Log in / create account   

article   discussion   edit this page   history    

Waves (novel) 
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

navigation Main page Contents Featured content Current events Random article search   Go interaction About Wikipedia   Community portal   Recent changes   Contact Wikipedia   Donate to Wikipedia   Help   toolbox What links here   Related changes   Upload file   Special pages    Printable version   Permanent link  Cite this page      Search                 

This article may not meet the notability guideline for books. Please help to establish notability by  adding reliable, secondary sources about the topic. If notability cannot be established, the article is  likely to be merged or deleted.  (May 2009 ) For the German novel by Eduard von Keyserling see Wellen (novel).  Waves (also known as Waves ­ The Trilogy) is a three­part novel by Ogan Gurel published in 2009. [1] A  21st century version of Faust, the novel explores good and evil in both individual and global settings  focusing around a hypothetical (though reality­based) technology that has both medical and military  applications. The protagonist, Tomas Twarok, is a contemplative and idealistic doctor­turned­entrepreneur  who strikes a deal with his college friend, Maximilian Iblis, a ruthless hedge fund manager.  The novel is constructed around three interleaved frame­narratives. The Melody, a reality­based sci­fi thriller  that goes forward in time. The Harmony, which passes backward in time is a psychological drama  (Bildungsroman) focusing primarily around the protagonist. The Rhythm, a scientific dialogue, which takes  place over twelve hours in a single day. Music as metaphor plays an important unifying theme throughout  the book.
Contents  1 Background   2 Plot Summary   3 Major Characters in Waves  3.1 Melody   3.2 Harmony   3.3 Rhythm   3.4 Other   4 Major Themes   5 Allusions and references to other works   6 Musical references   7 Scientific Concepts Discussed   8 References  8.1 Notes   9 Book information   10 External links  

Waves  
Author Illustrator Ogan Gurel 102 illustrations,  majority drawn by  author Country Language Genre(s) United States English Novel

Publication date February 5, 2009 Media type e­book

Background 

[edit]

Waves is primarily a work of fiction in which several principal characters (and nations) grapple in competition as well as in parallel over the  development and application of a new technology that utilizes terahertz radiation to detect and manipulate the function of individual proteins,  specifically their motions (or molecular dynamics). Waves is also a scientific treatise (in the form of literature) that outlines some of the background  and implications of this technology which, in turn, creates a literary device by which the reader realizes that all that transpires in the plot may not  necessarily be fantasy. Tomas Twarok, the protagonist, calls this technology the 'Novum Organum'; the reference to Francis Bacon's work of the  same name is not accidental. The Singaporeans (who develop the technology in parallel) call it EastStar.

Plot Summary 
The plot is complex. What begins as a deal struck between the two main characters, Tomas Twarok and Maximilian Iblis, spins out of control.  Parallel developments occur in Colombia, Singapore, Iran, and Malaysia, all requiring a response by the American President complicated by a  concurrent (and deepening) financial crisis. 

[edit]

Major Characters in Waves 
Over 100 characters appear in the book. Major characters are listed below as they appear in the Melody, Harmony, and Rhythm sections.

[edit]

Melody 
Tomas Twarok 

[edit]

A doctor­turned­entrepreneur thwarted in several attempts to bring his technology (Novum Organum) to fruition makes a deal with a college friend  of his, Maximilian Iblis, now a leading hedge­fund manager. Contemplative and idealistic he tries to guide the application of his idea towards  medical aims but learns that the world has other plans. His character is modeled after Goethe's Faust and Bulgakov's 'Master' in The Master and  Margarita. Tomas is American with some mixed Hungarian and Polish ancestry. In terms of the meaning of the name 'Twarok', the Polish folklore  character Pan Twardowski presents some similarities to Faust. Twaróg refers to a special type of Central European cheese, also known as  Quark cheese which can be used for both sweet and sour applications, reflecting the concept that good and evil are resident within all.   Maximilian Iblis  A Harvard educated German hedge­fund manager, whose initial fortune was earned through dubious circumstances. He is portrayed as being  foul­mouthed and ruthless; yet he is also practical and, at times, even warm. Iblīs (Arabic  ), is the name of the primary devil (Shaitan or  Satan) in Islam.   Abdul  One of Maximilian Iblis' bodyguards. He is modeled on the character of Billy Budd in Hermann Melville's novel of the same name. Though he is  killed in Chapter 1, his influence persists throughout the story.  Nina  Tomas's wife. Her character is akin to 'Gretchen' in Faust and 'Margarita' in Bulgakov's The Master and Margarita. She is both philosophical and  practical; supportive of Tomas's dreams, she also guides him away from this obsession. 

