Sponsor ed by

DOC_New_15-02-2009_L3.indd 1 2/17/09 3:47:54 PM
END PAPER_L3.indd 1 2/7/09 3:17:16 PM
ABU DHABI
Vol ume 2
- / Ê "
GVP First Page_L3.indd 3 2/3/09 5:46:43 PM
3 Best of Abu Dhabi
Building an atlas of success,
sustainability and culture
This second edition of ‘Best of Abu Dhabi’ comes at a time where rapid global change
ushers in a New Age replete with possible scenarios and myriad opportunities.
Sponsored by the National Bank of Abu Dhabi, its legacy for excellence endures,
together with organisations and entrepreneurs that are propelling the emirate’s business,
tourism and innovation spheres. ‘Best of Abu Dhabi’ aims to be a tribute to an age of
diversifed progress that sustainable growth and heightened development can cultivate
across sectors.
For emerging nation states, regions and cities, branding is more relevant than ever.
Vital for attracting allies, investment and visitors, those that fail to brand effectively get
left behind. Abu Dhabi has embraced this rationale in its key strategic planning and GVP
is playing its part in assisting governments to create strong place brands with its ‘Best
Of…’ book series that is being published in over 20 territories worldwide. This effective
positioning in turn attracts business, foreign direct investment and visitors; as well as
recruiting the best and the brightest. Through this process, Abu Dhabi can gradually begin
to wield the long term socio-political and economical infuence that it merits.
By creating sustainable infrastructure to represent a collective sum of its history, people,
culture, services, and its leadership; Abu Dhabi is honing its global image based on positive
values and perceptions in order to become itself a factor upon which to build a competitive
advantage for the good of its people.
Abu Dhabi’s remarkably sound socio-economic indicators forge a strong basis for
such promotion. Coupled with the emirate’s heightened role as a catalyst for fresh
regional synergies and global opportunities, the need to showcase stories of success
and sustainability in order to grasp a wider understanding of the enormous implications
of change, is critical. Abu Dhabi’s achievements positioned in sector-specifc chapters
represent a role model of progress for the region and the world.
These form a part of a vibrant kaleidoscope that refects the reality of the emirate today.
Be a part of it!

‘Best of Abu Dhabi’ is published by ‘Global Village Publishing’, a media house that
develops annual book series in diverse territories worldwide. Its mission is to serve as
the world’s premier platform for showcasing the world’s top brands and companies in
business, tourism and lifestyles. This is achieved through the development of the ‘Best
Of..’ book series, the GVP information portal Gvpedia and an ever expanding business
network of international partners and clients.
Regional Head Offces
= Bangalore = Brussels = Cairo = Copenhagen = Dubai = Johannesburg
= London = Santiago = Singapore = Washington DC
Chairman & International
Group Publisher
Sven Boermeester
Group Editor &
Managing Group Partner
Lisa Durante
Creative Director
Ravi Handve
Sales and Operations Director
Karl Hougaard
Photography
Riot Art
Lily Bandak
Project Managers
Sarah Appleton
Wafaa Dannoune
Selina Shiekh
Trisha Stewart
Production Manager & Accounts
Niki Wicks
Editorial Support
Joe Malsom
Nour Merza
Marlon Weir
Website
gvpedia.com
Published by
Global Village Publishing FZ LLC
Dubai Media City
United Arab Emirates
Tel: 009714 390 3957
Fax: 009714 390 8348
Email: info@gvpedia.com
ISBN # 978-1-60461-215-8
Every effort has been made to ensure the
accuracy of the information in the
‘Best of Abu Dhabi’ Vol. 2 publication. Neither
‘Best of Abu Dhabi’ nor
Global Village Publishing FZ LLC takes any
responsibility for errors or omissions.
All rights reserved
No part of this publication may be reproduced,
copied, transmitted, adapted or modifed in any
form or by any means. This publication shall
not be stored in whole or in part in any form in
any retrieval system.
3 - 4 Forword Page Cor_L3.indd 3 2/9/09 4:28:52 PM
C
o
n
t
e
n
t
s 2
Best of Abu Dhabi Pgs 11 - 58 Hotels & Hospitality Pgs 59 - 72
3 4
Tourism, Culture & Heritage Pgs 73 - 102 Luxury Lifestyles & Retail Destinations Pgs 103 - 116
5 6
Wellness, Health & Leisure Pgs 117 - 130 CSR & Green Innovation Pgs 131 - 140
7 8
Training & Education Pgs 141 - 146 Banking Pgs 147 - 158
1
04-05_1 - Content Page Cor_L3.indd 2 2/9/09 4:29:25 PM
Celebrate Success
9 10
Finance, Insurance & Security Pgs 159 - 168 Construction & Real Estate Pgs 169 - 180
11 12
Oil & Gas Pgs 181 - 188 Communication & Technology Pgs 189 - 196
13
Get up and Go Pgs 197 - 204
04-05_1 - Content Page Cor_L3.indd 3 2/9/09 4:29:40 PM
Building an At las of Success,
Sust ainability and Cult ure
Brand Image
Branding a Nation, a City and its People
GVP brands and builds the image of the world’s most exciting
economic regions to affect a change in the perception of a
nation, a city and its people by the rest of the world. This then
promotes the region in terms of its investment opportunities, key
industries, innovations, people, culture, tourism potential and
international objectives.
Product - The Books
Celebrate your success
The ‘Best of…’ publishing series produces annual maxi format
book publications in over 30 territories, from Bangalore to Belgium.
These detail success stories of people and companies making
positive inroads into the commercial fbre of both mature and
emerging markets.
The books showcase entrepreneurial spirit; establishing
powerful global networks and the creation of individual brand
awareness by bridging cultures. The result is the ultimate interactive
corporate gift and P.R. marketing tool for governments, companies,
hotels and business people providing leading products and services
for their region.
Product - The Folders
Fast track to the world
Market Essentials works closely with Foreign Embassies,
High Commissions, International Chambers of Commerce
and Trade Associations worldwide to produce high quality
trade folders. Each folder is designed to offer support and
advice to companies interested in trading with or investing in
overseas markets.
Product - www.gvpedia.com
Connecting the world’s most interesting people
and organisations
The portal provides GVP customers an interactive Public Relations
Box managed by a user friendly ‘Enterprise Content Management
System’ that allows clients to upload their press releases, photos,
videos and management profles. The latest networking add-
ons and social media applications are integrated within the site
providing maximum reach and feedback.
The value proposition for Subscribers to gvpedia.com
essentially covers four elements: exposure, expertise, exclusivity
and networking.
6 Best of Abu Dhabi
Turnover 2008 Employees & Partners Circulation International Head offces Management
US$ 8 000 000 100 500 000 Bangalore, Brussels, Cairo Sven Boermeester
Copenhagen, Dubai Lisa Durante
Johannesburg, London Charles Neil
Santiago, Singapore
Washington DC
REGIONAL HEAD OFFICES
= Bangalore = Brussels = Cairo = Copenhagen = Dubai = Johannesburg = London = Santiago = Singapore = Washington DC
6-7 GVP cor_L3.indd 2 2/9/09 4:40:57 PM
7 Best of Abu Dhabi
Sven Boermeester, Chairman with Lisa Durante, Managing Partner, GVP
Market
Promote and network the ‘red apples”
within each economy
GVP’s market sectors embrace
publishing, public relations, corporate
gifting, online community building
and networking.
Its target market covers large,
medium and small entrepreneurial
organisations enjoying growth, success
and sustainability. GVP explores every
geographic region to pick the ‘red
apples’ in business, exports, innovation,
design, fashion, retail, hospitality,
specialty foods, the arts and more.
Unique Selling Point (USP)
New markets create new business
opportunities
GVP publications promote, showcase
and network successful economies,
organisations and individuals from
across the globe. The organisation
celebrates success and provides
recognition amongst its ever
expanding international network of
infuential clients. Its online portal,
www.gvpedia.com, provides a platform
for clients and readers to network,
share best practice and grow new
markets, creating exciting new business
connections and opportunities.
Corporate Social Responsibility
There is no success without ethics
and sustainability
The best of world business, travel and
lifestyle within the Global Village is
dependent on more than monetary
proft. There is no success without core
values such as sustainability, integrity and
Corporate Social Responsibility
(CSR). GVP’s exclusive client base is
selected by invitation only based on these
criteria, with the added focus of
dedicated chapters covering CSR,
sustainability, green innovation and giving
back to the community.
Growth and Opportunity
Exchanging knowledge, skills and
economies of scale in media
With regional head offces in 5
continents, the organisation is currently
involved in more than 30 territories
where the ‘Best of’ series is published.
GVP has a 5-year growth plan to
develop a further 150 economic
territories organically, through each
continent’s regional head offce, and
through partnerships with companies
and individuals that have the expertise
to showcase their city, state or country.
Turnover 2008 Employees & Partners Circulation International Head offces Management
US$ 8 000 000 100 500 000 Bangalore, Brussels, Cairo Sven Boermeester
Copenhagen, Dubai Lisa Durante
Johannesburg, London Charles Neil
Santiago, Singapore Leon Swartz
Washington DC
GLOBALVILLAGE
PARTNERSHIPS
www.GVPedia.com
With its mission to serve as the
premier platform for showcasing
and networking the world’s top
brands and companies in business,
tourism and lifestyle, Global Village
Partnerships (GVP) is building an
atlas of success, sustainability and
culture. This is carried out through
the ‘Best of’ book series, the Global
Village online information portal
and the development of an ever
expanding business network of
international partners and clients.
REGIONAL HEAD OFFICES
= Bangalore = Brussels = Cairo = Copenhagen = Dubai = Johannesburg = London = Santiago = Singapore = Washington DC
6-7 GVP_L3.indd 3 2/4/09 4:28:53 AM
Image Courtesy - Space Imaging
08-09_ MAP_L3.indd 2 2/3/09 5:31:09 PM
08-09_ MAP_L3.indd 3 2/3/09 5:31:23 PM
Chapter 1 Best of Abu Dhabi
10-11_ Best of Abu Dhabi_L3.indd 2 2/3/09 5:37:48 PM
“What fruits and welfare we have reaped
throughout the past years, make us more certain and confident
about the capacity of our people to carry
the strategies and plans to their intended goals and objectives.”
Saadiyat Cultural District
“What fruits and welfare we have reaped
throughout the past years, make us more certain and confident
about the capacity of our people to carry
the strategies and plans to their intended goals and objectives.”
H.H. Sheikh Khalifa bin Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan,
President of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and Ruler of Abu Dhabi
Untitled-5 1 2/3/09 5:33:08 PM
10-11_ Best of Abu Dhabi_L3.indd 3 2/3/09 5:38:04 PM
Abu Dhabi’s oil
resources make it
the richest and most
powerful of the seven
emirates.
In 1969, Sheikh Khalifa was
nominated as the Crown
Prince of Abu Dhabi, this being
followed by his appointment
as the Head of the Abu Dhabi
Department of Defence.
Sheikh Khalifa was appointed,
in 1974, as the frst Chairman of
the Abu Dhabi Executive
Council, which replaced the
Emirate’s Cabinet.
Mubadala Development
Company, established in
2002, is the main investment
vehicle for the Abu Dhabi
Government to achieve
social and economic benefts.
Fathers of the nation
The UAE ended the frst chapter of its history with the death of its much loved founding father and
President, Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan, in November 2004. Ruling Abu Dhabi since 1966, he
guided the unifcation of the seven emirates into a federation established in 1971. His son, Sheikh
Khalifa bin Zayed, Abu Dhabi’s Crown Prince since 1969, took over the reigns of power after his
father’s demise. Sheikh Khalifa bin Zayed has brought a fresh wave of transformation and development
to the UAE. Together with his charismatic brother, Crown Prince General Sheikh Mohammed bin
Zayed Al Nahyan, Deputy Supreme Commander of the UAE Armed Forces, the royal team espouse
sustainability and measured socio economic development, fostering global alliances in line with the
UAE’s increasing stature. Together they inherit the leadership of one of the world’s richest and most
vitally strategic countries, which embraces heritage and progress in a seamless united federation
representing a prosperous and safe haven in an otherwise geo-politically vulnerable region.
B
e
s
t

o
f

A
b
u

D
h
a
b
i
12 Best of Abu Dhabi 13 Best of Abu Dhabi
H
is Highness Sheikh Khalifa bin Zayed Al Nahyan, Ruler of Abu
Dhabi, was elected as the new President of the UAE in 2005, to
succeed his father, the late President, His Highness Sheikh Zayed bin
Sultan Al Nahyan.
Committed to continue in the footsteps of his charismatic father, a task
that he has set himself for nearly 30 years since he frst became Crown
Prince of Abu Dhabi in 1969, he explains, “My father is my teacher. I
learn something from him every day, follow his path and absorb from him
his values, and the need for patience and
prudence in all things.”
HH Sheikh Khalifa was born in the
inland oasis-city of Al Ain in 1948, where
he went to school, learning the values
of respect for the environment and for
traditional heritage. In 1966, following his
father’s assumption of the post of Ruler of
Abu Dhabi, Sheikh Khalifa was appointed
as Ruler’s Representative in the Eastern
Region of Abu Dhabi and as Head of the
Courts Department in Al Ain. In a region
traditionally underscored by instability and
hardship, and was undergoing a radical
paradigm shift towards an era of exalted
wealth and demographic change, he
successfully managed the oil rush which
propelled socioeconomic expansion on an
unprecedented scale. Through his wise
stewardship, HH Sheikh Khalifa reinforced
the period of prosperity, peace and growth
which refects his rule today.
In 1969, Sheikh Khalifa was nominated
as the Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi,
this being followed by his appointment as the Head of the Abu Dhabi
Department of Defence, in which post he oversaw the building up of
the Abu Dhabi Defence Force, (ADDF), which later became the nucleus
of the UAE Armed Forces. In 1971, as part of the restructuring of the
Government of the Emirate, Sheikh Khalifa was appointed as Prime
Minister of Abu Dhabi and Minister of Defence and Finance. In 1973,
Sheikh Khalifa assumed the post of Deputy Prime Minister in the second
UAE Federal Cabinet.
Shortly afterwards, when the Cabinet of Abu Dhabi Emirate was
dissolved, as part of the process of strengthening the institutions of
the UAE federation, Sheikh Khalifa was appointed, in 1974, as the
frst Chairman of the Abu Dhabi Executive Council, which replaced
the Emirate’s Cabinet. Under his direction, and in accordance with
the instructions of HH Sheikh Zayed,
the Executive Council oversaw the
implementation of a wide-ranging
development programme in Abu
Dhabi, including the construction of
housing, water supplies and other
essential services, roads and the general
infrastructure that led to the emergence of
the city of Abu Dhabi as the modern city
that it is today.
Known for the benevolence that
mirrored that of his father - of particular
importance in terms of ensuring that
citizens were able to beneft from the
country’s increasing wealth - Sheikh Khalifa
established the Abu Dhabi Department of
Social Services and Commercial Buildings
in 1981. Charged with the provision of
loans to citizens for construction, over
Dh 35 billion have so far been lent by this
Department, with over 6000 multi-story
buildings being constructed throughout
the Emirate. The establishment of the
Department, popularly known as the
‘Khalifa Committee,’ followed another decision taken by Sheikh Khalifa
in 1979 to alleviate the burden on citizens of the repayment of loans from
the commercial banks. This involved a fxing of the interest rate payable
by citizens of loans for construction at 0.5 per cent, with the balance of
the interest being charged by the banks being paid by Government.
Sheikh Khalifa bin Zayed, President of the UAE, Ruler of Abu Dhabi
“The future of the country is contingent on our ability to
manage our national resources with wisdom and keenness on
the interests of the future.”
12 13
12-17_Nahyan Profile Cor_L3.indd 2 2/9/09 4:56:17 PM
A further step to ensure that
citizens were able to build the
properties that they needed, both
for residential and for investment
purposes, came with Sheikh
Khalifa’s creation of the Private
Loans Authority, early in 1991.
Soon after, 11,034 citizens had
already received loans amounting
to AED 11.15 billion.
The continuing growth of the
population, and rising costs, led
to a further step in 2000, when
Sheikh Khalifa instructed that
the total amount of individual
house-building loans should be
raised from AED 900,000 to AED
1.2 million. President HH Sheikh
Khalifa has also been involved
extensively in other areas of the
country’s development. In 1976,
following the unifcation of the
armed forces of the Emirates,
Sheikh Khalifa was nominated as
Deputy Supreme Commander
of the UAE Armed Forces. In
this capacity, he devoted much
attention to the building up of the
country’s defensive capability,
through the establishment of many
military training institutions and
through the procurement
of the latest military equipment
and training. He has moved
forward with the United Arab
Emirates’ keenness to ensure
that its armed forces are on
par with developments in the
military sphere elsewhere in
the world, with a focus on
planning, weaponry and
training so that UAE troops
can attain the maximum
effciency possible.
Sheikh Khalifa has held a
number of other top posts in the
Abu Dhabi Government. Since the
late 1980s, for example, he has
been Chairman of the Supreme
Petroleum Council, in which
capacity he has also sought to
ensure that the country diversifes
its economy away from reliance
on oil and gas production. In
particular, he has worked to
develop the UAE’s downstream
petrochemicals and industrial
complex at Ruwais. He is also
Chairman of the Abu Dhabi Fund
for Development, (ADFD),
which overseas the country’s
overseas aid programme, from
which over 40 countries
have now benefted; the Abu
Dhabi Investment Authority,
(ADIA), which manages the
fnancial reserves and investment;
12 Best of Abu Dhabi 13 Best of Abu Dhabi
As the eldest son, Sheikh Khalifa always enjoyed a close relationship with his father and ultimate mentor, Sheikh Zayed.
and the Environmental Research
and Wildlife Development
Agency, (ERWDA).
Upholding the belief that
with unity comes strength,
externally, Sheikh Khalifa is a
staunch supporter of developing
heightened synergies between
the six-member Gulf Co-operation
Council (GCC), believing that the
success and achievements of
this body “refect the depth of
understanding reached amongst
its leaders”. A keen supporter
of the regional policy of HH
Sheikh Zayed, he is a tireless
promoter of solidarity between
the Arab states. Known his having
spearheaded humanitarian efforts
on a massive scale, HH Sheikh
Khalifa is frmly committed to assist
with the plight of the Palestinian
people and the restoration of
stability in war-torn Iraq.
Characteristically unassuming
and sincere in fulflling his key
objectives as the President of the
UAE, he says: “We progress on
the path laid down by my father.
In particular we will continue with
the ‘open door’ policy and with
the practice of holding regular
consultations with the country’s
citizens, so that we may become
aware of, and follow up on, their
needs and concerns.”
“The understanding of heritage enlightens one’s judgment and illuminates one’s life”
12 13
12-17_Nahyan Profile Cor_L3.indd 3 2/9/09 4:56:19 PM
H
is Highness General Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed Al Nahyan
is the Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi and Deputy Supreme
Commander of the UAE Armed Forces. He became Crown
Prince of Abu Dhabi in 2004 and was appointed Deputy Supreme
Commander of the UAE Armed Forces soon after. Since 2004, he
has also been the Chairman of the Abu Dhabi Executive Council.
A staunch believer in the development of Abu Dhabi’s private
sector, General Sheikh Mohammed has held positions of authority,
drawing upon a wealth of diverse experiences. He says, “We
believe in more economic liberalisation, with the encouragement
of the private sector and foreign investment. Today the UAE is
economically powerful, but more importantly, security in the country
is something we can be proud of.”
Charged with numerous offcial responsibilities, in 1993, he
was appointed Chief-of-Staff of the UAE Armed Forces and held
the rank of Lieutenant General from 1994 until 2005, when he
was promoted to the rank of General. In 2003, General Sheikh
Mohammed was appointed Deputy Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi.
In 2004, His Highness was appointed the Deputy Chairman of
the Abu Dhabi Executive Council. He says, “We are focusing on
encouraging private investment and outsourcing more government
services, with my particular priorities lying in education and health.”
After receiving his formal education in the UAE and England,
General Sheikh Mohammed graduated from the Royal Military
Academy Sandhurst in 1979. Always close to his father, in addition
to his military responsibilities, General Sheikh Mohammed was
the principal advisor on security issues to the late Sheikh Zayed
bin Sultan Al Nahyan. As the Head of the Abu Dhabi Council for
Economic Development (ADCED), which is the premier economic
planning institution in the UAE, his keen understanding of economic
strategy has been invaluable in leading Abu Dhabi into the next
phase of development. Mirroring the ramifed integration of the next
phase of evolution outlined in the ‘Abu Dhabi Plan 2030’, he asks,
“How can we sell Abu Dhabi to the outside world? We want visitors
to see it as an interesting location to visit and invest in”. However,
“we must focus on what the UAE needs, on where its interests lie,
on doing the best for the UAE.”
As the Head of the Mubadala Development which, since its
establishment in 2002, represents the main investment vehicle
for the Abu Dhabi Government to achieve sustainable social and
economic benefts for the Emirate, he is also the Head of the UAE
Offsets Group. In addition, His Highness is the Head of the Abu
Dhabi Education Council which was set up in September 2005 to
develop education and vocational training. “We have to enable the
coming generation to be able to integrate and communicate with
the world”, he says.
Modest and affable, with the appealing ‘human touch’ instilled
by his father, General Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed has received
numerous citations and decorations from the UAE, the Kingdom
of Bahrain, Qatar, the Kingdom of Morocco, Pakistan, the US, UK,
France, and Italy.
14 Best of Abu Dhabi 15 Best of Abu Dhabi
Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed Al Nahyan, Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi, Deputy Supreme Commander
of the UAE Armed Forces
A staunch promoter of all that denotes
progress, Sheikh Mohammad bin Zayed Al
Nahyan, Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi and
Deputy Supreme Commander of the UAE
Armed Forces, is committed to opening up
Abu Dhabi to the world – sustainably.
14 15
12-17_Nahyan Profile Cor_L3.indd 4 2/9/09 4:56:22 PM
HH Sheikh Khalifa bin Zayed Al Nahyan has followed
the tolerant and generous policies adopted by his father,
whom he succeeded in November 2004. However,
there is now a difference of pace. HH Sheikh Khalifa
has brought a new generation of leaders to the fore,
among them many of Sheikh Khalifa’s younger brothers,
notably the charismatic new Crown Prince, HH Sheikh
Mohammed bin Zayed Al Nahyan, the third son of Zayed.
Younger technocrats have been appointed to senior
positions and the rate of development has quickened
in the hydrocarbon, tourism, real estate, and industrial
sectors. HH Sheikh Khalifa has made a point of touring
the other six Emirates to ensure that the benefts of
economic development reach all Emiratis, especially in
those smaller Emirates that are not blessed with major
oil and gas reserves like Abu Dhabi. He has also shown
himself open to innovation in the Bedouin system in this
conservative part of Arabia: Elections were held for the
Board of Abu Dhabi Chamber of Commerce and Industry,
with two foreigners and two women being appointed. In
addition, elections were also held for half of the forty seats
in the UAE Federal National Council, which is the highest
consultative body in the country.
T
he formation of the seven-member UAE in 1971 drew together
the southern Gulf States with a common policy in foreign affairs,
internal security, defense and immigration. HH Sheikh Zayed took
charge as the president and HH Sheikh Rashid Al Maktoum, Ruler
of Dubai, as the vice-president. Under their leadership, the UAE has
grown from disparate states into a powerful and unifed country.
Far from being tugged apart by the dominant partners in the union,
a healthy and friendly competition between the two emirates has
raised the fortunes of the UAE, with the other fve emirates carried
along. Thanks to its oil resources, Abu Dhabi is the richest and most
powerful of the seven emirates, putting it in the natural position of
leadership. Because of this, the presidency rests with its ruler. After
the demise of Sheikh Zayed, his heir, Sheikh Khalifa has taken charge
as the UAE President. What Dubai lacks in terms of oil wealth, it tries
to make up with shrewd business.
While it accedes to Abu Dhabi’s superior political clout in
many matters, Dubai exercises autonomy over its internal affairs,
especially over economic development. For instance, Dubai
decided in 2002 to sell freehold title to foreigners. It has also taken
liberal decisions in tourism.
Currently, Abu Dhabi seems to be following its example. The two
are mutually dependent - wealthy investors in Abu Dhabi constantly
seek investment opportunities and Dubai needs funds for its projects.
So Dubai can rest easy with the knowledge that
Abu Dhabi needs to protect its investments in Dubai. For its part,
Abu Dhabi values Dubai’s entrepreneurial spirit.
Today, the partnership between Abu Dhabi and Dubai looks
healthy. While Dubai drives the economic engine, Abu Dhabi
keeps the union secure and stable, evolving its diversifcation
plan at a sustainable pace. There is a new order in place in both
emirates with HH Sheikh Khalifa in Abu Dhabi and HH Sheikh
Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum in Dubai. This new
generation of leaders has much in common; chiefy, their
commitment to the economic growth, stability and security of the
union. Together, they steer a steady course towards the common
good of all Emiratis.
Abu Dhabi and Dubai – Partners in Progress
Abu Dhabi, the UAE’s understated capital, has
often been unfairly overlooked in favour of its
more famboyant neighbour, Dubai, but this has
changed dramatically with Sheikh Mohammed’s
drive to throw the doors of the Emirate open to
2.5 million tourists by 2010. He is recognised
as the mastermind who has propelled Abu
Dhabi into fostering prominent global alliances
for the betterment of industry, tourism and
diversifcation. They will arrive in the city with
the Louvre and Guggenheim museums; with a
dedicated Formula 1 themed integrated park;
with sustainably designed real estate projects
set among its offshore islands such as Saadiyat
overlooking the turquoise-coloured sea; where
mangroves and palms create the feeling of a
verdant oasis; and where the character of the
city remains truly Emirati – but with a relentlessly
modern twist famous as the ‘the Richest City in
the World.’
14 Best of Abu Dhabi 15 Best of Abu Dhabi
The Guggenheim Museum coming to life in Abu Dhabi.
In their own inimitable ways, Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Ruler of Dubai, and Sheikh
Khalifa bin Zayed Al Nahyan, President of the UAE and Ruler of Abu Dhabi, work tirelessly for the
sustainable socioeconomic diversifcation of the UAE.
14 15
12-17_Nahyan Profile Cor_L3.indd 5 2/9/09 4:56:23 PM
16 Best of Abu Dhabi
Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan, the remarkable frst President of the UAE who took charge in 1966, saw his Emirate grow, over 38 years as Ruler, into the
leading role in one of the most prosperous countries in the world, with a $100bn economy. His skills, which were derived from his native wit and the lessons learned
from conducting tribal relations with his neighbours in the erstwhile Trucial States, were perfectly adaptable to managing a rapidly expanding modern state. Sharing
his wealth derived from the oil industry with his people, he was also was exceptionally generous to other nations less fortunate than the UAE.
16 17
12-17_Nahyan Profile Cor_L3.indd 6 2/9/09 4:56:25 PM
17 Best of Abu Dhabi
“Our people should not forget their past and how their ancestors used to live and on what they relied on in their lives. The more they come to feel and know more about
their heritage, the more they are interested in their country and willing to defend it.”
1918 - 2004
16 17
12-17_Nahyan Profile Cor_L3.indd 7 2/9/09 4:56:26 PM
The Emirate’s GDP per
capita income surged
to a record US$71,200
in 2007, the world’s
second highest per
capita income.
Abu Dhabi is the largest and
most populated of the seven
emirates that make up the
United Arab Emirates.
Abu Dhabi’s current population
is 2,563,212, of which an esti-
mated 1,606,079 are expatriate
workers and professionals from
India, Pakistan, Egypt, Philip-
pines, Europe and elsewhere.
Abu Dhabi Overview
Even though Abu Dhabi is the capital of the United Arab Emirates (UAE), it is the second
most populous emirate after Dubai. With a population of approximately 1.45 million,
traditionally its economy was based around pearl diving, fshing and cultivating the date palm.
The discovery of oil in 1958 engendered radical transformation. Exports soon took off and
newfound prosperity, coupled with enlightened leadership, nurtured a dramatic turnaround
to Abu Dhabi’s fortunes. A modern city evolved; with infrastructure rising up from scratch to
accommodate its evolving status.
18 Best of Abu Dhabi
B
e
s
t

o
f

A
b
u

D
h
a
b
i
Format ion
Founding
Fat hers
Abu Dhabi is shown to have
9 percent of the world’s
proven oil reserves and
almost 5 percent of the
world’s natural gas.
18 19
18-25 Overview - Fast Facts_Cor_L3.indd 2 2/9/09 4:43:00 PM
A
bu Dhabi’s ongoing exploration, both onshore and offshore, has to date identifed 10
percent of the world’s known crude oil resources. As the third largest oil producer in the
Gulf, after Saudi Arabia and Kuwait, Abu Dhabi also has four percent of the world’s known
natural gas reserves.
As the economy diversifes, moving away from its reliance on oil wealth, the export of non-
oil related products has grown threefold since 1990 and is still rising. Private and overseas
investment is actively encouraged both government and private sector investment in tourism,
real estate, agriculture, retailing and manufacturing has progressed rapidly.
Even though it is still not as developed as in Dubai, tourism in Abu Dhabi is going to play
a key role in the future of the economy. With the establishment of the Abu Dhabi Tourism
Authority in 2004, this statutory body created to oversee the development and promotion
of tourism is coordinating the development of an array of sensitively devised attractions:
the mixed use lifestyle and entertainment ‘Saadiyat Island’; cultural landmarks such as
Guggenheim and Louvre Museums; the spectacular Sheikh Zayed Bin Sultan Al Nahyan
Mosque, otherwise known as the Grand Mosque.
Abu Dhabi, the understated capital of the United Arab Emirates, has often been unfairly
overlooked in favour of its ostentatious rival city, Dubai, but that is all about to change with
Sheikh Khalifa’s drive to throw the doors of the Emirate open to 2.5 million tourists by 2010.
They will arrive in a city where families promenade on curved corniches which overlook the
turquoise-coloured sea, where mangroves and palms create the feeling of a verdant oasis,
and where the character of the city is truly Emirati - this new-old city has an ‘Oriental’ pace, to
be enjoyed among many parks, fountains and picnic areas. Here is some background on ‘the
Richest City in the World.’
Geography
The Emirate of Abu Dhabi is the largest and most populated of the seven that make up the
United Arab Emirates, comprising of 86 percent of the country’s landmass. The landscape is
mostly desert, stretching from the striking scrub lands near the coast to the oasis of Liwa in
the south, where some of the world’s largest sand dunes can be found. Liwa is the last
outpost before the uninhabited, hostile ‘Empty Quarter.’ Approaching the capital city, the
desert ends in forests of palms and mangroves. Massive environmental modifcation has taken
place, with 120 million trees planted in Abu Dhabi alone. The city is on an island, accessed by
the Maqtaa Bridge.
Formation
The UAE is a federation of seven sheikhdoms:
Abu Dhabi; Ajman; Dubai; Fujairah; Ras al-Khaimah; Sharjah; Umm al-Quwain. Along with
Bahrain and Qatar, these emirates became known as the Trucial States on account of a
defense pact they signed with Great Britain in 1853. Following the British withdrawal from
the region in 1971, the emirates, fearful of their larger neighbours, drew together under the
guidance of Abu Dhabi’s ruler, Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan, and the original six were
federated as the UAE. Qatar and Bahrain chose to remain independent, whilst Ras al Khaimah
joined the federation in 1972.
Population
Abu Dhabi’s current population is 2,563,212, of which an estimated 1,606,079 are expatriate
workers and professionals from India, Pakistan, Egypt, Philippines, Europe and elsewhere.
History
Although parts of the Abu Dhabi Emirate were settled as far back as the 5th millennium BC,
the city itself has been populated since the 1790’s, when The Bani Yas tribal federation moved
from the ancient oasis of Liwa. The tribe split in two in the 19th century, and the factions
became the rulers of Abu Dhabi and Dubai.
Into the mid-20th century, Abu Dhabi was sustained by camel herding, small scale
agriculture, fshing and pearl diving, with most of the population living in palm huts. When the
global pearl industry collapsed, the region’s economy was devastated.
No one could have anticipated the 180 degree change in fortunes that was to come. Oil
was discovered in 1958, and Abu Dhabi was the frst Emirate to export ‘black gold’ in 1962.
Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahayan saw oil wealth’s transformative potential, and his visionary
policies laid the foundation for the glittering but well-regulated bastion of wealth that is Abu
Dhabi today.
In 1968 Britain announced that it would withdraw from the Persian Gulf by 1971 after two
hundred years as the colonial power, and Sheikh Zayed became the driving force behind the
formation of the United Arab Emirates, which came into existence on 2 December 1971.
Government
His Highness Sheikh Khalifa bin Zayed Al Nahyan is the hereditary Emir and Ruler of Abu
Dhabi, as well as the current President of the United Arab Emirates (UAE). In 2004, Sheikh
19 Best of Abu Dhabi
18 19
18-25 Overview - Fast Facts_Cor_L3.indd 3 2/9/09 4:43:07 PM
20 Best of Abu Dhabi
Khalifa announced that half the seats on the Federal National Council, a
parliament-like consultative body, would be opened to general elections
in the near future.
Economy
Abu Dhabi possesses 70 percent of the UAE’s entire wealth, largely
derived from oil - the Emirate is the fourth largest OPEC producer after
Saudi Arabia, Iran and Venezuela, and oil accounts 30 percent of the
GDP. One hundred years of oil supply (as opposed to ten years in Dubai)
ensure that this will be the case for some time to come.
Despite a recent unexpected slowdown in the global economy that
is having a negative spill over onto current forecasts in the UAE (which
may affect its growth rate), the economy is currently estimated to be
growing at eight percent a year, vying with China for the fastest growing
economy in the world. With wealth comes optimism, such as the massive
investment of funds repatriated by expatriate Arabs moving back to
the region from the West. A zero-tax regime, massive concentration of
capital, and high demand for goods and services have all ensured a
hefty rise of investment in businesses listed on the Abu Dhabi Securities
Market. Until very recently, investors could expect 30 to 90 new IPOs
over the next year, with domestic equities being so popular that the value
of shares traded grew by 343 percent in 2004.
Together with The Mubadala Development Company, the state
owned company of Abu Dhabi that is the investment vehicle of the
Abu Dhabi government with high profle investments in the energy,
telecommunication, aerospace, automotives, healthcare, real estate
and ship building sectors, the Abu Dhabi Investment Authority (ADIA) is
equally fush, with estimated at $200 to $500 billion, making it one of the
world’s biggest investment funds.
The Emirate plans to invest Dh41 billion ($11 billion US) in tourism
by 2015, with the goal of making Abu Dhabi a premier destination for
European vacationers. The 394-room mega-luxury Emirates Palace Hotel
already graces 1.3 km of private beachfront, and construction will soon
begin on a Dh55 billion ($15 billion US) gateway city at Al Raha beach
comprising of 60 luxury towers and an integrated city district serviced by
water taxis.
A development at Saadiyat Island will have a 17 story fve star hotel,
golf course and equestrian centre, and Lulu Island, 600 metres off the
coast, will boast 600 000 palm trees. Visitors will arrive via a new airport,
to be constructed by 2010, capable of handling 20 million passengers
per year.
Despite a recent unexpected global recessionary downturn, the next
industry that is booming is real estate, with the introduction of ‘Law 19,’ a
decree issued in August 2005 that allows non-nationals to own property.
Some experts predict an infux of Dhs186 billion ($50 billion US) worth of
capital into real estate in the Emirate in the next two years alone. Several
massive real estate projects are already underway, and the vast expanse
of uninhabited land around the capital can accommodate many more.
Yet real estate accounts for just a third of the Dh367 billion ($100 billion
US) that the Emirate plans to spend in the next fve years. There are plans
for an underground railway, a giant petrochemicals complex, a steel
mill and the world’s largest aluminium smelter. Oil production is also to
20 21
18-25 Overview - Fast Facts_Cor_L3.indd 4 2/9/09 4:43:10 PM
21 Best of Abu Dhabi
be increased by 70 percent, ensuring that for
years into the future, Abu Dhabi will remain ‘the
Richest City in the World.’
Education and employment
Mandatory primary and secondary schooling
has resulted in a comparatively strong literacy
rate, currently set at around 78 percent.
However public schools have fallen well behind
the private sector, which now accounts for 50
percent of pupils. Higher education has been
more successful in the UAE in recent years.
There are two government-funded universities:
Zayed University, which has campuses in Abu
Dhabi and Dubai, and UAE University based
in Al Ain. The Higher Colleges of Technology
(HCTs) were founded in 1988 and offer a more
technically driven programme of courses in
IT, engineering and technology. Last year
there were 15,000 students enrolled at the
HCTs’ 12 single-sex campuses across the
UAE. Remarkably, more than 65 percent of
students in higher education are female. This
is in part because young men have alternative
opportunities, such as the police or armed
forces, but it is also a sign of the increasing
eagerness of young women to pursue a career.
Unemployment among nationals is
apparently far lower than in other Gulf
Cooperation Council (GCC) countries such as
Bahrain and Oman. This is largely because the
country’s considerable hydrocarbon wealth
allows more job opportunities.
Religion
The local population is predominantly Sunni
Muslim and most of the imported labour is
also Muslim, although this is by no means a
prerequisite. There are also many expatriate
Christians, especially from South Asian and
from Europe. Islam is the offcial religion of
all seven emirates and the federal UAE. The
government generally adheres to the principle
of religious tolerance, and freedom of worship
is enshrined in the federal constitution, provided
that religious practices do not confict with
public policy or violate public morals. There are
several Christian churches across the country,
often next to mosques.
Language
The offcial language of the UAE is Arabic,
although English tends to be the lingua franca.
Urdu and other subcontinental languages are
also widely spoken amongst the expatriate
communities. The local dialect is distinct
from that of the rest of the Arab world, and
even from the rest of the Gulf. There are even
disparities between local tribes. However,
the presence of a large number of expatriate
Arabs in the country is changing the dialect to
something more similar to that spoken in the
northern Arab states. Standard classical Arabic
is used in newspapers and broadcasting.
Natural resources
Sitting atop 9 percent of the world’s proven
oil reserves (98.2 billion barrels) and almost 5
percent of the world’s natural gas (5.8 trillion
cu m), the UAE’s extraordinary hydrocarbon
wealth gives it the highest GDP per capita in
the world. Abu Dhabi owns the lion’s share
of these resources – 95 percent of the oil
and 92 percent of gas. Currently the UAE is
producing about 2.5m barrels per day (bpd)
of crude, just above its offcial OPEC quota
of 2.4m bpd. Nonetheless, the Abu Dhabi
National Oil Company (ADNOC) and its foreign
partners is investing heavily in an expansion
programme that will push production above 3m
bpd. Given these vast resources, oil and gas
continue to dominate the country’s economic
profle, despite some progress in diversifying
the economy. By contrast, the UAE has very
little fresh water - the growing population is
sustained instead by vast desalination projects.
Climate
Relentlessly sunny skies prevail throughout the
year. In June through September, the weather is
generally very hot and humid with temperatures
averaging well above 40°C (110°F). The
weather is pleasant and temperate from
October to May, although January to February
is cooler and a light jacket may come in handy
in the evenings.
Food
Almost any type of food is available in
Abu Dhabi - most international fast-food
chains have branches here, such as
McDonalds’s and Dunkin’ Donuts and a
plethora of restaurants serve cuisine from
almost any country in the world. However
visitors must try the delicious Gulf and Middle
Eastern food, whether from a cafeteria or a
gourmet restaurant. Try fresh fsh, like the local
‘Hammour’, which is excellent grilled, stuffed, or
fried with spices. Or order a variety of ‘Mezze’
(starter or hors d’oeuvre) such as ‘Hummus’ (a
chick pea dip), ‘Kebbeh’ (meat patties made
from minced lamb) or ‘Tabbouleh’ (a diced
tomatoes salad with onions, mint and
20 21
18-25 Overview - Fast Facts_Cor_L3.indd 5 2/9/09 4:43:11 PM
22 Best of Abu Dhabi
parsley). Desserts are generally very sweet, with indulgent use of honey
and nuts.
After dinner, try a leisurely pull on a Shisha, or water pipe. Tobacco
comes in numerous favours, and you could accompany it with mint tea
or strong Arabic coffee.
Since Muslims are prohibited from eating pork so it is not included in
Arabic menus, hotels frequently have substitutes such as beef sausages
and veal bacon on their breakfast menus. If pork is available, it will be
clearly labeled.
Bars
Although the UAE is a Muslim country, alcohol is widely available in
hotel restaurants and bars. These range from sophisticated cocktail
lounges to informal traditional British or Irish pubs, to piano and jazz
bars. You can also visit local nightclubs with Arab singers, belly dancers
and musicians.
Holidays
January: New Year’s DayApril: Islamic New Year’s DayJune: Prophet’s
Birthday - The celebration of the birthday of the Prophet Muhammad.
August: Accession Day - (6th) - Commemorates the accession of the
ruler of Abu Dhabi.
December: National Day - (2nd) – Celebration of the founding of the UAE.
Ramadan
Muslims fast from dawn to dusk during this month. Visitors should avoid
eating in public during daylight hours. After sunset, the fast is broken in a
meal called the ‘Iftar,’ and restaurants and businesses stay open well into
the night.
Eid al-Fitr - The celebration of the end of Ramadan, which lasts for
three days.
Eid al-Adha - The Festival of Sacrifce. Sheep are slaughtered and the
meat is distributed among family, friends and the needy.
Note: Dates of Islamic holidays vary according to the lunar calendar.
Shopping
Shopping is a national pastime in the UAE and one of the major
attractions for visitors. Glitzy state-of-the-art malls are in abundance, but
have not replaced traditional souks (markets), of which there are several
in Abu Dhabi offering everything from Persian carpets to electronics to
fsh. Shopping malls in Abu Dhabi offer an incredible array of international
brands, and many malls include multi-screen cinema complexes, coffee
shops and childcare facilities.
Dress Code
Abu Dhabi is an Islamic country and clothing should be modest.
Beachwear is only acceptable at beach clubs, hotels and public beaches.
During the daytime, the dress code is fairly casual although more
exclusive restaurants may expect guests to dress more formally during
the evening.
Visas
The type of visa required will vary depending on country of origin and
whether travelers have arrived for business or pleasure. It is best to
confrm visa requirements online before your trip to ensure a minimum of
hassle. See: http://www.uaeinteract.com/travel/visas.asp
Airport
Abu Dhabi airport is situated on the mainland, 35km (22 miles) east of
the city. The journey to the city centre should take about 45 minutes.
Limousines and Al Ghazal taxis can be pre-booked or picked up at the
airport. Fares are approximately Dh70 to the city centre, although orange
and white airport taxis charge approximately Dh40.
Many hotels run an airport shuttle service.
Local time
The UAE is 3 hours ahead of GMT.
22 23
18-25 Overview - Fast Facts_Cor_L3.indd 6 2/9/09 4:43:15 PM
23 Best of Abu Dhabi
22 23
18-25 Overview - Fast Facts_Cor_L3.indd 7 2/9/09 4:43:23 PM
Language
The offcial language is Arabic although English is widely
spoken and understood.
Currency
The local currency is the UAE Dirham and is divided into 100
fls. Underpinning itself against the US Dollar, the conversion
rate is a fxed AED 3.67to USD 1. Money can be changed at
hotels, banks, and licensed money changers in souks and
malls. ATMs are widespread and accept most major credit and
debit cards.
Credit cards
Most retail outlets, hotels and car rental companies accept
internationally recognized credit cards.
Business hours
Recently changed from Saturday, the week now begins
on Sunday, with Friday and Saturday being considered the
weekend in line with schools; Friday is the holy day. Some
businesses open on Saturday or stay closed for half a day
on Thursday.
The maximum number of working hours per week is offcially
set at 48, though exceptions are made for certain industries.
The working day varies between straight and split shifts but
generally speaking, government departments and services
work from 07:00 to 15:00, Sunday to Thursday. Private
businesses usually work a split shift from 08:00 to 13:00 and
16:00 to 19:30.
Most shops operate split shifts though the outlets in many of
the big shopping malls open at 10:00 and close between 22:00
and 24:00. Some food shops and petrol stations are open 24
hours a day. Most shops don’t open until around 15:00 on
Fridays, though corner shops only close during prayer times,
but will stay open till 22:00.
During the holy month of Ramadan, the Ministry of Labour
and Social Affairs has declared that daily working hours should
be reduced by two, in order to allow time for prayer. Many
offces start work an hour or so later and shops are open much
later at night. The more popular shopping malls are crowded
at midnight and parking at that time is tough to fnd. Food
outlets and restaurants generally remain closed during the
day, opening for Iftar; some provide take away services during
the day.
Electricity
The voltage in Abu Dhabi is 220/240v. Most sockets are
three-pin, although adapters for two pin plugs are available
at most hotels.
Drinking water
Tap water is safe to use although bottled water, which is served
in hotels and restaurants, is recommended for drinking.
Telecommunications
Communications are the responsibility of the federally run
Emirates Telecommunication Corporation (Etisalat). Currently
a near monopoly with Du, a second state owned Telecoms
Company; it is actively globalising and continuously expanding
its services. The objective to privatise this sector has been
postponed until 2015.
Useful websites
www.abudhabi.com
www.timeout.com/travel/abudhabi
www.lonelyplanet.com/worldguide/destinations/ middle-east/
united-arab-emirates/abu-dhabi
24 Best of Abu Dhabi
24 25
18-25 Overview - Fast Facts_Cor_L3.indd 8 2/9/09 4:43:25 PM
25 Best of Abu Dhabi
24 25
18-25 Overview - Fast Facts_Cor_L3.indd 9 2/9/09 4:43:28 PM
Branding a nation sustainably
The underlying message of the Tourism Development & Investment
Company’s (TDIC) mission – indeed, its very existence – highlights a
simple and fundamental premise of modern-day nation building: The
accumulation of a country’s wealth, especially accruing from its natural
resources, should be used to diversify its socio-economic base. TDIC
epitomises this ethos by spearheading infrastructure projects that are
based on environmental sustainability and stewardship – total respect for
the local environment and culture.
19 Best of Abu Dhabi
B
e
s
t

