...

WITHOUT WHOM THIS ISSUE WOULD NOT HAVE BEEN POSSIBLE
FOURTH OF JULY 2013

dr. paul and diana frank
Featured as this issue’s “East End Influencers,” (page 210), Dr. Paul Frank is founder and director of the Fifth Avenue Dermatology Surgery and Laser Center on Manhattan’s Upper East Side, and Diana Frank is a former model and a New York– and Hamptons–based photographer.
Paul, what’s your go-to Hamptons style?

I keep it extremely simple: light or dark jeans, depending on the time of day, and a fitted V-neck T-shirt. At night I’ll add an edgy sports jacket. Diana, where’s your favorite place to shop? I love Claudja at Lazypoint in Amagansett, 25 Park in Bridgehampton, and John Varvatos in East Hampton. When I am not wearing my feminine flowy dresses, I love wearing menswear—tailored to fit me.

bryn kenny
East End native Kenny has been a writer-editor for Women’s Wear Daily and W magazine and now works as an independent consultant. She contributed this issue’s “Hip Hoteliers” feature (page 258).
Which struck you most when writing this piece? Hotels are still a new phenom-

enon on the East End, and I’m looking forward to seeing (and experiencing) what these hoteliers have up their sleeves for the future.
Why is it significant to contribute to Hamptons’ 35th anniversary season?

jamee gregory
Gregory has worked at Viking Press, Mademoiselle, and Town & Country and is author of two Rizzoli books, New York Apartments: Private Views and New York Parties: Private Views . She lives with her husband, Peter, in Southampton, and for this issue, she wrote “Garden Club” about philanthropist Jeff Pfeifle’s lush East End oasis on page 326.
Why do you love gardening? I fell in

I grew up here; I went to Westhampton High. I’ve been reading the magazine since I was a teen, so writing for Hamptons is a full-circle, pinching-myself moment.

matthew wexler
Wexler has written about everything from barbecue to bed-and-breakfasts for publications including Hemispheres, Passport , Rendez-Vous en France, and Private Islands. He is writing a food memoir based on his experience as a private chef at a retreat center, and he penned this issue’s “Taste” article on Ruschmeyer’s (page 172).
What is your favorite Hamptons restaurant?

love with it when I had my first garden in Belgravia. I took classes at the Royal Horticulture Society’s school and visited every glorious English garden. Nurturing plants, mixing textures and colors, and creating a living tapestry give me great pleasure. Every season is a challenge and a surprise. Describe what interested you about Jeff Pfeifle’s garden. Jeff Pfeifle’s garden appealed to me because he uses few plants in a bold way. It is very classical and yet modern. I am also jealous of his apple orchard!

The Holy Grail of comfort food: John’s Drive-In for a Big John’s burger and handpacked ice cream. What do you love about Ruschmeyer’s? As a huge fan of the mini bar, I love that Ruschmeyer’s stocks theirs with regionally made products, including Hudson Baby Bourbon, which makes for the perfect nightcap—or splash in morning coffee when on vacation.

66

HAMPTONS-MAGAZINE.COM

PHOTOGRAPHY BY CLINT SPAULDING/PATRICKMCMULLAN.COM (GREGORY); CARLY CARYN (WEXLER)

THIS WEEK: LOCALLY GROWN

CE

LE

B R AT I
N

fresh catch
RUSCHMEYER’S REELS IN A NEW TEAM TO REINVENT ITS RESTAURANT SCENE IN THE SPIRIT OF SUMMER CAMP FOR GROWN UPS.
BY MATTHEW WEXLER PHOTOGRAPHY BY ERIC STRIFFLER

G

“L

et’s go to Montauk and eat by a pond.” This may not be the first idea that pops into people’s minds when traveling eastbound on Route 27, as the concrete madness of city life gives way to the Atlantic’s salty breezes that beckon lobster rolls and boogie boards. But Creative Director, designer, artist, hotelier, surfer, and DJ (yes, he has earned all of those titles) Robert McKinley has something else in mind. Ruschmeyer’s, a summer-camp-inspired getaway for those young at heart, doesn’t need oceanfront views—it’s making waves all on its own. Built on three acres of woodland adjacent to Fort Pond, Ruschmeyer’s has been a Montauk fixture since it was originally built as a summer camp

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT:

The relaxed, summer-camp inspired interiors of Ruschmeyer’s; Montauk lobster salad from the restaurant; Executive Chef Brian Loiacono, who is in his first summer at the eatery, Matt Kliegman, and Creative Director Robert McKinley.

