sunday, July 7, 2013 PAGE 17E
timesleader.com
SAVE MORE
MONEY
WELL HELP YOU
To subscribe, call 829-5000.
In a matter of weeks, you can
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K
PAGE 18E Sunday, July 7, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
B
O
N
U
S
C
A
S
H
HOLIDAY
BONUS CASH
up to
$1000
on select models
THRU MONDAY
JULY8
th
ONLY
$1000
NISSAN HOLIDAY
BONUS CASH
$500 NISSAN HOLIDAY
BONUS
CASH
$750 NISSAN HOLIDAY
BONUS
CASH
JULY 4TH BONUS EXTENDED
SAVE
$5,750
OFF MSRP ON EVERY NISSAN
ROGUE IN STOCK ONLY!
SAVE
$4,500
OFF MSRP ON ALL NISSAN
ALTIMA 2.5 OR 3.5S, SVS
OR SLS IN STOCK ONLY
SAVE
$8,000
OR MORE ON ALL NEW
2013 NISSAN MAXIMAS
IN STOCK ONLY!
SAVE
$5,000
OFF MSRP ON ALL
2013 NISSAN PLATINUM
PATHFINDERS
SAVE
$2,000
ON ALL NEW
2013 NISSAN SENTRAS
IN STOCK ONLY!
SAVE
$10,000
OFF MSRP ON
A FULLY EQUIPPED
2012 NISSAN MURANO LE!
KEN POLLOCK NISSAN
KEN POLLOCK
NISSAN
1-866-704-0672
229MUNDYSTREET
WILKES-BARRE, PA.
www. kenpollocknissan. com
The #1 Nissan Dealer in N.E. PA**
239
STK# N23062
MODEL# 22213
VIN# 613526
MSRP $25,470
10 AVAILABLE
AT THIS PRICE!
BUY FOR
$
19,720
*$239 per month
K
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Sunday, July 7, 2013 PAGE 19E
339 HIGHWAY 315, PITTSTON, PA 1-800-223-1111
*ALL PRICES PLUS TAX, TAGS, & FEES. ART WORK FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY. DEALER NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. 3 YEAR / 100,000 MILE LIMITED POWERTRAIN WARRANTY ON 2008
MODELS AND NEWER WITH LESS THAN 75,000 MILES. 90 DAY / 3,000 MILE LIMITED POWERTRAIN WARRANTY ON 2004 MODELS AND NEWER WITH LESS THAN 100,000 MILES. **2007 MODELS 72 MONTHS @ 4.69%; 2008
MODELS 72 MONTHS @ 3.94%; 2009 MODELS 72 MONTHS @ 3.14%; 2010/2011 MODELS 72 MONTHS @ 2.89%; 2012/2013 MODELS 72 MONTHS @ 2.64%. ALL RATES BASED ON APPROVED TIER 1 CREDIT. ALL PAYMENTS
INCLUDES TAX, TAGS, AND FEES AND $2,000 CASH DOWN OR TRADE. SALE ENDS 7/12/2013.
www.KenPollockCertifed.com
PLATINUM CERTIFIED HIGHLINE VALUE VEHICLE OUTLET
$
24,999* OR
$
369/MO**
2011 LEXUS CT 200H WAGON
HYBRID! LEATHER, NAVIGATION, SUNROOF,
STOCK # P14965
$
29,999* OR
$
449/MO**
2012 MERCEDES C300
4MATIC SEDAN
SPORT PACKAGE, NAVIGATION, POWER
SEAT, LOW MILES, STOCK # P15076
$
25,999* OR
$
389/MO**
2010 AUDI A4 QUATTRO SEDAN
ALL WHEEL DRIVE, MOON ROOF, LEATHER, ALLOYS,
STOCK # V1046A
$
33,999* OR
$
518/MO**
2011 VOLVO XC90 AWD
HEATED LEATHER, MOONROOF, 1-OWNER, POWER
SEATS, STOCK # P15067
$
27,899* OR
$
418/MO**
2012 INFINITI G37X AWD
HEATED LEATHER, BACK UP CAMERA, MOON
ROOF, 1-OWNER, STOCK # P15109
$
39,999* OR
$
609/MO**
2012 CADILLAC SRX AWD SUV
HEATED LEATHER, MOON ROOF, CHROME
PACKAGE, 1-OWNER, STOCK # P15163
$
6,799*
2004 CHEVROLET MALIBU SEDAN
AUTOMATIC, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS,
STOCK # P15008A
$
8,999*
2006 SCION XB WAGON
POWER WINDOWS & LOCKS, CD, ALLOYS,
STOCK # V1080B
$
7,999*
2005 CHEVROLET TAHOE 4X4
3RD ROW SEATING, AUTOMATIC, ALLOYS, PW, PL,
STOCK # P15151A
$
9,499*
2004 MITSUBISHI OUTLANDER AWD
ALLOYS, MOON ROOF, PW, PL STOCK # P15600
$
8,899*
2008 CHEVROLET COBALT COUPE
A/C, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, LOW MILES,
STOCK # V1072B
$
9,599*
2009 CHEVROLET COBALT COUPE
A/C, POWER WINDOWS AND LOCKS, LOW MILES,
STOCK # P15200
$
11,999* OR
$
164/MO**
2011 CHEVROLET
HHR
LT PACKAGE, POWER WINDOWS &
LOCKS, STOCK # P15045
$
12,799* OR
$
174/MO**
2012 TOYOTA YARIS
SEDAN
POWER WINDOWS & LOCKS, AUTO-
MATIC, A/C, STOCK # P15056
$
12,999* OR
$
181/MO**
2012 NISSAN
SENTRA S SEDAN
AUTOMATIC, POWER WINDOWS &
LOCKS, CD, 1-OWNER, STOCK # P15011
$
14,399* OR
$
197/MO*
2012 CHEVROLET
IMPALA SEDAN
BUCKET SEATS, KEYLESS ENTRY,
1-OWNER, STOCK # P15117
$
14,499* OR
$
199/MO**
2012 DODGE
AVENGER SXT SEDAN
CHROME WHEELS, AUTOMATIC, PW,
PL, 1-OWNER, STOCK # P15094
$
14,999* OR
$
209/MO**
2012 TOYOTA
COROLLA SEDAN
LE PACKAGE, AUTOMATIC, PW, PL,
1-OWNER, STOCK # P15096
$
14,999* OR
$
219/MO**
2008 JEEP LIBERTY
SPORT 4X4
ALLOY WHEELS, AUTOMATIC, POWER
WINDOWS & LOCKS, STOCK # P14925A
$
14,999* OR
$
213/MO*
2010 TOYOTA
CAMRY LE SEDAN
ALLOYS, POWER WINDOWS & LOCKS,
LOW MILES, STOCK # P15124
$
15,299* OR
$
212/MO**
2012 HYUNDAI
SONATA
POWER WINDOWS & LOCKS, 1-OWN-
ER, CRUISE, CD, STOCK # P15033
$
15,499* OR
$
219/MO**
2009 HYUNDAI
AZERA SEDAN
LEATHER, MOONROOF, ALLOYS,
POWER SEAT, STOCK # P15137
$
15,799* OR
$
224/MO**
2012 HONDA CIVIC
SEDAN
LX PACKAGE, AUTOMATIC, POWER WIN-
DOWS & LOCKS, CRUISE, STOCK # P15119
$
15,999* OR
$
228/MO**
2012 VOLKSWAGEN
PASSAT SEDAN
AUTOMATIC, POWER WINDOWS &
LOCKS, CD, 1-OWNER, STOCK # P15102
$
16,499* OR
$
242/MO**
2008 HONDA
CR-V 4WD
EX PACKAGE, MOON ROOF, ALLOYS,
CD, STOCK # P15135
$
16,999* OR
$
246/MO**
2011 MITSUBISHI
ENDEAVORS AWDS
AUTOMATIC, POWER WINDOWS &
LOCKS, 1-OWNERS, STOCK # P15052
$
17,999* OR
$
269/MO**
2008 CHEVROLET
EQUINOXLTZ AWD
HEATED LEATHER, MOON ROOF, CHROME
PACKAGE, 1-OWNER, STOCK # V1020A
$
17,999* OR
$
261/MO**
2012 DODGE
GRAND CARAVAN
SXT PACKAGE, ALLOYS, 1-OWNER,
BUCKET SEATS, STOCK # P15095
$
18,299* OR
$
267/MO**
2012 CHRYSLER 200
CONVERTIBLE
ALLOY WHEELS, AUTOMATIC, 4 CYLIN-
DER, 1-OWNER, STOCK # P15106
$
18,999* OR
$
275/MO**
2012 HONDA
ACCORD SE SEDAN
HEATED LEATHER, ALLOY WHEELS, AU-
TOMATIC, PW, PL, STOCK # P15036
$
19,799* OR
$
289/MO**
2011 VOLKSWAGEN
JETTA DIESEL SEDAN
MOON ROOF, LEATHER, AUTOMATIC,
ALLOYS, DIESEL, STOCK # P15161
$
19,999* OR
$
292/MO**
2012 NISSAN
ROGUE AWD
SV PACKAGE, REARVIEW CAMERA,
ALLOYS, 1-OWNER, STOCK # P15021
$
20,699* OR
$
299/MO**
2011 NISSAN
ROGUE SL AWD
NAVIGATION, LEATHER, SUNROOF,
REAR CAMERA, STOCK # P14996
2010 JEEP
WRANGLER 2DR 4X4
HARDTOP, AUTOMATIC, ALLOY WHEEL,
PW, PL, STOCK # P15108
$
21,999* OR
$
323/MO**
$
20,999* OR
$
306/MO**
2011 HONDA
CRV SE AWD
SPECIAL EDITION, ALLOY WHEELS, LOW
MILES! ALL WHEEL DRIVE, STOCK # P15103
2011 CHEVROLET
CAMARO COUPE
LT PACKAGE, MOON ROOF, AUTOMAT-
IC, ONLY 11K MILES, STOCK # P15146
$
24,999* OR
$
385/MO**
$
23,799* OR
$
353/MO**
2009 GMC ACADIA
AWD SUVSLT
PACKAGE, HEATED LEATHER, MOON
ROOF, 3RD ROW, STOCK # P15153
$
28,899* OR
$
433/MO**
2012 DODGE RAM
QUAD CAB 4X4
5.7L HEMI V8, ALLOYS, SPORT PACK-
AGE, STOCK # P15107
$
32,999* OR
$
499/MO**
2010 DODGE RAM
2500 CREW CAB 4X4
6.7L CUMMINS DIESEL, AUTOMATIC,
LEATHER, MOON ROOF, STOCK # P15020A
3 Year/100,000 Mile Warranty
125-Point Inspection Full Service Dealership Body
Shop Parts Accessories Service Sales
PLATINUM
CERTIFIED:
A Higher Standard Of Pre-Owned Vehicle
SPEND LESS AND GET MORE...
2010 SUZUKI SX4
SPORTBACK 5DR
AUTOMATIC, POWER WINDOWS &
LOCKS, CD, STOCK # P15065A
Kelley Blue Book Retail: $13,796*
OUR PRICE
2009 HONDA ACCORD
EX-L SEDAN
LEATHER, MOON ROOF, V6,
ALLOYS, AUTO, STOCK # V1070A
Kelley Blue Book Retail: $17,387*
OUR PRICE
2007 VOLVO
S80 SEDAN
HEATED LEATHER, REAR PARK
ASSIST, MOON ROOF, STOCK # P15086
Kelley Blue Book Retail: $17,328*
OUR PRICE
2010 FORD
EDGE SUV AWD
POWER WINDOWS & LOCKS, ALLOYS, ALL
WHEEL DRIVE, STOCK # P15125
Kelley Blue Book Retail: $22,321*
OUR PRICE
The Right VehicleFor You And Your Budget!
$
15,999*OR
$
235MO**SAVE $1,529*
$
10,999*OR
$
152MO**SAVE $2,797*
$
13,999*OR
$
196MO**SAVE $3,388*
$
20,499*OR
$
299MO**SAVE $1,822*
80010203
1.54% Financing With Millions To Lend and
FREE On All Vehicles
K
PAGE 20E Sunday, July 7, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
timesleader.com
WELL HELP YOU
MOVE
THAT
STUFF
CALL TODAY
800-273-7130
OR VISIT US ONLINE AT
TIMESLEADER.COM 24/7
PLACE YOUR
GARAGE
SALE AD
$
15
1, 2, OR 3 DAYS
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STARTING AT JUST
Package includes:
Sales Kit
Garage Sale Signs
AFREE unsold merchandisead
Your sale mapped FREE on
timesleader.com
and on our mobile app
PLUS FREE BREAKFAST
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Autos For Sale
ACME AUTO
SALES
343-1959
1009 Penn Ave
Scranton 18509
Across from Scranton Prep
GOOD CREDIT, BAD CREDIT,
NO CREDIT
Call Our Auto Credit
Hot Line to get
Pre-approved for a Car Loan!
800-825-1609
www.acmecarsales.net
AUTOS
11 AUDI S5 Convertible, Sprint
blue, black / brown leather
interior, navigation, 7 spd auto
turbo, AWD
08 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX blue,
auto, V6
07 BUICK LUCERNE CXL silver,
grey leather
06 VW JETTA GLS blue, auto,
sunroof
06 DODGE STRATUS SXT black,
auto 4 cyl
06 HYUNDAI SONATA GLS grey,
auto, 4 cyl
05 CHEVY MONTE CARLO LS
gold
05 INFINITI GX3 AWD grey, black,
leather, sunroof
05 CHEVY MONTE CARLO LT
white V6
05 AUDI 16 All Road. Green
2 tone, leather AWD
05 VW JETTA GLS grey, black
leather, sunroof, alloys
03 SUZUKI AERO Silver, 5 speed
02 VW BEETLE GLS lime green
5 speed, 4 cylinder
73 PORSCHE 914 green & black,
5 speed, 62k miles.
SUVS, VANS, TRUCKS, 4 X4s
08 FORD ESCAPE XLT blue, tan
leather, sunroof, 4x4
8 JEEP PATRIOT SPORT black,
4 cylinder, 5 speed 4x4
08 FORD EDGE SE white V6 AWD
07 DODGE CARAVAN SXT green,
4 door, 7 passenger mini van
06 DODGE DURANGO SLT grey,
3rd seat, 4x4
06 NISSAN MURANO SE
white AWD
06 MERCURY MARINER silver,
V6, AWD
06 JEEP COMMANDER LTD blue,
grey, 3rd seat, leather 4x4
06 PONTIAC TURANT red, grey
leather AWD
06 HONDA PILOT EX silver, 3rd
seat, 4x4
06 CHEVY 1500 SILVERADO REG
CAB truck red, 4x4
06 NISSAN EXTERA black, V6,
4x4
06 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE
LAREDO gold, V6 4x4
06 DODGE RAM 1500 QUAD CAB
Black, V8, 4x4 truck
06 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER LS
silver, 4x4
05 DODGE DURANGO SXT blue,
3rd seat 4x4
05 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER white,
V6, 4x4
05 CHEVY COLORADO CLUB
CAB grey 4x4 truck
05 CHRYSLER TOWN &
COUNTRY TOURING blue,
7 passenger mini van
05 FORD ESCAPE XLT Red,
V6 4x4
05 KIA SORRENTO LX silver,
V6 AWD
05 TOYOTA SIENNA LE gold,
7 passenger mini van
05 HYUNDAI TUSCON LX green
auto, AWD
04 CHEVY AVALANCHE LT
green, grey leather, 4 door
4x4 truck
03 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LTD
grey black leather sunroof 4x4
03 DODGE RAM 1500 SLT QUAD
CAB white & grey, 4x4 truck
03 FORD EXPEDITION XLT silver,
3rd seat, 4x4
03 NISSAN PATHFINDER black
V6 4x4
03 MITSUBISHI OUTLANDER XLX
red, V6, 4x4
02 MERCURY MOUNTAINEER
PREMIER black, tan leather
3rd row seat AWD
00 FORD F150 XLT SUPERCAB
blue, V8, 4x4 truck
01 FORD ESCAPE XLT red,
4 door, 4x4
01 DODGE DAKOTA CLUB CAB
SPORT blue, V6, 4x4 truck
99 FORD F 150 SUPER CAB
silver 4x4 truck
97 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LTD
4x4
CADILLAC '02
SEDAN DEVILLE
Black, all power, new brakes &
calipers, fully equipped. Excel-
lent interior, good body. Must
Be Seen to Be Appreciated!
$3,700, OBO. 570-287-8151
CHRYSLER 09
TOWN AND COUNTRY LX
Silver. Options include, dual
power sliding doors, DVD sys-
tem, Sirius satellite radio, MP3
single disc. Back up camera,
quad seating with table. Great
for trips. New plugs & wires &
front brakes. Serious inquiries
only $11,200, negotiable. Call
or text 570-574-6799.
TOYOTA ' 07 CAMRY
62,000 miles, one owner, well
equipped, security with glass
breakage, mags, dark grey
metallic, well maintained. Be-
low BB/NADA. $12,995, OBO.
570-472-3566
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS!
