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Volume 16 Number 6

June 2012

INSIDE NFPA NEWS


Comments Sought on Proposed TIA Errata Issued

Comments Sought on Proposed Tentative Interim Amendment


The following Tentative Interim Amendments (TIAs) have been proposed to NFPA. It is being published for public review and comment. Comments should be filed with the Secretary, Standards Council, by the date indicated below. The proposed TIAs have also been forwarded to the responsible technical committee for processing. The technical committee will consider public comments received by the date indicated below before vote is taken on the proposed TIA. (Please identify the number of the TIA to which the comment is addressed.) Three-fourths of the voting members of the technical committee and/or the technical correlating committee, if any, must vote in favor of the TIA on both technical merit and emergency nature as calculated in accordance with 3.3.4.5 of the Regulations Governing the Development of NFPA Standards to establish a recommendation for approval of the TIA. The Standards Council will review the technical committees ballot results, the public comments, and any other information that has been submitted when it considers the issuance of the TIA at the August 6-9, 2012 Standards Council meeting. In accordance with 1.6.2(c) of the Regulations, a proposed TIA which has been submitted for processing pursuant to 5.1 of the Regulations will be automatically docketed as an appeal on the agenda of the Standards Council, and any party may advocate their position either in writing or in person before the Council. If an automatically docketed appeal has not been pursued by any party, the Council need not consider the matter as an appeal. A TIA is tentative because it has not been processed through the entire codes- and standards-making procedures. It is interim because it is effective only between editions of the document. A TIA automatically becomes a proposal of the proponent for the next edition of the document. As such, it then is subject to all of the procedures of the codesand standards-making process. NFPA 13-Proposed 2013 Edition Standard for the Installation of Sprinkler Systems TIA Log No.: 1066 Reference: 3.4.1.1 Premixed Antifreeze Solution, 7.6.1, 7.6.2, 7.8.3.4, 23.1.3(42), 23.4.2.1.3, and A.7.6, A.7.6.1, A.7.6.2.2 and A.7.6.3.1 Comment Closing Date: July 2, 2012 Submitter: Terry Victor, Tyco/SimplexGrinnell www.nfpa.org/13 1. Revise 3.4.1.1 to read as follows: 3.4.1.1 Premixed Antifreeze Solution. A mixture of an antifreeze material with water that is prepared and factory mixed by the manufacturer with a quality control procedure in place that ensures that the antifreeze solution remains homogeneous and that the concentration is as specified. [ROP-33] [ROC-35]

Standards Council Minutes NFPA Conference and Expo

1 15 15 16

Changes to Technical Meeting Convention Rules Committee Leadership Conference NFPA Standards Forum Association Technical Meeting Schedule/Motions Committee Report Committee Calendar

17 18 26

Committees Seeking Members Committees Soliciting Public Input

The NFPA News is a compilation of codes and standards information and activities. We attempt to cover all important details during the codes and standards cycle process so that the public is aware of what is available and what is needed. We want to make the NFPA News an even more valuable tool for you. Please forward your ideas to nfpa_news@nfpa.org or contact Carolyn Cronin at 617-984-7240.

2. Revise 7.6.1 to read as follows: 7.6.1.1 The use of antifreeze solutions shall be in conformity with state and local health regulations. 7.6.1.2 Antifreeze shall not be used in ESFR systems unless at least one of the following two conditions is met the ESFR sprinkler is listed for use with the antifreeze solution. (1) For antifreeze solutions not referenced in this standard, the antifreeze solution shall be specifically listed for ESFR applications. (2) For antifreeze solutions referenced in this standard, the ESFR sprinkler shall be specifically listed for use with the antifreeze solution. (3) The ambient temperature of the protected area shall be above 25F (4C) and a propylene glycol mixture of not greater than 25% by volume is provided. [ROP-148] 3. Revise 7.6.2 to read as follows: 7.6.2.1 Except as permitted in 7.6.2.2, antifreeze solutions shall be listed for use in sprinkler systems. Antifreeze solutions shall be premixed by the manufacturer. [ROP-150] 7.6.2.2* Premixed antifreeze solutions of propylene glycol shall be permitted to be used with ESFR sprinklers where the ESFR sprinklers are listed for such use in a specific application. 7.6.2.2* Antifreeze solutions shall be limited to premixed antifreeze solutions of glycerin (chemically pure or United States Pharmacopoeia 96.5%) at a maximum concentration of 48% by volume, or propylene glycol at a maximum concentration of 38% by volume. [ROP-33] 7.6.2.2.1 Premixed antifreeze solutions of propylene glycol exceeding 40% concentration by volume shall be permitted for use with ESFR sprinklers where the ESFR sprinklers are listed for such use in a specific application. [ROP-33] 7.6.2.2.2 Premixed antifreeze solutions other than those described in 7.6.2.1 that are listed for use in sprinkler systems shall be permitted to be used. [ROP-33] 7.6.2.2.3 All premixed antifreeze solutions shall be provided with a certificate from the manufacturer indicating the type of antifreeze, concentration by volume, and freezing point. [ROP-33] 7.6.2.3 Glycerinewater and propylene glycolwater mixtures shown in Table A.7.6.2.2 shall be considered suitable for use. [ROP-33] 7.6.2.4 A premix antifreeze solution with a freezing point below the expected minimum temperature for the locality shall be provided. [ROP-33] 4. Revise 7.8.3.4 to read as follows: 7.8.3.4 Automatic sprinklers in areas subject to freezing shall be on dry pipe systems conforming to Section 7.2, on antifreeze systems conforming to Section 7.6, or be dry sprinklers of an adequate length connected to wet pipe systems located in heated areas.

5. Revise 23.1.3(42) to read as follows: 23.1.3(42) Information about listed antifreeze solution used (type and amount). 6. Revise 23.4.2.1.3 to read as follows: 23.4.2.1.3 For antifreeze solutions systems greater than 40 gal (151 L) in size, the friction loss shall also be calculated using the DarcyWeisbach formula: (no change to Equation) 7. Revise A.7.6.1, A.7.6.2, and A.7.6.2.1 to read as follows: A.7.6.1 The definition of an antifreeze system states that water will discharge after the antifreeze leaves the pipes. Systems that are all antifreeze, including tanks of antifreeze solution that will not discharge plain water, are not true antifreeze systems. Such systems should not be used without consideration to issues such as the combustibility of the antifreeze solution and the friction loss in the piping during cold conditions. Any listing associated with an antifreeze sprinkler system should address the inability for the specific antifreeze solution tested to ignite when discharged from specific sprinklers. A.7.6.2 Listed CPVC nonmetallic sprinkler pipe and fittings should be protected from freezing with glycerine compatible listed solutions only. In addition, due to antifreeze solution limitations other methods of freeze protection such as electric heat-tracing, or insulated coverings, which are approved for use on CPVC nonmetallic piping may be used to protect CPVC nonmetallic pipes from freezing. The use of diethylene, ethylene, or propylene glycols is specifically prohibited. Laboratory testing shows that glycol-based antifreeze solutions present a chemical environment detrimental to CPVC. [ROP-33] [ROC-344] The following is a list of research reports that have been issued by the Fire Protection Research Foundation related to the use of antifreeze in sprinkler systems: 1. Antifreeze Systems in Home Fire Sprinkler Systems Literature Review and Research Plan, Fire Protection Research Foundation, June 2010. Antifreeze Systems in Home Fire Sprinkler Systems Phase II Final Report, Fire Protection Research Foundation, December 2010. Antifreeze Solutions Supplied through Spray Sprinklers Interim Report, Fire Protection Research Foundation, February 2012. (UPDATE REFERENCE TO FINAL REPORT if available prior to issuance of TIA)

2.

3.

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The following tables provide an overview of the testing.


Topic Scope of Sprinklers Tested Information The following sprinklers were used during the residential sprinkler research program described in the report dated December 2010: Residential pendent style having nominal K-factors of 3.1, 4.9 and 7.4 gpm/psi1/2 Residential concealed pendent style having a nominal K-factor of 4.9 gpm/psi1/2 Residential sidewall style having nominal K-factors of 4.2 and 5.5 gpm/psi1/2 The following sprinklers were used during the spray sprinkler research program described in the report dated February 2012: Residential pendent style having a nominal K-factor of 3.1 gpm/psi1/2 Standard spray pendent style having nominal K-factors of 2.8, 4.2, 5.6 and 8.0 gpm/psi1/2 Standard spray concealed pendent style having a nominal K-factor of 5.6 gpm/psi1/2 Standard spray upright style having a nominal K-factor of 5.6 gpm/psi1/2 Standard spray extended coverage pendent style having a nominal K-factor of 5.6 gpm/psi1/2 <50% Glycerine and <40% Propylene Glycol Antifreeze SolutionsSolutions were not tested. 50% Glycerine and 40% Propylene Glycol Antifreeze SolutionsLarge scale ignition of the sprinkler spray did not occur in tests with sprinkler discharge onto a fire having a nominal Heat Release Rate (HRR) of 1.4 MW. Large scale ignition of the sprinkler spray occurred in multiple tests with sprinkler discharge onto a fire having a nominal HRR of 3.0 MW. 55% Glycerine and 45% Propylene Glycol Antifreeze Solutions Large scale ignition of the sprinkler spray occurred in tests with sprinkler discharge onto a fire having a nominal HRR of 1.4 MW. >55% Glycerine and >45% Propylene Glycol Antifreeze Solutions -- Large scale ignition of the sprinkler spray occurred in tests with sprinkler discharge onto a fire having a HRR of less than 500 kW. 70% Glycerine and 60% Propylene Glycol Antifreeze Solutions Maximum antifreeze solution concentrations tested. Large scale ignition of the sprinkler discharge spray was not observed when the sprinkler inlet pressure was 50 psi or less for tests using 50% glycerine or 40% propylene glycol. When discharging 50% glycerine and 40% propylene glycol antifreeze solutions onto fires having a HRR of 1.4 MW, no large scale ignition of the sprinkler spray was observed with ceiling heights up to 20 ft. When discharging 50% glycerine and 40% propylene glycol antifreeze solutions onto fires having a HRR of 3.0 MW, large scale ignition of the sprinkler spray was observed at a ceiling height of 20 ft.

Antifreeze Solution Concentration

Sprinkler Inlet Pressure Ceiling Height

Fire Control

The test results described in the test reports December 2010 and February 2012 indicated that discharging glycerine and propylene glycol antifreeze solutions onto a fire can temporarily increase the fire size until water is discharged. As a part of the residential sprinkler research described in report dated December 2010, tests were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of residential sprinklers to control fires involving furniture and simulated furniture. The results of these tests indicated that 50% glycerine and 40% propylene glycol antifreeze solutions demonstrated the ability to control the furniture type fires in a manner similar to water. For standard spray type sprinklers, no tests were conducted to investigate the ability of these sprinklers to control the types and sizes of fires that these sprinklers are intended to protect.

A.7.6.2.1 Where existing antifreeze systems have been analyzed and approved to remain in service, antifreeze solutions should be limited to premixed antifreeze solutions of glycerin (chemically pure or United States Pharmacopoeia 96.5%) at a maximum concentration of 48% by volume, or propylene glycol at a maximum concentration of 38% by volume. [ROP-33] The use of antifreeze solutions in all new sprinkler systems should be restricted to listed antifreeze solutions only. Where existing antifreeze systems are in service, the solution concentration should be limited to those noted in A.7.6.2.1 and the system requires an analysis and approval of the AHJ to remain in service. 8. Delete A.7.6.2.2 and A.7.6.3.1 to read as follows: A.7.6.2.2 See the premixed antifreeze manufacturers technical data 1 sheets to determine the freeze point of the solution. [ROP-33] [ROC-345] A.7.6.3.1 All permitted antifreeze solutions are heavier than water. At the point of contact (interface), the heavier liquid will be below the lighter liquid, preventing diffusion of water into the unheated areas. Submitters Substantiation: The information provided in the Fire Protection Research Foundation report Antifreeze Solutions

Supplied through Spray Sprinklers: Interim Report illustrates that under certain conditions (pressure, fire size, k-factor, ceiling height, deflector designetc) a 50% glycerine solution is capable of igniting and causing a dramatic increase in heat release rate. As noted in the FPRF report, these results highlight the complicated interaction between sprinkler spray and the ignition source.As a result of this additional testing, there are more questions that need to be answered, and the testing shows that concentrations of antifreeze that previous testing indicated were acceptable and would not support combustion actually do with a stronger ignition source. In addition, sprinklers with larger orifices that require lower pressure than typical residential sprinklers and potentially a lager droplet distribution also ignited. It is clear that further testing is need to fully understand under what conditions an anti-freeze solutions are safe, anti-freeze solutions can not be allowed in sprinkler systems. This TIA calls for the use of Listed Antifreeze Solutions. Using listed antifreeze solutions will ensure that the solution discharged from a sprinkler system will not ignite or cause a dramatic increase in heat release rate of a fire. The process for developing listed products will also allow for a continued improvement in fire and life safety in environments meeting the NFPA Codes and Standards. This TIA also calls for the continued acceptance of currently listed ESFR Antifreeze Systems. The listing process has already shown that, in some cases, it is possible to use current antifreeze solutions

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to provide the level of protection prescribed by NFPA 13. For this reason, it is proposed to allow the continued use of propylene-glycol solutions in systems and in protection scenarios that have been thoroughly tested to demonstrate such results. There are ESFR systems currently available that have been specifically tested and listed with a specific model of sprinkler and solution delivery method that provide an appropriate level of protection as to be considered Early Suppression. Emergency Nature: The latest testing from The Fire Protection Research Foundation titled Antifreeze Solutions Supplied through Spray Sprinklers Interim Report (dated February 2012) shows that anti-freeze concentrations currently allowed in new NFPA 13 sprinkler systems may support combustion and increase the size of the fire. This is a safety issue that requires changes in the standard. The following are two items which make this TIA of emergency nature. Only one is required for substantiation of an emergency nature. (d) The proposed TIA intends to offer to the public a benefit that would lessen a recognized (known) hazard or ameliorate a continuing dangerous condition or situation During the latest revision cycle the committee evaluated the test data that was present at the time of the cycle. The committee could not anticipate that additional data would change our justifications during the process. The new data demonstrates that variables utilized in the development of the 2013 edition may lead to changes in the fire involvement. Propylene glycol and glycerin antifreeze solutions discharged from sprinklers have the potential to ignite under certain conditions. Research testing has indicated that several variables may influence the potential for large scale ignition of the antifreeze solution discharged from a sprinkler. These variables include, but are not limited to, the concentration of antifreeze solution, sprinkler discharge characteristics, inlet pressure at the sprinkler, location of fire relative to the sprinkler, and size of fire at the time of sprinkler discharge. (f ) The proposed TIA intends to correct a circumstance in which the revised document has resulted in an adverse impact on a product or method that was inadvertently overlooked in the total revision process, or was without adequate technical (safety) justification for the action. Antifreeze solutions have been subject to recent testing and the new data shows that the installations found within the standard do not account for the complete safety of the occupant. The data appears to provide additional questions and challenges the parameters of installation found in the standard. The use of propylene glycol and glycerin antifreeze solutions should only be considered when other sprinkler system design alternatives are not available or practical. If these solutions are used, all relevant data and information should be carefully reviewed and considered in the sprinkler system.

NFPA 13D-2010 Edition Standard for the Installation of Sprinkler Systems in One- and TwoFamily Dwellings and Manufactured Homes TIA Log No.: 1060 Reference: 4.1.4, 5.2.7, 8.3, 8.3.1, 8.3.2(2), and 8.3.3 Comment Closing Date: July 2, 2012 Submitter: Dana Haagensen, Mass Dept. Of Fire Services www.nfpa.org/13D 1. Revise the title of 4.1.4 to read: 4.1.4 Maintenance and Modifications of Existing Antifreeze Systems. 2. In 5.2.7, insert the phrase, on modifications to existing, before antifreeze systems. 3. Revise Section 8.3 to read: 8.3 System Types. Systems shall be permitted to be wet pipe (not including antifreeze), dry pipe, or preaction. Antifreeze systems shall not be permitted for new installations. 4. Revise 8.3.1 to read: 8.3.1* Wet Pipe Systems. A wet pipe system, not including antifreeze, shall be permitted to be used where all piping is installed in areas maintained above 40F (4C), including areas properly insulated to maintain 40F (4C). 5. Delete 8.3.2(2) and renumber the subsequent paragraphs accordingly. 6. Move all of 8.3.3 to a new 4.1.4.2, renumber all references throughout the standard accordingly, including Annex sections, and revise the title of the subsection to read: 4.1.4.2 Acceptable Arrangements for the Maintenance and Modifications of Existing Antifreeze Systems. Submitters Substantiation: 1. Based on Fire Protection Research Foundation sponsored testing and research, it has been conclusively demonstrated that certain combinations of antifreeze type, antifreeze concentrations, sprinkler discharge pattern, sprinkler operating pressure, and nature of the fire development, can lead to situations where the discharge of antifreeze solutions in fire sprinkler systems exacerbates a fire. The latest research and testing demonstrates that the concentrations of antifreeze previously acceptable by consensus standards are not actually universally safe [see the February 2012 Fire Protection Research Foundation report - Antifreeze Solutions Supplied Through Spray Sprinklers: Interim Report]. 2. Seeing that new installations allow for the installation of piping in heated areas when simply coordinated with residential building design, and that dry systems are also an available option, the potential risks of using antifreeze outweigh the need for antifreeze systems.

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3.

4.

5.

6.

There are no noncombustible antifreeze products currently available to the industry, and no noncombustible antifreeze products that could be universally applied to fire sprinkler systems have been identified. The major testing laboratories have indicated that they will not list any antifreeze products that are derived from combustible liquids. The back-and-forth nature of the TIAs for antifreeze create a public image problem for fire sprinkler systems. The publics perception of the benefit of fire sprinkler systems will also be overshadowed by any further antifreeze incidents involving injury or death. Unfortunately, we cannot say conclusively that such incidents will not occur with the antifreeze systems allowed by current consensus standards. Driving the industry to the use of low concentrations of antifreeze is likely to increase the number of freeze-up incidents, as there is little industry experience with these low concentrations. For the public, freeze-up incidents very much overshadow their perception of fire sprinkler protection benefits. Fire protection codes and standards traditionally permit an increased level of risk for existing situations given the hardships in trying to rearrange and retrofit existing installations.

9.1.1* Wet Pipe Systems. A wet pipe system, not including antifreeze, shall be permitted to be used where all piping is installed in areas maintained above 40F (4C), including areas properly insulated to maintain 40F (4C). 3. Delete 9.1.2(2) and renumber the subsequent paragraphs accordingly. 4. Move all of Section 9.2 to a new 12.3.5.2, renumber all references throughout the standard accordingly, including Annex sections, and revise the title of the subsection to read: 12.3.5.2 Acceptable Arrangements for the Maintenance and Modifications of Existing Antifreeze Systems. 5. Revise the title of 12.3.5 to read: 12.3.5 Maintenance and Modifications of Existing Antifreeze Systems Submitters Substantiation: 1. Based on Fire Protection Research Foundation sponsored testing and research, it has been conclusively demonstrated that certain combinations of antifreeze type, antifreeze concentrations, sprinkler discharge pattern, sprinkler operating pressure, and nature of the fire development, can lead to situations where the discharge of antifreeze solutions in fire sprinkler systems exacerbates a fire. The latest research and testing demonstrates that the concentrations of antifreeze previously acceptable by consensus standards are not actually universally safe [see the February 2012 Fire Protection Research Foundation report - Antifreeze Solutions Supplied Through Spray Sprinklers: Interim Report]. 2. Seeing that new installations allow for the installation of piping in heated areas when simply coordinated with residential building design, and that dry systems are also an available option, the potential risks of using antifreeze outweigh the need for antifreeze systems. 3. There are no noncombustible antifreeze products currently available to the industry, and no noncombustible antifreeze products that could be universally applied to fire sprinkler systems have been identified. The major testing laboratories have indicated that they will not list any antifreeze products that are derived from combustible liquids. 4. The back-and-forth nature of the TIAs for antifreeze create a public image problem for fire sprinkler systems. The publics perception of the benefit of fire sprinkler systems will also be overshadowed by any further antifreeze incidents involving injury or death. Unfortunately, we cannot say conclusively that such incidents will not occur with the antifreeze systems allowed by current consensus standards. 5. Driving the industry to the use of low concentrations of antifreeze is likely to increase the number of freeze-up incidents, as there is little industry experience with these low concentrations. For the public, freeze-up incidents very much overshadow their perception of fire sprinkler protection benefits. 6. Fire protection codes and standards traditionally permit an increased level of risk for existing situations given the hardships in trying to rearrange and retrofit existing installations.

Emergency Nature: According to Paragraph 5.2(d) of the NFPA Regulations Governing Committee Projects , a proposed TIA can be considered emergency in nature if the proposed TIA intends to offer to the public a benefit that would ameliorate a continuing dangerous condition or situation. Based on Fire Protection Research Foundation sponsored testing and research, it has been conclusively demonstrated that certain combinations of antifreeze type, antifreeze concentrations, sprinkler discharge pattern, sprinkler operating pressure, and nature of the fire development, can lead to situations where the discharge of antifreeze solutions in fire sprinkler systems exacerbates a fire [a potentially dangerous situation to occupant life safety]. The latest research and testing demonstrates that the concentrations of antifreeze previously acceptable by consensus standards are not actually universally safe [see the February 2012 Fire Protection Research Foundation report - Antifreeze Solutions Supplied Through Spray Sprinklers: Interim Report]. Through prohibiting the use of antifreeze for new installations, the proposed amendment ameliorates potential dangers identified by testing/research and actual fire incidents. NFPA 13D-Proposed 2013 Edition Standard for the Installation of Sprinkler Systems in One- and TwoFamily Dwellings and Manufactured Homes TIA Log No.: 1061 Reference: 9.1, 9.1.1, 9.1.2(2), 9.2, and 12.3.5 Comment Closing Date: July 2, 2012 Submitter: Dana Haagensen, Mass Dept. Of Fire Services www.nfpa.org/13D 1. Revise Section 9.1 to read: 9.1 System Types. Systems shall be permitted to be wet pipe (not including antifreeze), dry pipe, or preaction. Antifreeze systems shall not be permitted for new installations. 2. Revise 9.1.1 to read:

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Emergency Nature: According to Paragraph 5.2(d) of the NFPA Regulations Governing Committee Projects , a proposed TIA can be considered emergency in nature if the proposed TIA intends to offer to the public a benefit that would ameliorate a continuing dangerous condition or situation. Based on Fire Protection Research Foundation sponsored testing and research, it has been conclusively demonstrated that certain combinations of antifreeze type, antifreeze concentrations, sprinkler discharge pattern, sprinkler operating pressure, and nature of the fire development, can lead to situations where the discharge of antifreeze solutions in fire sprinkler systems exacerbates a fire [a potentially dangerous situation to occupant life safety]. The latest research and testing demonstrates that the concentrations of antifreeze previously acceptable by consensus standards are not actually universally safe [see the February 2012 Fire Protection Research Foundation report - Antifreeze Solutions Supplied Through Spray Sprinklers: Interim Report]. Through prohibiting the use of antifreeze for new installations, the proposed amendment ameliorates potential dangers identified by testing/research and actual fire incidents. NFPA 13D-Proposed 2013 Edition Standard for the Installation of Sprinkler Systems in One- and TwoFamily Dwellings and Manufactured Homes TIA Log No.: 1067 Reference: Section 9.2 and A.9.2 Comment Closing Date: July 2, 2012 Submitter: Terry Victor, Tyco/SimplexGrinnell www.nfpa.org/13D 1. Revise Section 9.2 and A.9.2 to read as follows: 9.2* Antifreeze Systems. 9.2.1* Conformity with Health Regulations. The use of antifreeze solutions shall be in conformity with any state or local health regulations. [ROP-12] 9.2.2* Antifreeze Solutions. [ROP-12] 9.2.2.1 Except as permitted in 9.2.2.2, antifreeze solutions shall be listed for use in new sprinkler systems. 9.2.2.1* Unless permitted by 9.2.2.1.1, antifreeze solutions shall be limited to premixed antifreeze solutions of glycerine (chemically pure or United States Pharmacopoeia 96.5%) at a maximum concentration of 48% by volume, propylene glycol at a maximum concentration of 38% by volume, or other solutions listed specifically for use in fire protection systems. [ROP-12] 9.2.2.1.1 For existing systems, antifreeze solutions shall be limited to premixed antifreeze solutions of glycerine (chemically pure or United States Pharmacopoeia 96.5%) at a maximum concentration of 50% by volume, propylene glycol at a maximum concentration of 40% by volume, or other solutions listed specifically for use in fire protection systems. [ROP-12] 9.2.2.2* Premixed solutions of glycerine (chemically pure or United States Pharmacopoeia 96.5%) at a maximum concentration of 48% by volume or propylene glycol at a maximum concentration of 38% by volume shall be permitted to protect piping that is supplying sprinklers in a specific area of the dwelling unit, where acceptable to the Authority Having Jurisdiction.

9.2.2.2.1* Documentation shall be presented to the AHJ to substantiate the use of the antifreeze solution. 9.2.2.23 The concentration of antifreeze solutions shall be limited to the minimum necessary for the anticipated minimum temperature. [ROP-12] 9.2.2.3* An antifreeze solution with a freezing point below the expected minimum temperature for the locality shall be installed. [ROP-12] 9.2.2.4* The specific gravity of the antifreeze solution shall be checked by a hydrometer with a scale having 0.002 subdivisions. [ROP-12] [ROC-53] A.9.2.1 Antifreeze solutions can be used for maintaining automatic sprinkler protection in small, unheated areas. Antifreeze solutions are recommended only for systems not exceeding 40 gal (151 L). Because of the cost of refilling the system or replenishing small leaks, small, dry valves should be used where more than 40 gal (151 L) are to be supplied. Propylene glycol or other suitable material can be used as a substitute for priming water to prevent evaporation of the priming fluid and thus reduce ice formation within the system. [ROP-12] A.9.2.2 Listed CPVC nonmetallic sprinkler pipe and fittings should be protected from freezing with an antifreeze solution that is compatible with the nonmetallic material glycerine only. The use of diethylene glycol, ethylene glycol, or propylene glycol is specifically prohibited. Laboratory testing shows that glycol-based antifreeze solutions present a chemical environment detrimental to nonmetallic pipe CPVC. [ROP-108] Table A.9.2.2.1 A.12.3.5 Properties of Glycerine and Propylene Glycol for Existing Systems (Table A.9.2.2.1 unchanged) A.9.2.2.2.1 The documentation should substantiate that the proposed use of premixed glycerine and propylene glycol antifreeze solutions is consistent with the FPRF testing for the specific installation parameters. A.9.2.2.2 Examples of specific areas might include piping installed in an exterior wall or an unheated concealed space above a cathedral ceiling that cannot be protected with insulation or heat tracing. Premixed solutions of glycerine and propylene glycol should be used only where other freeze protections options are not practical. The specific areas protected by premixed glycerine and propylene glycol shall be limited to the greatest extent possible. Propylene glycol and glycerin antifreeze solutions discharged from sprinklers have the potential to ignite under certain conditions. Research testing has indicated that several variables may influence the potential for large-scale ignition of the antifreeze solution discharged from a sprinkler. These variables include, but are not limited to, the concentration of antifreeze solution, sprinkler discharge characteristics, inlet pressure at the sprinkler, location of fire relative to the sprinkler, and size of fire at the time of sprinkler discharge. Research testing also indicates that propylene glycol or glycerin solutions can be used successfully with certain other com-

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The following tables provide an overview of the testing.


Topic Scope of Sprinklers Tested Information The following sprinklers were used during the residential sprinkler research program described in the report dated December 2010: Residential pendent style having nominal K-factors of 3.1, 4.9 and 7.4 gpm/psi1/2 Residential concealed pendent style having a nominal K-factor of 4.9 gpm/psi1/2 Residential sidewall style having nominal K-factors of 4.2 and 5.5 gpm/psi1/2 The following sprinklers were used during the spray sprinkler research program described in the report dated February 2012: Residential pendent style having a nominal K-factor of 3.1 gpm/psi1/2 Standard spray pendent style having nominal K-factors of 2.8, 4.2, 5.6 and 8.0 gpm/psi1/2 Standard spray concealed pendent style having a nominal K-factor of 5.6 gpm/psi1/2 Standard spray upright style having a nominal K-factor of 5.6 gpm/psi1/2 Standard spray extended coverage pendent style having a nominal K-factor of 5.6 gpm/psi1/2 <50% Glycerine and <40% Propylene Glycol Antifreeze SolutionsSolutions were not tested. 50% Glycerine and 40% Propylene Glycol Antifreeze SolutionsLarge scale ignition of the sprinkler spray did not occur in tests with sprinkler discharge onto a fire having a nominal Heat Release Rate (HRR) of 1.4 MW. Large scale ignition of the sprinkler spray occurred in multiple tests with sprinkler discharge onto a fire having a nominal HRR of 3.0 MW. 55% Glycerine and 45% Propylene Glycol Antifreeze Solutions Large scale ignition of the sprinkler spray occurred in tests with sprinkler discharge onto a fire having a nominal HRR of 1.4 MW. >55% Glycerine and >45% Propylene Glycol Antifreeze Solutions -- Large scale ignition of the sprinkler spray occurred in tests with sprinkler discharge onto a fire having a HRR of less than 500 kW. 70% Glycerine and 60% Propylene Glycol Antifreeze Solutions Maximum antifreeze solution concentrations tested. Large scale ignition of the sprinkler discharge spray was not observed when the sprinkler inlet pressure was 50 psi or less for tests using 50% glycerine or 40% propylene glycol. When discharging 50% glycerine and 40% propylene glycol antifreeze solutions onto fires having a HRR of 1.4 MW, no large scale ignition of the sprinkler spray was observed with ceiling heights up to 20 ft. When discharging 50% glycerine and 40% propylene glycol antifreeze solutions onto fires having a HRR of 3.0 MW, large scale ignition of the sprinkler spray was observed at a ceiling height of 20 ft. Fire Control The test results described in the test reports December 2010 and February 2012 indicated that discharging glycerine and propylene glycol antifreeze solutions onto a fire can temporarily increase the fire size until water is discharged. As a part of the residential sprinkler research described in report dated December 2010, tests were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of residential sprinklers to control fires involving furniture and simulated furniture. The results of these tests indicated that 50% glycerine and 40% propylene glycol antifreeze solutions demonstrated the ability to control the furniture type fires in a manner similar to water. For standard spray type sprinklers, no tests were conducted to investigate the ability of these sprinklers to control the types and sizes of fires that these sprinklers are intended to protect.

Antifreeze Solution Concentration

Sprinkler Inlet Pressure Ceiling Height

binations of these same variables. Given the need for additional testing to further define acceptable versus unacceptable scenarios, the use of propylene glycol and glycerin antifreeze solutions should only be considered when other sprinkler system design alternatives are not practical. If these solutions are used, all relevant data and information should be carefully reviewed and considered in the sprinkler system. The following is a list of research reports that have been issued by the Fire Protection Research Foundation related to the use of antifreeze in sprinkler systems: 1. Antifreeze Systems in Home Fire Sprinkler Systems Literature Review and Research Plan, Fire Protection Research Foundation, June 2010. Antifreeze Systems in Home Fire Sprinkler Systems Phase II Final Report, Fire Protection Research Foundation, December 2010. Antifreeze Solutions Supplied through Spray Sprinklers Interim Report, Fire Protection Research Foundation, February 2012. (UPDATE REFERENCE TO FINAL REPORT if available prior to issuance of TIA)

9.2.3 to prevent the diffusion of water into unheated areas. To avoid leakage, the quality of materials and workmanship should be superior, the threads should be clean and sharp, and the joints should be tight. Only metal-faced valves should be used. Submitters Substantiation: The Technical Committee on Residential Sprinkler Systems is taking a different path in dealing with antifreeze in NFPA 13D than it has in NFPA 13R or than the Sprinkler System Installation Criteria Committee is taking with NFPA 13. This different path is fundamentally based on the fact that oneand two-family dwellings are treated differently in building codes and fire codes than other types of occupancies and in recognition of the fact that NFPA 13D has a different objective than NFPA 13R and NFPA 13. From its inception in 1975, NFPA 13D has been less stringent than NFPA 13 in order to present a document that balances the issues of reasonable fire protection with the realistic concerns of cost and redundancy. NFPA 13D has always recognized that if fire sprinkler systems are too much like NFPA 13, they will not be installed in one-and two-family dwellings and they will not be able to help change the fact that thousands of people continue to die each year due to fires in unsprinklered one-and two-family dwellings. As such, the Technical Committee on Residential Sprinkler Systems, concerned with the overall effort to get sprinkler systems into more one- and two-family dwellings is consciously choosing to be less

2.

3.

A.9.2.3 Many All permittedantifreeze solutions are heavier than water. At the point of contact (interface), provisions are required by

June 2012

restrictive than NFPA 13, while still maintaining a reasonable level of fire safety for the occupants of sprinklered one- and two-family dwellings. The information provided in the report, Antifreeze Systems in Home Fire Sprinkler Systems Phase II Report (Fire Protection Research Foundation, December 2010) was the basis for TIA 10-2 to NFPA 13D that was issued by the NFPA on March 1, 2011. That research report is still valid and demonstrates how residential sprinklers perform in typical dwelling units of typical one- and two-family dwellings with a variety of antifreeze solutions tested through a variety of pendent and sidewall residential sprinklers. Subsequent testing has been performed as a part of a project sponsored by the Fire Protection Research Foundation (FPRF), who released an interim report in February of 2012 titled, Antifreeze Solutions Supplied through Spray Sprinklers. This report followed up on the Phase II tests and looked at antifreeze solutions and their performance with a variety of standard spray sprinklers. Given that NFPA 13D calls for the use of residential sprinklers in all locations except mechanical closets and unheated areas not intended for living purposes (see section 7.5.3 and 7.5.4 of NFPA 13D), the results of this latest FPRF research is less important to NFPA 13D. Still, in reviewing the results of the tests, the committee has chosen to tighten up the rules with respect to new installations by proposing this TIA so that designers can make better decisions regarding the potential use of antifreeze systems. For existing systems, the committee is not recommending any changes from the TIA processed and issued in March of 2011. Based on input from Authorities Having Jurisdiction, a total ban on antifreeze systems is not realistic and would be detrimental to the effort to pass legislation for mandatory sprinkler requirements in one- and two-family dwellings. Since there are currently no listed antifreeze solutions, a requirement to only use listed antifreeze would be tantamount to a ban on the use of antifreeze. While the use of listed antifreeze systems is probably the best long-term solution, some recognition of glycerine or propylene glycol is necessary in the short term, even for new systems. NFPA 13D systems are intended to be cost effective. Completely eliminating the use of antifreeze in specific, isolated areas, may significantly drive up the cost of residential sprinkler systems. This TIA starts out expressing a preference for the use of listed antifreeze systems in section 9.2.2.1, but then goes on to allow the use of unlisted 48% glycerine or 38% propylene glycol where two conditions are met. The first condition is that the system has to be acceptable to the Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ). It is anticipated that the AHJ will understand the gravity of the decision and only approve situations where other options have been explored and rejected as impossible or impractical. The second condition is that the antifreeze has to be limited to a specific area. The committees intent is to limit the antifreeze as much as possible to the portion of the system that will experience the cold temperatures. This language is the best that the committee could agree on that allowed the flexibility necessary to handle the wide range of design situations that currently exist. It is anticipated that the AHJ would be able to consider each situation on a case-by-case basis and determine if the system was sufficiently isolated.

The use of 48% glycerine and 38% propylene glycol is supported by the Phase II test report discussed above when limited to residential sprinklers in typical dwelling units. This position is strengthened by the existing requirement in section 9.2.2.2 (which becomes 9.2.2.3 in this TIA), which requires the antifreeze to be limited to what is needed for the environment. If the pipe is only going to be subjected to temperatures of 20F, then a solution of 48% glycerine would not be permitted and a premixed solution of 25% glycerine should be used instead since this is all that is needed to protect down to 20F. In order to provide the designer with as much information as possible, so that informed decisions can be made, this TIA proposes an expanded annex section that discusses the findings of the various tests that have been performed, including the latest tests just released. This should help designers understand the risks involved and the consequences of their decisions and help guide them to keep antifreeze solutions to the lowest possible concentrations if they decide they want to use antifreeze at all. This TIA does not propose changes to the rules for existing systems (allowing them to stay as they were in TIA 10-2 with up to 50% glycerine and 40% propylene glycol). This decision was made after a review of the testing programs to date and a first order risk analysis that looked at the potential problems that would arise if we forced people to retroactively change out their existing systems. This risk analysis shows that the risk of changing the antifreeze requirements for existing building and forcing building owners to make a change is higher (6 to 6.3 deaths per year) than leaving the 50% glycerine or 40% propylene glycol in systems (3.0 to 3.6 deaths/year). The following is a summary of this analysis: Assumptions Risk Analysis for Antifreeze Systems

There are approximately 100 million homes (1 and 2 family) in America There are approximately 300,000 fires in the homes each year (0.003 fires/home/year) There are approximately 3000 fire deaths per year in homes (0.01 deaths/fire) o Of these fire deaths, 10% occur in fires that started in spaces that NFPA 13D does not require to be sprinklered, so these deaths will be assumed in this analysis to occur, even in sprinklered homes, even though actual fire experience has shown that sprinklers in adjacent rooms sometimes activate to control these fires and significant losses are not being experienced. o In an effort to be conservative, this analysis will also assume that sprinklers are only 90% effective, even though significant work has shown them to be much more effective There are approximately 2 million sprinklered homes in America (2% of all homes) o There are approximately 500,000 systems (25% of all sprinklered homes) with antifreeze that is required right now by NFPA 13D to be a maximum of 50% glycerin or 40% propylene glycol o There are approximately 1500 fires/yr in the homes with these antifreeze systems o There have been no deaths associated with fires in homes

June 2012

having antifreeze systems with 50% or less glycerine or 40% or less propylene glycol o There have been two incidents of flash fires in the last 5 years causing 1 death and 2 serious injuries in apartments. In both cases, the system concentration is believed to have been greater than 50% with one of these being believed to be 70% glycerine and the other 60% glycerine. For the purposes of this conservative analysis, the 2 serious injuries will be considered as deaths. o Using these last two bullet points, the risk of death due to flash fire caused by the antifreeze is between 0 and 0.0004 deaths per year depending on what mix of concentrations is assumed for the population of sprinklered homes with antifreeze in the systems. If the Situation is Left As Is with 50% Glycerine or 40% Propylene Glycol Allowed to Remain There will be 1500 fires each year in the systems with antifreeze (500,000 sprinklered homes with antifreeze and 0.003 fires/home/year) There will be 3 deaths per year assuming that sprinklers are 90% effective and in 90% of the locations where deadly fires start (1500 fires times 0.01 deaths per fire is a potential for 15 deaths, 1.5 might occur from fires starting in unsprinklered spaces, 1.5 might occur due to some failure of the system, the other 12 will be saved) There will be between 0 and 0.6 deaths due to flash fires depending on the population of antifreeze solutions in homes (1500 fires times 0.0004 is 0.6, which is extremely conservative considering this statistic is gathered from high concentrations systems that were not in homes) Total of between 3.0 and 3.6 possible deaths per year from this decision

Of course, any risk analysis like this is dependent on the assumptions used to formulate the conclusions. A sensitivity analysis was performed on the assumption above that if some change was required by NFPA 13D that 25% of the systems would be shut off and only 25% of the systems would be changed to comply. If the assumption was changed to 10% of the systems being shut off and 80% of the systems being changed to comply (with the remaining 10% of the systems left as is) then the decision to force the change still comes out worse (with a risk between 4.2 and 4.26) than the decision to leave all of the systems alone (with a risk between 3 and 3.6). Emergency Nature: This TIA has been prompted by the recently released interim research report, Antifreeze Solutions Supplied through Spray Sprinklers, issued by the Fire Protection Research Foundation in February of 2012. It is part of a package of TIAs being submitted by each of the fire sprinkler installation and maintenance documents in order to address the issues raised by that research. It meets the definition of part 5.2(c) in the Regulations Governing Committee Projects as an emergency since the issues raised by the research where not known at the time the standard was being developed. The use of propylene glycol and glycerin antifreeze solutions should only be considered when other sprinkler system design alternatives are not available or practical. If these solutions are used, all relevant data and information should be carefully reviewed and considered in design and installation of the sprinkler system. NFPA 13R-2010 and Proposed 2013 Edition Standard for the Installation of Sprinkler Systems in Low-Rise Residential Occupancies TIA Log No.: 1062 Reference: 5.4.1, 5.4.2(1), 5.4.3, and 5.4.4 Comment Closing Date: July 2, 2012 Submitter: Dana Haagensen, Mass Dept. of Fire Services www.nfpa.org/13R 1. Revise 5.4.1 to read: 5.4.1* Wet Pipe Systems. A wet pipe system, not including antifreeze, shall be used where piping is installed in areas that can be maintained reliably above 40F (4C). 2. Delete 5.4.2(1) and renumber the subsequent paragraphs accordingly. 3. In 5.4.3, delete antifreeze system,. 4. Insert a new 5.4.4 to read: 5.4.4 Antifreeze systems shall not be permitted for new installations. Existing antifreeze systems antifreeze systems shall be permitted to be modified in accordance with NFPA 13. Submitters Substantiation: 1. Based on Fire Protection Research Foundation sponsored testing and research, it has been conclusively demonstrated that certain combinations of antifreeze type, antifreeze concentrations, sprinkler discharge pattern, sprinkler operating pressure, and nature of the fire development, can lead to situations where the discharge of antifreeze solutions in fire sprinkler systems exacerbates a fire. The latest research and testing

If We Call for Replacement/Reduction of Solutions Assumption that 125,000 systems (25% of existing antifreeze systems) will get turned off Assumption that 125,000 people (25% of existing antifreeze systems ) will comply and spend the money to do something else (lower system concentration, heat tracing or conversion to dry-pipe or preaction system) Assumption that 250,000 systems (50% of existing systems) will be left as is with whatever antifreeze they have The homeowners who shut off their systems will experience 375 fires and 3.75 fire deaths that cant be prevented by a sprinkler system shut off The homeowners that complied will experience 375 fires and 0.75 fire deaths assuming the sprinkler systems are 90% effective and that sprinklers are installed in 90% of locations where deadly fires start The homeowners that left their systems as is will experience 750 fires and between 1.5 and 1.8 fire deaths (1.5 of the fire deaths are from the system being 90% effective and 90% of the fires starting in sprinklered spaces and up to 0.3 of the fire deaths are from the potential for a flash fire depending on the antifreeze concentrations that are assumed) Total of between 6.0 and 6.3 potential deaths per year from this decision

June 2012

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

demonstrates that the concentrations of antifreeze previously acceptable by consensus standards are not actually universally safe [see the February 2012 Fire Protection Research Foundation report - Antifreeze Solutions Supplied Through Spray Sprinklers: Interim Report]. NFPA 13R allows, in certain circumstances, the use of commercial sprinklers (quick-response standard-spray) sprinklers. The latest research was performed using commercial sprinklers and using the antifreeze concentrations currently allowed by consensus standards. The results of this research directly show that some changes need to be made to NFPA 13R to avoid dangerous situations. Seeing that new installations allow for the installation of piping in heated areas when simply coordinated with residential building design, and that dry systems are also an available option, the potential risks of using antifreeze outweigh the need for antifreeze systems. There are no noncombustible antifreeze products currently available to the industry, and no noncombustible antifreeze products that could be universally applied to fire sprinkler systems have been identified. The major testing laboratories have indicated that they will not list any antifreeze products that are derived from combustible liquids. The back-and-forth nature of the TIAs for antifreeze create a public image problem for fire sprinkler systems. The publics perception of the benefit of fire sprinkler systems will also be overshadowed by any further antifreeze incidents involving injury or death. Unfortunately, we cannot say conclusively that such incidents will not occur with the antifreeze systems allowed by current consensus standards. Driving the industry to the use of low concentrations of antifreeze is likely to increase the number of freeze-up incidents, as there is little industry experience with these low concentrations. For the public, freeze-up incidents very much overshadow their perception of fire sprinkler protection benefits. Fire protection codes and standards traditionally permit an increased level of risk for existing situations given the hardships in trying to rearrange and retrofit existing installations.

NFPA 13R-Proposed 2013 Edition Standard for the Installation of Sprinkler Systems in Low-Rise Residential Occupancies TIA Log No.: 1065 Reference: 5.4.2 and A.5.4.2(1) Comment Closing Date: July 2, 2012 Submitter: Terry Victor, Tyco/SimplexGrinnell www.nfpa.org/13R 1. Revise 5.4.2 to read as follows: 5.4.2* Piping in areas that cannot be maintained reliably above 40F (4C) shall be protected by use of one of the following methods: (1)*Antifreeze system using a listed antifreeze solution in accordance with NFPA 13 (2) Dry pipe system (3) Preaction system (4) Listed dry-pendent, dry-upright, or dry-sidewall sprinklers extended from pipe in heated areas [ROP-26] (5) Heat tracing in accordance with 6.7.2.1 [ROP-25] 2. Revise A.5.4.2(1) to read as follows: A.5.4.2(1) Antifreeze solutions can be used for maintaining automatic sprinkler protection in small, unheated areas. Because of the cost of refilling the system or replenishing small leaks, antifreeze solutions are recommended only for systems not exceeding 40 gal (151 L). Listed CPVC sprinkler pipe and fittings should be protected from freezing with glycerine or anitifreeze solutions listed for use in CPVC sprinkler systems only. In addition. Due to antifreeze solution limitations other methods of freeze protection such as electric heattracing. or insulated coverings, which are approved for use on CPVC piping maybe used to protect CPVC pipes from freezing. The use of diethylene, ethylene, or propylene glycols is specifically prohibited. Laboratory testing shows that glycol-based antifreeze solutions present a chemical environment detrimental to CPVC. The use of antifreeze solutions in all new sprinkler systems should be restricted to listed antifreeze solutions only. [ROP82] [ROC-54] Submitters Substantiation: The information provided in the Fire Protection Research Foundation report Antifreeze Solutions Supplied through Spray Sprinklers: Interim Report illustrates that under certain conditions (pressure, fire size, k-factor, ceiling height, deflector designetc) a 50% glycerine solution is capable of igniting and causing a dramatic increase in heat release rate. As noted in the FPRF report, these results highlight the complicated interaction between sprinkler spray and the ignition source.As a result of this additional testing, there are more questions that need to be answered, and the testing shows that concentrations of antifreeze that previous testing indicated were acceptable and would not support combustion actually do with a stronger ignition source. In addition, sprinklers with larger orifices that require lower pressure than typical residential sprinklers and potentially a lager droplet distribution also ignited. It is clear that further testing is need to fully understand under what conditions an anti-freeze solutions are safe, anti-freeze solutions can not be allowed in sprinkler systems. Emergency Nature: The latest testing shows that anti-freeze concentrations currently allowed in sprinkler systems will support combustion and increase the size of the fire. This is a safety issue that requires changes in the standard.

Emergency Nature: According to Paragraph 5.2(d) of the NFPA Regulations Governing Committee Projects, a proposed TIA can be considered emergency in nature if the proposed TIA intends to offer to the public a benefit that would ameliorate a continuing dangerous condition or situation. Based on Fire Protection Research Foundation sponsored testing and research, it has been conclusively demonstrated that certain combinations of antifreeze type, antifreeze concentrations, sprinkler discharge pattern, sprinkler operating pressure, and nature of the fire development, can lead to situations where the discharge of antifreeze solutions in fire sprinkler systems exacerbates a fire [a potentially dangerous situation to occupant life safety]. The latest research and testing demonstrates that the concentrations of antifreeze previously acceptable by consensus standards are not actually universally safe [see the February 2012 Fire Protection Research Foundation report - Antifreeze Solutions Supplied Through Spray Sprinklers: Interim Report]. Through prohibiting the use of antifreeze for new installations, the proposed amendment ameliorates potential dangers identified by testing/research and actual fire incidents.

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NFPA 25-2011 Edition Standard for the Inspection Testing and Maintenance of WaterBased Fire Protection Systems TIA Log No.: 1068 Reference: 5.3.4.2, A.5.3.4.2, Table A.5.3.4.2, A.5.3.4.2.1, and A.5.3.4.2.1(3) Comment Closing Date: July 2, 2012 Submitter: Roland Huggins, American Fire Sprinkler Association, Inc. www.nfpa.org/25 1. Delete 5.3.4.2 and subsections and add a new 5.3.4.2 and 5.3.4.2.1 as follows: 5.3.4.2* Antifreeze solutions shall comply with one of the following: (1) The concentration of a glycerin solution measured in an existing system shall be limited to 50% by volume. (2) Newly introduced solutions shall be factory premixed antifreeze solutions of glycerin (chemically pure or United States Pharmacopoeia 96.5%) at a maximum concentration of 48% by volume. (3) The concentration of a propylene glycol solution measured in an existing system shall be limited to 40% by volume. (4) Newly introduced solutions shall be factory premixed antifreeze solutions of propylene glycol (chemically pure or United States Pharmacopoeia 96.5%) at a maximum concentration of 38% by volume. (5) Other solutions listed specifically for use in fire protection systems. 5.3.4.2 Except as permitted by 5.3.4.2.1 and 5.3.4.2.2, all antifreeze systems shall utilize listed antifreeze solutions. 5.3.4.2.1* For systems installed prior to September 30, 2012, listed antifreeze solutions shall not be required until September 30, 2022 where all of the following conditions are met: (1)* The concentration of the antifreeze solution shall be limited to 50% glycerin by volume or 40% propylene glycol by volume. (2) Newly introduced solutions shall be factory premixed antifreeze solutions (chemically pure or United States Pharmacopoeia 96.5%). (3)*Antifreeze systems with concentrations in excess of 30% propylene glycol and 38% glycerine shall be permitted based upon an approved deterministic risk assessment, except where explictly permitted under 5.3.4.2.1(4). (4) A risk assessment shall not be required for the following applications: a) Light hazard occupancies with ceilings heights not exceeding 20 ft (6.1m) where Quick Response sprinklers are installed b) Dwelling Units where residential or other fast response sprinklers are installed

5.3.4.2.2 Premixed antifreeze solutions of propylene glycol exceeding 30% concentration by volume shall be permitted for use with ESFR sprinklers where the ESFR sprinklers are listed for such use in a specific application. 2. Renumber A.5.3.4.2 and Table A.5.3.4.2 as A.5.3.4.2.1(1) and Table A.5.3.4.2.1(1). 3. Add new annex section to read as follows: A.5.3.4.2.1 It is assumed that all antifreeze systems installed after September 30, 2012 will meet the minimum requirements of NFPA 13(2013 Edition) or TIA XXX (2010 Edition). Subject to the approval of the AHJ, small installations in normally unoccupied areas such as dust collectors and similar spaces may utilize concentrations in excess of the limits established in 5.3.4.2.1. Where concentrations in excess of 5.3.4.2.1 are desired for larger systems, an equivalency should be approved by the AHJ. A.5.3.4.2.1(3) Propylene glycol and glycerin antifreeze solutions discharged from sprinklers have the potential to ignite under certain conditions. Research testing has indicated that several variables may influence the potential for large-scale ignition of the antifreeze solution discharged from a sprinkler. These variables include, but are not limited to, the concentration of antifreeze solution, sprinkler discharge characteristics, inlet pressure at the sprinkler, ceiling height, and size of fire at the time of sprinkler discharge. All relevant data and information should be carefully reviewed and considered in the deterministic risk assessment. In addition to the variables identified above, the deterministic risk assessment should include occupancy, quantity of solution, impact on life safety, and potential increase in heat release rate. The following is a list of research reports that have been issued by the Fire Protection Research Foundation related to the use of antifreeze in sprinkler systems that should be considered in the development of the deterministic risk assessment: 1. Antifreeze Systems in Home Fire Sprinkler Systems Literature Review and Research Plan, Fire Protection Research Foundation, June 2010. Antifreeze Systems in Home Fire Sprinkler Systems Phase II Final Report , Fire Protection Research Foundation, December 2010. Antifreeze Solutions Supplied through Spray Sprinklers Interim Report , Fire Protection Research Foundation, February 2012. (UPDATE REFERENCE TO FINAL REPORT if available prior to issuance of TIA)

2.

3.

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The following tables provide an overview of the testing


Topic Scope of Sprinklers Tested Information The following sprinklers were used during the residential sprinkler research program described in the report dated December 2010: Residential pendent style having nominal K-factors of 3.1, 4.9 and 7.4 gpm/psi1/2 Residential concealed pendent style having a nominal K-factor of 4.9 gpm/psi1/2 Residential sidewall style having nominal K-factors of 4.2 and 5.5 gpm/psi1/2 The following sprinklers were used during the spray sprinkler research program described in the report dated February 2012: Residential pendent style having a nominal K-factor of 3.1 gpm/psi1/2 Standard spray pendent style having nominal K-factors of 2.8, 4.2, 5.6 and 8.0 gpm/psi1/2 Standard spray concealed pendent style having a nominal K-factor of 5.6 gpm/psi1/2 Standard spray upright style having a nominal K-factor of 5.6 gpm/psi1/2 Standard spray extended coverage pendent style having a nominal K-factor of 5.6 gpm/psi1/2 <50% Glycerine and <40% Propylene Glycol Antifreeze SolutionsSolutions were not tested. 50% Glycerine and 40% Propylene Glycol Antifreeze SolutionsLarge scale ignition of the sprinkler spray did not occur in tests with sprinkler discharge onto a fire having a nominal Heat Release Rate (HRR) of 1.4 MW. Large scale ignition of the sprinkler spray occurred in multiple tests with sprinkler discharge onto a fire having a nominal HRR of 3.0 MW. 55% Glycerine and 45% Propylene Glycol Antifreeze Solutions Large scale ignition of the sprinkler spray occurred in tests with sprinkler discharge onto a fire having a nominal HRR of 1.4 MW. >55% Glycerine and >45% Propylene Glycol Antifreeze Solutions -- Large scale ignition of the sprinkler spray occurred in tests with sprinkler discharge onto a fire having a HRR of less than 500 kW. 70% Glycerine and 60% Propylene Glycol Antifreeze Solutions Maximum antifreeze solution concentrations tested. Large scale ignition of the sprinkler discharge spray was not observed when the sprinkler inlet pressure was 50 psi or less for tests using 50% glycerine or 40% propylene glycol. When discharging 50% glycerine and 40% propylene glycol antifreeze solutions onto fires having a HRR of 1.4 MW, no large scale ignition of the sprinkler spray was observed with ceiling heights up to 20 ft. When discharging 50% glycerine and 40% propylene glycol antifreeze solutions onto fires having a HRR of 3.0 MW, large scale ignition of the sprinkler spray was observed at a ceiling height of 20 ft.

Antifreeze Solution Concentration

Sprinkler Inlet Pressure Ceiling Height

Fire Control

The test results described in the test reports December 2010 and February 2012 indicated that discharging glycerine and propylene glycol antifreeze solutions onto a fire can temporarily increase the fire size until water is discharged. As a part of the residential sprinkler research described in report dated December 2010, tests were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of residential sprinklers to control fires involving furniture and simulated furniture. The results of these tests indicated that 50% glycerine and 40% propylene glycol antifreeze solutions demonstrated the ability to control the furniture type fires in a manner similar to water. For standard spray type sprinklers, no tests were conducted to investigate the ability of these sprinklers to control the types and sizes of fires that these sprinklers are intended to protect.

Submitters Substantiation: The information provided in the Fire Protection Research Foundation report Antifreeze Solutions Supplied through Spray Sprinklers: Interim Report illustrates that under certain conditions (pressure, fire size, k-factor, ceiling height, deflector designetc) a 50% glycerine solution is capable of igniting and causing a dramatic increase in heat release rate with a stronger ignition source. In addition, sprinklers with larger orifices that require lower pressure than typical residential sprinklers and potentially a larger droplet distribution also ignited. After apparently successfully using antifreeze solutions for years, several changes in codes, sprinkler system materials, and industry practices have converged, resulting in an identifiable problem with past usage of antifreeze in sprinkler systems. Once the issue of ignition of antifreeze solutions became an apparent problem, code changes and research to determine appropriate code changes were needed. This TIA applies the research conducted by The Fire Protection Research Foundation to NFPA 25, for the testing, inspection and maintenance of existing antifreeze systems. This TIA requires the use of Listed Antifreeze Solutions for systems installed after September 30, 2012. Using listed antifreeze solutions will ensure that the solution discharged from a sprinkler system will not ignite or cause a dramatic increase in heat release rate of a fire. The process for developing listed products will also allow for a continued improvement in fire and life safety in environments meeting the NFPA Codes and Standards. This TIA allows the continued acceptance of currently listed ESFR Antifreeze Systems. The listing process has already shown that, in

some cases, it is possible to use current antifreeze solutions to provide the level of protection prescribed by NFPA 13. For this reason, it is proposed to allow the continued use of propylene-glycol solutions in systems and in protection scenarios that have been thoroughly tested to demonstrate such results. There are ESFR systems currently available that have been specifically tested and listed with a specific model of sprinkler and solution delivery method that provide an appropriate level of protection as to be considered Early Suppression. This TIA allows the continued use of propylene glycol up to 30% and glycerine up to 38%. Factory Mutual testing reported in FM Technical Report J.L.0003004619 K-25 Suppression Mode Sprinkler Protection for Areas Subject to Freezing has identified that a concentration up to 30% propylene glycol will not increase the heat release rate. Additionally, the MSDS sheets on propylene glycol identifies that a concentration of 30% does not have a flash point (as would be present with a combustible liquid). Prior testing of the residential sprinklers and antifreeze has shown that 50% glycerine has a similar response to fire as 40% propylene glycol. Based on the concentrations from the residential sprinkler tests, a concentration of 38% glycerine was considered to be equivalent to 30% propylene glycol. This TIA allows the continued uses of propylene glycol between 30% and 40% and of glycerin between 38% and 50% for the following:

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1. 2.

Dwelling units with residential or fast response sprinklers, and Light hazard occupancies with quick response sprinklers and a ceiling no higher than 20 ft.

The fuel load for dwellings units does not create a large enough fire before the activation of quick response sprinklers in ceilings up to 20 ft to present a hazard for either residential sprinklers or spray sprinklers as depicted by the reports. The previous research program on residential sprinklers assigned an adequately conservative fire size of 1.4 MW that was based on a ceiling height of 19 ft. The latest report on spray sprinklers shows that with a 1.4 MW fire, there is no difference in outcome between a residential sprinkler and a spray sprinkler (see Figure 2 of Antifreeze Solutions Supplied through Spray Sprinklers Interim Report). Thus, dwelling units do not present a significant risk when concentrations do not exceed 40% for propylene glycol and 50% for glycerine. Light Hazard occupancies typically have a fuel load that has a lower rate of heat release than dwellings units but it is not unusual to encounter office settings with similar levels of furnishing. Thus, the higher rate of heat release was used for the evaluation. For ceilings up to 20 ft, the evaluation for dwelling units is applicable and the use of antifreeze at the currently allowed concentrations does not pose a hazard. In order to evaluate the potential risk when the ceilings are greater than 20 ft, DETACT was used to determine the fire size at the time of activation of the sprinkler system. The same variables as used in the Antifreeze Solutions in Home Fire Sprinkler Systems report were applied. Additionally, the report - Performance of Residential Sprinkler Systems with Sloped Ceilings and Beamed Ceilings determined that the same fire growth curve was appropriate for dwelling units. It was determined that a 3 MW fire occurs with a 33 ft ceiling It is not well understood how the antifreeze discharge will react at ceiling heights above 20 ftnor at what size fire significant involvement of the antifreeze discharge could occur at such ceiling heights. Thus, the ceiling height for light hazard occupancies is limited to a maximum of 20 ft. In many cases, replacing existing antifreeze systems is a significant financial and /or operational burden for the owner. It is appropriate to provide time to plan and budget for the antifreeze systems identified above that have a minimal life safety and property loss risk. It is recognized that some existing antifreeze systems that are not readily grouped and identified above do not pose a risk, however, the variables affecting the hazard requires specific analysis. The results obtained from the Antifreeze Systems in Home Fire Sprinkler Systems report clearly indicated that a 1.4 MW fire does not present a threat for 40% propylene glycol and 50% glycerine. The results from the Antifreeze Solutions Supplied through Spray Sprinklers Interim Report clearly show that a larger fire (3.0 MW) when combined with a 20 ft ceiling can create a problem. This presented the only two failures. However, significant increases in heat release rate were noted with a 3 MW fire and an 8-ft ceiling with smaller orifice sprinklers. This TIA allows continued uses of propylene glycol between 30% and 40% and of glycerin between 38% and 50% for conditions not identified above, only when they are approved based upon a deterministic risk assessment. Emergency Nature: The latest testing from The Fire Protection Research Foundation titled Antifreeze Solutions Supplied through Spray Sprinklers Interim Report (dated February 2012) shows that

anti-freeze concentrations currently allowed in new NFPA 13 and 13R sprinkler systems, that are inspected, tested and maintained in accordance with NFPA 25, may support combustion and increase the size of the fire. This is a safety issue that requires changes in the standard.

NFPA 99-2012 Edition Health Care Facilities Code TIA Log No. 1064 Reference: 6.6.2.2.3.2, 6.6.3.1 through 6.6.3.1.2 Comment Closing Date: July 2, 2012 Submitter: Walter Vernon, Wentworth-Douglass Hospital www.nfpa.org/99 1. Revise 6.6.2.2.3.2 to read: 6.6.2.2.3.2* Receptacles. The cover plates for the electrical receptacles or the electrical receptacles themselves supplied from the life safety and critical branches shall have a distinctive color or marking so as to be readily identifiable. 1. Revise 6.6.3.1 through 6.6.3.1.2 to read: 6.6.3.1 Source. 6.6.3.1.1 The life safety and critical branches shall have an alternate source of power separate and independent from the normal source that will be effective for a minimum of 112 hours after loss of the normal source. 6.6.3.1.2 The life safety and critical branches shall be so arranged that, in the event of failure of the normal power source, the alternate source of power shall be automatically connected to the load within 10 seconds. Submitters Substantiation: Proposal 99-39 (Log #CP 312) in the ROP for the 2012 edition replaced the term emergency system with life safety and critical branch throughout the document. While this revision made sense in most instances, it does not correspond with Type 3 essential electrical systems (EES). The way the language currently reads in the 2012 edition makes it appear as though a Type 3 EES should have both a life safety and a critical branch. This was never the intent of the technical committee. If taken literally, this current language can make a Type 3 EES more stringent than a Type 2 EES which only requires a Life Safety branch and an Equipment Branch. Having any critical functions in the facility would mean that a Type 1 system must be used. Emergency Nature: The current language could lead a user of the document to believe that a facility with certain critical functions or critical care rooms can use a Type 3 EES, which could greatly diminish patient and employee safety. Another unwanted effect could be that a facility that is properly designed with a Type 3 EES, be required to have a Critical Branch and meet certain requirements that could add unnecessary cost to the project.

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June 2012

NFPA 269-2012 Edition Standard Test Method for Developing Toxic Potency Data for Use in Fire Hazard Modeling TIA Log No. 1057 Reference: 12.5 Comment Closing Date: July 2, 2012 Submitter: Richard G. Gann, National Institute of Standards and Technology www.nfpa.org/269 1. Revise Section 12.5 to read as follows: 12.5 Report. The report shall contain the following information for each the tests using the exposure of animals: (1) Strain of rat and identity of supplier (2) Weight of each animal when received, prior to test, and of surviving animals at 7 and 14 days postexposure (3) Number of animals that die during the test, and number of animals that die up to 14 days posttest (4) Blood carboxyhemoglobin saturation values for animals that die during the test (5) Animal observations (e.g., unusual behavior during test); immediate posttest observations of animals, such as tremors, convulsions, difficulty in breathing, and severe eye irritation (6) The LC 50 obtained by the predictive equation from Section 12.4.1 (7) The number of rats that died in each of the two check tests in Section 10.1.2 (8) The LC50 measured with the animal exposure tests (89) Whether the animal check tests confirm or do not confirm the predicted LC50 value, as described in Section 10.1.2.The percentage of disagreement between the predicted and measured LC50 values Submitters Substantiation: The current text is technically incorrect. NFPA 269 does not contain a procedure for measuring the LC50 with test animals. The procedure only calls for running animal check tests at mass loss concentrations corresponding to 70 % and 130 % of the predicted LC50 value. The only output of these two tests is the number of rats that die, since the sole purpose of these two tests is to determine whether the actual LC50 value is outside the precision of the predicted LC50 value. Two determinations of toxicity with animals are sufficient for assessing range of toxic potency but not an LC50. Emergency Nature: This error needs to be fixed urgently. A performing laboratory cannot complete the Report, as the Standard is now written. This is because there is no number to satisfy 12.5 (8) in the current version, and there is no animal-derived LC50 value to calculate the percent difference in 12.5 (9). Therefore, a laboratory that is in compliance with ISO 17025, or equivalent performance standard, cannot perform the test.

NFPA 1124-2006 and Proposed 2013 Edition Code for the Manufacture, Transportation, Storage, and Retail Sales of Fireworks and Pyrotechnic Articles TIA Log No. 1047 Reference: 7.3.18 and 7.4.9.2 Comment Closing Date: July 2, 2012 Submitter: Julie Heckman, American Pyrotechnics Association and Jerald Farley, American Promotional Events, Inc. www.nfpa.org/1124 1. Revise 7.3.18.1 to read as follows: 7.3.18.1 7.3.19 Portable Generators. Fuel for generators shall be permitted to be Class I, Class II, and or Class III combustible liquids as fuel and shall be limited to not more than 5 gallons (18.9 L). 7.3.18.2 Portable generators shall be permitted to use Class I flammable liquids as fuel, provided the quantity of such fuel is limited to 2 gal (7.6L). 2. Revise 7.4.9.2 to read as follows: 7.4.9.2 Portable Generators. 7.4.9.2.1 Portable generators supplying power to CFRS facilities shall use only Class II or Class III combustible liquid fuels. 7.4.9.2.2.1 Portable generators shall be located not less than 20 ft (6.1 m) from the CFRS facility. 7.4.9.2.32 Generator fuels shall be stored not less than 20 ft (6.1 m) from the CFRS facility. 7.4.9.2.43* Where the generator fuel storage is located not less than 50 ft (15.2 m) from the CFRS facility, the quantity of such fuel shall not be limited by 7.3.17 7.3.19. Submitters Substantiation: There is a contradiction found in the current code. Section 7.3 applies to all Consumer fireworks retail sales (CFRS) facilities and stores. Section 7.4 adds requirements that apply only to CFRS facilities. Section 7.5 adds requirements that apply only to stores. Existing paragraph 7.3.18.2 allows the use of portable generators that use Class I liquids in all CFRS facilities and stores. But, paragraph 7.4.9.2.1 effectively prohibits the use of portable generators that use Class I liquids at CFRS facilities. In essence, paragraph 7.4.9.2.1 prohibits what paragraph 7.3.18.2 allows. Paragraphs 7.3.18.2 and 7.4.9.2.1 are in conflict. This was not the intent of the Committee. This proposed TIA corrects this conflict by modifying paragraph 7.3.18.1 and eliminating paragraph 7.3.18.2 and paragraph 7.4.9.2.1 and renumbering the subsequent paragraphs accordingly. In addition , this TIA increases the limits of Class I fuel from 2 gallons to 5 gallons for the following reasons: Consumer fireworks retailers need lights in order to operate at night and to use any other equipment requiring electrical supply at all times. Examples of equipment that retailers currently use that require electricity are lights inside the CFRS facility, emergency exit lights, fans, credit card machines, cash registers, sales promotion equipment and computers. So, electrical power is used during all hours of operation. Portable generators are needed for day time operations as well as for night time operations. AHJs have indicated that they would prefer retailers of consumer fireworks use portable generators with the larger tank capacity because the retailer will have to refill it less frequently and, con-

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sequently, the refilling will be less likely to occur in the dark and with a hot generator. Fewer refills mean fewer chances for the person who is refilling to get burned and less likelihood of fuel being spilled on the hot generator resulting in a fire or other accidents. Some AHJs have specifically told retailers to use the larger capacity generators even though such use is not in compliance with NFPA 1124 and any other code provisions. Furthermore, AHJs have said that if the tank capacity of the generator is larger, the quantity of fuel stored nearby for refill purposes is likely to be less; therefore the overall risks are lowered. Emergency Nature: The proposed revision is necessary to correct a conflict that currently exists in the document as paragraph 7.3.18 currently permits the use of Class I liquids as fuel for portable generators within a capacity limitation specified, while paragraph 7.4.9.2 only permits the use of Class II or III fuels. The requirement in 7.3.18 is applicable to all retail sales venues, while the requirement in 7.4.9.2 with its limitation is applicable to consumer fireworks retail sales (CFRS) facilities, which would have been included in the all facility provision of 7.3.18. Thus, the conflict exists and would be corrected by this TIA.

Table 1.5-2 Importance Factors by Risk Category of Buildings and Other Structures for Snow, Ice, and Earthquake Loadsa Risk Category Snow Importance Factor, Ice Importance Factor Ice Importance Factor Seismic Importance from Thickness, Wind, Factor, Table 1.5-1 Is Ii Iw Ie I 0.80 0.80 1.00 1.00 II 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 III 1.10 1.25 1.00 1.25 IV 1.20 1.25 1.00 1.50

component importance factor, Ip, applicable to earthquake loads, is not included in this table because it is dependent on the importance of the individual component rather than that of the building as a whole, or its occupancy. Refer to Section 13.1.3.
aThe

2. Revise the title of Table 40.3.10(b) as follows: Table 40.3.10(b) Cold-Formed Steel LightFrame Construction Other Steel Construction 3. Delete 44.2.4 as follows: 44.2.4 Seismic Requirements for Composite Construction

Errata Issued
The following errata has been issued. Copies of these errata are available on the NFPA web site on the Document Information Page listed under List of NFPA codes & standards. Electronic products and pamphlet reprints may have this errata incorporated. NFPA 5000 -2012 Edition Building Construction and Safety Code Reference: 35.3.1.1, A.35.3.1.1, Table. 40.3.10 (b) and 44.2.4 Errata No.: 5000-12-2 www.nfpa.org/5000

Issue Date: May 23, 2012

Standards Council Meeting Minutes Available


The NFPA Standards Council met on March 5-6, 2012 in San Juan, PR. The minutes and agendas associated with these meetings are posted on NFPAs website at http://www.nfpa.org/SC. Copies of Standard Council minutes and agendas from these meetings can also be obtained by email at stds_admin@nfpa.org, or write to Codes and Standards Administration, NFPA, 1 Batterymarch Park, Quincy, MA 02169-7471.

TheCommittee on Structures, Construction, and Materials notes the following error in the 2012 edition of NFPA 5000, Building Construction and Safety Code. 1. Revise 35.3.1.1 and add a new A.35.3.1.1 as follows: 35.3.1.1* Minimum design loads for structures shall incorporate the applicable importance factors given in ASCE/SEI 7, Table A.35.3.1.1. 1.5-2 (See A.35.3.1.1). A.35.3.1.1 ASCE/SEI 7, Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures, Table 1.5-2, is reprinted in this section with the permission of ASCE/SEI.

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June 2012

Changes to the NFPA Technical Meeting Convention Rules


On November 12, 2011, the NFPA Board of Directors approved changes to Technical Meeting Convention Rules. These convention rules will take effect at the upcoming Association Technical Meeting on June 13-14, 2012 in Las Vegas, Nevada. 3.3 Voting on Motions. Except as otherwise provided in these rules, the vote on motions shall be taken by electronic means unless the Presiding Officer determines otherwise. by a show of hands. If the Presiding officer is uncertain of the result of the vote, he or she can order a county of the vote. A motion that the vote be counted is allowed, and requires a majority vote of those present. No proxy voting is permitted. 3.4.5.2 Time Restrictions. The maker of the motion shall have five three minutes to speak in favor of the motion. 3.4.5.3 Rebuttal. Thereafter, the Presiding officer shall recognize speakers alternating, to the extent practicable, between those against and those that favor the motion. Each speaker shall be limited to five three minutes or such other time as the Presiding officer, in consideration of the available time, may designate. A complete set of convention rules can be found on the NFPA website at http://www.nfpa.org/assets/files/pdf/codesstandards/directory/convrules2011.pdf

NFPA 20,Standard for the Installation of Stationary Pumps for Fire Protection NFPA 13R, Standard for the Installation of Sprinkler Systems in Residential Occupancies up to and Including Four Stories in Height NFPA 13,Standard for the Installation of Sprinkler Systems

Thursday, June14, 2012,continuing at 8:00 a.m.

NFPA 75, Standard for the Protection of Information Technology Equipment NFPA 105,Standard for the Installation of Smoke Door Assemblies and Other Opening Protectives NFPA 150, Standard on Fire and Life Safety in Animal Housing Facilities NFPA 275,Standard Method of Fire Tests for the Evaluation of Thermal Barriers Used Over Foam Plastic Insulation NFPA 1144, Standard for Reducing Structure Ignition Hazards from Wildland Fire NFPA 1500,Standard on Fire Department Occupational Safety and Health Program NFPA 1582, Standard on Comprehensive Occupational Medical Program for Fire Departments NFPA 1917,Standard for Automotive Ambulances NFPA 1951, Standard on Protective Ensembles for Technical Rescue Incidents NFPA 1971, Standard on Protective Ensembles for Structural Fire Fighting and Proximity Fire Fighting NFPA 1991, Standard on Vapor-Protective Ensembles for Hazardous Materials Emergencies NFPA 1124,Code for the Manufacture, Transportation, Storage, and Retail Sales of Fireworks and Pyrotechnic Articles NFPA 1127, Code for High Power Rocketry NFPA 72,National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code

Association Technical Meeting Schedule and Motions Committee Report Available


The Report of the Motions Committeeidentifies Certified Amending Motions for documents in the Annual 2012 revision cycle that may be considered at the 2012 Association Technical Meeting in Las Vegas, Nevada on June 13-14, 2012. The following is a list of documents (with Certified Amending Motions) in the order in which they will be presented at the Association Technical Meeting: Wednesday, June 13, 2012, beginning at 2:00 p.m.

NFPA 59A, Standard for the Production, Storage, and Handling of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) NFPA 61,Standard for the Prevention of Fires and Dust Explosions in Agricultural and Food Processing Facilities NFPA 499, Recommended Practice for the Classification of Combustible Dusts and of Hazardous (Classified) Locations for Electrical Installations in Chemical Process Areas

The Report identifies a list of 24 Consent Documents in the Annual 2012 Revision cycle that did not receive NITMAMS and, therefore, will be forwarded directly to the NFPA Standards Council for issuance on May 29, 2012.

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June 2012

Committee Leadership Conference


The Committee Leadership Conference will be held on Sunday, June 10, 2012, during the NFPA Conference and Expo at the Mandalay Bay Convention Center, Las Vegas, NV. The registration for the conference will start at 8:00 a.m. on June 10th. The Committee Leadership Conference is held at each June Annual Meeting. This conference is an interactive training program that provides each NFPA Committee officer and member with specific training in carrying out the duties and responsibilities of committee work. The conference is open to all NFPA Committee participants and others who wish to attend. Advance registration is requested. Please contact Codes and Standards Administration by email at stds_admin@ nfpa.org or call 617-984-7246.

July 2012 2426 Combustible Metals and Metal Dusts (484 First Draft), Salt Lake City, UT 2526 Commissioning and Integrated Testing (4 Draft Development), NFPA HQ, Quincy, MA August 2012 69 NFPA Standards Council, NFPA HQ, Quincy, MA 1217 Safety to Life & Building Code (101, 5000 First Draft), St. Louis, MO 12-13 Assembly Occupancies and Membrane Structures 13-14 Mercantile and Business Occupancies 13-14 Residential Occupancies 14 Educational and Day-Care Occupancies 14-15 Industrial, Storage and Miscellaneous Occupancies 14-15 Board and Care Facilities 15-17 Health Care Occupancies 16 Detention and Correctional Occupancies 1317 Electrical Equipment of Industrial Machinery (79 First Draft), Denver, CO 1328 Health Care Facilities (99 First Draft), San Diego, CA 13-15 Electrical Systems 14-15 Health Care Emergency Management & Security 16-17 Medical Equipment 16-17 Mechanical Systems 20-21 Hyperbaric and Hypobaric Facilities 22-24 Piping Systems 27-28 Fundamentals 1825 Electrical Safety in the Workplace (70E First Draft), Denver, CO 2122 Carbon Monoxide Detection (720 First Draft), Denver, CO September 2012 1114 Commissioning and Integrated Testing (3, 4 First Draft), San Diego, CA 1213 Aerosol Products (30B First Draft), Warwick, RI 18 20 National Fuel Gas Code (54 pre-First Draft), Savannah, GA 2425 Liquefied Petroleum Gases (58 ROC), Memphis, TN 2426 Inspection, Testing & Maintenance of Water-Based Systems, (25 ROC), Chicago, IL 2627 Fire and Emergency Service Organization and Deployment-Career (1710 First Draft), Washington, DC 2627 LP-Gases at Utility Gas Plants (59 First Draft), Memphis, TN 30Oct 4 Road Tunnel and Highway Fire Protection (502 ROC), Miami, FL October 2012 912 Lightning Protection (780 ROC), Orlando, FL 1213 Fire and Emergency Service Organization and Deployment-Volunteer (1720 First Draft), Albany, NY 1417 Fixed Guideway Transit and Passenger Rail Systems (130 ROC), San Diego, CA 2930 Venting Systems for Cooking Appliances (96 ROC), Baltimore, MD 31Nov 1 Electric Generating Plants (850, 851, 853 pre-First Draft), NFPA HQ, Quincy MA

NFPA Standards Forum


The Standards Forum will be held on Tuesday, June 12, 2012 at 1:30 p.m. during the NFPA Conference and Expo at the Mandalay Bay Convention Center, Las Vegas, NV. NFPA is streamlining and simplifying the Codes and Standards Process (Re-Engineering the Codes and Standards Process). At this session technical committee members and interested parties will be able to see the latest changes to the New Regulations Governing the Development of NFPA Standards and the features of the new Electronic Submission System. Advanced registration is not required. For questions please contact Carolyn Cronin of Codes and Standards Administration by email at ccronin@nfpa.org or call 617-984-7240.

Committee Calendar
For additional meeting information, please contact the appropriate staff liaison listed on NFPAs Document Information Page (click the document number below and then the Technical Committee tab). If you are interested in attending an NFPA Technical Committee meeting as a guest, please read NFPAs Regulations Governing Committee Projects/Regulations Governing the Development of NFPA Standards (Section 3.3.3.3) for further information. First Draft Meeting (formerly known as ROP Meeting) June 2012 46 Carbon Monoxide Detection (720 pre-Draft), NFPA HQ, Quincy, MA 810 Correlating Committee on Fire and Emergency Protective Clothing and Equipment (1851, 1852, 1855, 1981, 1982, 1989, 1999 ROC, 1975 First Draft), Las Vegas, NV 9 Correlating Committee Professional Qualifications (1006 ROC, 1061 ROC, 1005 First Draft, 1521 First Draft), Las Vegas, NV 1114 NFPA Conference & Expo, Las Vegas, NV 2021 Data Exchange for the Fire Service (950 pre-First Draft), NFPA HQ, Quincy, MA

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November 2012 12 Pyrotechnics (1123 ROC), Nashville, TN February 2013 2526 Technical Search and Rescue (1670 Second Draft), Ft Lauderdale, FL 2628 Fire Service Training (13E, 1407, 1408, 1452 First Draft), San Diego, CA

The Committee on Boiler Combustion System HazardsFundamentals is seeking members in all interest classifications except Manufacturers and Special Experts. This Committee is responsible for Chapters 1, 2, 3 and 4 in NFPA 85, Boiler and Combustion Systems Hazards Code. The Committee on Boiler Combustion System HazardsHeat Recovery Steam Generators is seeking members in all interest classifications except Manufacturers and Special Experts. This Committee is responsible for Chapter 8 in NFPA 85, Boiler and Combustion Systems Hazards Code. The Committee on Boiler Combustion System HazardsPulverized Fuel Systems is seeking members in all interest classifications except Special Experts, Manufacturers and Users. This Committee is responsible for Chapter 9 in NFPA 85, Boiler and Combustion Systems Hazards Code. The Committee on Boiler Combustion System HazardsSingle Burner Boilers is seeking members in all interest classifications except Manufacturers. This Committee is responsible for Chapter 5 in NFPA 85, Boiler and Combustion Systems Hazards Code. The Committee on Boiler Combustion System HazardsStoker Operations is seeking members in all interest classifications except Special Experts and Users. This Committee is responsible for stoker material, Chapter 10 in NFPA 85, Boiler and Combustion Systems Hazards Code. The Committee on Building CodeBoard and Care Facilities is seeking members in all interest classifications except Enforcers and Special Experts. This Committee is responsible for Chapter 26 in NFPA 5000, Building Construction and Safety Code. The Committee on Building CodeBuilding Construction is seeking members in the following interest classifications: Enforcing Authorities, Research/Testing and Users. This Committee is responsible for Chapter 7, Sections 8.3, 8.4 and Annex D in NFPA 5000, Building Construction and Safety Code. The Committee on Building CodeBuilding Systems is seeking members in all interest classifications except Special Experts. This Committee is responsible for Chapter 12, Chapters 49-54 and Annex B in NFPA 5000, Building Construction and Safety Code. The Committee on Building CodeDetention and Correctional Occupancies is seeking members in all interest classifications except Manufacturers. This Committee is responsible for Chapter 21 in NFPA 5000, Building Construction and Safety Code. The Committee on Building CodeEducational and Day-Care Occupancies is seeking members in all interest classifications except Enforcing Authorities and Special Experts. This Committee is responsible for Chapters 17 and 18 in NFPA 5000, Building Construction and Safety Code.

Committees Seeking Members


The Committee on Aerosol Extinguishing Technology is seeking members in all interest classifications except Special Experts. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 2010, Standard for Fixed Aerosol Fire Extinguishing Systems. The Committee on Aerosol Products is seeking members in all interest classifications except Manufacturers and Special Experts. The Committee is responsible for NFPA 30B, Code for the Manufacture and Storage of Aerosol Products. The Committee on Aircraft Fuel Servicing is seeking members in all interest classifications. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 407, Standard for Aircraft Fuel Servicing. The Committee on Aircraft Maintenance Operations is seeking members in all interest classifications except Special Experts. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 410, Standard on Aircraft Maintenance. The Committee on Airport Facilities is seeking members in all interest classifications except Manufacturer, Special Expert, and User. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 409, Standard on Aircraft Hangars; NFPA 415, Standard on Airport Terminal Buildings, Fuel Ramp Drainage, and Loading Walkways; and NFPA 423, Standard for Construction and Protection of Aircraft Engine Test Facilities. The Committee on Animal Housing Facilities is seeking members in all interest classifications except Users and Special Experts. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 150, Standard on Fire and Life Safety in Animal Housing Facilities. The Correlating Committee on Boiler Combustion System Hazards is seeking members in all interest classifications except Manufacturers. This Correlating Committee oversees all technical committees responsible for NFPA 85, Boiler and Combustion Systems Hazards Code. The Committee on Boiler Combustion System HazardsFluidized Bed Boilers is seeking members in all interest classifications except Manufacturers. This Committee is responsible for Chapter 7 in NFPA 85, Boiler and Combustion Systems Hazards Code.

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June 2012

The Committee on Building CodeFurnishings and Contents is seeking members in all interest classifications except Special Experts. This Committee is responsible for Chapter 10 in NFPA 5000, Building Construction and Safety Code. The Committee on Building CodeIndustrial, Storage, and Miscellaneous Occupancies is seeking members in all interest classifications except Manufactures, Special Experts and Users. This Committee is responsible for Chapters 29-31 and 33-34 in NFPA 5000, Building Construction and Safety Code. The Committee on Building CodeStructures, Construction and Materials is seeking members in all interest classifications except Manufacturers. This Committee is responsible for Chapter 32 and Chapters 25-48 in NFPA 5000, Building Construction and Safety Code. The Committee on Chimneys, Fireplaces, and Venting Systems for Heat-Producing Appliances is seeking members in all interest classifications except Manufacturer and Special Experts. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 211, Standard for Chimneys, Fireplaces, Vents, and Solid Fuel-Burning Appliances. The Committee on Classification and Properties of Hazardous Chemical Data is seeking members in all interest classifications except Special Experts. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 704, Standard System for the Identification of the Hazards of Materials for Emergency Response. The Committee on Confined Space Safe Work Practices is seeking members in all interest classifications except Users. Manufacturers are especially in need. The Committee on Construction and Demolition is seeking members in all interest classifications except Enforcing Authorities and Special Experts. The Committee is responsible for NFPA 241, Standard for Safeguarding Construction, Alteration, and Demolition Operations. The Committee on Data Exchange for the Fire Service is seeking members in all interest classifications except Users. This committee is responsible for NFPA 950, Standard for Data Development and Exchange for the Fire Service. The Correlating Committee on Combustible Dusts is seeking members in all interest classifications except Manufacturers and Special Experts. This correlating committee oversees the technical committee on Fundamentals of Combustible Dusts and the technical committees for the following documents; NFPA 61 Standard for the Prevention of Fires and Dust Explosions in Agricultural and Food Processing Facilities; NFPA 91, Standard for Exhaust Systems for Air Conveying of Vapors, Gases, Mists, and Noncombustible Particulate Solids; NFPA 484, Standard for Combustible Metals; NFPA 654, Standard for the Prevention of Fire and Dust Explosions from

the Manufacturing, Processing, and Handling of Combustible Particulate Solids; NFPA 655, Standard for Prevention of Sulfur Fires and Explosions; and NFPA 664, Standard for the Prevention of Fires and Explosions in Wood Processing and Woodworking Facilities. The Committee on Fundamentals of Combustible Dusts is seeking members in the Enforcer interest classifications. The Committee on Electrical Equipment in Chemical Atmospheres is seeking members in all interest classifications except Special Experts and Users. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 496, Standard for Purged and Pressurized Enclosures for Electrical Equipment; NFPA 497, Recommended Practice for the Classification of Flammable Liquids, Gases, or Vapors and of Hazardous (Classified) Locations for Electrical Installations in Chemical Process Areas; and NFPA 499, Recommended Practice for the Classification of Combustible Dusts and of Hazardous (Classified) Locations for Electrical Installations in Chemical Process Areas. The Committee on Electrical Equipment Evaluation is seeking members in all interest classifications except Research/Testing. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 790, Standard for Competency of Third-Party Field Evaluation Bodies, and NFPA 791, Recommended Practice and Procedures for Unlabeled Electrical Equipment Evaluation. The Committee on Electronic Computer Systems is seeking members in all interest classifications. The Committee is responsible for NFPA 75, Standard for the Protection of Information Technology Equipment. The Committee on Electrical Equipment of Industrial Machinery is seeking members in all interest classifications except Manufacturers. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 79, Electrical Standard for Industrial Machinery. The Committee on Electrical Equipment Maintenance is seeking members in all interest classifications except Manufacturers and Users. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 70B, Recommended Practice for Electrical Equipment Maintenance. The Committee on Electrical Safety in the Workplace is seeking members in all interest classifications. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 70E, Electrical Safety in the Workplace. The Committee on Electrical Systems Maintenance is seeking members in all interest classifications. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 73, Standard for Electrical Inspections for Existing Dwellings. The Committee on Emergency Medical Services is seeking individuals in all interest classifications. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 450, Guide for Emergency Medical Services and Systems.

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June 2012

The Committee on Emergency Power Supplies is seeking members in all interest classifications except Users. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 110, Standard for Emergency and Standby Power Systems, and NFPA 111, Standard on Stored Electrical Energy Emergency and Standby Power Systems. The Committee on Emergency Services Organization Risk Management is seeking individuals in all classifications except Enforcing Authorities and Special Experts. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 1201, Standard for Providing Fire and Emergency Services to the Public, and NFPA 1250, Recommended Practice in Fire and Emergency Service Organization Risk Management. The Committee on Explosives is seeking members in all interest classifications except Manufacturers and Special Experts. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 495, Explosive Materials Code and NFPA 498, Standard for Safe Havens and Interchange Lots for Vehicles Transporting Explosives. The Committee on Explosion Protection Systems is seeking members in all interest classifications except Manufacturer, Special Expert, and User. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 67, Guideline on Explosion Protection for Gaseous Mixtures in Pipe Systems; NFPA 68, Standard on Explosion Protection By Deflagration Venting; and NFPA 69, Standard on Explosion Prevention Systems. The Committee on Exposure Fire Protection is seeking members in all interest classifications except Manufacturers and Special Experts. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 80A, Recommended Practice for Protection of Buildings from Exterior Fire Exposures. The Committee on Finishing Processes is seeking members in the classification of Enforcing Authority. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 33, Standard for Spray Application Using Flammable or Combustible Materials and NFPA 34, Standard for Dipping, Coating, and Printing Processes Using Flammable or Combustible Liquids. The Committee on Fire and Emergency Service Organization and DeploymentCareer is seeking members in the classification of Enforcing Authority. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 1710, Standard for the Organization and Deployment of Fire Suppression Operations, Emergency Medical Operations, and Special Operations to the Public by Career Fire Departments. The Committee on Fire and Emergency Service Organization and DeploymentVolunteer is seeking members in all interest classifications except Enforcing Authorities and Users. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 1720, Standard for the Organization and Deployment of Fire Suppression Operations, Emergency Medical Operations, and Special Operations to the Public by Volunteer Fire Departments.

The Correlating Committee on Fire and Emergency Services Protective Clothing and Equipment is seeking members in all interest classifications except Manufacturers and Research/Testing. This Correlating Committee oversees the technical committees for the following documents; NFPA 1800, Standard on Electronic Safety Equipment for Emergency Services (proposed); NFPA 1801, Standard on Thermal Imagers for the Fire Service; NFPA 1851, Standard on Selection, Care, and Maintenance of Protective Ensembles for Structural Fire Fighting and Proximity Fire Fighting; NFPA 1852, Standard on Selection, Care, and Maintenance of Open-Circuit Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA); NFPA 1855, Standard for Selection, Care, and Maintenance on Protective Ensembles for Technical Rescue Incidents; NFPA 1951, Standard on Protective Ensembles for Technical Rescue Incidents; NFPA 1952, Standard on Surface Water Operations Protective Clothing and Equipment; NFPA 1953, Standard on Protective Ensembles for Contaminated Water Diving (proposed); NFPA 1971, Standard on Protective Ensembles for Structural Fire Fighting and Proximity Fire Fighting; NFPA 1975, Standard on Station/Work Uniforms for Emergency Services; NFPA 1977, Standard on Protective Clothing and Equipment for Wildland Fire Fighting, NFPA 1981, Standard on Protective Clothing and Equipment for Wildland Fire Fighting; NFPA 1982, Standard on Personal Alert Safety Systems (PASS); NFPA 1983, Standard on Life Safety Rope and Equipment for Emergency Services; NFPA 1984, Standard on Respirators for Wildland Fire-Fighting Operations; NFPA 1989, Standard on Breathing Air Quality for Emergency Services Respiratory Protection; NFPA 1991, Standard on Vapor-Protective Ensembles for Hazardous Materials Emergencies; NFPA 1992, Standard on Liquid Splash- Protective Ensembles and Clothing for Hazardous Materials Emergencies; NFPA 1994, Standard on Protective Ensembles for First Responders to CBRN Terrorism Incidents; and NFPA 1999, Standard on Protective Clothing for Emergency Medical Operations. The Committee on Fire and Emergency Services Protective Clothing and EquipmentElectronic Safety Equipment is seeking members in all interest classifications except Manufacturers. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 1800, Standard on Electronic Safety Equipment for Emergency Services (Proposed); NFPA 1801, Standard on Thermal Imagers for the Fire Service; and NFPA 1982, Standard on Personal Alert Safety Systems (PASS). The Committee on Fire and Emergency Services Protective Clothing and EquipmentEmergency Medical Services Protective Clothing and Equipment is seeking members in all interest classifications except Manufacturers. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 1999, Standard on Protective Clothing for Emergency Medical Operations. The Committee on Fire and Emergency Services Protective Clothing and EquipmentSpecial Operations Protective Clothing and Equipment is seeking members in all interest classifications except Manufacturers and Users. This Committee is particularly seeking members with expertise in contaminated water operations protective clothing and equipment. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 1951; Standard on Protective Ensemble for

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Technical Rescue Incidents; NFPA 1952, Standard on Surface Water Operations Protective Clothing and Equipment; NFPA 1975, Standard on Station/Work Uniforms for Fire and Emergency Services; and NFPA 1983, Standard on Life Safety Rope and Equipment for Emergency Services. The Committee on Wildland Fire Fighting Protective Clothing and Equipment is seeking members in all interest classifications. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 1977, Standard on Protective Clothing and Equipment for Wildland Fire Fighting. The Committee on Fire Department Ground Ladders is seeking members in all interest classifications except Users. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 1931, Standard for Manufacturers Design of Fire Department Ground Ladders, and NFPA 1932, Standard on Use, Maintenance, and Service Testing of In-Service Fire Department Ground Ladders The Committee on Fire Department Rescue Tools is seeking members in all interest classifications except Manufacturers and Users. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 1936, Standard on Powered Rescue Tools. The Committee on Fire Hose is seeking members from all interest classifications except Manufacturers. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 1961, Standard on Fire Hose; NFPA 1962, Standard for the Inspection, Care, and Use of Fire Hose, Couplings, and Nozzles and the Service Testing of Fire Hose; NFPA 1963, Standard for Fire Hose Connections; NFPA 1964, Standard for Spray Nozzles, and NFPA 1965, Standard for Fire Hose Appliances. The Committee on Fire Reporting is seeking members in all interest classifications except enforcers. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 901, Standard Classifications for Incident Reporting and Fire Protection Data. The Committee on Fire Safety and Emergency Symbols is seeking members in all interest classifications except Special Experts and Manufacturers. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 170, Standard for Fire Safety and Emergency Symbols. The Committee on Fire Tests is seeking members in all interest classifications except Manufacturers, Research/Testing and Special Experts. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 252, Standard Methods of Fire Tests of Door Assemblies; NFPA 253, Standard Method of Test for Critical Radiant Flux of Floor Covering Systems Using a Radiant Heat Energy Source; NFPA 257, Standard on Fire Test for Window and Glass Block Assemblies; NFPA 259, Standard Test Method for Potential Heat of Building Materials; NFPA 260, Standard Methods of Tests and Classification System for Cigarette Ignition Resistance of Components of Upholstered Furniture; NFPA 261, Standard Method of Test for Determining Resistance of MockUp Upholstered Furniture Material Assemblies to Ignition by Smoldering Cigarettes; NFPA 262, Standard Method of Test for Flame Travel and Smoke of Wires and Cables for Use in Air-Handling Spaces; NFPA 265, Standard Methods of Fire Tests for Evaluating

Room Fire Growth Contribution of Textile Coverings on Full Height Panels and Walls; NFPA 268, Standard Test Method for Determining Ignitibility of Exterior Wall Assemblies Using a Radiant Heat Energy Source; NFPA 269, Standard Test Method for Developing Toxic Potency Data for Use in Fire Hazard Modeling; NFPA 270, Standard Test Method for Measurement of Smoke Obscuration Using a Conical Radiant Source in a Single Closed Chamber; NFPA 273, Standard Method of Test for Determining the Degrees of Combustibility of Building Materials (Proposed); NFPA 274, Standard Test Method to Evaluate Fire Performance Characteristics of Pipe Insulation; NFPA 275, Standard Method of Fire Tests for the Evaluation of Thermal Barriers Used Over Foam Plastic Insulation; NFPA 276, Standard Method of Fire Tests for Determining the Heat Release Rate of Roofing Assemblies with Combustible Above-Deck Roofing Components; NFPA 284, Standard Test Method for Mattresses for Correctional Occupancies (Proposed); NFPA 285, Standard Fire Test Method for Evaluation of Fire Propagation Characteristics of Exterior Non-Load-Bearing Wall Assemblies Containing Combustible Components; NFPA 286, Standard Methods of Fire Tests for Evaluating Contribution of Wall and Ceiling Interior Finish to Room Fire Growth; NFPA 287, Standard Test Methods for Measurement of Flammability of Materials in Cleanrooms Using a Fire Propagation Apparatus (FPA); NFPA 288, Standard Methods of Fire Tests of Horizontal Fire Door Assemblies Installed in Horizontal Fire Resistance-Rated Assemblies; NFPA 289, Standard Method of Fire Test for Individual Fuel Packages; NFPA 290, Standard for Fire Testing of Passive Protection Materials for Use on LP-Gas Containers; NFPA 701, Standard Methods of Fire Tests for Flame Propagation of Textiles and Films; and NFPA 705, Recommended Practice for a Field Flame Test for Textiles and Films. The Correlating Committee on Flammable and Combustible Liquids is seeking members in all classifications and is particularly interested in Manufacturers of containers and tanks. This Correlating Committee is responsible for NFPA 30, Flammable and Combustible Liquids Code. The Committee on Flammable and Combustible LiquidsFundamentals is seeking members in the interest classifications of Enforcers and Users. This Committee is responsible for chapters in NFPA 30, Flammable and Combustible Liquids Code. The Committee on Flammable and Combustible Liquids Tank Storage and Piping Systems is seeking members in the interest classifications of Manufacturerstorage tank vaults. This Committee is responsible for chapters in NFPA 30, Flammable and Combustible Liquids Code. The Committee on Flash Fire Protective Garments is seeking members in all interest classifications except Manufacturers and Users. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 2112, Standard on Flame-Resistant Garments for Protection of Industrial Personnel Against Flash Fire, and NFPA 2113, Standard on Selection, Care,

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Use, and Maintenance of Flame-Resistant Garments for Protection of Industrial Personnel Against Flash Fire. The Committee on Fluid Heaters is seeking members in all interest classifications except Manufacturers and Special Experts. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 87, Recommended Practice for Fluid Heaters. The Committee on Foam is seeking members in the Enforcer classification only. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 11, Standard for Low-, Medium-, and High-Expansion Foam. The Committee on Forest and Rural Fire Protection is seeking members in all interest classifications except Special Experts. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 1141, Standard for Fire Protection Infrastructure for Land Development in Wildland, Rural and Suburban Areas; NFPA 1142, Standard on Water Supplies for Suburban and Rural Fire Fighting; NFPA 1143, Standard for Wildland Fire Management; NFPA 1144, Standard for Reducing Structure Ignition Hazards from Wildland Fire; NFPA 1145, Guide for the Use of Class A Foams in Manual Structural Fire Fighting; and NFPA 1150, Standard on Foam Chemicals for Fires in Class A Fuels. The Committee on Garages and Parking Structures is seeking members in all interest classifications except Manufacturers, Special Experts, and Users. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 88A, Standard for Parking Structures. The Committee on Gas Hazards is seeking members in all interest classifications. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 306, Standard for the Control of Gas Hazards on Vessels. The Committee on Gas Process Safety is seeking members in all interest classifications except Special Expert. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 56 (PS), Standard for Fire and Explosion Prevention During Cleaning and Purging of Flammable Gas Piping Systems. The Committee on Gaseous Fire Extinguishing Systems is not seeking new members at this time, but will consider applications for members in the Enforcer classification that do not represent the US Federal government. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 12, Standard on Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems; NFPA 12A, Standard on Halon 1301 Fire Extinguishing Systems; and NFPA 2001, Standard on Clean Agent Fire Extinguishing Systems. The Committee on Hazard and Risk of Contents and Furnishings is seeking members in all interest classifications except Research/Testing Laboratories, Manufacturers and Special Experts. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 555, Guide on Methods for Evaluating Potential for Room Flashover; NFPA 556, Guide on Methods for Evaluating Fire Hazard to Occupants of Passenger Road Vehicles; and NFPA 557, Standard for Determination of Fire Load for Use in Structural Fire Protection Design. The Correlating Committee on Health Care Facilities is seeking

members for all interest classifications except Special Experts and Users. This Correlating Committee is responsible for overseeing all Technical Committees for NFPA 99, Health Care Facilities Code. The Committee on Health Care FacilitiesElectrical Systems is seeking members for all interest classifications. This Committee is responsible for Chapters 6 and 7 in NFPA 99, Health Care Facilities Code. The Committee on Health Care FacilitiesEmergency Management and Security is seeking members for all interest classifications except Special Experts and Users. This Committee is responsible for Chapters 12 and 13 in NFPA 99, Health Care Facilities Code. The Committee on Health Care FacilitiesFundamentals is seeking members for all interest classifications. This Committee is responsible for Chapters 1, 2, 3, 4 and 15 in NFPA 99, Health Care Facilities Code. The Committee on Health Care FacilitiesHyperbaric and Hypobaric Facilities is seeking members for all interest classifications except Users. This Committee is responsible for Chapter 14 in NFPA 99, Health Care Facilities Code, and NFPA 99B, Standard for Hypobaric Facilities. The Committee on Health Care FacilitiesMechanical Systems is seeking members for all interest classifications except Users and Manufacturers. This Committee is responsible for Chapters 8 and 9 in NFPA 99, Health Care Facilities Code. The Committee on Health Care FacilitiesMedical Equipment is seeking members for all interest classifications. This Committee is responsible for Chapters 10 and 11 in NFPA 99, Health Care Facilities Code. The Committee on Health Care FacilitiesPiping Systems is seeking members for all interest classifications. This Committee is responsible for Chapter 5 in NFPA 99, Health Care Facilities Code. The Committee on Helicopter Facilities is seeking members in all interest classifications. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 418, Standard for Heliports. The Committee on Incinerators and Waste Handling Systems is seeking members in all interest classifications except Manufacturers and Special Experts. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 82, Standard on Incinerators and Waste and Linen Handling Systems and Equipment. The Committee on Industrial Trucks is seeking members in all interest classifications except Manufacturers. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 505, Fire Safety Standard for Powered Industrial Trucks Including Type Designations, Areas of Use, Conversions, Maintenance, and Operations.

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June 2012

The Committee on Internal Combustion Engines is seeking members in the interest classifications of Enforcer, Insurer, and User. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 37, Standard for the Installation and Use of Stationary Combustion Engines and Gas Turbines. The Committee on Laser Fire Protection is seeking members in all interest classifications except Special Experts. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 115, Standard for Laser Fire Protection. The Committee on Liquid Fuel Burning Equipment is seeking members in the interest classifications of Insurer and User. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 31, Standard for the Installation of Oil-Burning Equipment. The Committee on Loss Prevention Procedures and Practices is seeking members in all interest classifications except Special Experts. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 600, Standard on Industrial Fire Brigades, and NFPA 601, Standard for Security Services in Fire Loss Prevention. The Committee on LP-Gases at Utility Gas Plants is seeking members in all interest classifications except Users. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 59, Utility LP-Gas Plant Code. The Committee on Manufacture of Organic Coatings is seeking members in all interest classifications except Manufacturer and Special Expert. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 35, Standard for the Manufacture of Organic Coatings. The Committee on Manufactured Housing is seeking members in all interest classifications except Enforcing Authorities and Manufacturers. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 501, Standard on Manufactured Housing; NFPA 501A, Standard for Fire Safety Criteria for Manufactured Home Installations, Sites, and Communities; and NFPA 225, Model Manufactured Home Installation Standard. The Committee on Marinas and Boatyards is seeking members in all interest classifications except Special Experts. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 303, Fire Protection Standard for Marinas and Boatyards. The Committee on Marine Fire-Fighting Vessels is seeking members in all interest classifications except Manufacturers and Special Experts. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 1925, Standard on Marine Fire-Fighting Vessels. The Committee on Marine Terminals is seeking members in all interest classifications except Special Experts and Insurance. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 307, Standard for the Construction and Fire Protection of Marine Terminals, Piers, and Wharves. The Committee on Merchant Vessels is seeking members in all interest classifications except for Special Experts. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 301, Code for Safety to Life from Fire on Merchant Vessels.

The Committee on Mining Facilities is seeking members in all interest classifications, including Special Experts and Manufacturers of mining equipment. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 120, Standard for Fire Prevention and Control in Coal Mines, and NFPA 122, Standard for Fire Prevention and Control in Metal/Nonmetal Mining and Metal Mineral Processing Facilities. The Committee on Motion Picture and Television Industry is seeking members in all interest classifications except Special Experts and Users. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 140, Standard on Motion Picture and Television Production Studio Soundstages, Approved Production Facilities, and Production Locations. The Committee on Motor Craft is seeking members in all interest classifications except for Special Experts. With the recent notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) entitled Inspection of Towing Vessels (published in the Federal Register on August 11, 2011), the Committee is looking for representatives from the towing vessel industry. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 302, Fire Protection Standard for Pleasure and Commercial Motor Craft. The Committee on Oxygen Enriched Atmospheres is seeking members in all interest classifications except for Special Experts and Users. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 53, Recommended Practice on Materials, Equipment and Systems Used in Oxygen- Enriched Atmospheres. The Committee on Fire Prevention Organization and Deployment is seeking members in all interest classifications except Enforcing Authorities. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 1730, Standard on Organization and Deployment of Code Enforcement, Plan Review, Fire Investigation, and Public Education Operations to the Public. The Committee on Portable Fire Extinguishers is seeking members in all interest classifications. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 10, Standard for Portable Fire Extinguishers. The Correlating Committee on Professional Qualifications is seeking members in all interest classifications except Enforcing Authorities, Labor, and Special Experts. This Correlating Committee oversees the Technical Committees responsible for NFPA 1000, Standard for Fire Service Professional Qualifications Accreditation and Certification Systems; NFPA 1001, Standard for Fire Fighter Professional Qualifications; NFPA 1002, Standard for Fire Apparatus Driver/Operator Professional Qualifications; NFPA 1003, Standard for Airport Fire Fighter Professional Qualifications; NFPA 1005, Standard for Professional Qualifications for Marine Fire Fighting for Land-Based Fire Fighters; NFPA 1006, Standard for Technical Rescuer Professional Qualifications; NFPA 1021, Standard for Fire Officer Professional Qualifications; NFPA 1026, Standard for Incident Management Personnel Professional Qualifications; NFPA 1031, Standard for Professional Qualifications for Fire Inspector and Plan Examiner; NFPA 1033, Standard for Professional Qualifications for Fire Investigator; NFPA 1035, Standard for Professional Qualifications for Fire and Life Safety

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June 2012

Educator, Public Information Officer, and Juvenile Firesetter Intervention Specialist; NFPA 1037, Standard for Professional Qualifications for Fire Marshal; NFPA 1041, Standard for Fire Service Instructor Professional Qualifications; NFPA 1051, Standard for Wildland Fire Fighter Professional Qualifications; NFPA 1061, Standard for Professional Qualifications for Public Safety Telecommunicator; NFPA 1071, Standard for Emergency Vehicle Technician Professional Qualifications; NFPA 1081, Standard for Industrial Fire Brigade Member Professional Qualifications; and NFPA 1091, Standard for Traffic Control Incident Management Professional Qualifications (proposed). The Committee on Professional QualificationsAccreditation and Certification to Fire Service Professional Qualifications is seeking members in all interest classifications except Special Experts. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 1000, Standard for Fire Service Professional Qualifications Accreditation and Certification Systems. The Committee on Professional QualificationsEmergency Vehicle Mechanic Technicians Professional Qualifications is seeking members in all interest classifications. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 1071, Standard for Emergency Vehicle Technician Professional Qualifications. The Committee on Professional QualificationsFire Inspector Professional Qualifications is seeking members in all interest classifications except Users. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 1031, Standard for Professional Qualifications for Fire Inspector and Plan Examiner. The Committee on Professional QualificationsFire Investigator Professional Qualifications is seeking members in all interest classifications except Users and Special Experts. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 1033, Standard for Professional Qualifications for Fire Investigator. The Committee on Professional QualificationsFire Marshal Professional Qualifications is seeking members in all interest classifications except Users, Consumers, and Special Experts. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 1037, Standard for Professional Qualifications for Fire Marshal. The Committee on Professional QualificationsFire Service Instructor Professional Qualifications is seeking members in all interest classifications except Users and Special Experts. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 1041, Standard for Fire Service Instructor Professional Qualifications. The Committee on Professional QualificationsIncident Management Professional Qualifications is seeking members in all interest classifications except Users. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 1026, Standard for Incident Management Personnel Professional Qualifications

The Committee on Professional QualificationsIndustrial Fire Brigades Professional Qualifications is seeking members in all interest classifications except Users and Special Experts. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 1081, Standard for Industrial Fire Brigade Member Professional Qualifications. The Committee on Professional QualificationsPublic Fire Educator Professional Qualifications is seeking members in all interest classifications except Users and Special Experts. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 1035, Standard for Professional Qualifications for Fire and Life Safety Educator, Public Information Officer, and Juvenile Firesetter Intervention Specialist. The Committee on Professional QualificationsPublic Safety Telecommunicator Professional Qualifications is seeking members in all interest classifications except Users. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 1061, Standard for Professional Qualifications for Public Safety Telecommunicator. The Committee on Professional QualificationsRescue Technician Professional Qualifications is seeking members in all classifications except Labor, Users, and Special Experts. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 1006, Standard for Technical Rescue Professional Qualifications. The Committee on Professional QualificationsWildfire Suppression Professional Qualifications is seeking members in all classifications except Special Experts. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 1051, Standard for Wildland Fire Fighter Professional Qualifications. The Committee on Public Emergency Service Communication is seeking members all interest classifications except Users and Special Experts. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 1221, Standard for the Installation, Maintenance, and Use of Emergency Services Communications Systems. The Committee on Recreational Vehicles is seeking members in all interest classifications except Manufacturers and Special Experts. This Committee is responsible for chapters in NFPA 1192, Standard on Recreational Vehicles, and NFPA 1194, Standard for Recreational Vehicle Parks and Campgrounds. The Committee on Road Tunnel and Highway Fire Protection is seeking members in all interest classifications except Special Experts. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 502, Standard for Road Tunnels, Bridges, and Other Limited Access Highways. The Committee on Safety to LifeAlternative Approaches to Life Safety is seeking members in all interest classifications except Special Experts and Users. This Committee is responsible for Chapters in NFPA 101A, Guide on Alternative Approaches to Life Safety.

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June 2012

The Committee on Safety to LifeBoard and Care Facilities is seeking members in all interest classifications except Enforcers and Special Experts. This Committee is responsible for Chapters 32 and 33 in NFPA 101, Life Safety Code. The Committee on Safety to LifeDetention and Correctional Occupancies is seeking members in all interest classifications except Manufacturers. This Committee is responsible for Chapters 22 and 23 in NFPA 101, Life Safety Code. The Committee on Safety to LifeEducational and Day Care Occupancies is seeking members in all interest classifications except Enforcing Authorities and Special Experts. This Committee is responsible for Chapters 14-17 in NFPA 101, Life Safety Code. The Committee on Safety to LifeFurnishings and Contents is seeking members in all interest classifications except Special Experts. This Committee is response for Chapter 10 in the NFPA 101, Life Safety Code. The Committee on Safety to LifeIndustrial, Storage and Miscellaneous Occupancies is seeking members in all interest classifications except Manufacturers, Special Experts and Users. This Committee is responsible for Chapters 11, 40 and 42 in NFPA 101, Life Safety Code. The Committee on Shipbuilding, Repair, and Lay-Up is seeking members in all interest classifications except Insurance. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 312, Standard for Fire Protection of Vessels During Construction, Conversion, Repair, and Lay-Up. The Correlating Committee on Signaling Systems is seeking members in all classifications except Special Experts. This Correlating Committee oversees the Technical Committees responsible for NFPA 72, National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code. The Committee on Signaling SystemsNotification Appliances for Fire Alarm Systems is seeking members in all classifications except Manufacturers and Special Experts. This Committee is responsible for Chapter 18 and Annex F in NFPA 72, National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code. The Committee on Signaling SystemsPublic Fire Reporting Systems is seeking members in all classifications except Manufacturers, Special Experts, Installers/Maintainers and Users. This Committee is responsible for Chapter 27 in NFPA 72, National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code. The Committee on Signaling SystemsSupervising Station Fire alarm and Signaling Systems is seeking members in all classifications except Manufacturers. This Committee is responsible for Chapter 26 in NFPA 72, National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code.