o
f

A
b
u

D
h
a
b
i
The Angsana Resort & Spa, Eastern Mangoves is located 20 minutes
from the city centre and 10 minutes from Abu Dhabi International Airport.
Construction is well underway for this urban resort designed to refect
the natural environment and offer an escape from the city’s urban
sprawl, whilst contributing to the preservation of the valuable mangrove area.
26-29_TDIC - Interview2 Cor_L3.indd 2 2/9/09 4:44:31 PM
27 Best of Abu Dhabi
F
or nation-states, regions and cities, destination
branding is more relevant than ever. Vital for
attracting allies, investment and visitors, those
that fail to brand effectively get left behind. With
the effective fne tuning of a strong ramifed brand,
Abu Dhabi has accepted this rationale. Lee Tabler,
CEO, TDIC explains, “In line with Abu Dhabi Tourism
Authority’s strategy of delivering managed growth,
we are adopting a leadership role in the arena of
environmental preservation, for example. TDIC
is working on delivering a hospitality landscape
underscored by managed growth, where changes will
be gradual and measured.”
Strong place brands are important for
four reasons
• Attracting business and foreign direct investment
• Attracting visitors
• Recruiting the best and the brightest
• Wielding political and economic infuence
When it comes to TDIC, in existence since
2006, its success in the delivery of best practices
can be “tangibly measured by the partnership with
world class operators across a number of segments
– culture, architecture, construction, leisure and
hospitality.” Because of this, Tabler explains, “We
have encouraged leading international brands to enter
the Abu Dhabi market.” By creating and facilitating
projects that add to the emirate’s unique positioning
and reinforce a memorable tourist experience, TDIC
is participating in establishing an image based on
positive national values and perceptions on which the
emirate can rely when promoting sustainable socio-
economic diversifcation, exports and services. In
this sense, the destination becomes a valuable tool,
conveying an emotional and intangible component
that can affect investment decisions. Even though
its shareholding is fully owned by Abu Dhabi Tourism
Authority (ADTA), TDIC’s ambition is to transform from
“a relatively small scale player to a major organisation
which plays a key role in the development of Abu
Dhabi’s tourism infrastructure”.
Clearly, its relevance is becoming increasingly
evident in the tourism sector in which TDIC is involved.
With competing locations vying for global tourism
spend, destinations offering similar high quality
products are being pushed to devise that extra
sales edge that makes destinations ‘stand out’ from
the crowd.
So, what challenges does TDIC face in ensuring
its operations serve the truest interests of its
stakeholders and of Abu Dhabi? Tabler clarifes, “It is
in ensuring that our stakeholder values are delivered
across every segment of the developmental chain.
This requires additional research and preparation time,
exceptional human resources and partners whose
operational and delivery rationale is in total synch with
our own.” He adds, “TDIC is distinguished in that
the company’s approach is not purely commercially
driven. Though TDIC does have to stand on its
own feet economically, is has responsibilities to the
community of Abu Dhabi and to the emergence of
the destination in terms of economic, cultural and
socio-economic sustainability.”
A place brand is the collective sum of its’
• History
• People
• Culture
• Products or services
• Customers
• Financials
• Operations
• Leadership
In this crowded arena, nations, regions or
cities that lack the relevant brand equity will not
be competitive in the long-run. This is why TDIC is
tracking measurable ways in which its philosophy
of best practices across every segment in which it
operates is being translated across existing projects.
Mr Tabler says, “Environmental sustainability
is a key element of TDIC’s corporate ethos and is
drilled very much into the company’s corporate
DNA. This, of course, is in line with the overarching
development principles of the Abu Dhabi Government
as outlined in its Urban Plan 2030. TDIC has strict
environmental guidelines for all its sub-contractors
and development investors.
“The company has instigated numerous initiatives
across a number of projects including its fagship
Desert Islands multi-experiential destination
and Saadiyat Island – the 27 square kilometre island
which is just 500 metres offshore
Abu Dhabi city. These initiatives include work
Construction is well advanced on the luxury
Anantara Resort & Spa Qasr Al Sarab, located
in the Emirate’s Liwa Desert in the
Empty Quarter. Rising like a mirage in the
desert, this retreat is just 90 minutes drive
from Abu Dhabi International Airport will boast
a fve star hotel with 150 rooms and villas with a
luxury heath spa.
26-29_TDIC - Interview2 Cor_L3.indd 3 2/9/09 4:44:38 PM
28 Best of Abu Dhabi
on Sir Bani Yas Island – the largest of the
Desert Islands – to expand and upgrade a bird
sanctuary to ensure that the island remains the
migratory home of hundreds of species.
“Sir Bani Yas Island also hosts the Arabian
Gulf’s frst wind turbine, which is now producing
electricity, and it is working with the Abu Dhabi
future energy initiative, Masdar, to ensure
Desert Islands utilises as much renewable
energy as possible.
“On Saadiyat Island, TDIC has created
an inter-tidal mangrove nursery in its Saadiyat
Reserve district where it is cultivating 100,000
propagated mangrove seedlings to be
transplanted. It is also propagating an
additional 180,000 seedlings for transplantation
during the island’s development. These
schemes will enhance the ecological value
of Saadiyat Reserve. TDIC has also
restricted resort development on Saadiyat
Beach to within 60 metres of dune lines so
as to protect the breeding grounds of
Hawksbill turtles.
“Saadiyat will also have the UAE’s frst
Gary Player-designed golf course – the
Saadiyat Beach Golf Course – and here again
the company’s environmental credentials
come to the fore. Mr. Player was selected for
his reputation as an environmental guardian.
He has delivered an ecologically-conscious,
amphitheatre-style course which will be
capable of hosting a major tournament in
the future. It follows a class fgure-of-eight
confguration with over a third having views
of the Saadiyat coastline, where dolphins are
regularly spotted. Landscaping here utilises
native grasses and desert palms. Water
management will be through a modern,
computer-controlled irrigation system that
allows for fexibility to ensure sound
irrigation practices. TDIC intends to enroll
this course in the Audubon International
Awards certifcation scheme, which recognises
courses that protect the environment,
conserve natural resources, provide wildlife
habitats and are governed by high standards
of environmental management.
“On the cultural side, our partners
include the French Government for the
Louvre Abu Dhabi and the Guggenheim
Foundation for the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi.
On architecture – we have made a huge
difference – by commissioning the world’s
best to design the cultural assets of Saadiyat
Cultural District, which will be home to the
world’s single largest concentration of premier
cultural institutions. Lord Foster for the
Sheikh Zayed National Museum, Frank
Gehry for the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi, Jean
Nouvel for the Louvre Abu Dhabi, Zaha
Hadid for the district’s Performing Arts
Centre and Tadao Ando for the Maritime
Museum. Close by we expect to open the
Saadiyat Beach Golf Course by the fnal
quarter of 2009 – and another golf course
master architect, Robert Trent Jones II has
been commissioned for the design of a
remarkable tidal course in the Saadiyat
Reserve district. And we have partnered
another major golf name – Troon – to run
these facilities.
“Hospitality has been a hugely successful
area for us with TDIC’s philosophy of
partnering the best to deliver the best, attracting
some of the world’s leading operators to Abu
Dhabi. These include Westin Hotels &
Resorts, Angsana, Anantara and St. Regis,
which will operate a TDIC property on
Saadiyat Beach. I believe our strategy has
signifcantly raised the hospitality benchmark
within Abu Dhabi and ensured greater
awareness for the destination as a whole
as these brands begin their tried and tested
international cross-marketing campaigns”,
he concludes.
www.tdic.ae
Personal Biography
Lee Tabler
Chief Executive Offcer
Lee Tabler, TDIC’s Chief Executive Offcer, has more than 25 years international real estate
development experience, 17 of them in senior management positions with technical and
fnancial responsibilities throughout North America, Europe, Asia and the Middle East.
Having been a founding member and past chairman of the Middle East Council of the Urban
Land Institute – the international non-proft research and educational organisation that caters
to professionals in land use and real estate development – Lee Tabler is now chairman of
the council’s planned Real Estate Education Centre. He is also a member of the International
Council of Shopping Centres, the International Real Estate Investment Council, the US Real
Estate Commission and the Asian Society in Hong Kong and New York.
Lee Tabler holds a bachelors degree in architecture from the Southern California Institute of
Architecture, US, a masters degree in urban and regional planning from the American School of
Architecture in Fontainebleau, France and a masters degree in real estate fnance from the American University in Washington DC, USA.
26-29_TDIC - Interview2 Cor_L3.indd 4 2/9/09 4:45:15 PM
30 Best of Abu Dhabi
Saadiyat beach, Saadiyat Island
The Abu Dhabi Golf Resort will be a unique location where lifestyle and leisure exist together
to create a perfect living environment. In addition to the hotel there will be a gated residential
community comprising exclusive villas, luxury townhouses and premium apartments with
picturesque views of the golf course.
The ADTA & TDIC Headquarters building will be an important landmark
for the city of Abu Dhabi in a prominent position known as ‘Between the
Bridges’. It has been designed from the outset to be an environmentally
friendly building and will aim to set the highest standards for
environmental design.
26-29_TDIC - Interview2 Cor_L3.indd 5 2/9/09 4:46:00 PM
Saadiyat I sland:
A treasured destination
23 Best of Abu Dhabi
B
e
s
t

o
f

A
b
u

D
h
a
b
i
Development should not disturb the natural habitat of Saadiyat Island that is rich in natural mangrove forests and protected fauna.
Abu Dhabi, the largest of the seven emirates which makes up the United
Arab Emirates, is successfully capitalising on its natural assets – clean seas
rich in marine life, unspoilt islands, oases sheltered by mountain heights
and vast desert tracks – to deliver distinct experiences among a people
renowned for their hospitality and pride for their heritage. Saadiyat Island
is an ideal case in point. This exquisite destination, with its innovative mix
of attractions, is intent on appealing to visitors and investors looking for a
sustainable environment to call their own.
30-35_ TDIC - Saadiyat 2_Cor_L3.indd 2 2/9/09 5:12:59 PM
Saadiyat I sland:
A treasured destination
31 Best of Abu Dhabi
S
aadiyat Island is progressing in many
phases with a frst – the opening of a
world-class golf course designed by sporting
legend Gary Player – due to open in September
2009. This is in line with Abu Dhabi’s objective
to appeal to the 2.7 million guests it hopes
to attract by 2012, By carefully managing its
growth with a series of sensitively articulated
infrastructure innovations, the face of
sustainable tourism is taking shape.
In 2004, the Abu Dhabi Tourism Authority
(ADTA) embarked on developing Saadiyat
Island into a world-class, environmentally
sensitive tourist destination that included, as its
centrepiece, a cultural district for Abu Dhabi,
the region and the world. The task of delivering
this transformation was entrusted to Abu
Dhabi’s Tourism Development & Investment
Company (TDIC) which has since taken
Saadiyat onto the world stage.
Hyperbole notwithstanding, Saadiyat
Island represents one of the most important
development opportunities in Abu Dhabi’s
history. Meticulously planned, the island,
with its 30 kms of water frontage and natural
environmental-features, including mangrove
forests, is evolving as a strategic international
tourism destination that epitomises a new
dawn in Abu Dhabi’s evolution to regional and
global pre-eminence.
To be developed in three phases, with
total completion expected around 2018, the
masterplan envisages highly individual districts
and includes hotels, marinas, international
standard museums and cultural centres,
golf courses, civic facilities and sea-view
residential properties.
In many ways Saadiyat Island will be an
extension of the UAE capital which the Abu
Dhabi Government has masterplanned as a
“stately global capital.” Saadiyat is being linked
to the mainland via a 10-lane freeway, making
the destination easily accessible from Abu
Dhabi International Airport just 25 kms away.
“Saadiyat Island and its beaches represent
special opportunities to hotel and resort
developers”, explains Mubarak Al Muhairi,
ADTA’s Director General and TDIC’s Managing
Director. With a strategy to dispose of
development land on the island to private
investors who will each develop their sites in
accordance with a sustainable master plan
and supporting stringent planning regulations
and design guidelines, “guests will access
resort beaches by a series of boardwalks
and pathways that will meander through the
picturesque dune environments”, he adds.
By including a comprehensive array of
amenities, including commercial and residential
properties, resort hotels, recreational facilities,
nature preserves, as well as most signifcantly,
the notion of bringing together a cluster of
renowned cultural facilities to be operated in
partnership with established museums and
performing arts institutions from across the
world, Abu Dhabi has embarked on one of the
most ambitious urban and cultural development
projects ever conceived. Take for instance,
the 24,000 square metre Louvre Abu Dhabi, a
universal museum with exhibits encompassing
a diversity of cultures. It will have 6,000 square
metres of permanent displays and 2,000 square
metres of temporary displays. Heralding a “new
era of cultural co-operation, in the long term the
Louvre Abu Dhabi will become autonomous,
a national, regional and international asset
allowing all to participate in an interconnected
global understanding”, said HH Sheikh
Mohammed Bin Zayed Al Nahyan, Crown
Prince of Abu Dhabi at the launch
of the unprecedented 30-year cultural
The Louvre Abu Dhabi, designed by Pritzker Architecture Prize-winner Jean Nouvel, will encompass a broad historical and geographic canvas with thematic exhibitions and special programmes. Inspired by Islamic architectural forms,
Jean Nouvel’s dome-like structure allows for the dynamic interplay of natural light within interior gallery spaces.
30-35_ TDIC - Saadiyat 2_Cor_L3.indd 3 2/9/09 5:13:08 PM
32 Best of Abu Dhabi
accord between France and the UAE in March 2007.
So with the guiding principles for the Cultural District to make it,
by defnition, a destination everyone in the worlds of art and culture
would want to visit and revisit, this cluster of permanent institutions,
through its collections, architecture and programmes, will become
one of the world’s greatest concentrations of cultural experiences.
This is being achieved by the addition of the Sheikh Zayed National
Museum, the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi, Performing Arts Centre and
the Maritime Museum.
An equally important focus in Saadiyat’s positioning as an island
experience of genuine and enduring worth is its management of
tourism assets, with strict environmental codes designed to ensure that
development respects, and is aligned to, Abu Dhabi’s strong culture
of protecting its sensitive coastal and desert ecologies. For instance, a
batch of 58 Hawksbill turtles that recently hatched safely on the
island are being protected and monitored as part of a sustainable
breeding programme - as part of TDIC’s proven commitment to
environmental responsibility.
Saadiyat Island is a fagship project for TDIC, for Abu Dhabi and the
region. Its name is already resonating within global cultural and golfng
circles and as its development progresses; much more is expected from
this island which is designed as a destination apart.
www.saadiyat.ae
l Saadiyat Island will eventually house around 160,000 residents and will be connected to Abu Dhabi via a ten-lane causeway.
l Building of the world-class Cultural District is underway.
l New York Universitys’ frst overseas liberal arts campus is to open on the island.
l The Gary Player designed Saadiyat Beach Golf Club is to open September 2009.
l Abu Dhabi National Hotels (ADNH) is investing around AED 750 million in a fve-star Park Hyatt resort on Saadiyat Beach. The resort will
boast a 400 room hotel overlooking a 300 metre-wide stretch of beach.
l Abu Dhabi-headquartered Al Jaber PSC, one of the most prominent construction and development companies in the UAE, is to build a
signature Shangri-la Resort on Saadiyat Beach. The hotel will have 400 rooms and front over 300 metres of pristine beach.
SAADIYAT CULTURAL DISTRICT
Maritime Museum
Performing Arts Centre
Oce park
Boutique hotels
Retail & commercial environment
Luxury town homes & apartments
Guggenheim Abu Dhabi
Louvre Abu Dhabi
Biennale Park
Sheikh Zayed National Museum
SAADIYAT MARINA
World class Marina
Waterfront restaurants & hotel
Luxury apartments
Central business district
Leisure & entertainment facilities
Commercial & retail environment
SAADIYAT PROMENADE
Family resort
Dynamic beach lifestyle
Boardwalks with cafés & restaurants
Leisure & entertainment
SAADIYAT BEACH
International tourist destination
9 kilometers of natural beaches
Five-star hotels and resort
Private and public beach clubs
Championship golf course with
luxury residential villas and apartments
designed by Gary Player
SAADIYAT RESERVE
Championship golf course
Luxury residential
waterside living
SAADIYAT LAGOONS
Luxury low-rise waterfront residential
Waterside living
Tidal lagoon system
SAADIYAT RETREAT
Boutique hotels
Luxury residential villas
30-35_ TDIC - Saadiyat 2_Cor_L3.indd 4 2/9/09 5:13:10 PM
33 Best of Abu Dhabi
Designed by golfng legend, Gary Player, the Saadiyat Beach Golf Club is a uniquely captivating golfng development being built on Saadiyat Island - the Arabian Gulf’s frst ocean course. Boasting two freshwater lakes and one
salt water lake, the course features several beach-front holes and weaves in and out of nine 5-star beachfront hotels. Adopting a fgure of eight concept, the course is organically designed in total
harmony with the surrounding environment.
SAADIYAT CULTURAL DISTRICT
Maritime Museum
Performing Arts Centre
Oce park
Boutique hotels
Retail & commercial environment
Luxury town homes & apartments
Guggenheim Abu Dhabi
Louvre Abu Dhabi
Biennale Park
Sheikh Zayed National Museum
SAADIYAT MARINA
World class Marina
Waterfront restaurants & hotel
Luxury apartments
Central business district
Leisure & entertainment facilities
Commercial & retail environment
SAADIYAT PROMENADE
Family resort
Dynamic beach lifestyle
Boardwalks with cafés & restaurants
Leisure & entertainment
SAADIYAT BEACH
International tourist destination
9 kilometers of natural beaches
Five-star hotels and resort
Private and public beach clubs
Championship golf course with
luxury residential villas and apartments
designed by Gary Player
SAADIYAT RESERVE
Championship golf course
Luxury residential
waterside living
SAADIYAT LAGOONS
Luxury low-rise waterfront residential
Waterside living
Tidal lagoon system
SAADIYAT RETREAT
Boutique hotels
Luxury residential villas
30-35_ TDIC - Saadiyat 2_Cor_L3.indd 5 2/9/09 5:13:15 PM
34 Best of Abu Dhabi
Saadiyat Island
Saadiyat Island is a truly special place. Born out of collective inspiration, it
is a rare destination experience of rich depth and diversity.
A symbol of progress, a tribute to vision, a celebration of talent,
Saadiyat Island embraces nature and human achievement with
enlightened balance. It will be an irresistible magnet attracting the world
to Abu Dhabi – and taking Abu Dhabi to the world.
Home to an international arts and culture hub, with new levels of
resort hospitality, as well as groundbreaking leisure, retail, business
and residential offerings, Saadiyat Island is the vibrant new heartbeat of
modern Arabia.
Designed to build bridges between cultures, create harmony through
integration, and inspire understanding through creation, Saadiyat Island
will transform local and global perceptions of Abu Dhabi.
Saadiyat Cultural District
The pulsing cultural hub for celebration and innovation in the arts, and
the soul upon which the entire fabric of the island is built. With its array of
architectural icons, Saadiyat Cultural District fuels the imagination, fosters
interaction, and allows people of all backgrounds to embrace a common
bond of creativity.
Saadiyat Beach
Where turtles nest, dune grasses sway gently in the breeze and the bluest
of azure waters sparkle with the sun. This rare 9 km stretch of natural
beach is a resort and leisure space of luxury. Home to a championship
golf course and the stunning horizon of the Arabian Gulf.
Saadiyat Retreat
A secluded haven of peace and tranquility, this private ‘island within an
island’ hides exquisite luxury homes ‘suspended’ above calm waters,
intimate resorts, and a very special kind of harmony for the body, mind
and spirit.
30-35_ TDIC - Saadiyat 2_Cor_L3.indd 6 2/9/09 5:13:32 PM
35 Best of Abu Dhabi
Saadiyat Reserve
Home to fourishing natural wetlands, lush mangroves, free-fowing
waterways, and the region’s frst ever tidal golf course. An unforgettable
place where man and environment become one.
Saadiyat Marina
Vibrant and sophisticated, this is the commercial heart of the
island. Boutique retail, café society chic, designer apartments
and colourful nightlife combine to create a waterfront space of
energy and excitement.
Saadiyat Promenade
The colourful downtown waterfront hub for families. A place to while
away the day and lose yourself in exploration and the total enjoyment
of togetherness.
Saadiyat Lagoons
Nature’s private show. Beautiful homes nestled on the banks of
tiny islets, where pristine waters gently lap, and nature’s morning
chorus greets each new day.
30-35_ TDIC - Saadiyat 2_Cor_L3.indd 7 2/9/09 5:13:52 PM
Present ing a new face of Arabia

Welcome to Desert Islands’ launch phase one, the nature-based
‘Sir Bani Yas Island’ destination. Abu Dhabi is emerging as a major
international destination as the government identifes sustainable
tourism as a potential market growth area. Driven by the will to diversify
the economy, the Abu Dhabi Executive Council has placed tourism at
the core of its strategic thinking.
B
e
s
t

o
f

A
b
u

D
h
a
b
i
36-39_TDIC - Desert 2_Cor_L3.indd 2 2/9/09 4:48:43 PM
37 Best of Abu Dhabi
S
ir Bani Yas Island, the frst phase of
Desert Islands, a remarkable destination
that presents a rarely seen face of Arabia,
has opened in Al Gharbia, the Western region
of Abu Dhabi.
As a fagship legacy product of Tourism
Development & Investment Company (TDIC),
a major developer of residential, leisure and
cultural destinations in Abu Dhabi, Desert
Islands refects the rationale of environmental
sustainability which is embedded in its
corporate DNA.
Sir Bani Yas Island – a former Royal nature
reserve – opened to international tourism
with guests staying at the 64-room boutique
Desert Islands Resort and Spa operated by
Thailand’s award-winning Anantara brand.
It has proved an instant hit with visitors who
can opt for a series of adventure activities
from 4x4 guided tours of the Arabian Wildlife
Park (home to one of the world’s largest
herds of Arabian Oryx), to kayaking, mountain
biking, hiking and snorkeling in the island’s
marine-life rich seas. “I believe our strategy
of partnering with the best to deliver the
best, attracting some of the world’s leading
operators to Abu Dhabi, has signifcantly
raised the hospitality benchmark. This
ensures greater awareness for the destination
overall”, he clarifes.
Preparatory work has also begun on
TDIC’s Desert Islands socio-economic
initiatives with the opening on the nearby
heritage-rich Dalma Island of the Desert
Islands Education Centre, where up to 500
Emiratis are undergoing vocational training
to empower them to beneft from the tourism
career opportunities that are beginning to
emerge. With Emiratisation the order of the
day, TDIC is taking on board the challenges
of training and retaining HR expertise, in
line with quotas and the pressures of global
competition. Tabler explains, “TDIC has a
solid commitment to the recruitment, training
and development of a professional national
cadre – indeed our Desert Islands Education
Centre is a physical testament to this
commitment. In addition, TDIC already has a
signifcant number of Emiratis working within
its various departments including marketing,
the cultural division as well as project
development. We are always eager to
meet and recruit aspiring Emiratis who
are looking to be mentored and trained
to play a role in a company which has a
signifcant nation-building role. The training
of nationals and the opening up of new
career streams for them are also key
components of our partnership agreements
with both the Guggenheim Foundation and
the French Government”.
Desert Islands is being managed
sensitively with respect for, and with the aim
of developing, the local culture and traditions,
he says, “It will provide a signifcant economic
boost to the Western region and nationals
residing there, by increasing employment,
education and investment opportunities,”
he adds.
Tabler says that the overall sustainability
strategy is aimed at meeting present needs
without compromising those of the future.
“We want to expand on the late Sheikh
Zayed’s eco-philosophy and ultimately reduce
the need for non-renewable resources.” The
strategy is being developed jointly by TDIC
and Masdar, Abu Dhabi Government’s
advanced energy and sustainability initiative
responsible for developing renewable energy
strategies for the emirate.
36-39_TDIC - Desert 2_Cor_L3.indd 3 2/9/09 4:48:56 PM
Already earning international
recognition, Sir Bani Yas Island
is at the core of Abu Dhabi’s
effort to create a world model
of sustainable development. Its
legacy reserve status was created
by the late UAE President and
Ruler of Abu Dhabi, to ensure the
survival of some of Arabia’s most
endangered species including
the Arabian Oryx. This gazelle,
indigenous to Arabia, was labelled
extinct in the wild in 1972 – now
Sir Bani Yas Island is home to
several hundred of them.
Tabler explains, “Sir Bani
Yas Island is a nature-based
destination which in many ways
represents the true essence of
Arabia. A simple vision for a
single island has formed the
basis and guiding principles
for environmental conservation
throughout and beyond the Desert
Islands.” Sheikh Zayed planted the
frst tree on the island and TDIC’s
master plan for the destination
was based on the former leader’s
eco-philosophy.
Dalma Island is the
destination’s cultural jewel;
it is a true symbol of UAE
heritage mirroring an authentic
Arabian lifestyle in a genuine
environment. Currently 5,000
people live on the island.
Discovery Islands is an
exclusive and luxurious retreat
nestled on six natural islands.
It is home to a vibrant marine life
and untouched animal habitats.
Two islands will be developed
into exclusive boutique resorts,
while two others will offer
camping experiences on
untouched desert islands.
The remaining islands harbour
undisturbed breeding grounds
for birds and turtles.
“The launch of Desert Islands’
frst phase is a milestone, not
only in TDIC’s history, but in that of
the western region of Al Gharbia,”
explained Tabler. “As the frst
TDIC destination to come on
line, the opening up of Sir Bani
Yas Island has given us a great
sense of satisfaction, particularly
since it has been achieved in
less than three years of the
company’s launch. It is a
paradigm of how the great
potential of this region can be
leveraged in a solid, sustainable
manner”, he concludes.
www.desertislands.com
Sir Bani Yas Island is also host to the Arabian Gulf’s frst wind turbine, which is now
producing electricity, and is working with the Abu Dhabi future energy initiative, Masdar,
to ensure Desert Islands utilises as much renewable energy as possible.
36-39_TDIC - Desert 2_Cor_L3.indd 4 2/9/09 4:49:17 PM
The Arabian Oryx is native to the Arabian Peninsula. It is an
endangered species and has been classifed as extinct in the wild
since the early 1970s. Its distinctive white coat refects sunlight and
helps the Oryx stay cool in the harsh summer heat. Sir Bani Yas
has one of the largest herds in the world.
36-39_TDIC - Desert 2_Cor_L3.indd 5 2/9/09 4:49:25 PM
With a Formula One race track
and a Ferrari theme park added
to more intellectual attractions
such as the Louvre and the
Guggenheim museums the
Emirate aspires to be a centre
for art, culture and entertainment.
Abu Dhabi has the world’s high-
est per capita GDP, currently
standing at $46,147. 9.2 percent
of the world’s oil reserves are
located within the Emirate, and
these are expected to last for at
least the next 150 years.
A $10-billion investment
in the tourism sector is
projected to increase
the number of visitors to
Abu Dhabi to 1.2 million
by 2015.
Abu Dhabi International
Airport welcomed
a record 6.9 million
passengers in 2007, up
31% on the year before.
Open for business
Abu Dhabi has already been named the world’s richest city, with the most abundant
oil reserves in the UAE, over 700 kilometres of coastline and the country’s high-
est mountain peak; but the Emirate’s ambitions are soon set to eclipse all this and
more. The capital of the UAE, and the largest of the seven Emirates, has made vast
investments in order to attract international business and increase socio-economic
development. Bringing together the forces of entrepreneurship and innovation, the
guiding force of this rapid expansion is the Abu Dhabi Chamber of Commerce &
Industry (ADDCI). Since 1969, this autonomous institution which serves the public
interest and represents the various private sectors in Abu Dhabi has evolved from
being a service provider to becoming an active player that fosters close ties with the
business community locally and worldwide.
B
e
s
t

o
f

A
b
u

D
h
a
b
i
40-43 ADCCI_L3.indd 2 2/3/09 8:18:53 PM
H
E Mohammed Rashed Al Hameli, Director-General, Abu Dhabi
Chamber of Commerce and Industry shares his insights on the
mission, vision and strategy of ADDCI.
In what specifc ways is ADCCI successfully positioning Abu
Dhabi as a leading commercial and business destination?
How has the innovative promotion of its commerce and
business opportunities added to the economy and global
profle of the emirate?
41 Best of Abu Dhabi
The Abu Dhabi Corniche is a visual statement of the
emergence of Abu Dhabi as a worldclass city. It features
hotels, residential and commercial properties that are
contemporary and iconic while fully maximizing the value
of this important location.
HE Salah Salem Bin Omar Al Shamsi, President,
Abu Dhabi Chamber of Commerce and Industry
The ADCCI is an autonomous body supporting government
policies in promoting trade, commercial and industrial activities. In
this context, we provide a series of services to both national and
foreign businessmen who have businesses in Abu Dhabi or are
prospective entrepreneurs. The Chamber has played a signifcant role
in harnessing the potential of the private sector to contribute to Abu
Dhabi’s non-oil economy.
Having embarked upon an aggressive approach breaking
away form the traditional role of merely issuing licences, the
ADCCI has now taken up the more active responsibility of linking the
private sector with the public sector. At the same time, the
Chamber is also involved in fnding solutions to problems faced by
businessmen in setting up business or entering into joint ventures
with foreign companies.
This year we have launched two very important work centres: the
Members Services Centre and the Business-Link. These two centres
are like a ‘One-Stop Shop’ providing A-Z services to members as well
as the business community, traders and entrepreneurs.
Abu Dhabi is emerging as the centre of very vibrant economic
activity, with the government adopting an open foreign investment-
friendly economic policy and allowing the private sector to play
a pivotal role. Abu Dhabi is on fast track. Our strategic location
supported by the bold and dynamic open economic policies, has
turned our Emirate into a beehive-like hub for global business and
commercial activities.
The ‘Abu Dhabi Plan 2030’ is an unprecedented, phased
undertaking to be shared by the government and the private sector
to refurbish and build a modern infrastructure. Over the next two
decades, Abu Dhabi will be spending trillions of dollars on tourism
facilities, building hotels and resorts for high-end tourists. Health and
education projects will be launched to provide the best in the two
essential services sectors. Real estate, commercial and residential
properties, modern network of roads, seaport, airport, and light rails
will be provided. Our economic growth during the past couple of years
is a brilliant achievement refecting the strong long-term
growth through wealth creating opportunities. Our real estate
market has emerged as a strong challenge to other players in the
feld and is now exploding, registering unprecedented demand-based
growth expected to cross $500 billion when completed. Our
innovative specialized industrial zones set up in selected parts of the
emirate and our government’s policy of allowing 100
percent ownership to foreign investors and entrepreneurs offer
excellent opportunities to industrialists and entrepreneurs to set up
their businesses.
What partnerships with industry stakeholders has ADCCI
fostered, and why?
As I said earlier, the ADCCI has undergone a basic change from being
a mere basic service provider to be an active player fostering close
ties with the business community. The establishment of the Abu Dhabi
Business Group Forum and its interaction with ADCCI brings the
International business community on one platform, which would help
40-43 ADCCI_L3.indd 3 2/3/09 8:19:02 PM
42 Best of Abu Dhabi
networking amongst national businessmen
and entrepreneurs. The ADCCI is aware
of the changes on the market-place and
the growing importance of the private
sector in contributing to the development of
non-oil economy.
We have two elected expatriate members
on our board of directors to give more
representation to the private sector.
Diversifcation from oil-related
revenues is a long-term strategy that
is sometimes diffcult to implement.
What concrete steps is ADCCI
taking to ensure that it is realistically
implemented?
Our progress and success depend on
our strategic planning, building friendly
working relationships with various segments
of the business community at all levels to
develop Abu Dhabi’s non-oil economic
sectors. We encourage our businessmen
and trading community to foster strong
trade and business ties with foreign
businessmen, frms and companies.

Despite the recent and well-documented
successes of Abu Dhabi as a business
hub, what challenges does ADCCI face
in marketing this location to the ever-
growing volumes of investors?
We have successfully marketed the
economic and commercial benefts that
Abu Dhabi has to offer to foreign investors,
and the vast potential that the Emirate
has to offer in real estate, tourism, health
and industry. The private sector plays a
very crucial role in developing a strong
economy; ADCCI realizes this and has
established open, transparent and fast-
track policies in dealing with members and
foreign businessmen. The government
has liberalized the economy allowing
full-scale involvement of foreign investors.
However, we want to go for high-end quality
partnerships that will help us develop a
sound and stable non-oil economy. Abu
Dhabi is the largest of the seven emirates
endowed with rich natural resources other
than oil and gas. We have about 200 natural
islands, sand dunes, sea coast. We have the
advantage of turning these resources into
developing a strong non-oil-based economy.
Our FDI reached about $ 6 billion in 2006
and there is potential for more, as there are
more opportunities for investment in our
burgeoning tourist and travel industry, hotels,
health and education to name but a few.
Competition is always healthy and key to
growth. Competition does not mean we try
to undercut one another. Chambers of all the
seven emirates under the UAE Federation of
Chambers of Commerce and Industry (FCCI)
have a common goal to help boost and
strengthen the UAE economy by providing
guidance, help and support to businessmen
and entrepreneurs.
What further innovation can be expected
from ADCCI in the future?
In line with the changes in global economic
activity, the Chamber has laid down a
well-planned strategy to meet emerging
challenges, especially laying emphasis
on perfection and excellence within the
various departments of the Chamber. It is
our continuous endeavour to provide best
services and guidance to our members so
as to help them increase their trade and
business activities.
In addition, the Chamber is keen to
encourage young UAE men and women
entrepreneurs to start small- and medium-
sized enterprises (SMEs) to help boost the
government’s efforts to build the non-oil
economy. As an important part of its
strategy, it also provides its members with
orientation programmes to develop and
polish their skills and capabilities to
acquire modern know-how and knowledge
of international market-place trends. To this
end, the e-commerce culture has
been assimilated at the ADCCI with ease
to be in tandem with developments
around us and has greatly improved the
Since its inception in 1969,
the Chamber has discussed
many economic laws and
legislations that regulate economic
performance in the Emirate. As
a member of the UAE Federation
of Chambers of Commerce &
Industry, it plays a signifcant
role in discussing and drafting
these laws and regulations at
the UAE level. Its presence in
the international arena has been
gradually expanded through
multi-membership in many
Arab and world chamber
counterparts, including the
Arab-French, the Arab-Swiss,
the Arab-American, the Arab-
Belgian, the Arab-Luxembourg
and the Arab-German Chambers of
Commerce & Industry.
HE Mohammed Rashed Al Hameli, Director-General, Abu
Dhabi Chamber of Commerce and Industry
Abu Dhabi’s strategy for fnancial success is based on both the enhancement of
the economic structure and the diversifcation of income sources through nurturing the
non-oil sectors, strengthening the public-private partnership (PPP), encouraging the direct
foreign investment (DFI), as well as through entering into joint ventures hinged upon
comparative advantages. Any local economy managed by global standards seeks to apply
the laws of the knowledge-based economy.
40-43 ADCCI_L3.indd 4 2/3/09 8:19:13 PM
43 Best of Abu Dhabi
internal and external workings of the organisation.
The Chamber’s duty is to render the best possible services
to its member frms and companies. According to Chamber
Law, all individuals and companies that are based in the
Emirate and participate in any commercial or professional
activities in this area must be registered. Membership
certifcates are issued to all members and from this moment
onwards they are kept updated on the latest data and
information available from the Chamber, as well as being
educated about how to make the most of the services which
it offers. Members are notifed of the Chamber’s frequent
functions and events whilst being kept abreast of its general
duties and the tasks it carries out.
The wealth of data and information which the Chamber
possesses allows it to be an active participant in a variety
of functions and events, both locally and internationally.
Through these, the Chamber is able to introduce its member
companies and products so that they too can beneft from
these opportunities. This interaction helps the Chamber
to gain a clearer vision of the problems and obstacles that
members may be facing. These problems are discussed and
appropriate solutions are devised; if necessary, further action is
taken by approaching the authorities.
Through its website, the Chamber makes all information
required by the business community in Abu Dhabi and the
UAE instantly available. Their vision, “to be the leading
chamber in achieving socio-economic development” by
consistently seeking to support the national economy and
improving both the development of the services it offers and
the domestic and foreign relations it fosters, is being realised
across diverse spheres. Embarking on a strategy to invest in
the best and most advanced practical education in order to
upgrade the level of professionalism of its staff, they are
becoming recognized by the community as being highly
qualifed role-models who uphold the Chamber’s values
and enhance its prestigious position, nationally and
internationally. In this way, the Chamber’s mission, ‘to
contribute effectively to the enhancement of our national
economy through adoption of the best professional and
technical practices,’ is coming to fruition in tandem with Abu
Dhabi’s pre-eminence in the 21st century.
Abu Dhabi is the number one city in the Arab world across
diverse indicators. It is seeking to integrate into the global
market and to achieve prosperity for its citizens and residents.
To make this a reality, the government has adopted a scientifc
approach based on standards that would make it possible to
measure its performance against that of other economies.
Tel: +9712 621 4000
www.adcci-uae.com
The Chamber is also represented in boards,
including the UAE-Turkish Businessmen Board, the UAE-
Syrian Businessmen Board and the UAE-Indian Businessmen
Board. It is a member of the Federation of the AGCC Chambers
of Commerce & Industry, the Federation of Arab Chambers of
Commerce, Industry & Agriculture, the Islamic Chamber and
the Arab Labour Organization. Such representation falls within
the framework of its membership in the UAE Federation of
Chambers of Commerce & Industry.
40-43 ADCCI_L3.indd 5 2/3/09 8:19:22 PM
Chapter 2 Hotels & Hospitality
58-59 2 Hotels, Hosp&Ent_L3.indd 2 2/3/09 11:06:12 PM
Hotels & Hospitality
‘‘Who so ever practices hospitality entertains God himself ’’.
Anonymous
58-59 2 Hotels, Hosp&Ent_L3.indd 3 2/3/09 11:06:14 PM
Emirates Palace boasts
a 1.3 km stretch of
private beach.
302 grand rooms, 92 suites,
each carefully decorated and
furnished to ensure a superior
guest experience.
Features the most luxurious,
functional and techonologically
advanced conference and
meeting facilities in the UAE.
Emirates Palace presents an
exquisite selction of dining
venues serving a variety of
the fnest global cuisines,
crafted by the skilled hands
of multi-cultural chefs.
Palat ial Hospit ality
It rises from the desert sands like a mirage. Its breathtaking appeal, the silver
and gold glass mosaic tiles of its grand atrium dome shimmering in the sun’s
radiance, is undeniable. By night, this monolith of magnifcence is suffused with
brilliant light and glitters like a many facetted diamond. Superlatives are not
redundant when it comes to describing the most exclusive and expensive hotel
ever to be built. Launched in 2004, its construction cost over US $3 billion - and
it stands as a proud landmark of the modern UAE. Located in Abu Dhabi, this
tribute to comfort and service is owned by the Government of UAE and is man-
aged by the Kempinski Group of hotels.
H
o
t
e
l
s