CA$H PAID
570-301-3602
Auto Classic /Antiques
PONTIAC`78
TRANS AM
Red on white, T-Tops, 400/500,
AOD, 3:42 Posi, Nitrous, Classic,
Modified Stock, show and go. 5k on
drivetrain. Excellent condition, in
and out, New paint.
570-443-7757
Miscellaneous
LIKE
NEW
Used Tires &
Batteries
for $20
& Up
VITOS
&
GINOS
949 Wyoming
Ave. Forty Fort
288-8995
Motorcycles
'96 Harley
Davidson
1200 Sportster, 27,000 miles,
$3500
570-655-2923
Harley Davidson
'05 Soft Tail Classic
Stage 4 Screaming Eagle Kit
7,000 miles. $9,650.
570-417-1542
HARLEY DAVIDSON 06'
1200 Custom Sportster
7,900 miles, excellent condi-
tion. Special seat and Chrome
accessories. $7,900.
570-510-8828
KAWASAKI '10
VILCAN 900
PRICE REDUCED!!!
Blue. Extremely low miles -
under 250 miles! Very lightly
used. Must sell. Asking
$5500. Call Ed at
570-814-9922
Trucks / SUVs / Vans
'03 CHEVY
Silverado. 2500 heavy duty.
extended cab. 6.0 liter engine,
loaded, auto. 51,900. Runs
like new. $14,500.
570-362-0823/570-655-2020
OLDS '99
BRAVADA
New parts.
Needs some body work.
$3,400.
(570)760-2791
1518 8th Street, Carverton, PA
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
DODGE '06 DAKOTA
CLUB CAB
6 speed. EXTRA SHARP!
$4995. 570-696-4377
1518 8th Street, Carverton.
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
GMC ENVOY 03
4X4, 3rd row Seat, SHARP
SUV!
$5,995. 570-696-4377
FORD '03 F350 XL
SUPER DUTY
DUMP TRUCK
Diesel, (330 HP, 560 pounds
of torque) auto tranny 4 door,
85,000 miles, 10 ft dump, all
wheel disk brakes, class 3
hitch, trailer brake controller,
new tires & new state inspec-
tion. cold air conditioning.Ex-
tra nice condition with no leaks
anywhere. $15,900 drives this
beauty home! 570-817-2952
1518 8th Street, Carverton, PA
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
FORD 00
WINDSTAR SEL
Leather, LIKE NEW! $3,495.
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis. Slocum St. Park
FORD 04 ESCAPE
4x4 1 Owner. Extra Sharp
SUV! $4,995.
CALL FOR DETAILS
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street, Carverton, PA
Near Francis. Slocum St. Park
FORD '04
EXPLORER XLT
Sunroof, 3rd row seat.
BARGAIN PRICE $4,995
Call for details
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
GMC 04 SIERRA
4x4
Ladder rack, tool box, ONE
OWNER. Bargain Price!
$4,995. 570-696-4377
JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE
Laredo 2005
82,000 miles, Well maintained,
excellent condition. Beige in
color, $12,500. 570-654-7451
or 570-466-4669
Kia Sorento EX 05' Gray
4WD 4 door SUV. 99,400
miles. Clean title. Very good
condition. Excellent running
and handling. V6. Automatic.
Loaded with extras. $7,500.
Full details at your request.
570-793-3686
Trucks / SUVs / Vans
LEXUS '05 RX330
AWD, blue
grey/black leather,
moon roof, 90 k.
Warranty.
$15,995
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
TOYOTA '06
HIGHLANDER
V6, AWD, silver/grey cloth,
98k, moon roof.
Extended Warranty
$12,995
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
JEEP '11
LIBERTY SPORT
4x4, silver/grey
cloth, 36k,
4 new tires.
Factory Warranty
$15,995
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
CADILLAC "07
SRX
AWD, pearl red/tan leather,
panoramic moon roof, 69k.
Warranty
$16,895
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
CADILLAC '07 SRX
AWD, pearl red/tan leather,
panoramic moon roof, 69k.
Warranty
$16,895
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
HONDAS
ACCORD '12 LX
Grey/grey cloth. Only 9k
miles. Factory Warranty.
Reduced Price
$17,995
ACCORD '10 LX
Maroon/tan cloth.
Only 15k miles.
Price Reduced
$15,495
CIVIC '09 LX-S
Grey/suede leather interior,
alloy wheels, 46k miles.
Warranty
$12,495
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
MAZDA TRIBUTE, 2008
4 Cyl i nder, 4 Wheel Dri ve,
Deep Red with new brakes,
battery and tires. Just detailed,
excellent condition. 46,000
miles. $12,000. 570-510-8828
Auto Parts
Vito &
Ginos
LIKE NEW
USED
TIRES &
BATTERIES
$20 & uP
570-288-8995
Forty Fort
Auto Services
$ WANTED JUNK $
VEHICLES
LISPI TOWING
We pick up
570-822-0995
WANTED
Cars & Full Size Trucks.
For prices...
Lamoreaux Auto Parts 477-2562
Air Conditioners
AIR CONDITIONERS, (1) Fri-
gidaire, 5450 BTU, $75. (1) LG
8000 BTU, $100. (1) Whirlpool
11,000, BTU, $150.
570-693-1454
Arts /Crafts /Hobbies
Barbie Dolls
(2) Anniversary (with gowns)
$20.00
570-825-2494
Antiques & Collectibles
$ Antiques
Buying $
Old Toys, model kits,
Bikes, dolls, guns,
Mining Items, trains
& Musical Instruments,
Hess. 474-9544
COKE TRAYS (2) $40.00
CAMEL CIGARETTE TRAYS
(2) $20.00
570-825-2494
K
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Sunday, July 7, 2013 PAGE 21E
AMERICAS NEW CAR ALTERNATIVE
290 MUNDY STREET, WILKES-BARRE AT THE WYOMING VALLEY MALL CALL 301-CARS
80006684
HURRY,
SALE
ENDS
THIS
WEEKEND!
BUY
NATIONWIDE
AND
SAVE
THOUSANDS!
CHECK OUT OUR FULL INVENTORY
nationwidecarsales.net
Monday-Friday 9am-8pm Saturday 9am-5pm
CHECK
THIS
OUT
2012 NISSAN
VERSA S
#19346, Only 3 Left At This Price
13,688 OR
$
205
*
PER MO.
2012 FORD FOCUS
SEL
2012 HYUNDAI
SANTA FE
PER MO.
$25,511 OR
$399***
2009 CHEVY AVALANCHE LTZ
2007 JEEP COMMANDER
$224
*****
PER MO.
or $13,896
2011 HYUNDAI ELANTRA GLS
PER MO.
$14,633 OR
$220*
#19295
2012 VOLKSWAGEN JETTA
PER MO.
$14,990 OR
$224*
#19351, 14 To Choose From
2012 JEEP LIBERTY
PER MO.
$18,864 OR
$283*
#19391
2012 MAZDA 6
PER MO.
$14,713 OR
$221*
#19424
2012 HYUNDAI SONATA GLS
PER MO.
$16,560 OR
$248*
#19297, 6 To Choose From
2012 FORD ESCAPE 4X4
PER MO.
$18,560 OR
$279**
#19423
2012 HONDA ACCORD
PER MO.
$17,386 OR
$261*
#19389
2012 TOYOTA COROLLA LE
PER MO.
$14,970 OR
$224*
#19324, Only 3 Left At This Price
2012 TOYOTA CAMRY LE
PER MO.
$16,425 OR
$246*
#19359, 4 To Choose From
2012 NISSAN VERSA S
PER MO.
$13,688 OR
$205*
#19346, Only 3 Left At This Price
2012 FORD FOCUS SEL
PER MO.
$14,983 OR $226*
4 To Choose From #19383
STARTING AT
PER MO.
$8,745 OR
$138**
#19265A
2008 Chrysler Sebring
PER MO.
$14,365 OR
$225***
#19213A
2009 VOLVO S40
2011 DODGE DAKOTA
QUAD CAB BIG HORN
PER MO.
$19,985 OR
$299
#19435A
*TAX &TAGS ADDITIONAL. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. ASK SALESPERSON FOR DETAILS OF PROGRAMS. FINANCE RATE SUBJECT TO APPROVAL.
* 2011-12, 2.49%for 72 mos ** 2010, 3.49%for 72 mos *** 2009, 3.99%for 72 mos ****2008, 4.24%for 72 mos *****2007, 4.99%for 72 mos
******2006, 5.99%for 60 mos *******2004, 5.99%for 60 mos ******2003, 5.99%for 60 mos ********2002, 5.99%for 60 mos
2012 KIA OPTIMA
PER MO.
$17,955 OR
$269*
2012 NISSAN ROGUE
PER MO.
$17,995 OR
$270*
#19370
2012 NISSAN ALTIMA S
PER MO.
$14,985 OR
$225*
#19269
2012 CHEVY IMPALA LT
PER MO.
$14,888 OR
$223*
#19272, Moonroof!
2012 NISSAN SENTRA S
PER MO.
$13,996 OR
$209*
#19301, 5 To Choose From
2002 CHRYSLER SEBRING
#19200A
$6,636 OR
$129********
PER MO.
Exclusively at Nationwide Car Sales
If you are dissatised with your purchase
or change your mind for any reason,
bring your vehicle back within 48 hours
or 200 miles and in the same condition
and receive a FULL REFUND.
PER MO.
$23,595 OR
$353
#19450
2012 CHEVY EQUINOX LTZ
#19448
PER MO.
$28,690 OR
$429*
2013 FORD EXPLORER 4x4
2013 FORD MUSTANG CONV
PER MO.
$21,389 OR
$320*
#19454
PER MO.
$11,988 OR
$179*
#19453
2011 HYUNDAI ACCENT
2013 KIA SPORTAGE AWD
PER MO.
$21,149 OR
$316*
#19443
PER MO.
$17,788 OR
$266
#19452
2012 NISSAN ROGUE AWD
PER MO.
$19,860 OR
$297*
#19449 4 to Choose From
2012 TOYOTA RAV 4 4x4
PER MO.
$14,699 OR
$279*****
#19317
2006 JEEP WRANGLER 4x4
V
E
H
I
C
L
E
S
F
O
R
E
V
E
R
Y
B
U
D
G
E
T
!
K
PAGE 22E Sunday, July 7, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
CALL 800-273-7130
OR VISIT TIMESLEADER.COM 24/7 TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD
PLACE YOUR
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timesleader.com
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1, 2, OR 3 DAYS
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Package includes:
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Your sale mapped FREE on
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and on our mobile app
CALL AN
E
X
P
E
R
T
To place an ad call
829-7130
Air Conditioning & Heating
STRISH A/C
Ductless / Central Air Conditioning
Free Estimates
Licensed & Insured
570-332-0715
Appliances
A.R.T.
APPLIANCE
REPAIR
We service all major
brands.
570-639-3001
Building & Remodeling
1ST. QUALITY
CONSTRUCTION
CO.
Roofing, siding, gutters, insulation,
decks, additions, windows, doors,
masonry & concrete.
Insured & Bonded.
Senior Citizens Discount!
State Lic. # PA057320
570-606-8438
ALL OLDER HOMES SPECIALIST
825-4268.
Remodel / Repair.
Kitchens and Baths
www.davejohnson
remodeling.com
Bathrooms/Kitchens
Carpentry A/Z 570-819-0681
Shedlarski
Construction
Home Improvement Specialist
Licensed, insured & PA registered.
Kitchens, baths, vinyl siding &
railings,replacement
windows & doors,
additions, garages, all phases of
home renovations. Free Estimates
570-287-4067
Chimney Service
A-1 ABLE CHIMNEY
Rebuild & Repair Chimneys. All
types of Masonry.
Liners Installed,
Brick & Block,
Roofs & Gutters.
Licensed & Insured
570-735-2257
Chimney Service
CHIMNEY
REPAIRS
Parging. Stucco. Stainless Liners.
Cleanings. Custom Sheet
Metal Shop. 570-383-0644
1-800-943-1515
Call Now!
Cleaning & Maintenance
CONNIE'S CLEANING
15 Years Experience
Bonded & Insured
Residential Cleaning
Gift Certificates Available
570-430-3743
Connie does the cleaning!
LIGHT TO MEDIUM
HOUSECLEANING
for Greater Pittston/Plains
area. Reasonable rates.
Contact Julie 570-655-5009
Concrete & Masonry
A STEP-UP MASONRY
PA094695
Specializing in All Types of
Masonry. Stone, Concrete
Licensed & Insured Free
Estimates Senior Discount
570-702-3225
AAAAAAHH!!!
Why Scream?! Call
UNLIMITED!
MASONRY CONCRETE
CONTRACTORS
call today for your Free Estimate!
570-582-4719
D. PUGH CONCRETE
All phases of masonry &
concrete. Small jobs welcome.
Senior discount. Free est.
Licensed & Insured
288-1701/655-3505
KENS MASONRY
All phases of brick/block,
chimney restoration.
570-204-8601
L & A
CONCRETE
WORKS
Why Live With
Ugly Concrete?
Try Concrete
Resurfacing,
Stamped or Stenciled
Overlays
Licensed & Insured
PA088910
570-840-0803
Concrete & Masonry
WYOMING VALLEY
MASONRY
Concrete, stucco,
foundations, pavers, retaining wall
systems, flagstone, brick work,
chimneys repaired. Senior Citizens
Discount
570-287-4144
or 570-760-0551
Construction & Building
GARAGE
DOOR
Sales, service, installation
and repair.
FULLY INSURED
HIC# 065008
CALL JOE
570-735-8551
Cell 606-7489
Electrical
RNI ELECTRIC, LLC
Licensed & Insured
Retired Veteran
Panel upgrades.
New & old work.
25 Years Experience
570-814-8979
SLEBODA ELECTRIC
Master electrician
Licensed & Insured
Service Changes & Replacements.
Generator Installs.
868-4469
Fencing
ACTION FENCE
SPRING SALE:
Discounts on wood, vinyl,
chain link, aluminum and more!
Call today for a
FREE ESTIMATE!
570-602-0432
Gutter Repair & Cleaning
GUTTER CLEANING
Window Cleaning
Pressure Washing.
Insured. 570-288-6794
Handyman
Evan's Home
Improvement
Lending a hand since 1975.
All types of remodeling
projects!
570-824-6871
Hauling & Trucking
AA CLEANING
A1 Always hauling, cleaning
attics, cellar, garage, one piece
or whole Estate, also available
10 & 20 yard dumpsters. 655-
0695 592-1813 or 287-8302
Hauling & Trucking
A CLEAN
HOUSE IS
A HAPPY
HOUSE!
All KINDS of
HAULING &
JUNK
REMOVAL
SUMMER
CLEAN UP!
TREE/SHRUB REMOVAL
DEMOLITION
ESTATE CLEANOUT
Free Estimates 24 hour service
Small and large jobs!
570-823-1811 570-239-0484
A.S.A.P Hauling
Estate Cleanouts,
Attics, Cellars,
Garages, were cheaper than
dumpsters!.
Free Estimates,
Same Day!
570-855-4588
A.S.A.P HAULING
Estate Cleanouts, Attics,
Cellars, Garages, were
cheaper than dumpsters!.
Free Estimates, Same Day!
570-855-4588
AAA CLEANING
A1 General Hauling
Cleaning attics, cellars, garages,
Demolitions, Roofing & Tree Re-
moval. Free Est. 779-0918 or 542-
5821; 814-8299
ALWAYS READY
HAULING
Property & Estate Cleanups,
Attics, Cellars,
Yards, Garages,
Construction Sites, Flood
Damage & More.
Cheaper Than a Dumpster!!
Same Day Service
Free Estimates
570-301-3754
BOB & RAY'S HAULING
We Haul Everything!
Cheap, fast, clean &
respectful. Keep Smiling
Free Estimates.
570-655-7458
570-604-5224
Mikes $5-Up
Hauling Junk & Trash from Houses,
Garages, Yards, Etc
826-1883 472-4321
Hauling & Trucking
HAULING &
TRUCKING
Commercial &
Residential
Vitos &
Ginos
570-574-1275
Landscaping
Foltz Landscaping
Skid-Steer
Mini Excavating New Landscapes/
Lawns. Retaining walls/patios.
Call: 570-760-4814
PA Landscaping &
Lawn Service Inc.
Lawn Cutting
Shrub Trimming, Mulching
Landscaping Services
25+ Years Exp.
570-287-4780
palandscaping@verizon.net
TOUGH BRUSH
& TALL GRASS
Mowing, edging, mulching, shrubs
& hedge shaping. Tree pruning.
Garden tilling. Spring Clean Ups.
Leaf removal. Weekly
& bi-weekly lawn care.
Fully Insured
Free Estimates
570-829-3261
Mold Remediation
WATER DAMAGE
Restoration, Mold Testing and
Remediation
Service with Integrity
TEEM Environmental
Services, Inc.
Old Forge, Pa.
570-457-1894 or 457-6164
PA#085152
Painting & Wallpaper
A & N PAINTING
SUMMER SPECIAL
$100 + materials for average size
room. 18 years experience
Exterior Painting,
Power washing, Deck Staining.
570-820-7832
MARTY'S PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Top Quality Work
570-468-9079
Painting & Wallpaper
ATTENTION
Serra Painting
Book Now For
Summer & Save. All Work
Guaranteed Satisfaction.
30 Yrs. Experience
Powerwash & Paint
Vinyl, Wood, Stucco
Aluminum.
Free Estimates
You Cant Lose!
570-822-3943
Back Mountain
Painting
Over 30 Years Experience
570-675-1719
DAVE
WITKOSKY
PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Free estimates,
30 years experience
570-826-1719
or 570-704-8530
JACOBOSKY
PAINTING
Need a new look, or just want to
freshen up your home or business?
Let us splash your int./ext. walls
with some vibrant colors!
Reasonable prices with hard
workers. FREE ESTIMATES!
570-328-5083
M. PARALIS PAINTING
Int/ Ext. painting, Power
washing. Professional work at
affordable rates. Free
estimates. 570-288-0733
Paving & Excavating
EDWARD'S ALL
COUNTY
PAVING
*DRIVEWAYS
*PARKING LOTS
*ROADWAYS
*HOT TAR & CHIP
*SEAL COATING
Licensed and
Insured. Call Today
For Your
Free Estimate
570-474-6329
Lic.# PA021520
Roofng & Siding
BEST PRICE METAL
ROOF INSTALLATION
& OLD BARN
RESTORATION
LIC. & INS. 570-675-2430
CORNERSTONE
CONSTRUCTION
Roofing Siding Carpentry
40 yrs. experience
Licensed & Insured
PA026102
Call Dan: 570-881-1131
J.R.V. Roofing
570-824-6381
Roof Repairs & New Roofs.
Shingle, Slate, Hot Built Up,
Rubber, Gutters & Chimney
Repairs. Year Round. Li-
censed/Insured
FREE Estimates
*24 Hour Emergency Calls*
Jim Harden
570-288-6709
New Roofs & Repairs, Shingles,
Rubber, Slate, Gutters,
Chimney Repairs.
Credit Cards Accepted
FREE ESTIMATES!
Licensed-Insured
EMERGENCIES
SPRING ROOFING
McManus
Construction
Licensed, Insured. Everyday Low
Prices. 3,000
satisfied customers.
570-735-0846
Tree Service
APEX TREE AND EARTH
Tree Removal, Pruning, Stump
Grinding, Hazard Tree
Removal, Grading, Drainage,
Lot Clearing.Insured.
Reasonable Rates
apextreeandearth.com
Serving Wyoming Valley,
Back Mountain &
Surrounding Areas.
570-550-4535
Be Inspired!
Read The Times Leader's "AT HOME"
section every Saturday for ideas.
Dig
Up
Buried
Treasure
In
Classified
When it
comes to
bargains,
C marks
the spot.
What will
you find
in the
classified?
Bicycle,
dogs, coats,
cars, etc.
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Sunday, July 7, 2013 PAGE 23E
Antiques & Collectibles
KETTCAR GO-KART
Adjustable seat, made in
Germany. Good condi ti on.
570-603-7415
Appliances
COOKER, Waterless and Alu-
minum, by kitchen Craft. 16
Qt., Good Condition. $10.
570-735-6638
Clothing
MEN'S SUIT, Beige, Summer
Suit, Haggar. Jacket size 46,
pants size 38. Excellent Condi-
tion. $20. 570-288-0060
Furniture & Accessories
HEAD BOARD, for king size
bed. Good condition. $50.
570-288-0060
PATIO FURNITURE, 4 piece
wicker, like new. Used for 1
year. Includes cushions and
covers, plus round glass table
with 7.5 ft. umbrella. $300.
570-740-7446
ROCKER, maple, cushion on
seat-back. $70. 570-735-1589
Jewelry
NECKLACE
"Journey". Gold and 8
diamonds. From Littman Jew-
elers, in the box. Priced at
$700. Selling for $250.
570-407-0865
Landscaping & Gardening
GARDEN HOSE Ames, Reel
Easy, automati cal l y wi nds.
Used twice. $22. Call after 1
p.m. 570-822-1227
LAWN MOWER, 22" cut $50.
WEED WACKER, needs
pri mer. Leave a message.
570-693-1454
Machinery & Equipment
GENERATOR
General. 5500 watts. Still in
box, never used. $475.00
570-817-8982
Medical Equipment
BRUNO STAIRLIFT 2003
Model 1550
Factory Servi ced, 12 Ft 9"
track, 2 Remote Controls, Bat-
tery Operated. $600.00 OBO
Factory Service Available.
570-825-6918
JAZZY WHEEL CHAIR, needs
a battery. $300 Or best offer.
570-829-2411
POWER WHEEL CHAIR
PERMOBIL C300
Top of the line. 5yrs old, good
condition, full tilt, adjustable
speeds, ai r cushi on seat.
Comes with tools, pump for
seat and bat t ery charger.
$3, 000, OBO.
570-824-0328.
Miscellaneous
GARAGE SALE LEFTOVER
ITEMS: MTD 14.5HP 42" cut
riding lawn tractor, new bat-
tery asking $400. BUNK BED
cot size complete, sheets $25.
M a p l e c o f f e e t a b l e
45"wx28"dx16:h $10. Solid oak
cabinet suitable for TV open-
ing 44" wx32"h, 2 drawers $25.
77 men's ties $5.
570-675-2647
ANTIFREEZE & COOLANT
(2) $5 each. 570-655-2154
ASH TRAY, Water Ford Crys-
tal, 7 ins. $130. CHINA CHER-
UBS, (2) Lefton, Hand Painted.
$35 for pair. Call any after-
noon. 570-788-0621
AVON BOTTLES, (19) in ori-
ginal boxes, some full. 1960's
to 80's. $50 for all.
570-639-1323
Miscellaneous
CAGES (2) for dogs, steel
2 2 " x 1 9 " x 2 3 " $ 2 0 . a n d
24"x30"x21", $25. Both in new
condition. 570-655-2154
CAMCORDER in carry case.
Almost new. $150.
570-675-4383
FILE CABINET, brown with
gold trim. 4 deep drawer, 27"
wide, 4 ft. high. Like new. $25.
570-654-4793
GAME original Pachinko game
from Ginza Japan 450, 3'x6'
maple top work bench with 8
drawers $400. Dewalt 12" ra-
dial arm saw in excellent con-
dition $500, Old international
time company time clock
$40. Over 100 year ol d
Banjo, excel l ent condi ti on
$100. 3 bumpers fro 1965
Corvette front left, front right,
left rear, excellent condition.
Old Dolls. Call 570-474-6977
GARAGE SALE LEFT
OVER ITEMS
RCA Black TV $35. Oklahoma
State Uni versi ty ti re cover,
brand new never used $40.
Tennessee seat cover never
used $25. Fluke multi meter
87V/E2 $175. George Forman
grill $15. 570-825-5548
GARAGE SALE LEFTOVER
ITEMS: RCA 27" TV B&W re-
mote 435. 15" black/orange
never used Oklahoma tire cov-
er, never used $25. George
Forman grill $15. Set of 20
Ocean Wor l d of Jacques
Cousteau never used books
$25. Fluke multi meter never
used 87V/E2 kit, never used
$175. 570-825-5548
GARAGE SALE LEFTOVER
ITEMS: Cherry dining room set
$750. Walnut corner cabinets
$200. Oval kitchen table, 6
chairs $100. Dresser & mirror,
8 drawers $25. Troy Bilt snow
thrower $500. Mastercraft vari-
able speed band saw $150.
570-868-5568
Miscellaneous
GARAGE SALE LEFTOVER
ITEMS: Universal tripod $10.
Classic wood display easel $5.
Computer keyboard $5. 2 Fish-
er speakers 13x36 $40. Saud-
er computer desk with hutch
$75. Leather desk chair $25. 2
sturdy platforms 4x4 & 4x6
$35. 4 men's suits 46"L $40
each. 1 men's tuxedo 46"l $40.
570-474-2067
LADDER 28' aluminum exten-
sion ladder $185. 570-287-
7684 after 5 pm
LUGGAGE, Samsonite Soft
Luggage/Wheel ed cart. (1)
Cranberry medium bag, (1)
Cranberry Garment Bag, (1)
Wheel ed cart. $50 for al l ,
Leave a message.
570-693-1454
PRINTING EQUIPMENT
FOR SALE
Closing due to Illness.
570-824-5033
PUNCH BOWL SET, Never
used, i n ori gi nal box. 18
pieces, $10. Leave a message.
570-693-1454
ROSARIES (300) $3 each.
570- 829- 2411 RECORDS
(400) LP', 78's, 45's, from the
50's, 60's 70's and 80's. $1
each. 570-829-2411
SUI T CASES, on wheel s,
American Tourister and At-
lantis. (2) black and (1) blue.
25/26". Excellent condition.
Call after 1:00 p.m. $10 Each.
570-822-1227
SWEEPER, Dirt Devil Electric
Sweeper. Turbo tool cruiser.
Self propelled, 12 AMPS. Ex-
cellent Condition. $45. Call
after 1 p.m. 570-822-1227
VCR TAPES, 45 total. $15 for
all. UMBRELLA STROLLER,
$4. SCREEN, Fine, Aluminum,
48" wide. 15' roll. $10. TIER
LIGHT, Malibu, like new. Was
$75, asking $50. 570-779-9791
Musical Instruments
CLARINET, in case, $80.
570-735-1589
GUITARS, (1) electric, 6 string,
(1) electric 4 string. $80 each.
Pools & Spas
POOL FILTER, Hayward, auto
chlorine feeder and 3/4 HP.
motor. $275 for all.
570-639-1323
Stereos /Accessories
SATELLITE RADIO, XM, (1)
Delphi SA 1001 Boombox with
remote. (1) AC Adapter (also
battery operated) (1) Delphi
Receiver. In Box. $100. Leave
a message, 570-693-1454
Tools
SKIL SAW, Craftsman, 7.5",
new in the original box. $25.
Call after 1 p.m. 570-822-1227
Toys & Games
QUAD, BARBI E, Power
Wheel s. Good condi t i on,
purple and pink in color. Three
batteries, 1 AC charger for bat-
teries. $80. Will text pictures.
570-760-5291
RIDE ON TRACTOR, Ford,
cart train driven. 23 years old,
$175. TRAIN, HO Army, set of
4. $18. 570-735-1589
Want To Buy
ANTIQUES
One item or entire contents of
homes.
Cash Paid
570-814-3371
570-328-4420
www.namewebsite.com
S
L
D
P
ic
t
u
r
e
it
Peddle your wheels for as little as
$
10
when you advertise in the Classifeds.
To place your ad, call 000-000-0000.
The Midtown Press
CLASSIFIEDS
In Print & Online
timesleader.com
CALL 800-273-7130
OR VISIT TIMESLEADER.COM 24/7 TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD
PAGE 24E Sunday, July 7, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
K
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Sunday, July 7, 2013 PAGE 25E
Monster Jobs
Customer Support / Client Care
Valley Distributing &
Storage Company
Customer Service Manager
Customer Service Representative
Requirements:
Bachelors Degree or
equivalent experience
CDS Transportation
Transportation Dispatcher
Requirements:
Bachelors Degree or
equivalent experience
Please send resume and salary
requirements to:
Karen Haller
khaller@valleydist.com
Visit our web site at www.valleydist.com
Drivers & Delivery
CORE-MARK
HERE WE GROW AGAIN!! As we continue to add NEW customers at our Pennsylvania Division,
we continue to add MORE drivers! We are a National Convenience Store
Distribution Company hosting a
JOB FAIR on Thursday 7/11/13 From 9 am until 4 pm
Show up and be interviewed!
We are looking to fill the following Full-Time Positions:
CLASS A CDL DRIVERS
DRIVER HELPERS
Competitive Salary, Generous benefit package to include
Medical/Dental/Vision/STD/LTD and 401k. Driver, new hire, $4,000 sign on bonus for Class A
Drivers. Attendance/Safety and Performance Bonus programs available. Annual and merit in-
creases. Designed Route Deliveries with great equipment and company provided uniform and
work boots. DRIVERS-Guaranteed 40 hours per week!We also have Part-Time opportunities
available for drivers, if you are looking to supplement your income
Apply @
100 West End Rd Wilkes-Barre, PA 18706
NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE SHOW UP AND BE INTERVIEWED!!
All applicants subject to pre-employment drug and background check. EOE
Drivers & Delivery
WAREHOUSE
HERE WE GROW AGAIN!! As we continue to add NEW customers at our Pennsylvania Division,
we continue to add MORE warehouse workers!
We are a National Convienance Store Distribution Company hosting
a JOB FAIR on Wednesday 7/10/13 from 10am until 12 noon
Show up and be interviewed! We still have several warehouse positions available to include:
Stocker, Cooler/Freezer and Full Case order selectors.
Previous Forklift experience a plus for all Stocker positions. All positions are Full time 40 hours
per week, with a competitive salary, generous benefit package, and various bonus programs!
Work for the Best! We Welcome College Students Looking For Summer Work!!!
Apply @
100 West End Rd.Wilkes-Barre, PA 18706
NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE. SHOW UP AND BE INTERVIEWED!!
All applicants subject to pre-employment drug and background check. EOE
Drivers & Delivery
Drivers & Delivery
2
D
ays
O
ff per
W
eek!
DRIVER HIRING EVENT
JULY 12, 6:00pm-8:30pm
JULY 13, 9:00am-5:00pm
The Host Inn
860 Kidder St. Wilkes-Barre
For Details: 866-928-7012
80010847
Customer Support / Client Care
Hire Xpectations for 2013!
At Telerx, our people are our most valuable asset because it
takes great people to make a great company. That's why we
are looking for a "higher" caliber people to join our team.
If you're a star and are looking for a new career....
Telerx is hiring!
Now Hiring
Account Representatives
No Weekends or Holidays!
JOB FAIRS!
Telerx will be conducting weekly Job Fairs every Monday,
July 1st through August 19th from 10:00am-5:00pm
Hanover Industrial Estates
600 Lasley Avenue, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18706
All qualified Account Representative applicants will receive an
on the spot interview at the Job Fairs.
Please visit our website
www.telerx.com and complete the application prior to
attending the Job Fairs. Apply to job# 2446
Start Dates: July 15th, August 5th, and August 26th
Shift: Between the hours of 9:00am-8:00pm
*Must be flexible
We offer competitive pay and great benefits.
Apply online: www.telerx.com
Questions? Contact Traci Roth: 267-942-3599
EOE
Medical/Health
EEI
d/b/a
The Meadows Nursing and Rehabilitation Center
RN CHARGE
7am-3:30pm
Full Time
w/ benefits
RNs can apply on line @
https://home.eease.com/recruit/?id=5721451
**********************
RN/LPN Relief Charge
7am-3:30pm Weekend Program
Work every Monday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday
Full Time pay w/ full time benefits!!
RNs/LPNs can apply on line @
https://home.eease.com/recruit/?id=5721621
**********************
LPN Med Tx Nurse
3pm-11:30pm
Full Time
w/ benefits
LPNs can apply on line @
https://home.eease.com/recruit/?id=346940
**********************
CNAs
2:30pm-10:30pm
Full Time/Part Time
w/ benefits
C NAs can apply on line @
https://home.eease.com/recruit/?id=296360
Individualized orientation program.
Competitive starting rates
Vacation, Holiday and Personal Days
Tuition Reimbursement
Health insurance and Pension Plan
Apply in person at: Meadows Nursing & Rehab Center
4 East Center Hill Road
Dallas PA 18612
Or
E-mail resume hr@meadowsnrc.com
e.o.e.
Help Wanted General
When was the last time you worked for the best?
Boden is a UK based clothing company that has been in business since 1991, selling
quality mens, womens and childrens clothing. We are currently hiring for our
Warehouse in Pittston, PA.
We are currently hiring for a Warehouse Team Leader and Assistant Team Leader
to work our 3:00pm-11:30pm shift.
We offer:
Competitive starting rate
Generous clothing allowance and staff discount
401(K)
Health, dental and vision insurance
Paid time off
Why not get in touch? If you have previous experience working in a warehouse, please email
your resume to recruitment@bodenusa.com or stop by and fill out an application:
Boden
180 Armstrong Road, Pittston, PA 18640
Accounting /Financial
FULL-TIME
BOOKKEEPING
POSITION
AP & AR; Bank & CC
Reconciliation;
Other related duties.
8:30-5:00 M-F.
Email resume, wage require-
ments, and letter of
experience to:
NEPAJOB@GMAIL.COM
EOE
Building / Construction / Skilled
SUBCONTRACTORS
WANTED
Can use own truck and tools,
however company truck
and tools are available.
INSTALLERS
To install Steel carports,
garages and buildings.
Training and tools provided.
Some overnight stays.
Lots Of Work, Busy Season!!
Keystone Carports
570-674-0828
Clerical
EXPERIENCED
OFFICE HELP
Must have previous
experience with general
office duties including
knowledge of word & excel.
Good customer service skills
a must. Full benefits after 90
days. Send resume to:
Box 4425 15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
Customer Support / Client Care
LUZERNE -
INSURANCE OFFICE
Busy Insurance office seeking
full time in-office sales/custom-
er service representative. Must
be pr of essi onal , peopl e
f ri endl y, and ent husi ast i c.
Property-Casualty insurance
license will be required either
before or soon after employ-
ment. Great opportunity with
g o o d s a l a r y a n d
commission/incentives. Apply
in person or send resume to
Al l st at e 572 Uni on St reet
Luzerne, PA 18709.
Ma y e ma i l r e s u me t o
sbittner@allstate.com as well.
Drivers & Delivery
CLASS A
CDL DRIVER
Owner Operators .95 cpm
plus fuel surcharge. Local driv-
ing positions out of Pittston.
845-616-1461
DRIVER
Experienced
Limousines/Sedans.
Part-time. Days/
Nights/Weekends.
Knowledge of major
airports and NYC
recommended.
570-288-5466
Drivers
CDL-A: $2,000 Sign-On, Get
Home Weekly! Dedicated Ac-
count! The Best Pay, Equip-
ment, Benefits & More! Roll
with the best @ US Xpress:
866-630-8228
OFFICE FURNITURE
INSTALLERS/
DELIVERY DRIVER
Earn up to $800
a week delivering office
furniture plus:
Home nights
No Weekends
Sign On Bonuses
CDL And Non
CDL Positions Available
Health Insurance
Paid Holidays
Send resume to
larry@edsioffice.com
or fax: 570-501-0587
Help Wanted General
Full time
Custodial Person
Hanover Area
3-11pm Mon-Fri for person
that can work in detailed area.
Must be able to work
in all facets of cleaning and
floor care. $9.25hr to start
with full time benefits after 90
days. Paid time off available.
Apply on line with Sovereign
www.sovereigncs.com
EOE and Drug Free
Workplace
PET STORE
Kennel Cleaner Mon-Sat 11-3
Apply in person
Pet Wonderland,Wilkes-Barre
Optical
Part time Monday-Friday
Machine Operator
Assembly
Final Lens Inspection
Send resume or apply in
person Mon-Fri 8:30-6pm
Luzerne Optical
180 N Wilkes Barre Blvd
Wilkes Barre, PA 18702
Part time Facility
Cleaning Associates
Wilkes Barre and Nanticoke
Area Mon-Fri with few hours
on Sat /Sunday.
Great part time job
starting at $9.25 hr.
General facility cleaning and
restroom care.
Apply on line with Sovereign
www.sovereigncs.com
EOE and Drug Free Work-
place
Installation / Maintenace / Repair
HVAC
INSTALLER
Qualified candidates must
read & interpret HVAC sys-
tem drawings, specs & sub-
mittals, as well as fabricate
& install fiberboard ductwork.
Have experience installing:
all types of commercial units,
refrigerant & gas piping,
control wiring & components.
Salary commensurate with
experience & includes full
benefit package. Please
reply with cover letter to:
Mericle Construction, Inc.
100 Baltimore Dr.
Wilkes-Barre PA 18702
hr@mericle.com
INSTALLATION
TECHS NEEDED
Take Charge of your
Earnings Potential Today!
Do you have: Wiring-Land-
scaping-Roofing-Painting-
Plumbing-HVAC or other
construction skills? We are
seeking self-motivated,
customer-service oriented
technicians to repair, install &
maintain DirecTV service for
our customers
Paid Training - Classes
Begin July 22nd!
- Company owned vehicle
issued
- 401K with immediate
vesting & match
- Comprehensive medical,
dental & vision benefits
- Discounted satellite TV
service
For Immediate
Consideration CALL
888-878-6087 or APPLY AT:
www.installsuccess.com
(Job ID: 2193)
MAINTENANCE
For housing complex Free-
land, PA. Duties: work or-
ders & turn-overs, electric,
plumbing, and janitorial
experience. $10 per hour.
Fax resume to 845-694-5216
or email: steven@
thecapitalrealty.com
Logistics/Transportation
BUS DRIVER
Part time.
Apply at: CYC
36 S. Washington St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA
570-823-6121
Button Oil & Propane is
currently looking to fill the
following positions:
-Sales Representative
Commission based, 2-3 yrs
sales experience
-Seasonal Transport
Driver
Must have Class A CDL with
Hazmat and 2 yrs. Minimum
experience
-Seasonal Home
Delivery Driver
Must have Class B CDL with
Hazmat and 2 yrs. Minimum
experience
Please apply in person or
send resume to
rb3@buttonoil.com
DRIVERS
Hazleton, PA.
Local and Regional
Runs Avail.
CDL-A, 1yr Exp. Req.
Estenson Logistics.
Apply: www.goelc.com
1-866-213-1065
K
PAGE 26E Sunday, July 7, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Production/Operations
Integrity Staffing is now hiring for
temporary warehouse positions at the
largest online retailer in the world.
Learn skills you can take with you.
Discover your true abilities.
Weekly Paychecks
Immediate Benefits
Day & Evening Schedules
EARN UP TO $13.50
PER HOUR!
NOW HIRING - IMMEDIATE OPENINGS!
Online: www.IntegrityHazletonJob30.com
In Person: 711 W. Broad Street Hazleton, PA 18201
Hours: Monday Friday 8 am 4 pm
We Offer Two Easy Ways to Apply:
1
2
Please bring HS diploma/GED and identification proving
eligibility to work in the USA when applying.
Have Fun.
Work Hard.
Stephanie
Sortation Department
Work Ha
Sales / Business Development
Classifed Advertising Salesperson
Part-time temporary position
Must have excellent customer service, communication, sales and
spellingskills, andability tospeak well on thetelephone. Eagerness
to sell will be rewarded with commission opportunity in addition to
base pay. Temporary position for 12 weeks (or different length of
time). Send cover letter and resume to hiring@timesleader.comor
to: Human Resources, The Times Leader, 15 N. Main Street, Wilkes-
Barre PA 18711.
8
0
0
0
7
3
6
9
Maintenance / Supervisory
Valmont-Newmark, the global leader in designing and manufacturing poles,
towers and structures for the utility markets, currently has an opening for a
qualified candidate for the following position.
Quality Assurance Tech, Level II NDT
Required experience includes:
Level I Ultrasonic
Level I Magnetic Particle
Strong computer and communications
Welding-
Capable of setting priorities and meeting deadlines
Associates degree preferred
AWS Certified Welding Inspector
Maintenance Electronic Technicians
Minimum 5 years experience with Electrical
(480 volt, Three-phase Power), Hydraulic, Pneumatic,
and Mechanical Systems.
Technical Degree and/or Professional Certifications preferred
Preferred on-job experience
Candidates must possess the ability to work in a self-directed environment.
Only Second shifts & Weekend shifts available
Welder / Fitters
Candidate must have at least 2-3 years of welding
Experience in MIG & Submerged Arc processes.
Blueprint reading is a requirement.
Welder trainees
Pre-requisite: Vo-Tech or Welding Training School.
For more details on Valmont Industries go to our website: www.valmont.com
Apply in person:
Valmont-NEWMARK
Valmont Industrial Park
225 Kiwanis Boulevard
West Hazleton, PA 18202
A drug-free workplace and Equal opportunity employer
Other
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
Would you like to deliver newspapers
as an Independent Contractor
under an agreement with
THE TIMES LEADER?
Call Terry to make an appointment
at 570-829-7138
KINGSTON
SWOYERSVILLE
WILKES-BARRE
LEE PARK
PLYMOUTH
WAPWALLOPEN
SWEET HUNLOCK CREEK
TRUCKSVILLE
Call Jim McCabe to make an appointment
at 570-970-7450
KINGSTON
SWOYERSVILLE
WILKES-BARRE
LEE PARK
PLYMOUTH
WAPWALLOPEN
SWEET VALLEY/
HUNLOCK CREEK
TRUCKSVILLE
LARKSVILLE
WARRIOR RUN
Logistics/Transportation
EVERY
THURSDAY
IN JULLY
from
Noon-4pm
at the
Tunkhannock
Public Library
Interested Applicants can Apply Online at www.XLCServices.com.
Interviews scheduled Monday thru Friday. Call 800-472-1013 or
walk-ins welcome at Job Fairs.
Hiring Experienced Forklift Operator/Technicians
Operate powered industrial forklift equipment with
attachments to safely perform various assignments.
***STRAIGHT DAY SHIFT OR NIGHT SHIFT
(12 hour shifts ave. 42 hours per week)
Salary commensurate with experience
MUST HAVE 1 YEAR FULL
TIME EXPERIENCE
Skills Required:
High School Diploma/GED
College education preferred
Computer Skills
Valid Drivers License
Criminal Background Check
Pass Pre-Employment Drug
Screen & Physical
*Mehoopany Location
* Benets Available *
Automotive
339 Highway 315 Pittston
New and used car dealership is now looking for an experienced
Auto body Technician for a growing dealership.
The technician should be able to perform all aspects of damaged vehicles to pre accident
condition.
- Must have minimum of 5 years experience in the industry
- Must have current drivers license
- Must have own tools
- Excellent working conditions
- Salary based on experience
- Must be dependable
- Full time position 40 plus hours per week
- Excellent benefts, medical, dental, 401K
- Immediate openings available
Apply in person or email resume mwynn@kpautogroup.com
Food Services
Part-Time Deli Positions
Now hiring Part Time Deli Clerks in all Gerritys locations.
Looking for dependable and customer oriented individuals.
Sales Commission Bonus and Employee Discount. Part time
offers flexible hours. Previous deli or food service experience
preferred, but willing to train. Apply at:
www.gerritys.com
Or apply to any Gerritys locations.
timesleader.com
WELL HELP YOU
MOVE
THAT
STUFF
CALL
800-273-7130
OR VISIT
TIMESLEADER.COM
24/7 TO PLACE YOUR
CLASSIFIED AD
PLACE YOUR
GARAGE
SALE AD
TODAY
Your
Package
includes:
Garage
Sales
Kit
Garage
Sale
Signs
FREE
Unsold
Merchandise
ad
Your
sale
location
mapped
FREE
online
and on
our
mobile
app
PLUS
a FREE
BREAKFAST
from
McDonalds.
$15
1, 2, OR 3 DAYS
8 LINES
STARTING AT
Logistics/Transportation
Experienced
Service
Coordinator
-2nd Shift- We offer top wages
and benefits package.
Call for interview and ask for
Paul or Dave: Falzone Towing
Service, Inc.
271 N. Sherman Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
570-823-2100
Medical/Health
MEDICAL ASSISTANT/LPN
Full-Time
Needed for busy physicians
group. Experience a must.
Computer experience helpful
Please respond to:
Box 4430
Wilkes-Barre,PA 18711
Medical/Health
HARROLDS PHARMACY
POSITIONS AVAILABLE:
COMPOUNDING
PHARMACIST
Compounding Experience
Required
Current PA License
Great Customer Service
Skills
Able to Work in a Fast Paced
Environment
COMPOUNDING TECH
Compounding Experience
Required
Data Entry Experience
Preferred
Great Customer Service
skills
Able to work in fast pace
environment
Submit Resume to :
Harrolds Pharmacy
179 Old River Road
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
Fax to 570-824-8730
Email to
info@
harroldspharmacy.com
Production/Operations
Select Staffing
NOW HIRING!
Production
Positions
Immediately Available!
In Pittston Area
1st shift: Mon-Thurs,
5am-3:30pm
2nd shift: Sun-Wed,
5pm-3:30am
Apply Online Today!
www.selectstaffing.com
(570) 562-3809
EOE
KMS FAB LLC
Has immediate openings for
the positions listed below.
-Assembly
-Powder Coat
-Machine Operators
-General Sheet Metal
-Press Brake
-Turret Punch
-Laser Operators
Please email your resume to:
kbrunges@kmspa.com
Or fill out an application at
KMS FAB, LLC.
100 Parry Street
Luzerne, PA 18709
E.O.E.
Project / Program Management
ASSISTANT
MANAGER
TRAINEE
3 people needed to assist
manager. Duties will include
recruiting, training & marketing.
Will train. Must be clean,
neat and professional.
Call Mr. Scott
(570) 288-4532 E.O.E
K
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Sunday, July 7, 2013 PAGE 27E
Customer Support / Client Care
We have an immediate opening for (1) Experienced
Auto Service Technician.
Starting rates $15-$22 per hour!
Must be PA licensed and have own tools.
We offer an excellent benet package.
Come join our growing company!
Apply in person or call.
All replies will be strictly condential.
Medical/Health
The Greater Hazleton Health Alliance has
the following openings:
Radiology Supervisor FT
Cat Scan Tech Casual
(Ultrasound/Vascular Certification Preferred)
Physical Therapist (Rehab) FT
Physical Therapist (Home Health) FT
Operating Room & OB RNs Casual
(experienced preferred)
Home Health RNs FT & Casual
SDU/Endo/PACU Float RN - Casual
Med/Surg/Tele./Peds RNs FT/PT
Speech & Occupational Therapists Casual
Excellent benefit package for full time employees, which in-
cludes medical, dental, vision, tuition reimbursement, STD,
LTD, Life insurance and defined contribution plan.
Candidates interested can forward their resume in
confidence to: jobs@ghha.org
Employment Applications are available for download from our
web site at www.ghha.org
timesleader.com
WELL HELP YOU
MOVE
THAT STUFF
CALL 800-273-7130
OR VISIT TIMESLEADER.COM
24/7 TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD
PLACE YOUR
GARAGE SALE AD
TODAY
Your Package includes:
Garage Sales Kit
Garage Sale Signs,
FREE Unsold Merchandise ad
Your sale location mapped FREE online and on
our mobile app
PLUS a FREE
BREAKFAST
fromMcDonalds.
$15
1, 2, OR 3 DAYS
8 LINES
STARTINGAT
Production/Operations
PRODUCTION
AEP Industries, Inc.,
manufacturer of flexible packaging films in Mountaintop hiring
NIGHT SHIFT MACHINE OPERATORS
Starting at $ 10.50/hr. PLUS .50 /hr. for night shift; 60-90
day evaluation provides increase $$ based on
YOUR performance, attendance etc.
Full-time 12 hours shifts alternating / 3 & 4 day work weeks
(overtime pay every other)
EVERY OTHER WEEKEND A MUST
As a Machine Operator you will remove, inspect, and pack
finish product to specifications with strong opportunity for
promotion. You must be able to do some heavy lifting, MUST
know how to use a tape measure and scale,
and be a TEAM PLAYER.
Previous mfg. experience preferred.
Benefit Pkg. includes:
Medical, Dental, Vision, Life Ins., Vacation, Holiday pay
Applications accepted daily @
AEP INDUSTRIES, INC.
8 a.m. until 4 p.m.
20 Elmwood Avenue
Crestwood Industrial Park
Mountaintop, PA 18707
Email: grullony@aepinc.com
EOE * A drug free workplace
Business / Strategic Management
THERAPEUTIC STAFF SUPPORT
** BEHAVIORAL SPECIALIST CONSULTANT
** CASE MANAGER POSITIONS AVAILABLE
Community agency providing mental health services to
children and their families seeks energetic, caring individuals
to provide 1-on-1 behavioral intervention in school, home and
the community. TSS requirements include: Bachelors De-
gree in Human Services or related field and experience work-
ing with children. Background in Autism a plus.
BSC requirements include: Masters Degree in Social Work,
Counseling, Psychology or related field and experience
working with children. Previous supervisory & Autism
experience helpful. Case Manager requirements include:
past experience with HMOs, excellent interpersonal &
organizational skills, prior scheduling experience, knowledge
of Microsoft Office package and basic office equipment.
Competitive salary and benefits package available.
Send resume in confidence to:
Evergreen Behavioral Intervention for Children
90 Main Street
Luzerne, PA 18709
Call: 570-714-3860
Fax: 570-714-7594
Email: rebeccas@evergreenbic.com
Sales / Business Development
In Home Sales Scranton
Wilkes Barre
$85k to 100k++ 1st yr.
Commissions advanced -
no wait. Paid Training
Paid benefits & incentives
Confirmed and
preset appointments
Exclusive BATH FITTER
Product 401K
plus profit sharing
Contact SIMEON
at 570-360-7235
RETAIL ART
MATERIAL
SALES
Mature, responsible individual
wanted Part-time for retail Art
Material Dept. Requires flex-
ible morning & afternoon week-
day hours + every Saturday.
Apply: Marquis Art & Frame
122 South Main St
Wilkes-Barre
TRAVEL
AGENT
Rapidly growing agency seeking
PT experienced travel agent.
Sabre familiarity a must.
Flexible hours.
Call Karen at:
570-714-5566
Sea The World Travel
Dig
Up
Buried
Treasure
In
Classified
When it
comes to
bargains,
C marks
the spot.
What will
you find
in the
classified?
Bicycle,
dogs, coats,
cars, etc.
K
PAGE 28E Sunday, July 7, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
timesleader.com
PLACE YOUR
GARAGE
SALE AD
CALL 800-273-7130
OR VISIT TIMESLEADER.COM 24/7 TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD
Package includes a sales kit, garage
sale signs, a FREE unsold merchandise
ad, your sale mapped FREE online and
on our mobile app.
GET RIDOF
HIS STUFF
BEFORE YOU GET RID OF HIM
WELL HELP YOU
Plus a FREE BREAKFAST
fromMcDonalds.
$15
1, 2, OR 3 DAYS
8 LINES
STARTING AT