The Committee on Smoke Management Systems is seeking members in all interest classifications except Manufacturers and Special Experts. This Committee is responsible for Chapters in NFPA 204, Standard for Smoke and Heat Venting, and NFPA 92, Standard for Smoke Management Systems. The Committee on Solvent Extraction Plants is seeking members in all interest classifications except Special Expert and User. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 36, Standard for Solvent Extraction Plants. The Committee on Static Electricity is seeking members in the interest classifications of Enforcing Authorities, Insurer, and Research/ Testing. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 77, Recommended Practice on Static Electricity. The Committee on Subterranean Spaces is seeking members in all classifications except Special Experts and Users. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 520, Standard on Subterranean Spaces. The Committee on Tank Leakage and Repair Safeguards is seeking members in the interest classifications of Insurer, Installer/ Maintainer, and Manufacturer. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 326, Standard for the Safeguarding of Tanks and Containers for Entry, Cleaning, or Repair, and NFPA 329, Recommended Practice for Handling Releases of Flammable and Combustible Liquids and Gases. The Committee on Telecommunications is seeking members in all interest classifications. The Committee is responsible for NFPA 76, Standard for the Fire Protection of Telecommunications Facilities. The Committee on Textile and Garment Care Processes is seeking members in all interest classifications except Manufacturers. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 32, Standard for Drycleaning Plants. The Committee on Transportation of Flammable Liquids is seeking members in all interest classifications. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 385, Standard for Tank Vehicles for Flammable and Combustible Liquids. The Committee on Vehicular Alternative Fuel Systems is seeking members in the interest classifications of Enforcing Authorities, Users and Insurance. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 52, Vehicular Gaseous Fuel Systems Code. The Committee on Wastewater Treatment Plants is seeking members in all interest classifications except Special Experts and Manufacturers. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 820, Standard for Fire Protection in Wastewater Treatment and Collection Facilities.

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June 2012

The Committee on Water Additives for Fire Control and Vapor Mitigation is seeking members in all interest classifications except Manufacturers and Special Experts. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 18, Standard on Wetting Agents, and NFPA 18A, Standard on Water Additives for Fire Control and Vapor Mitigation. The Committee on Water-Cooling Towers is seeking members in all interest classifications except Manufacturers and Special Experts. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 214, Standard on Water- Cooling Towers. The Committee on Water Tanks is seeking members in all interest classifications except Manufacturers and Special Experts. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 22, Standard for Water Tanks for Private Fire Protection.

The Committee on Wood and Cellulosic Materials Processing is seeking members in all interest classifications, particularly Enforcing Authorities. This Committee is responsible for NFPA 664, Standard for the Prevention of Fire and Explosions in Wood Processing and Woodworking Facilities. To apply for membership on an NFPA Technical Committee, visit the Document Information Page for the relevant NFPA code(s) or standard(s) for which the Technical Committee is responsible. Then choose the Technical Committee tab and select the link Submit a Committee application online. You will be asked to sign-in or create a free online account with NFPA before using this application system. The application deadline the October 2012 Standards Council meeting is August 17, 2012.

Committees Soliciting Public Input (formerly Proposals)


The committees for the following documents are planning to begin preparation of their reports. In accordance with the New Regulations Governing the Development of NFPA Standards (Regs for Fall 2013 and All Subsequent Revision Cycles), committees are now accepting Public Input for recommendations on content for the documents listed below. Public input received by 5:00 p.m. ET on the closing date indicated will be acted on by the committee and that action will be published in the committees report. Public Input must be submitted to Codes and Standards Administration on Public Input forms which are available on the NFPA website on the documents information page. (NOTE: For information on specific committee meeting dates, contact Codes and Standards Administration, NFPA.) Copies of new document drafts are available by email at stds_admin@nfpa.org or from Codes and Standards Administration, NFPA, 1 Batterymarch Park, Quincy, MA 02169-7471, or they may be downloaded from NFPAs website at http://www.nfpa.org/codelist. If you need a current edition of a document, please write to NFPA, Fulfillment Center, 11 Tracy Drive, Avon, MA 02322, or call 800-344-3555. Change in proposal closing date or cycle P* Indicates proposed document Document No./ Title Edition NFPA 1-2012 NFPA 3-2012 NFPA 4-P* NFPA 11-2010 NFPA 12-2011 NFPA 12A-2009 NFPA 13E-2010 NFPA 16-2011 NFPA 18-2011 NFPA 30-2012 NFPA 30A-2012 NFPA 30B-2011 NFPA 31-2011 NFPA 33-2011 NFPA 34-2011 Public Input Closing Date Meeting Reporting A2014 A2014 A2014 F2014 F2014 F2014 F2014 F2014 A2014 A2014 A2014 A2014 F2014 F2014 F2014 June 2012

Fire Code 6/22/2012 Recommended Practice on Commissioning and Integrated Testing of Fire Protection and Life Safety Systems 6/22/2012 Standard for Integrated Fire Protection and Life Safety System Testing 6/22/2012 Standard for Low-, Medium-, and High-Expansion Foam 1/4/2013 Standard on Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems 1/4/2013 Standard on Halon 1301 Fire Extinguishing Systems 1/4/2013 Recommended Practice for Fire Department Operations in Properties Protected by Sprinkler and Standpipe Systems 1/4/2013 Standard for the Installation of Foam-Water Sprinkler and Foam-Water Spray Systems 1/4/2013 Standard on Wetting Agents 6/22/2012 Flammable and Combustible Liquids Code 6/22/2012 Code for Motor Fuel Dispensing Facilities and Repair Garages 6/22/2012 Code for the Manufacture and Storage of Aerosol Products 6/22/2012 Standard for the Installation of Oil-Burning Equipment 1/4/2013 Standard for Spray Application Using Flammable or Combustible Materials 1/4/2013 Standard for Dipping, Coating, and Printing Processes Using Flammable or Combustible Liquids 1/4/2013

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NFPA 40-2011 NFPA 45-2011 NFPA 54-2012 NFPA 59-2012 NFPA 70E-2012 NFPA 73-2011 NFPA 79-2012 NFPA 85-2011 NFPA 86-2011 NFPA 87-2011 NFPA 88A-2011 NFPA 90A-2012 NFPA 90B-2012 NFPA 91-2010 NFPA 92-2012 NFPA 99-2012 NFPA 99B-2010 NFPA 120-2010 NFPA 122-2010 NFPA 160-2011 NFPA 170-2012 NFPA 204-2012 NFPA 253-2011 NFPA 262-2011 NFPA 265-2011 NFPA 276-2011 NFPA 286-2011 NFPA 302-2010 NFPA 303-2011 NFPA 307-2011 NFPA 312-2011 NFPA 318-2012 NFPA 326-2010 NFPA 329-2010 NFPA 405-2010 NFPA 408-2010 NFPA 409-2011 NFPA 410-2010 NFPA 422-2010 NFPA 423-2010 NFPA 484-2012 NFPA 520-2010 NFPA 556-2011 NFPA 557-2012 NFPA 600-2010 NFPA 601-2010 NFPA 701-2010 NFPA 720-2012 NFPA 790-2012 NFPA 791-2012

Standard for the Storage and Handling of Cellulose Nitrate Film 6/22/2012 Standard on Fire Protection for Laboratories Using Chemicals 1/4/2013 National Fuel Gas Code 6/22/2012 Utility LP-Gas Plant Code 6/22/2012 Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace 6/22/2012 Standard for Electrical Inspections for Existing Dwellings 7/8/2013 Electrical Standard for Industrial Machinery 6/22/2012 Boiler and Combustion Systems Hazards Code 1/4/2013 Standard for Ovens and Furnaces 6/22/2012 Recommended Practice for Fluid Heaters 6/22/2012 Standard for Parking Structures 6/22/2012 Standard for the Installation of Air-Conditioning and Ventilating Systems 6/22/2012 Standard for the Installation of Warm Air Heating and Air-Conditioning Systems 6/22/2012 Standard for Exhaust Systems for Air Conveying of Vapors, Gases, Mists, and Noncombustible Particulate Solids 1/4/2013 Standard for Smoke Control Systems 1/4/2013 Health Care Facilities Code 6/22/2012 Standard for Hypobaric Facilities 6/22/2012 Standard for Fire Prevention and Control in Coal Mines 1/4/2013 Standard for Fire Prevention and Control in Metal/Nonmetal Mining and Metal Mineral Processing Facilities 1/4/2013 Standard for the Use of Flame Effects Before an Audience 7/8/2013 Standard for Fire Safety and Emergency Symbols 1/4/2013 Standard for Smoke and Heat Venting 1/4/2013 Standard Method of Test for Critical Radiant Flux of Floor Covering Systems Using a Radiant Heat Energy Source 1/4/2013 Standard Method of Test for Flame Travel and Smoke of Wires and Cables for Use in Air-Handling Spaces 1/4/2013 Standard Methods of Fire Tests for Evaluating Room Fire Growth Contribution of Textile or Expanded Vinyl Wall Coverings on Full Height Panels and Walls 1/4/2013 Standard Method of Fire Tests for Determining the Heat Release Rate of Roofing Assemblies with Combustible Above-Deck Roofing Components 1/4/2013 Standard Methods of Fire Tests for Evaluating Contribution of Wall and Ceiling Interior Finish to Room Fire Growth 1/4/2013 Fire Protection Standard for Pleasure and Commercial Motor Craft 6/22/2012 Fire Protection Standard for Marinas and Boatyards 7/8/2013 Standard for the Construction and Fire Protection of Marine Terminals, Piers, and Wharves 7/8/2013 Standard for Fire Protection of Vessels During Construction, Conversion, Repair, and Lay-Up 7/8/2013 Standard for the Protection of Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities 6/22/2012 Standard for the Safeguarding of Tanks and Containers for Entry, Cleaning, or Repair 1/4/2013 Recommended Practice for Handling Releases of Flammable and Combustible Liquids and Gases 1/4/2013 Standard for the Recurring Proficiency of Airport Fire Fighters 1/4/2013 Standard for Aircraft Hand Portable Fire Extinguishers 1/4/2013 Standard on Aircraft Hangars 7/8/2013 Standard on Aircraft Maintenance 1/4/2013 Guide for Aircraft Accident/Incident Response Assessment 1/4/2013 Standard for Construction and Protection of Aircraft Engine Test Facilities 7/8/2013 Standard for Combustible Metals 6/22/2012 Standard on Subterranean Spaces 1/4/2013 Guide on Methods for Evaluating Fire Hazard to Occupants of Passenger Road Vehicles 7/08/2013 Standard for Determination of Fire Loads for Use in Structural Fire Protection Design 1/4/2013 Standard on Industrial Fire Brigades 1/4/2013 Standard for Security Services in Fire Loss Prevention 1/4/2013 Standard Methods of Fire Tests for Flame Propagation of Textiles and Films 1/4/2013 Standard for the Installation of Carbon Monoxide (CO) Detection and Warning Equipment 6/22/2012 Standard for Competency of Third-Party Field Evaluation Bodies 6/22/2012 Recommended Practice and Procedures for Unlabeled Electrical Equipment Evaluation 6/22/2012

A2014 F2014 A2014 A2014 A2014 A2015 A2014 F2014 A2014 A2014 A2014 A2014 A2014 F2014 F2014 A2014 A2014 F2014 F2014 A2015 F2014 F2014 F2014 F2014 F2014 F2014 F2014 A2014 A2015 A2015 A2015 A2014 F2014 F2014 F2014 F2014 A2015 F2014 F2014 A2015 A2014 F2014 A2015 F2014 F2014 F2014 F2014 A2014 A2014 A2014

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NFPA 804-2010 NFPA 805-2010 NFPA 806-2010 NFPA 820-2012 NFPA 850-2010 NFPA 851-2010 NFPA 853-2010 NFPA 914-2010 NFPA 950-P* NFPA 1000-2011 NFPA 1003-2010 NFPA 1035-2010 NFPA 1071-2011 NFPA 1091-P* NFPA 1126-2011 NFPA 1145-2011 NFPA 1150-2010 NFPA 1201-2010 NFPA 1250-2010 NFPA 1407-2010 NFPA 1410-2010 NFPA 1452-2010 NFPA 1581-2010 NFPA 1583-2008 NFPA 1584-2008 NFPA 1620-2010 NFPA 1710-2010 NFPA 1720-2010 NFPA 1901-2009 NFPA 1906-2012 NFPA 1931-2010 NFPA 1932-2010 NFPA 1936-2010 NFPA 1952-2010 NFPA 2001-2012 NFPA 2010-2010 NFPA 2113-2012

Standard for Fire Protection for Advanced Light Water Reactor Electric Generating Plants 1/4/2013 Performance-Based Standard for Fire Protection for Light Water Reactor Electric Generating Plants 1/4/2013 Performance-Based Standard for Fire Protection for Advanced Nuclear Reactor Electric Generating Plants Change Process 1/4/2013 Standard for Fire Protection in Wastewater Treatment and Collection Facilities 7/8/2013 Recommended Practice for Fire Protection for Electric Generating Plants and High Voltage Direct Current Converter Stations 1/4/2013 Recommended Practice for Fire Protection for Hydroelectric Generating Plants 1/4/2013 Standard for the Installation of Stationary Fuel Cell Power Systems 1/4/2013 Code for Fire Protection of Historic Structures 1/4/2013 Standard for Data Development and Exchange for the Fire Service 1/4/2013 Standard for Fire Service Professional Qualifications Accreditation and Certification Systems 7/8/2013 Standard for Airport Fire Fighter Professional Qualifications 1/4/2013 Standard for Professional Qualifications for Fire and Life Safety Educator, Public Information Officer, and Juvenile Firesetter Intervention Specialist 1/4/2013 Standard for Emergency Vehicle Technician Professional Qualifications 7/8/2013 Standard for Traffic Control Incident Management Professional Qualifications 1/4/2013 Standard for the Use of Pyrotechnics Before a Proximate Audience 7/8/2013 Guide for the Use of Class A Foams in Manual Structural Fire Fighting 7/8/2013 Standard on Foam Chemicals for Fires in Class A Fuels 1/4/2013 Standard for Providing Fire and Emergency Services to the Public 1/4/2013 Recommended Practice in Fire and Emergency Service Organization Risk Management 1/4/2013 Standard for Training Fire Service Rapid Intervention Crews 1/4/2013 Standard on Training for Initial Emergency Scene Operations 1/4/2013 Guide for Training Fire Service Personnel to Conduct Dwelling Fire Safety Surveys 1/4/2013 Standard on Fire Department Infection Control Program 1/4/2013 Standard on Health-Related Fitness Programs for Fire Department Members 1/4/2013 Standard on the Rehabilitation Process for Members During Emergency Operations and Training Exercises 1/4/2013 Standard for Pre-Incident Planning 1/4/2013 Standard for the Organization and Deployment of Fire Suppression Operations, Emergency Medical Operations, and Special Operations to the Public by Career Fire Departments 6/22/2012 Standard for the Organization and Deployment of Fire Suppression Operations, Emergency Medical Operations and Special Operations to the Public by Volunteer Fire Departments 6/22/2012 Standard for Automotive Fire Apparatus 7/8/2013 Standard for Wildland Fire Apparatus 7/8/2013 Standard for Manufacturers Design of Fire Department Ground Ladders 1/4/2013 Standard on Use, Maintenance, and Service Testing of In-Service Fire Department Ground Ladders 1/4/2013 Standard on Powered Rescue Tools 1/4/2013 Standard on Surface Water Operations Protective Clothing and Equipment 1/4/2013 Standard on Clean Agent Fire Extinguishing Systems 1/4/2013 Standard for Fixed Aerosol Fire-Extinguishing Systems 1/4/2013 Standard on Selection, Care, Use, and Maintenance of Flame-Resistant Garments for Protection of Industrial Personnel Against Flash Fire 6/22/2012

F2014 F2014 F2014 A2015 F2014 F2014 F2014 F2014 F2014 A2015 F2014 F2014 A2015 F2014 A2015 A2015 F2014 F2014 F2014 F2014 F2014 F2014 F2014 F2014 F2014 F2014 A2014 A2014 A2015 A2015 F2014 F2014 F2014 F2014 F2014 F2014 A2014

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