&

H
o
s
p
i
t
a
l
i
t
y
Located on a 1.3 km stretch of Abu Dhabi’s most
beautiful sandy beach, the Emirates Palace
stretches across one million square metres and
is surrounded by a beautifully landscaped park.
60-61 Emirates Palace_L3.indd 2 2/3/09 11:41:03 PM
W
inner of the prestigious Platinum MENA Travel awards (2006) in three categories, the
most by any hotel, including ‘Best New Hotel of the Year’, ‘Best in Convention and
Conference Facilities’, and ‘Best Tourism Project’, the Palace has become a cornerstone
of Abu Dhabi’s fresh wave of innovation that is attracting inbound tourists and business
travellers alike.
Designed by Wimberly Allison Tong and Goo (WATG), one of the worlds’s leading
hospitality designers, this architectural wonder embraces a feel of times gone by with
the relentlessly modern without jarring the overall ambience. The traditional Arabian element
of the dome, with the amazing 14 smaller domes on top of ancillary buildings added
to the bronze hues of the building refect the different shades of sand found in the Arabian
Desert. The seamless level of service and smart ensuite touch-technology
blends the traditional with cutting edge convenience for the delectation of the most
discerning of guests.
Located on a 1.3 km stretch of Abu Dhabi’s most beautiful sandy beach, the Emirates
Palace stretches across one million square metres and is surrounded by a beautifully
landscaped park - vast enough for exploration by bicycle. Its superlative leisure facilities
already include two stunning pool landscapes and two ultra luxurious spas each in the East
and West Wings.
The General Manager, Hans Olbertz, is justifably proud of an exalted clientele that
range from visiting dignitaries, participants of international conferences and the high-end
leisure tourist and sundry international jet set on the look out for seclusion and calm. “Our
management company, Kempinski, does a wonderful job of marketing the property via their
channels worldwide”, he explains. “This is also why you will encounter plenty of Germans,
but in essence the Emirates Palace sells itself through the unique brand recall it has
garnered with select niches globally”.
It is not diffcult to understand the reason for this property’s kudos that has, in many
respects, served as a basis for Abu Dhabi’s travel and tourism is rapidly reaching its target
of three million tourists by 2015. Its unique structure, comprising a Palace section with the
top suites, two wings with guest rooms and a fully equipped conference centre, allows it to
meet the requirements of a variety of market segments simultaneously.
With a staff force touching 1800 and 49 different nationalities, an occupancy that
exceeds 60 percent and up to 15 different functions going on daily, luxurious offering
notwithstanding, the smooth running of the Emirates Palace represents the culmination of
complex logistics managed with dexterity by Hans Olbertz, who has managed the hotel
since inception. “I love Abu Dhabi, and having worked here in several capacities in the past
has made me appreciate the astounding changes that are underway. It is no longer wishful
thinking; Abu Dhabi is now internationally recognised as a gateway to the Arab world.
Coupled with its unsurpassed luxury facilities, its geographical advantage has helped the
Palace emerge as the hotel of choice for the glitterati and as one of the fnest conference
destinations in the world”, he explains.
Stepping into interiors of the Palace, designed by KY&A, specialists in hotel, resort and
spa interiors, is like entering a fairyland. Everything is breathtakingly larger than life and
unmistakably stylish, yet muted. Garishness is anathema to the property and also to the
model of intelligent, eco-friendly tourism that the Government of Abu Dhabi is planning for
the federal capital of one of the world’s richest oil producing countries that is diversifying
61 Best of Abu Dhabi
Hans Olbertz , General Manager, Emirates Palace
60-61 Emirates Palace_L3.indd 3 2/3/09 11:41:12 PM
62 Best of Abu Dhabi
its economy with stealth and
acumen. From the magnifcent
collection of 1002 chandeliers
made with Swarovski’s premier
Strauss crystals, to the
decorations of gold leaf and
the fnest marble, the property
has a rarifed aura that
cannot fail to impress even
the most hardened of luxury
hotel afcionados.
The superb appointments in
its four Presidential suites, 16
Palace suites, 40 Khaleej suites
and 302 luxury rooms combine
the ultimate in Arabian regal
splendour with cutting- edge
technology and memorable
service too. “In this day and
age when competition can kill,
hoteliers must ensure a touch
of uniqueness in everything
they offer. From the calibre
and preparedness of the staff,
to the quality and choice of
the F&B outlets, to the mod
cons as well, no detail can be
overlooked”, Massoud says.
Dedicated to anticipating the
diverse needs of its guests, a
thoughtful provision of language
preference to operate the
advanced hotel multimedia
system, is a testament to
the globalised identity of its
guests. This includes a touch
screen control panel that
allows guests full control of
all room appliances such as
lights, air-conditioning and in-
room entertainment including
50-inch plasma screens in
rooms and 61-inch plasma
screens in the suites. Interactive
TV with high speed internet
access and the unparalleled
butler service for each room
make a stay at the Palace a
memorable experience and
one with a human dimension
too. Our butler’s friendly and
competent ministrations made
the stay more accessible in a
manageably rarifed way.
With gourmet dining an
integral aspect of luxury
hospitality, the Emirates Palace
boasts of a wide array of
elaborate cuisines to tickle the
most jaded palate. As many as
170 chefs work in 128 kitchens
and pantries that serve a variety
of exotic cuisines from across
the world including Iranian,
Italian, Arabic, and Asian cuisine
in internationally branded
specialty restaurants, relaxing
lounges and cafes.
With Abu Dhabi projecting
itself as an international hub for
trade, commerce and industrial
markets, the Emirates Palace is
the ideal spot for conventions,
meetings and banquets of
all sizes. The very best in
technology, facilities, equipment
and service staff weave
together the perfect setting,
blending the best Arabian aura
with a patina of luxury and
competence. When it comes
to meetings, incentives and
conference requirements, The
Emirates Palace can customise
the layout and equipment
setting according to client’s
requirements. This fexibility
makes it the ideal setting both
for a large convention or an
intimate business meeting.
And when it comes to
getting together for business,
nobody does it better than
them. Boasting a world class
array of conference facilities and
venues, the Emirates Palace
International Conference Centre
houses an auditorium with
fxed seating for 1,200 guests,
a main ballroom that can hold
up to 2000, an extensive range
of 40 meeting rooms, a high-
tech business centre and a
media centre to boot. Six large
terraces and a variety of pre-
function areas provide tranquil
locales for breaks, cocktail
receptions and banquets.
Set in its 100 hectares of
beautifully landscaped park
with several open lawns, it also
offers spectacular outdoor
venues for gala dinners and
creative events. “We have
had numerous functions on a
grand scale, ranging from the
GCC Summit and the World
Leadership Summit, to the
Young Arab Leaders conference
as well as host of opera shows,
live concerts and more” he
says. “The name of the game
is to proceed with precision
whilst allowing for the human
touch to shine through”,
he adds.
Whether for business or
leisure, enjoying the ample
facilities cannot be easier: a
relaxing stroll on the serene
stretch of secluded beach, a
couple of laps in either of the
two swimming pools, a brisk
workout in one of the two
state of the art ftness centres
or a game of tennis under
the tutelage of resident tennis
professional Dermot O’Grady.
Even children can have the time
of their lives - a colourful, action-
packed play zone guarantees
fun for them, and
for children aged 14 and above,
an energy zone simulates
extreme sports like wind surfng,
para-gliding and climbing.
Even though it is just one
km away from the city centre,
shopping is always a temptation
to be indulged in thanks to
the hotel’s in-house boutiques
that have just the right selection
of designer items for every type
of guest.
Adding to the exhaustive list
of its fabulous enticements, this
haven of comfort is all the more
sought after as it is located near
many major business quarters,
shopping malls and local
attractions. Easily accessible
from major international
gateways through Abu Dhabi
and Dubai International Airports,
small wonder then that the
world’s who’s who have been
dazzled by the splendour and
hospitality of the Emirates
Palace. The beauty and
enduring appeal of the Emirates
Palace though, is that it never
fails to lend its caring service
to anyone who comes to stay -
even the humblest like me can
get to live like a king for a day.
Tel: +9712 690 9000
www.emiratespalace.com
With a staff force touching 1500, an occupancy rate that exceeds 60 percent and up to 15 functions going on
daily, the smooth running of Emirates Palace is the culmination of complex logistics managed with dexterity.
60-61 Emirates Palace_L3.indd 4 2/3/09 11:41:21 PM
Winner of the prestigious Platinum MENA
Awards (2006) in three ctaergories, stepping
into interiors of the Palace is like entering a
fairyland. Everything is breathtakingly larger
than life and unmistakably stylish.
60-61 Emirates Palace_L3.indd 5 2/3/09 11:41:24 PM
A resort with a difference
Location, they say, is everything. Add elegant décor, traditional Arabian
hospitality, a stretch of pristine white beach and miscellaneous modern luxuries
and you have a winning combination; Beach Rotana. Attached to one of Abu
Dhabi’s largest and most exclusive malls, and lying in the heart of the city – a
mere 30 minute drive from the International Airport - the resort’s unequivocal
popularity is easy to comprehend. Accolades notwithstanding, Rotana is far from
content to rest on its laurels, the property is constantly reinventing itself in order
to remain at the crest of the market become the fulfllment of all its guests’ needs.
“We are always developing, always willing to redesign and upgrade to become
ever more competitive” explains General Manager Moritz Klein.
Rotana boasts squash
courts, swimming
pools, water-sports and
food-lit all weather
tennis courts.
Tourism accounted for
3.7Dhs billion of Abu
Dhabi’s GDP in 2007.
Founded in 1993,
Rotana Beach Abu Dhabi
is part of Rotana Hotel
Management Corporation.
Beach Rotana encompasses
10 Treatment Rooms, 2
Tranquility Suites and Relaxation
areas, a dedicated Spa Team
of expert therapists and
a comprehensive treatment menu.
H
o
t
e
l
s

&

H
o
s
p
i
t
a
l
i
t
y
With eleven restaurants on offer, from elegant dining to alfresco by the beach, there is an option for every mood or inclination.
Beach Rotana sets a sophisticated tone embraced by the entire resort. A stylish lounge lies beneath a vast glass dome,
whilst the attentive staff ensure prompt check-in times and fawless service.
64 - 65 Beach Rotana_L3.indd 2 2/4/09 3:28:38 AM
F
rom the moment you wander into the opulent lobby,
Beach Rotana sets a sophisticated tone embraced
by the entire resort. A stylish lounge lies beneath a vast
glass dome, whilst attentive staff ensure prompt check-
in times and fawless service. The sheer quantity, variety
and quality of the facilities available, however, is what
sets this hotel apart from its other fve star neighbours.
With eleven restaurants on offer, from elegant dining
to alfresco by the beach, there is an option for every
mood or inclination. Not to mention the award winning
eateries from worldwide, vibrant bars, live evening
entertainment and wickedly exotic cocktails. If you’d
rather build up an appetite, as opposed to quenching
one, Rotana boasts squash courts, swimming pools,
water-sports and food-lit all weather tennis courts to
boot. “Depending on whether you want to work out or
wind down, we have the right option for our guests”,
Klein says.
However, Beach Rotana Abu Dhabi is ideal for
business as well as those just here to soak up the
sun, and its success in this market is as much to do
with its state-of-the-art business centre as its enviable
location. For events or conferences there is a skilled
team provided to meet the organizers’ needs, wireless
connectivity and professional Secretary Support
designed to help with anything and everything. This
meticulous attention to detail, all with the aim of
creating an environment where business can be as
effcient and relaxed as possible, is part of the bespoke
service that Rotana Resort considers “integral to our
tremendous success”.
Still on the facilities front, the Zen spa is veritable
haven of tranquillity, offering a serene and relaxing
retreat. Deriving from Holistic Asian Philosophies but
with an added contemporary twist, the spa is designed
to take an uncomplicated approach to providing ‘me
time’. With 10 Treatment Rooms, 2 Tranquillity Suites
and Relaxation areas, a dedicated Spa Team of
expert therapists and a comprehensive treatment
menu, the spa allows visitors to rebalance and
rejuvenate in comfort.
Founded in 1993, Rotana Beach Abu Dhabi is
part of the Rotana Hotel Management Corporation.
Committed to the standards of excellence that the
chain is now famous for regionally, Klein explains
that the resort is “constantly working to build up
international awareness and infltrate foreign markets so
that we can be as well established worldwide as we are
here in the Middle East”. At the moment Rotana has 25
operations but by 2012 65 are predicted, an ambitious
but no doubt achievable strategy. Tourism accounted
for 3.7Dhs billion of Abu Dhabi’s GDP last year and this
fgure is projected to rise exponentially due to the scale
of tourism-related planning in the Emirate’s
capital city, and poised to beneft hugely from this
trend are resorts such as Rotana. To ensure that the
impressive standards that the brand is famed for
are maintained, they benchmark themselves against
Leading Hotels of the World Inc, of which they are a
member, and consequently undergo annual quality and
integrity checks.
Ultimately, the most important test of success is…
“Total guest satisfaction, every time and in every way…
It’s what the resort works unfailingly towards, and it’s
what I am personally committed to”.
Tel: +9712 697 9000
www.rotana.com
65 Best of Abu Dhabi
With eleven restaurants on offer, from elegant dining to alfresco by the beach, there is an option for every mood or inclination.
64 - 65 Beach Rotana_L3.indd 3 2/4/09 3:28:42 AM
Sporting facilities
Health and ftness
centre, recreation &
sports courts, indoor/
outdoor pools, 24 hour
gym & spa facilities.
Rooms
390
Location
Perfectly situated on
the beach less then 10
minutes from downtown
Abu Dhabi. Nearby the
Heritage Village, Marina,
Lulu island & Gold Souq.
Amenities
3 Executive boardrooms,
4 Meeting rooms,
Multiple grand ballrooms
Renovated auditorium;
all perfectly ftted for
conferences and exhibitions.
A history of excellence
With its landscaped parkland and seafront replete with private marina and arc
of pristine white beach, the tranquillity of this hotel resort is what underpins the
Intercontinental position as a luxury hospitality brand that knows no rivals.
H
o
t
e
l
s

&

H
o
s
p
i
t
a
l
i
t
y
Abu Dhabi’s social scene would not be the same without the
InterContinental’s inimitable restaurants and bars, having earned a well
deserved reputation for some of the best dining experiences in town. This
hotel has defnitively established itself as the benchmark against which
others on Abu Dhabi’s deluxe hotel scene must be compared.
66 - 67 InterContinental Hotel_L3.indd 2 2/4/09 4:52:59 AM
67 Best of Abu Dhabi
A
bu Dhabi is evolving at
an exponential rate; with
construction booming, the
tourist industry fourishing and an
explosion of new developments
planned to transform the region
and expand its international
infuence. At the heart of this
thriving and successful city lies
the InterContinental, a hotel that
has been one of Abu Dhabi’s
most celebrated landmarks for the
past 28 years and has recently
re-opened to reveal a fresh face,
following a 65 million dollar revamp
project. Set amid beautifully
landscaped parkland, the hotel
is situated on the seafront with
a private marina and an arc of
pristine white beach.
With all the tranquillity and ex-
clusivity of a resort and every luxury
and amenity of a fve star hotel,
the re-launched InterContinental
ushers in a new era of hospital-
ity excellence. From the stunning
new lobby to the four restaurants
serving exquisite dishes including
Brazilian Churrascaria and Thai
seafood, to the stylish bars and
piano lounge, fully equipped gym-
nasium and Health Zone; this hotel
has defnitively established itself
as the benchmark against which
others on Abu Dhabi’s deluxe hotel
scene must be compared. “We
are a trusted and respected brand,
which is a responsibility we take
very seriously”, explains General
Manager Simon W. Stamper, who
has recently returned to the hotel
after a three year stint in the early
1990’s. Abu Dhabi holds a special
place in Mr. Stampers’ heart as it
is here that he frst met his wife.
He speaks fondly of the changes
in Abu Dhabi tourism and is
impressed by how much prettier
the Emirate is these days, with the
Parkland and Lulu Island close
to the hotel guest have beautiful
day trips to look forward to. Mr.
Stamper credits the Abu Dhabi
Tourism Authority for much of
the progress.
In line with this progress the
hotel has itself kept abreast with
technology and boast the fastest
in-room internet in the area, as well
as the cheapest rates for room
booking in its hotel if you book via
their internet site.
Founded in 1983 and part of
the InterContinental Hotel group,
the hotel has an enviable location
right on the beach and is less than
10 minutes from the city cen-
tre. The Abu Dhabi International
Exhibition Centre, Heritage Village
and the Cultural Foundation are
also close to hand. The ambience
of understated luxury and effort-
less elegance is perfectly suited to
both tourists and corporate trips,
although the state-of-the-art busi-
ness centre certainly attracts many
of the latter. The meeting facilities
include three executive board-
rooms, four connectable meeting
rooms that can cater for up to 100,
grand ballrooms perfect for confer-
ences and exhibitions and a newly
renovated auditorium.
Abu Dhabi’s social scene
would not be the same without
the InterContinental’s restaurants
and bars, having earned a well
deserved reputation for some
of the best dining experiences
available - the quality and variety
of restaurants is a treat for the
taste-buds. Chamas, the Brazilian
inspired restaurant with a genuine
Latin band, serves endless
skewers of freshly barbecued
meat by enthusiastic and attentive
Passadores to until you are fll
to burst, diners can also try
the uniquely Brazilian cocktail
“Caipirinha” with its bitter natural
taste, that is sweetened by either
a choclate or strawberry sugar,
this evening out is indeed a dining
experience with a difference, in
addition, there is also the award-
winning Fishmarket which has a
delicious display of the freshest
sea-food cooked Thai style and
served looking out over the
Arabian Gulf. But it doesn’t stop
there; there is also Boccaccio, a
relaxed and airy Italian Restaurant,
Selections which boasts some of
the best views Abu Dhabi from its
vantage point on the third foor, a
piano lounge for a chilled break
and the famous a.m.p.m bar for
the hotel’s night owls, serving
the freshest beats and the most
extravagant cocktails. If you’re
after that extra dose of exclusivity,
however, guest’s can choose
the Club InterContinental - which
offers access to the elite Private
Club Lounge.
The rooms themselves are
spacious, modern and luxurious;
with magnifcent panoramic views
of the city skyline and the highest
levels of personalized service.
For those after a fast track to
refreshment and revitalization
the Health Zone is ideal, with
its Jacuzzi, steam room, sauna,
cold plunge pool and massage
treatments. Yet one of the
most appealing sides of the
InterContinental, that sets it apart
from the competition, is
the hotel’s dedication to
showcasing what its host city
has to offer. The Concierge
service provides guests with a
compelling insight into the rich
culture and amazing experiences
to be found in Abu Dhabi,
especially those that are often not
put on the traditional tourist maps.
This is mirrored in Mr. Stampers’
genuine passion for Abu Dhabi
and the industry in general;
“We’re so excited about the
future, the InterContinental has
resumed its rightful place at the
heart of this amazing city’. With
its sophisticated new image
and illustrious past, the future
looks bright.
The Yacht Club
What better setting than a stylish
terrace overlooking Abu Dhabi’s
most picturesque marina. The
Yacht Club is set to become
the hottest spot in town with its
contemporary interiors, Pacifc
Rim cuisine and the unlimited
imagination of its bar staff. Prepare
for cocktail creations, unforgettable
sunsets and much more. Open
daily, 12.00pm to 01.00am.
Tel: + 9712 666 6888
www.ichotelsgroup.com
The quality and variety of restaurants is a treat for the taste-buds. For instance Chamas, a Brazilian inspired eatery with a genuine Latin band, serves endless skewers of freshly barbecued
meat designed to fll you to bursting point. In addition, let loose in the award-winning Fishmarket which boasts a superlative selection of the freshest sea-food cooked Thai style. But the fun
does not stop there; there is also Boccaccio, a relaxed and airy Italian restaurant; where an evening al fresco adds a zing to any palate.
66 - 67 InterContinental Hotel_L3.indd 3 2/4/09 4:53:07 AM
A fully equipped
ftness centre, ftted
with free-weights and
a variety of cardiovas-
cular machines.
Le Royal Méridien has
275 guest rooms –
including 79 luxurious
suites.
Ten restaurants and bars offer
an array of choices from Italian
cuisine to exotic Asian fare to
elegant French gastronomy to
fresh seafood.
Liwa Grand Ballroom is the pride of
Le Royal Méridien Abu Dhabi: the
spacious and beautiful room can
seat up to 400 delegates and can
accommodate 1,000 guests for a
cocktail party.
Bespoke Magnificence
Ensconced in the heart of Abu Dhabi and framed by lushly landscaped
gardens, Le Royal Méridien Abu Dhabi is set against dazzling high-rise towers
of the city bordered by the cerulean waters of the Arabian Gulf. One of Abu
Dhabi’s principal landmarks, where spectacular urbanisation is interlocked with
the charm of an ancient culture and its architecture, the luxury property borders
Corniche gardens, private lounges, futuristic health club and every amenity for
the discerning guest.
H
o
t
e
l
s

&

H
o
s
p
i
t
a
l
i
t
y
Sitting at the heart of the Abu Dhabi, travellers have long considered
this elegant hotel a jewel in the heart of the Middle East.
68-69 Le Royal Meridien Abu Dhabi_L3.indd 2 2/4/09 5:05:42 AM
W
ith 275 rooms and 79 suites, the Le Royal Méridien Abu Dhabi is just a brisk
walk away from the renowned city sites such as the Abu Dhabi Mall, the Cultural
Foundation, Abu Dhabi’s Petroleum Exhibition, not to mention the Zayed Heritage Village.
With all the global features and activities you would expect at any Le Méridien property,
impeccable attention to detail and dedication to exemplary customer service reigns
supreme. Such services range from your standard babysitting, dry cleaning and secretarial
services to currency exchanges, medical services, airport transportation and health clubs
as well as nearby golf course too. What’s more, with a multilingual staff as to cater for all
nationalities, any guest can feel at home.
Why not begin the day with an invigorating workout in the fully equipped ftness centre
then fnish off with a refreshing dip in the indoor or outdoor pool? Set amidst landscaped
gardens and luxuriant foliage, the outdoor pool is a work of modern art.
After a chaotic day of business or sightseeing, there is the chance to relax with a
massage, sauna or to soak in the Jacuzzi. If you’re in an active mood, then why not entice a
colleague into a game of squash? There is even the option to try water-skiing, jet skiing, or
boating on the shimmering waters of the Arabian Gulf.
Leisure pursuits notwithstanding, the property is within walking distance of Abu
Dhabi’s principal commercial and business districts, and only a short drive from the
International Airport.
With so much to enjoy, its offerings don’t stop here. It’s expert staff also facilitates
opportunities to discover unique cultural experiences both within the hotel, as well as
across the local community. Dedicated to providing these experiences, as well as to
recommending the most enriching art, musical, fashion and design events that the emirate
has to offer, Abu Dhabi is also home to myriad museums, as well as the National Theatre
and the Abu Dhabi Classical Music Society.
If all of this were not suffcient for global culture vultures, then wait for the launch of
the Guggenheim Museum complex, designed by the legendary Frank Gehry under
construction on Saadiyat Island. Hand in hand with Le Meridien, Abu Dhabi’s treasures are
set to unfold…
Tel: +9712 674 2020
www.starwoodhotels.com/lemeridien
69 Best of Abu Dhabi
The beautiful Corniche, the most popular boulevard in the city, boasts public
gardens and recreational promenades.
68-69 Le Royal Meridien Abu Dhabi_cor_L3.indd 3 2/9/09 4:49:53 PM
Swit ch on t o sust ainability
In view of the need for a serious energy conservation strategy
being enacted by Dubai’s hotels, various products, strategies and
services are being developed by Phillips in order to assist
hospitality groups to lower Co2 emissions in line with Dubai
government directives. D.P. Smedema, General Manager, Phillips
Middle East, Designation, airs his views on the way forward.
H
o
t
e
l
s

&

H
o
s
p
i
t
a
l
i
t
y
DP Smedema, General Manager, Philips Lighting Middle East
Phillips supports a sustainable approach towards the hospitality industry, which includes training technical staff of all major hotel chains. They are planning work-
shops together with the Dubai Department of Tourism and Commerce Marketing in November 2008 to increase awareness of energy consumption in hotels and
support them towards energy effcient solutions. Philips is also putting together a green week in Dubai to strengthen public awareness towards energy saving.
70 - 71 Phillips Hospitality_L3.indd 2 2/4/09 5:43:39 AM
71 Best of Abu Dhabi
S
ince 2008 Philips Middle East, headquartered in Dubai, has been
working with the hotels in making energy scans of their hotel facilities,
giving recommendations on how to improve their energy effciency
by a simple lamp replacement, without changing the ftting or fxture.
Commonly used products like incandescent light bulbs can easily be
replaced by energy saving lamps, called compact fuorescent lamps with
integrated transformer. This replacement will immediately save 80 percent
on energy consumption, reducing the CO2 by 41kg per year per lamp.
Philips Ambiance range has been created for hospitality and homes,
since they save energy without disturbing the ambience in the room.
Another popular lamp in hotels is the halogen refector, or dichroic, which
can directly be replaced by the Philips MASTERLine ES. This switch
saves 40 per cent on energy consumption and cost, also lasting 2-3
times longer, which dramatically reduces maintenance, saving time and
money.
An electronic transformer (e.g. Philips ET-S) is strongly recommended
to ensure that the specifed lifetime is reached and energy saving of the
total light system is guaranteed. Since last year we have reached the next
step in energy saving measures:
LED technology... With retroft lamps like MASTERLED 7W replacing a
35W halogen refector lamp, or 40W incandescent light bulb, signifcant
energy can be spared.
Occasionally, a so-called mockup room is installed with the
proposed energy effcient lighting solution to check the acceptability of
the total atmosphere.
In comparison to the rest of the world, how important is this area
regionally in your overall operations in terms of growth prospects,
turnover and market share?
For Philips, hospitality is becoming a professional segment with a
cross Product Division approach (Lighting and Consumer lifestyle) with
dominantly sustainable solutions. With a leading position in the lighting
industry to increase energy saving, and a high position on the Dow
Jones Sustainability Index, sustainable solutions are one of Philips core
competences. With the growing need of energy effcient solutions in this
hospitality segment in the Middle East, it is vital to become a key supplier
of energy effcient lighting and consumer lifestyle solutions in the region’s
hotel industry.
Are your clients primarily hotels or other commercial developers?
Are there differences in the ranges of products you supply
between one type of client/segment to another?
The hotel segment is a growing professional segment, which we serve
next to offce, industry, retail and outdoor. Each asks for a different
approach and different products/solutions. Where road lighting mainly
uses high pressure sodium lamps, offces ask for fuorescent lighting
solutions and fashion shops are moving from halogen towards compact
discharge lamps. What they all have in common is the increasing need for
energy effcient solutions.
In terms product imports of all types, this region is notoriously
price conscious and often capitulates to cheap imports from
South East Asia that may not have the quality benchmarks set by
Phillips. How do you counter unfair competition?
Because of limited knowledge and awareness in the Middle East towards
lighting, it is diffcult to recognize and appreciate the difference between
one lamp and another. So logically consumers purchase the cheapest
lamp as long as it fts. Only after usage they experience that lifetime is
short, light output is fades fast or lamps simply change colour. To ensure
consumers purchase the right product to prevent disappointment, we
are setting up training programs and workshops in hotels and other
segments. After which, those this who attended the course are better
prepared to take the right decisions about their lighting, recognizing the
difference between the initial cost of a lamp and the value of lighting. After
all, the cheapest lamp is actually the most expensive lighting solution.
Tel: + 9714 309 5035
www.mea.philips.com
Philips is growing its lighting division in the Middle East, especially in the hospitality sector. Building on current lighting contracts with major hotel chains, they are joining forces with top players in transforming them into ‘green’
hotels by supplying them with latest innovations using more LED technology. Philips aims to continue supporting the hospitality industry as well as the government in making the Middle East sustainable, astounding other parts
of the world, with its track record of sustainability.
Park Hyatt Dubai, Lighting Design by Stephen Gough of Project Lighting Design
Photo courtesy Lumasense
70 - 71 Phillips Hospitality_L3.indd 3 2/4/09 5:43:44 AM
Chapter 3 Tourism, Cult ure & Herit age
72 - 73 3-Tourism, Culture & Heritage - Etihad_L3.indd 2 2/4/09 7:06:00 AM
“Don’t tell me how educated you are, tell me how much you travelled.” “Don’t tell me how educated you are, tell me how much you travelled.”
Prophet Muhammed (PBUH), (570-632 AD)
Untitled-1 1 2/4/09 6:55:38 AM
72 - 73 3-Tourism, Culture & Heritage - Etihad_L3.indd 3 2/4/09 7:06:14 AM
Abu Dhabi International
Airport is undergoing
expansion to increase
capacity to 40 million
passengers.
Abu Dhabi is looking to
have 26,000 hotel rooms
by the end of 2012.
ADTA supports Abu
Dhabi’s tourism industry
in a manner consistent
with the indigenous
cultural and social values
of UAE society.
ADTA has gained many
international awards for
enhancing the tourism
sector in Abu Dhabi
and worldwide.
Managing a distinctive destination
Abu Dhabi Tourism Authority was established in 2004 with wide ranging
responsibilities for the promotion and development of the emirate’s
international tourism industry. Its mandate covers key areas including
destination marketing, infrastructure and product development as well as
regulation, licensing and classifcation.
T
o
u
r
i
s
m
,

C
u
l
t
u
r
e

&

H
e
r
i
t
a
g
e
74 -77 ADTA_L3.indd 2 2/4/09 7:19:02 AM
Abu Dhabi International
Airport is undergoing
expansion to increase
capacity to 40 million
passengers.
A
DTA activities also include supporting the
emirate’s tourism industry in a manner
consistent with the indigenous cultural and social
values of UAE society. ADTA is achieving this
aim through intense and extensive international
promotion, the opening of dedicated offces in
key markets, dynamic product development
innovative and precision-targeted marketing to
build brand and destination awareness as well as
impactful educational campaigns for consumers
and the travel trade.
In all its activities, ADTA works closely
with stakeholders and partners including the
immigration services, Abu Dhabi Airports
Company, hotel owners, developers and
operators, Etihad, the national airline of the UAE,
the Department of Transport, Abu Dhabi National
Exhibitions Company, Abu Dhabi Authority For
Culture & Heritage and municipalities throughout
the emirate.
This has resulted in the authority having a
substantial presence at key industry events
worldwide, the staging of road shows and trade
workshops as well as inbound familiarisation trips
for trade and media. ADTA activities also include
regulation and monitoring of the tourism industry,
which is helping to upgrade services, standards
and performance throughout the industry and the
promotion of training opportunities to encourage
more UAE national participation in the industry.
ADTA is also closely involved in the
development of the emirate’s tourism
infrastructure and products and it plays a
Vision
‘To be a leading tourism authority
that is positioning the emirate
of Abu Dhabi as an outstanding,
globally recognised, sustainable
tourism destination, while
enriching the lives of the Abu
Dhabi community and visitors
alike’ - Sultan Bin Tahnoon Al
Nahyan, Chairman, Abu Dhabi
Tourism Authority
Mission
‘To drive and support the
development and promotion of
tourism in Abu Dhabi effciently,
effectively, and transparently,
in partnership with all our
stakeholders while ensuring the
highest quality standards’ - Sultan
Bin Tahnoon Al Nahyan, Chairman,
Abu Dhabi Tourism Authority
74 -77 ADTA_L3.indd 3 2/4/09 7:19:19 AM
76 Best of Abu Dhabi
For centuries the tribes that inhabited the southern tip of the Arabian Peninsula lived a tough nomadic life, or earned a living by diving for pearls and fshing along the coast. In 1958 massive oil and gas reserves catapulted
these impoverished desert sheikhkdoms into a dimension of wealth and plenty. Slowly embracing socio-political reform, today the region’s most socially liberal country, is a federation of modern city states replete with gleaming
skyscrapers towering above manicured oases and palm-lined boulevards. With economic diversifcation and enlightened development plans in diverse spheres, there is more to life in Abu Dhabi than meets the eye.
leading role in attracting inward investment
to further the sector’s role in economic
diversifcation. ADTA is also responsible for
supervising existing and future government
tourism projects and services.
ADTA strategies span the development
of the business tourism (formerly Meetings,
Incentives, Conferences and Exhibitions)
sector, the enhancement of leisure services
and products and the implementation of a
comprehensive events strategy. The ADTA
also works in close co-ordination with the
Abu Dhabi National Exhibitions Company
(ADNEC) to further the emirate’s
ambitions to become a world-class
business tourism destination.
Throughout every aspect of its work,
ADTA is dedicated to leveraging Abu
Dhabi’s rich natural heritage and traditions
and delivering socio-economic and
environmental sustainability.
ADTA’s corporate ethos is based around
Abu Dhabi’s brand message of respect, which
leads to an inclusive approach embracing
all segments of its home community and its
valued overseas partners and guests.
As an employer, ADTA strives to be the
‘best of the best’ promoting innovation and
leadership by encouraging ongoing training
and development both for its own staff,
national and expatriate alike, and by providing
training to employees of its stakeholders and
industry partners.
Tel: + 9712 444 0444
www.abudhabitourism.ae
74 -77 ADTA_L3.indd 4 2/4/09 7:19:53 AM
76
74 -77 ADTA_L3.indd 5 2/4/09 7:20:40 AM
Art ist ic Perspect ives
By 2012, Abu Dhabi will be making headway as one of the cultural hubs of the
Middle East. As the clock counts down to that date, with the opening of museums,
art centres and art fairs aplenty, ‘Best of Abu Dhabi’ gives you a taste of the artis-
tic adventures the emirate has already undertaken, as well as those yet to come.
T
o
u
r
i
s
m
,

C
u
l
t
u
r
e

&

H
e
r
i
t
a
g
e
Three years ago, Abu Dhabi set up
Watani, a social and cultural develop-
ment project that aims to engage its youth
in local Emirati culture, with a particular
emphasis on art.
The Abu Dhabi Tourism Authority
(ADTA), which offers services like
tours of the Grand Mosque, expects
2.7 hotel guests in the UAE capital
by 2012.
Part of its plan to promote local
culture, ADACH held a photography
exhibition on “The Costumes and
Adornments of UAE Women,” by artist
Cibely Dohle.
Guggenheim - Abu Dhabi’s upcoming art icon of Heritage and art culture
Image Courtesy - Sadaqat Ali Syed Image Courtesy - Sadaqat Ali Syed
78 - 79 Art in Abu Dhabi_L3.indd 2 2/4/09 7:36:45 AM
79 Best of Abu Dhabi
I
n 2005, Abu Dhabi took signifcant strides
towards becoming a Middle Eastern cultural
focal point by creating the Abu Dhabi Authority
for Culture and Heritage (ADACH). An offshoot
of the Abu Dhabi Cultural Foundation, this
organisation aims to promote the cultural and
historical aspects of Abu Dhabi, with a focus
on literature, music, theatre, cinema, art and
photography. ADACH caters to all types of art
lovers through its ‘Plan for 2008-2012,’ which
takes up the challenge to keep the local Emirati
heritage alive while promoting the art that is
refective of an increasingly developed and
cosmopolitan city.
Recently, the organisation demonstrated its
range in artistic offerings. Among other things, it
set up: ‘Picasso Abu Dhabi: Masterpieces from
the Musee National Picasso’, which featured
186 paintings, sculptures and drawings and
marked the frst presentation of the Musee
National Picasso collection in the Middle East;
‘The Arts of Islam’, which attracted over 61,000
visitors in just three months; and the screening
of 9 Iranian flms. ADACH also showed its
commitment to promoting the culture of the
surrounding Arab region, with its exhibition on
‘Treasures from Sudan’.
Thanks to the realisation that the federal
capital must invest in community initiatives in
order to foster meaningful societal values and
substance to its tourism investment efforts,
major inroads have been made through a
collaboration with one of the most famous
art fairs in the world: artparis. artparis is an
international fair dedicated to modern and
contemporary art that takes place annually in
France’s City of Lights. The organisers of this
event have come together with the ADACH
and Abu Dhabi Tourism Development and
Investment Company to create a fair for modern
and contemporary art in the UAE capital.
Dubbed artparis Abu Dhabi, the event will
provide a yearly meeting point for lovers of art
across the Middle East and further afeld.
The November 2008 exhibition witnessed
the second running of artparis Abu Dhabi in
Emirates Palace. The show had expanded by a
mind-blowing 40 per cent from its earlier debut,
exhibiting 58 modern/contemporary art galleries
worldwide and encompassing over 3,300
artworks by more than 700 artists, including
Andy Warhol, Pablo Picasso and Paul Cezanne.
Capping all of these artistic achievements is
the opening of Saadiyat Island’s Cultural District,
earmarked for 2012. This section of Abu Dhabi
will embody the largest concentration of premier
cultural institutions in the world. The project will
house various museums, including: the Sheikh
Zayed National Museum, the Guggenheim Abu
Dhabi Museum and the Louvre Abu Dhabi. It will
also be home to a prestigious performing arts
centre and a maritime museum. The buildings
for the project are being designed by award
winning architects from around the world, like
the famed Frenchman Jean Nouvel. A project
unprecedented in scale and scope, the Cultural
District will brand Abu Dhabi as a meaningful
addition to the region’s burgeoning art scene.
Currently one of the fastest growing economies in the world, Abu Dhabi
is also setting itself up to become a leader in yet another feld: the
international art scene. By putting in place the infrastructure to propel
art, heritage and culture, the emirate aims to open its doors to artists
and culture-based tourism from around the world, as well as fostering
the talents of its home grown art fraternity.
Louvre - A home of a prestigious performing arts centre and a maritime museum
Image Courtesy - Sadaqat Ali Syed
78 - 79 Art in Abu Dhabi_L3.indd 3 2/4/09 7:36:54 AM
79
The Grand Mosque’s
courtyard and prayer halls can ft
over 40,000
worshippers at one time.
The Grand Mosque is
home to the world’s
largest chandelier, a 9
tonne behemoth made of 1
million Swarovski crystals
imported from Germany.
Initiated by Sheikh Zayed in
1998, the Grand Mosque was
a global meeting point since
inception, bringing together over
3,000 workers and 38 contract-
ing companies from around
the world.
The overall cost of the
Grand Mosque is just
over AED 2 billion ($545
million).
Beauty and truth
Shiekh Zayed Bin Sultan Al Nahyan, the late founding father of the UAE, had a vision: to create a
world in which religious and cultural understanding reigned supreme. This enlightened leader left us
the physical manifestation of that ideal in the legacy of the Grand Mosque. At a time that is on
occasion witnessing the devaluation and demonization of the sacred precepts of Islam, the Grand
Mosque epitomises the beauty and purity that has long been part of the Islamic tradition.
T
o
u
r
i
s
m
,

C
u
l
t
u
r
e

&

H
e
r
i
t
a
g
e
In a region famous for creating the biggest and the best, the Grand
Mosque had much to live up to – and it did. Covering 22,412 square
metres, the mosque is about the size of fve football felds, making it
the third-largest mosque in the world.
Image Courtesy - Sadaqat Ali Syed
80 - 83 Zayed Mosque_L3.indd 2 2/4/09 7:43:19 AM
The Grand Mosque’s
courtyard and prayer halls can ft
over 40,000
worshippers at one time.
In a region famous for creating the biggest and the best, the Grand
Mosque had much to live up to – and it did. Covering 22,412 square
metres, the mosque is about the size of fve football felds, making it
the third-largest mosque in the world.
The mosque has the world’s largest carpet at 7,119 square metres, from Iran.
It has 28 types of marble and 24-carat gold throughout.
The 22,412 square metre mosque site equates to around the size of fve football felds.
More than 3,000 workers and 38 renowned contracting companies took part in the
construction work.
The mosque has 82 domes of traditional Moroccan design - all decorated with white marble.
The main dome’s outer shell is 32.8 metres in diameter and stands at a height of
70 metres from the inside and 85 metres from the outside.
Image Courtesy - Sadaqat Ali Syed
80 - 83 Zayed Mosque_L3.indd 3 2/4/09 7:43:31 AM
Image Courtesy - Sadaqat Ali Syed
80 - 83 Zayed Mosque_L3.indd 4 2/4/09 7:43:50 AM
83 Best of Abu Dhabi
L
ocated in the heart of Abu Dhabi, the
Grand Mosque (offcially called the Sheikh
Zayed Bin Sultan Al Nahyan Mosque) is a
cultural and architectural landmark. This
white marble wonder sits atop a 9.5-metre
high hill, as if descending onto the city from
another world.
Just looking at the exterior is enough to
impress the visitor. Eighty-two extraordinary
marble domes crown the building with
its endless rows of pillars, and intricate
calligraphy and colourful foral patterns
crisscross its outer walls. The surrounding
tile-inlayed lakes refect the mosque in their
dark waters, creating the impression of a
building that goes beyond the boundaries of
human reality.
The inside of the mosque is perhaps
even more remarkable. Just beyond the
entrance is the main prayer hall, a glittering
room with the capacity to hold up to 9,000
worshippers. On the West Side is the
marvelous Qibla wall, the direction Muslims
pray towards. Subtly decorated so as not
to distract the worshippers, the wall is
nonetheless breathtaking. At 23 metres high
and 50 metres wide, it is covered in 6 pages
of Quranic verses and lit with fbreoptics,
making it shimmer a soft gold.
The rest of the mosque’s interior is equally
impressive, as it attempts to mimic nature.
Gracing the foor is the world’s largest
carpet, a hand-woven 7,119 square metre
masterpiece from Iran. The greens, whites
and pinks of the carpet give off the feeling
of sitting in a grassy garden. White columns
rise like trees from the ground, covered
in colourful images of marble vines and
fowers that seem to be growing towards
the mosque’s traditional Islamic arches. The
multicolored chandeliers that hang down
from the ceiling could be bunches of fruit
drooping from heavily laden tree branches.
And further up in the domes the lighting turns
blue, emulating a night sky, with delicate
white carvings for the stars.
As Abu Dhabi grows into a global capital
city, embracing globalisation in its various
manifestations, the Grand Mosque is
keeping the city’s traditional identity alive,
as well as promoting the religious and
cultural understanding envisioned by the
country’s leaders. Although non-Muslims
are not allowed in Abu Dhabi’s mosques,
the Grand Mosque is an exception. A few
months after the Mosque opened on the frst
day of Eid in December 2007, guided tours
were made available for people of all faiths
and backgrounds. The tours, conducted
mostly by UAE nationals, provide insight
on the mosque’s architecture, Islam, and
the national culture of the UAE. There is no
fee for the tours, thereby allowing as many
people as possible to beneft from learning
about the region and the sacred religion that
the mosque represents.
Although Sheikh Zayed was unable to
see the completion of his beloved mosque,
his vision is what continues to drive it
forward as a centre of religious and cultural
understanding. When complete in 2009, it
will be the crowning achievement of a city
that emblemises the harmony and tolerance
to be found in the moderate Islam espoused
by Shiekh Zayed and his descendents.
The Grand Mosque’s courtyard is a delight. Stretching out to 17,000 square metres, this open-air section of the mosque is the meeting point of the manmade with nature. Giant foral marble designs pave the courtyard,
while the sky provides the grandest roof one can fnd. The mosque’s 4 marble and gold minarets, one at each corner of the courtyard, tower 104 metres into the air, as if providing a staircase into heaven.
Image Courtesy - Sadaqat Ali Syed
80 - 83 Zayed Mosque_L3.indd 5 2/4/09 7:44:02 AM
83
84 Best of Abu Dhabi
Flavours of the Emirates
With exotic gourmet delights like Khanfarosh, Lokaimat, Sagu, Jazariya and
Balalit, lamb kabsah with jarrish, chicken tajine and saffron couscous, regional
cuisine is very much a communal experience. With diners sitting together on
the floor sharing from large platters, it is as diverse as the social and ethnic
origins of the UAE. Reflecting the variety of cultural influences that the country
has experienced over the centuries, traditional Emirati cooking consists primar-
ily of dates, fresh and dried fish, camel meat as well as milk. However, typi-
cally Lebanese cuisine, with its grilled meats and characteristic dips, has been
embraced whole-heartedly by all.
T
o
u
r
i
s
m
,

C
u
l
t
u
r
e

&

H
e
r
i
t
a
g
e
D
ishes are served together, not as separate courses and a typical meal consists of
slow cooked spiced lamb on top of a bed of warm rice, with other accompaniments
ranging from hummus, ful (spiced bean paste), falafel, and shawurmah (shwarma;
broiled meat served on fat bread) as well as stuffed vine leaves and other Arabian fare.
In addition to dishes standard to the Arab world, the infuence of Iranian cuisine can
be seen in the Emirati preference for rice as a staple and ingredients such as saffron,
cardamom, and rose water as favouring in desserts. The traditional dish of Meshawah,
made of dried fsh and spices, and eaten with bread or rice and usually mixed with
onions, bears an Iranian infuence too.
Like in other countries of the region, the preference is for lamb and chicken, and
fresh fruits, vegetables and unleavened bread (khubz) are staple fare. Numerous spices
are used for favouring. In the olden days, these would help conceal the taste of less
than fresh produce. Today, however, blends such as baharat (mixed spice that is a
combination of cumin, cloves, coriander, nutmeg, pepper and cinnamon) are still popular
as the base for many preparations.
84-87 Emarati Cuisine_L3.indd 2 2/5/09 12:26:09 AM
84
85 Best of Abu Dhabi
Immigrants have brought their culinary tastes with them
and thanks to the Levantine Arabs; Lebanese food has
become an integral part of Emirati cuisine. So too has
South Asian fare, as Indians and Pakistanis have always
had strong links to Gulf region, bringing their foods and
spices to fll the souks with their appetizing aromas.
Whilst restaurants serve every hue of Arabic, Western
and Oriental cuisine, the best place to eat wholesome
Emirati cuisine is at home. Meals in traditional homes are
social occasions where the whole family gathers. Even
when low tables and chairs are used, shared platters and
eating together by using the right hand are the norm.
A remnant of the Bedouin mentality, what really gives
Emiratis pleasure is in extending hospitality. And if guests
are around at meal times, they are invited to join in the
traditional mansaf of whole lamb and spiced rice. The
meal is laid out on trays for everybody to help themselves.
Most homes have reception rooms or a Majlis whose sole
purpose is to serve meals to guests on special occasions.
At breakfast, the frst meal of the day is light and tasty.
Starting with Balaleet, which is vermicelli fried with eggs,
onions, cinnamon, sugar, oil and saffron, followed by
Khubs khameera, a bread-like preparation made with
saffron and sesame seed. This could be eaten on its own
or with honey, date syrup or even cheese spread. This
could be followed by Arsiya which is made from cracked
wheat and cooked in meat. It has a savoury taste with a
consistency like porridge.
Each meal has to end with a sweet; at breakfast
it would be fried dough balls eaten with date syrup,
lugaimat, or dates. All of it washed down by the drink
Arabs favour the most - ghawah, the hot and strong
Arabic coffee.
Drinking coffee is an integral part of Arab culture and
is a habit that is indulged every where, from the humblest
café to the palaces. In the past, coffeehouses were the
main meeting places in the Gulf. A cup of coffee was
Even though traditional Emirati cuisine is based on a healthy subsistence diet of dates, fsh, rice and camel’s milk; today,
Lebanese culinary infuences pervade.
Image Courtesy - Sadaqat Ali Syed
84-87 Emarati Cuisine_L3.indd 3 2/5/09 12:26:11 AM
85
86 Best of Abu Dhabi
usually followed by a turn at the gaduo, the traditional smoking pipe
shared by men folk.
Coffee is served on many occasions and if offered, it is gracious to
accept. As a symbolic extension of welcome, it is served black and is
usually favoured with cardamom or cloves. Indeed, Arabs
love spices and every imaginable spice can be found in the spice
streets or atarinehs.
Freshly ground and served with cardamom, Arabic coffee is served
in tiny cups with no handles. The cup must be held by the right hand
and the server will constantly replenish the cup. Shaking the cup from
side to side indicates that enough has been drunk.
Milk and dairy products play a strong role in the Emirati diet.
Camel’s milk, as much as its meat, was a staple food for the Bedouin
and enabled small populations to occupy and make economic use
of the extensive desert regions. In modern times, camels are reared
chiefy for racing and no longer used for food supply and transport.
But camel milk is still consumed by Emiratis and some families keep
a camel for milk in the family compound. The milk is drunk as a fresh
drink, haleeb.
Haleeb Ghanam, Haleeb Kharouf - Goat’s and Sheep’s milk is
processed into laban, raab, labneh, chami, dihn/zibda, samn and
kami/bathith for immediate consumption as well as commercial
purposes. These are still available at local markets though production
is now concentrated on the rearing of goats and sheep for meat.
Haleeb Baqar - cow’s milk is consumed fresh and is also used for
the preparation of laban, dihn/zibda and samn that is a liquid garnish
ideal on savoury and sweet dishes. Of late, it has been replaced by
ghee - a similar product originating from the Indian sub-continent.
Full-bodied and multi layered, Emirati cuisine never disappoints.
Just what is expected from a hearty meal.
Machboos (or Fooga)
Ingredients
• 4 cups water
• 4 chicken bouillon cubes or 5 teaspoons chicken stock
powder
• 2 tablespoons olive oil
• 8-10 bone-in chicken pieces, skin removed (if it is the breast
pieces, cut those in half since they are very large)
• 2 whole dried limes (loomi)
• 1/8 teaspoon saffron
• 1 large onion, chopped
• 1 large tomato, chopped
• 1 garlic clove, minced
• 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
• 1 1/2 teaspoons ground turmeric
• 1 1/2 teaspoons ground cumin
• 1 1/2 teaspoons curry powder
• 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper (optional) or chili powder
(optional)
• 2 teaspoons salt
• 2 cups basmati rice, rinsed and drained
Directions
1. Preheat oven to 375°F and grease a 9x13 baking dish.
2. Bring water to boiling and add chicken bouillon cubes, lower
heat and add dried limes and saffron and let simmer till
bouillon is dissolved --keep it hot.
3. Sprinkle chicken with half the spices (except the garlic).
4. Heat the olive oil in a large skillet on med-high to high heat
and fry the chicken till both sides are brown, lower heat to
medium and remove the chicken to a plate.
5. In that same skillet sauté the onions for 2 minutes, add
tomatoes, garlic and remaining spices and sauté another 2
minutes, then turn off the burner.
6. Add the rice and stir for about 30 seconds to 1 minute, till
well coated.
7. Spread rice in the baking dish and place the chicken pieces
over the rice.
8. Gently press the dried limes on the sides of the pot to
distribute favor in the broth and then poor on the rice and
chicken (the whole thing including the dried limes) and cover
tightly with foil.
9. Bake for 40-45 minutes--do not open the foil cover at all until
the time is up.
10. If you want to eat this the authentic way, you can lay
newspaper on the foor (for easy cleanup of spills), put all
of this on a very large platter or on a couple large sheets
of aluminum foil laid on the newspaper and everyone sits
around and eats with their right hand! Can be eaten with
ketchup.
84-87 Emarati Cuisine_L3.indd 4 2/5/09 1:58:49 AM
86
87 Best of Abu Dhabi
84-87 Emarati Cuisine_L3.indd 5 2/5/09 12:26:14 AM
87
Camelicious
Every December, thousands of camels flutter their long eyelashes at one of the
biggest camel beauty pageants in the world. Part of the Mazayin Dhafrah Festival
organised by the Abu Dhabi Authority for Culture & Heritage, this spectacle of camel
comeliness boasts a prize bigger than that of Miss World.
T
o
u
r
i
s
m
,

