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* An ALA Notable Children’s Book
* A Booklist Editor’s Choice
* A Kirkus Reviews Best Book of the Year
* A Book Links Best New Book for the Classroom
* A New York Public Library “100 Titles
for Reading and Sharing” selection
* A People magazine’s “Summer’s Hottest Reads” selection

10

written by annie barrows + illustrated by sophie blackall

To Victoria Rock, mentor, strategist,
and fellow subversive, with gratitude.

—A. B. + S. B.

Text © 2013 by Annie Barrows.
Illustrations © 2013 by Sophie Blackall.
All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form
without written permission from the publisher.
Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data
Barrows, Annie.
Ivy + Bean take the case / written by Annie Barrows ; illustrated by Sophie Blackall.
p. cm. — (Ivy + Bean ; bk. 10)
Summary: After watching a movie about a detective on the television,
Bean decides to set up shop as a private investigator—and she and Ivy start
looking for mysteries to solve.
ISBN 978-1-4521-0699-1 (alk. paper)
1. Bean (Fictitious character : Barrows)—Juvenile fiction. 2. Ivy (Fictitious character:
Barrows)—Juvenile fiction. 3. Private investigators—Juvenile fiction. 4. Best friends—
Juvenile fiction. 5. Humorous stories. [1. Mystery and detective stories. 2. Private
investigators—Fiction. 3. Best friends—Fiction. 4. Friendship—Fiction. 5. Humorous
stories.] I. Blackall, Sophie. ill. II. Title. III. Title: Ivy and Bean take the case. IV. Series:
Barrows, Annie. Ivy + Bean ; bk. 10.

CONTENTS
BLACK AND WHITE AND TOUGH ALL OVER 7
PIRVATE INSTEVIGATOR 17
UNDER COVER JOB 29
SPECIAL DELIVERY 36
WHAT’S UP? 47
PANCAKE FALLS 56
HOUSE CALLS 65

PZ7.B27576Iys 2013
813.6—dc23

PLAN AHEAD! 72

2012046876
Manufactured in China.

THE BIG NAB 85
DANGER MAKES THEM YAWN 97

Book design by Sara Gillingham Studio.
Typeset in Blockhead and Candida.
The illustrations in this book were rendered in Chinese ink.

AT THE END OF THEIR ROPE 109

10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

CRACK! 119

Chronicle Books LLC
680 Second Street, San Francisco, California 94107
Chronicle Books—we see things differently.
Become part of our community at www.chroniclekids.com.

4

5

BLACK AND
WHITE AND
TOUGH ALL OVER
Bean wasn’t allowed to watch television. Or
music videos. Bean’s mom said she could
watch two movies a week, but they had to
be movies where everyone was good. There
couldn’t be any bad words. There couldn’t
be any mean people. There couldn’t be
anyone smoking a cigarette or wearing tiny
clothes. There were only about ten movies
that followed all these rules. Luckily, Bean
liked all ten of them. She watched them over
and over.

Bean’s mom said ten movies were plenty.

He was also kind of mean. Everyone in the

She said kids Bean’s age should be using their

movie was kind of mean, plus they all smoked

imaginations instead of watching TV. She said

cigarettes. They didn’t wear tiny clothes, but

fresh air was more important than movies.

that was the only rule they didn’t break.

And then what did she do?

“I can’t believe you’re letting me watch

She made Bean watch a movie. It was her

this,” said Bean.

favorite movie, she said. Everyone should see

“Seven Falls is a classic,” said Bean’s mom.

it at least once, she said. The movie was called

“It’s one of the greatest movies ever made.”

Seven Falls, but it wasn’t about waterfalls or

“Don’t be a stooge,” said Al Seven to

even the leaf-falling kind of

another movie guy. That was pretty mean, but

fall, which is what Bean

Bean pretended not to notice, because this

had guessed. It was

was one of the greatest movies ever made. Al

about a guy named

Seven was also in black and white, but Bean

Al Seven. Boy, was

knew she was supposed to imagine he was

he tough! He was

in color. “What is it about dames?” asked Al

so tough he talked

Seven, walking slowly down a rainy street.

without moving his

“They break your heart, I guess,” he answered

lips, and some of it

himself.

was bad words.

8

That was the end.
9

Bean’s mom let out a big, happy sigh.

Her mom’s eyebrows were almost inside

“Wasn’t that amazing? Did you get it?”

her hair. “Oh dear,” she said.

Get what? Bean wasn’t sure, but she
nodded. “I’m going to be just like Al Seven
when I grow up.”
Her mother raised one eyebrow. “You’d
better not be.”
But then again, why wait, thought Bean.
She could start being like Al Seven now. She
slumped over and put her feet on the coffee
table. “Whaddaya say we watch it again,
pal?” she said.

Her mom raised both eyebrows.

“What I say is don’t call me pal
and take your feet off the
table.”
That hadn’t worked. Bean
took her feet off the table. “Dames,”
she said sadly. “They break your heart.”
10

+ + + + +

world were tough, and they didn’t laugh very

It took Bean a long time to go to sleep that

much. They didn’t do normal stuff like go to

night. She couldn’t stop thinking about Al

school and the grocery store. They walked

Seven and his black-and-white world. It didn’t

down alleys and wore hats. But the most

seem like the real world, the world on Pancake

un-normal thing about Al Seven’s world was

Court that Bean lived in. People in Al Seven’s

the mysteries. There were mysteries all over
the place.
Bean untwisted her pajamas and thought
about that. A mystery was a question you
couldn’t find the answer to. In Al Seven’s
world, the mysteries were things like Who
took Hester’s jewels? or Where was Sammy
La Barba on the night of May twelfth?
Bean didn’t have any jewels and she sure
as heck didn’t know anyone named Sammy
La Barba, but there were plenty of questions
that she didn’t have answers to. Millions of
them. For instance, Who thought of money?
Not even grown-ups knew the answer to that

12

13

question. But Bean had other questions, too,

rubbed their faces until they came up with

like What’s inside the cement thing in the

the answers. Then they walked down alleys

front yard? What’s behind the Tengs’ fence

in the rain.

and why do they lock it up? and What’s the

That’s what Bean was going to do. First

matter with the mailman? When she asked

thing tomorrow morning. “None of your busi-

these questions, her parents usually said

ness!” she muttered. “Ha!”

something like It’s none of your business.
That meant that there was an answer, but they
didn’t want her to know it.
Bean smiled toughly at her dark ceiling.
They didn’t want her to know things. Just like
Sammy La Barba didn’t want Al Seven to know
where he was on the night of May twelfth. But
Al Seven had figured it out, because he was a
private investigator. Private investigators got
to the bottom of mysteries. They solved them.
They snuck around. They spied. They asked
the hard questions. They sat in their cars and

14

15

PIRVATE
INSTEVIGATOR
Al Seven had a cool office with his name on
the door. Bean could do that, easy-peasy. She
began with the desk. Bean had a good board,
and she had two triangle things that were
called sawhorses even though they didn’t look
anything like horses. She put the sawhorses
on the front lawn, and then she put the board
on top of the sawhorses. Desk! The spinny
chair was a little harder. Bean had to yank it
up the basement stairs, yank, yank, yank. And
just when she got to the top, it fell back down
most of the stairs. It was already broken, but it
was more broken after it fell down the stairs.

“What the heck are you doing, Bean?”
called her father from the

“Thanks, pal,” said

Bean.

kitchen.

Her

“I’m trying to get this

“Don’t call me pal.

chair

You’re welcome.”

up

the

stairs!”

shouted Bean.

dad

said,

Bean put the chair

“Do you want help?”

behind the desk and

Bean thought about

sat in it. She spun

that. Al Seven had a helper,

around. Pretty good.

a lady named Dolly.

But she wasn’t done

Mostly, Dolly lit Al’s

yet. She needed to

cigarette, but Bean

look tough enough to

figured she would have

solve a mystery. She

carried a chair if Al had asked her

needed a hat. She

to. “Yes, please.”

was pretty sure there

Her dad came down to the basement

was one upstairs, in

and carried the spinny chair up the stairs.

the closet of things

He even carried it out to the front yard.

no one wanted.

18

19

She was right! On the highest shelf of

and the phone under her arm, Bean went

things no one wanted, covered with dust,

downstairs to her mom’s recycling bin.

was a hat. It was sort of grayish, sort of

brownish. It smelled funny.

of important-looking papers. Papers with rub-

When Bean put it on, she

ber stampings all over them. Papers with

could hardly see. It was a

typing in three different colors. Papers

little dangerous, walking

with sticky notes. Today was a good day in the

around in that hat, but Al

bin. Papers were spilling out the sides. Also

Seven said, “Danger makes me laugh.”

big envelopes. And file folders! What a haul!

While Bean was climbing down from

Since she was already down on the floor, Bean

the shelf, she found something she hadn’t

took a look in her mom’s wastebasket. Five

expected, something great. It was a telephone,

thousand lipstick tissues and a plastic picture

an old one with two parts and a cord. Perfect!

of an alligator lying on a log. Words coming

Al Seven was always slamming the phone

out of the alligator’s mouth said, “Sure I’m

down on people. Bean slammed the phone

working. I’m working so fast you can’t see it.”

down a few times to test

Bean stared at the plastic picture for a

it. “So long, pal,” she

long time. Was the alligator working or was it

whispered. With the

supposed to be funny? Did grown-ups think it

hat on her head

was funny? If they did, why? It was a mystery.

20

Bean’s mom’s recycling bin was always full

21

But, Bean decided, not a very interesting one.
With her hat, her phone, and an armful of
paper, Bean went outside.
+ + + + +
Bean was a good artist. She
could draw nice stuff like
flowers and cute bugs and
dancing bagels, but she
could also draw serious
stuff like science pictures
and pyramids. Her sign was
serious. She wanted it to
look like a real, grown-up
sign. Al Seven’s sign said Al
Seven, Private Investigator.
Bean wanted a sign like
that. She began to write in
big, serious letters.

23

Bean’s last name was really long. It was so

long that sometimes she mixed up the letters.

She mixed up the letters.

Bean got another piece of paper. Bean, she

wrote in big, serious letters. Good.

Private. Good.

Investigator. Oops. Instevigator.

Bean got another piece of paper.

Bean. Good.

Pirvate. Oops.

Bean got another piece of paper.

Bean. Good.

Prva—oops. Bean crumpled the paper and

threw it on the ground.

She got another piece of paper.

Bean. Good.

P. Good.

I. Good.

Done. Whew.
24

25

Bean taped her sign to the plum tree. She
put her hat on her head. She put the papers
and file folders on the desk. She made her
eyes into slits and looked around Pancake
Court. She watched Jake the Teenager walk
out of his house with a gigantic shopping bag.
“So long, pal,” she muttered. She picked up
the phone and slammed it down. She was
tough. She was ready. She was ready for
her first mystery.

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