Satan) in Islam.   Abdul  One of Maximilian Iblis' bodyguards. He is modeled on the character of Billy Budd in Hermann Melville's novel of the same name. Though he is  killed in Chapter 1, his influence persists throughout the story.  Nina  Tomas's wife. Her character is akin to 'Gretchen' in Faust and 'Margarita' in Bulgakov's The Master and Margarita. She is both philosophical and  practical; supportive of Tomas's dreams, she also guides him away from this obsession.  Julien  The family cat who makes an appearance in nearly every chapter of the Melody. He is analogous (in the opposite sense) to the cat character,  Behemot, in Bulgakov's The Master and Margarita.   Olga  Step­daughter of Tomas (daughter of Nina). She personifies adolescent angst.   Ceferino Diago  Colombian drug lord who launders his group's money through Maximilian Iblis' hedge fund.   Nigel, Jax, and Adhi  Maximilian Iblis' bodyguards. Adhi tries to steal the technology though his efforts are eventually thwarted.  Kashif Mahboubi  Newly installed Prime Minister of Singapore.   Yinglan Yousuf  A deputy researcher in the Singaporean Ministry of Defence who develops a parallel version of the technology (called EastStar) for military  purposes.  Eleanor Shanmugam  Defence Minister for Singapore.   Elijah Mason  Fictional U.S. President who survives an assassination attempt and grapples with widespread financial disaster and mysterious terror attacks.   William Madison  CIA Director.   Helga Iblis  Maximilian Iblis' mother, suffering from advanced Alzheimer's disease. Her mind is mentally stuck in the world of Nazi Germany and Tomas, in  an effort to demonstrate the medical applications of his 'Novum Organum', hopes to cure her.  Jenna Mason  Wife of President Elijah Mason. Her character is modeled on Lady Macbeth from Shakespeare's Macbeth.  

Harmony 
Tomas Twarok  see above.  Nina  see above.  Martin Boucher  Ioannis Kostakis  Ava  Ramzi  Prof. Roger Williams  Marjorie Nelson  Dr. Narius Maxwell  Dr. Mohseni  Prof. William Henderson  Thiang Johnson  Kimberly Lügstein  Jacob Irgang 

[edit]

Rhythm 

[edit]

With Tomas as tutor, twelve students figure among each of the twelve dialogues. He develops a relationship with one of them (Nora); three others  (Carter, Jason, and Yinglan) make appearances (under separate circumstances) in the Melody portion of the novel.

Other 

[edit]

The influence of other historical characters are present throughout Waves. These include John F. Kennedy, Beethoven, Niels Bohr, Antoine de Saint  Exupéry, and René Descartes. 

Major Themes 
Science and Art   The rational vs. the imaginative world (dreams & reality)   Existence of God   Good and Evil   Free will or Fate   The free­market (equilibrium or non­equilibrium)   The Platonic psyche (logos, thumos, and eros) and its antipodes   Idealism vs. realism   Proteins vs. DNA (which are more important)   What is normal; what is disease?   Debt bondage   Happiness and depression   Courage and love   Teleology vs. deontology   East vs. West   How could Nazism arise?   Genocide  

[edit]

Debt bondage   Happiness and depression   Courage and love   Teleology vs. deontology   East vs. West   How could Nazism arise?   Genocide   Iron triangles   The consequences of political corruption   The underpinnings of economic strength  Nuclear war   The individual and society (individual goals vs. collective goals)   Virtue and necessity   Epistemology   The Doctor­Patient Relationship  

Allusions and references to other works 
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe's Faust and Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship   Mikhail Bulgakov's The Master and Margarita   Antoine de Saint Exupéry's book The Little Prince   Hermann Melville's novella Billy Budd   Hippocrates Aphorisms   The movie Untraceable   Friedrich Nietzsche's work God is Dead   Galileo's works The Starry Messenger and Il Saggiatore   Molière's comic play Tartuffe   Shakespeare's plays King Lear, Hamlet, Richard II, As You Like It, Julius Caesar, and Macbeth   George Orwell's novella Animal Farm   The movie Apocalypse Now   Norman Mailer, Miami and the Siege of Chicago (1968)   René Descartes' Discourse on the Method   Stanley Kubrick's film Full Metal Jacket   Plato's dialogues Phaedrus and The Symposium   T.S. Eliot's The Wasteland   Ludwig Wittgenstein's Tractatus Logico­Philosophicus   Aeschylus' Prometheus Bound   The movie Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb   J. Robert Oppenheimer (various works)   Aldous Huxley's novel Brave New World   Arthur Miller's play Death of a Salesman   Dante Alighieri's Divine Comedy   Jean­Paul Sartre's Being and Nothingness   Miguel Cervantes' Don Quixote   W.H. Auden's poem Funeral Blues   Jonathan Swift's novel Gulliver's Travels   John Stuart Mill's book Utilitarianism   Sinclair Lewis's novels Arrowsmith and Babbitt   Edgar Allan Poe's poem The Raven   Virgil's epic poem The Aeneid   Lao Tzu's Tao Te Ching   Immanuel Kant's Groundwork of the Metaphysic of Morals   The Parable of the Six Blind Men and the Elephant   Marcus Aurelius' Meditations   Charles Schulz' Charlie Brown, Snoopy and Me   The movie Saving Private Ryan   Alexander Kuprin's The Bracelet of Garnets   Robert Bolt's play A Man for All Seasons   Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address   Homer   Thomas Jefferson and the Declaration of Independence   Sun Tzu's The Art of War   David Hume's philosophical treatise An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding   The Shahnameh (Persian  ) of Ferdowsi   Thomas Mann's novel The Magic Mountain   Wallace Stevens's novel Peter Quince at the Clavier   Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyam   The Bible   Robert F. Kennedy's book Thirteen Days   Alexander Hamilton in The Federalist Papers   William Carlos Williams collection of poems Al Que Quiere!  

[edit]

Musical references 
This is a partial list of musical references in Waves

[edit]

Johann Sebastian Bach Toccata and Fugue in d minor and Air on a G String and Jesu Joy of Man's Desiring and Concerto for Two Violins in D  Minor BWV1043  

William Carlos Williams collection of poems Al Que Quiere!  

Musical references 
This is a partial list of musical references in Waves

[edit]

Johann Sebastian Bach Toccata and Fugue in d minor and Air on a G String and Jesu Joy of Man's Desiring and Concerto for Two Violins in D  Minor BWV1043   Gustav Holst ­ Jupiter, the Bringer of Jollity ­ The Planets Suite   New Order ­ Blue Monday   Gustav Holst ­ Mercury, the Winged Messenger ­ The Planets Suite   The Cure – Faith and Other Voices   Auld Lang Syne   Carl Orff ­ O, Fortuna   Frédéric Chopin ­ Sonata n°2 in B­flat minor op.35, 3rd movement Marche funèbre and Etude Op.10 n°3 "Tristesse"   Franz Liszt ­ Consolation Nn°3   Johannes Brahms ­ Rhapsody G minor op. 79 n°2   U2 ­ Beautiful Day   Patricia Kaas ­ Mon mec à moi   Felix Mendelssohn ­ Octet E Flat Major 3rd movement   Johannes Brahms ­ Piano concerto n°2. 1st movement, and Piano concerto n°1. 1st movement in D minor and 2nd movement in D Major.   Savage Garden ­ Truly Madly Deeply   Ludwig Van Beethoven ­ Symphonie n°6 (Pastoral), 1st Mvt, Symphony n°9, and Egmont Overture   Stardust ­ The Music Sounds Better With You   Ludwig Van Beethoven ­ Piano Sonata n°14 'Moonlight' and Piano Sonata n°8 Op.13 'Pathetique'   Richard Wagner ­ The Ride Of The Valkyries   ZZ Top ­ Sharp Dressed Man   Blues Traveler ­ Run­Around   Alphaville ­ Big In Japan   Modern Talking ­ You're My Heart You're My Soul   Tom Petty ­ Free Fallin'   Tracy Chapman ­ Baby Can I Hold You   Hail to the Chief ­ United States Presidential Anthem   Singapore National Anthem ­ Majulah Singapura   Gounod­Liszt ­ Faust Waltz Part 1   David Bowie ­ Young Americans   Hohenfriedberger March by Friedrich II from the movie Barry Lyndon (Stanley Kubrick)   British Grenadiers   The Eagles ­ Please Come Home for Christmas   Genesis ­ Follow you, follow me   Giacomo Puccini ­ Nessun Dorma   Samuel Barber ­ Adagio for Strings, op.11   Emilie Autumn – Misery loves company   Giacomo Puccini ­ O mio babbino caro   Sarah Brightman ­ Time To Say Goodbye   The Beatles – Let it Be   Gustav Holst ­ Mars 'Bringer of War' ­ The Planets Suite   Bryan Ferry ­ Slave to Love   Joaquín Rodrigo ­ Concierto de Aranjuez   Kraze ­ The Party (house)   Little Drummer Boy   Edward Elgar ­ Nimrod (from Enigma Variations)  

Scientific Concepts Discussed 
Alkanes   Amino Acids   Anesthesia   The Big Bang   Blackbody Radiation   Bohr model   Brain Structures and Their Functions   Calcium oscillations   Catalysts   Central Dogma   Chemical Bonding   Chemical Bonds as springs   Chemical kinetics   Chemical reactions   Cherenkov Radiation   Cosmic Background Explorer   Drug classification   Condensed Phases  Cosmic microwave background radiation   Cranial nerves   Definition of terahertz radiation   Diabetes   DNA vs. Proteins  

[edit]

Drug classification   Condensed Phases  Cosmic microwave background radiation   Cranial nerves   Definition of terahertz radiation   Diabetes   DNA vs. Proteins   Drug design   Drugs acting on proteins   Electromagnetic Spectrum   EM Radiation and biology   Endocrine axis   Entropy   Epilepsy   Control theory and feedback control systems   First Law of Thermodynamics   Formation of electromagnetic waves   Formation of Waves   Fundamental Forces   Gamma Rays   Gibbs Free Energy   G protein   Harmonic oscillator   Homeostasis   Hooke's Law   Hormone Action and Hormone Types   Human Evolution   Hydrogen bonding   Hydrophobic vs. Hydrophilic   Induced fit   Infinity   Infrared spectroscopy   Insulin and the insulin receptor   Infrared radiation   Krypton binding to Proteins   Lobes of the Cerebral Cortex   London Dispersion Forces   Maxwell­Boltzmann Distribution   Microwaves   Modulating protein function with terahertz radiation   The Mpemba effect   Na /K ­ATPase   Neuromuscular Junction   Newton's First Law   Newton's Law of Gravitation   Newton's Second Law   Newton's Third Law   Normal Modes of proteins being primarily in the terahertz spectrum   Optical resolution   Ozone Depletion   Packing Defects in Proteins   Pathology of Alzheimer's disease   Peptide bond   Personality Disorders   Pharmacokinetics / Pharmacodynamics   Planck Law and the basic Planck Equation   Planetary motions   Polar vs. nonpolar   Polarizability   Portal venous systems   Proteins as transmitters   Protein Crystallography   Protein folding   Protein normal modes   Protein secondary structure   Protein translation   Proteins as flexible molecules   Proteins as receivers   Proteins communicating   Radio waves   Radioactive Decay   Reaction energy profiles   Receptor activation   Resonant frequencies   Second Law of Thermodynamics   Selection rules  

Radio waves   Radioactive Decay   Reaction energy profiles   Receptor activation   Resonant frequencies   Second Law of Thermodynamics   Selection rules   Serotonin   Signal transduction   Specific and General Force Laws   Spectroscopy   DNA structure   Terahertz Gap   Terahertz based forces   Terahertz for [[mind reading]|mind­reading]   Terahertz for medicine   Thermodynamics   Transition states in kinetics   Trigonometry   Forces   Types of proteins   Types of Waves   Using terahertz radiation for Alzheimer's disease   Using terahertz radiation for Diagnosis   UV Radiation   van der Waals Forces   The Vestibulocochlear nerve   Visible light   Properties of Water   Water and Life   Basic Wave Equation   X­rays  

References 
Notes 
1.

[edit] [edit]

^ Originally publicly released on Scribd on November 8, 2008. Published on the Amazon Kindle on February 5, 2009. The publication dates are  important as they date the public release of the scientific ideas outlined in the book rendering these concepts (for the purposes of intellectual property  law) as being 'Prior Art' and thus unpatentable and available for public use. 

Book information 
Waves by Ogan Gurel E­Book (2009, First edition) Available on the Amazon Kindle  

[edit]

External links 
eBook site including reader reviews Scribd discussion group for Waves          Facebook discussion group for Waves

[edit]

Categories: 2009 novels | American novels | Thriller novels | Psychological novels | Science fiction novels | Terahertz technology | Molecular  dynamics 

This page was last modified on 14 May 2009, at 22:29 (UTC).   All text is available under the terms of the GNU  Free Documentation License. (See Copyrights for details.)   Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a U.S. registered 501(c)(3) tax­deductible nonprofit charity.  Privacy policy  About Wikipedia  Disclaimers    

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful