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What’s My Number?
Topic:
Problem solving with place value.

In this activity students will:
Q Use blocks to model problems. Q Record solutions and explain their mathematical thinking. Q Look for patterns and identify the “code” of base ten. Q Write similar word problems and exchange them with each other.

Setup:
• Student arrangement: Partners Partners need: • 1 place value mat with digit cards • 3 blocks-of-100 • 1 activity sheet for each student

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Packed with Math: 2–3

© Digi-Block

What’s My Number?
Introduction:
r Pass out materials to partners.

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Example 1: r Ask students to put 8 blocks-of-10 and 7 ones on their mats and set the digit cards. Have a volunteer say how to write the number for 8 blocks-of-10 and 7 ones. (87: “eighty-seven”) Example 2: r Ask students to put 23 single blocks on their mats and set the digit cards. In order to do this, students will need to pack the blocks as much as possible. r Have a volunteer say how to write the number for 23 single blocks (2 blocks-of-10 and 3 single blocks). Example 3: r Ask students to put 14 blocks-of-10 on their mat and set the digit cards. Again, students will need to pack the blocks as much as possible. r Have a volunteer say how to write the number for 14 blocks-of-10 (1 block-of-100, 4 blocks-of-10, 0 single blocks). r Have students say what number is represented by 14 blocks-of-10. (140: “one hundred forty”)

Activity:

r Pass out the activity sheets.

Partners will: r Read the problems and then model them with blocks. r Record their solutions and look for patterns. r Prepare to explain their thinking, then write their own problems.
r While students work watch for the discovery of the “code” of base ten. When students see this

pattern, they can differentiate between the number of tens in a number, and the number in the tens place. For example, the number 314 has one ten in the tens place, but there are 31 tens in the number. This pattern extends to all kinds of groups of tens. Closure: r Discuss which problems students found to be easy or difficult and why. Have students share any similarities in the problems. Do students discover the “code” of base ten? Do they know any answers immediately without needing to model with blocks? How do they “know?”

Assessment:

r Do students accurately model problems with blocks? r Do students discover the code of base ten? r Are students able to explain their mathematical thinking? r Are students able to invent similar problems of their own?

Extensions:

r Ask students to choose a problem to model, draw, and explain to the group. r Use problems that students write for additional practice. Make a booklet of students’ word problems,

put a stack of student problems in a math center, and/or collect problems for student portfolios. r A second activity sheet is provided for additional practice. Problems include 4-digit numbers so additional blocks are required.

© Digi-Block

Packed with Math: 2–3

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5 What’s My Number?
Name ________________________________________________

Model each problem with blocks.

A.

How do you write the number for 12 blocks-of-10?

How do you write the number for 13 blocks-of-10?

B.

C.

How many blocks-of-10 are in the number 206?

How many blocks-of-10 are in the number 172?

D.

E.

The children put 126 jellybeans into bags of ten. How many bags of ten did they make?

There were 260 children on the playground. They were put into teams of ten. How many teams were there?

F.

On the back, write some of your own problems about blocks.©
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Packed with Math: 2–3
© Digi-Block

What’s My Number?
Name ________________________________________________

5

Model each problem with blocks.

A.

I have 13 tens. I am a three-digit number. I have 7 ones. What number am I?

B.

I have 30 tens. I am a three-digit number. The sum of my digits is 9. What number am I?

C.

How do you write the number for 100 blocks-of-10?

D.

How many blocks-of-10 are in the number 1072?

E.

The children picked 314 apples. They put them in bags of ten. How many bags of ten did they fill?

F.

Karen had 25 packs-of-10 and 3 loose candies. How many candies did Karen have altogether?

On the back, write some of your own problems about blocks.©
© Digi-Block This page may be copied for classroom use.

Packed with Math: 2–3

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