in 1952. However, don’t expect mess-hall food from the restaurant, which underwent mixing it up after two years under the culinary guidance of chef Ben Towill and Phil Winser (of Manhattan’s The Fat Radish). New on the scene are restaurateurs and tastemakers Matt Kliegman and Carlos continued on page 174

172

HAMPTONS-MAGAZINE.COM

TASTE

DRINK IN SUMMER
Ruschmeyer’s new cocktail menu features top-shelf spirits and house-made mixers. The namesake cocktail, Ruschmeyer’s (SHOWN BELOW), bites with a combination of vodka, chili-watermelon juice, and agave, while the Magic Garden (named for the grounds behind the restaurant) is an easy-to-drink elixir of botanical Hendrick’s gin, Lillet, basil, rhubarb simple syrup, and celery bitters. Try a pitcher of both to complement the entrées.

ABOVE:

The whimsical theme of the restaurant is based on a character imagined by Robert McKinley. LEFT: Block Island swordfish with cucumber couscous.

“Bingo night, barbecues, s’mores kits… it’s not all about glitz and glamour.”
ROBERT MCKINLEY

continued from page 172 Quirarte of The Smile, one of New York City’s trendiest dining and nightlife spots at the epicenter of cool in Noho. They hope to bring their own spin to the venue, riffing off of an established (if somewhat high-spirited) clientele, and refocus the property’s energy toward a well-curated menu and range of activities. McKinley says, “The idea is to create a nautical summer camp for adults, really fostering that spirit—bingo night, barbecues out front, s’mores kits, croquet, and volleyball—making it a fun back-to-basics kind of experience where it’s not all about glitz and glamour.” The environment that McKinley refers to was inspired by a whimsical narrative he created to inform Ruschmeyer’s visual identity as well as its culinary viewpoint. The designer’s wild

imagination invented the character of Captain Commodore Ruschmeyer III, born from a long line of seafarers. “This imaginary blue-blood seafarer explored the globe via a ship and learned about different cultures and aesthetics, giving me license to do different things,” says McKinley. The result of this creative expression is an airy dining space accented with naval postcard orange, knotty pine, and black and white gingham check. A four-part original mural adorns one wall, evoking a muted nautical theme, while midcentury Japanese lanterns dangle above. When the sun sets, the paper orbs reflect in the massive windows like endless moons rising against the backdrop of the Sand Bar and pond. While the space may be a fantastical inspiration from McKinley’s mind, Ruschmeyer’s menu is grounded in local ingredients with sunkissed accents from the Mediterranean, thanks to newly appointed Summer 2013 Executive Chef Brian Loiacono. With a bright smile and youthful physique more befitting a beachcomber than someone spending his days (and nights) in the kitchen, the Brooklyn native has arrived continued on page 176

174

HAMPTONS-MAGAZINE.COM

TASTE
S’mores in a jar is a decadent take on the camp-fire favorite. BELOW: People’s Bootcamp is led on Ruschmeyer’s lawn every Saturday morning by Adam Rosante.
LEFT:

SITE SPECIFIC
“It’s like a big family. We like to include our friends in everything we do [here].”
CARLOS QUIRARTE
continued from page 174 with more culinary gravitas than one might expect. Loiacono was a sous chef at both Bar Boulud as well as the threeMichelin-star-holder Daniel, and was quickly recruited by The Smile team only days after his return from Giancarlo Perbellini’s Ristorante Perbellini in Verona, Italy. Hunkered down in a room with The Smile’s Executive Chef Melia Marden to quickly create the launch menu, Kliegman says the chefs’ synergy was like a musical collaboration. The menu speaks to local ingredients and is executed with a precise attention to detail. To capture authentic East End flavors, Loiacono purchased a well-worn 1989 Mercedes station wagon and started making the rounds to local farmers and purveyors. After a lot of handshaking and walks through the fields, his culinary brainstorming has begun to take shape on the plate. Simple dishes like minted sugar snap peas and steamed mussels with white wine and fresh herbs embody the Ruschmeyer’s philosophy. Loiacono takes advantage of the woodburning pizza oven with variations that include white clams, chili, parsley, and mascarpone, as well as a traditional margherita pizza with burrata (a fresh Italian cheese made Christy Turlington from mozzarella and cream) and local basil. Burns is a fan of By supporting the Hamptons fishing the laid-back vibe at Ruschmeyer’s. industry, Kliegman says the team is able
The summer camp vibe at Ruschmeyer’s wouldn’t be complete without the requisite line-up of activities. Robert McKinley has drawn upon his eclectic network of friends and colleagues on the East End and in NYC to assemble a weekly calendar that trades macramé and candle making for a more contemporary take on summer fun. • Reggae Sundays: Rock steady at The Sand Bar for a Jamaican-inspired groovy early evening. • A Night of Comedy with Seth Herzog (schedule varies): Known from performing on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon, Herzog brings his quirky humor to Montauk. • Bingo Thursdays: Not your average three-card play. Tiebreakers are determined by a spontaneous dance-off competition led by MC Zach Bliss. • The People’s Bootcamp (Saturday mornings): Take part in Adam Rosante’s signature workout so you’ll feel less guilty about that second round of s’mores in a jar. • Love, Adorned: Summer Session: Retail therapy pops up with an East End outpost of Lori Leven’s internationally inspired array of goods ranging from jewelry and accessories to one-of-a-kind utility items.
PHOTOGRAPHY BY YOO JEAN HANZ (BOOTCAMP); GILBERT CARRASQUILLO/GETTY IMAGES (TURLINGTON BURNS)

to create an “authentically Montauk” experience. Entrées will evolve throughout the summer as the season changes—but diners can only hope that Ruschmeyer’s lobster roll with South Fork greens remains on the menu. Succulent lobster meat is gently tossed with a housemade mayonnaise spiked with lemon zest and celery leaves, and piled continued on page 178

176

HAMPTONS-MAGAZINE.COM

TASTE

continued from page 176 high on a buttery potato roll. Other standouts include grilled Block Island swordfish, served with cucumber couscous and goliath day boat scallops seared to golden perfection and accompanied by whole-wheat penne pasta and spring peas. After dinner, revelry continues in the Electric Eel, a cocktail lounge that retains its 1950s nomenclature. Decked out in canvas, army duck fabric, and ship blueprints, McKinley also has incorporated vintage pieces and photographs from friends. The Sand Bar beckons those who want to enjoy the cool night air (along with table tennis and a roaring fire pit). As the summer wears on, activities like afternoon reggae and nightlife events will weave into the Ruschmeyer’s aesthetic, along with special guest appearances and pop-up shops. “It’s like a big family,” says Quirarte. “We like to include our friends in everything we do.” 161 Second House Road, Montauk, 668-2877; kingandgrove.com/montauk-hotels/ruschmeyers H

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP:

Lucy’s Whey and Round Swamp Farm are at the top of Marc Murphy’s favorites for local fare.

to market
RESTAURATEUR AND CHEF MARC MURPHY REVEALS HIS LIST OF THE EAST END’S BEST FARMSTANDS AND FRESH FARE.

Lucy’s Whey
Lucy’s has an amazing selection of American artisan and farm cheeses. Some of my favorites are the Spring Brook Farm Tarentaise and Bonne Bouche, which are delicious and pair perfectly with a bottle of Wölffer rosé. 80 N. Main St., East Hampton, 324-4428; lucyswhey.com

produce. I love the zucchini and summer squash. 82 Sagg Main St., Sagaponack, pikefarms.com

Round Swamp Farm
Nothing says summer like corn on the cob and heirloom tomatoes—and they have the best of both here. Everything is harvested in the field and then brought to the store. You can really tell how fresh the produce is—and it’s been a must-have in my house for years. 184 Three Mile Harbor Road, East Hampton, 324-4438; roundswampfarm.com

North Sea Farms
A neighborhood staple, North Sea Farms has a little bit of everything. I love getting the fresh free-range eggs and free-range chicken. In the fall they also have free-range turkeys that are perfect for Thanksgiving. 1060 Noyack Road, Southampton, 283-0735

Sag Harbor Baking Company
As soon as you walk in, you are filled with the aroma of freshly baked goods. I love that its selections change daily and with the seasons. The homemade granola is fantastic, and the baguettes and boules are continued on page 180

Pike Farms
ABOVE:

The white clam pizza is made with mascarpone and perfectly crisped in a wood-burning stove.

With nicely cut flowers and a variety of berries and cherries, Pike also has gorgeous

178

HAMPTONS-MAGAZINE.COM

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MICHAEL HARLAN TURKELL (LUCY’S WHEY)