C
u
l
t
u
r
e

&

H
e
r
i
t
a
g
e
C
oming as part of the UAE’s second Dhafrah Festival, a desert carnival sponsored
by Abu Dhabi’s royal family that aims to preserve traditional Bedouin heritage
under pressure by the so-called westernized ‘Coca Cola’ culture in the oil-rich Gulf
region, the camel pageants rounded up around 17,000 camels. The frst event made
international headlines with prizes amounting to AED 35 million in prize money and 100
cars up for grabs. In its second year, the Dhafrah Festival has proved its popularity by
attracting some 24,000 camels belonging to over 2,000 people from around the Gulf,
including the UAE, Saudi Arabia, Oman, Qatar and Bahrain.
These camels, also known as ‘the ships of the desert’, are registered for the beauty
contest in several categories, defned by age and skin colour. They are required to
be of pure-bred origin and free from any contagious diseases or defects. Five judges
assess the animals on strict criteria, including the curvature of their ears, the size
of their nose relative to the rest of the face and the fullness of their hump. They frst
inspect the camels’ overall bodies, then examine their individual body parts, like their
necks, heads, lips, noses, legs and feet, separately.
Owners can participate with more than one camel as long as they can prove
ownership, and those owning the top three camels in each category split a AED 7
million prize fund, and each receive a car from a pool of more than 100 4x4 vehicles
and pickups. The money and cars for the contest were donated by the members of
Abu Dhabi’s ruling family.
Sheikh Mohammad Bin Butti Al Hamed, Head of the High Committee for the
Festival, Representative of the Ruler at the Western Region, praised the role of the
88 Best of Abu Dhabi
88 - 89 Camel Beauty Pageant_L3.indd 2 2/5/09 2:01:04 AM
88
camel in traditional Arab life, as it was
a mode of travel, a source of food and
constituted the main measurement of wealth.
“Although the camel has always been a
companion to the Arab during his travel in
the old days, today camels still play a part in
our lives, as thousands of people continue
to attend camel races and watch what is
perceived as part of our heritage.”
Although the beauty pageant is its main
event, the Al Dhafrah Festival is much more
than a camel show. It includes various events
and activities that aim to revive Bedouin
traditions and to improve the economy in the
Western Region of the Abu Dhabi Emirate,
through both commerce and sustainable
tourism. Among these events is the Dates’
Packaging Competition, meant to fnd the
best wrapping that prolongs the dates’
freshness; the Poetry competition, which
received hundreds of entries; a photography
competition; and a handicrafts competition
for traditional Arabian hand-made objects.
The Al Dhafrah Festival, however,
doesn’t stop there. Apart from these
shows it also offers an entertainment
programme, with evenings of traditional
poetry, music and dances, as well a
traditional style Arabian souq for a spot of
‘olde worlde’ retail therapy.
4 There are two types of camels: the Bactrian (or Asian) camel, which has two humps, and the Dromedary (or Arabian)
camel, which has one hump.
4 The camel’s nickname, ‘Ships of the Desert’, comes from their walk. Like a giraffe, the camel moves both legs on one
side of its body at the same time, then on the other side. The rolling motion resembles a ship at sea.
4 Camels can be milked, but the favour is an acquired taste. Camel dairy herds are kept in parts of the Middle East.
4 Camel wool is of high quality and is used in the Arab world for rug-making and clothing. Camels shed around 2 kgs of
wool every time they moult.
4 Camels have a complex system of eye protection involving: a double row of long curly eyelashes to keep out sand
and dust; a third eyelid that moves from side to side, like a windshield wiper, to wipe any sand away; and thick bushy
eyebrows to shade their eyes from the sun.
4 Camel humps are full of fat, not water, and will shrink if the camel doesn’t eat. Baby camels are born without a hump,
and must start eating solids before they can develop any.
89 Best of Abu Dhabi
88 - 89 Camel Beauty Pageant_L3.indd 3 2/5/09 2:04:40 AM
89
Abu Dhabi at a glance
It’s undeniable that the UAE has made intelligent use of modern technologies and management
systems in order to further its impressive socioeconomic diversifcation programme. Recognising
however that there is more to development than meets the modern eye, taking a fresh look at its
unique desert and seafearing heritage is equally important in maintaining valued traditions and
maintaining the balance of an increasingly sensitive ecosystem.
90 Best of Abu Dhabi

T
o
u
r
i
s
m
,

C
u
l
t
u
r
e

&

H
e
r
i
t
a
g
e
FALCONRY

F
alcons were once used to hunt food by the desert people but today
falconry has the status of a national pastime in the UAE. Two breeds
of falcons: the Saker and the Peregrine falcon are among the most
popular for hunting purposes. In the old days when falcon and Bedouin
hunted for food together, they would be trapped along the coast during
their autumn migration. They were then trained, used in hunting food and
later released in the spring to carry out their hunter role.
Trust, bonding and a rare understanding between the captive bird
and the trainer is needed to train the falcons to catch prey. Because the
houbara bustards, the birds of prey, were due just three weeks after the
falcons were captured themselves, it was also an intense exercise sport.
Once the falcons were trained to catch prey, in time for the migrating
bustards, the falcon remained a constant hunting companion to the
Bedouins throughout the winter. Even other prey such as curlews, hares
and gazelle, were occasionally hunted with the help of the saluki dogs.
A
vital source of livelihood in the Arabian Peninsula since ancient times,
income from pearling was cyclical and a bad season often resulted in
mounting debt for families involved. By the end of the Nineteenth century
pearling fourished and physically ft men began to opt for pearling as a
profession over nomadic life. They participated in the diving expeditions
known as ghaus in the summer, and wound their way home to cultivate
their date gardens in the winter. This was especially the case with the
Bani Yas sub-tribes, based out of Liwa.
In a couple of generations, pearl diving had become entrenched as
a profession in the area we now know as the UAE. There were over
1,200 pearling boats operational and a rudimentary business model had
been carved out in the industry. Many of the Bani Yas pearlers formed
cooperatives, jointly owning their boat and sharing the profts according
to a mutual agreement. Each boat carried a crew of about 18 men. The
captain or nakhuda took the biggest share and a larger share was taken
by the divers as compared to the haulers. Money was then left in the kitty
for the following season.
Life at sea on the pearling boats required physical endurance and
mental fortitude. Pearling also imposed long periods of absence from
home resulting in tremendous responsibility for the women left behind
to tend to children and old folks. It was as if entire villages were bereft
of young able bodied men during the four summer months. Over time
certain tribes grew roots in particular areas and coastal habitats such
as Abu Dhabi, Dubai and Ras Al Khaimah. However, the advent of the
cultured pearl in Japan in the 1940s caused the natural pearl markets to
collapse and this had a ripple effect on the pearling settlements and tribes
dependent on this trade.
PeARLiNg
90 - 91 Abu Dhabi Pictorial_L3.indd 2 2/5/09 12:32:19 AM
90
91 Best of Abu Dhabi
ibN MAjid
E
xploring uncharted territories is not new to Arabia. Ibn Majid,
fondly known as the ‘Lion of the Sea’ is a fgure of the region’s
sailing history. Although his is the more well known name, his father,
grandfather and other ancestors were part of a family of illustrious
sailors long before Vasco da Gama even sighted Cape of Good Hope
or had treaded Arabian sands. History shows that Arabs had explored
European waters much before the Europeans had crossed the Indian
Ocean. Although we don’t have the exact date, Ibn Majid’s date of birth
is said to be between 1432-37. Born in Julfar, which is close to present
day Ras al Khaimah, his sailing adventures were documented by him
in 40 surviving works, of which 39 are in verse. While all his writings
are marked by a lyrical quality, some short, others long, the 805-verse
Al Sofaliya, that narrates the journey between India and Sofala on the
Mozambique coast, is possibly the longest. The Fawa’id is another
opus that is a comprehensive tome detailing Ibn Majid’s vast store of
navigation knowledge and also deftly weaves in the knowledge base
of early Arab astronomers. Ibn Majid died at the age of about 70, soon
after he wrote his last known poem in 1500 AD.
T
he camel has functioned as the ship of the desert and was practically
a life line for the old time inhabitants of the UAE who had a partly
nomadic lifestyle. The Bani Yas, the largest tribe in the UAE, trudged the
vast sandy stretches of what we now know as Dubai and Abu Dhabi.
The Awamir and Manasir tribes too roamed the desert region but closely
guarded the locations of oases.
Crossing wide swathes of the desert in search of brush and bush
vegetation that sprang to life after erratic rains, some of the Bani Yas
Bedouins were fortunate enough to be able to return to a home in the
oases to cultivate their date palms. Camel owners among them who had
a grazing pasture near their palms were especially lucky as they could
harvest dates while their livestock grazed and drank at the wells shared
by the community.
The original multitasking friend of the desert Bedouin, the camel
needed water and had the job of fetching it too. When the caravans
were on the move it served as a beast of burden to transport household
goods as it was uniquely suited to the inhospitable terrain. The Bedouins
raced camels for entertainment and for the most part camel milk was
the only source of diary protein available to the Bedus during long
summers. The hardy camel could go without water for days and its meat
was considered a delicacy reserved for feasts. Camel skin made sturdy
bags, useful containers for carrying water and other utensils. Fine cloaks,
known as bight, woven from fne camel hair were coveted items. Even
the bedu’s rugs and tents were fashioned from the hide of this supremely
versatile desert mammal.
The CAMeL
90 - 91 Abu Dhabi Pictorial_L3.indd 3 2/5/09 12:32:22 AM
91
Retail flying high
Abu Dhabi Duty Free (ADDF) opened its doors in 1984 and has
since gone from strength to strength to become recognised as
one of the world’s fnest duty free operations, having already won
several prestigious industry awards. T
o
u
r
i
s
m
,

C
u
l
t
u
r
e

&

H
e
r
i
t
a
g
e
he retail world is sound and Abu Dhabi’s growth rate will remain strong
despite international fnancial volatility. (TOURISM FIGURES) With
an estimated growth in tourism projected at XXX per annum, Abu
Dhabi’s retail fundamentals are strong and as a result so is the growth
opportunities for ADDF.
92 - 93 Abu Dhabi Duty Free_L3.indd 2 2/5/09 10:26:47 AM
93 Best of Abu Dhabi
A
DDF is not only known for its outstanding
promotions, top quality stores and superior service
but is also renowned for its innovative designs. The
interior features resemble a futuristic satellite and are
similar to a mushroom shape that rises up from the foor
to the ceiling in changing colours of blue and green -
giving the impression of a seamless structure formed
from one material.
The colours are inspired from the greenery of Abu
Dhabi’s palm trees, oasis cities and the proximity to
the blue of the Arabian Gulf. This unique design
undoubtedly makes the duty free area an attraction in
itself as you arrive, depart or transit through Abu Dhabi
International Airport.
Over the years ADDF’s various refurbishments,
renovations and extensions have increased the retail
space offering from just six shops to the current area
of over 5,000 square metres. Well researched and
designed, ADDF lays claim to have pioneered the ‘shop-
in-shop’ concept in the region, providing dedicated
corners for various prestigious international brands.
The range of outlets available at ADDF is vast, with
an offering of all the top names in fashion, fragrances,
cosmetics, confectionery and many more, which creates
a lavish shopping experience for all. Other popular duty
free items such as gold and jewellery, electronic items,
local antiques and souvenirs are also available. Small
purchase items such as books, pharmaceuticals and
toiletries can also be bought.
Arrival Shop
The arrival shop and arrivals business in general is one
of the fastest growing elements in the worldwide duty
free industry, with 100 square metres of retail space
adjacent to the luggage collection area, ADDF hopes
that the outlet provides travellers, either waiting for their
luggage, or those wishing to purchase goods at the
end of a journey (thereby avoiding have to carry them in
transit) an alternate duty free option.”
Terminal 2
With three duty free areas in what is a dedicated terminal
for fights to and from the Sub-Continent, the terminal
includes an arrival store, a landside shop and, of course,
a large duty free area in departures.

Terminal 1A
A mixed category of merchandise can be found here in
a 150 square metre retail area stocking everything from
food and chocolates, beauty products, toys, and gifts.
The “Big Ticket”
ADDF is famed for its exciting promotions, competitions
and prize draws. The most popular of them all -
the ‘Big Ticket’ - enters into its 15th anniversary year
in 2007.
With a total prize fund of AED 1,500,000 (USD
407,830), tickets are available for only AED 500 (USD
136) and give the ticket holder 10 chances of winning.
The frst prize amounts to AED 1,000,000 (USD 271,
887), with the remaining cash prizes divided from
the remaining fund among the other 14 winners, in
descending order. Tickets can be purchased throughout
the airport.
Tel: +9712 575 7818
www.abudhabidutyfree.co.ae
92 - 93 Abu Dhabi Duty Free_L3.indd 3 2/5/09 10:27:02 AM
Zoom into pole position
If there is one common passion among the people of the Emirates,
it is for cars - the faster, the better. Small wonder then that there is
jubilation at Abu Dhabi hosting UAE’s first Formula One Grand Prix
in 2009 on a track expected to offer the best F1 racing in the world.
W
ork is proceeding at a fast clip on the track in time for the 2009 Formula 1 Abu Dhabi
Grand Prix on Yas, the 2,550-hectare natural leisure island, on the east coast of the
capital. Designed by renowned Formula 1 circuit designer Hermann Tilke, the track is being
built by master developers Aldar Properties. “A mix of high-speed and low-speed corners will
be the hallmark of the Abu Dhabi Formula One Circuit. The cars will touch 250 km/h through
the third turn and achieve 300 km/h on the 1.2 km long main straight, which is followed by a
tight hairpin” says Tilke, “We are working hard with the Abu Dhabi team to create an exciting
race”, he adds.
Moving from Bahrain, where the high adrenalin competition was hosted for fve years,
spectators in Abu Dhabi will soon be treated to unrivalled high speed excitement played out
on three distinct sections of the 5.6km circuit, including high speed areas ending in tight
overtaking turns, a street section and a marina section too. Originally fat, Yas Island today is
being refashioned with man-made hills to ensure track undulations up and down, upping the
level of skill required by drivers and thrill experienced by spectators that will be watching close
at hand.
A special feature of the track is that it will be have two parts. One part will be permanent
and is meant for everyday use and the other part of 2.5km for is for the exclusive use of F1. “It
94 Best of Abu Dhabi

T
o
u
r
i
s
m
,

C
u
l
t
u
r
e

&

H
e
r
i
t
a
g
e
The capital and the largest of the seven
Emirates that make up the United Arab
Emirates, is an idyllic location for one the
world’s most popular sports. Abu Dhabi has
more than 200 natural islands; with pristine
and unspoilt beaches in the region, it is
rapidly gaining popularity among leisure
tourists from across the world.
94 - 97 Formula1_L3.indd 2 2/11/09 10:31:40 PM
Richard Cregan views the Yas Marina Circuit
model with John Howett, president of Toyota F1
94 - 97 Formula1_L3.indd 3 2/5/09 1:03:24 AM
96 Best of Abu Dhabi
will be characterised by different variants of
track alignments”, he explains.
The Grand Prix plan is part of a grandiose
$40 billion project to transform Yas Island
into a premier leisure destination with over
100 new hotels as part of well planned
developments. In addition to the motor
race track, the island will boast a Ferrari-
themed park, museum and theatre. This
will allow visitors to experience the thrill of
the exclusive Ferrari Driving School (Pilota
Ferrari), kart track and dune buggies.
The frst phase of the project will be
completed in 2008 and the overall project
will be completed in 2014 on the island’s
32kms gulf shoreline.
By signing a seven-year deal for a race in
the capital of the UAE with the Formula One
management company, fnally Abu Dhabi
has succeeded in grabbing the opportunity
to host this spectacular spectator sport
considered the most expensive in the world.
The green signal from the Chairman and
CEO of Formula One Management, Bernie
Eccelstone was long-awaited as
this is without doubt one of the world’s
most prestigious sporting events, in the
same category as an Olympic Games or
World Cup.
Clearly the Executive Affairs committee
of the Abu Dhabi government who clinched
the deal to bring Formula One to the
federal capital until 2016 understand how
it will propel tourism and socio-economic
diversifcation into the services sector. “We
wanted to create an event for that enjoyed
high viewership worldwide. We also wanted
to introduce a new sport to the region by
bringing it right to the people. This is a sport
for the future of Abu Dhabi, a sport for our
children”, explains HE Mubarak Al Muhairi,
director general, Abu Dhabi Tourist Authority.
The massive global media impact of
the sporting event will increase the stature
and visibility of Abu Dhabi as a leisure
destination. With its enormous reserves of
fnancial liquidity ranging from $250 billion
and $500 billion secured by its vast oil
94 - 97 Formula1_L3.indd 4 2/5/09 1:03:27 AM
97 Best of Abu Dhabi
and gas reserves that are comprise nine
per cent of the world’s proven oil reserves,
the federal capital is not only keen to steal
the limelight from its sister emirate Dubai,
that put in place fundamental tourism
infrastructure a decade or so earlier – it has
the cash too.
The aim is to plan a fruitfully diversifed
future for the emirate’s 1.5 million population.
On a structural level, by integrating typical
elements of the Arabian landscape into the
prized 5.5 km track, the aim is to merge
local traditional elements into a rampantly
progressive sport at the cutting edge of
technological innovation. This integration of
world class sporting events with a purpose-
built infrastructure that takes from the west
but merges with traditional landscape will
ultimately reinforce the appeal of a luxury
lifestyle destination in the making.
Overall inbound tourism fgures that stood
at 1.2 million in 2005, increasing by 16
per cent rise in 2006 prove this. And with
estimates reaching 3.5 million and by 2015,
it is obvious that policy makers are confdent
about their strategy and the continuous
global resonance that the event will spark.
Clearly tourism revenues and visibility
underscore the desire to start a new chapter
in a bold, outwardly focussed era of Abu
Dhabi’s development, after the death of the
UAE’s frst president, HH Sheikh Zayed Al
Nahyan in 2005. HH Sheikh Mohammed Bin
Zayed Al Nahyan, the Crown Prince of Abu
Dhabi, predicts “very real macroeconomic
benefts” for Abu Dhabi and rest of the UAE
from the opportunities that are bound to
open up through increased international
attention and connectivity.
His Excellency Khaldoon Al Mubarak,
Chairman of the Abu Dhabi Executive
Affairs Authority (EAA), promises that the
coveted Grand Prix will be something truly
memorable. In the meantime, the world is
waiting with baited breath for the fag to drop
and for the race to begin in Abu Dhabi.
www.yasmarinacircuit.ae
The UAE is the second country in the Middle East to host the race after Gulf Arab partner
Bahrain, which hosted its frst Grand Prix in 2004. There had been some doubt if the close
proximity of Bahrain would scuttle Abu Dhabi’s chances but the Formula One management felt
that neither country would be a threat to the other and would in fact work closely together to
make sure F1 is very successful in this geo politically crucial part of the world.
The F1 track will cement racing, already a major pastime of Emirati youth, into the local culture.
94 - 97 Formula1_L3.indd 5 2/5/09 1:03:33 AM
East ern Perspect ives
Lily Bandak’s photography portrays a striking vision of the UAE,
highlighting the advancement of its cities with more traditional
images in order to communicate the complexity and beauty of the
people, their culture and achievements.
T
o
u
r
i
s
m
,

C
u
l
t
u
r
e

&

H
e
r
i
t
a
g
e
Abu Dhabi, which translates from the Arabic in to ‘Father of the Gazelle’, is the United Arab Emirates’ largest emirate and, by some estimates, the world’s wealthiest city.
98-101 Lilly Bandak_L3.indd 2 2/5/09 3:23:47 AM
99 Best of Abu Dhabi
H
er initial visual project aims to dispel the western
misconception of the Middle East as inferior in
terms of scientifc and technological development
and she pays particular attention to the unknown
accomplishments of the many talented and ambitious
women she has met through her work.
In addition to this commendable objective, a more
recent ambition is to highlight the diffculties faced
by people with disabilities and moreover, what they
can achieve with the right help and support. This is a
particularly passionate project for Lily as she suffers
from Multiple Sclerosis - a condition that, since her
diagnosis in 1984, has caused physical disability
restricting her to a wheelchair and impeding her
photography. After a period of frustration, Lily sought
help from the Vocational Rehabilitation services in the
US and designed a camera which could be fastened to
her wheelchair allowing her to continue her work within
the Middle East.
Lily’s return to the region began with her travels in
Bahrain and continued into the UAE, throughout which
she endeavored to demonstrate to the Arab World
that a person with disabilities, even in a wheelchair,
could be an active member of society. The biggest
challenge that she faced was trying to change people’s
attitudes towards those who are disabled. She found
that people in general and more particularly in the
Middle East saw disability as a fnite condition worthy
of pity. Her aim for the future is to introduce assistive
technology to the region so that the disabled can be
more independent.
The situation of the disabled is rapidly improving
within the UAE as people realize the importance
of valuing all members of society and see what
inspirational fgures like Lily Bandak can achieve.
Although private care is available, more recently there
are widespread public efforts to ease the problems of
people with special needs and support their families.
Some of the organisations in the UAE that assist in
this include the Sharjah Humanitarian City, Emirates
Special Needs LLC (Abu Dhabi), Abu Dhabi Centre for
Care and Rehabilitation, Dubai Club for Special Sports
and Takamul (Dubai), just to name a few. In addition,
the UAE Government passed the Disability Act (Federal
Law No.29/2006) in November 2006 which protects
the rights of people with disabilities and special needs.
It is now the responsibility of architects and
construction companies to provide equitable facilities
to their new sites for all members of society, as
99
98-101 Lilly Bandak Cor_L3.indd 3 2/9/09 4:54:31 PM
100 Best of Abu Dhabi
100
98-101 Lilly Bandak Cor_L3.indd 4 2/9/09 4:51:00 PM
101 Best of Abu Dhabi
recognition and subsequent action by these
groups helps to increase general awareness.
Born in Jordan, Lily is now an American
citizen, living in Newark.
She was educated in Paris and the US,
studying at such institutions as the Philadelphia
College of Art, the University of Delaware and the
Antonelli College of Photography.
Her work has included the personal
photography of many public fgures within the
Middle East, inclusion as the only female to have
her work on permanent display in the White
House and her participation in the
book, Images of Egypt, sponsored by the
Egyptian government.
This is all just the beginning for Lily as her
vision is to see people with special needs not just
supported in separate schools and organizations,
but integrated within society. For her, this can be
achieved through assistive technology and the
UAE would be an ideal place to launch her ideas
due to its positive and progressive attitude. From
her early memories of a small fshing village that
was Dubai in 1980, the vision that it represents
today is something that Lily is very proud of and
her photos share this with the rest of the world.
“I am hoping to change the outlook on people
with disabilities, especially in the Arab World and
I wish I could get people to join me in this effort.
We, in the Arab World, have over 10 million
people with disabilities and we need to try and
help them”, she concludes.
www.arabworldphotography.com
101
98-101 Lilly Bandak Cor_L3.indd 5 2/9/09 4:54:51 PM
Chapter 4 Luxury Lifestyles & Retail Destinations
102-103 Lux Lifestyle_L3.indd 2 2/5/09 3:31:42 AM
Luxury Lifestyles & Retail Destinations
“Don’t play too much golf.
Two rounds a day are plenty.”
Harry Vardon, American golfer, (1870 – 1937)
102-103 Lux Lifestyle_L3.indd 3 2/5/09 3:31:44 AM
104 Best of Abu Dhabi
L
u
x
u
r
y

L
i
f
e
s
t
y
l
e
s

&

R
e
t
a
i
l

D
e
s
t
i
n
a
t
i
o
n
s
Luxury Product s &
Services
When capturing time becomes the essence of quality living,
Quintessentially represents the tool by which impeccable services
can be sought in an atmosphere of rarefed effciency. Offering
endless advantages to the global elite, it is a private members’
club with a 24-hour, international concierge service. Whether you
desire sold-out opera tickets for a concert in Rome or a shipment
of freshly baked bread from your hometown, Quintessentially puts
the keys of virtually every city at your fngertips.
www.quintessentially.com
Global capit al of t he fut ure
Sheikh Nahyan bin Mubarak Al Nahyan, UAE Minister of Higher Education and Scientifc Research
highlighted the strategic focus eloquently at the recent Future Capital World Summit held in Abu Dhabi
in January 2009: Sustainable development, economic diversifcation, driving a knowledge economy,
private investments and a strong private-public partnership. “A few of the world capitals of tomorrow
will have in common an ability to innovate, to maintain vigorous growth, to create prosperity and to
bring together people, government and institutions to create a vibrant, wealthy and fairly balanced
society”, he said. With sustainable affuence underscoring lifestyle and aspirations of “this peaceful
and stable city in this peaceful and stable country” he added, Abu Dhabi is dedicated to fostering a
lifestyle of stability and elevated quality of life that befts the so-called ‘richest city in the world’. Boast-
ing an annual GDP of 729.7 billion AED, which together with Qatar’s, is among the highest worldwide,
Abu Dhabi is hosting tailor-made sporting and cultural events that represent an ideal method to brand
a city and create a thriving ‘pulse’ that ensures its ensuring appeal.
Personal Shopping
With a dizzying range of products and brands available in
the world’s richest city, residents of Abu Dhabi may fnd
themselves at a loss when it comes to buying the necessities
and luxuries of life. Saving the day is Kelly Lunderberg, the
founder of the UAE’s frst personal shopper service, Divine.
Catering to both shop-a-holics and shop-a-phobics, Divine
personal shoppers combine a personal approach with
professional skills and expert shopping experience. With
Divine, sophistication and glamour are just a phone call away.
www.divine.ae
104 - 105 Luxury Pictorial_L3.indd 2 2/5/09 3:44:09 AM
Fashion
Fashion in Abu Dhabi is not limited to shop windows,
but has become integrated into the very pulse of the city.
Discerning shoppers settle for no less than the crème of
the fashion crop. Supplementing Abu Dhabi residents’
desire for the ultimate in chic, the UAE capital now hosts
an annual Abu Dhabi Fashion Week, drawing in fashion
maestros like Valentino and putting the emirate on the
map of fashion enthusiasts around the world.
www.abudhabifashionweek.com
105 Best of Abu Dhabi
Golf
Established four years ago, the Abu Dhabi Golf
Championship has evolved into a major highlight
of the European PGA Tour’s Middle East Tour’s
‘Desert Swing’. The January 2009 Championship
brought together star golfers from around the world
at the UAE’s premium golfng facility, the Abu Dhabi
Golf Club, adding yet another achievement on this
emirate’s repertoire.
www.abudhabigolfchampionship.com
www.adgolfclub.com
Yacht ing & Mot oring
With waterfront development heralding boating lifestyles,
the Abu Dhabi Yacht Show is set to be one of the worlds
ultimate Super Yachting events. Launching in May 2009,
the glittering maritime jewels on show will position Abu
Dhabi as a leading promoter in this rapidly evolving sector.
Bringing together leading automobile manufacturers, the
annual Abu Dhabi Motor Show is the largest and most
comprehensive motor exhibition in the Middle East. In
existence for decades, it brings the best of the world of
wheels to the UAE and the region at large.
www.abudhabiyachtshow.com, www.admotorshow.com
104 - 105 Luxury Pictorial_L3.indd 3 2/5/09 3:44:15 AM
Superyacht s come t o
Abu Dhabi
On typical Renaissance maps of ancient Arabia, European cartographers
often naively labelled the eastern extremity ‘Ichthyophagi’ (Fish Eaters).
That region is now the ultra-modern UAE, which is still rich in plentiful fsh
supplies. The Emirates have come a long way, however: today’s maps
depict vast transformations since the 15th century, including a new brand
name, Abu Dhabi MAR, soon to be a major player in the burgeoning
international superyacht marketplace.
L
u
x
u
r
y

L
i
f
e
s
t
y
l
e
s

&

R
e
t
a
i
l

D
e
s
t
i
n
a
t
i
o
n
s
The frst Swift hull rests at sunset. Image Courtesy - Dick Holthuis
106-111 MAR - Logistics Intl_L3.indd 2 2/5/09 3:50:01 AM
A
bu Dhabi MAR is a broad-based, yacht-
related enterprise by local entrepreneurs
who recognise two compelling facts. First,
global yacht-construction capacity can’t keep
up with demand; there are more than 700
large yachts on order today and new facilities
are desperately needed for the future. Second,
Abu Dhabi is an ideal site for an operation that
can build, service, reft, and berth very large
yachts from any homeport, at the luxury level
owners and crews deserve and expect.
Abu Dhabi MAR has begun with a bang,
not a whimper, by building yachts of 141
and 135 metres length overall. The two are
branded ‘Swift’ because they are conversions
of high-speed frigates created for The Royal
Dutch Navy. The UAE Navy later purchased
them, but in 2007 elected to replace them.
Rather than scrap them, Abu Dhabi MAR
is applying advanced technology, expert
management, and no little audacity to convert
them to extraordinary, futuristic private yachts.
Why trouble to convert warships bristling
with cannons and rockets into exquisite
yachts, when clients can build new ones from
scratch? The answer is: Time. Creating yachts
of these proportions can easily consume fve
years. By starting with ‘readymade’ steel hulls
of commanding ‘mil-spec’ quality, Abu Dhabi
MAR shortens the process considerably.
The Swift initiative is not alone a case of
form following function; it is an example of
purpose pursuing performance. The inherent
speed and manoeuvrability of a modern
naval ship offers owners and guests limitless
possibilities for exhilaration at sea. And military
seaworthiness allows a crew to deliver the
yacht wherever she is wanted, in any weather,
without pause.
Because the hulls are intact, removing the
superstructures and gutting the interiors to
make way for luxury furnishings and high-tech
equipment was done with the ships afoat in a
reserved basin of Al Mina Harbour. Meanwhile,
as a central facet of Abu Dhabi MAR’s bold
long-range programme, it is setting up state-
of-the-art shipyard facilities. The Swift 141
has already been be hauled out there for
completion and cosmetic fnish, and future
yachts will be constructed or reft there.
The shipyard is also offering such added
services as crew procurement and
training, complete interior outftting, and
shore management.
The Swifts will be as ‘green’ as possible:
the original fuel-guzzling turbine propulsion
is being replaced by fuel-effcient diesels
with minimal environmental impact. The
exterior and interior styling, by the exceptional
Pierrejean Design Studio of Paris, is at once
eye-catching and breath-taking, in tune with a
welcome trend toward sleekness and tasteful
minimalism in large yachts.
Abu Dhabi MAR has an unlimited future
as a global superyacht centre. It will easily be
found on the new world map to the beneft of
superyacht owners and crews everywhere.
Image Courtesy - Dick Holthuis Inevitable yachtbuilding sparks fly.
106-111 MAR - Logistics Intl_L3.indd 3 2/5/09 4:48:41 AM
108 Best of Abu Dhabi
L
u
x
u
r
y

L
i
f
e
s
t
y
l
e
s
In what tangible ways are you laying the
foundation for the creation of a viable
superyacht industry in Abu Dhabi?
The Middle East has established commercial
shipyards but lacks even one shipyard that
can build or reft luxury yachts to the highest
international standards. Abu Dhabi MAR will
fll that need by building world-class enclosed
shipbuilding facilities, run by an experienced
international management team, and populated
by a highly motivated, skilled workforce. Abu
Dhabi MAR will build impeccable yachts and will
be the frst full-service shipyard in the
Middle East exclusively serving the global
superyacht community.
Throughout your years in this specialist
sector, what evolution have you
witnessed in terms of design innovation,
sustainability criteria, and production
techniques?
Yachts were once totally designed by a single
individual. Today, having grown exponentially
larger, they must be created by teams of naval
architects, exterior designers, and interior
stylists and decorators, each painstakingly
selected by the clients. Superyachts have
therefore become a designer’s dream world.
But for a shipyard the continued innovation
in design, and resulting complexity, can be
daunting. Only a select few shipyards can
meet the challenge of tomorrow’s even more
complex designs. Abu Dhabi MAR is
developing production techniques to meet
that enormous challenge.
What challenges do you face in Developing
the Abu Dhabi MAR business model/
product range?
With our frst yacht, the Swift141, we are
fortunate to have a client who wants something
extreme, something vibrant and exciting in
design and flled with modern technology. We
see this custom yacht as an early opportunity
to prove ourselves to other clients with our very
frst project—an unusual challenge in terms of
credibility. Sustainability will follow when our
work is not so extreme, when we build a variety
of superyachts and are considered among the
top places cultivated clients would choose to
build any custom yacht to their specifcations
and individual tastes. Our business model is
therefore to be, and be known, among
leaders in custom yachtbuilding and to do
it all in Abu Dhabi.

With an already sophisticated branding
presence, what type of branding strategy
do you envision for Abu Dhabi MAR?
Branding is absolutely critical for Abu Dhabi
MAR’s success. We are the “new boys
on the block” and we have to be sure the
superyacht world notices us, which means
careful advertising, promotion, and PR. More
important, however, once we have been
noticed, we have to demonstrate clearly that
we can deliver the goods. In other words our
approach to branding is not to superfcially
create an image out of clever advertising and
slick slogans, but—if I can borrow that old slick
slogan!—to build a better yacht so the world will
beat a path to our door.
List Abu Dhabi MAR’s current range of
services and the new areas that you are
evolving into.
Tradition-bound shipyards build the old-
fashioned way—laying a keel and following
methodically from A to Z. We have adopted
modern methods employed by aerospace
giants Airbus and Boeing, who assemble
components and systems technically and
expertly fabricated by specialist subcontractors.
We currently employ subcontractors in 17
locations throughout the world, to design
and fabricate components, plus 30 to 40
custom suppliers. For example, our Swift141
and Swift135 have Dutch-built steel hulls and
American-built composite superstructures
that perfectly combine into extraordinary,
One of Abu Dhabi MAR’s key production managers, Saif S. Altenaiji (left), consults with Abu Dhabi MAR Industrial Manager Johan Valentijn. Altenaiji, a local resident, is a trained naval architect and marine engineer. He has
studied abroad, and has much international shipyard management experience. Valentijn is also a naval architect and marine engineer with more than 35 years designing and building yachts and managing shipyards.
Image Courtesy - Dick Holthuis
106-111 MAR - Logistics Intl_L3.indd 4 2/5/09 3:50:19 AM
The painted interior structure of the frst Swift yacht is made ready to receive
critical thermal insulation, before the electric wiring, ducting, piping, and stun-
ning luxury interior furnishings are installed.
Image Courtesy - Dick Holthuis
106-111 MAR - Logistics Intl_L3.indd 5 2/5/09 3:50:27 AM
Image Courtesy - Dick Holthuis
A section of the epoxy-composite superstructure is moved aboard in the heat of an Abu Dhabi summer night.
In December 2008 the superstructure’s
forward section is complete, ready for its
wraparound glass wall and yacht fnish.
106-111 MAR - Logistics Intl_L3.indd 6 2/5/09 3:50:50 AM
111 Best of Abu Dhabi
harmonious shapes. In addition to
building a yacht, we will also provide
outftting of luxury items, hire and
train crews, and organize onshore
management. We will also offer mooring
for visiting yachts and perform complete
refts and repairs.
How would you defne Abu Dhabi
MAR’s management style? What
lessons has the management
learned working in Abu Dhabi?
We have established an open, positive,
forward-looking, management style. It is
based on very close cooperation among
our key Abu Dhabi managers, expatriate
shipbuilding administrators, international
subcontractors and suppliers, and
growing pool of imported skilled
labour. We have Emiratis, Europeans,
Australians, New Zealanders,
Americans, and Asians in this project.
We have learned that this
cooperative method is essential to total
harmony when so many contrasting
cultures are involved. Together we will
accomplish our frst goal of perfecting
two superyachts, and attain the
long-term goal of establishing Abu
Dhabi as an attractive centre for all
superyacht activity. In short, Abu Dhabi
and Abu Dhabi MAR are growing
together in reality and in the eyes of
the world.
What further strategies for
proftability do you have?
Many yachtbuilders, despite their
extraordinary high-ticket product, are
notorious for suffering limited proft
margins. This is largely because many
still operate within the format of a
family-owned cottage industry, trying
to do everything in-house. We will
never get bogged down in that sort
of weighty tradition and minutiae. We
want to grow the company into the right
modern format to overcome all those
tradition-bound disadvantages. Again,
by being an effcient “assembler” we
can achieve the highest possible quality
while keeping production costs under
tight control.
Where does Abu Dhabi MAR
go from here? Scenarios for
the future?
We don’t want to model us after any
existing shipyard. We have developed
our own methods so that in three
to fve years we are credibly seen as
among the top builders and marketers
of superyachts, unique in the way
we manage and make use of our
workforce’s talent and enthusiasm.
When we are fully operational, we will
set the standard for the yachtbuilders
of the future. We have a strong dream
of how to do this differently, and my
optimism tells us that we will accomplish
it without a doubt, helping put Abu
Dhabi on the map as a respected
marine centre
Tel: +9712 445 5551
www.abudhabimar.com
Abu Dhabi MAR employs management talent
from all major yachtbuilding centres to supervise
the workforce. Managers have devoted consider-
able time, energy and sensitivity to sharing
cultures and training workers, resulting in a
highly skilled, motivated team capable of building
world-class yachts to the highest standards.
Image Courtesy - Dick Holthuis
106-111 MAR - Logistics Intl_L3.indd 7 2/5/09 3:51:09 AM
Old world charm meets
new age glamour
In line with Abu Dhabi’s 2030 Urban Plan, Deerfelds is supporting the needs of the market
by closing the gap in the in the retail, entertainment, residential, commercial and hospitality
markets. Deerfelds, offcially known as ‘Deerfelds Town Square’, is a project being run
under the auspices of the Mubarak and Brothers Property and Financial Investments (MBI).
As MBI’s frst real estate project, Deerfelds aims to create a residential and commercial
haven in which the needs and desires of all colours of residents and visitors will be satisfed.
S
cheduled for completion by the end of 2010, Deerfelds Town
Square is set to offer tenants, residents and shoppers a holistic
experience in entertainment, living, working, and shopping – all out
of a single community district. This 5.5 million sq ft community will
boast a typical town square ambience and a uniquely designed
shopping mall refecting classical Victorian architecture. The retail and
entertainment area will be spread on 2.2 million square feet, hosting
over 200 retailers from diverse segments from medium to upscale
brands, the shopping mall will offer over 3000 parking spaces for its
visitors. The mall will complement the development’s spectrum of
residential and hospitality components.
Nestled in a prime location, Deerfelds Town Square is set in
the Al Bahia area, amidst new developments in Abu Dhabi such
as Al Raha Beach, Yas Island, AL Reef, and Khalifa A and B Cities. Its
unique placement offers excellent accessibility to major landmarks,
such as the Abu Dhabi International Airport, the Warner Brothers
theme park, the Formula 1 Race Track, and the main Abu Dhabi –
Dubai highway.
Discussing the mission, vision and strategy of this mixed-use
retail kingdom, Deerfelds Town Square General Manager, Banu Tas
says, “Deerfelds Town Square was launched in May 2008 and was
showcased a week after the launch at Cityscape Abu Dhabi. The
reason for us coming onboard was to introduce Deerfelds to the
Abu Dhabi community and to promote the town of Al Bahia where
Deerfelds is being developed. The response has been excellent, and
a healthy booking of units has been witnessed since then. Today
Deerfelds is focusing on the retail and entertainment components
where many retailers in the region have shown enthusiasm for opening
new outlets in Abu Dhabi – which is amongst the region’s most
prosperous cities.”
Tas highlights the potential Deerfelds has in the local and
international market by concluding that, “Deerfelds Town Square will
evolve as a unique, distinctive destination that will merge the alluring
charm of the glorious past and the glamour of new age living. Its
architectural design will evoke timeless elegance and stylish appeal,
offering year-round ‘quality family time’ to Abu Dhabi’s close knit
communities and tourists.”

Tel: +9714 435 5699
www.deerfeldstownsquare.com
112 Best of Abu Dhabi
L
u
x
u
r
y

L
i
f
e
s
t
y
l
e
s

&

R
e
t
a
i
l

D
e
s
t
i
n
a
t
i
o
n
s
Abu Dhabi is experiencing a well articulated shift towards
sustainable leisure tourism. Its market share is estimated
to increase by 40 percent in 2015, with an increase of the
number of hotel rooms to 25,000.
Currently Abu Dhabi’s residential market is showing short-
age in supply. It will increase its offering from the 180,000
units that came online in 2007, to 251,000 being built in
2013, 411,000 in 2020 and 686,000 in 2030.
MBI is a respected venture capital frm that specializes in properties and fnancial investments. Deerfelds Town Square project has been painstakingly designed so as to ft within the parameters of true product innovation and
acceptable risk profle.
112 - 113 MBI_L3.indd 2 2/5/09 3:55:18 AM
Featuring retail and entertainment components
across 2.2 million sq feet, ‘Deerfelds Town
Square’ will primarily comprise over 200
retailers from different segments, medium to
upscale brands, anchor shops, retail chains,
food courts, casual and fne dining restaurants
as well as coffee shops.
Nestled in Al Bahia area amidst new
developments in Abu Dhabi such as Al Raha
Beach, Yas Island, and Khalifa A and B Cities,
the development will also comprise a hotel. The
Deerfelds Town Square project is scheduled
for completion in 2010.
Research indicates that Deerfelds’ current retail Gross Leasable Area (GLA) is 820,000 m². The expected GLA in 2010 -
which is the year that Deerfelds will open - will reach 1.4 million m²; which is still lower than the international GLA ratio.
MBI, a major investment company with interests
in diverse industry verticals such as education,
manufacturing and real estate, seeks to leverage
the group’s extensive industry specifc know-how
to develop and augment other enterprises that
will contribute to the development of the emirate
of Abu Dhabi, and the UAE at large. Founded on
family values passed down the generations, MBI
is a leading corporate citizen embedded with core
principles of integrity and transparency, prioritizing
the interests of the community that it aims to serve.
ac
112 - 113 MBI_L3.indd 3 2/5/09 3:55:40 AM
Shop till’ you drop
Touted as the ‘richest’ city in the world, Abu Dhabi is both a centre of tradition and
an affluent meeting place of world cultures. Its retail experience is reflective of this
emirate’s unique nature. Here, both the casual and the experienced shopper can
come across all types of treasures, from antiques in Bedouin-style souks, to the
latest fashions in sleek, ultra modern malls.
L
u
x
u
r
y

L
i
f
e
s
t
y
l
e
s

&

R
e
t
a
i
l

D
e
s
t
i
n
a
t
i
o
n
s
With over 18 shopping centres dotting Abu Dhabi, visitors can fnd
international brands and nascent regional ones too. Souks, the Arabic
word for the traditional marketplaces characteristic of the Middle East,
offer a variety of traditional handicrafts, carpets, and spices.
114 -115 Retail Overview_L3.indd 2 2/5/09 5:07:32 AM
Abu Dhabi Mall
The Abu Dhabi Mall is the largest mall in the capital of the UAE, stretching
over a total area of 200,000 sq meters. Located near the Beach Rotana
Hotel and Towers, this shopper’s dream boasts over 220 stores, including
Bang & Olufsen, Betty Barclay, Esprit, Massimo Dutti, and Tommy Hilfger.
The range of goods available in the mall’s shops include children’s, women’s
and men’s fashion, make-up and perfume, music, soft-furnishings, household
furniture, electrical goods, gifts, health-food, pharmacies, confectionery, dates,
sportswear, books and stationery, as well as the city’s preferred grocer, Abu
Dhabi Co-op.
Abu Dhabi Mall also features the very best in dining and entertainment,
with over 40 international food outlets and an extensive food court. Topping
all of this is the mall’s six screen cinema, the Dune City Entertainment Centre
and Bowling City, all of which are a welcome break from the more ‘serious’
fun of shopping.
www.abudhabi-mall.com
Marina Mall
Marina Mall is the second largest mall in Abu Dhabi, right after the Abu Dhabi
Mall. Strategically located in the Water Breaker area next to Corniche Hotel,
this mall offers a jam-packed shopping experience. It is home to over 160
stores, including IKEA, Woolworths, Zara, Versace, Burberry, Louis Vuitton,
Channel, Gucci and Yves Saint Laurent, as well as the major hypermarket,
Carrefour. Away from the whirlwinds of shopping, Marina Mall offers leisure
and entertainment with a nine-screen cinema, a musical fountain, and a wide
variety of restaurants, cafes, and fast food outlets that cater to every taste.
www.marinamall.ae
Iranian Souk
One of the most authentic souks in the country, the Iranian Souk in Al Meena
is famous for its open-air atmosphere and kaleidoscope of colours. As can
be noted from its name, this souk sells goods imported from Iran, including
beautiful bedspreads, carpets and hand-painted pottery.
In 2007, the Abu Dhabi government decided to help revive the UAE’s
traditional souk culture by redeveloping the Iranian souk’s internal vistas
of green parks, pools and fountains. Visiting the Iranian Souk is a must for
shopping enthusiasts who want to experience the more traditional side of the
UAE. Endless hours can be spent exploring its maze of exciting possibilities.
Al Meena Souk
Al Meena Souk, also known as the Afghan Souk, is one of the oldest souks in
Abu Dhabi. Its winding alleys are home to many cosy shops selling everything
from local souvenirs to colourful fabrics to traditionally designed jewellery.
What the souk is most famous for, however, is its offering of Persian carpets.
The endless patterns and colours of its carpets are sure to please even the
most refned tastes for the Oriental. After a round of bargaining with the local
merchants, Al Meena Souk gives shoppers a chance to recharge their energy
with a quaint little coffee stall at the centre of the shopping area.
114 -115 Retail Overview_L3.indd 3 2/5/09 5:07:46 AM
Chapter 5 Wellness, Health & Leisure
116-117-Wellness, Health & Leisure_L3.indd 2 2/5/09 5:12:53 AM
“He who has health has hope;
and he who has hope has everything.”
Ancient Arabic Proverb
116-117-Wellness, Health & Leisure_L3.indd 3 2/5/09 5:12:55 AM
118 Best of Abu Dhabi
Health kick start
Specializing in the treatment of patients with knee and sports related injuries, the Abu Dhabi Knee
and Sports Medicine Centre (ADKSMC) was the frst healthcare facility of its kind in the UAE and
Middle East. Providing patients with state-of-the-art healthcare based on accepted international
standards and evidence-based medicine, the Centre became fully operational in January 2007
with a staff of 20. Established by Mubadala Development Company in 2006, the Centre forms part
of Mubadala Healthcare’s integrated network of world-class facilities. ADKSMC has performed
over 1,200 surgical procedures, of which 850 were anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior
cruciate ligament (PCL) knee reconstructions. Since the incidence of ACL injuries in the UAE is
estimated to be fve times that of European countries and North America, ACL injuries represent a
signifcant healthcare problem for the UAE. Dr Charles Brown, Medical Director, ADKSMC shares
his insight on the Centre’s activities.
W
e
l
l
n
e
s
s
,

H
e
a
l
t
h

&

L
e
i
s
u
r
e
How is the ADKSMC fulflling its vision to create a Centre of Excellence dedicated
to improving the lives of patients with knee and sports related injuries?
In contrast with most of the hospitals and clinics in the region which treat many different
types of medical problems, ADKSMC was established to specialize in treating patients
with knee and sports related injuries. With a focus to deliver cost effective, state-of-the
art treatment based on the latest internationally accepted evidence- based medicine,
a dedicated medical staff has been trained to care exclusively for patients with these
conditions. The second focus of our Centre is education. Our surgeons and physical
therapists are actively involved in teaching and the Centre hosts visiting surgeons who
come to learn the latest techniques in knee surgery. To date we have hosted visiting
surgeons from the UAE, Bahrain, Qatar, Oman, Yemen, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Libya, Iran,
South Africa, Belgium, Sweden, Norway, Iceland and the UK. We are also actively involved
in teaching at regional and international medical education courses.
As part of its outreach program, the Centre also trains athletic trainers and physical
therapists for several of the UAE Sports Clubs in the latest treatment methods for athletic
injuries. Members of our medical staff have pioneered many of the current surgical
techniques practiced globally and have published numerous articles and book chapters in
the feld of knee ligament surgery.
Musculoskeletal allograft tissue is invaluable in the treatment of patients with failed
The Centre was founded in 2006 by Mubadala Development
Company with the goal of providing the people in Abu Dhabi, UAE
and surrounding GCC countries with high quality in-country treat-
ment of knee problems and sports related injuries. To ensure that
our patients receive the best possible care, treatment at the Centre
is based on accepted international standards which have been
validated by evidence-based medicine. Since opening its doors,
the Centre has performed over 1,200 surgeries including 850 knee
ligament reconstructions.
118 -119 AD Knee & Sports Med Center_L3.indd 2 2/5/09 5:17:03 AM
119 Best of Abu Dhabi
Musculoskeletal allograft tissue is invaluable in the treatment of patients with failed knee ligament surgery and those requiring reconstruction of more than one knee ligament. In 2007, the Centre installed a -80º freezer for
storage of allograft tissue imported from tissue banks in the United States certifed by the American Association Tissue Banks, making it the frst healthcare facility in the UAE and Middle East to offer the option of allograft tissue
to its patients. Previously, allograft tissue was only available to patients in the UAE by traveling to USA or a few European countries. Since its establishment, the Centre has performed over 50 operations requiring the use of
allograft tissue. Recognized for its innovative pain management program and state-of-the art ACL reconstruction surgical techniques developed by its Anesthesia Department and Medical Directors, the Centre has hosted visiting
surgeons from Bahrain, Saudi Arabia, Iran, Yemen, Egypt, Libya, South Africa, Belgium, Norway, Sweden, Norway, and the UK who came to learn more about these techniques.
knee ligament surgery and those requiring
reconstruction of more than one knee ligament.
In 2007, the Centre installed a -80º freezer for
storage of allograft tissue imported from tissue
banks in the United States certifed by the
American Association of Tissue Banks, making
it the frst healthcare facility in the UAE and
Middle East to offer the option of allograft
tissue to its patients. Previously, allograft tissue
was only available to patients in the UAE by
traveling to USA or a few European countries.
Since its establishment, the Centre has
performed over 50 operations requiring the use
of allograft tissue. Recognized for its innovative
pain management program and state-of-the
art ACL reconstruction surgical techniques
developed by its Anesthesia Department
and Medical Directors, the Centre has
hosted visiting surgeons from Bahrain, Saudi
Arabia, Iran, Yemen, Egypt, Libya, South
Africa, Belgium, Norway, Sweden, Norway,
and the UK who came to learn more about
these techniques.
What initiatives are you planning in
order to assist in positioning Abu Dhabi
as a hub for health tourism? What
role does the ADKSMC hope to play in
this development?
Together with Dr. Nader Darwich, Deputy
Director, ADKSMC, anesthesiologists Dr Ahmad
Ahmad and Dr Ahmad Taha, and experienced
physical therapists David Baston and Azzam
Kamal we aim to provide the best cost effective
care to the people of the UAE. We are confdent
that once patients from abroad discover that
our Centre is capable of providing them with
the same quality and same types of treatment
offered in Europe, the USA or other countries
such as Thailand and Singapore - which
promote themselves as preferred destinations
for health tourism - they will choose us over
these other destinations.
Can you outline any groundbreaking
treatments currently available at ADKSMC
please?
ADKSMC pioneered the use of musculoskeletal
allograft tissue in the Middle East and GCC.
Musculoskeletal allograft tissue is invaluable in
the treatment of patients with failed ligament
surgery and patients requiring reconstruction
of more than one knee ligament. Previously,
allograft tissue was only available to patients
regionally and in the UAE by travelling to the
USA or selected European countries.
Since becoming fully operational in 2006,
we have performed over 50 operations using
allograft tissue. The availability of allograft
tissue allows ADKSMC to be one of the
few facilities in the region specializing in the
treatment of patients with failed knee ligament
operations, and patients with complex
multiple ligament injuries.
ADKSMC is also the only Centre in the region
offering a comprehensive pain management
programme for patients undergoing surgery.
Managed by our Anesthesia Department,
our pain management programme minimizes
the patients’ pain after surgery and allows for
earlier mobilization and rehabilitation minimizing
surgical morbidity.
Meet the ADKSMC surgical team
Dr. Charles Brown, Medical Director
A respected international teacher responsible
for developing multiple specialised techniques
and instruments currently used by orthopedic
surgeons world-wide, as well as the author
of over 48 abstracts, book chapters and
scientifc articles; Dr. Charles H Brown Jr., is an
Orthopaedic surgeon certifed and recertifed
twice by the American Board of Orthopaedic
Surgery, specializing in the treatment of knee
ligament injuries. Dr. Brown is also a member
of the American Academy of Orthopaedic
Surgeons, and the American Orthopaedic
Society of Sports Medicine. An internationally
recognized authority on the treatment of knee
ligament injuries and complex knee problems,
he completed his orthopaedic training at the
Harvard Combined Orthopaedic Training
Program in Boston, Massachusetts. Dr. Brown
was a staff orthopaedic surgeon at the Brigham
and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts
and a Clinical Instructor at Harvard Medical
School from 1991, until leaving to become
Medical Director of ADKSMC in January 2006.
Dr. Brown is a pioneer in the use of hamstring
tendon grafts for anterior cruciate ligament
surgery and has published numerous articles
and given lectures worldwide on this topic.
Dr. Nader Darwich, Deputy Medical Director
Dr. Darwich is a consultant Orthopaedic
Surgeon who received his medical degree from
the Faculty of Medicine, Damascus University,
Syria in 1983 and did his post graduate
orthopaedic training in France where he
practiced orthopaedics until December 1995.
Dr. Darwich is holder of the French
Board in Orthopaedics and trauma surgery
since 1992 from the Faculty of Medicine,
Nancy University, France. He is sub-specialized
in arthroscopic surgery, knee ligament
reconstruction and sports injuries. Dr. Darwich
invented a device for the distal interlocking in the
intramedullary nailing.
This helps the operating surgeon to
avoid exposure to operating at the point of
distal locking.
Dr. Darwich is currently licensed with the
French Medical Council, British Medical Council
(Full Registration), MD with the Syrian Ministry of
Health and Orthopedic Surgeon with the Syrian
Ministry of Health.
Tel: +9712 631 7774
www.sportsmedicine.ae
118 -119 AD Knee & Sports Med Center_L3.indd 3 2/5/09 5:17:08 AM
SEHA means health in
Arabic.
SEHA is an independent, public
joint stock company created
to manage and develop the
curative activities of the public
hospitals and clinics of the
Emirate of Abu Dhabi.
SEHA manages 8
hospital systems
totalling 12 facilities,
2,653 licensed beds,
more than 55 Primary
Health Clinics and 16,500
employees.
Health Wish
Although the full name of this company is Abu Dhabi Health Services Company, its
corporate name is SEHA. This word represents an English phonetic pronunciation and
translation of the Arabic word for ‘Health’. Launched in 2007 by the Government of
Abu Dhabi, SEHA is an independent, public joint stock company (PJSC) created
to manage and develop the curative activities of its public hospitals and clinics.
Its establishment is part of the Government’s healthcare sector reform initiatives,
representing another step in the realisation of the strategic vision to provide the people
of the UAE with the best healthcare facilities in the world, locally. Carl V. Stanifer, CEO,
SEHA shares his views on this innovative healthcare venture.
W
e
l
l
n
e
s
s
,

H
e
a
l
t
h

&

L
e
i
s
u
r
e
SEHA is committed to
providing quality health-
care for the community in
a socially responsible and
cost effective manner
on par with international
standards.
In addition to being honoured in 2008 with two Arab Health
Awards and a special commendation, four of SEHA’s
hospitals have been accredited by Joint Commission
International (JCI), the highest international accreditation
available. Accreditation by JCI represents worldwide
consensus on the quality of patient care offered that refects
state-off-the-art healthcare practices and the highest quality
healthcare delivery trends.
120 - 121 SEHA_L3.indd 2 2/5/09 5:24:42 AM
“It is under SEHA and through
partnership and management
agreements with leading
international healthcare services
providers that SEHA will bring world
class healthcare delivery to all the
residents of Abu Dhabi.”
Dr. Ahmed Mubarak Al Mazrouei, Chairman of
the Abu Dhabi Health Services Company (SEHA)
Please defne SEHA’s activities?
We own and operate 12 hospitals in the Emirate, more than 50
clinics and have over 2,600 patient beds. By delivering world
class healthcare, locally, we partner with internationally recognised
healthcare leaders. Our partners include Johns Hopkins
Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Bumrungrad International, The
New England Center for Children, Vamed and Vienna Medical
University. SEHA’s aim is to continuously optimize the performance
of our partners to derive the utmost value from our contractual
relationships. We are also developing the infrastructure required
to support and achieve these world class standards for
healthcare delivery.
For instance, SEHA is constructing new buildings and
undertaking other capital improvements for upgrading facilities so
as optimise resources and improve services. By enhancing our
facilities infrastructure, using the latest medical technology and
equipment, as well as by customizing services, SEHA is
enhancing healthcare service delivery locally. This is achieved
by striving to improve our services to reach international standards,
by adopting world-recognized benchmarks of clinical excellence
and fnancial performance, for example evidence-based
medicine. In addition, we are also implementing product
differentiation through introduction of specialty services and
diagnostic services too.
SEHA is also establishing and repositioning ambulatory health
care services (AHS) and integrating them with SEHA hospitals
to establish cross-referral patterns. Ambulatory Care is the
international standard of outpatient care in the developed world.
It blends well with the latest patient care concept of ‘continuum
of care’, where by a patient is assessed and treated based upon
their unique condition. This means that we manage and monitor
patient care continuously. AHS represents a suite of healthcare
services that include specialty consultation, diagnostics, laboratory,
pharmacy and emergency services at the local, community level,
enabling patients to obtain services locally that were formally only
available at an acute care hospital. Ambulatory care harnesses
technology and modern healthcare delivery techniques to
increase convenience and access for the patient, achieving one
of our missions of access to high quality healthcare on par with
international standards.
Who is your target segment and what services do you
provide them?
We provide all Abu Dhabi residents with access to healthcare
and a choice of providers. Our operational base is substantial. In
2009, we estimate we will care for more than 5.1 million outpatients
and 108,000 inpatients. We are excited that more than 21,000
babies are expected to be born at our hospitals. Our hospitals will
perform almost 41,000 surgeries, more than 72,000 MRI/CT Scans
and 65,000 dialysis treatments.
Do you compete with the top range of qualifed systems?
If so, what are they?
SEHA is benchmarking itself against the best systems in the world.
Our ultimate goal is to deliver world class healthcare to the people
of Abu Dhabi. To accomplish this, we have partnered with some of
the most eminent hospital managers in the world.
What specifc initiatives is SEHA undertaking regionally?
SEHA is committed to providing quality healthcare for the
community in a socially responsible and cost effective manner on
par with international standards, measured through accessibility,
affordability, choice and satisfaction. One of our strategic missions
is to frst establish SEHA as a market leader by providing
integrated high quality healthcare services locally. In the region we
will be organizing and participating in medical conferences and
symposiums geared towards enhancing knowledge sharing and
120 - 121 SEHA_L3.indd 3 2/5/09 5:25:01 AM
122 Best of Abu Dhabi

L
e
i
s
u
r
e
,

H
e
a
l
t
h

&

W
e
l
l
n
e
s
s
transferring new technology from research to practice.
SEHA will respond to local, regional and international market
needs based on objective and informed decision making. We
will be developing regional centres of excellence emphasizing
outcome based quality provision, research and training. This is
an exciting time in the healthcare sector in the region and we
will identify additional acquisitions and sustainable opportunities
in the healthcare industry outside Abu Dhabi. SEHA will also
be attracting investment opportunities, strategic partners and
utilizing and investing funds as appropriate in the region to
facilitate our mission.
Can you discuss the SEHA pricing strategy?
SEHA competes for patients on the same basis as the private
sector so our pricing structure has to be competitive. The
new reimbursement model being introduced in Abu Dhabi is
grounded on an insurance model in which employers will pay
for employee healthcare. Health insurance is mandatory for
all employers and anyone needing medical care in Abu Dhabi
- whether they go to a public or private provider - must either
pay for services received directly or have insurance to cover the
expense. While SEHA enjoys the largest market share in
Abu Dhabi, to maintain that share, reasonably priced care
ensuring that quality and outcomes supersede the competition,
is a must.
What progress is SEHA making in terms of its brand
promotion?
Our marketing plans call for a branding campaign to establish
the SEHA name as the quality leader locally and in the region.
One of our strategic objectives is to ensure patient safety and
build patient trust in the healthcare system. All our efforts are
aimed at reaching this goal.
Tel: +9712 632 7600
www.seha.ae
Multi-organ transplants get the go-ahead
Under the supervision of SEHA, the Sheikh Khalifa Medical City
(SKMC) managed by Cleveland Clinic recently initiated the
development of a comprehensive multi-organ transplant programme.
The frst two kidney transplants were performed by Dr. Abrar
Khan, the newly appointed Director of Transplantation and
Hepatobiliary Surgery. Dr. Khan, a multi-organ transplantation
surgeon-scientist, arrived from the US in October 2007.
Saif Bader Al Qubaisi, MD, SEHA, stated that “the launch of a Multi –
Organ transplant program is a signifcant advance in organ transplantation
for the UAE and the region. SEHA and SKMC are sincerely committed to
the continuous improvement of healthcare in Abu Dhabi and the UAE,
and the multi-organ transplantation programme is a signifcant
step forward. The new programme will enable us to treat patients
in the UAE rather than sending them abroad for treatment. This will
result not only in limiting the suffering of the patients outside the country,
but also in increased convenience for them and their respective families.”
Healthcare Centre on track
The launching of the new Ambulatory Healthcare Centre of the Sheikh
Khalifa Medical City ‘A’, the frst of 37 clinics to be upgraded in Abu
Dhabi, is one of the frst steps in SEHA’s long term plan to overhaul the
healthcare system of the Emirate and deliver medical services to the
people of Abu Dhabi, equal to the best systems in the world.
Working Hours
Disease Prevention & Screening Centres (DPSCs), a subsidiary of SEHA
through its Ambulatory Healthcare Services (AHS), announced an increase
in working hours, by adding 3 extra hours of service daily, now operating
till 6 pm.
DPSCs have been introduced with a view to streamline medical visa
screening processes for the beneft and convenience of the expatriates
residing in the Abu Dhabi.
“Our Country puts a lot of emphasis
on human development, and cares for
its Citizens anywhere in this Country,
and considers the Citizens true fortune
of this land”.
Late His Highness Sheikh Zayed Bin Sultan Al Nahyan,
President of the UAE
120 - 121 SEHA_L3.indd 4 2/5/09 5:25:17 AM
120 - 121 SEHA_L3.indd 5 2/5/09 5:25:21 AM
124 Best of Abu Dhabi
Growing through diversification
The UAE healthcare sector is ripe for major changes over
the next few years - changes that can only serve to further
stimulate an already burgeoning industry.
W
e
l
l
n
e
s
s
,

H
e
a
l
t
h

&

L
e
i
s
u
r
e
His Excellency Mr. Humaid Al Qutami, Minister of Health, UAE, presented “Best Public Service Campaign Award” to Dr. Shamsheer V.P., Managing Director, Lifeline Hospital Group.
ABU DHABI
124 -125 Lifeline Hospital Cor_L3.indd 2 2/9/09 4:51:57 PM
125 Best of Abu Dhabi
R
eports suggest that the
UAE healthcare market
is expected to increase from
AED11.7 billion in 2005 to
AED43.7 billion in 2015. This is
due to the UAE’s fast-growing
population and the recent
stipulation by the Abu Dhabi
Health Authority that all residents
should have health cover -
either through insurance or
provided by their employers.
Price regulation in the UAE
pharmaceutical sector is also
expected to see a per capita
increase of 33 per cent over the
next four years, with a total
market spend reaching AED4.4
billion by 2012.
In addition, many believe
the UAE to be a growing
hub for an equally growing
health tourism market -
travelling outside one’s own
country to receive medical
treatment, often combined with
a recuperative stay at a tourist
resort. “The UAE’s central
location is extremely convenient
for European, African and Asian
patients,” observes Lifeline
Hospital Group managing director,
Dr. Shamsheer V.P. “European
countries have long waiting lists
when it comes to elective
surgeries and patients often
have to wait months for treatment.
In Africa, many countries
lack modern infrastructure
for healthcare. In Asia too,
some countries are
not adequately equipped to
provide high quality healthcare.
All these factors, coupled with
the rich culture and hospitality of
the UAE, work in favour of medical
tourism here.”
Lifeline Hospital Group
It is hard to dispute that Lifeline
Hospital Group, already a major
provider of healthcare in the UAE,
will continue to play an increasing
role in the growth of the healthcare
sector within both the UAE and
the wider region. First established
in May 2007, the state-of-the-art
Lifeline Hospital was launched
in Abu Dhabi with the objective
of providing top quality and
affordable healthcare. Since
then, Lifeline Hospital Group has
continued to chart its exponential
course of organic growth through
a diversifed portfolio of health-
related businesses. There are
four additional health centres and
seven pharmacies across Abu
Dhabi, Al Ain and Musaffah.
Lifeline Scientifc Company
is a joint venture with three leading
international pharmaceutical
frms: Emcure Pharmaceuticals,
Dr. Reddy’s and Calypte
Biomedical Corporation.
“Initially, Lifeline Scientifc
Company will distribute the
pharmaceutical products
and medical services of our three
partners,” explains Dr. Shamsheer.
“The company then plans to
integrate backwards
and directly manufacture
medical, pharmaceutical and
biotechnology products.”
D-Club, the group’s organic
foods catering company, was
launched last year and intends to
expand into other GCC countries
in due course.
ADLINE Advertising, the
group’s in-house advertising
and PR division, executes
both Lifeline’s own marketing
campaigns, as well as those for
external clients.
Working for the community
Within the community, the group
participates in educational
campaigns, and holds free camps
for workers. “We have also recently
run diabetes, breast cancer and
AIDS awareness campaigns,”
notes Dr. Shamsheer. “In the
diabetes campaign which lasted
for 10 days, we had fve centres
advising patients and conducting
free blood sugar estimates. We had
as many as 500 patients in a single
day in each of the camps. During
the breast cancer awareness
campaign, we examined,
taught self-examination and
carried out free mammography
for over 500 women. We are
also close to making a major
contribution to AIDS care in several
African countries.”
The group’s work within
the community has not gone
unrecognised. Major awards
include the Public Service
Campaign Award from the UAE
Ministry of Health, the Daman
Healthcare Quality Award for
Patient Satisfaction, and Australian
Council on Healthcare Standards
(ACHSI) Certifcate for adherence
to ACHSI healthcare standards.
“These awards are a shot in the
arm for the mission of the group,”
enthuses Dr. Shamsheer. “Lifeline
has a philosophy of reaching out to
people to preserve life and health
and we plan to carry on with these
campaigns in future.
“Further into the future we
intend to open more hospitals
in the GCC and North Africa,”
adds Dr. Shamsheer. “The organic
foods business will also grow
by setting up offces across the
GCC. The sourcing of foods
will be done from all over the
world. But with increasing
emphasis on local production.”
In the pipeline for the more
immediate future are new
General and a day care surgery
hospitals - both in Mussafa,
plus Lifeline Egypt and Lifeline
USA, both of which will be
developed with hospital and
pharmaceutical components.
Tel: +9712 633 5522
www.lifelineauh.ae
His Excellency Mr. Humaid Al Qutami, Minister of Health, UAE, presented “Best Public Service Campaign Award” to Dr. Shamsheer V.P., Managing Director, Lifeline Hospital Group.
124 -125 Lifeline Hospital_L3.indd 3 2/5/09 5:28:00 AM
I mperial College London
Diabetes Centre
In 2004, Abu Dhabi’s Mubadala Development Company and the UK’s Imperial
College London came together for a synergetic endeavour in the felds of education,
healthcare, research and development. The result was the creation of Imperial
College London Diabetes Centre (ICLDC), a new facility in Abu Dhabi specializing
in diabetes treatment, research, training as well as public health. With the combined
expertise of Imperial College London and the commitment of Abu Dhabi to
excellence in the realm of medicine, ICLDC is set to become a world leader in the
study and treatment of diabetes.
W
e
l
l
n
e
s
s
,

H
e
a
l
t
h

&

L
e
i
s
u
r
e
D
r Maha Taysir Barakat, Medical & Research Director and Consultant Endocrinologist at ICLDC,
shares her views of how this new institution add value to specialist healthcare in the region.
In what specifc ways is ICLDC fulflling its vision ‘to create a Centre of Excellence for
diabetes with a multi-disciplinary approach covering all aspects of diabetes and
its complications’?
ICLDC offers a model of comprehensive treatment that is built on four pillars: treatment, public health,
training and research.
Treatment - Facilities at ICLDC are at par with any international treatment centre. The Centre
has signifcantly more experienced and professional physicians than any Diabetes unit currently in
the UAE.
Public Health - One of the core focus areas for ICLDC. In February
2007 ICLDC launched ‘DIABETES. KNOWLEDGE. ACTION’, the award-winning public health
awareness campaign under the patronage of HH Sheikha Fatima bint Mubarak, in partnership with
the Emirates Foundation.
Training and Education - We organise specialist seminars targeted towards the healthcare
professionals (accredited for CME credits) and weekly in-house seminars for resident doctors.
126 Best of Abu Dhabi
The Centre forms part of Mubadala Health-
care’s integrated network of
world-class facilities.
126-127_ Imperial College - Final_L3.indd 2 2/5/09 11:05:43 AM
127 Best of Abu Dhabi
Research at ICLDC - Focusing on occurrence
and prevention of Diabetes in the country.
Clearly the more we understand these reasons,
the more we can instigate preventative and
predictive measures.

ICLDC was created as part of a joint
initiative between Mubadala Development
Company and the UK’s Imperial College
London. Can you tell us how the
cooperation between these two institutes
has given ICLDC a unique edge?
The cooperation between these institutions
has provided us with superior capabilities
that can help lead the Diabetes
management and prevention programs at
the national level.
Mubadala Healthcare, a division of
Mubadala Development Company is dedicated
to investments in strategic, high-value
projects that enhance the private healthcare
infrastructure of Abu Dhabi in particular and
the UAE in general.
Partnering with Imperial College London
brings the world-class tradition of pioneering
excellence in teaching and research
to the country.

Can you briefy run through the individual
themes of your operations and services,
explaining your approach to achieving
‘the highest level of specialized
patient care from frst diagnosis to the
management of all the complications
associated with diabetes’?
Our emphasis at ICLDC is on prevention, early
detection and, more specifcally, long-term
management of Diabetes. It is estimated that
more than a quarter of UAE nationals suffers
from Diabetes. ICLDC is working towards
managing and eventually reversing this trend.
Continuous education under the holistic
theme of Diabetes management for these
patients and for those around them – family,
care-takers, friends – plays a key role in
allowing the development of healthy lifestyle
habits, and thereby helping to prevent
long-term complications.

How would you defne your management
style? What lessons has ICLDC learnt
during its operations in Abu Dhabi?
ICLDC is built and run on a culture of
collaboration – that is, collaboration with our
partners, our doctors, our community and
our patients.
We have been very fortunate to
continuously receive support from the
government, various organisations and
our partners and sponsors of countless
campaign activities.
We also receive tremendous support from
the UAE media that allows us to reach out to
the community very promptly.
As you grow to understand the diabetes
phenomenon in the UAE and the
broader Middle East, and aim to cater
your services to the region, what
challenges have you faced socially,
culturally and professionally?
The biggest challenge has been to bring
Diabetes to the fore, to be discussed by
the community. ICLDC has gladly
stepped in to help drive education and
awareness of Diabetes in the country.
One of your stated aims is the focus on
research. How does that ft into your
greater goal of tackling the problem of
diabetes in the UAE?
Our vision is to improve the quality of life for
those with Diabetes as well as helping to
prevent Diabetes in those with a predisposition.
Education and research play a crucial role to
achieve this vision and to reverse the
alarming prevalence that is affecting the UAE
and the region.
The research facility aims at fnding
mechanisms to slow down and reverse the
development of Diabetes.
Research conducted at ICLDC
encompasses epidemiological, basic,
clinical and genetic research.
Can you tell us about the technological
advances in the world of diabetes that
ICLDC is bringing to Abu Dhabi?
The Centre provides the highest level
of specialised care for patients, starting at
the initial diagnosis and all the way to the
management of all complications
associated with Diabetes. This is achieved
through our in-house comprehensive
diagnostic facilities which include: on-site
blood testing, digital retinal photography,
retinal laser machines, ultrasound and
x-ray facilities, and the latest in cardiac
echocardiography and stress testing to detect
the earliest signs of heart disease. All these
modalities are integrated into a unique paperless
electronic IT system that collates the information
and guides treatment according to international
evidence-based protocols.
What are ICLDC efforts on community
outreach on education and awareness
of Diabetes?
ICLDC launched the frst-ever public health
awareness campaign on Diabetes in the U.A.E:
‘DIABETES. KNOWLEDGE. ACTION’ in the
year 2007.
What are the objectives for the campaign?
To encourage community participation in
awareness and prevention activities Reach
out to community through various campaign
activities including the targeting of people at
high-risk of developing Diabetes.
Where does ICLDC go from here?
Scenarios for the future?
Maintain World-Class Treatment -
Continually review and improve treatment of
Diabetes at ICLDC in line with evidence-based
medicine and latest protocols.
Community outreach through ‘DIABETES.
KNOWLEDGE. ACTION’ 2009 - The public
health awareness campaign will continue.
ICLDC will continually enhance the campaign
to focus on those most at risk and also on
lifestyle education of the young to protect the
next generation.
Support and cooperate with Government
Initiatives - We fully support the Emirate-
wide and federal strategies for primary and
secondary prevention against Diabetes. The
Centre will work closely with stakeholders –
the Government, public and media – to
enhance quality of life through prevention
of Diabetes.
Tel: +9712 40 40 800
www.icldc.ae
126-127_ Imperial College - Final_L3.indd 3 2/5/09 11:05:56 AM
Rainbow Island children
activities center enables
member’s children to learn
new skills while having fun in
a healthy and encouraging
environment.
Launched in 1998, under the
directives of H.H. Sheikha
Fatima Bint Mubarak,
The Abu Dhabi Ladies Club is
managed by National Catering
Company L.L.C since
June 2008.
Several lunch and
dinner outlets offer the
ideal meeting place
for friends and family,
serving vast varieties
of succulent and
gastronomic cuisines.
The Abu Dhabi ladies
Club is home to a modern
fully-equipped gymnasium,
2 aerobics studios and
a pilates studio, as well
as tennis, squash and
basketball courts.
Unrivalled Relaxation
Located at the end of the Abu Dhabi Corniche, close to the Emirates Palace
Hotel, the Abu Dhabi Ladies Club is the place to go. Nestled amidst lush green
trees, and surrounded by its own expansive landscaped gardens, the club’s fa-
cilities are built to exceedingly high standards providing sporting, cultural, artistic
and social facilities exclusively for women.
W
e
l
l
n
e
s
s
,

H
e
a
l
t
h

&

L
e
i
s
u
r
e
At the Abu Dhabi Ladies Club, we
take pride in our commitment to enrich
the lives of our members through
social, cultural and educational
programs, as well as entertainment
and ftness services. Our aim is to offer
a healthy environment for women of
Abu Dhabi to meet and develop their
talents and skills, lead a healthy life
style and have an active and valuable
role in the community.
Pilates studio
128-129 AD Ladies Club_L3.indd 2 2/5/09 1:41:16 PM
129 Best of Abu Dhabi
A
perfect location to see and be seen, the Abu
Dhabi Ladies Club is noted for attracting ladies
from a broad spectrum of UAE and expat society.
Since the inauguration of the Abu Dhabi Ladies Club
in 1998, under the directive of Her Highness Sheikha
Fatima Bint Mubarak and her tremendous support,
the club has aimed at giving women and girls a
suitable platform for serious participation in social,
cultural, professional and athletic activities.
The Abu Dhabi Ladies Club is a unique facility in
Abu Dhabi, as it is open to women only, and places
high care in keeping and respecting the local customs
and traditions.
Facilities at the Abu Dhabi Ladies Club are ultra
chic in line with the undeniable culture of luxury that is
being fostered in the Emirate overall.
With choice and diversity a constant in the club’s
gastronomic offerings, all-day dining options are
excellent, from the luxurious fne dining Al Aryam
restaurant, which is open for lunch and dinner, to
the cooler Orchid Coffee Shop, enchanting
Lobby lounge and the Lavanda Terrace Café.
This is the ideal getaway for a family or business
lunch, dinner, afternoon snack or just a coffee and
cake with friends.
The Club offers a vast range of services, activities
and classes. On the sports and physical ftness front
it offers a relaxation day spa designed to combat daily
stresses, a modern, well-equipped Gymnasium, two
Aerobics Studios built to international standards, and
a Pilates studio comprising the most advanced Pilates
machines and equipment. Also available are sports
facilities ranging from tennis, roller-skating and squash
to basketball as well as volleyball. All of this would
not be complete without an outdoor haven with an
extended area for relaxing in the sun and swimming
pools that are ideal for either swimming or energy-
intensive aqua-aerobic exercise classes.
All ladies and young girls are actively encouraged
to join the many sporting teams participating regularly
in tournaments and friendly competitions both within
local and regional clubs.
The Abu Dhabi Ladies Club has an extensive
program of cultural and artistic classes for women
and children, including languages, etiquette, painting,
crafts, makeup, decoration, fower arrangements, and
much more. The Club hosts regular seminars and
conferences on issues and subjects that are of great
interest to the contemporary woman.
The Rainbow Island Children Activities Centre at
the Abu Dhabi Ladies Club enables members’ and
guests’ children to learn new skills while having fun,
a revolutionary concept of ‘learning through play’
activities. Children are encouraged to join the fun in
indoors and outdoors activities under the supervision
of qualifed staff.
For your special occasions, the Abu Dhabi
Ladies Club tent is the ideal place to transform
celebrations into memorable occasions.
Accommodating up to 600 seated ladies, with
spectacular views over the pool into the garden, the
Abu Dhabi Ladies Club adds a magical touch
to banquets.
Tel: +971 2 666 2228
www.adlc.ae
The Abu Dhabi Ladies Club is the perfect place to be, whether you are chilling out
or hosting a seminar, business meeting, presentation or exhibition. Whatever the
requirements, the club’s experienced team of professionals is on call to ensure the event
is successful.
Be it expert pampering or promoting social activities for women in their community, the
ADLC provides an unrivalled opportunity for relaxation and empowerment.
128-129 AD Ladies Club_L3.indd 3 2/5/09 4:50:19 PM
Chapter 6 CSR & Green I nnovat ion
130-131 6-CSR & Green Innovation_L3.indd 2 2/5/09 4:51:13 PM
“Waste not the smallest thing created, for grains of sand
make mountains, and atomies infinity.”
“Waste not the smallest thing created, for grains of sand
make mountains, and atomies infinity.”
E. Knight, English barrister and writer, (1852 - 1925)
Untitled-8 1 2/5/09 1:10:44 PM
130-131 6-CSR & Green Innovation_L3.indd 3 2/5/09 4:51:24 PM
132 Best of Abu Dhabi
Spreading a smile
“We believe that the grace of wealth bestowed upon us by Allah, must be
spread to envelop our friends and brethren around the world.” These attri-
butes have gained the late Sheikh Zayed Bin Sultan Al Nahyan widespread
gratitude, placing him foremost amongst modern charismatic leaders - those
with the political will to take a courageous and honest stand against suffering;
those with the means to support human rights and just causes. By calling for
tolerance and collaboration, he contributed with unprecedented largesse to
causes such as the development of the underprivileged and the environment.
C
S
R

&

G
r
e
e
n

I
n
n
o
v
a
t
i
o
n
Bord of Trustee Chairman Sheikh Ahmed Bin Zayed
Zayed Children Welfare Centre in Mombassa,Kenya
132 - 133 Zayed Foundation_L3.indd 2 2/5/09 4:52:11 PM
133 Best of Abu Dhabi
B
ased on the principles of Islamic faith and Arab traditions and established in Abu
Dhabi in 1992, over the years the evolution of the Zayed Bin Sultan Al Nahyan
Charitable and Humanitarian Foundation has highlighted the UAE’s journey towards
maturity, refected by the ethos of fraternity instilled in the Emirati people by the late Sheikh
Zayed Bin Sultan Al Nahyan, former President of the UAE.
By devising mechanisms for extending charititable interventions regionally and
worldwide, Sheikh Zayed’s eagerness to help deprived people has taken root. Since its
establishment, the foundation has focused on diversifcation of its activities in association
with national and international organisations, to promote the UAE’s in the humanitarian
feld wherever assistance is needed.
In 1999, the Afro-Asian Bar Association for Defence of Human Rights unanimously elected His Highness
Sheikh Zayed Bin Sultan Al Nahyan as the Man of the Year. Renowned for his distinguished approach
towards life, the principles he lived by were based upon tolerance, solidarity, mercy and integrity. Drawing
from the wisdom of the past as a guide to ensuring insightful conclusions on the way forward, not forsaking the
present in striving for the long run; immediacy of action was his hallmark.
Formation
With an impressive capital formation of USD 1 billion (AED 3,671,000,000),
which was deemed as an endowment, its revenues were to be used to achieve
the objectives of the foundation. As a public foundation specialised in charity and
philanthropy inside and outside the UAE, Zayed Bin Sultan Al Nahyan Charitable
and Humanitarian Foundation its activities include the provision of public utilities of
all kinds, including participation in setting up and supporting Mosques and Islamic
cultural centres, academies for Islamic research and education and contributions to
its scholars for the advancement of civilization.
In addition, the schools, and higher education institutes, centres of scientifc
research, public libraries and establishments for vocational training. By offering
scholarships and supporting endeavours in the felds of writing, translation and
publishing, core objectives are being fulflled.
Setting up and funding hospitals, clinics and rehabilitation centres, frst aid
organisations, orphanages and child care centres as well as homes for the elderly
and disabled; the aim has been to co-operate with charitable organisations for the
achievement of common aims, especially in circumstances where such co-operation
is necessary, such as giving aid distribution during natural disasters, and provision of
relief services in remote areas.
With successful outreach programmes to diverse categories of recipients
widening in scope on a sustainable basis each year, His Highness the late Sheikh
Zayed Bin Sultan Al Nahyan maintained that, “The human being is the core of any
civilization… Thus it is necessary to focus on people because they are the centre
of gravity for any real and sustainable progress. No matter how many buildings,
installations, schools and hospitals we build… No matter how many bridges and
monuments we construct… They all remain solid matter that has no soul and can not
be sustainable. Humanity makes up the true spirit of everything, whose members are
able with their arts and skills to maintain and upgrade these constructions and grow
alongside with them”.
Tel: +9712 681 4700
www.zayedfoundation.com
Bord of Trustee Chairman Sheikh Ahmed Bin Zayed
132 - 133 Zayed Foundation_L3.indd 3 2/5/09 4:52:23 PM
133
Healt h Empowerment
Since the inception of the Abu Dhabi chapter in 2006, the Palestine Children’s
Relief Fund (PCRF), has succeeded in securing free medical treatment for
over 20 Palestinian children in the UAE. Striving to enhance awareness of its
goals and achievements via fundraising events and other community forums,
the PCRF maintains a network of doctors, host volunteers and families to
facilitate the cause. This active network of key individuals is critical to the
children who receive medical treatment throughout the region.
134 Best of Abu Dhabi
C
S
R

&

G
r
e
e
n

I
n
n
o
v
a
t
i
o
n
The PCRF has earned commendation from spokespersons such as former US President and Nobel prizewinner Jimmy Carter, US Governor Arnold Shwarzenegger and South African Nobel prizewinner Archbishop Desmond TuTu.
134 - 135 Palastine Children's Relief Fund_L3.indd 2 2/5/09 4:53:00 PM
135 Best of Abu Dhabi
Founded in 2006 under the patronage of the UAE Red Crescent by a diverse group of people committed to making a difference and saving lives, the PCRF Abu Dhabi concentrates its efforts on sponsoring as many children
as possible and providing them with comprehensive medical treatment in the UAE.
T
he Palestine Children’s Relief Fund, (PCRF), is a registered non-
political, non-proft, tax exempt organisation established in 1991 by
concerned people in the US to address the medical and humanitarian
crisis facing Palestinian youths in the Middle East. The PCRF has since
expanded to help suffering children from across the region locate free
medical care.
The PCRF’s primary objective is to identify and treat all children in
need of specialised surgery not available to them locally. The PCRF
locates, sponsors and runs volunteer medical missions to the Middle
East in adult and pediatric cardiac surgery, pediatric cardiology,
plastic and reconstructive surgery, maxillofacial surgery, pediatric
urology, ophthalmology, vascular surgery, pediatric orthopedic surgery,
occupational therapy, and other specialties.
Since 1991, the PCRF has earned commendation from
spokespersons such as former US President and Nobel prizewinner
Jimmy Carter, US Governor Arnold Shwarzenegger and South African
Nobel prizewinner Archbishop Desmond TuTu. Thanks to public
awareness and support, the PCRF has been able to send over 1000
children for medical treatment outside Middle East.
Moreover, the PCRF seeks to improve the condition of medical care
in the region by sending US medical personnel to treat challenging cases
and train local health care workers. In addition, it also distributes medical
equipment and supplies to the West Bank and Gaza Strip help to provide
patients with appropriate tools for their care.
Tel: 9715 0 328 6074
abudhabi@pcrf.net
www.pcrf.net
The PCRF has earned commendation from spokespersons such as former US President and Nobel prizewinner Jimmy Carter, US Governor Arnold Shwarzenegger and South African Nobel prizewinner Archbishop Desmond TuTu.
134 - 135 Palastine Children's Relief Fund_L3.indd 3 2/5/09 4:53:11 PM
135
Hope at hand
Hand in hand with the advances of an industrial and technological age, come
socio-economic disparities and environmental imbalances that can be the root
cause of the many crises and disasters that leave people in miserable situations.
With women and children often the most affected, numerous regions around the
world are facing humanitarian challenges. Armed conficts and disputes; silent
disasters like starvation, poverty and epidemics are equally the hallmark of this
post-modern age.
C
S
R

&

G
r
e
e
n

I
n
n
o
v
a
t
i
o
n
AMBULANCE AND COMMUNITY SAFETY
The RCS is active across diverse health and social
awareness programmes that respond to the needs
of local community and contribute in supporting
Government efforts to foster environmental health and
safety. The organisation also addresses issues related
to the welfare of special segments such as the aged
and handicapped, as well as by assisting in limiting
hazards such as:
Road accidents; addiction (nicotine and
drugs); nutrition problems; blood and related
contagious diseases.
With a strategy that includes frst aid training,
special need’s rehabilitation and participating in
environmental safety events, as well as propagating
international humanitarian law, the RCS has
consolidated its partnership with international bodies
working in cooperation with them in the UAE to carry
out its training programmes.
In line with its 10 year strategy, the RCS has
consolidated its partnership with international
organisations such as the international Red Cross
Committee, the Regional Mission of the International
Federation of Red Crescent, as well as the Red Cross
Societies, the national societies and UN organizations
such as UNICEF and UNDP.
136-137 Red Crescent_L3.indd 2 2/5/09 4:53:36 PM
137 Best of Abu Dhabi
T
his is why the UAE Red Crescent has
its work well cut out. Standing out to
ease lives of victims and reduce the pain
of friends, brothers and affected people,
the altruistic vision of the late President,
Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan created
the appropriate platform capable of quickly
responding to humanitarian causes. Over the
years, through selfess giving, the UAE has a
prominent place thanks to its humanitarian
organisations and entities that refect the
basic generosity intrinsic of this culture.
Founded in 1983, and spending over
AED 2 billion in humanitarian assistance over
this time, the UAE Red Crescent underlines
the UAE’s humanitarian role in regional and
international arenas through humanitarian
programmes, as well as charity and
development projects worldwide. Considered
a pioneer humanitarian organisation by
industry specialists, the Red Crescent’s role
has greatly evolved as a result of the increase
in disasters in the world.
A milestone in the Red Crescent’s
progress occurred in 1983 when H.E.
Sheikh Hamdan bin Zayed Al Nahyan
gave directives to execute development
projects to help local inhabitants in
disaster-hit areas to help cope and access
the long term tools to rebuild their lives.
Facing economic and social challenges
lying ahead, the organisation realised that
effcient humanitarian aid should be based
upon those foundations - giving families the
ability to earn for themselves and not merely
scraping by on donations. Consequently,
people’s lives in these areas developed; and
they were able to live in dignity.
Local interest
The Social Care Division in the Red
Crescent caters for low-income and needy
people inside the UAE. Programmes include
humanitarian and medical aid and social
sponsorships (sponsoring students, prisoners,
and people with special needs). They also deal
with supporting institutions, local projects and
charity campaigns to help low income families.
There are also seasonal action drives like
providing breakfast for fasting people,
Iftar Zakat (alms to be paid for poor people
during Ramadan), Eid dress, oblation and
pilgrimage to Mecca.
Expanding abroad
The Projects and Relief sector in the Red
Crescent handles urgent aid abroad for
communities hit by disasters and
calamities. It also coordinates with the
Federation of Red Cross and Crescent societies
and other humanitarian organisations. Executing
charitable construction and development
projects through rebuilding and rehabilitation
of destroyed infrastructure in areas of confict,
these cover 95 countries especially Palestine,
Iraq, Lebanon, Afghanistan, Sudan and other
African countries.
Construction and Development
Since reconstruction and rehabilitation of
infrastructure is vital to welfare in areas hit by
disasters in order alleviate the impact of the
lack of basic services on the life of people
in those areas, the Red Crescent Authority
starts executing its development programmes
immediately after the relief operation in order
to bring people’s lives into normal. The best
example of that are the construction projects
in Palestine in terms of number of projects and
their cost. They include rebuilding destroyed
houses, building and rehabilitating educational,
health and service institutions as well as
worship places.
Orphans programs
Sponsoring orphans is another critical aspect
of the organisation’s remit. Thanks to enormous
donor support, the Authority succeeded in
underlining orphan’s humanitarian causes
around the world. Sponsoring over 38,000
orphans in the UAE and abroad, the value of
amount paid to orphans annually is around
AED 65 million in 24 countries in Asia, Africa
and Europe.
Promoting Voluntary Work Values
By depending on volunteers to execute its
programmes, a culture of service is fostered.
Accordingly, the Volunteers Division has
strategies to attract volunteers and train
them. The Authority has been able to polish
their skills through different practical and
theoretical training skills. The foundation
programme includes intensive courses in
confronting disasters, frst aid, international and
humanitarian law and methods of voluntary
work. The Volunteers Division is keen to carry
out the strategy of the Red Crescent to promote
voluntary values among people and activate the
role of volunteers towards humanitarian cases
by utilizing their unique abilities.
Tel: +9712 641 9100
www.rcuae.ae
136-137 Red Crescent_L3.indd 3 2/5/09 4:53:47 PM
137
Building Bridges
Business with the Middle East /North Africa (MENA) region is thriving
thanks to high oil prices that have led to unprecedented regional growth and
development. Boasting the largest market for British companies in the MENA
region, as well as a large UK expatriate resident workforce, Abu Dhabi offers
particularly rosy business opportunities. With its unrivalled regional business
intelligence acumen and vast government and private sector contacts
network, The Middle East Association (MEA) is uniquely placed to assist in
propelling businesses to take advantage of the opportunities on offer.
C
S
R

&

G
r
e
e
n

I
n
n
o
v
a
t
i
o
n
Despite the global economic downturn, Abu Dhabi’s
GDP has continued rising on the back of strong
oil revenues and new investment in infrastructure,
industry, real estate and tourism.
138 - 139 Middle East Association_L3.indd 2 2/5/09 4:54:16 PM
139 Best of Abu Dhabi
W
ith its diversifed economy, (non-oil
sectors contribute around 95 per cent
of GDP) healthy growth rate (around 15 per
cent) business friendly environment, excellent
infrastructure, communications and numerous
free zones, Abu Dhabi is a magnet for foreign
investment, with British companies leading
the inbound investment pack. Even traditional
British culinary stalwarts such as The Ivy and
the Wolseley restaurants are setting up shop;
the question every company must ask is, can
we afford to forgo a presence in Abu Dhabi?
The MEA does not believe so. Widely
recognised as the UK’s foremost private sector
organisation for promoting trade and good
relations with MENA, Turkey and Iran, the MEA
is an independent and non-proft association
founded in 1961, representing some 400 large
and small companies from all business and
industry sectors in the region. The Patron of
the Association is HRH The Duke of York, UK
Special Representative for International Trade
and Investment. Its strong support of Business
Councils and excellent relationships with the
UK Government and Arab Governments are
widely recognised. Membership is strong and
progressive, and turnover has doubled in
the last three years. This is a refection of the
energy that the MEA has put into developing
relationships with the MENA region.
The MEA takes more businesses to the
MENA region than any other organisation. In
the last twelve months the Association has led
ten missions to the region. It continues to break
new ground, taking three missions to Northern
Iraq in the last couple of years. Another new
initiative is the launch of the MEA Women in
Business Network which is evolving in co-
operation with Women in Business International.
Its in-house programme of events,
including VIP and Ambassadors lunches, is
popular, with over 50 events held a year.
With successful conferences on Libya,
Morocco, Saudi Arabia and Tunisia
attended by high level business delegations
from the country concerned, the strength
of the business network is proving to
be a useful resource for international
business development.
The MEA is becoming increasingly sector
focused - the fnancial services sector and the
education and skills sector are priorities. The
‘City and the GCC Countries Conference’, now
in its third year, is recognised as the premier
event for promoting fnancial cooperation
between the City of London and the GCC
countries. This year’s event, organised
in cooperation with the City of London
Corporation, attracted an unprecedented
level of support from across the GCC region,
lead sponsors being Bahrain Economic
Development Board, Qatar Financial Services
Authority, Emirates National Bank of Dubai and
Boubiyan Bank (Kuwait).
Aside from assisting in business expansion,
the important focus on the education and
skills sector refects the urgency of the need
to bridge the skills gap in the region, and
the UAE has featured strongly in the MEA’s
initiatives. With its partner, Compass Rose, the
Association is working on the pioneering MENA
Learning & Leadership Programme (MLLP), a
highly innovative programme bringing together
the key pillars of private sector, government,
civil society and academia to develop and
deliver sustainable solutions to learning and
development in MENA. The programme
was launched in 2007 in the UAE and has
generated a huge amount of interest. The
25-strong education and training mission to the
UAE in March 2008 was successful, benefting
from the personal involvement of His Excellency
Sheikh Nahayan bin Mabarak Al Nahayan,
Minister of Education and Scientifc Research.
With support from such infuential fgures within
the MENA region and beyond, MEA aims to
bridge the gap between east and west in terms
of both business and education.
www.the-mea.co.uk
Michael Thomas, Director General MEA (sixth from right) with mission members during the MEA trade mission to Northern Iraq, October 2007
138 - 139 Middle East Association_L3.indd 3 2/5/09 4:54:33 PM
139
Chapter 7 Training & Education
140 - 141 7- Training & Education_L3.indd 2 2/5/09 4:55:17 PM
“The mediocre teacher tells. The good teacher explains.
The superior teacher demonstrates.
The great teacher inspires.”
William Arthur Ward, American editor and pastor, (1921 – 1994)
140 - 141 7- Training & Education_L3.indd 3 2/5/09 4:55:28 PM
A bridge between civilisations
In 2006, a piece of 13th century France settled in Abu Dhabi. None other
than the prestigious Paris-Sorbonne University opened its doors in the
UAE capital, bringing together two civilizations on the new Paris-Sorbonne
University Abu Dhabi (PSUAD) campus. For centuries, this prestigious centre
of learning has produced some of the world’s greatest thinkers. With a new
focus on a dialogue of civilizations between the West and the Arab World and
a diverse range of courses, PSUAD continues this tradition of erudition.
T
r
a
i
n
i
n
g

&

E
d
u
c
a
t
i
o
n
Paris-Sorbonne University –
Abu Dhabi is the frst PSU
campus outside France. The
campus aims to attract the best
students from the UAE, the Middle
East and around the world.
With over 500 million people
speaking French across fve
different continents, learning
the language is key to bridging
the cultures of today’s world.
With about one-ffth of the UAE’s 50,000 annual high
school graduates choosing to study in Europe, opening
European universities like the Paris-Sorbonne in Abu
Dhabi helps capital spent on education stay in the
country, as well as provides an excellent education from
a foreign university for at a lesser cost right at home.
Just as in Paris, the same prestigious academic program will be taught in French by
professors from the Sorbonne. An education that enhances critical thinking, communication
skills and international perspective awaits the university students along with a degree that
guarantees world class excellence in the feld of Humanities and Social Sciences.
142 - 143 Paris Sorbonne_L3.indd 2 2/5/09 4:56:22 PM
W
elcome to this pivotal French contribution
to the UAE’s fourishing system of
higher education. With over 50,000 students
graduating from the UAE every year, the
demand for quality higher education is on the
rise. PSUAD is one of the best answers to that
demand. The university offers a wide range of
subjects in arts, languages and social sciences.
Just as in Paris, the same prestigious academic
program is taught in French by professors from
the Sorbonne and Paris-Descartes. For those
who are new to the French language, PSUAD
offers intensive French courses that provide a
solid base for entering the world of higher French
learning. The university offers an education that
enhances critical thinking, communication skills
and an international perspective.
A global leader in the feld of Humanities and
Social Sciences, PSUAD also follows the new
European system of higher education, called the
Licence Master Doctorate (LMD). Under this, an
undergraduate three-year degree course, the
Licence, is offered. The graduate programme
consists of a two year Master Degree, followed
by a multi-year doctoral programme. PSUAD
provides a unique opportunity for students
living in the UAE, giving them a chance to
receive degrees are recognised by all European
universities – right at their doorstep.
Supremely inclusive in its mandate, PSUAD
has opened its doors to all, regardless of gender,
nationality or religion. The university has one
major mission: to foster the love for life-long
learning, which students can carry forward
across various spheres and disciplines. To
do so, it offers courses in Arabic Language,
Literature and Civilisation, Archaeology and
Art History, Economics and Management,
Geography and Urban Planning, History,
International Business and Languages, Law
and Political Sciences, French and Comparative
Literature, Philosophy and Sociology.
In Abu Dhabi, just like in Paris, Paris-
Sorbonne offers the best intellectual
arrangement to access the highest cultural level.
Professor Georges Molinié, President of
Paris-Sorbonne and Abu Dhabi campus says,
“We offer an opportunity for increasing your
personal capacities and letting you develop your
critical analytic sense, allowing you to become
full time members of this tolerant and sharing
community we are striving to create for our
common future.”
As the Arab World and the West come to
engage more intensively on an international level,
the world needs people who understand both
civilizations well enough to turn that engagement
from confict to cooperation. PSUAD offers
an atmosphere that can create such future
leaders and diplomats. Through institutions
like PSUAD, people from around the world
can foster meaningful dialogue that helps us
better understand and appreciate one another,
hopefully leading us to a brighter tomorrow.

Tel: +9712 509 0555
www.paris-sorbonne-abudhabi.ae
Welcome to the institution known for its refned and elite education since the 13th century. An internationally renowned university with superior
mastery and expertise in the felds of Humanities and Social Sciences, Sorbonne produces the greatest leaders and movers of the world.
Opened since 2006 in the United Arab Emirates, Paris-Sorbonne University Abu Dhabi is a French-speaking higher education institution that
attracts not only the best students from the UAE, but also the best students from all over the Middle East and the world
142 - 143 Paris Sorbonne_L3.indd 3 2/5/09 4:56:37 PM
¯|o V.rv |.cos c| t|o
Petroleum Institute
Undergraduate Engineering Education
¯|o JrJo.g..JJ.to p.cg..ns p.cv|Jo . .|gc.cJs Jr|vo.s|tv oJJc.t|cr |ccJsoJ cr org|roo.|rg
.rJ .pp||oJ sc|orcos |r t|o b.c.J |o|J c| oro.gv ¯|o oJJc.t|cr c| t|o .|c|o po.scr |s .|sc
cort..| tc n|ss|cr c| t|o || sc t|.t t|o g..JJ.t|rg org|roo.s .||| bo ooJ|ppoJ .|t| t|o rocoss..v
toc|r|c.| .rJ po.scr.| ccnpotorc|os tc bo sJccoss|J| |||o|crg |o..ro.s .|t| t|o c.p.b|||tv tc
|Jrct|cr o|oct|vo|v |r .rv orv|.crnort
Women in Engineering
¯|o |.c|||tv .|o.o |on.|o org|roo.|rg stJJorts .ttorJ c|.ssos. /...r.|. |s JoJ|c.toJ tc t|o |Jort||c.
t|cr. Jovo|cpnort .rJ or|.rconort c| .cnor org|roo.s .rJ t|o|. p.c|oss|cr.| .Jv.rconort |r t|o
g|cb.| scc|otv ¯|o || oJJc.tos org|roo.s .|c .||| bo |o.Jo.s |r |rJJst.v .rJ scc|otv .rJ .|c |o..|J . ro.
.go |c. .cnor |r . p.c|oss|cr .||c| Jrt|| .ocort vo..s
..s p.oJcn|r.rt|v . n.|o p.oso.vo
Modern Campus - Diverse Community
¯|o || |.s Jovo|cpoJ . t.J|v J|vo.so ccnnJr|tv |.v|rg 48
J||o.ort r.t|cr.||t|os cbso.v|rg bost oJJc.t|cr.|
p..ct|cos .rJ p.cJJc|rg .oso..c| |r t|o |o|J c|
oro.gv ¯|o ovc|Jt|cr c| t|o c.npJs |.c|||t|os
.o|octs t|o rooJs c| sJc| . J|vo.so .rJ t.|ortoJ
g.cJp .|t| st.to c| t|o ..t |.c|||t|os |c. oJJc.
t|cr. .oso..c|. |cJs|rg .rJ .oc.o.t|cr JrJo.
Jovo|cpnort .|t| p.c|octoJ ccnp|ot|cr bv
t|o orJ c| 2012
State-of-the-Art Laboratories
|.c| p.cg..n |s ooJ|ppoJ .|t| ncJo.r |.bc..tc.|os |cJs|rg
t|o ncst JptcJ.to |rst.Jnort.t|cr .rJ toc|rc|cgv |.bc..
tc.|os v..v |.cn . |||os|.o J.||||rg .|g tc n.to.|.|s sc|orco
|.bc..tc.|os StJJorts |.vo t|o Jr|oJo cppc.tJr|tv tc
p..t|c|p.to |r . .Jv.rcoJ |.rJscr p..ct|c.| oJJc.t|cr
oxpo.|orco |o|p|rg tc p.op..o g..JJ.tos |r t|o ro.
ono.g|rg oro.gv toc|rc|cg|os
Advanced Research and Technology Development Center
|oso..c| |r t|o c|| .rJ g.s |rJJst.v |s c| ||g| |npc.t.rco tc t|o |JtJ.o c| t|o
|/| ¯|o |ot.c|oJn |rst|tJto |s c|..goJ .|t| t|o .ospcrs|b|||tv c| .JJ.oss|rg t|o
rooJ c| o|c|ort p.cJJct|cr c| oro.gv .rJ n.r.g|rg t|o oro.gv .oscJ.cos ¯|o
ccrst.Jct|cr c| t|o |rst|tJto’s |.st JoJ|c.toJ .oso..c| |.c|||tv. t|o ¯/||||| |oso..c|
|.c|||tv. |s rc. |r p.cg.oss .|t| t|o || |oso..c| ´orto. |r t|o p|.rr|rg st.go
Global Graduate Opportunities
|r c.Jo. tc orccJ..go .c.Jon|c oxc|.rgo (|rc|JJ|rg |.cJ|tv. .oso..c| sc|c|..s. JrJo.g..JJ.to
.rJ g..JJ.to stJJorts: t|o || |.s s|groJ nonc..rJ. c| JrJo.st.rJ|rg .|t| |o.J|rg |rto.r.
t|cr.| Jr|vo.s|t|os |rc|JJ|rg ´c|c..Jc Sc|cc| c| V|ros. |S/. |r|vo.s|tv c| V..v|.rJ. |S/.
¯oc|r|sc|o |r|vo.s|t.t VJrc|or. Co.n.rv. |r|vo.s|tv c| |ocborVcrt.rJr|vo.s|t.t.
/Jst.|.. .rJ 'c|.rros |op|o. |r|vo.s|tv. /Jst.|.
The Petroleum Institute (||: ..s c.o.toJ |r 2001 .|t| t|o gc.| c| ost.b||s||rg |tso|| .s . .c.|J
|o.Jo. |r org|roo.|rg oJJc.t|cr .rJ .oso..c| |r ..o.s c| s|gr||c.rco tc t|o c|| .rJ g.s .rJ t|o
b.c.Jo. oro.gv |rJJst.v ¯|o ||’s spcrsc.s |rc|JJo /bJ ||.b| |.t|cr.| O|| ´cnp.rv (/||O´: .rJ
|cJ. n.|c. |rto.r.t|cr.| c|| ccnp.r|os ´J..ort|v t|o || c|o.s b.c|o|c. Jog.oos |r ´|on|c.|. ||oct.|
c.|. Voc|.r|c.| .rJ |ot.c|oJn |rg|roo.|rg .rJ |ot.c|oJn Cocsc|orcos. .s .o|| .s V.sto. c| |rg|
roo.|rg Jog.oos |r ´|on|c.|. ||oct.|c.|. Voc|.r|c.| .rJ |ot.c|oJn |rg|roo.|rg |o. org|roo.|rg
.rJ sc|orco p.cg..ns .||| bo .JJoJ |r t|o |JtJ.o .s rooJoJ
¯|o org|roo.|rg p.cg..ns |.vo .oco|voJ |r|t|.| .cc.oJ|t.t|cr |.cn t|o |/| V|r|st.v c| ||g|o. |JJ
c.t|cr .rJ Sc|ort||c |oso..c| .rJ .||| bo .cc.oJ|toJ bv |rto.r.t|cr.| |rst|tJt|crs |r JJo ccJ.so
´J..ort|v t|o.o ..o cvo. 1100 JrJo.g..JJ.to stJJorts .rJ 50 g..JJ.to stJJorts or.c||oJ .t t|o
|ot.c|oJn |rst|tJto ¯|o |rst|tJto g..JJ.toJ |ts |.st 44 stJJorts |r 'Jro 2006 ono.g|rg |.cn t|o
org|roo.|rg p.cg..ns tc st..t t|o|. c..oo.s .s sJcoss|J| p.c|oss|cr.|s
Accreditation and Licensure
The Petroleum Institute was granted initial licensure by the Ministry of Higher Education, and Scientifc
Research Commission for Academic Accreditation, UAE. All undergraduate and graduate programs have
been granted initial accreditation by the same accrediting body. In addition, the Foundation English program
has received conditional accreditation from Commission for English Language Program Accreditation (CEA).
144 Best of Abu Dhabi

T
r
a
i
n
i
n
g

&

E
d
u
c
a
t
i
o
n
144 - 1465 The Petroleum Institute_L3.indd 2 2/5/09 4:57:40 PM
¯|o V.rv |.cos c| t|o
Petroleum Institute
Undergraduate Engineering Education
¯|o JrJo.g..JJ.to p.cg..ns p.cv|Jo . .|gc.cJs Jr|vo.s|tv oJJc.t|cr |ccJsoJ cr org|roo.|rg
.rJ .pp||oJ sc|orcos |r t|o b.c.J |o|J c| oro.gv ¯|o oJJc.t|cr c| t|o .|c|o po.scr |s .|sc
cort..| tc n|ss|cr c| t|o || sc t|.t t|o g..JJ.t|rg org|roo.s .||| bo ooJ|ppoJ .|t| t|o rocoss..v
toc|r|c.| .rJ po.scr.| ccnpotorc|os tc bo sJccoss|J| |||o|crg |o..ro.s .|t| t|o c.p.b|||tv tc
|Jrct|cr o|oct|vo|v |r .rv orv|.crnort
Women in Engineering
¯|o |.c|||tv .|o.o |on.|o org|roo.|rg stJJorts .ttorJ c|.ssos. /...r.|. |s JoJ|c.toJ tc t|o |Jort||c.
t|cr. Jovo|cpnort .rJ or|.rconort c| .cnor org|roo.s .rJ t|o|. p.c|oss|cr.| .Jv.rconort |r t|o
g|cb.| scc|otv ¯|o || oJJc.tos org|roo.s .|c .||| bo |o.Jo.s |r |rJJst.v .rJ scc|otv .rJ .|c |o..|J . ro.
.go |c. .cnor |r . p.c|oss|cr .||c| Jrt|| .ocort vo..s
..s p.oJcn|r.rt|v . n.|o p.oso.vo
Modern Campus - Diverse Community
¯|o || |.s Jovo|cpoJ . t.J|v J|vo.so ccnnJr|tv |.v|rg 48
J||o.ort r.t|cr.||t|os cbso.v|rg bost oJJc.t|cr.|
p..ct|cos .rJ p.cJJc|rg .oso..c| |r t|o |o|J c|
oro.gv ¯|o ovc|Jt|cr c| t|o c.npJs |.c|||t|os
.o|octs t|o rooJs c| sJc| . J|vo.so .rJ t.|ortoJ
g.cJp .|t| st.to c| t|o ..t |.c|||t|os |c. oJJc.
t|cr. .oso..c|. |cJs|rg .rJ .oc.o.t|cr JrJo.
Jovo|cpnort .|t| p.c|octoJ ccnp|ot|cr bv
t|o orJ c| 2012
State-of-the-Art Laboratories
|.c| p.cg..n |s ooJ|ppoJ .|t| ncJo.r |.bc..tc.|os |cJs|rg
t|o ncst JptcJ.to |rst.Jnort.t|cr .rJ toc|rc|cgv |.bc..
tc.|os v..v |.cn . |||os|.o J.||||rg .|g tc n.to.|.|s sc|orco
|.bc..tc.|os StJJorts |.vo t|o Jr|oJo cppc.tJr|tv tc
p..t|c|p.to |r . .Jv.rcoJ |.rJscr p..ct|c.| oJJc.t|cr
oxpo.|orco |o|p|rg tc p.op..o g..JJ.tos |r t|o ro.
ono.g|rg oro.gv toc|rc|cg|os
Advanced Research and Technology Development Center
|oso..c| |r t|o c|| .rJ g.s |rJJst.v |s c| ||g| |npc.t.rco tc t|o |JtJ.o c| t|o
|/| ¯|o |ot.c|oJn |rst|tJto |s c|..goJ .|t| t|o .ospcrs|b|||tv c| .JJ.oss|rg t|o
rooJ c| o|c|ort p.cJJct|cr c| oro.gv .rJ n.r.g|rg t|o oro.gv .oscJ.cos ¯|o
ccrst.Jct|cr c| t|o |rst|tJto’s |.st JoJ|c.toJ .oso..c| |.c|||tv. t|o ¯/||||| |oso..c|
|.c|||tv. |s rc. |r p.cg.oss .|t| t|o || |oso..c| ´orto. |r t|o p|.rr|rg st.go
Global Graduate Opportunities
|r c.Jo. tc orccJ..go .c.Jon|c oxc|.rgo (|rc|JJ|rg |.cJ|tv. .oso..c| sc|c|..s. JrJo.g..JJ.to
.rJ g..JJ.to stJJorts: t|o || |.s s|groJ nonc..rJ. c| JrJo.st.rJ|rg .|t| |o.J|rg |rto.r.
t|cr.| Jr|vo.s|t|os |rc|JJ|rg ´c|c..Jc Sc|cc| c| V|ros. |S/. |r|vo.s|tv c| V..v|.rJ. |S/.
¯oc|r|sc|o |r|vo.s|t.t VJrc|or. Co.n.rv. |r|vo.s|tv c| |ocborVcrt.rJr|vo.s|t.t.
/Jst.|.. .rJ 'c|.rros |op|o. |r|vo.s|tv. /Jst.|.
The Petroleum Institute (||: ..s c.o.toJ |r 2001 .|t| t|o gc.| c| ost.b||s||rg |tso|| .s . .c.|J
|o.Jo. |r org|roo.|rg oJJc.t|cr .rJ .oso..c| |r ..o.s c| s|gr||c.rco tc t|o c|| .rJ g.s .rJ t|o
b.c.Jo. oro.gv |rJJst.v ¯|o ||’s spcrsc.s |rc|JJo /bJ ||.b| |.t|cr.| O|| ´cnp.rv (/||O´: .rJ
|cJ. n.|c. |rto.r.t|cr.| c|| ccnp.r|os ´J..ort|v t|o || c|o.s b.c|o|c. Jog.oos |r ´|on|c.|. ||oct.|
c.|. Voc|.r|c.| .rJ |ot.c|oJn |rg|roo.|rg .rJ |ot.c|oJn Cocsc|orcos. .s .o|| .s V.sto. c| |rg|
roo.|rg Jog.oos |r ´|on|c.|. ||oct.|c.|. Voc|.r|c.| .rJ |ot.c|oJn |rg|roo.|rg |o. org|roo.|rg
.rJ sc|orco p.cg..ns .||| bo .JJoJ |r t|o |JtJ.o .s rooJoJ
¯|o org|roo.|rg p.cg..ns |.vo .oco|voJ |r|t|.| .cc.oJ|t.t|cr |.cn t|o |/| V|r|st.v c| ||g|o. |JJ
c.t|cr .rJ Sc|ort||c |oso..c| .rJ .||| bo .cc.oJ|toJ bv |rto.r.t|cr.| |rst|tJt|crs |r JJo ccJ.so
´J..ort|v t|o.o ..o cvo. 1100 JrJo.g..JJ.to stJJorts .rJ 50 g..JJ.to stJJorts or.c||oJ .t t|o
|ot.c|oJn |rst|tJto ¯|o |rst|tJto g..JJ.toJ |ts |.st 44 stJJorts |r 'Jro 2006 ono.g|rg |.cn t|o
org|roo.|rg p.cg..ns tc st..t t|o|. c..oo.s .s sJcoss|J| p.c|oss|cr.|s
Accreditation and Licensure
The Petroleum Institute was granted initial licensure by the Ministry of Higher Education, and Scientifc
Research Commission for Academic Accreditation, UAE. All undergraduate and graduate programs have
been granted initial accreditation by the same accrediting body. In addition, the Foundation English program
has received conditional accreditation from Commission for English Language Program Accreditation (CEA).
145 Best of Abu Dhabi
144 - 1465 The Petroleum Institute_L3.indd 3 2/5/09 4:27:37 PM
Chapter 8 Banking
146 - 147 8-Banking_L3.indd 2 2/5/09 5:29:51 PM
"We will nurture and develop UAE human capital,
support infrastructure proj ects, SMEs and capital markets.
We will provide innovative products/ services and an
effective conduit for both UAE and foreign investors."
Michael Tomalin, Chief Executive, NBAD
146 - 147 8-Banking_L3.indd 3 2/5/09 5:29:59 PM
Forty years young
With a new head offce, that is a stunning architectural tribute and an impressive addition to the
skyline of the island city, National Bank of Abu Dhabi (NBAD)’s undisputed standing is reinforced
for generations to come. As the frst national bank in the emirate of Abu Dhabi, it is ftting that
NBAD has its headquarters in the nation’s capital and a regional offce in the UAE’s commercial
hub – Dubai. Celebrating its 40th anniversary in 2008, NBAD is the emirate’s largest bank by
assets, boasting a track record of progress to sustain it today and in tomorrow’s world.
B
a
n
k
i
n
g
W
hen it came to life in February 1968, NBAD was something of
a novelty in Abu Dhabi itself. The relatively sleepy emirate had
never known a bank of its own, and when the late, Sheikh Zayed bin
Sultan Al Nahyan , founder of the UAE, launched NBAD, the Bank’s
frst balance sheet was drawn up in Bahraini Dinars since there was
no Dirham note issue. At the end of 1969 the Bank recorded its frst
full year of operation. The total balance sheet of the Bank was the
equivalent of AED 219 million, the capital was AED 11 million and net
profts just AED 2 million. Showing a proft since inception, with paid
dividends on the initial capital, there was AED 1 million left over to
build the capital for the fowing year. Today, 40 years later, the Bank
is unrecognisable. By the end of 2007, NBAD’s balance sheet was
AED 139 billion, 660 times larger, profts AED 2.5 billion and capital
resources over AED 11 billion, over 1000 times bigger than those
early days.
Underpinning the evolution of the UAE and of Abu Dhabi itself,
today NBAD is amongst the top 250 banks in the world, and one
of the largest banks in the Middle East. Employing 3,000 people in
11 countries In four continents, it has a vast gamut of products and
services: from credit cards to corporate fnance, fnancial engineering
to car loans. NBAD employs over 50 nationalities and scores of
talented qualifed teams. With over 300,000 customers worldwide,
some aspects however, have stayed just the same in these 40 years.
“Our commitment to serving and to building Abu Dhabi, and the
wider UAE nation, remains the same. NBAD is part of the DNA of Abu
Dhabi. The late Sheikh Zayed had a great vision for this country and
this Emirate, and part of the vision was to establish a bank owned
by Abu Dhabi for Abu Dhabi and its friends. The strength and vitality
of NBAD today bears witness to that vision, and those of us who are
fortunate enough to work for NBAD now have the responsibility to
grow the Bank to even greater heights”, explains Michael H. Tomalin
NBAD’s Chief Executive.
“‘Forty years young’ is the theme of our anniversary celebrations;
NBAD is still a young bank, bristling with new ideas and innovative
solutions. But 40 years is an achievement, with each decade of
performance outshining the decade before it” he adds.
Today, in addition to having one of the largest branch and ATM
networks in the UAE more than 84 branches and 225 ATMs all over
the UAE, NBAD provides 24-hour internet banking accessibility
through NbadOnline and NbadDirect, as well as account access and
personalised customer support through a 24-hour Call Centre. NBAD
is represented through branches and operating subsidiaries in Oman,
Kuwait, Bahrain, Egypt, Sudan, Libya, the UK, France, Switzerland
and the US. With their international banking business expanding
steadily, NBAD plans to open in Jordan, Qatar, and Hong Kong to
increase its global reach.
148- 157 NBAD_L3.indd 2 2/5/09 5:46:06 PM
At a glance
NBAD is rated senior long term/short term A+/A-1 by Standard
and Poor’s, Aa3/P1 by Moodys and AA-/F1+ by Fitch giving
one of the strongest combined rating of any Middle Eastern
fnancial institution.
2007 fnancial results are solid proof of the successful
implementation of NBAD’s strategic plan. Attributable profts for
the year 2007 were AED 2,505 million, 19 percent higher than
2006, and one of the highest amongst all UAE banks. Total assets
reached AED 140 billion at the end of 2007, up 38 percent from
year end 2006 with customer deposits up 16 percent to AED 82
billion and loans up 39 percent to AED 80 billion. Total capital
resources reached AED 13.7 billion, up 20 percent, including AED
2.5 billion of subordinated convertible bonds and without any new
shareholder contributions. The Return on Equity (ROE) at 26.3
percent in 2007 is ahead of the 25 cent average target set in the
bank’s fve- year plan. The net profts from the domestic banking
business increased 19 percent to AED 1,454 million in 2007 which
represented 58 percent of the group proft.
Investment banking businesses contributions to the group
profts were AED 556 million of which AED 283 million, or 11.3
percent of group proft. These profts came from the Financial
Markets Group, and AED 82 million, or 3.3 percent, from the
Investment Banking Group, which in two years moved NBAD from
not being ranked in the top 30, to number one in the Bloomberg
league tables for MENA transactions.
Asset Management group contributed AED 72 million or
2.9 percent. NBAD’s brokerage arm, Abu Dhabi Financial
Services(adfs), contributed AED 119 million or 4.7 percent.
Active equity markets affected positively the asset management
and brokerage businesses although performance remains below
historic levels.
Profts from international banking business reached AED 354
million, representing 14 percent of the group proft and an increase
of 7 percent over 2006. Profts from the brand new private banking
business were AED 19 million, offering full private banking services
through their Geneva subsidiary, which started in 2007, aided by
local private teams in UAE and in locations where NBAD operates.
H.E. Nasser Ahmed Khalifa Al Sowaidi, Chairman, NBAD
Vision
To be the Number One Arab Bank
Mission
To provide our customers with the best services
Corporate Social Responsibility
To act as a role model in the social and environmental
development of the UAE
Values
- Value our stakeholders
- Accessible to our customers 24 x 7
- Loyal to our heritage but global in our outlook
- Understand our customers needs
- Empower our people
- Strive constantly for organisational excellence
Customer Pledge
- We will listen to you
- We will understand your needs
- We will dedicate all our energies to serving you
148- 157 NBAD_L3.indd 3 2/5/09 5:46:13 PM
11 Best of Abu Dhabi
Awards
Based on its relentless development and improvement of human resources, operations, the use of technology, and the results achieved,
NBAD has won the Middle East Excellence Award 2008, the Mohamed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum Business Award 2007, the Sheikh Khalifa
Excellence Gold Award, the Dubai Quality Award, as well as the Emirates Institute of Banking & Finance Studies (EIBFS) Human Resources
Development Award and the Dubai Human Development Award. NBAD has also won the Best Bank in the UAE Awards from Euromoney, the
Banker, and Global Finance as many as nine times in the last six years; the Middle East e-banking Country Award and the Outstanding use
of IT in Financial Services Award; numerous Deal of the Year Awards, as well as special recognition from UAE environmental groups for the
bank’s active participation in environmental conservation.
Corporate Social Responsibility Policy
Being one of the largest local banks in the UAE, and as one of the growing number of fnancial institutions interested in increasing its
Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), NBAD believes that CSR is a fne way of contributing to sustainable development. By recognising that
in conducting daily business operations, they have an inevitable impact on the environment in the UAE; it acknowledges its responsibility,
as well as the commercial advantage in going beyond what is required when managing its impact on society, the environment and the
economy. “Through sound projects and initiatives, issues such as effective preservation of the environment, humanitarian, social, economic
and charitable causes are considered as good business practices. We not only balance these responsibilities, but ensure the sustainability of
these elements for the future”, Tomalin clarifes. “For corporate social responsibility is about managing business interaction with people, the
environment and the economy. Consequently, NBAD has developed environmental activities, partnerships and changes which have been
applied collectively across the organisation. We look forward to continuing our path as responsible corporate citizens and strengthening our
commitment to corporate social responsibility in the UAE”, he adds.
Client-Focused Businesses
Even though an oil-driven economic boom in the Middle East may slow as crude prices decline and loan growth slows with funding
costs rising, NBAD has maintained a leading position in the local market over the past 40 years with a remarkable positive record. Recent
liquidity restrictions caused by the global credit crisis have changed the goalposts somewhat. “The unwillingness of international banks to
lend to one another for more than a day, and the drying up of international capital markets has resulted in unprecedented tightness”,
Tomalin says. Despite this current state of fux, NBAD’s mainline banking businesses are “performing satisfactorily”, he concluded. With a
current fve year plan that includes a target increase in earnings of 20 percent per annum and a minimum return on capital of 25 percent,
NBAD intends to achieve these by putting their clients at the heart of the bank’s growth, through continuous improvement of service levels
and product innovation.
Tel: +9712 611 1111
www.nbad.com
148- 157 NBAD_L3.indd 4 2/5/09 5:46:38 PM
From its modest beginnings as a pearling settlement,
Abu Dhabi has come a long way in the last 50 years.
Its population has grown from just 15,000 in 1962 to
closer to 1.8 million today. Oil revenues have been
invested wisely to create an impressive modern
society and frst-class infrastructure. Tourism is a key
priority in the government’s ambitious diversifcation
plans, with a target of 3 million visitors by 2015.
Thanks to its range of activities and services, NBAD’s
role in facilitating this diversifcation is pivotal.
148- 157 NBAD_L3.indd 5 2/5/09 5:46:48 PM
With a positive outlook for Abu Dhabi and
the UAE overall, despite the global crisis
NBAD is secure and well-capitalised.
“We have no direct exposure to the sub-
prime crisis, but as any other bank in the
world; we may be exposed to another bank
that has that exposure”, Tomalin explains.
148- 157 NBAD_L3.indd 6 2/5/09 5:46:57 PM
Even though the bank is not negotiating
with any party for a merger, reinforcing
the bank’s general support for
consolidation in the UAE, Michael
Tomalin, CE, NBAD says. “To compete
effectively in a more globalised world, the
UAE and Abu Dhabi will need
larger banks.”
YOUR Number One Partner in Retail Banking
Through one of the largest branch and ATM networks in the UAE,
NBAD offers a wide range of retail banking services to all segments.
YOUR Number One Partner in Elite Banking
Elite Banking is an exclusive and privileged world, where banking
is an indulgence. Defned as ‘a touch of gold’, the unrivalled
convenience of a bespoke range of private facilities epitomises
the highest level of service at every step. It’s more than a banking
service; it’s a way of life.
YOUR Number One Partner Private Banking
NBAD offers discerning high-net-worth individuals tailor made and
state of the art private banking and wealth management services, via
its independent wholly owned Swiss Private Banking subsidiary or its
UAE based Private Banking division. Furthermore, it provides wealth
protection vehicles such as Trusts via its wholly owned subsidiary in
Jersey, Channel Islands.
Michael Tomalin, Chief Executive, NBAD
148- 157 NBAD_L3.indd 7 2/5/09 5:47:11 PM
YOUR Number One Partner in Corporate
Banking
NBAD is the leading provider of fnancial services to businesses
and is the Bank of choice for the government and other key
private and public sector institutions. Corporate Banking Group
(CBG) refects NBAD’s strengths in providing corporate clients a
wide array of commercial, transactional and electronic banking
products through innovative product development and a well-
integrated approach to Relationship Management. NBAD’s
Corporate Banking Group is the primary delivery channel for
corporate banking products in the UAE.
Skilled Relationship Teams of dynamic and motivated
personnel are assigned to each corporate to provide one-
stop-shop for all their fnancial services and requirements.
The Corporate Banking Group consists of dedicated strategic
business units that cater exclusively to specifc client groups
and specialize in particular product clusters.
Your Number One Partner in Investment
Banking
NBAD is a leading provider in the UAE of a full range of
corporate fnance and investment banking services, from
mergers & acquisitions to equity offerings and fxed
income issuance.
They pride themselves on the quality of the advice and
service provided, and has invested heavily in the people and
the systems required to maintain the leading position in the
provision of advisory and funding solutions to all valued clients.
148- 157 NBAD_L3.indd 8 2/5/09 5:47:19 PM
Your Number One Partner in Asset
Management
Asset Management Group (AMG) is currently the largest
local mutual fund manager in the country supporting
current assets approximately AED 7.2 billion, as of January
2008, and providing investment expertise through managing
fve regional funds, fve offshore funds and numerous
portfolios for a range of institutional investors and high net
worth individuals.
Your Number One Partner in Islamic
Banking and Financial Services (ADNIF)
Islamic Banking and Financial Services are provided through
the Islamic Banking Division of NBAD (ISD) and Abu Dhabi
National Islamic Finance (ADNIF) complementing each other.
Customers are offered Sharia’a-compliant products and
services through Corporate, Retail, Treasury & Investment
divisions of ADNIF/ISD and other bank’s delivery channels.
Our business strategy is to offer total Sharia’a compliant
solutions with a clear market positioning where real-time
value for customers, dedicated ladies section, reduced
documentation and easy procedure would be the key
elements for differentiation. In a marketplace with too many
competitors, big promises and complex products for the
customers, we would be a little different by offering a basket
of products & services with less hassle and more value to
customers strengthening the ADNIF Brand-promise “Pure
and Simple!”.
148- 157 NBAD_L3.indd 9 2/5/09 5:47:27 PM
CSR & Corporate Governance
The National Bank of Abu Dhabi has always been genuinely committed to the principles of
Corporate Governance. Established in 1968 by Royal decree, NBAD is in its 41st year of
successful and proftable operations for the benefts of its stakeholders.
Even in the absence of offcial corporate governance guidelines prior to 2007, successive
NBAD Boards of Directors have always ensured that the bank adhered to the highest standards
of corporate governance. This has translated into a regimen of exemplary practices in the
management and operation of NBAD. NBAD’s Board of Directors watchfulness and constant
scrutiny has enabled the executive management to keep the bank’s risk and reputation
protected from fnancial vicissitudes over the last four decades.
NBAD demonstrates a correlation between good corporate governance and superior fnancial
performance, and is an outstanding example of this. In 2007 for instance, the bank achieved
Return on Equity (ROE) 2007: 26.3 percent one of the highest in the UAE and the region, and
a net proft of AED 2,505 million - up 19 percent on 2006 with a compound annual growth rate
(CAGR) from 1999 to 2007 of 30 percent. In addition, NBAD’s credit rating remained the highest
assigned by international credit rating agencies to a UAE bank, which compares favourably with
ratings of banks in Europe, the US and Australasia.
To improve the bank’s performance and services offered to its customers and the community,
the Board established the Corporate Governance Committee (CGC) in 2006, headed by the
Chairman and two board members. The CGC assists the Board in shaping and monitoring the
corporate governance policies and practices and evaluating compliance of them. It ensures that
borrowing by directors and senior management is always transparent, and that directors and
senior management of the bank avoid trading in NBAD shares during the stipulated ‘closed’
period prior to the bank’s scheduled earnings and other market announcements.
NBAD sees itself as a role model with respect to Corporate Governance practice as the bank
has already implemented a number of Corporate Governance ‘best practices’ as directed by
the various Board committees:
• Risk Management Committee
• Compensation and Nomination Committee
• Audit Committee
• Corporate Governance Committee
• Remedial Advances Committee
148- 157 NBAD_L3.indd 10 2/5/09 5:47:42 PM
148- 157 NBAD_L3.indd 11 2/5/09 5:47:50 PM
Chapter 9 Finance, I nsurance & Security
158-160 9-Finance, Ins & Sec_L3.indd 2 2/5/09 7:53:40 PM
I t isn’t for the moment you are struck that you need courage,
but for the long uphill climb back to faith and security.
Anne Morrow Lindbergh, Pioneering American aviator and author, (1906-2001)
158-160 9-Finance, Ins & Sec_L3.indd 3 2/5/09 7:53:44 PM
160 Best of Abu Dhabi
F
i
n
a
n
c
e
,

I
n
s
u
r
a
n
c
e


&

S
e
c
u
r
i
t
y
I NSURANCE
As one of the largest in the Arab world, the total insurance market in the
UAE expanded by 27 percent in 2006. With 48 operating companies,
including 24 national companies, seven of which are headquartered in Abu
Dhabi, the UAE market is piecemeal. Since the levels of life insurance are
slight in the UAE, the evolution of an increasingly affuent middle class and
the increase in the number of expatriate workers will fuel further growth.
Non-life insurance however, still overshadows the market, amounting to
approximately 85 percent of all premiums, with business on the upswing.
All headquartered in Abu Dhabi, the UAE’s three largest companies -
Emirates Insurance Company, Abu Dhabi National Insurance Company
and Al Ain Ahlia have benefted from excellent underwriting receipts and
investment profts in 2007 despite more stringent regulation. Other than
motor insurance, the new insurance law, coming into force in February
2007, does not allow insurance brokers to issue policies directly from
their offces and recommends the creation of an insurance commission
in charge of devising and issuing regulations, as well as implementing an
industry code of conduct.
The government is active in strengthening the industry with the UAE’s
insurance law to raise industry standards. A principal innovation in the
new law is that it provides for the launching of an independent regulator.
Even though compulsory health insurance for all expat workers will cause
inevitable diffculties, the new system gives a boost to the insurance
sector and has already inspired the creation of a new national insurance
company, Daman.
160-161 Insurance - Overview_L3.indd 2 2/5/09 8:12:09 PM
161 Best of Abu Dhabi
Challenges must be addressed in order for the sector to
fourish. Its dependence on equity markets should be reduced
to curtail negative fallout from bearish investor behaviour and
market adjustments.
160-161 Insurance - Overview_L3.indd 3 2/5/09 8:12:10 PM
The reliable insurer
For over 36 years, the Abu Dhabi National Insurance Company
(ADNIC), a leading UAE-based public shareholding company,
has been providing sound and affordable insurance products and
services to satisfed clients. With a motto that underscores the
corporate ethos - ‘Reliable Insurer’ of choice - this dependability
is not just a motto to ADNIC, but a vision stringently developed
and adhered to over the years. F
i
n
a
n
c
e
,

I
n
s
u
r
a
n
c
e


&

S
e
c
u
r
i
t
y
162 - 163 ADNIC_L3.indd 2 2/5/09 8:00:27 PM
E
stablished in 1972 through the support of
Abu Dhabi Government, the Abu Dhabi
National Insurance Company (ADNIC) is a
public shareholding company incorporated in
the Emirate of Abu Dhabi.
Over the past 36 years, ADNIC has
established itself as ‘The Reliable Insurer of
Choice’ and a core insurance institution in
the local and regional market, characterised
by continuous, unabated growth combined
with ratios and results that are consistently
one of the best in the industry.
ADNIC is justifably proud of its
history, characterised by continuous,
unabated growth in all segments, with
combined ratios and results that are one
of the best in the market. It boasts a
solid fnancial base supported by strong
reinsurance protection which supports its
short-term and long-term commitments to
its clients and partners.
Long standing traditions of integrity and
honesty underline ADNIC’s commitment
in each and every policy issued or service
rendered. ADNIC constantly monitors local
and global trends in the industry to provide
its clients with the best insurance products
and services available.
ADNIC offers a wide range of business
and personal insurance covers expertly
customized and competitively priced to
meet the exact requirements of its corporate
and individual clients. Products are
continually re-evaluated and redesigned to
ensure they are appropriate in the current
environment. Quality re-insurers are
selected to mitigate the level of risk in excess
of that retained by the Company. On the
business / commercial insurance front,
ADNIC provides products such as Fire &
General Accident, Engineering, Aviation,
Marine, Group Life & Medical, and
Energy-related covers.
While on the Personal insurance side, the
Company provides insurance covers which
include home, car, boat, life & medical, travel,
personal accident and cargo. Some
of these products are offered online
(i.e. e-Travel).
The Company has an objective to expand
the existing client base of corporations,
individuals and partnerships with re-insurers
as well as brokers, government agencies and
institutions, both in the local and
regional markets.
The ADNIC Management and team remain
focused on the vision, mission and strategies
necessary to continue the Company’s long
history of maintaining its obligation towards its
clients, business partners and shareholders.
TOLL FREE - 800 8040
www.adnic.ae
163 Best of Abu Dhabi
H. E. Khalifa Mohamed Al Kindi, Chairman, ADNIC
“The Company’s unwavering commitment
towards sound and prudent underwriting
policies in both the felds of insurance
and investment has yielded the best
results year after year, which contributed
to the steady growth of our Company.
This is a primary incentive for us to
continue relentlessly further improving
our performance backed by a solid
fnancial foundation, thereby assuring
that the Company’s leading position both
regionally and internationally remains our
strategic goal.”
Excerpt from the Chairman’s speech
at the AGM in April, 2008
ADNIC is pleased to announce that Standard & Poor’s
has assigned ADNIC ‘A-’ Rating with Outlook: Stable.
This interactive rating is based on ADNIC’s Very Strong
Capitalization, Strong Earnings and Very Strong Liquidity.
This recognition is a stimulus for us to continue delivering
the highest standards of service to our clients and business
partners at all times. We are confdent that with our
relentless commitment backed by your valued support,
ADNIC will strive for excellence.
Information on the most current rating is available at
www.standardandpoors.com or from Standard & Poor’s at
+44 (0)20 7176 3800. A rating is an opinion of an insurer’s fnancial strength;
it is not a recommendation of an insurer’s products.
162 - 163 ADNIC_L3.indd 3 2/5/09 8:00:31 PM
Cover Evolves
Established in 1988, the principle behind the success of Emirates Insurance
Association (EIA) is the cooperation between the member insurance companies
and related agents in insurance activities. With the aim of establishing a sound
scientifc and technical basis integrated within their programme, ensuring proper
representation of the members’ interests, management of their duties and
defence of their rights is pivotal. So that trust can prevail not only in the EIA but
also in the entire insurance sector, a safeguard has been designed in the
interests of the insured parties which seek for the appropriate solutions in case
of problems between EIA and the insurers.
F
i
n
a
n
c
e
,

I
n
s
u
r
a
n
c
e

&

S
e
c
u
r
i
t
y
H.E. Sheikh Faisal Bin Khalid Sultan Al Qassemi with Sheikha Lubna Al Qasimi
164-165 Emirates Ins Asso_L3.indd 2 2/5/09 9:14:16 PM
165 Best of Abu Dhabi
B
y studying the technical bases
of rating, claims and terms and
conditions related to various types of
insurance EIA can suggest standard
insurance policies and submit them for
approval by the competent authorities. This
procedure is required for the establishment
of the necessary prerequisites for granting
special rates and discounts to the clients.
In addition, it is based on technical
considerations and the nature of the risk
involved. Close analysis of the factors
affecting the insurance market in the UAE
and suggesting proper solutions to conduct
studies prevents and minimizes losses in
various insurance branches.
EIA prepares studies, statistics
and issue publications about the local
insurance market that are essential to plan
a feasibility study for the establishment of
insurance and reinsurance pools in the
UAE, according to national insurance
market requirements. The organisation also
studies the needs of the insurance sector
with respect to various types of insurance
services and required expertise for its
progress by working on improving the
standard of knowledge of insurance and
reinsurance community through seminars
and similar institutes.
EIA is currently working towards
establishing an institute designated to
provide the necessary training for their
insurance workers, which will in turn
foster a communications division fully
able to effectively enact agreements and
regulations aimed at resolving problems
and disputes between the members to the
overall beneft of the industry.
To promote overall insurance
awareness, EIA represents the Emirates
insurance market in the Arab, regional and
international meetings in coordination with
the appropriate authorities.
Tel: +971 2 677 1444
www.eia.ae
H.E. Sheikh Faisal Bin Khalid Sultan Al
Qassemi is the Chairman of Emirates
Insurance Association. The fourteen
members of the Board of Directors
represent insurance companies
and brokers (locals and foreigners)
operating in the UAE. The association
has technical committees, each
specializing in one feld of the insurance
industry, each committee is chaired
by a General Manager and from these
General Managers the Higher Technical
Committee is formed.
H.E. Sheikh Faisal Bin Khalid Sultan Al Qassemi with Sheikha Lubna Al Qasimi
164-165 Emirates Ins Asso Cor_L3.indd 3 2/9/09 4:52:34 PM
Total Security
G4S is the largest and fastest growing security frm in the UAE.
Since 1994, the company has been providing its services to the
UAE government, embassies, banks and over 750 companies
across the Emirates. On a global scale, the company operates
in over 110 countries, employs more than 570,000 people and is
the largest employer quoted on the London Stock Exchange.
F
i
n
a
n
c
e
,

I
n
s
u
r
a
n
c
e

&

S
e
c
u
r
i
t
y
“We continually invest time in listening
to our customers needs and in
developing our staff through continuous
training and development. All aspects
of recruitment, selection, training,
deployment and supervision of our staff
are managed using years of collective
expertise to ensure high standards of
service and customer satisfaction.”
Services include manned security, cash management –
including secure storage, teller management, ATM replenishment and secure escorts.
Full range of security systems including IT security solutions. Facility manpower- including
a range of offce administrative staff, maintenance technicians, chauffeurs, housekeeping
and promotional staff. G4S offers total integrated security solutions in the UAE
166 - 167 G4S_L3.indd 2 2/5/09 9:25:42 PM
167 Best of Abu Dhabi
I
n the UAE, with around 10,000 staff, offces in Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Sharjah,
Al Ain, Ras Al Khaimah and Fujairah, G4S is uniquely placed to provide high
level security services to customers throughout the Emirates. The company
is also a member of Ligue Internationale des Societes de Surveillance,
which represents the world’s leading security organisations. “G4S is a well
established brand name in the UAE,” says Rory Mallon, Regional Managing
Director, Inner Gulf. “Our business has experienced rapid growth and
development alongside the growth of the city.”
In terms of its services, the company provides the full spectrum of security
needs. “We recognise that our reputation and continued growth is dependant
upon maintaining our principles of helpfulness, honesty and integrity,”
says Mallon. “For this reason we continually invest time in listening to our
customers needs and in developing our staff through continuous training and
development. All aspects of recruitment, selection, training, deployment and
supervision of our staff are managed using years of collective expertise to
ensure high standards of service and customer satisfaction.”
Services include manned security, cash management - including
secure storage, teller management, ATM replenishment, secure escorts
and the provision of facility manpower - including a wide range of offce
administrative staff, maintenance technicians, chauffeurs, housekeeping or
promotional staff.
“G4S Facility Services was formed as a result of requests from our existing
clients, building on our proven track record of utilising skilled, professional
and trustworthy individuals in our existing services,” explains Mallon. “This
service has proved to be a highly effective management strategy for our
customers, helping them reduce costs and overheads, which has led to the
continuing expansion of this division. All personnel are individually selected
and trained in view of our customer’s specifc profle requirements and our
own standards.”
Other services include the installation and monitoring of security
systems such as intruder alarms, access control, airport and defence
systems, CCTV systems and fre systems. Consulting services include threat
assessment, risk and fraud management, operational and contingency
planning, as well as security, fre and safety training. “We base our security
system design on the understanding that it is frst necessary to know what is
to be protected and why, before a valid security system design is possible,”
says Mallon. “It is our policy to involve the customer in every phase of
system design, thus ensuring that they are familiar with the rationale behind
equipment that is utilised.”
In terms of information and communications technology, G4S develops
customised software for aspects such as cyber security, access control,
audit implementation and network security. It also offers systems integration
applications such as satellite communication systems, broadband access
solutions, video conferencing and data collaboration systems.
“The range of IT security is vast: from unbreakable codes to secure
software; from malicious attacks and web viruses to protected cabling,
networking, telephone and multimedia communications,” states Mallon.
“Our expertise covers research, design, programming, installation,
maintenance, monitoring and feedback of high quality networking solutions.
When facing complex decisions with multiple possibilities and potential
threats, you need a clear picture of what is necessary, achievable, sound
advice and practical cost-effective solutions. Our experts can give you
the information you need, and then install, update and maintain all the
components you require, making your IT system an unbreakable link in the
chain of security.”
Clearly, the growing demand for both a varied and sophisticated range
of security solutions goes hand in hand with the phenomenal growth within
the region, and the new demands businesses face everyday. As Mallon
concludes, “In recent years, the UAE security industry has evolved with
the increased use of technology, considerable labour demand, and most
importantly with the changing requirements of customers. We are proud
to be part of Abu Dhabi’s continuing success and we are honoured to be
the trusted security solutions company to a wide range of companies,
embassies, government institutions and multinationals.”
Tel: +9712 449 1510
www.g4s.com
Corporate Social Responsibility
G4S is conscious of its ethical responsibility to its
employees, customers, the local community and
the environment. To this end we try to work towards
a sustainable and holistic approach to CSR. We
are committed to raise standards and invest in the
communities in which we operate. G4S is committed to
being a socially responsible corporate citizen.
We invest in our people through our employee
development programmes. We have established a
licensed training school for front line operational staff,
offering tailor made programmes for developing staff
competency. Mentoring programmes. On-line portals for
continual personal development for employees. Monthly
recognition schemes and awards for front line staff.
Employees are encouraged to play an active role
within the local community through sponsorship
matching programmes which support good causes,
projects for physically challenged children, student work
placement programs, supporting a range of health,
welfare and community projects through partnering
with government authorities for environmental clean up
campaigns and blood donation drives.
We have also established a G4S Employees
Trust Fund which offers monetary support to those
employees in need of urgent fnancial assistance
Our staff accommodation and facilities are operated
above the standard norm which addresses the
individual’s physiological, social, psychological and
safety needs. Our business complies with International
Occupational Health, Safety and Environment standards
and has been awarded the ISO 14001:2004 and
OHSAS 18001:1999 certifcates.
We also encourage partnerships in sports by
supporting aspiring young athletes, sports schools
and teams.
166 - 167 G4S_L3.indd 3 2/5/09 9:25:43 PM
Chapter 10 Construction & Real Estate
168-169 10-Const and Real Est_L3.indd 2 2/5/09 9:28:51 PM
Construction & Real Estate
“ Real estate proj ects must always stand for human value...
raise life to its greatest possible heights... supporting a spiritual and
meaningful conception of human existence.”
Dr. Sulaiman Al Fahim, CEO Hydra Properties
168-169 10-Const and Real Est Cor_L3.indd 3 2/9/09 4:53:44 PM
170 Best of Abu Dhabi
Concret e st eps t owards
a greener world
While the city of Dubai has captured the world’s attention with its unprecedented list of construction
marvels and attractions, its neighbouring sister emirate Abu Dhabi patiently waited in the sidelines
for its time to come. But make no mistake; Abu Dhabi may still be less renowned around the
world, but this is about to change - big time. With an impressive list of projects in the pipeline,
forecasts show that the volume of construction projects in Abu Dhabi will outpace those of Dubai
within three years. What is to be expected in the UAE’s federal capital in the coming years?
Consider MASDAR’s frst carbon neutral city in the world, the Louvre and Guggenheim Museums
on Saadiyat Island, the Grand Prix Circuit and infrastructure on Yas Island, for starters. With
sustainability, a major production criteria, all projects that involve state-of-the-art engineering,
construction materials and methods offer an opportunity for a company like Unibeton Ready Mix to
set itself apart from its competition.
C
o
n
s
t
r
u
c
t
i
o
n

&

R
e
a
l

E
s
t
a
t
e
Green ConCrete
Always committed to CSr, Unibeton’s commitment to total quality management (tQM) extends to every area of its operations and they are one of
the few ready Mix Companies accredited to QHS&e Management System. to help to build a more sustainable environment, Unibeton is focus-
ing on Green; environmentally friendly concrete with low carbon dioxide emissions to produce energy saving construction. As the largest ready
Mixed Concrete Company in the Gulf, Unibeton is not only a member of the Emirates Green Building Council but also leading the feld with the
promotion of Green sustainable concrete by using materials that represent a 75 percent saving on carbon dioxide emission against the more
traditional type of conventional concrete made from ordinary Portland cement. the greatest focus on green concrete is with the use of partial
cement replacements such as PFA & slag. this is an impressive improvement, considering that every month more than a million cubic meters of
concrete are poured in what must surely be the world’s greatest construction frenzy.
170-171 Unibeton Ready Mix-Option3_L3.indd 2 2/5/09 9:38:03 PM
Eng. Mohd. Shehadeh, General Manager, Unibeton
F
ormed in 1990, Unibeton that is part of the
diversifed Al Fara’a Construction Group of
Companies, has subsequently expanded to include
twelve plant locations across the UAE. Today it is
the leading concrete supplier for many of the regions
landmark projects currently underway. For instance, it
supplies concrete to the Saadiyat and Sheikh Zayed
Bridges, the Landmark Tower, which will become the
tallest tower in Abu Dhabi and the Ferrari Experience
Building too. In addition, it has supplying MASDAR
City, a 6,000,000m3-world frst carbon city neutral
and expect to remain the main supplier.
“Overall, based on the technology at hand,
Unibeton expect CO2 savings on the MASDAR
Project to reach an impressive 1,200,000 tons over 6
million m3 of concrete with improvements to concrete
mixture designs, processes and delivery systems
compared to business as usual”, explains Engr.
Mohammed Shehadeh, General Manager, Unibeton.
When it comes to sustainable production
methods, Unibeton intends to save an additional
200,000 tons of CO2 and an impressive 600 million
AED from innovations in reinforcing and piling
technology, in collaboration with piling contractors
and MASDAR. Throughout the duration of the
MASDAR Project, “Unibeton intends to use in excess
of 1.4 million tons of Supplementary Cementitious
Materials and to recover more than 50 per cent of
wash water for re-use through its water conservation
measures”, he adds. As a result, Unibeton will save
water used in concrete mixtures by 110,000 tons
over 6 Million m³ of concrete. In this way Unibeton
plans to use approximately 1.8 million tons of
recycled aggregates in 20 per cent of concrete
which is required to be manufactured using recycled
aggregates in MASDAR. This is in addition to
supplies of RCA for site formation, as 2.3 Million
tons of crushed aggregates are immediately available
to UNIBETON for site formation and general
sub-grade requirements.
According to Engr. Shehadeh, many of the
lessons learned on sustainability throughout the
course of the MASDAR project will be applied to
many of the other “main stream” projects in the UAE
and the rest of the Gulf.
tel: +9712 551 1500
www.unibetonrm.com
Unibeton is supply piling concrete to
Nakheel Tall Tower Project in Dubai,
the tallest tower in the world, reaching
over 1 km high.
Unibeton set up a State of the Art
Batch plant and Laboratory at the Tall
Tower site.
The approved mix has been specially
designed to meet a construction
requirement for more than 80 meter
deep piles, high strength properties and
extreme workability for more than six
hours workability retention.
170-171 Unibeton Ready Mix-Option3_L3.indd 3 2/5/09 9:38:10 PM
Getting real on real estate
As one of the fastest growing economies in the world, the UAE’s nominal GDP, currently at
AED 678.9 billion, is expected to rise to about AED 1 trillion in 2012. As its federal capital, Abu
Dhabi’s success has been a major boost for the UAE, as its wealth makes up 60 percent of the
UAE’s economy. The city’s GDP nearly doubled between 2003-2006, from AED 191.1 billion to
AED 359.4 billion, pushing Abu Dhabi towards becoming a fnancial and cultural centre in the
Middle East. A key driver of this astonishing growth is the emerging Abu Dhabi real estate market.
172 Best of Abu Dhabi
C
o
n
s
t
r
u
c
t
i
o
n

&

R
e
a
l

E
s
t
a
t
e
V
arious factors make Abu Dhabi an attractive opportunity for
investment. The city has a high demand for commercial and
residential space, with a limited supply. It also offers potential investment
yields in excess of 10 percent, a dream for any investor. In addition, Abu
Dhabi has a solid and diverse economy, with the UAE government and
Central Bank injecting AED 120 billion into the market and guaranteeing
all bank deposits held in the UAE to encourage inter-bank lending and
mortgage fnance.
Plan Abu Dhabi 2030
In September 2007, the Abu Dhabi Government published ‘Plan
Abu Dhabi 2030’, an initiative that aims to help the emirate grow
in a sustainable manner, by respecting its culture and surrounding
environment. The plan takes into account the predicted surge in
population, which is expected to reach over 3 million in 2030. Its aim is to
help control growth in a way that maintains the modern and comfortable
lifestyle the emirate is known for, whilst creating sustainable methods to
retain the nation’s culture, national heritage and delicate biosphere.
With respect to the environment, the plan will allow business
to grow in a way that protects Abu Dhabi’s natural resources and
natural areas, particularly the sensitive coastal and desert ecologies.
In terms of culture, the plan states that the emirate will emblemise
the contemporary expression of the modern Arab city, one in which
residents live and work in a healthy and supportive community
infrastructure. In allowing Abu Dhabi to prosper in a way that does not
compromise its residents or its environment, Plan Abu Dhabi 2030
sets the emirate up as a model capital city of the 21st century.
Reem Island
Hailed as ‘a city within a city’, Reem Island is one of the most impressive
real estate projects underway in Abu Dhabi. A natural island of 663
hectares (6.5 million square metres) and located about 300 meters off
the emirate’s coast, Reem Island is set to become one of Abu Dhabi’s
residential and commercial hotspots. It is currently being transformed into
a mini-paradise by three prestigious developers: Tamouh Investments
(60 percent), Sorouh Real Estate PJSC (20 percent), and Al Reem
Investments (20 percent). An independent facilities management
company, Bayt Al Khidma, is overseeing the whole project to ensure that
the highest standards of construction are met.
Connected to the mainland by various bridges and a mere 20
minutes from the Abu Dhabi International Airport, Reem Island
provides a scenic escape from city life while keeping its residents and
workers connected to the rest of the world. It aims to accommodate
280,000 residents, and will include facilities such as schools, hotels,
hospitals, resorts, restaurants, spas, beaches, shopping malls and
a 27-hole golf course. It is divided into three different areas: Pearl of
the Emirates, Najmat Abu Dhabi (Star of Abu Dhabi), and Shams Abu
Dhabi (Sun of Abu Dhabi).
Shams Abu Dhabi
Of the many projects blossoming on Reem Island, Shams Abu Dhabi
promises to be one of the most innovative and exciting opportunities for
investors in the UAE capital. Costing AED 25 billion, the development
stretches over 6 million square meters of the island. Shams Abu Dhabi
is being built on the model of a self-sustaining city enriched with all the
aspects of leisure available to the modern metropolis.
Clever brand extenstions to favour tourism, Ferrari World Theme Park - Yas Island
172 -173 Real Estate Overview_L3.indd 2 2/5/09 9:42:31 PM
Ninety percent of the development taking
place is for residential buildings, aiming to
create 30,000 residential units to house
around 50,000 people. The other 10 percent
of the project is going to commercial and
recreational facilities. One of the most
notable of these is Central Park, a 81,000
square metre expanse of greenery, and one
of the largest recreational areas in the UAE.
The park includes waterways linked into a
four km canal, which will offer landscaped
areas for relaxation. In addition, the park
provides areas for exhibition and retail,
including restaurants to satisfy every palate.
It also houses a theatre district that will be
an avenue for all types of entertainment,
including drama, flm, music and street
performers. With such varied offerings,
Shams Abu Dhabi is guaranteed to turn
Reem Island, as well as Abu Dhabi, into an
increasingly desired area of investment.
Desert Island
Abu Dhabi has entered new territory with the
opening of Desert Islands, an eco-friendly resort
unlike any other destination in the Arabian
Gulf. An AED 11.5 billion wildlife sanctuary that
takes visitors away from the hustle and bustle
of urban life, the resort is made up of eight
different islands: Sir Bani Yas Island, Dalma
Island, and the rocky Discovery Islands. Desert
Islands’ rugged landscape, teeming with wildlife
and Stone Age ruins, is set against glittering
turquoise waters – creating an experience to
rival those of the Caribbean and the Maldives.
The frst part of the resort to open is Sir
Bani Yas Island, an 87 square kilometer
paradise that was originally the royal retreat
of the late Sheikh Zayed. Under the auspices
of the Tourism Development and Investment
Company (TDIC), the only existing building
on the island has been converted into a
64 room resort and spa operated by Thai
hospitality group Anantara. The island’s
abundant wildlife roams the Arabian
Wildlife Park, which covers three quarters
of the resort.
In accordance with its eco-friendly
philosophy, Desert Islands has plans for
creating one of the world’s largest alternative
energy plants, based on solar and wind
power. It is also home to the UAE’s frst and
largest windmill, which stands as a symbol
of the sustainability of the project. Desert
Islands plans to expand with the opening
of 3 tented resorts, each housing up to ten
people, by next year. It also has plans for a
larger lodge that will open in 2010.
Al Raha Beach
Al Raha Beach is a beachfront development
stretching over 11 kilometres along the beach
side of the Abu Dhabi-Dubai highway. Located
next to Khalifa City and Abu Dhabi International
Airport, this AED 54 billion development will be
made up of at least eight different residential
and commercial districts, and will house
120,000 residents. Each district will have its
own personality, providing a wide range of
environments appealing to a variety of
different people.
Al Raha Beach is not limited to the Abu
Dhabi shoreline, but connects to picturesque
islands just off the shore through an
impressive network of canals and bridges.
Between the mainland and the islands, Al
Raha Beach will encompass nine hotels, fve
beaches, four marinas, parks, restaurants
and different leisure facilities. The project will
provide a world class residential, commercial
and entertainment centre.
Al Reef Villas
Based on a 10 million square foot plot near the
Abu Dhabi International Airport, Al Reef Villas
is a magnifcent residential community offering
villas and apartments for all those searching
for an affordable paradise. The development
presents its property in four different themes:
Mediterranean, Desert, Contemporary and
Arabic. In addition, it offers residents a chance
to live in signature villas or apartments in a
variety of styles.
With 46 apartment buildings housing
1,810 fats in a mixture of one, two and
three bedroom units, the project aims to
satisfy the needs and desires of all types of
residents. The apartments come in sizes
ranging from 25 to 175 square meters.
They also keep Abu Dhabi’s urban residents
connected to the natural environment, with
balconies or ground foor courtyard gardens
in every complex.
Some of Abu Dhabi’s Coming Attractions
Strategically positioned as the ‘thinking person’s
tourism destination’, Abu Dhabi is preparing
for a whole new range of projects that aim to
attract well heeled travellers and investors from
around the world. The scale of projects under
construction is truly phenomenal, making this
emirate a global leader in economic growth. A
taste of Abu Dhabi’s coming attractions can be
found below:
• YasIsland–Aworldclassleisure
destination rising from the sands
east of Abu Dhabi. This $40 billion
development will boast the region’s frst
and the world’s biggest Warner Bros.
Theme Park, a Ferrari-themed motoring
attraction and a Formula 1 race track
that will host the 2009 Grand Prix.
• IndustrialCities-fveindustrialcities
being developed within a specialized
economic zone stretching across 75
square kilometres of land, with a current
investment of over AED 10 billion.
• AbuDhabiMetro–Atleasttwometro
lines will become part of Abu Dhabi’s
impressive transport plan, and will
eventually be linked to Dubai metro.
It is hard for anyone who has visited UAE and has
been mesmerized by the sheer wealth and architectural
beauty of these small Gulf countries, not to marvel
at the transformation of this once almost barren and
inhospitable land into an alluring paradise.
172 -173 Real Estate Overview_L3.indd 3 2/5/09 9:42:36 PM
Development will be carried
out in multiple phases from
2006 – 2023.
Reem Island comprises
6.5 million square metres
of land.
Tamouh Investments
is master developing
60% of the Island,
Sorouh 20% and
Reem Investments the
remaining 20%.
The master plan currently
has over 200 towers on
the Island.
Delivering on a Promise
With the published blueprint of its visionary 2030 plan and over a
trillion dirhams of investment and infrastructure planned, Abu Dhabi is
transforming itself from an unassuming quiet achiever into the region’s
shinning light for real estate development.
C
o
n
s
t
r
u
c
t
i
o
n

&

R
e
a
l

E
s
t
a
t
e
Abu Dhabi’s growth rate will exceed 17 per cent by the end of 2008 and the emirate’s economy
will remain strong despite the international recession. With sustainable real estate development
a core strategic imperative for Abu Dhabi, its strong economy will continue to grow as it links up
with the global economy through the enhancement of the private sector’s role.
174-175 Profile Group Property_L3.indd 2 2/5/09 9:48:19 PM
175 Best of Abu Dhabi
O
ne of the pioneers for this development
has been Profle Group Properties (Profle).
In 2006, they were the frst company to offer all
nationalities the opportunity to own waterfront
luxury apartments on Abu Dhabi’s idyllic
Reem Island. Later the same year, their Marina
Heights development was one of the frst to
start its construction on Reem, and now in
2009 these same towers are expected to be
some of the frst to be handed over to investors
and home owners.
“The completion of these units will represent
a signifcant milestone for Abu Dhabi, and one
that reinforces Profle’s continued focus on
delivery,” comments Guy Alan Sadler, Chief
Executive Offcer for Profle. “We never lost
sight of the need to physically deliver on our
promises. Abu Dhabi has a well documented
accommodation crisis across all real estate
categories, and it’s only once projects start
being delivered that any tangible relief will
be felt within the city. We have a responsibility
not only to our investors but also to the
emirate of Abu Dhabi as a whole. We take this
responsibility very seriously and it’s something
we look forward to fulflling later on this year,”
says Sadler.
“Our industry is literally built on bricks and
mortar, and while sales and marketing are an
important part, it’s the ability to deliver projects
on time and to specifcation that is
the critical component of any development.
The requirements of end-users must never
be forgotten. How a property appears
in a glossy brochure or fnancial spreadsheet
is irrelevant in comparison to the
suitability of the fnished product for its
owner upon completion.
“The relationship between developer and
client needs to go well beyond reservation
agreements and installment payments.
Instead it’s a commitment to deliver on
promises and surpass expectations which
continues right up to fnal delivery and beyond”,
adds Sadler.
The development of Reem Island will be
spread across 6.5 million square meters of
natural landscape, and meticulously planned
to accommodate over 150,000 inhabitants
living and working on the island. When fully
completed, this ‘mega development’ will boast
residential, retail and commercial districts, and
be fully equipped with the fnest education,
healthcare and leisure facilities within a modern
and vibrant urban setting.
“Reem Island represents a unique
opportunity to secure a slice of blue-chip real
estate within the pristine waters of the Arabian
Gulf. Its location will offer residents a remarkable
lifestyle on a ‘natural’ island only 300 metres
off the coast of the downtown Abu Dhabi, and
certain to be one of the premier residential and
commercial addresses in the city,” says Sadler.
The viability of such investments, even in
challenging economic times, is still abundantly
clear. The fundamentals of the emirate are
unquestionable; Abu Dhabi is the capital of
the UAE and holds the political and legislative
power within the country. It’s the largest emirate
geographically and most populated at 1.7
million inhabitants. In addition, Abu Dhabi is one
of the richest cities in the world, with a GDP per
capita of over $46,000 p.a. supported by strong
oil reserves, considerable income from trade
and manufacturing, and a rapidly expanding
tourism industry.
Abu Dhabi has also been blessed with
natural resources, with over 200 natural
islands, spectacular desert landscapes and the
mountains of Al Ain, making its a truly unique
location for both residents and tourists alike.
“As a locally-owned company with a true
local commitment and presence, we appear to
have struck a chord with investors, as Profle
has established itself as one of the truly trusted
brands within the rapidly transforming Abu
Dhabi Real Estate market,” concludes Sadler.
Tel: 800-PROFILE (800-7763453)
www.proflegroup.ae
174-175 Profile Group Property_L3.indd 3 2/5/09 9:48:48 PM
Leading Real Est at e
Even though the world may be undergoing recession, the majority of Abu
Dhabi’s real estate sector is safely poised to weather the storm. Thanks to the
establishment of a solid backbone of knowledgeable investors and end users
investing for mid to long term capital gain and rental yield, Abu Dhabi is
creating a sustainable property market.
C
o
n
s
t
r
u
c
t
i
o
n

&

R
e
a
l

E
s
t
a
t
e
L
inda Loughnane, MD, LLJ Property is upbeat about the excellent opportunities emerging during this
time of rapid transition.
What was the rationale for starting a real estate company? And how has LLJ Property
evolved since its inception?
I have worked in real estate in Abu Dhabi since 1993. My partners in LLJ, Lubna and Jane, worked with
me for an Abu Dhabi branch offce of a Dubai-based company. We recognised the opportunities in Abu
Dhabi and in 2005, felt it was the right time to launch a new company to serve the UAE Capitals’ real
estate market.
LLJ do a lot more than sell property. We work in project management, administrative support and
consultancy for private and master developers. We also have a very active leasing team and are
developing the property management side of the business.

With the recent global downturn, is LLJ Property concerned that the Abu Dhabi ‘dream’ is a
‘bubble’ waiting to burst?
I don’t consider Abu Dhabi a bubble that will burst at all. There are sound reasons for companies to be
in Abu Dhabi, and they’re mainly long term. Just look at the diversifcation programme of the emirate.
Projects like Khalifa Port, the biggest industrial project in the world, which will attract new industries in
engineering, manufacturing and aviation.
Tourism is another major investment area, with the expansion of Etihad Airways, the opening of new
hotels and the development of the cultural district on Saadiyat which will be home to the Guggenheim
and Louvre museums. These types of projects require highly skilled professionals and create long term
employment in the city driving the future need for housing. With this level of diversifcation, Abu Dhabi’s
growth is here to stay.
176 Best of Abu Dhabi
“LLJ’s competitive advantage is its Abu Dhabi
focus. We’ve always had our headquarters in the
country’s capital. There are signifcant differences
between Dubai and Abu Dhabi, both in their
demographic growth and diversifcation as well
as planned expansion. Because of our tenure
here, LLJ Property understands the heartbeat
of Abu Dhabi. Our close relationship to it means
that we’re not just promoting products. We’re
promoting Abu Dhabi.”
176-177 LLJ Property_L3.indd 2 2/5/09 9:51:32 PM
177 Best of Abu Dhabi
Property Sales – the multilingual sales team has a reputation for
high quality customer care. They are experienced in handling sales
of off-plan property, for both local and foreign individual and bulk
purchasers. LLJ Property’s investment division facilitates the sale and
purchase of any substantial real estate assets including residential
and commercial foors, retail space, entire buildings and plots of land
in Abu Dhabi.
Property Leasing – LLJ Property offers a full leasing management
service to residential and commercial landlords. The leasing team
has a reputation for understanding and responding effectively to
individual and corporate clients’ seeking residential, commercial or
retail space to lease.
Property Management – to cater for the growing Abu Dhabi
property ownership market, LLJ Property has developed bespoke
Property Management systems to specifcally suit the UAE and
to satisfy the requirements of current and future landlords within
the emirate. These systems cater for both portfolio and individual
owners, providing a complete solution for both residential and
commercial landlords.
Consultancy – LLJ Property’s knowledge and market expertise
are regularly sought at an early stage by both master and private
developers who engage the company as planning consultants for
Abu Dhabi real estate projects. These include residential, commercial
and mixed use developments.
Mangrove Place, Reem Island, Abu Dhabi.
What do you think the rental
trends will be for offces and
homes this year?
We have yet to see any
adjustment. However, there is a
lot of commercial property due
to complete in 2009, hopefully
this will result in an easing off on
commercial rents. Also, given
some companies may slow down
their planned expansion, this will
ease the pressure on residential
and offce space so we are likely
to see a dip in residential rates
this year after rents doubled in
2008. However, Abu Dhabi won’t
be seeing cheap rents. There is
a signifcant gap between supply
and demand – it’s even more
expensive than Dubai. In Abu
Dhabi, you’d be lucky to fnd a one
bedroom apartment to rent for less
than AED 180,000 today.
Are there still opportunities to
make a ‘quick proft’ in the real
estate market or is the market
becoming more mature and
settling down?
We’ve never believed that real
estate is about a quick proft. As
a business we are not focused
purely on short term gains, we take
a longer term view and are building
a company that will grow with the
market and hopefully weather the
storms. We believe that property is
a medium to long term investment.
Investors should buy property
based on this principle and their
potential to earn good rental yields
as well as capital gains. The Abu
Dhabi market is maturing and we
welcome the seasoned investors
who recognise the excellent
opportunities for good returns from
property investment.
What confdence-boosting
measures can be introduced
into the market to make the
secondary market more active
and more transparent?
Just general awareness. For
example, there is a perceived
belief that mortgages are not easy
to come by. That is not true. A
number of banks are offering 80
to 90% LTV on purchase price of
Abu Dhabi property. Banks are still
lending money, but today they’re
marketing to the right buyer.
What are the most attractive
developments to invest in?
Why?
There are viable opportunities
in both the commercial and
residential markets, as long
as you’re buying from reputed
developers with an existing track
record.
My personal favourite is Reem
Island. Aside from all its great
amenities, it is located near the
central business district with easy
access to the airport, the cultural
district on Saadiyat Island and the
main attractions of the city.

Does LLJ Property have plans
to expand its services and/or
diversify into related activities?
We are establishing a valuations
department and, as more real
estate projects near completion
creating more landlords, we are
developing our individual unit
property management team.
These will work hand in hand with
our already established leasing
team to offer both individual and
corporate investors a full tenant
fnding and management service
for their property portfolios.
In what specifc ways is LLJ
Property involved in setting
new standards in real estate
services? Is it time for realtors
to unite to beneft the industry
and standardise procedures,
or is it still a case of lone
operators doing their ‘own
thing’?
LLJ is very much a people
business. We focus on client
service. We are not claiming to be
a company that does everything –
our focus is on our clients and their
needs.
I’m defnitely in favour of
realtors coming together and
regulating the industry. Evolving
accepted practices is essential.
There are rogue brokers that create
a bad taste in the market. We
don’t want that type of negativity
in the industry. More established
companies must pull together
to provide good, honest and
ethical service.

What effect will the increasing
supply of property in Abu
Dhabi have on prices and
overall environmental
sustainability?
Prices are basically determined
by supply and demand. As long
as there is demand, prices will
increase. However because of the
current market correction, prices
will move more slowly than before.
In terms of environmental
sustainability, Abu Dhabi is working
particularly hard on this. The Abu
Dhabi Plan 2030 is focused on
helping the emirate grow in a
sustainable manner. The evolution
of a zero carbon city being
developed by Masdar, is another
initiative being taken in Abu
Dhabi that epitomises global
sustainability objectives.
Tel: +971 2 495 0500
www.lljproperty.com
“The UAE has seen stability and growth since the time of President Sheikh Zayed
Al Nahyan and the Federation’s establishment. I’ve lived here since 1993, and I feel
comfortable and happy about the opportunities and lifestyle… In terms of loopholes in
the market, they’re constantly being closed off. Hopefully, this will continue to improve.”
176-177 LLJ Property_L3.indd 3 2/5/09 9:51:34 PM
Ambitions Unlimited
Since it was launched in Abu Dhabi in 2007, Tamouh has been
playing a major role in shaping the future developments of the UAE’s
infrastructure and community lifestyle. The company is committed to
providing buyers and investors with properties of the finest quality, and
investments they can be proud of. Driven by a passion for excellence
and commitment to quality, time and budgets, Tamouh’s team of
experts have unlimited ambitions.
C
o
n
s
t
r
u
c
t
i
o
n

&

R
e
a
l

E
s
t
a
t
e
Central Business District, Al Reem Island, Abu Dhabi
178 - 179 Tamouh_L3.indd 2 2/5/09 11:47:00 PM
T
his real estate trailblazer has a
diverse portfolio that includes
various projects placing it in a league
of its own. The company’s exclusive
venture, Reem Island is a 6.2 million
square metre natural island, set 350
metres across from Abu Dhabi’s coastal
shoreline, and will be developed into a
full community.
The Marina Square, the frst plot of
Reem Island, covers an area of 13.2
million square feet and is comprised
of 70 percent residential and 30
percent commercial districts. It is a
multi-purpose project consisting of a
shopping arcade, eight cineplexes,
branded retail outlets, restaurants, a
marina, a fve star hotel facing
the marina, and private beach access
and sports facilities. It will also host
community facilities that will cater to
the residents’ commercial, medical,
spiritual and leisure needs, with fully
equipped clinics, mosques, parks, day-
care centres and convenient
outlet supermarkets.
Other projects through which
Tamouh will break new ground include
the City of Lights, CBD, Dolphin Island,
Royal Group Headquarters, Meena
Plaza, University City and Danet
Gateway. Most of these projects will be
completed within the next fve years.
Where others see endless
challenges, Tamouh sees endless
potential. This is because the company
knows that if they dream it, they can do
it. It’s precisely this thinking that drives
the real estate developer to take the
road less travelled, giving you better
value in everything from services to
investment opportunities.
Tel: 800-TAMOUH (826684)
www.tamouh.com
City of Lights, Al Reem Island, Abu Dhabi
The Cove, Al Reem Island, Abu Dhabi
Marina Square, Al Reem Island, Abu Dhabi
178 - 179 Tamouh_L3.indd 3 2/5/09 11:47:03 PM
Chapter 11 Oil & Gas
180 - 181 11-Oil & Gas_L3.indd 2 2/6/09 1:37:22 AM
Oil & Gas
“Wealth is not money. Wealth lies in men. This is where true power lies,
the power we value. This is what has convinced us to direct all our resources
to building the individual, and to using the wealth which God has
provided us in the service of the nation.”
H. H. Sheikh Zayed Bin Sultan Al Nahyan,
President, UAE (1918-2004)
180 - 181 11-Oil & Gas_L3.indd 3 2/6/09 1:37:23 AM
182 Best of Abu Dhabi
O
i
l

&

G
a
s
ENERGY
Even though the price of oil is fattening out due to the global fnancial crunch, as the
world’s sixth-leading oil exporter, Abu Dhabi has benefted enormously from the elevated
energy prices and is determined to boost production capacity to satisfy long-term global
demand. The emirate’s plans to increase crude output to over 3mn barrels per day by
2009 and potentially 4mn by 2011. It also plans to expand its oil-related industry and is
injecting approximately Dh100bn ($27.23bn) into oil sector projects between 2008 and
2012. For instance, Takreer, the Abu Dhabi National Oil Company’s (ADNOC) refning
operation, is planning to increase refning capacity through the construction of a new
refnery at Ruwait. In addition, construction began on a 360-km oil pipeline to transport
crude from the Habshan oilfelds near Abu Dhabi to an export terminal in the eastern
emirate of Fujairah, which has a deep-water port on the Gulf of Oman.

Onshore felds will supply additional capacity, with the Abu Dhabi Company for Onshore
Oil Operations (ADCO) investing nearly $1.4bn in its development programme that will
add 400,000 bpd to its current level of crude oil output. The cost of boosting production
implies investment of billions of dollars in infrastructure and technology, and rising costs
that have refected a global trend until very recently, are cause for concern. In addition
some of Abu Dhabi’s mature oilfelds need increasingly complex oil extraction procedures
such as Ehnanced Oil Recover and using water or gas.
In a bid to become a global centre for alternative energy, Abu Dhabi’s multibillion-dollar
renewable energy initiative Masdar has commissioned Hydrogen Energy - a joint venture
between BP Alternative Energy and Rio Tinto - to develop a hydrogen generator with
carbon capture and storage. As natural gas consumption in the emirate rises, the desire
for developing Abu Dhabi’s sour gas felds is increasing. Ultimately, greater focus is being
given to educating tomorrow’s petrochemicals professionals, through the signing of
agreements with several foreign universities for specialist courses in this feld.
182 -183 Energy_L3.indd 2 2/6/09 1:42:14 AM
183 Best of Abu Dhabi
ENERGY
Even though the price of oil is fattening out due to the global fnancial crunch, as the
world’s sixth-leading oil exporter, Abu Dhabi has benefted enormously from the elevated
energy prices and is determined to boost production capacity to satisfy long-term global
demand. The emirate’s plans to increase crude output to over 3mn barrels per day by
2009 and potentially 4mn by 2011. It also plans to expand its oil-related industry and is
injecting approximately Dh100bn ($27.23bn) into oil sector projects between 2008 and
2012. For instance, Takreer, the Abu Dhabi National Oil Company’s (ADNOC) refning
operation, is planning to increase refning capacity through the construction of a new
refnery at Ruwait. In addition, construction began on a 360-km oil pipeline to transport
crude from the Habshan oilfelds near Abu Dhabi to an export terminal in the eastern
emirate of Fujairah, which has a deep-water port on the Gulf of Oman.

Onshore felds will supply additional capacity, with the Abu Dhabi Company for Onshore
Oil Operations (ADCO) investing nearly $1.4bn in its development programme that will
add 400,000 bpd to its current level of crude oil output. The cost of boosting production
implies investment of billions of dollars in infrastructure and technology, and rising costs
that have refected a global trend until very recently, are cause for concern. In addition
some of Abu Dhabi’s mature oilfelds need increasingly complex oil extraction procedures
such as Ehnanced Oil Recover and using water or gas.
In a bid to become a global centre for alternative energy, Abu Dhabi’s multibillion-dollar
renewable energy initiative Masdar has commissioned Hydrogen Energy - a joint venture
between BP Alternative Energy and Rio Tinto - to develop a hydrogen generator with
carbon capture and storage. As natural gas consumption in the emirate rises, the desire
for developing Abu Dhabi’s sour gas felds is increasing. Ultimately, greater focus is being
given to educating tomorrow’s petrochemicals professionals, through the signing of
agreements with several foreign universities for specialist courses in this feld.
182 -183 Energy_L3.indd 3 2/6/09 1:42:18 AM
Success wit h safety
Oil is a huge contributor to the Abu Dhabi economy, which accounts
for 90 percent of the UAE’s total production. Dubbed as ‘Black Gold’,
due to it being a powerful pawn in global economics, the dangers faced
with accessing this substance are astronomical. With this in mind the
National Drilling Company (NDC) has made safety its priority while
maintaining a high level of success in the oil and gas industry.
O
i
l

&

G
a
s
184 -185 NDC_L3.indd 2 2/6/09 1:44:43 AM
T
he National Drilling Company (NDC) is one of the largest drilling contractors in
the Middle East, providing its customers with quality drilling, work over and
well-maintenance services.
Established in 1972, NDC was the frst venture among the ADNOC Group of
Companies. Today, they operate a feet of 10 offshore and 18 onshore drilling rigs,
a Multi-Purpose Service Vessel, as well as fve water well rigs surveying Abu Dhabi’s
ground water. Services include Onshore Services, Offshore Services, Ground Water
Research Program, Directional and Horizontal, Barge Services, Wireline Services
and Logging Services.
With an enviable safety record, NDC take pride in their reputation for providing
safe, healthy working conditions while protecting the environment and safeguarding
assets. They offer effcient drilling and well-maintained services to clients at
competitive rates, paying special care to protect the surrounding environment as
well as the health and safety of employees.
Onshore Drilling
Since Rig ND-01 began work in 1973; NDC has drilled over 4,000 wells, onshore
and offshore, to a total depth of over 21.5 million feet, more than the radius of the
earth (20.9 million feet). The company’s current onshore feet consists of 16 drilling
and work-over land rigs. In 2003, NDC invested in four of the most advanced land
drilling rigs in the world, with state-of-the-art automation, and the highest levels of
HSE safeguards, well control and rig integrity. Capable of drilling down to 20,000
feet, the rigs’ environmentally friendly design ensures zero discharge while extensive
mechanization keeps staff away from high-risk areas.
Offshore Drilling
In September 2005, NDC added Rig Al-Hail, one of the most heavily automated and
technologically advanced rigs in the region, to its feet. The new addition brought
NDC’s offshore feet total to 10 jack-up rigs and one self-propelled jack-up barge.
In response to rising demand for its drilling, work-over and wellhead maintenance
services, NDC also operates a number of sub-contracted rigs.
Rigs operations without Lost Time Injury
NDC is known for it’s safety records and achievements during operations in different
locations, these records includes onshore and offshore rigs which successfully
completed years and millions of man working hours without any Lost Time Incident.
Recently one of NDC Onshore rigs ND-17 completed 13 years ( 5.46 million man-
hours) without LTI, and this achievement is considered a milestone in the history of
the company drilling business. There are other rigs who completed certain periods
without LTI, for example onshore rig ND-01 completed 11 years, offshore rigs Diyina
and Junana completed 5 years.
IADC (The International Association of Drilling Contractors) endorsed these
achievements by issuing their prestigious certifcates for the drilling rigs operating
without any Lost Time Incident.
Health, safety and Environment
The National Drilling Company demand a strong commitment to HSE as
demonstrated by NDC Chairman, Abdulla Nasser Al-Suwaidi, through the NDC
Board directions and site visits.
The NDC Chairman has stated that safety is of paramount to the success of
NDC. He has even gone further explaining that safety, maintenance and integrity
are essential for NDC’s continual existence. The NDC General Manager
Mr. Abdalla Saeed Al Suwaidi gives emphasis to HSE every week during General
Management Team meetings and other occasions when he meets NDC staff during
facility inspections and other feld visits.
This top level commitment is highlighted to all staff through the NDC motto –
“HSE comes frst at NDC” emphasizing that all NDC operations must be conducted
without harm to people. The main HSE drive within NDC is through a HSE
Management System which comprises of eight elements and hundred and nineteen
expectations. The HSE-MS has been re-launched within NDC during
2002. This involves training, web based systems and direct commitment of
individual key position holders throughout the organisation. The application
of key performance indicators and targets will further embed HSE-MS within
the business.
Tel: +9712 677 6100
www.ndc.ae
184 -185 NDC_L3.indd 3 2/6/09 1:45:01 AM
Meeting power needs
With natural gas from its offshore production wells flowing to the
UAE and, more recently, Oman, Dolphin Energy is linking the Gulf
nations in a unique regional gas grid.
O
i
l

&

G
a
s
Platforms DOL-1 & DOL-2 were assembled at J Ray
McDermott’s yard in Jebel Ali, Dubai, then shipped by
specialist barge to Qatar’s North Field for installation in
early 2006. A delicate moment – maneuvering 1,000
tons of superstructures into position, to complete the
DOL-1 Dolphin well platform in Qatar’s North Field.
186-187 Dolphin_L3.indd 2 2/6/09 2:23:38 AM
187 Best of Abu Dhabi
D
olphin Energy’s Dolphin Gas Project has been the single largest energy
initiative ever undertaken in the Middle East. Meticulously planned,
Dolphin’s activities make up a complex, highly effcient value chain - unique to
the industry in the Arabian Gulf. The overall investment in constructing the entire
Dolphin Gas Project - wells, sealines, processing plant, export pipeline and
receiving facilities - has made it one of the largest energy-related ventures ever
undertaken in the region.
Dolphin now produces raw gas from its 24 wells in Qatar’s North Field. It
processes this gas at its brand-new, dedicated Gas Processing Plant in
Qatar’s Ras Laffan Industrial City. It then transports the refned methane
through the 48 inch, 364 km subsea export pipeline (largest and longest in
the Middle East) from Qatar to Dolphin’s Gas Receiving Facilities at Taweelah
in Abu Dhabi.
In Qatar itself, valuable by-products are meanwhile being produced during
processing: ethane, condensate, propane, butane. The ethane is supplied to
Qatar Petroleum on long-term contract and the other products are being sold
on international term and spot markets, in signifcant quantities.
As the company’s frst gas arrived in the UAE, Dolphin’s Chairman, HH
Sheikh Hamdan Bin Zayed Al Nahyan, Deputy Prime Minister of the UAE, said:
“This achievement is historic as well as highly important.” He added, “It signifes
that the vision of our late President, Sheikh Zayed Bin Sultan Al Nahyan has
been realised. It also demonstrates the commitment to the venture of their
Highnesses Sheikh Khalifa Bin Zayed Al Nahyan, President of the UAE and
Ruler of Abu Dhabi and Sheikh Hamad Bin Khalifa Al Thani, the Emir of the
State of Qatar. It particularly results from the support of His Highness the Crown
Prince of Abu Dhabi, Sheikh Mohammed Bin Zayed Al Nahyan.”
He also explained: “The entire Dolphin value chain is now functioning, as we
have long envisioned and planned. We are therefore managing and supplying
our own gas to our contracted customers, controlling every stage of the
process.” In the meantime, the next challenge would be to carefully ramp up
production, until reaching targeted pipeline throughput of 2 billion standard
cubic feet per day in early 2008.
The Partners
Dolphin Energy was established in March 1999 as an initiative of the
Government of the UAE Emirate of Abu Dhabi.
The founders had always conceived Dolphin as a force for international
cooperation – one that would unite the vision and resources of the region with
multinational capital and expertise. Total of France was accordingly invited to
become a shareholder in Dolphin Energy during 2000. After a further selection
process, Occidental Petroleum of the USA became the company’s second
international partner in 2002.
The three Dolphin Energy Limited shareholders are Mubadala Development
Company with 51 percent, and Total and Occidental Petroleum with 24.5
percent each. Mubadala Development Company is wholly owned by the
Government of Abu Dhabi.
The Growing Dolphin Pipeline Network
Dolphin Energy entered the business of gas supply in January 2004, when
it commissioned the natural gas pipeline that connects Al Ain with the UAE
East Coast Emirate of Fujairah. The 24 inch, 182 km pipeline supplies gas to
the power and desalination plants in Fujairah of the Union Water & Electricity
Company (UWEC), to the ultimate beneft of hundreds of farmers and scores of
inland rural communities.
Initially all the gas being delivered to UWEC has come from Oman via a tie-in
on the UAE-Oman border near Al Ain. From early 2008, Dolphin will ‘reverse
the fow’ and will thereafter supply Oman directly with up to 200,000 scf/
day of its gas from Qatar, which will also reach Fujairah via Dolphin’s Eastern
Gas Distribution System (EGDS) and Al Ain. Dolphin Energy supplies all its
customers with gas through its Taweelah Receiving Facilities in Abu Dhabi.
Some of this gas goes direct to neighbouring power plants. The majority of the
gas is being supplied to other parts of the UAE, using Dolphin’s EGDS.
The EGDS has been upgraded by Dolphin during 2006 and 2007 as part of
a long term lease agreement with Abu Dhabi National Oil Company (ADNOC).
Tel: +9712 699 5500
www.dolphinenergy.com
Dolphin Energy entered the business of gas supply in January 2004, with the commissioning of its natural
gas pipeline connecting Al Ain with the UAE East Coast Emirate of Fujairah. This 24 inch, 182 km pipeline
supplies gas to the Union Water & Electricity Company (UWEC) power and desalination plant in Fujairah.
Dolphin’s newly commissioned receiving facilities at Taweelah, Abu Dhabi, where Dolphin receives,
monitors and then distributes its own gas from Qatar.
Dolphin gas is a unique source of new energy for the Southern
Gulf. Through its supply of natural gas from Qatar, it brings
together three GCC nations, the UAE, Qatar and Oman, in a
regional energy network for the very frst time.
The continuing support of the governments of the UAE,
Qatar and Oman has been the key factor in enabling the
national and international stakeholders in Dolphin Energy to
assemble the skills, technologies and construction teams
essential to the success of our mission.
Above all, Dolphin Energy will support the development
of substantial, long-term new industries throughout the
region, creating wealth, economic growth and employment
opportunities for citizens far into the future.
186-187 Dolphin_L3.indd 3 2/6/09 2:23:53 AM
Chapter 12 Communication & Technology
188-189 Comm & Tech_L3.indd 2 2/6/09 2:26:37 AM
Communication & Technology
“The principal advantage of information technology is that it gives
users freedom to do what they want to do. I t allows for creativity.
I t lets them be productive. I t lets people learn things they didn’t think they
could learn before; ultimately it’s about actualising potential.”
Mohammad Hassan Omran, Chairman, Etisalat.
188-189 Comm & Tech_L3.indd 3 2/6/09 2:26:39 AM
Greening the community
Long established as the world’s leading electronics brand, it is only
fitting that Philips, that first began producing electric light bulbs
more than a century ago, should be flying the flag for energy-effi-
cient lighting technologies. Light emitting diodes (LEDs) have long
been used for a variety of visual displays. Now LED technology is
about to change the face of lighting across almost every segment,
including homes, offices, hospitality, roads and retail sectors.
C
o
m
m
u
n
i
c
a
t
i
o
n

&

T
e
c
h
n
o
l
o
g
y
Philips will be running workshops together with the Dubai government, Department of Tourism and Commerce Marketing in November 2008 to increase the awareness of energy consumption in hotels and supporting
them towards energy effcient solutions. In the same month the company is organising a ‘Green Week’ in Dubai to increase public awareness towards energy saving.
190-191 Philips_L3.indd 2 2/6/09 3:17:33 AM
191 Best of Abu Dhabi
I
ntended to replace incandescent and halogen lamps, we are still in the early
days for LED light bulb technology in terms of its performance. So too is the
price tag relatively high at present. However, the company believes that over the
next two to three years the positive benefts of LED lighting promise to be huge,
in terms of both its long lifetime and energy saving properties. Recent research
by Philips has shown potential energy savings of 40 per cent. In monetary
terms, this is a global saving of around US$64 billion. This equates to 555
million tones of CO2, 1,560 million barrels of oil per year or the annual output of
530 medium sized power stations.
“Commonly used products like incandescent light bulbs can easily be
replaced by energy saving lamps,” states DP Smedema, general manager for
Philips in the Middle East and North Africa. “This replacement will save 80 per
cent on energy consumption right away, which reduces CO2 by 41kg per year,
per lamp. It also lasts two to three times longer, which dramatically reduces
maintenance and saves time and money.”
Aside from the environmental and cost benefts is the adaptability of LED
technologies. Aeshetially, LED lighting can provide any desired colour and
create effects not possible with existing technologies. For road lighting,
with no need for flters (coloured fltered incandescent lamps can lose 90 per
cent of available light), the energy savings are signifcant. For industrial lighting,
the extra low voltages of LED lighting (typically 12 or 24 volt) is a major
safety advantage.
“Each segment asks for a different approach,” explains Smedema.
“Where road lighting mainly uses high pressure sodium lamps, offces ask
for fuorescent lighting solutions and fashion shops are moving from halogen
towards compact discharge lamps. What they all have in common is the
increasing need for energy effciency.”
Community awareness
Still, concedes Smedema, creating public awareness is crucial to the uptake
of such technologies within the region. “Because of limited knowledge and
awareness in the Middle East, it is diffcult to recognise and appreciate the
difference between one lamp and another,” he feels. “Logical behavior is
that people buy the cheapest lamp as long as it fts. Only after usage do
they experience that its lifetime is short, light output is fading fast or lamps
simply change colour. To make sure people buy the right product and prevent
disappointment, we are setting up training programs and workshops in hotels
and other segments. After the course, people are better prepared to make the
right decisions and recognise the difference between the initial cost of a lamp
and the value of lighting. After all the cheapest lamp is often the most expensive
lighting solution.”
Philips will be running workshops together with the Dubai government,
Department of Tourism and Commerce Marketing in November 2008 to
increase the awareness of energy consumption in hotels and supporting
them towards energy effcient solutions. In the same month the company is
organising a ‘Green Week’ in Dubai to increase public awareness towards
energy saving.
Walking the talk
On an equal scale is Philips’ own internal environmental pledge. As part of
its EcoVision4 environmental action plan - now running for its ffth year - is a
absolute reduction of its own operational carbon footprint of 25 per cent by
2012. This includes doubling its investment in green innovations by 2012 and
further increasing the energy effciency of its operations over the same period.
Another major target is to generate 30 percent of the company’s total
revenues from green products over the next fve years (up from 15 per in 2006),
“In the coming years Philips intends to grow in lighting in the Middle East,” offers
Smedema, referring not least to the region’s fastest growing industry - tourism.
“Building on current lighting contracts with some major hotel chains, we want
to grow with major players changing them into ‘green’ hotels and supplying
them with latest innovations using more LED technology. The UAE Government
is already making tremendous inroads into developing environmental initiatives
and technologies. It is our aim to continue to support the government to this
end and making the Middle East an eco model for other parts of the world.”
Tel: + 9714 309 5035
www.mea.philips.com
190-191 Philips_L3.indd 3 2/6/09 3:20:34 AM
Technological Synergies
Since 1989, Bond Communications has been delivering state of the art, innovative and integrated
IT Solutions covering the Middle East, Arabian Gulf and Levant regions. As system integrators and
solution providers, the group provides consultancy services, project design and management, turnkey
solutions as well as annual maintenance contracts. Bond Communications is dedicated to delivering
Total Integrated Solutions, utilizing the latest technology by providing excellent value – on time, every
time. Jason Abboud, its Marketing Manager, shares his insights on the group’s progress.
C
o
m
m
u
n
i
c
a
t
i
o
n

&

T
e
c
h
n
o
l
o
g
y
Bond Communications Group has been involved in providing state of the art services
and solutions to both private as well as public sectors in the following markets:
Bond is a technology integrator providing solutions from all the major manufacturers’
worldwide. As a contractor, we do not manufacture products. We aspire to the highest
level of excellence in our products and services.
QUALITY
We provide leading edge, high quality solutions to our clients, which
meet or exceed functional specifcations, delivered on time at a
competitive price.
CLIENTS
We locate and retain clients by ensuring that their objectives are satisfed
in all aspects. We develop new products and services and research
new market innovations that will enhance our clients’ experience
beneft and compliment their existing systems and help them better achieve
their goals.
PEOPLE
We develop and retain high quality, well-motivated, satisfed employees
with well-defned career paths and the ability for the individual to advance
through effective personnel management.
VALUE CREATION
We pursue a fair and attractive economic return to ensure the success of
the company and achieve long-term sustainable growth.
Sports Facilities and Stadiums
Hotels and Resorts
Smart Homes / Smart Communities
Commercial Buildings
Conference and Exhibition Centres
Shopping Malls
Broadcasting
Airports, Ports and Rail Ways
Financial Institutes and Banks
Governmental and Educational Institutes
Oil and Gas
192-193 Bond Comm_L3.indd 2 2/6/09 2:32:02 AM
193 Best of Abu Dhabi
What has been the growth of the company over the past 10 years
– could you provide some fgures please? In wider industry terms,
what has been the growth of the ELV market in the UAE and what
have been the main drivers of the growth?
Our growth in the last 10 years has been tremendous. Revenues in the
last 5 years alone have grown exponentially. The pattern seems to be in
line with the overall industry growth in the UAE driven by the increased
awareness of the advantages technology and automation bring to end
product. Most recent development are in the Green Building technology
and energy effcient strucutures.
What do you consider to be Bond Communications’ unique
competitive strengths?
Bond’s main strengths lie in the total in house solutions we provide to our
clients. We design, build, commission and maintain integrated solutions
to a degree not seen in the West much less in the Middle East and the
GCC countries. When we provide the full scope of our solutions, we
effectively replace nearly a dozen contractors, giving us control over
quality and project management and providing tremendous ease to the
project owners.
The UAE’s ecological footprint has been under much scrutiny
over the past few years. How are business attitudes changing
towards green issues for some of the newer property
developments in the UAE and what sort of cost benefts are
thay seeing as a result? Can you provide any examples?
From the beginning of 2008, all new buildings in Dubai have
to meet minimum ‘green’ specifcations. There is more and more
awareness of the need to be ecologically conscious and as usual,
Dubai is leading the way with the esablishment of new regulations
and with organisations such as the Emirates Green Building Council.
The long term benefts of building green, more energy effcient
strucutures are becoming more and more obvious to both the project
developers and to the ultimate end users fueling greater demand.
The benefts are not only fnancial, as in lower utility bills, but also,
the end results allow a more confortable, guilt-free living and
working space that is good for the environment and the people
occupying it.
What is Bond Communications’ contribution as a member of the
Emirates Green Building Council?
Bond will be an active participant in the promotion and awareness of the
green building council as well as support the council’s events for greater
public awareness, education, training and research.
Tel: +9712 633 3377
www.bondcommunications.com
We believe that taking calculated risks encourages growth and discovery. We push ourselves to the limit,
question boundaries, and continually advance.
Nicholas W. Mobayed, President and CEO, Bond Communications - Business at the exhibition
192-193 Bond Comm_L3.indd 3 2/6/09 2:32:11 AM
The ‘Best Of ’ Times
Launched in 2007, SAB Media has made significant progress in
developing both The Times and The Sunday Times across the re-
gion from its Dubai Media City base, thanks to a unique partnership
between it and Rupert Murdoch’s News International.
C
o
m
m
u
n
i
c
a
t
i
o
n

&

T
e
c
h
n
o
l
o
g
y
The Times has covered the region since its earliest days, reporting on many of the region’s signifcant founding events such as Sheikh Zayed’s birthday on 2nd December 1918
to the announcement of the UAE’s independence on 2nd December 1971.
194-195 SAB Media_L3.indd 2 2/6/09 3:39:08 AM
195 Best of Abu Dhabi
I
t was back in 1798 that The
Times made its frst appearance
in The Middle East when its
journalists reported on Napoleon’s
arrival in Egypt.
Since then, like the desert
sands, events and history have
ebbed and shifted dramatically,
during which time the newspaper,
along with its sister title The
Sunday Times, have grown to
become two of the most infuential
and respected newspapers in
the world.
Along the way, The Times has
maintained its presence in the
region reporting on some of its
most signifcant and memorable
events, with the UAE’s developing
history regularly fnding its way into
the newspapers’ columns.
Today, the newspaper has
an even greater link with the
Middle East, thanks to a unique
partnership between Saudi owned
company SAB Media and Rupert
Murdoch’s News International,
which sees the international edition
of both papers being printed daily
in the Middle East.
Launched in 2007, SAB Media
has already made signifcant
progress in developing both The
Times and The Sunday Times
across the region from its Dubai
Media City base.
Both papers are now available
in several GCC countries on the
morning of publication and SAB
Media is currently in the process
of expanding its regional print sites
across the rest of the Middle East
to provide its daily offering to an
even greater number of readers.
Simultaneously, a full-colour
product and a greater focus on
Middle East content through a
dedicated Middle East edition are
also being developed which will all
add up to produce a signifcantly
enhanced package for the papers’
many loyal Middle East readers.
Focusing on a diet of
international news, sport and a
second to none business section
- interspersed with regional
advertising from the ever-swelling
ranks of blossoming Middle
East businesses - the papers
currently enjoy a circulation of
just over 22,000.
This has been helped in no small
part by signifcant and targeted
marketing and subscription-
building exercises, such as having
the entire Times business desk
team out for the Leaders in Dubai
conference in 2007.
Available through retailers or
by subscription at home or at
work, The Times and The Sunday
Times contains an unparalleled
depth and breadth of coverage
that has become the newspaper’s
trademark over its 220-year history.
Long regarded as required reading
for political and business leaders,
The Times and The Sunday Times
combine objective news reporting
with hard-hitting political analysis,
lively commentary and incisive
business reporting.
“We are proud that we are
now available daily in a region
that is destined to play an ever
more infuential role in the world,”
explains James Harding, Editor of
The Times.
“Since 1798, when The Times
reported Napoleon’s arrival in
Egypt, we have invested heavily
in our reporting from the region
and we now have one of the
largest correspondent networks
in the Middle East. Expanding
our printing operations across
the region is another signifcant
moment in our history and we look
forward to providing intelligent,
informative and entertaining news,
comment and analysis for many
new readers in the region.”
John Witherow, Editor of The
Sunday Times added: “We are
delighted to have this opportunity
to extend the availability of
The Sunday Times across this
important region. We are proud
of our reputation for delivering
news and analysis to an intelligent
and thoughtful audience. There
are more than 3.5 million weekly
readers of the Sunday Times and
this fgure is only increasing further
through our partnership with SAB
Media in the Middle East.”
“One reason we’re excited to
have the licence to publish The
Times and The Sunday Times here
is its broad appeal,” said Sheikh
Salah Al Belawi, Chairman of the
SAB Media.
“The newspapers offer
advertisers a way to reach the
region’s political and business
elite, along with an educated
and engaged English-speaking
audience. From a branding
standpoint, The Times name
sells itself. There is not
another publication that can touch
it, in terms of recognition and
respect.”
SAB Media is a part of a
conglomerate of companies under
the umbrella of Saudi based SAB
Group Holding Co owned by
Sheikh Salah Al Belawi which cover
a wide area of sectors ranging from
construction to investments, real
estate and retail.
Please contact SAB Media for
The Times and The Sunday Times,
regionally and internationally.
Tel: +9714 364 2900
www.thetimesme.com
194-195 SAB Media_L3.indd 3 2/6/09 3:39:20 AM
Chapter 13 Get Up & Go
196-197 13-Get Up and Go_L3.indd 2 2/6/09 3:43:02 AM
Get Up & Go
“ Events at home, at work, in the street - these are the bases for a story.”
Naguib Mahfouz, Arab winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature
196-197 13-Get Up and Go_L3.indd 3 2/6/09 3:43:04 AM
The majority of the oil and
gas reserves is located in
the Emirate of Abu Dhabi,
which holds more than 95
percent of the UAE’s total
oil and gas reserves.
Approximately 98 percent
of private sector workers in
the UAE are non-UAE
nationals. Emiratization of
the UAE workforce remains a
national objective.
The standard workday is eight
hours per day; the standard
workweek is six days per week;
however, these standards are
not enforced strictly.
The business language is
English and Arabic
(Government Offces only
Arabic).
Abu Dhabi on the move
Well known and well regarded as the strategic, fnancial, commercial and
tourist hub of the Middle East, Abu Dhabi is a thriving business metropolis,
trend-setter and window on the world for the UAE and region overall.
G
e
t

U
p

&

G
o
198 Best of Abu Dhabi 199 Best of Abu Dhabi
Abu Dhabi 2008-2009

It is situated along the Arabian Gulf, between latitudes 22.5, 25 North, and longitudes 51, 55 East. It is the biggest of all seven emirates, with
an area of 87,340 sq. km., which is equivalent to 86.7 percent of the country total area., excluding the islands, the Emirate of Abu Dhabi is
composed of three major regions and more than 200 islands. The Abu Dhabi region, which includes the city of Abu Dhabi, the capital of UAE.
It is the seat for the president of the state, the cabinet, most of the ministries, the federal institutions, foreign embassies, broadcasting and
T.V. stations, Zayed Port, Abu Dhabi Airport, most of the oil companies, establishments and commercial markets. The Abu Dhabi corniche
with its public parks and fountains is a remarkable landscape of the city and many more projects are in the way especially Sadiyat Island, the
world cultural destinations. The eastern region, its capital is Al-Ain city. This region is very fertile, and rich in greenery, it is also where both on
–shore oilfelds and the biggest oil refnery in the country are located, with the latter being based at Al-Ruwais city along with many oil-related
(petrochemical and gas) industries. With its huge development and solid base of economic growth, Abu Dhabi is considered one of the fastest,
most advanced, and most developed cities in the world.
ABU DHABI 2008-2009
The Emirate of Abu Dhabi is the capital with estimated population of 2.3 million
and the United Arab Emirates population is estimated at 5.7 million for 2008.
Major ethnic groups living in the UAE include Arabs, Pakistanis, Indians, Iranians,
Afghans, Banglladeshis, and Filipino communities. The UAE population growth for
2008 is expected to grow by 7.1% to reach 6 million in 2009.
• Population
Population and Workers (000)
2008 2009
UAE Abu Dhabi UAE Abu Dhabi
Male Male
Male 3952 1693 4207 1807
Female 1764 614 1864 653
Total * 5716 2307 6071 2460
Workers 3202 1205 3430 1306
* Total include all people were available in the UAE
198
198-203 AD Open for Business Cor_L3.indd 2 2/9/09 4:57:29 PM
198 Best of Abu Dhabi 199 Best of Abu Dhabi
Abu Dhabi City
Capital of the United Arab Emirates
The United Arab Emirates is located in the middle of the Arabian Gulf,
north of the equator, between latitudes 22, 26.30, and longitudes 51,
56.30 East of Greenwich Mean Time (GMT). It is bordered from the
North by the Arabian Gulf, from the West by the State of Qatar and the
Kingdom of Saudia Arabia, from the South by the Sultanate of Oman
and the Kingdom of Saudia Arabia, and from the East by the Gulf of
Oman. The strategic geographical location of UAE to the East of the
Arab world is very important for the security and stability of this vital part
of the Arab world. The total Area of the country is 83600 sq.km. This
includes an archipelago with an area about 5,900 sq.km. Abu Dhabi oil
wealth has been wisely utilized to encourage a healthy trade, non-oil
industry, and commerce atmosphere. The promotion of tourism and
various tourism-related projects will elevate Abu Dhabi to a Singaporean
status in the region. Large gardens and parks, green boulevards lining
all the streets and roads, sophisticated high-rise buildings, state of
the art communication services and transport, the presence of all the
international luxury hotel chains, rich shopping malls, cultural centers – all
contribute to Abu Dhabi’s dynamism, vibration and splendor.
UAE Geographic Location
Language - The business language is English and Arabic (Government
Offces only Arabic).
Accommodation - Most major international hotel chains, including
Hilton, Sheraton, Intercontinental and many more of hotels and
hotel apartments.
Transportation - Taxis are common and unexpected luxury taxis
are available.
Housing: Housing rentals range from US$ 60,000to US$136,000
per annum, payable one year in advance. Apartments can be less
expensive- about US$ 22,000 (1 bedroom).
Health - Public health services in Abu Dhabi are adequate
Major hospitals have modern equipment. Most Western
expatriates use private medical facilities and carry private health
insurance cards also.
Working Hours - the regular working days for local government
Departments are Sunday to Thursday. From 8.00 am to 3.00 pm.
Commercial Offces from private sector 8.00am to 1.00pm and from
4.00pm to 8.00pm.
Religion - The offcial religion is Islam, with a reported 80-90%
of the total population (Including expatriates) being Muslims. Worship
of other religions is permitted.
Business Infrastructure
The UAE was established in 1971. It is a federation of seven
emirates. In accordance with the UAE consultation, the seven
emirates rules comprise a Federal Supreme Council, the highest
legislative and executive body. The Council selects a president and
vice-president from its membership, the president in turn, appoints the
prime Minister and the Cabinet. The Abu Dhabi Emirate ruler
HH Sheikh Khalifa Bin Zayed Al Nahyan has been confrmed by the
UAE Supreme Council as the president of the UAE since November,
2004. HH Sheikh Mohamed Bin Zayed has been appointed as
Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi. The Abu Dhabi Executive Council, which is
chaired by his Highness, is the driving-force for Abu Dhabi economic and
political development.
199
198-203 AD Open for Business Cor_L3.indd 3 2/9/09 4:57:30 PM
UAE Market-Place & Hub
• Market for more than 1.5 billion consumer
• Shopping centre of the Middle East
• Gateway to Asia, Africa & Europe
• State-of-the-art- infrastructure
• No trade barriers
• Diversifed economy (industry & services)
• Privatization
• Public / Private partnership (PPP)
• Pro-business attitude environment
• Support to SME’s
• Foreign Strategic partnership in petrochemical
and high tech projects
• Export – oriented industries
Investment Incentives
• Abu Dhabi GDP (real) growth of about 7.5%
• Future investment of more than Dhs. 1.9 Trillion in new project
• Economic diversifcation
• Development driven by local & foreign investment
• Liberalized trade
• Public / Private partnership
• Pro-business attitude
• Support for SME’s
• Political Stability
• Drafting of investment law in progress
• Full tax holiday on profts, business and free transfer of fnancial assets
with absent restrictions on capital movement
• Abu Dhabi Stock Exchange Market
• Advanced & well established Telecommunications & IT infrastructure
• Members of WTO & GCC
• Customs duties imposed on goods are 5% as of July 2008 (long list
of consumer goods, commodities & raw materials exempted), maybe
a 5% VAT Tax to be imposed by early 2008
• Agreement signed with different countries on both Avoidance of
Double taxation & Free Trade
• Most advanced air and seaports (Two Airports in Abu Dhabi & Al Ain),
Modern high-way network
• Transparency of economic information & regulations
• Free movement within UAE & GCC Countries
• Simplifed procedures for acquiring trade, industries or other licenses.
• Simplifed procedures for acquiring labor or visit visas
• A highly profcient banking sector with international fnancial services &
credit facilities
200 Best of Abu Dhabi 201 Best of Abu Dhabi
201
198-203 AD Open for Business Cor_L3.indd 5 2/9/09 4:57:47 PM
UAE Market-Place & Hub
• UAE Economic Variables :
(Value in Billion Dirhams)
Economic Variables 2007 * 2008 * 2009 ** 2008 – 2009 %
Population (000) 5338 5716 6071 6.2
Workers (000) 2971 3202 3430 7.1
Gross Domestic Product (At Constant 2005 Prices) 561.5 601.5 648.3 7.8
G.D.P. (Exc. Oil Sector) 362.7 390.8 426.0 9.0
Gross Fixed Capital Formation 123.7 143.1 177.0 23.7
Total Commodity Exports 535.2 645.5 790.0 22.4
Total Commodity Imports 522.7 640.0 778.0 21.6
Compensation of Employees 122.3 133.3 146.2 9.7
General Consumer Price Index Number (2005=100)% 125.4 138.3 152.5 10.2
Per Capita GDP (Constant Prices) (Th.Dhs) 107.5 107.7 106.8 - 0.1
Source : Information & Decision Support Centre – ADCCI
* Adj.
** ESt.
Abu Dhabi Economic Variables
Economic Variables 2007 * 2008 * 2009 ** 2008 – 2009 %
Population (000) 2145 2307 2460 6.6
Workers (000) 1116 1205 1306 8.8
Gross Domestic Product (At Constant 2005 Prices) 337.2 361.7 388.6 7.4
G.D.P. (Exc. Oil Sector) 148.6 160.4 175.0 9.1
Gross Fixed Capital Formation 59.7 68.9 85.8 24.5
Total Commodity Exports 276.9 318.3 400.0 25.7
Total Commodity Imports 63.3 75.0 89.3 19.0
Compensation of Employees 58.4 66.4 73.0 9.9
General Consumer Price Index Number (2005=100)% 125.9 139.3 154.0 10.6
Per Capita GDP (Constant Prices) (Th.Dhs): 165.7 165.5 158.0 - 0.4
Source : Information & Decision Support Centre – ADCCI
* Adj.
** ESt.
Expected Investment Until 2010 (Billion Dhs.)
S. Sector Billion Dirhams
1 Construction / Building 1.200
2 Tourism 0.290
3 Power and Water 0.075
4 Oil and Gas 0.120
5 Industrial 0.240
Total 1.915
GDP (Bn Dhs) (Constant Prices) GDP Non-Oil Secotr (Bn Dhs) (Constant Prices)
200 Best of Abu Dhabi 201 Best of Abu Dhabi
200
198-203 AD Open for Business Cor_L3.indd 4 2/9/09 4:57:34 PM
Gross domestic product by Economic sector
(Billion Dirhams / At Constant 2005 Prices)
SECTORS 2009 2008* 2007**
Abu Dhabi UAE Abu Dhabi UAE Abu Dhabi UAE
Agriculture, Live Stock and Fishing 5.9 9.3 6.1 9.6 6.2 9.7
Mining and Quarrying:
*Crude Oil 213.6 222.3 201.3 210.7 188.6 198.8
*Quarrying 0.3 1.2 0.2 1.0 0.1 0.9
Manufacturing Industries 45.4 75.8 41.9 70.2 38.2 65.3
Electricity, Gas and Water 6.4 11.3 5.9 10.5 5.4 9.7
Construction 17.0 41.4 15.2 38.3 13.8 34.9
Wholesale, Retail Trade and Repairing Services 13.4 62.4 12.5 56.7 11.7 53.2
Restaurants and Hotels 2.7 12.9 2.4 12.0 2.1 11.0
Transports, Storage and Communication 12.2 42.9 11.2 39.4 10.9 35.7
Real Estate and Business Services 17.5 52.1 15.3 45.0 13.7 41.0
Social and Personal Services 4.4 10.9 4.0 10.1 3.8 9.7
The Financial Corporation Sector 22.3 58.4 20.3 53.8 18.8 50.1
Government Services Sector 27.5 47.4 25.4 44.2 23.9 41.5
TOTAL 388.6 648.3 361.7 601.5 337.2 561.5
Total of Non Oil Sectors 175.0 426.0 160.4 390.8 148.6 362.7
Source: Information & Decision Support Centre – ADCCI
* Adj.
** Est.
Sector Contribution to GDP% 2009 (est.)
Abu Dhabi UAE
Oil Sector 65 44
Government & Public Sector 13 15
Private Sector 22 41
100.00% 100.00%
Sector Contribution in GDP %
Crude Oil 55.0 34.3
Manufacturing Industry 18.1 18.8
Construction & Real State 9.3 15.0
Trade, Hotels and Restaurants 4.5 12.2
Other Economic Sectors 13.1 14.6
100.00% 100.00%
Leading Sectors for Investment
• Architecture/Construction/Engineering
• BuildingProducts
• Aircraft&parts
• OilandGas-feldMachinery&services
• PollutionControlEquipment
• MedicalEquipmentandSupplies
• Computer/Peripherals
• SafetyandSecurityEquipment
• AirConditioning&RefrigerationRank
• SportingGoods/RecreationEquipment
Oil Sector Investment
The UAE will spend more than 80 bn. Dhs. In the coming 5
years. The UAE has nearly 97.8 billion barrels of proven oil
reserves, about 9.8 percent of total proven world oil reserves,
and 6073 bn. cubic meters of proven natural gas reserves,
approximately 4.6 percent of total world proven natural gas
reserves. The majority of the oil and gas reserves is located in
the Emirate of Abu Dhabi, which holds more than 95 percent of
the UAE’s total oil and gas reserves. The UAE’s oil production
capacity is currently 2.9 million barrels per day (mb/d) and the
Abu Dhabi National Oil Company (ADNOC) plans to expand its
productioncapacityto4mb/dby2009-2010throughinvesting
morethan18bn.Dhs.Thecrude-oilsectorcontriutiontoGDP
amounts to 201 bn.Dhs. in 2008 and increased to 214 in 2009
withanaverageincreaseofabout7percent.Grossfxedcapital
formation in 2008 reached 11.3 bn. Dhs. and rose in 2009 to
13.8 bn. Dhs. (constant prices).
202 Best of Abu Dhabi
202
198-203 AD Open for Business Cor_L3.indd 6 2/12/09 12:48:39 AM
Gross domestic product by Economic sector
(Billion Dirhams / At Constant 2005 Prices)
SECTORS 2009 2008* 2007**
Abu Dhabi UAE Abu Dhabi UAE Abu Dhabi UAE
Agriculture, Live Stock and Fishing 5.9 9.3 6.1 9.6 6.2 9.7
Mining and Quarrying:
*Crude Oil 213.6 222.3 201.3 210.7 188.6 198.8
*Quarrying 0.3 1.2 0.2 1.0 0.1 0.9
Manufacturing Industries 45.4 75.8 41.9 70.2 38.2 65.3
Electricity, Gas and Water 6.4 11.3 5.9 10.5 5.4 9.7
Construction 17.0 41.4 15.2 38.3 13.8 34.9
Wholesale, Retail Trade and Repairing Services 13.4 62.4 12.5 56.7 11.7 53.2
Restaurants and Hotels 2.7 12.9 2.4 12.0 2.1 11.0
Transports, Storage and Communication 12.2 42.9 11.2 39.4 10.9 35.7
Real Estate and Business Services 17.5 52.1 15.3 45.0 13.7 41.0
Social and Personal Services 4.4 10.9 4.0 10.1 3.8 9.7
The Financial Corporation Sector 22.3 58.4 20.3 53.8 18.8 50.1
Government Services Sector 27.5 47.4 25.4 44.2 23.9 41.5
TOTAL 388.6 648.3 361.7 601.5 337.2 561.5
Total of Non Oil Sectors 175.0 426.0 160.4 390.8 148.6 362.7
Source: Information & Decision Support Centre – ADCCI
* Adj.
** Est.
Labor & Employment Issues
Approximately 98 percent of private sector workers in the UAE are non-
UAE nationals. Emiratization of the UAE workforce remains a national
objective, although mandated hiring of nationals has been limited to
only a few sectors, such as banking, which has a four percent quota,
insurance, which has a fve percent quota and trade, which has a two
percent quota for companies employing 50 workers or more as well as
quotas in the federal government. In addition, in 2006, the UAEG also
added Emiratization requirements that all secretaries and Public Relations
Offcers must also be Emirati. The Right to Organize and Bargain
Collectively. The law does not specifcally grant – but does not prohibit –
workers the right to engage in collective bargaining.
It does, however, expressly authorize collective work dispute
resolution. Ministerial resolution No. 307 of 2003 stipulates, ‘The
masters and the workers have to solve their collective disputes
through the direct negotiation, medium, reconciliation and then
arbitration according to the procedures mentioned in this resolution’
There were a number of organized gatherings of workers that
complained of unpaid wages before the Ministry of Labor in 2006.
Professional associations may raise work-related concerns, to
lobby the UAEG for redress, or to fle a grievance with the
Government. For the resolution of work-related disputes, workers
rely on conciliation committees organized by the Ministry of Labor
or on special labor courts.
The UAE Government has committed itself to strictly regulating
and enforcing labor laws,
as witnessed by a recent
series of legislation and
proposals. In June 2004, the
UAE’s Cabinet of Ministers
approved a memo calling for
the establishment of labor
unions and associations in
the UAE. Since that time,
the UAEG has said that it is
revising its labor law to allow
for the creation of either a
labor association or a labor
union and to ensure laborers’
rights to organize and
bargain collectively.
The exact role unions will
play and membership conditions remain unclear. However, under the
proposed law, trade association or union membership could be limited
to UAE citizens, while expatriate workers would be represented through
special committees. Businesses in free trade zones must comply with
federal labor laws; however, the Ministry of Labor does not regulate them.
Instead, each free trade zone maintains its own labor department to
address workers’ concerns.
Acceptable Conditions of Work
The standard workday is eight hours per day; the standard workweek
is six days per week; however, these standards are not enforced
strictly. The law also provides for a minimum of 24 days per year of
annual leave plus 10 national and religious holidays. There is no
legislated or administrative minimum wage; rather, supply and demand
determine compensation.
Compensation packages generally provide housing or housing
allowances. In addition, other benefts, such as homeward passage or
health cards for minimal to no-cost health care, are often provided to
employees by their employers. The Labor Ministry reviews labor contracts
and does not approve any contract that stipulates a clearly unacceptable
wage. The Ministry of Health and Ministry of Labor, municipalities, and
civil defense enforce health and safety standards, and the Government
requires every large industrial concern to employ a certifed occupational
safety offcer.
Establish and Doing Business
Regulation of the establishment and conduct of business in the UAE is
shared at the federal and emirate levels.
There are four major laws affecting foreign investment in the UAE:
• Federal Companies Law
• Commercial Agencies Law
• Federal Industry Law
• Government Tenders Law
These laws, especially the Federal Companies Law, are being revised
to overcome obstacles to foreign direct investment in the UAE.
The Federal Companies Law applies to all commercial companies
established in the UAE and to branch offces of foreign companies
operating in the UAE. Companies established in the UAE are required to
have a minimum of 51 percent UAE national ownership. However, profts
may be apportioned differently. Branch offces of foreign companies
are required to have a national agent unless the foreign company has
established its offce pursuant to an agreement with the federal or an
emirate government. All general partnership interest must be owned by
UAE nationals. Foreign shareholders may hold up to a 49 percent interest
in limited liability companies.
The Commercial Agencies Law On June 18, 2006, the UAE
announced substantial changes to the Commercial Agencies Law.
These amendments include: 1) requiring mutual consent to renew an
agency agreement, 2) limiting an
agency contract to a fxed time
period, 3) allowing either party to
fle for damages, 4) eliminating
the Ministry of Economy’s
Commercial Agencies
Commission (which handles
agency disputes), and 5)
allowing the import of ‘liberalized
goods’ without
the agents approval.
The Agencies Law requires
that foreign principals distribute
their products in the UAE only
through exclusive commercial
agents that are either UAE
nationals or companies wholly
owned by UAE nationals. The foreign principal can appoint one agent for
the entire UAE or for a particular emirate or group of emirates.
The Federal Industry Law stipulates that industrial projects must
have 51 percent UAE national ownership. The law also requires that
projects either be managed by a UAE national or have a board of
directors with a majority of UAE nationals. Exemptions from the law
are provided for projects related to extraction and refning of oil, natural
gas, and other raw materials. Additionally, projects with a small capital
investment or special projects governed by special laws or agreements
are exempt from the industry law. In Abu Dhabi ZonesCorp is in charge
for the development of the Industrial sector. The three industrial cities
of Abu Dhabi, ICAD-1,ICAD-11 and ICAD -111, are expected to attract
investment exceeding Dhs 30 bn by 2009 . total investment in ICAD-
1,ICAD-11 have exceeded Dhs 20 bn. ZonesCorp was established with
Dhs 1 Bill with a 10 years closed end fund to build infrastructure projects
to attract industrial investment.
The Tenders Law stipulates that a supplier or contractor, with
respect to federal projects must either be a UAE national or a company
in which UAE nationals own at least 51 percent of the share capital
or foreign entities represented by a UAE distributor or agent. Foreign
companies wishing to bid for a federal project must, therefore, enter
into a joint venture or agency arrangement with a UAE national or
company. Federal tenders must accompany a bid bond in the form
of an unconditional bank bond guarantee for fve percent of the value
of the bid.
203 Best of Abu Dhabi
203
198-203 AD Open for Business Cor_L3.indd 7 2/9/09 4:57:52 PM
204 Best of Abu Dhabi
Best of Abu Dhabi Vol. 2 Dist ribut ion Part ners

In addition to being distributed via the Abu Dhabi Chamber of Commerce and Mubadala,
this edition is circulated to the senior management of top companies in GVP’s global publishing
network, and through hand-to-hand corporate gifting by GVP’s editorial participants to their
principal clients. Ensuring a valued cross-section of business readers, editions are
also for sale in all Magrudy’s bookstores in the UAE, on Amazon.com, Gvpedia.com as well as
via direct sales from GVP offces worldwide.

Leading hotels, resorts and airport lounges showcase this edition, which has been regarded by
inbound travellers as a focal point from which to network for business relationships or acquire
products and services. Selected high net worth individuals including those with assets over
AED 5 million, as well as company directors and foreign investors via the GVP internal
distribution database, are also covered.
Government decision makers, including senior management at development
agencies, chambers of commerce, regional institutions and commerce associations
receive copies of ‘Best of Abu Dhabi’.

EmiratEs PalacE
Emirates Palace Hotel
P. O. Box 39999, Abu Dhabi, UAE
Tel: +971 2 6909000
Fax: +971 2 6909999
www.emiratespalace.com
BEach rotana
Beach Rotana Abu Dhabi
Tourist Club Area
P.O.Box 45200, Abu Dhabi,UAE
Tel: (971) 2 6979000
Fax:(971) 2 6442111
www.rotana.com/property-4.htm
intErcontinEntal hotEl
Bainouna Street, Abu Dhabi
4171, UAE
Tel: +971 2 6666888
Fax: +971 2 6669153
www.intercontinental.com
lE royal mEridiEn aBu dhaBi
Sheikh Khalifa Street
P.O. Box 45505, Abu Dhabi, UAE
Tel: +971 2 6742020
www.starwoodhotels.com/
lemeridien/index.html
middlE East association
Patron, HRH The Duke of York, UK
Special Representative for
International Trade and Investment
www.the-mea.co.uk
tourism dEvEloPmEnt &
invEstmEnt comPany (tdic)
www.tdic.ae
204 - 205 Distribution Page_L3.indd 2 2/7/09 1:48:55 PM
204 - 205 Distribution Page Cor_L3.indd 3 2/9/09 4:59:09 PM
206-207_Abu Dhabi Picture_L3.indd 2 2/7/09 3:04:16 PM
206-207_Abu Dhabi Picture_L3.indd 3 2/7/09 3:04:25 PM
G V P e d i a . c o m
208_Website Page_L3.indd 1 2/7/09 2:58:57 PM
Sponsor ed by
DOC_New_15-02-2009_L3.indd 1 2/17/09 3:47:54 PM

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful