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Entered as Second Class M atter at the San Jose, Calif., Postoffice.

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R O S IC R U C IA N E M B L E M S
M em bers desiring R osic ru cian emblems may obtain them from H eadquarters. T h e y are made of gold, beautifully inlaid with enamel, neat in size, and consist of the triangle surmounted by the E gyp tian cross. M e n s style emblem with screw back, $2.00. W o m e n s style, with patent safety catch pin, $2.25.

U N T O T H E E I G R A N T
T h is is one of the rarest, occult, mystical manuscripts and books ever given to the public. I t con tain s som e of the true, secret teach in gs of T h ib e t , and was w ritten over 2,000 years ago. T h e first issue, of this bo o k was translated with special permit of the Grand L a m a of disciples of the secret college of the Grand T e m p le of T h ib e t, and authorized by the E m p e r o r of China. T h e soul of the rare writings, the spirit of the teachings, and the sublime beauty of expression, has not been altered or modified, only the physical body, newer paper, and new cover, have been added to the wonderful elem ents still living and b re athing in the m ost sacred of manuscripts of the T em ple of the land of mystical, unknown beauty. Many attem pts have been made, and thousands of claims have been presented purporting to secure and reveal the inner, secret, and sacred teach ings of the M aste rs in Thib et, who are considered to be the most highly developed mystics on earth. But no authentic copy of the. teachin gs like this manuscript has ever been given to the world. T h is bo o k is printed on heavy paper and well-bound, and sold at a special price of $1.50 per copy, postage paid by us.

A T H O U S A N D Y E A R S O F Y E S T E R D A Y S
Reincarnatio n made simple! L ear n e d teachers have always said: F a c t s and prin ciples told in story form are N E V E R F O R G O T T E N and are more easily understood. A fascinating fiction story of reincarnation was written by the Im p e ra to r sometim e ago and becam e very popular. I t is interesting, instructive, and shows how the " Y E S T E R D A Y S " of the past are revealed. A s a story, it is e x c e lle n t; as an explanation of rein carnation, it is unequalled. T h is second edition is prepared at such a price that all may secure it 75 cents each, plus 10 cents for postage*

A U TO EM BLEM S
W e have at last secured an emblem for your car. W e have had man y requests for an attractiv e emblem that mem bers could attach to the radiator of their car to serve the sam e purpose as other fratern ity emblems. T h e s e beautiful Ro sicru cian emblems are in the form of a cross surm ounted on an Egyp tian triangle. T h e y are finished with duco enamel, which preserves them against heat; the c ross and triangle are finished in gold, the rose in red, and stems and leaves in green. I t has a special arrangem ent perm itting it to be fastened to the radiator of a car. T h e size of the emblem is five and one-quarter inches. T h e y are intended solely for use on automobiles, and are econom ically priced at $1.50, postage paid by us.

A T T R A C T IV E SE A L S
T h e s e Ro sicru cian seals are about the size of a twenty-five cent piece, beautifully printed in red, and em bossed gold, and have the symbol of the c ross and rose, and the words " A M O R C , R o sicru cian Order, San Jo s e , California, on their face. T h e s e seals can be used by mem bers on letters or com munications to friends or business acquain tances. I f you would like to spread the name of the organization to your friends, and at the sam e time have an attractiv e little seal for your stationery , we would suggest that you secure them. T h e y may be had at the rate of fifty cents per hundred, or practically what they cost, postage paid by us.

(C O N T IN U E D

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Published Monthly

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S u p r b m b C o u n c il o f

AM ORC

Rosicrucian Park, San Jose, California

JU L Y , 1929

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V O L U M E V II. No. 6

C ontents
The Imperators Monthly Message Roger BaconThe Rosicrucian "Earth-Bound ............. _________ ___________ ___ ____ ....... ,M y
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Be Not Discouraged-------------------------------------------------- ---- My The Spirit of God-----------------My

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Report of the Egyptian Tour (Installment Number Fiv e)________ __________________________________ ..... ~..My T h b T r ip S e c r b t a r y Idiosyncrasies.. ---------------------------------------------- By
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S u p r b m b S ec reta ry S u p r e m e S ecrbta ry

Suggestions for the Coming Convention................ My

4
HOW TO ADDRESS LETTERS This is Very Important
to:
Always address your envelopes A M O R C , Rosicrucian Park, San California. In the lower corner of your envelope, write the name of one of the following departments; which is to give immediate attention to your letter. For general information: Supreme Secretary. Payment of dues or fees: Financial Secretary. Purchase of supplies: Supply Bureau. Regarding lost lectures, missing mail, errors, etc., Complaint Dept. Regarding the formation of groups, distribution of propaganda literature, and furtherance of the work: Extension Dept. Regarding this magazine and its departments: Triangle Dept. Regarding help in illness or strictly personal problems: Welfare Dept." Personal letters to the Imperator should be marked in the corner: Imperators Secretary. Make checks and money orders payable only to AM ORC FUNDS. Unless you notify us within thirty days after issuance of a magazine that you have not received we cannot rectify

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^ h e Imperators (^Monthly (^Message


V V V V V
H A V E but one thought to bring to our members this month, and that is a thought of appreciation for the op portunity I have had in the past twenty years to carry out the work of the Order, and fulfill the mission that my superior officers in the Order say was truly my mission at this time. Tw enty years ago this month of July, I had reason to believe that I might be permitted to cross some threshold in some portal that led to one chamber of the Order of the Rosy Cross. I knew not where the portal was, nor when nor how I might cross it, but the fact that there was still a chamber in which the spirit of Rosicrucianism dwelt, and that the doorway was still open, was all that I needed to know to feel that my desires and prayers of many years had been realized. I had come to learn that the Order itself was not a myth, or so dormant that its real life had passed into silence and history; but the additional fact that a seeker might still find an opportunity to enter the ranks and become a humble Neophyte was indeed thrilling and in spiring. Therefore, it was with unusual anticipation and hope that I started on my journey across the high seas toward Europe. I was conscious, of course, that I might not qualify, or that I might not be deemed worthy of crossing the threshold and entering the chamber; but I was encouraged by the fact that I was to be permitted to know of the cham ber and its guardian, and make the con tact that would permit me to tell others how they might find the goal of their desires, even if I was found unworthy of entering the chamber myself. I often think of this incident when I hear of seekers in America who dis cover so easily where the portal to the first chamber is located, but who regret that they must journey for an hour, or journey for a mile, to reach it. Distance seems to be, to them, an important ele ment in their journey toward the light, and time seems to be a factor that re ceives undue consideration. Some in our organization today have waited thirty, forty, and fifty years for an opportunity to cross the threshold. Some have grown old, and reached the last decade of their lives, waiting for an opportunity to enter the organization that once was the light and life of their parents. W e have many members in our organization whose parents were at one time members of the O rder in foreign lands. These persons have seen emblems and even robes containing the Rosicrucian symbols; and it has been their ambition to follow in the footsteps of their parents. T h ey have waited and waited, and are now happy in the fact that finally they have made the great contact. O thers have been seekers but for a few months, and have possibly been too fortunate in making the con tact too conveniently, and too quickly. T h ey cannot have the appreciation of the contact that comes only after months of preparation, years of anxiety, and many decades of waiting. Perhaps our members, generally, have not sensed what has become apparent to all of the higher members, and es pecially to all of the officers throughout this North American jurisdiction; it is that throughout the world Rosicrucian ism is becoming more solidified in its activities and co-operative work, and more systematized in its outer and inner operations. V arious j u r i s d i c t i o n s throughout the world that were dor mant in accordance with the one hundred and eight year cycle law have recently become operative, and other jurisdictions that were operating under temporary restrictions and limita tions as a result of the war have become openly active in all phases of the work. T h e result is a more free and intimate form of intercourse between the various jurisdictions, and the establishment of

a more complete fraternal relationship. In America the various contending bod ies claiming to operate as mystical, oc cult, and even Rosicrucian organizations have been reduced to a few in number; and there is today but on e universally

recognized Rosicrucian organization in A m erica and that is A M O R C . There


always will be Rosicrucian societies, groups, or clubs of independent origin, but the time has come when these or ganizations can no longer keep pace with the growth and development of the world-wide organization, nor even con tinue to pretend to be a part of the regular Order of the Rosy Cross. Much has been accomplished by the Rosicrucian O rder in America in the past twenty years. Its foundations now are excellently laid, and its first struc tures tower considerably above the heights of the attainments of other metaphysical and mystical societies of a fraternal nature. There is hardly a day that passes that some large newspaper or magazine does not contain an article or a reference regarding the Rosicrucian Order, and these statements are clipped and forwarded to us by our members, that they may be preserved in the rec ord books at Headquarters. D ay after day, week after week, sees the work of our organization established in a new community, or among a new group of persons in some part of the continent. M ore and more the members who have reached the higher grades make reports of achievements and successes in vari ous ways, and enthusiastically give credit to the principles taught in our courses of study. M en of science, men of learning in various professions and arts, eminent business men, and men of prominent po sition, reveal themselves almost weekly in the correspondence as having joined secretly and quietly in order to peruse the studies and derive the proper bene fits without attracting undue attention to their membership. Th eir enthusiasm and their highly developed interest in the work forces them ultimately to iden tify themselves, and reveal the fact that they are now ready and anxious to serve in the great cause and help carry it on to greater heights. In every possible way the H eadquart ers of the organization in San Jose has

enlarged the scope of its activities, con sistent with the Constitution and ethical rules and regulations of the Order, so as to reach out to the greatest possible number of seekers and bring the light within their reach. Hundreds of forms of activities are carried on by the vari ous departments of Headquarters which have no direct bearing upon the actual membership, and have no immediate connection with the regular work of the lodges or regular routine matters of the organization. In every way that is con sistent with the ancient and modern reg ulations of the organization, the knowl edge possessed by the Rosicrucians is being carefully but widely spread among those who cannot unite with the organization, but nevertheless need some of the light of knowledge in order to make their lives more happy and successful. And so it is a period of rejoicing and a period for celebration. A t the conven tion to be held this summer, we antici pate that many important matters will be discussed and brought officially into the routine work of the organization for the benefit of all who are anxious to attain the utmost in right living and right thinking. Personally I extend to each one of you, wherever you may live, and in whatever grade of the work you may be, an invitation to come and visit Headquarters, and see with your own eyes what is being done and what is being accomplished. Do not for get that the Supreme Temple, the Supreme Lodge, and all of the officers and de partments at Headquarters constitute your home and your national center of interests in the work we are doing. W e want you to feel that you have a share of interest in our Headquarters and that you are personally a member of the Su preme Lodge in every sense. Therefore, on this occasion of the twentieth anni versary of the present cycle o f our or ganization in America, I send to each one of you the cordial greetings of fel lowship, and extend my hand to you as a Brother. I assure you that the organ ization values your membership as I personally value your friendship and your hearty co-operation in the work that lies before us.

Boger

Bacon
By R a y m u n d A n d r e a

Grand Master, AMORC, Great Britain V V V V V


T is gratifying to observe the steadily growing interest in the old M asters of our O r der as shown by the various biographies a n d m o n o graphs appearing from time to time from the pens of scholars of different per suasions of thought. T h a t our prede cessors will, during the present century, come into their own, that their lives will be rightly valued and their work thor oughly understood, may, I think, be safely augured. Through many genera tions mankind has profited of the ad vanced thought and discoveries of these pioneers; but in the immediate future the keener eye of the modern student will be fixed upon the personalities who disseminated the deeper science, and due honour will be accorded to them. It seems a little cruel, yet it is the way of the world, that men of great intel lectual acumen so often fail to realize the paramount value of a peculiar knowledge accessible to them in the worlds greatest libraries, maybe in the very libraries and museums of the uni versities in which they were nurtured and trained for professional life; and that they should deem this knowledge so unorthodox, so opposed to accepted belief and demonstration, as to consider the exponents of it a set of imposters and worthy of contempt. If they hap pen to live long enough to take a few steps, through some happy circum stance, beyond the hard and fast bounds of orthodoxy and undertake a little pio neer work themselves, they will per chance turn suddenly back with rever ent thought to the despised authors they have violently impugned, and thank God that their eyes have been opened to appreciate them. Indeed, this is some what the position at the present time. W e have been inundated for the last quarter of a century with biographies and autobiographies of little men and statesmen, of the living and the dead; but the advancing scholars of our day, whose eyes are riveted upon the higher evolution of the race, are interrogating the past for authentic information about the elect few whose works are now seen as underlying and making possible our highest civilization, yet themselves have received scant recognition at the hands of their immediate successors. I am not so uncharitable as to suggest that those men of science who are now giving us biographies and monographs of the early Rosicrucians were formerly denouncers of these same pioneers; but it is significant that they are fellows of colleges in which orthodoxy is rampant. It is significant, for instance, that a statue of Roger Bacon was erected in the University Museum of O xford in 1914, in commemoration of the seventh centenary of Bacon's birth. It is signifi cant, too, that for the annual lecture on a master mind read in the British A cad emy, Bacon was the chosen subject for 1928. It is immensely gratifying to read the able and sincere discourse just pub lished by Dr. Little, a Fellow of the Academy, and I believe it will do much in focussing the interest of his fellow members upon the life and work of the father of experimental science and of medieval occultism. From this lecture and the biographies available I propose to sketch a few of the main features and incidents, I am not competent to do more, of the personality and thought of the master which will bring him very near to us. W e shall realize that the thought of the Rosicrucian of yester day is precisely that of the Rosicrucian of today profound and practical, revo lutionary in application, intent upon en lightening, uplifting and ameliorating, and withal, from the point of view of the orthodoxy of the schools, disrup tive in character.

Comparitively little appears to be known of the life of Bacon. T h e date and place of his birth cannot be stated with certainty, but was probably in 1214 in the county of Somersetshire. So scanty is the information available that in a standard biography some thirty pages alone suffice for it, while the greater space is given to speculation and discussion of his works. His early edu cation was received at O xford Univer sity, where he gained considerable repu tation for his knowledge; and later he removed to Paris to study theology. No date or reason can be assigned to his joining the Franciscan Order. His forty years of study, to which he referred in 1267, fall into two periods of equal length: the time before his admission into the Order and the time afterward. Tw enty years were devoted to the study of languages and of science at O xford and Paris. Subsequently he en tered the Franciscan Order, presumably for the protection it offered as a power ful organization, and the facilities for study that membership provided. It is conjectured therefore that he was over thirty years of age when he became a member, and entered the Order for very good reasons and after mature consid eration. A word about the Franciscan Order will not be out of place, since an inter esting portion of Bacons life centers within the period of his membership. He had evolved doctrines which con tained certain suspicious novelties that put the brethren in a panic and which they were authorized to avoid as reprobated by the O rder. T h e Fran ciscans, Minorites, or Lesser Brethren, are an austere religious order working under the auspices of the Roman Church and founded in 1298 by St. Francis of Assisi. A t one time, owing to internal dissensions, the order was split into three bodies. T od ay the O rder consists of the Conventuals, O bser vants, and Capuchins; the Second O r der consists of Nuns; and the Third Order consists of members who live in society, not taking the vow of celibacy, but are bound by the spirit of the rule of the Order. T h e Franciscans have al ways been foremost in foreign mission ary work, and throughout all their in ternal dissensions have faithfully con

tinued St. Francis work of ministering to the poor. M ost of the great Scottish theologians were Franciscans, as also were many popes of famous name; and in the world of letters Bacon was a prominent member of the Order. T h e Franciscans reached England in 1220. A t the reformation there were sixty-five monasteries in England; and after the dissolution of the monasteries the Order was restored by the foundation of an English convent in Douay in 1617. It is now reputed to have twelve houses in Great Britain and seventeen in Ire land, and is held in peculiar reverence by the Catholic community. W e can predict without difficulty what would happen were our Imperator to betake himself to the quiet retreat of a Franciscan monastery for reflection and literary activities, and in due course, feeling that the time were fully ripe, hand his Cosmic revelations to his brethren to peruse. His retreat would abruptly terminate in a chorus of ana themas and a probable communication from Rome. This is what appears to have actually happened to Bacon. He had not long been a member of the Franciscan Order before he incurred the suspicion of his superiors; and when Banoventura, an aspiring character eager to revive the spirit of St. Francis and impatient of new and curious learn ing, became General of the O rder in 1256, it is likely that he was responsible for Bacons removal from O xford to Paris, where he was placed under close supervision. Dr. Little, in the opening of his lecture says, Is there any other instance of a medieval thinker receiving a command from the reigning Pope to send him his works, not because their orthodoxy was suspected, but because they might suggest remedies for the evils from which the world was suffer ing? But, as one of Bacon's biog raphers points out, when Pope Clement IV wrote to Bacon in 1266, command ing him to send His Holiness his works with all speed, there is reason for think ing that the relations between Bacon and the Franciscans were far from nor mal. How could it be otherwise when we are assured that his invective against the intellectual and moral vices of his time increased in severity? He was in a privileged position inside the Order

and he made the most of it. H e took the measure of the whole system and found it corrupt in the sight of God. Never before had the moral corruption of the Church, including the court of Rome, been so fiercely arraigned. "T h e whole clergy is given up to pride, lux ury, and avarice. W herever clergymen are gathered together, as at Paris and O xford, their quarrels, their conten tions, and their vices are a scandal to laymen. He prophesied that unless sweeping reforms were instituted by the Pope, there was no prospect but the advent of Antichrist in the near future. No wonder that Pope Clement grew warm and wrote him a letter. I imagine he thought that the advent of Antichrist had come and that Bacon was he. M ore than once in the worlds history has Antichrist proved to be a Rosicrucian. Bacon, however, was hot on the trail; no Pope could stop him. H e made a violent onslaught on the scholastic ped antry of his contemporaries, their false standards of wisdom, and their prefer ence of metaphysical subtleties and ver bal contention to the pursuit of real knowlege; until in 1278, Jerome, the new General of the Order, held a chap ter in Paris. Bacon was summoned for his "novelties, condemned and cast into prison. W h a t precisely these "nov elties were we do not know; his works were full of them, but we know that the Church of Rome dislikes "novelties and should not be molested with them. He had been suspected of unsound views for twenty years. W h o ever heard that valuable truths might some times be concealed beneath the jugglery of the magicians; that the history of Greek philosophy should be under the keeping and guidance of Providence no less than the history of Judaea; that the teaching of the Stoics on personal mor ality should be superior to that of any Christian teacher; or that there should be any ethical value in the works of Mohammedan writers? In Paris he found everything within the Order cal culated to arouse his fiery spirit to the limit. H e was eager for the promotion and diffusion of science and the re form of the Church, and he found the university seething with dialectical con troversy. T h e controverted questions were of momentous importance and

Bacon was prepared for them; but they were prosecuted by men destitute of scientific training, unable to distinguish truth from error, verbal subtleties from fundamental realities, and who had nev er troubled to read Aristotle and the Bible in the original. T o these wooden disputants his wisdom was anathema, and they silenced him by incarceration. T h e General of the Order, Jerome, who was responsible for this, anticipated ap peals to the Pope on B acon s behalf and took care that his decision was con firmed. It is believed that he remained a prisoner for fourteen years. A fter the death, in 1292, of Jerome, who had previously been raised to the papal chair, a chapter of the Franciscans was held in Paris, at which the then G en eral of the O rder, liberated some of those condemned in 1278. Bacon, it is thought, was one of those liberated; for in that year he was again at work on his last treatise. T h e date of his death is uncertain, but transpired soon after. H e was buried in the Franciscan Church in O xford. D r. Little refers to the legendary Bacon which grew up side by side with the real Bacon soon after his death, and quotes the following from a writer of 1385: "F ria r Roger called Bachon, an Englishman, intent rather on practi cal philosophy than on writing it, per formed wonderful experiments. F o r he was of such subtlety in natural philos ophy that he was more intent on his wonderful experiments (the truest sci ence) than on writing or teaching. By natural condensation of the air he some times made a bridge thirty miles long over the sea from the continent to E n g land, and, after passing over it safely with all his retinue, des troyed it by rarefying the air by natural means . . . . He was so com plete a master of optics that from love of experiments he neglected teaching and writing, and made two mirrors in the University of O xford; by one of them you could light a candle at any hour, day or night; in the other you could see what people were doing in any part of the world. B y experiment ing with the first, students spent more time in lighting candles than in studying books; and seeing in the second their relations dying or ill or otherwise in

The M ystic T riangle

trouble, they got into the habit of go ing down to the ruin of the university; so by common counsel of the University both mirrors were broken. . . . Dr. Little contends that Bacon was not speaking strictly original; that he always needed some external stimulus; that few of his ideas were his own; and that his originality lay in finding fresh applications and combinations of the ideas of others. I am not disposed to confute this statement, since there may be an element of truth in it. Indeed, the Doctor gives one or two instances of the enunciation of principles for which Bacon has been given great credit, but points out that these principles had pre viously been enunciated by others. His predecessors enunciated, and that is as far as they got; Bacon enunciated also, and then harnessed his principles to the forces of the sun, moon, and stars and produced unheard of results by his unique applications and combinations of these forces. Our modern men of science are none too happy when they have to deal with an original; they must prove him a plagiarist somehow, even though they perforce must kneel to him. Bacon met the objection that experi mentation in searching out the laws of nature did but limit or deny superna tural agencies, in this way: W e do not perceive the wonderful actions of na ture which are done every day in us and in things before our eyes; but we think they are done either by special divine operation or by angels or devils or chance. But this is not so, except in so far as every operation of the creature is in some sort from God. But this does not prevent operations being done ac cording to natural laws or reason; for nature is the instrument of G ods handi work. W e may well smile, with the history of the Roman Church before us, at the onerous tasks and responsibilities which Bacon enjoined upon the Pope in his earnest efforts for reformation. It is the duty of Christian prelates and princes to encourage the investigation of the secret powers of art and nature, not to forbid it because they might be used for bad purposes. And yet it is true that these magnificent sciences, through which great good can be

wrought as well as great evil, should only be known by certain persons au thorized by the Pope, who subject to the feet of the Roman Church should work for the public good under papal command, so that the Church in all its tribulations can have recourse to these powers, and at last Antichrist and his followers would be met and, as miracles like his were done by the faithful, it would be shown that he was not God and his persecution would be hindered and mitigated in many respects by measures of this kind. And therefore if the Church would arrange for the study of them, good and holy men might work at these magical sciences by special au thority of the Pope. . . . In his advocacy of experimental science Bacon clearly defined the two kinds of experience for the attainment of knowledge. There are two kinds of experience: one is of the senses, and the other by illumination or divine inspira tions. T h e simplest example of the first is the conviction one gets that fire burns, by putting ones hand in it; this is more efficacious than any amount of argu ment. O f the second there are seven degrees, culminating in the mystics vision of God. These two kinds of ex perience are alike in this, that they pro ceed by immediate contact with reality, not by reasoning. He held that all knowledge went to the writing of the Bible, but that all knowledge was necessary to the under standing of its words, in their literary and in their mystical sense. T h e first aim of his contemporaries, he insisted, should be to restore the text of St. Jer omes translation, which could be done only by going back to the earliest manu scripts, many of which were still in monastic libraries. In any case of doubt or obscurity the readings should be compared with the original Greek or Hebrew; corrections by irresponsible in dividuals do more harm than good and ought to be stopped. T h e revision should be undertaken by an authorita tive papal commission consisting of competent scholars working on definite principles. In a letter to Pope Clement IV he says: I cry to you against this corruption of the T ext, for you alone can remedy the evil. H e did not cry in vain. For many years the V atican

Commission has been working under the presidency of Cardinal Gasquet and B acons plan is being carried out. A few weeks ago the famous historian of the V atican, Cardinal Gasquet, passed to his rest and was buried at Downside Abbey in England, of which Abbey he was at one time the Prior. N o doubt this work of his last years will be con

tinued by able successors and brought to completion. Strange revolution in the centuries! In the 13th century the Church of Rome accepted Bacon; in the 13th century the Church of Rome threw him out; in the 20th century he rises from the dead within the precints of the V atican .

B IB L IO G R A P H Y

L i[e and W o rk o f R oger Bacon by John H enry Bridges. W illiams & Norgate,
London.

R og er Bacon by H. S. Redgrove. Rider & C o., London. R oger B acon , by Dr. A . G. Little. Annual master and mind lecture 1928 in th*
British Academy. Issued by the O xford University Press.

V V V V V

Sarth'^Bound,
An Explanation of a Very Important Principle in the Lives of All Beings
By T h e I m p e r a t o r
much is b e i n g written and published these days in regard to manifestations of an unusual nature that ap pear to be in accordance with the doctrine of spiritu alism, or in keeping with the nature of the so-called spirit dem onstrations of the seance room that many of our members ask us to be a little more specific in regard to the knowledge which the Rosicrucians pos sess relating to these things. In the earlier grades of our work, the student is very definitely told to guard himself against accepting the spiritual istic doctrines and to wait to investi gate these matters until after he has become more familiar with the Rosicrucian teachings. It is further intimated in many parts of our teachings that many, if not most of the demonstra tions or unusual manifestations that oc cur without fraud in the seance room, or in experimental circles, can be better explained by laws and principles dis tinctly different from those offered by the spiritualistic movement. I believe that somewhere in our teachings we also make the very definite statement that spirits of departed persons do not re turn to earth, and in this wise manifeat their identity in order to prove the im mortality of the soul. T h a t very defi nite statement often causes confusion in the minds of those who have heretofore believed many of the spiritualistic claims, and it is a startling statement to those who have had or still have occa sional experiences that seem to be spiritualistic. H eretofore we have refrained from any general explanation of our attitude, except in the higher teachings in the upper grades of the work; for we have not wanted to introduce the more pro found principles involved in these mani festations into the work of the lower grades. In fact, it is almost impossible for the student in the lower grades to comprehend the real principles involved in these unusual manifestations of the continued existence of departed per sons, without having become very fa miliar with many other laws and prin ciples of the spiritual world and of the Cosmic. T his is why the su bject of such manifestation has been treated so briefly in the earlier work. However,

The M ystic T riangle

we are continually aware of the fact that in the present Aquarian cycle such manifestations are becoming more fre quent, more definite, and more convinc ing to the persons who are inclined to believe in the present-day tenets of spiritualism.

T h erefore, in dealing with on e phase of this matter, in the present article, we hope to make plain one or two princi ples which have to do with one of the most frequent forms of manifestations common to those who are related in some way to persons who have passed on. It is with considerable anxiety, however, that we open this subject even to this degree, for we do not want and hope we shall not have a flood of in quiries asking for further illumination and instruction in regard to the other principles which are not dealt with in this particular article. In other words, we hope and pray that our members will realize that we cannot present a com plete outline of the higher teachings dealing with the laws and principles in volved in the process of transition, and the conditions that surround personali ties after transition, in this magazine or in personal communications.
From all this our new members may properly judge that the Rosicrucians do not agree with the present-day spiri tualistic claims, and that they know just how and why certain persons have such unusual experiences as they consider to be spiritualistic or proofs of the spiri tualistic contentions. In order to present, in this article, the several principles which we wish to make plain and understandable, we be lieve it is best to bring them forth in the form of incidents in a story that is not wholly fictitious, and not even partly a product of imagination. T h e principal thread of the following story is true and correct, as some of our mem bers know, but names and places have been changed, and a few unimportant incidents or details introduced ficti tiously in order to help make plain the laws being presented. T o begin the story, we will step backward to the days of the troubles with N icaragua in 1927, when some of the United States marines were sent into foreign lands to help the American

government maintain its plans and de sires. Among the marines was one lieu tenant whom we shall call Henry Smith. He was a brave, clean-cut, educated young man with good military training, a student of the popular sciences and arts, an'd a reader of many of the pres ent-day systems of higher thought. W e cannot say that he was a mystic, a phil osopher, or even a real student of the spiritual or psychological systems of philosophy; nor was he particularly in clined toward religion or the church. Sometime toward the close of 1927, he disappeared during one of the skir mishes and was reported as having been killed in warfare somewhere on the battle line, but most likely during an expedition across the lines into the enemys fields. T h e report of his death was recorded at W ashington, and there the story of his career ended. Henry Smith had a cousin, M rs. John Jones, living in Kansas City. M rs. Jones was fairly well acquainted with her cousin, had followed his expedition into Nicaragua with much interest, and was sorely grieved when she was notified that he had lost his earthly life during the warfare. She was also unhappy in the knowledge that his body had not been recovered and returned to his home, that no proper burial ceremony had been given him, and that there was no tomb to mark his burial place. Now we must pass a few years and come up to the present time in our story, where we find that M rs. Jones has become a more proficient and pro found student of spiritual philosophy, and in order to enlarge and improve her understanding she has become a mem ber of the A M O R C . No attempt has been made on her part, during the years intervening, to find, through spiritualis tic, occult, mystical, or other means of a psychic nature the location of her cousins body, nor the exact time and nature of his transition. In fact, M rs. Jones was not spiritualistically inclined and did not believe that any really defi nite information regarding her cousin or the nature of his transition could be ob tained through the mediumship of an other person. However, during the course of one of her experiments in meditation, concen

tration, and spiritual study, she had oc casion, as do all of our members at the beginning of their first lessons, to sit in the quietness of her little room at home, which she had set aside as a sanctum for study and higher thought. During the course of her meditation and con centration, she had occasion to look into the large mirror that was before her, and while looking into her own eyes she was surprised to see her features chang ing and the face of her cousin appear ing. She had not expected or antici pated any such incident as this, and was considerably startled. A fter the first few minutes of surprise, she regained her proper poise and did not permit herself to speculate, analyze, or ques tion what was occurring, and, therefore, did not create any delusions which might account for what followed. In a few moments she seemed to hear the voice of her cousin speaking to her as from the mirror, and she noticed that there seemed to be some movement of the lips in the face that smiled sweetly to her. T h e voice was indefinite, and did not seem to have the timbre and qualities of the human voice; and as she recalled the incident later, she was not quite sure that there was really any sounds connected with what she seemed to hear, but rather an inner or mental form of hearing conveyed a message to her which she believed at the time was in the form of spoken words. T h e message conveyed in this manner was to the effect that the cousin was in a hospital somewhere in Nicaragua, evi dently unknown in identity to those around him, and his location unknown to the American authorities. There seemed to be an intimation that he was in pain and suffering, more or less un conscious and unable to reveal his iden tity to the persons around him or send any communication to the American o f ficers, so that he might be discovered and returned to the United States. His final words seemed to be a plea that the cousin, M rs. Jones, have a search insti tuted, his whereabout learned, and aid sent to him at once.

ordinary spiritualistic methods by re fraining from taking the matter up with mediums or those connected with spiri tualistic activities. A fter considerable thought, she decided to write to the W elfare Department of A M O R C , ex plain the entire incident, and ask its help in securing any possible verifica tion of the strange message that lin gered in her mind. T h e W elfa re D e p a r t m e n t of A M O R C naturally thought of the many natural, normal means of securing addi tional information for M rs. Jones, with out resorting to any supernormal or supernatural processes whatsoever. It is a practice with the various depart ments of A M O R C to deal with natural law and natural, normal principles whenever it is believed that they will serve, rather than resort to any specula tive processes in securing definite in formation in regard to earthly condi tions and affairs. T h is is not an indica tion that the officers and workers of A M O R C have more faith in the laws and principles of nature than they do in the laws and principles of the higher realms, but experience has taught all of us that many of the most practical re sults desired by our members are more efficiently attained or secured by the ap plication of our various material meth ods which constitute the rational system of the W elfa re Departments of our or ganization. Therefore, M rs. Jones was directed to communicate with one of our service volunteers in the C anal Zone, who was and still is closely asso ciated with governmental affairs. Upon receipt of the letter, Captain Brown at the Canal Zone wrote M rs. Jones that he was glad to be of service in such a matter as this, and that he would institute an investigation of the governmental records, as well as inves tigate the marines who are still situated in or near Nicaragua. Captain Brown further stated that he realized that the nature of the incident which she related in her letter and the manner in which she had received the strange message purporting to come from her cousin were things which he could not reveal or explain to government officers or to the officers of the marines, and that he would have to handle the matter with considerable diplomacy, but that re

The M ystic T tiangle July 1929

T h e whole incident reawakened M rs. Jones interest in the events of 1927, and naturally inspired her to begin an im mediate investigation. O nce again M rs. Jones proved her lack of interest in the

gardless of the time or expense in volved, he would keep at the case until he made a definite report to her. This attitude on the part of Captain Brown is typical of the service being rendered by thousands of our members who are always anxious to carry out the ideals of co-operative work in our organiza tion, in the true spirit of brotherhood. Captain Brow ns investigation finally resulted in a definite report from W a s h ington that so far as their official rec ords were concerned, Lieutenant Henry Smith had been killed in action and un questionably buried in enemy grounds. Their files in his case were closed. T h e officers of the marines stationed near the place of the scene of action re ported that their records likewise stated definitely the death of Lieutenant Henry Smith and his burial in enemy grounds. Captain Brown was not satisfied with these reports, however, although he communicated them promptly to M rs. Jones, and merely intimated that he would make further inquiries. He then wrote to the A M O R C for further ad vice and guidance in his investigations. Knowing that certain laws and princi ples of the spiritual or Cosmic world permit of unusual manifestation at times, we took this particular case as one which would enable us to again test the knowledge contained in our higher teachings. A series of experiments were con ducted by the staff of officers at Head quarters, and the following information was secured through contact with the Cosmic records. Lieutenant Henry Smith was sent with two others on a scouting expedition into the enemy's territory. They began their entrance into the other country by an airplane flight. During the flight they were shot at by the enemy, and had to come to earth. In making a sudden landing, they were badly jolted, and one of the three became lamed. He had to remain partly hidden in bushes while the other two, one of them being Lieutenant Smith, advanced cautiously. A bullet shot toward the airplane as it was de scending had slightly wounded Lieuten ant Smith's neck, but it did not deter him in his advancement for a short time. Finally, however, the loss of blood caused him to become weak, and his

companion had to assist him in walking toward their goal. A few hundred feet further they were attacked by seme na tives, and had to take refuge behind some rocks. Here t h e y were sur rounded, and they were so injured by bullets that Lieutenant Smith became un conscious and his companion was easily captured. T h ey were carried to some crude barracks, built in the wild section of the country by the Nicaraguans, where they were cared for. An investigation was conducted by one of the superior officers to determine the nature of the affair, for it was evi dent that Lieutenant Smith would die, and his companion had already passed on. Realizing that the Americans would make an investigation or that in the event of an exchange of prisoners, if Lieutenant Smith did not die, the whole affair would add to the bitterness of the diplomatic relations between the two countries, it was decided to change the uniform of Lieutenant Henry Smith and garb him in native costume while in the hospital, and thus hide his identity. For five days he was in a delirious condi tion, as a result of a fever that had set in, and was only conscious of his true objective surroundings for a few min utes at a time, during which time he attempted to bribe some guards to com municate with the American marines. Realizing that he could not succeed in this manner, he became anxious about his safety, and realized that if he con tinued in his present condition without the proper medical aid, he would pass on. During such periods of rational thought as were possible, he thought of his relatives in various parts of the United States, and what means he might take to communicate with them and let them know where he was. His transition finally occurred while he was partly conscious of his surroundings, and of his perplexities and desires. His body was buried in foreign soil in the costume of a native, and his true iden tity kept from the records. T h e third member of the party, who had been lamed and partly wounded, returned to A.merican soil, and reported that he had seen Smith injured and his companion severely wounded, and had

watched them being captured practi cally dead while hiding behind some rocks. Later investigations on the part of the marines failed to find him among the captured prisoners of war, and a story current among the natives was to the effect that several American marines had been injured and had died in bar rack hospitals. It was upon such reports as this that the American government had established their reports of the final passing and disappearance of Lieuten ant H arry Smith. Obtaining this definite information regarding the entire incident would seem to close the story; but there re mains this question to be answered: W h y did a personality purporting to be Henry Smith apparently communicate with his cousin, M rs. Jones, and claim that he or it was in a hospital, still alive, and desiring discovery and release? In other words, we can generalize this question into one as follows: W h y is it that the seeming personality of a per son who has passed on will apparently appear before the consciousness of a person living here on earth, and create the impression that the personality is still living and desires help? You will note that this question does not include the how or why of the appearance of personalities claiming to be certain in dividuals, nor does it include the how and why of the means of creating such messages or impressions in the con sciousness of a person living here on earth. These points we are purposely eliminating from this incident; first, be cause they are not important to the story, or the actual case in hand, and secondly, because such points involve principles which are clearly presented in the unfolding teachings of the higher grades. Now it has been found through long experience and hundreds of experiments made by the master experimenters in our organization in many lands and for many years, that when a person passes out of this earthly life under conditions and in circumstances that are unusual, mysterious, strange, or fraught with important consequences, and especially connected with occurrences that should be revealed to some others in order that the fog may be lifted, the clouds dis pelled, and the true facts revealed, he

The M ystic T riangle July 1929

remains mentally or psychically earthbound" for an indefinite length of time. In other words, when a person passes out of this life as did Lieutenant Henry Smith, with a dominating thought and an insistent desire to communicate to some friend or relative the revelation of his identity, location, and cause of pass ing, he carries with him into spiritual consciousness this great anxiety to com municate or contact some living person and reveal the information that he be lieves is of an important nature. This intense desire associated with living persons and earthly conditions, and having as its crux a communication with persons on the earth plane, causes the personality or spiritual mind of the soul to be bound to the earth's aura or the earths minds. Again, in other words, we may say that this intense desire to communicate with someone else living on the earth plane acts as a mental cord that holds the person bound to other earthly minds for a period that ends only when the desire is brought into a realization or the intense wish is ful filled. It has been found that such earthbound" persons continue to project their thoughts and radiate their ideas along the mental cord that holds them to the earth minds until they find an oppor tunity of making plain and definite the thoughts and message which they be lieve must be communicated. In many cases it has been found that such a con dition on the part of one who has passed on is an agonizing, tormenting one, or in other words anything but a peaceful and joyous condition. It has been definitely established that such persons are not aware of the fact that they are binding themselves to an earth ly contact by holding the thought which constitutes their great desire, but they realize only one thing they must re lieve themselves of this information or the facts constituting the message they wish to give in order that they may be freed from the only heavy, painful, ma terial emotion that weighs down their consciousness and holds them enslaved to earthly contact. W e are not prepared to say that it is such a condition that is responsible

for all of the peculiar manifestations that have been attributed to so-called ghosts or spirits, even when such mani festations have been proved not to be fraudulent or due to natural causes; but we do know that thousands of persons have passed from this life under such circumstances and in conditions of be ing earth-bound" as have caused them to come before the investigations of the most experienced of our M aster workers in many lands. In a great many of these cases, the intense desire to communicate with someone is associated with some crime that has been committed by the one who has departed or with some in justice or unfair circumstance that origi nated in the actions of the departed one, and now rests as a burden upon some living person. A s might be expected, it was found in every case that the earth-bound" person was attempting to do that which seemed the most ethi cal or most spiritual thing to do. And in most cases, the desire to communicate was closely associated with an intense desire to relieve someone else of unnec essary suffering or unjustified accusa tions. T h e next peculiar part of such a situ ation is that the mind of a person who passes on with such intense desires and thus becomes earth-bound until the condition is relieved loses all sense of the elements of time and space as ap preciated by our objective, earthly senses. W e can thoroughly understand how a spiritual consciousness living in a spiritual realm, even though close to the earth and its envelope, would have no consciousenss of space or distance, and certainly not of earthly distances in the same sense that we consider them during our earthly lives. Surely such a person would have no consciousness of time, for there would be no past, present, or future in the relation of inci dents to one another. This explains one of the strange and most puzzling points in connection with the messages or communications w-hich such personalities eventually transmit to some mind on the earth plane. T h e message or communication that they ra diate and cause to be implanted in the human consciousness is in the terms of the N O W . It is entirely free from

any relationship with the time in ele ments of days, weeks, months, or years of the past. W h atever was the thought or message that the mind of this person ality concentrated upon during its last hours of consciousness on the earth plane, it is unchanged in terms of time or relationship to space, distance, and period after transition. In the case of Lieutenant Henry Smith, his last earthly, conscious thoughts which he wished to communi cate were probably, I am here in a hospital, suffering, waiting, and hoping to be discovered and taken back to my own country. You will note that that message or that communication is of the present time or of the N O W , and it was carried over with the consciousness into the spiritual realm without modifi cation or alteration. And even though days, weeks, months, and years pass, the thought continues in the N O W in its form of expression, and would therefore reach the mind of a person living on the earth as coming from one who was speaking in the present tense and, there fore, of the N O W . T h is is why M rs. Jones believed that the message inti mated that her cousin was still living, still in a hospital, and still seeking to be found and rescued, whereas in truth he had been in the spiritual world for over a year. This much may be said in regard to the methods or processes for bringing such communications to the minds of earthly beings. W e have said that it is a fact that the spirits or souls of de parted persons do not return to earth and enter rooms, and family circles, or seance groups, or clothe themselves with material form to perform physical feats. W e do say, however, in our teachings, and make understandable how the personality that has departed may and can project its thoughts or a representation of itself to the psychic consciousness of persons still living on this earth plane. In such projections, nothing of a material or spiritual es sence departs from the person in the spiritual realm, or comes to the earth plane. All that passes between the one above and the one below are thought vibrations like unto the thought vibra

tions that pass betw een the spiritual, psychic mind of two living persons on the earth plane who are in telepathic or psychic communication with each other. S u c h earth-bound personalities seek every possible opportunity to reach the minds of those wrho are receptive or ready to receive the communication that is being radiated, by mental attunement, so that it may be objectively real ized and passed along to the intended person. In most cases, the results sought for are achieved through a com bination of unusual circumstances by which one or more persons living on the earth plane are temporarily or momen tarily attuned to psychic influx or Cos mic Consciousness. In such rare mo ments these persons, if they are in any way related to or known to the spiritual personality, will receive the message, communication, or impression that is be ing directed. V ery often such attunement or state of receptivity on the part of earthly persons occurs during sleep; but it is more perfect, complete, and objectively recalled or remembered when the receptivity occurs during per iods of meditation or concentration in a waking state. In this particular case M rs. Jones was highly receptive be cause of the special intensity of her ex periment and the sacredness of it, as sociated as it was with matters most holy to her. Her mind was also free from anticipations, analysis, speculation, and indefinite ideas which might have inhibited her psychic reception or be clouded her impressions. It was a mag nificent opportunity for the personality of Henry Smith; for M rs. Jones was a relative and one anxious to know of his whereabouts and her little period of

concentration and meditation was like the opening of a great doorway that permitted the personality in the spiritual world to enter, and in a perfectly frank and complete manner, deliver the mes sage that held him bound to the earths mind. T h e delivery of this communication, the receipt of it, and the realization of it by M rs. Jones instantly relieved the per sonality of Henry Smith of the condi tion which held him captive, and un questionably it was the beginning of his flight to freedom in the spiritual realm. And not unless some most extraordi nary situation would arise would he have any desire to ever comm unicate again with those of this earth plane. A fter the officers at Headquarters had communicated their information to Captain Brown, with instructions that he send it to M rs. Jones, and thereby explain the entire matter to her, a rec ord was obtained from a congressional report regarding the latest findings of the activities in Nicaragua, and therein was revealed some facts which verified the story of H enry Sm iths short flight in an airplane, his injury in the neck, his hiding behind stones, and his disap pearance in the hands of the enemy. Thus was the Cosmic story verified; and the whole case is typical of many that have been brought to our attention or which have interested us at Head quarters in a personal way during the past years. W e hope that our members will find in this story the answer to many of their questions, and a key to some of the higher principles which cannot be ade quately revealed nor properly explained in the pages of this magazine.

V V

SOUVENIRS FROM EGYPT


Brother Bell, who was Trip Secretary on the recent trip to Egypt and Pales tine, secured from an Egyptian Brother a collection of real Egyptian Scarabs. He offers to sell these at the cost placed on them in Egypt. Here is an oppor tunity to secure a real souvenir of Egypt. There are two classes of them: those containing hieroglyphs of ancient Gods and characters, at seventy-five cents each; and those containing mystical symbols, a little larger in size, at one dollar each, postage prepaid. Send your orders direct to: M r. Arthur B. Bell, 11 South 10th Street, San Jose, California.

The M ystic Triangle July 1929

fe J\(gt "Discouraged
By A r t h u r B . B e l l . F. R. C.

V V V V V
) M E few weeks ago one of our members made inquiry as to whether or not the study of another course of philosophy would interfere with his progress in the A M O R C teachings. A little inquiry developed some very surprising facts and I shall relate them to you, because of their great importance as showing how fortunate we are in having the privilege of membership in our beloved Order, This Brother explained that he had taken up one of the popular forms of Christian metaphysics nearly forty years ago, and found it to be quite satisfying for a period of ten years or more; for he had become proficient in applying the healing work he had learned. About this time one of the members of his family was taken sud denly ill, and regardless of the knowl edge and power he possessed and ap plied, the loved one passed on. He was dumbfounded, confused, and stunned; for this man had come to believe that even transition might be overcome, set aside, forgetting that even Lazarus whom the M aster Jesus restored also experienced transition in due time. There came to this Brother the de termination to gain an understanding of the matter; for he perceived that the studies he had so ardently perused did not make clear either the reason for the failure of the treatment or the rea son for the loss of this dear one. Thus for nearly thirty years he sought out and studied assiduously every philo sophic work he could learn about, in cluding the many and varied courses which are so frequently offered by those who go about from city to city offering to make a great master of you through the study of ten or a dozen lectures. Think of it, Brothers and Sisters! Here was a man who had spent forty years of his life seeking its mysteries, and yet had found nothing to which he could point and say, It was through this great system of philosophy that I have attained to understanding. It was at this point that A M O R C found him, and to his consciousness, the teachings offered were just one more experiment; but not being completely discouraged, he became a member and a very earn est student. His previous studies were of course of some advantage to him, yet he found many discrepancies be tween our principles and those he had previously struggled with; but realizing that he had not attained their unfoldment he was willing to lay them aside, and listen carefully to what our work had to say. Our Brother, when he came to ask the question regarding the study of an other course, was in the Third Grade of the Postulant Lectures, and as yet had no experience or demonstration which would indicate that any real progress had been made. H e did not realize what had been going on W I T H IN dur ing the months he had plodded wearily through these three grades. In answer ing his question he was told that any decision as to what he should study or what he should reject was a matter which he must determine for himself, as A M O R C imposed no arbitrary re strictions upon its students. This ans wer did not satisfy him and he pressed on for more light, asking: W h a t would you recommend? He was then told that so far as we know there are no two philosophies exactly alike, and that under all ordinary circumstances the student is cheating himself by under taking more than one set of studies along this line at one time; for confus ion will be the uniform result. His re sponse was, Thank you, I will stick to A M O R C . Some three weeks later this same brother had a marvelous experience, in a moment of meditation, which came

The M ystic T dangle July 1929

without previous warning, as a great in flux of light; and thus in an instant of time he had attained the goal of under standing and illumination which our order has to offer the sincere, earnest student. A fter nearly forty years he had in the twinkling of an eye opened the portals of lifes mysteries and gained the pearl of great price. W a s it worth the struggle? Yes, a thousand times yes. T h e point we wish to bring clearly to your attention is that many of our mem bers permit themselves to get discour aged, and allow the demon tempter to encourage them to leave the Order. W h a t a misfortune this is! If they could only be shown, if they could only be made to see and realize that they are actually on the right path, and that eventually they may achieve the price less blessing which consecration to the ideals and principles of our O rder must unfold, few if any would ever have the courage to withdraw or resign. T h e Rosicrucians have always known that mystical development and illumination may not be had for the asking, and that time, patience, and perseverance must be employed in our quest for these beneficient treasures. T h e writer has never seen nor heard of any course of study along mystical lines which can begin to compare with the arrangement provided by A M O R C for the syste matic and orderly development of the initiate. Each lecture and each grade contains just the exact elements of knowledge necessary to the students proper growth and capacity to absorb and understand. T h e steps are gradual, marvelously well timed, and designed to meet the exacting conditions of both in ner and outer development. Sometimes our members feel that they are not mak ing the proper progress, but they er roneously come to this conclusion be cause they know not what is going on W IT H IN . Think of the Brother who spent nearly forty years of his life be fore he even found the door to the Path. Do not become discouraged Brothers and Sisters, but strive a little harder to harmonize the outer self with the high and exalted ideals of the inner. Divine self and you will be richly re warded. T h e experience of the Brother in his ceaseless, unremitting search for the

Path of Promise, is parallel with that of many others in our Order who have reached the pinnacle of unfoldment; so you who have found A M O R C early in life, and quickly, should rejoice in the knowledge that you are privileged to know that you have made no mistake, and that the future holds forth a gra cious gift for those who are sincere and persevering in their journey onward and upward toward the prize. Into the office at Headquarters there pours a steady and endless stream of letters from members in every grade, and from every part of the world, de tailing results of experiments with the Principles given in our lectures which are astounding, startling, and almost unbelievable to those who are unfa miliar with our work. T h ey come by the hundred each day, each week, and gladden the hearts of the officers who review them, but who realize that these demonstrations are orderly and in ac cordance with the laws which are given. If some of you who read this article have not yet reached the point where these wonders are possible to you, just hold firm your courage and confidence and soon you also will have success with your experiments. It will be most helpful to you to re fer to your Rosicrucian M anual, par ticularly to that portion containing the dictionary. T h is book is absolutely in dispensable to the diligent student; for herein is contained a compendium of knowledge which supplements the lec tures and may be properly regarded as a valuable extension thereof in the mat ter of elucidating and clarifying the definition and understanding or the many terms and laws so frequently re ferred to. This book is not alone for the beginner but for the advanced stu dent; for it may be profitably referred to almost daily for the purpose of com paring our interpretation of the many Principles with the exact meaning. It is a surprising fact that as we read the definition of a word in this dictionary section today, and feel that its meaning is fully comprehended, we will find that reference to the same word a few weeks later will unfold a new and larger per ception. T h at is why it is a book one can hardly afford to be without.

Let us quote the definition given of Soul:

"Soul W e wrongly speak of the Soul in man, or mans Soul, as though each human being or each conscious organism had within its body on this earth plane a separate and distinct something which we call Soul; and, therefore, in one hundred beings there would be one hundred Souls. This is wrong, indeed. There is but one Soul in the universe; the Soul of God, the Living, V ital Consciousness of God. W ithin each living being there is an un separated segment of that universal Soul, and this is the Soul of man. It never ceases to be a part of the univer sal Soul, any more than electricity in a series of electric lamps on one circuit is a separate amount of electricity, uncon nected with the current flowing in all lamps. T h e Soul in man is the God in man, and makes all mankind a part of God Brothers and Sisters under the Fatherhood of G od .
Here is the true and complete ex planation of one of the most important Principles in our work, and yet you may have to refer to this definition many,

many times and study it minutely before the full force of its meaning becomes apparent to you. You will find that as your understanding enlarges, through careful consideration of the lectures, your comprehension of the definition of not only Soul but of all other words and Principles contained in the dictionary portion of the Manual, will expand and become clearer. T o illustrate this point: W h en you first try to think of the Soul as being undivided, unseparated, just one Soul, you cannot grasp it fully for you have been taught and have al ways believed that each person has a separate Soul, and your objective mind tells you that it is incredible. Later on as you progress you find that such a condition is possible, and finally you realize that it is not only possible but is a fact, and then you begin to under stand the entire matter. Those of you who have not yet ac quired a copy of the M anual will do well to order one as soon as you can arrange to do so. Those of you who have one will do well to study it gen erously and often; for you will find it of great help in solving many of your troublesome problems.

V V V V V

The Sphit of Qod


Some Helpful Thoughts for New and Old Members
By R o y l e T h u r s t o n
one of our members asks the old ques tion, in the classroom of his lodge or writes it in his cor respondence when making his reports to the Supreme Lodge, which is usually phrased something like this: W h y do you attempt to make a distinction be tween spirit and soul in the teachings when the most universal impression or understanding is that spirit and soul are the same? Your use of the term spirit
iC C A S IO N A L L Y

to signify a univesal essence existing in all matter and not solely in the hu man being seems to rob spirit of its holiness, and to make it less Divine than the holy spirit in the Bible. W e r e a l i z e that the Rosicrucian teachings were the first, in America at least, to generally promulgate the idea that spirit, as used in the sacred teach ings of the M aster mystics of the past, signified a universal essence radiating from the Divine source of all creative energies and powers, permeating all

matter, and giving all matter its vitality. How well we remember the first classes of the Rosicrucian work held in New Y ork many years ago, when this unique use of the word spirit was first pre sented. M any questioned its use at the time, and long and interesting were the discussions which followed. I think that I am safe in saying that the Rosicrucian literature of the present cycle in Amer ica was the first literature of a meta physical or ontological nature using the term spirit in the sense in which the Rosicruians use it. I have been pleased to note in the past ten years that quite a number of other religious or philo sophical movements have come to use the word in the same sense, and that even many of the prominent clergymen of the country make a distinction be tween spirit and soul. However, as I have said, many of our new members and some of the old ones still ask the question given above, and are undoubt edly puzzled by the use of the word spirit as it is used in our lectures and lessons. First of all, we must note that the misunderstanding, or shall we say con cern about the use of the term spirit is due to the fact that the Christian doc trines have used the word spirit in so many different ways and with such lib eral interpretation of its real meaning, that these doctrines of the Christian Church are responsible for the miscom prehension of the true meaning of the word spirit. In very few of the sacred writings of other denominations or other religions of the world is the word spirit used as a synonym for so many other terms or attributes of God's pow ers. I believe that this is due wholly to errors on the part of the translators of the Christian Bible; and I believe also that the reason that so many of the clergymen of today are using the word spirit in a different sense and more in keeping with the Rosicrucian interpre tation is to be found in the fact that more recent translations or versions of the Holy Bible have been more careful in presenting the exact shades of mean ings of many of the words that were used with confusion in the earlier trans lations. In America, many of our members are accustomed to thinking that the

word spirit is a synonym for the word soul, and in nearly every instance we find that they have arrived at this con clusion as a result of its use in this way in the Christian writings. Further more, in the English language the word spirit has lost its original root meaning, but among foreigners and especially those of the Latin tongue, the word spirit immediately brings to mind its original root with a meaning quite dif ferent from the English interpretation or application. I may say in passing that the use of the word spirit in the Rosicrucian teach ings was not arbitrarily adopted, nor was it selected by the American juris diction as a distinctive word having a very definite meaning for English stu dents, but comes into our teachings through a literal translation of the term as found in all of the foreign lectures and lessons of the Rosicrucian work; our organization in America would not be warranted in changing such terms as it has in its official vocabulary simply because of a misunderstanding among persons who are of the English tongue. In other words, it would be inconsistent with truth and with the principles of universal thinking and comprehension to change a term in the English lectures and lessons simply because the English mind has a different and erroneous com prehension of the meaning of some for eign words. Just because we have mis understood the meaning of the word, in the English countries, is one excellent reason for its continued use in the Rosi crucian teachings, so that we may change our thinking, correct our errors. and learn an interesting lesson. There are many instances where the use of the word spirit in the Holy Bible, especially in the older versions, c le a r ly shows that the translators were very in different or unmindful of the real sig nificance of the word, and were more or less careless in the use of synonyms for spirit and soul. T h e idea that is prevalent in the Christian minds that spirit is something holy and found only in connection with the soul of human beings is due to the use of the term Holy Spirit or Holy G host, in con nection with the trinity of the Godhead.

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The M ystic T t iangle July 1929

T h e doctrine of the trinity was adopted long after the Christian church had been founded, and the use of the term Holy Spirit or Holy Ghost was an arbitrary one and should not have been used to imply what is really meant. W h en the words Holy Spirit or Holy Ghost as used in the English Bibles are translated into the Latin or other foreign lan guages, the readers in those languages receive a different idea of what is meant than English students do, for they can not help but associate the original root meaning of the word spirit with the term as used in the Bible. In the first chapter of Genesis, we read, for instance, that the spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters. In older versions and in other sacred writings telling the story of creation, the idea presented is that in the begin ning everything was without life or ani mation, chaotic, disorderly, uncon trolled. and did not have creative or constructive essences of any kind. This condition of affairs was changed by the spirit of God, moving from God into all that He created, which animated, at once, all matter or all things created by God with a creative force and energy, and immediately this brought about sys tem and order. T h e alchemist writing on this point in ancient times would have said something like the statement made by Dr. John Dalton, the famed Rosicrucian physicist in later centuries, which was Until the spirit of God en tered into matter, matter was uncreative, unproductive, and unsystematized. Its existence atomically was a result of the creation of the atoms and the molecules through a Divine decree, and all that existed was stationary, without motion, and fixed in crystallized form without the power to grow, change, or repro duce. It was then that God moved His spirit into all that He had created, and the creative powers of this spirit not only gave animation to the crystallized cells and the group formation of atomic structures, but caused them to proceed in an orderly manner to extend their motions and vitality in accordance with the law of the angles of their form, and the rate of vibration of the spirit in them. Thus the atoms continued to grow in accordance with the law of

their angles and the axes of their bodies and reproduce themselves in the dis tinct classifications in which they were originally created. Thus chaos was turned into order, and lifelessness into eternal animation. It may be said in passing that all of the mystics, alchemists, and philosoph ers of the past and up to the time of Dr. Dalton, not only considered spirit as motion and motion as one of the fun damental principles of all life and all creative processes, making matter mani fest in all of its forms, but most rever ently and sincerely looked upon the spirit of motion and the spirit energy itself as a Divine energy having its source in God and its manifestation of God. Therefore, the use of the word spirit in connection with material things, and as a term for the universal energy that is found in all matter, did not necessarily imply that it was without holiness or divinity, as some of our Christian brethren of today believe. In the same book of Genesis, we find the word spirit wrongly used in one sense, and yet correctly used in another sense, in connection with the creation of man. For here we find that after God had made man out of the material ele ments of the earth, He breathed into the nostrils of man the breath of life, and man became a living soul. T h e intima tion here is that the breath of life was the soul, and that the soul was breathed into the soulless body of man. If our use of the word spirit is correct, then the soulless body of man formed out of the material elements of the earth was already charged and filled with spirit, for spirit was in all of the matter com posing the body of man, but the soul was not there and had to be added. M y readers will note that the statements do not say that the spirit was breathed into the body of man, but that the breath of life was breathed into the nostrils of man. It is this statement that is used as one of the fundamentals of the Rosicru cian ontology, for the purpose of show ing the duality of mans existence; i. e., the body made of mortal matter filled with the essence of spirit, and the soul of man, which was added to the physi cal part of man, and thereafter man be came not a living body, or a living man-

The M ystic Triangle July 1929

ifestation of earthly elements, but a liv ing soul, giving emphasis to the soul part of man as the primary manifesta tion of his existence, and placing the physical body in a secondary place. Now if we go back into the ancient teachings of the Rosicrucians and of the early mystics, we find many interesting points that will help us to understand the use of the word spirit. W e find that the Jewish people had three words for the idea of soul. These were N efesh, Neshemah, and Ruach. All three of these words meant B reath , albeit in different aspects. T h e word Rauch was generally translated Spirit, but really meant a rush of wind. In this sense the word Pneum a was used in the Greek language to mean the same thing, or perhaps a rush of air, or air itself. In the Latin languages we find the word Spiritus, which also meant breath, air, or wind; there is no real English equiva lent for the Latin word Spiritus. T h e Greek word Psuche, like the Hebrew word N efesh , referred to the soul. W e find this distinction clearly made in Job X X X I I L 4 , T h e Spirit of God hath made me, and the Breath of the A l mighty hath given me life." However, w-e find through mistranslation another Biblical statement that contradicts the idea expressed in Job. In Ecclesiastics X II:7 , we read: Then shall the dust re turn to the earth as it was; and the spirit shall return unto God who gave it. This latter statement would intimate that after transition the physical ele ments composing the body of man would have no spirit in them, and that the spirit in matter would return to God with the soul. T his is certainly an idea contrary to other ideas stated elsewhere in the Bible. It intimates that spirit and soul are one, and that either word may be used to mean the same thing. Y et in First Thessalonians V :2 3 , we find that man is possessed of spirit, soul, and body. T h is same idea is expressed in other parts of the Bible. Another inter esting Biblical reference to this matter is found in John 111:8. Here the original Greek or Hebrew word was translated literally into wind, adhering very closely to its real meaning instead of using the word spirit or soul as the translators used it in other parts of the Bible. W ith the Greeks, in their writ

ings, the word Pneum a did not mean soul or spirit, but a breath of life or a vitalizing force associated with the soul consciousness as a separate thing and not the same thing. T h e Greeks had the word Psuche, which meant Breath and Soul, and never had the meaning of the word L ife, or animation or vitality, for they had other words which con veyed the meaning of life and vitality. Therefore, the Greeks could not have made the mistake of using one word that would have meant soul, life, vital ity, and breath. In tracing the meaning of these words in Greek, Latin, and other languages, I find that the adjective Psuchikos, which means pertaining to the soul, appears six time in the New Testament. It is never correctly translated to mean psy chic or spiritual, or of the breath, which would be correct, but four times it is translated as natural and twice as sensual. Here we see the transla tors adhering more correctly to the real meaning of the word. Attempting to find a proper consid eration of these terms in the official church writings, we note that the R o man Catholics in their official publica tions candidly refer the investigator to all the early Jewish writings for infor mation regarding the words spirit and soul. On the other hand, the Protestant Christian denominations which have so much to say about the soul in their writ ings and preachments, and which con stantly use the word spirit as a synonym for soul, seem unable to tell what the words really mean, or how they came into use, but merely intimate that they had something to do with the breath. Especially in regard to the word spirit there seems to be no definite under standing except that it is used with the adjective H oly to mean the equiva lent of the Holy Ghost. T h e Holy Ghost, on the other hand, in all oriental writings, refers to a special form of D i vine Consciousness that descended into the Avatars, Divine M asters, or Sons of God at the time of their missionary work, or surrounded persons who were especially blessed at the time of bap tism. In another article dealing with this subject, which I hope to have ready for

the next issue, I will point out the rela tionship o the word D ust to the words, Soul and Body, and we will have a better understanding of the meaning of the three words, Spirit, Soul, and B ody, as found in man. T h e point to be learned from the foregoing facts is that the word Spirit as used in the Rosicrucian teachings to indicate a Divine essence

that pervades all space and animates all matter, independent of the soul or Holy Ghost, is correctly used in an interna tional sense, and in a philological sense, and is in accordance with the facts as we find them in Nature. This is cer tainly sufficient reason for the continua tion of the use of the word Spirit in the Rosicrucian teachings in the manner in which it is used.

V V V V V

^Report of the Egyptian Roour


INSTALLMENT NUMBER FIVE
Reported by T h e T r i p S e c r e t a r y
E reached the shores of Lake Moeris, situated in one of the most primitive sections of Egypt, and one of the very interesting historical places of mystical history, in the middle of the afterhas been stated, it was here that one of the great M asters first per formed the rite of baptism, and it was here that many wonderful ceremonies were held in the centuries preceding the Christian E ra. T h ere is considerable mystery regarding the lake itself, as one will discover from reading accounts of it in various encyclopedias. M any of the historians of ancient times described this lake, telling different stories about it; and we find that there is even much scientific speculation as to the origin of the water that is in the lake, and the buildings which originally surrounded it. Th ere are several ancient accounts of an island that was in the middle of the lake, upon which a great temple was built by the mystical Brotherhoods, and where many wonderful miracles were performed. O ur readers will find it really worthwhile to consult books deal ing with ancient Egypt, or encyclopedic articles regarding Lake M oeris. Bear in mind that the lake now has a differ ent name; for although the name M oeris is still used in encyclopedias and other accounts, many modern maps or records refer to the lake as the Fayuum Lake. Since the lake was so far from any modern town or any form of modern conveniences, a large truck had fol lowed our long line of automobiles carrying sufficient food for a good luncheon, which we all enjoyed on the grass under the trees near the edge of the lake. A fter luncheon and after tak ing some moving pictures, we proceeded to the shore of the lake and there each one of us performed the symbolical ceremony of being baptized in its w at ers. T h e official staff had brought along a hundred small bottles, and these were filled with the water from the lake and tightly corked so that each one of us might have a souvenir of the water to take back to our homes in America. At the close of our sunset ceremony, just as the sun was beginning to lower in the sky, we got into our automobiles and started on our return trip to Cairo. As I stated in the preceding article, some of us had lost our way in reaching the lake, because so few of the automo bile drivers and guides in Cairo knew exactly where the lake was, and the natives in the primitive villages through which we had passed during the long ride of the morning and afternoon could

not tell us exactly how to reach the lake. In making the return trip, we tried to secure more competent guides, but this seemed to be impossible; so it was with some concern that we proceeded on our way toward Cairo. All seemed to be going well until after the sun had completely disappeared, and the sky became darkened. Then we found that our journey was taking us along unpaved roads and sandy by ways, under a moonless sky, and with out any signs or lights that would guide us. M any hours passed while our long line of automobiles hurried eastward, and then northward, and finally came to a halt out in a wild and primitive sec tion of Egypt where there were no homes, no stores, no natives, no signs, or anything to tell us in what direction to go to find the proper highway. T h e Imperator and his staff were in the first two automobiles, and he insisted that we should continue in a certain direc tion because of an impression he had, and a contact he had made with certain natural principles which gave him the true sense of orientation. He was able to persuade the drivers of six of the automobiles to follow him, but the re mainder insisted upon going in another direction, and thus the party was di vided into two sections. A fter several more hours had passed, part of the group of automobiles being guided by the Imperator was a g a i n divided through the insistence of the drivers that they change their course; and we learned later on that the original second division had also become divided a number of times during the evening and night. In this manner the automobiles carrying the party of tourists were scat tered on different roads, going in differ ent directions in the darkness of the night. I wish I could give you the mental picture of our ride with the Imperator's group of cars that night. There were six cars in our party following the guid ance of the Imperator, and his car. As we went along the sandy roads with only our automobile headlights to pierce the inky blackness of the desert lands on a moonless night, we went up over huge sand dunes and down into the valleys between them, around curves and between clusters of palms that hid

us from sight, and often our cars were so separated that we were a mile or two apart. M any times the Imperator found that his car, which was in the lead, was at least three or four miles away from the second car, which was following him. Fearful that the trailing cars would lose sight of him, he would stop his car, stand up on the roof of his auto, and from there signal with burning flashlights a code message to the other cars in the distance. M ost of the time not even the headlights of the other cars could be seen; but the brilliant light of the magnesium flash going high into the darkness from the roof of his automobile was visible to the trailing automobiles, three and four miles away, and in this manner they were able to follow the lead. Some of the cars were delayed in trailing us because they would run out of gasoline. You can imagine what this meant, when we tell you that nowhere on the long trip of many, many hours did we find any regular gasoline service stations. T h ey are uncommon, even in the most modern localities, and in the primitive sections of Egypt gasoline is sold in four or five gallon cans by the natives, who have them in huts or little stores, which often are without any sign or symbol which the American tourist would recognize. Add to this difficulty the fact that we were touring late at night when there were no lights in either homes or stores, and when it was almost impossible to see where any hab itation could be found that might have some of these cans of gasoline. O ften the cars would have to drain part of their gasoline through rubber tubing in order to provide one other car with a few quarts of gasoline to enable it to reach the next supply place. Doing this would hold up the trailing automobiles sometimes for a half hour while the leading automobile would go on, not knowing that the others had stopped. Thus the ride of our division of the au tomobile parade went on, hour after hour, signalling and stopping, hunting for gasoline supply, and trying to make the sleeping occupants comfortable and warm; for it became very cold as the midnight hour approached.

It was long after midnight when we finally saw the distant lights of the city of Cairo, and it was well on toward morning when the Imperators car, and those that were trailing him, finally reached the hotel and found that the hotel management had kept the evening dinner waiting for our arrival. W e were certainly cold, hungry, sleepy, dusty with a heavy coat of sand that had even penetrated our hair and covered our scalps like a coat of plaster, and our clothing looked as though we had been whitewashed. T h e other automobiles that had branched off at different places under the independent guidance of na tive drivers who thought they could find a short route, came trailing to the hotel as late as sunrise in the morning. And so the party of tourists reached the hotel at various hours, and slept late the next morning in an attempt to recover from one of the most tiresome and yet fascinating midnight rides that a party of American tourists have ever taken in Egypt. As we look back upon the trip now, this adventure is one of the out standing features; for it was certainly thrilling to be lost in the wilds of Egypt on a dark night such as that one was. Thus ended the day of Sunday, F e b ruary 10th. All day M onday was free to do as we pleased, and most of it was spent in sleeping and getting cleaned, as well as packing our baggage and preparing for the next important event of our tour. Finally, at 6:30 in the evening, our special sleeping cars left the Cairo sta tion en route for Luxor. W e were greatly surprised at the modern equip ment, the convenience, and even luxury of the sleeping accommodations on these European trains, and after enjoy ing a good dinner on the train, and spending part of the evening in dis cussing our plans, the entire party re tired. W e constituted the largest party of tourists that had ever engaged sleep ing accommodations on a train bound for Luxor, necessitating the addition of more sleeping compartments to this one train than had ever been required before, and it took two dining cars to serve the meals. W ith all of our baggage and many boxes of special equipment re quired for the work to be done at Luxor, the party constituted a long

train of many cars, filled with happy, enthusiastic persons. At seven o'clock the next morning, we arrived at the station at Luxor and found automobiles waiting to take us to the hotel where rooms had been en gaged for us. As the sun was just ris ing and tinting the sky and the land with its golden color, we were greatly impressed by the beauty and grandeur of ancient Luxor. Certainly we were surprised when our automobiles brought us to the gates of the lawns and park that surrounded our hotel. T h e many trees, large and of heavy foliage, af forded much shade and beauty, and the many gardens of flowers in unique set tings throughout the park around the hotel made this place seem like a little Garden of Eden in the great deserts of sand through which we had travelled during the night. W h en we entered the hotel and finally reached the rooms that had been assigned to us, we found the utmost of modern conveniences, large bedrooms with balconies, many win dows, comfortable beds of the ancient style but modern in many ways, spa cious bathrooms, with a plentiful supply of hot and cold water, and native ser vants at every turn ready to carry out our wishes. As we went out on the balconies from our various bedrooms and looked over the landscape, we could see the ruins of temples close by the Nile with its sil very sunlit waters within a stone's throw, and across on the opposite shores the tombs of the kings and the ruins of ancient Thebes. In every direc tion we saw huge palm trees, flower gardens, and picturesque spots. Nearby we could see the native quarters, and here and there amid the trees rose the minarets of Mohammedan mosques. T h e Imperator was busy with his water colors and painting materials, even be fore we had time to go to the dining room for breakfast; and the pictures he made, which we afterward saw on the boat on the way to America, seemed to have registered the beauty and color as well as the atmospheric impressiveness of this ancient city of mystic temples. A fter unpacking our things and changing our clothes to summertime

Palm Beach styles, we went downstairs to enjoy a very modern breakfast in a dining room that was decorated and ar ranged in the style of Egyptian archi tecture. A fter breakfast the tour began by a visit to the ancient temples of Luxor which required all of the morn ing hours; and in the afternoon we rode to the temple of Karnak, which lies out side of the city limits. In the late after noon and evening, our time was spent visiting the native shops and securing souvenirs. T h e first day in Luxor was certainly a busy one, and a most im pressive one. Immediately upon our arrival in Luxor we were approached by one Brother who immediately identified himself as a member of the oldest Rosicrucian lodge in Egypt, known as Akhnaton Lodge in honor of Amenhotep IV , the great past M aster of the Rosicrucian Brotherhood. Throughout the day he introduced us to other Rosicrucians in the city, some of whom had stores or places of business. All of us will remember the one Brother who had the perfume store in the native section, where many hours were spent during the week securing samples of the vari ous ancient Egyptian perfumes, includ ing that of the Lotus and other native flowers and herbs, and in getting essen tial oils for incense and perfumes to bring back to America. T his Brother served tea and coffee in his shop in the afternoons; and many congenial groups of our members spent pleasant periods in his office, meeting other Rosicrucians and talking over the wonderful work of the early Rosicrucians. T h e climate at Luxor was like that of a balmy June, despite the fact that the land was dry and there had been no rain for many years. T h e natives were cordial and glad to know us, and on every hand we found an unusual wel

come extended not only by the Rosicru cians of Luxor, but by those of the out lying districts. W e were surprised to learn that although there were a great many Rosicrucians in Luxor, and many of them officers of a lodge, there was no active lodge in the city, and that all of these members journeyed once a month to Cairo, where the ancient Rosicrucian lodge still holds its sessions along with a number of newer ones which are about a hundred years old. I am reserving until my next article a description of what we did, and what we actually saw and learned in Luxor, but I cannot help saying this much right now: It was the unanimous opinion of all of our members on their way home to America that our five-day stop in Luxor was the most beautiful part of the entire trip, and that if we could have changed our plans or had the trip to do over again, many weeks would be spent in Luxor instead of just a few days. T h e fascination of the Nile, the beautiful scenery along its shores, the many ruined temples through which one may stroll or sit in meditation, the beau tiful flower gardens shaded with palm and other trees, the natives in their oriental costumes, and with their fasci nating customs and interesting atten tions, the wonderful climate, the fine food, the beautiful evenings under the starry skies with oriental music, cool breezes, the mystic spell of the vibra tions, and the whole ensemble of life and historical things made this place of Luxor a spot where mystics and espec ially Rosicrucians would want to live for years and forget all other places. Surely whenever the A M O R C plans another trip to foreign lands, more time is going to be spent at Luxor if the wishes of the touring members are ful filled.

FOR YOUR HOME


The M ystic T riangle July 1929
At the request of some members we have prepared a very attractive wall card, about 11 by 14 inches, in several colors and gold, containing the Confession to M aat. This is a beautiful and useful decoration for any sanctum. It may be had at thirty-five cents, postage prepaid by us. Send orders to: Amorc Supply Bureau, Rosicrucian Park, San Jose, Calif.

Idiosyncrasies
By T h e S u p r e m e S e c r e t a r y

V V V V V
H E first question which we have selected this month as one to comment upon is quite appropriate. In fact, it is consistent with the title of this monthly article. T h e question will cause us to give some thought to the idiosyncra sies classified as occult, metaphysical, psychic, spiritual, and even scientific. T h e question is: W h y is it that many educated, reasonable, and ordinarily tolerant persons have an aversion to mysticism and occultism? W h y is it that they will not permit one to present a principle no matter how plausible? Finally, what essential part does auto matic writing, the ouija-board, and crystal gazing have to do with the de velopment of the finer, inner psychic qualities of men or women? Please en lighten me." If we may take the liberty, it would be preferable in this instance to discuss the above question in its reverse order. T h a t is, the last part first. W e do this because it can be presented more favor ably to the reader. T o the student who is desirous of attaining mastership of self, and an intimate knowledge of the laws of Nature, it is most advisable that he refrain from automatic writing, the use of the ouija-board, and crystal gaz ing. T h is statement might appear to be intolerant and not in accord with the broad views of Rosicrucianism, but it is cautionary advice. In the first place, none of the above are of any practical value to the student; no matter how much a student may have recourse to the above methods, the results are not dependable and are injurious to his san ity. Before pointing out how the beginner-student is misled, let us thor oughly analyze the above methods. It has been said that psychology bridges the difference between practical mysticism and material science. T h ere fore, we will turn the searchlight of psychological laws on these modern su perstitions. O n your way down-town any day, as you hurry across streets and thoroughfares, or ride rapidly along in your car or in a public conveyance, you see with your physical eyes thou sands of different objects and many dif ferent incidents. All day, in fact, a ka leidoscopic series of events pass in re view before you, but how many details can you actually remember? Can you recall everything you saw a week ago? C an you recall everything you saw or heard even today? A moment's thought will convince you of the comparatively few things that you can remember. Some days seem like total blanks: you cannot recollect one incident. This is not a reflection upon your memory. It is no indication of lack of observation. T o impress a scene upon our memory requires more than the focusing of our eyes upon it. Your eyes see thousands of objects daily, but you do not concen trate sufficiently long enough upon them to register them on your objective mem ory. T o remember an object, you look at it and become conscious of it; that is, you have the realization that you are looking at it. W h en you do this, you file away in your brain a mental picture of the object; and when you wish to have the picture again, you reconstruct it in your mind. You gather together all of the separate impressions and once again, in your mind, form the picture that was previously photographed o * the retina of your eyes. Let me give you an example. O n your way to a friends home on one of these bright, beautiful, spring mornings, you pass through a public park. Everything is fragrant, and es pecially do you notice the delicate shades and hues of the flowers. Y ou look long at them and admire the mas ter touch of the Great Architect. Then you hurry on, and in the rush of the days duties forget the incident of the park. Later that evening you are per

haps glancing through a current maga zine and finally you turn to a page where your attention is attracted to an advertisement of a perfumery. A s you momentarily concentrate your attention upon the advertisement, the illustration of the advertisement combined with the explanatory sentences, suggests a chain of associated ideas to course through your mind, such as fragrance, flowers, gardens, and finally there appears in your consciousness the memory of the park a complete mental picture of what you saw in the morning. T h ere fore, it would indicate from the above that to memorize anything we must first become conscious of what we are sen sing, whether we look at it or hear it. But let me state that there are thou sands of incidents and impressions reg istering upon the subjective mind, the inner mind, that we are not aware of. It is possible, as you know, to look at something and at the same time be thinking of something not in any way related to it, and in that case you will never remember what you were looking at. Thus, while you are perhaps look ing out a window, if your mind is occu pied with other thoughts, thousands of objects will pass before your view but none of them will be impressed upon your brain, because you will not have realized the fact that you are looking at them; but your objective mind, which is always on the alert, will store away, without you being conscious of it, many of these impressions that are received on the retina of your eye. A fter all it is very fortunate that everything we see or hear is not regis tered on our brain, but only on the sub jective mind; because otherwise we would clutter our outer consciousness with many useless impressions. Since, as I said, you are not conscious of many impressions that are being stored away on your inner mind, you do not know that they exist, and you cannot recall them. Y ou cannot will or demand that they appear from your memory. Have you not had the experience of noticing, let us say a building or place which seems familiar, and still you are not able to recall ever being there before or ever seeing the building? Have you ever heard a selection of music that seems so

familiar, still you know that you have never become conscious of ever hearing it before? These are examples of the impressions received by your subjec tive mind that are flashed to your brain from within, and that you cannot ever remember having received. W h ile we are asleep, impressions can be made, as you know, on the subjective conscious ness, that your outer self is not aware of. Perhaps you wonder why we have dwelt on this point. It is just this: I wish to bring out the fact that you can become conscious of a great many things that you unconsciously had im pressed upon your subjective mind, and that many times these things flash in your mind and you do not know where they originate from. By now you will perhaps want to know what all this has to do with auto matic writing; because of the somewhat lengthy discussion presented above, we can more easily explain. Automatic writing is the theory that an exterior personality of one departed or on the present plane may compel another in a receptive state to write as directed. It is usually performed in this manner: T h e subject selects a tablet and pencil, and becomes comfortably seated in a quiet room. Usually there are none present but himself. H e places the tab let upon a desk or table, and rests his hand and arm in writing posture upon the tablet. T h e pencil point is allowed to bear lightly upon the paper. T h e subject attempts to passively await some impulse that will cause the re laxed arm and fingers to become tense. Finally the hand in short, jerky, and ap parently involuntary movements guides the pencil across the paper, tracing out sentences. Sometimes the words convey a definite sentence. In other instances the words are not related and convey no meaning. T h e subject, of course, is fully conscious of the whole procedure except for the fact that he honestly is not aware of whence the evident mes sage is from. In the majority of in stances, where the subject is sincere in his experiment, he is surprised at the results. T o those not familiar with the fundamental principles underlying this

phenomena, it is indeed most myster ious. T h e outstanding incident is that the nature of the message is strange. It is something that the subject has per haps never given thought to. Because of his inability to associate with it through the process of memory any sen tence read or heard, he becomes more than ever convinced of some supernatu ral force at work. T h e subject reasons that if he never, in his waking con sciousness, received such a message, that he is aware of, then most assuredly it cannot be the product of his own brain, but the reception of psychic im pressions. Now, it is most simple to say that this is neither a series of impressions from a soul residing on another plane, nor is it the caprice of a conversable psychic body on this plane. From the principles discussed above, we can eas ily determine that the subject had reg istered impressions upon his subjective mind that he had not become conscious of. These impressions might have been received years ago, but now, while in a passive mood, he wilfully opened the channel of his subjective mind. T h e myriad of impressions stored there were released, and in both logical sequence and disorder they flashed into his ob jective or brain consciousness. Then, at that moment, certain nerve areas of his brain directed involuntarily the move ment of his arm and fingers, which traced the message from his own sub jective mind on the paper before him. It is not mysterious, not weird, not su pernatural, but merely the functioning of simple laws of Nature, laws which students of Rosicrucianism learn to un derstand and use to dispel the modern darkness of superstition. T h e ouija-board craze which swept this country some years back and even today sways many weak-minded per sons is explained by applying the same principles as above. Briefly, the prin ciple may be said to be an unconscious suggestion from your subjective mind to your objective mind or brain conscious ness, resulting in the involuntary action of spelling messages on the ouija-board before you.

Let us suppose you ask this question: I accept the fact that the so-called message is not from another person or persons, and is only from my own sub conscious mind, but what harm is there in these experiments, and why should I refrain from performing them? If you are fully aware of the psychological principles involved in a process of auto matic writing, or the use of the ouijaboard, there is little danger, but if you know of the falsity of the thing, why waste valuable research and study time with a worthless experiment? W h y give something that is unworthy of thought any consideration, when there are so many practical, sensible experiments to conduct? T h e real injury and danger arises when one is not acquainted with the principles we have discussed, and indulges in those practices in absolute belief and confidence in the results ob tained. If a subject has not a strong will, and he resorts to the ouija-board with the conviction that the message re ceived is a communication from a soul gone beyond, and relies upon the sug gestions of his own subjective mind un der those conditions, he becomes ob sessed with the illogical ideas received and casts away the good reasoning of his outer consciousness. These obses sions have cost the sanity of many per sons. During the rage of ouija-board indulgences, many thousands w e r e placed in psychopathic wards of state hospitals for the insane for observation. T h e next pseudo form of mysticism is crystal gazing. A ny real mystic who uses a crystal uses it merely as an in cidental, not as an essential or a requi site. A crystal plays no essential part in real mysticism or metaphysics. T o some persons, a crystal has become a symbol of something mysterious, a me dium through which the secret laws of life unfold. Such a belief is ridiculous. T h e charlatans who travel about as en tertainers on the stage and with the cir cus have given credence to this form of superstition. Originally, the mystics of the Orient used a perfect crystal to aid them perfect their concentration. Each of you know how difficult it is at times to develop a complete state of concen tration and meditation. Thoughts con

tinually flash through your mind that disturb you. T h e oriental mystic was able to eliminate all impressions of the outer senses more easily, by gazing at the flawless crystal, as the crystal was without any material peculiarity that would distract his attention and prevent concentration. T h e depth of the flaw less crystal holds attention and aids to temporarily exclude other thoughts from the mind. Aside from that virtue, the crystal has no more mystical power than the pane of glass in your window. T h e old mystics claimed no power for it, and realized that perfect concentra tion is brought about by one's own will. But the charlatans, knowing nothing of these laws, lend to the cyrstal a bogus air of weird sorcery. I believe the scrutiny we have given automatic writing, the ouija-board, and crystal gazing, explains why so many who are not real students of mysticism and natural laws unjustly criticize these subjects. It is because the false systems have defamed the honorable study of the psychic or inner self. Science has rightly condemned all of the above sys tems; but legislation preventing char latans from engaging in such practices

has not been undertaken, as yet, in all states. A s long as these charlatans con tinue associating their disgraceful prac tices with metaphysics and true mysti cism, the layman will be misled, dis gusted, and discouraged from knowing the mystery of himself. It seems that the old adage of learn by experience applies to students of metaphysics and mysticism. T h e beginner-student is attracted by sensation alism, blind mystery that excites him, pleases his senses, and entertains. T h e sensationalism offers no sound explana tion of the laws, nor any helpful knowl edge. Naturally, the beginner first con tacts the false methods we have dis cussed. If he has courage after the or deal to carry on in his studies and in vestigations, he finally comes upon the right path. He is more analytical and much the wiser because of real experi ence; and is then able to select the gold from the dross. I am proud to say that Rosicrucianism is presenting to thousands a sane, help ful system of instruction that will stand the test of the ages, as it is based upon the laws of the universe.

V V V

V V

Suggestions for the (foming (Convention


By T h e S u p r e m e S e c r e t a r y
;C C O R D IN G to the reports coming to us, we are going to have a very large attend ance at the convention this summer from every part of North America, and it is possible that we will have visitors from foreign places if the hopes of our foreign members are fulfilled in every case. Some questions have been asked re garding the convention which we be lieve will be best answered in these col umns. First of all, we did not mean to intimate that those who came to the convention should not appear at H ead quarters in San Jose before Monday, the 19th of August. Undoubtedly many members will arrive in San Francisco or other parts of the state several days before this date, and if they wish to come down to San Jose and spend the entire time of their California visit ex clusively in this city, we shall be glad to have them let us know and we will try to make proper arrangements for them at some hotel. V isitors are welcome at Headquarters any day of the week ex cept Sundays, and we do not limit this to any particular week of the year. U n questionably many of the members who attend the convention either as visitors or delegates will remain days after the convention is over for further contact

The M ystic Triangle July 1929

with us, and to enjoy the beauties and climate of this wonderful valley. Secondly, we wish to say that whether you are a delegate and coming officially to this convention or just a regular member of the O rder and com ing as a visitor, you are welcome to attend whatever sessions, meetings, or lectures that are held during the con vention week, or thereafter, without any documents from any lodge or any pa pers of delegation of any kind, as long as you are a member in the O rder and in regular standing. Therefore, do not hesitate to make your summer vacation trip include a trip to this city. Thirdly, we may say in answer to many who have asked about railroad connections that there is one train which leaves Chicago for San Francisco daily that is a very rapid train, and is not an extra fare train like some others. It is called "T h e San Francisco Limited" of the Southern Pacific Railroad, and leaves Chicago every night at eighttwenty, including Sundays. Those who are fond of touring by auto and camping will find that San Jose is on the United States auto route No. 101 which is one of the main high ways in the W e st; and all through the W e st and right here in our valley there are beautiful auto camps with attractive cottages set in the midst of pretty little gardens, with very reasonable rates and every modern convenience. Thousands of tourists use these new forms of west ern auto camps in preference to hotels when they are touring with automobiles. If we find that more persons attend the convention than can be present at each one of the sessions, we will dupli cate many of the sessions and lectures on several occasions, so that everyone who is visiting the city during that week or thereafter may enjoy the benefits of the features which will make this con vention an unusual success. It is planned that not only will the moving pictures taken on the recent trip through Europe and Egypt be shown at this convention, so that all present may have definite evidence of the Rosicrucian temples and places seen abroad, but the official delegates who represent the highest branches of our organization will have an opportun ity to read, examine, and analyze care

fully many rare books and documents pertaining to the history of the Order and the establishment of the present A M O R C , which have not been re vealed to others than the members of the Supreme Council heretofore. M any other matters will be taken up and set tled in regard to the activities of the A M O R C as the only recognized Rosi crucian body in the W estern W orld ; for this reason we want every lodge and group to have one or more dele gates present at this convention. T h e results of this convention are going to be of considerable importance in clari fying the conditions in this country in regard to the Rosicrucian activities, and will undoubtedly bring a stop to the un official and unrecognized pretentions on the part of a few persons or groups of persons who have appropriated the use of the name "Rosicrucian or the Rosicrucian symbols for personal or commercial purposes. Remember that if you are planning to come to this convention or to be here with us a few days before it or after it, either as a visiting member or as a dele gate, it is necessary for you to write at once and tell us that you are hoping to come or expect to do so. Even if your plans do not work out according to your wishes, and you do not even tually reach here, it is best to advise us that you contemplate coming. This will in no way obligate you unless you later advise us to make some definite reserva tions for you at some hotel. Hotel res ervations can be left until the ten days preceding the convention; but your let ter about your expectations or desires to be with us should be sent as soon as you receive this issue of the magazine. Address such letters to the Convention Chairman, care of A M O R C Temple, San Jose, California. Those of you who are coming as delegates from any group or lodge should have a letter signed by the M as ter or Secretary of the lodge or group stating that you are the official delegate. In the case of a M aster or Secretary coming as a delegate, such a letter will not be necessary. T h is will truly be a memorable occasion in the history of the organization, and we are sure that most of you want to take part in it.

A SPECIAL BOOK FOR OUR MEMBERS

C S

he
V V V V V

^Rosicrucian
in all advised

A U T H O R IZ E D B Y T H E IM P E R A T O R

All m em bers in all Grades of our Ord er, including tho se in the C o rre s pondence Studies and those a ttend in g T e m p le L o d g es cities, are that this bo o k is official and will be found of utm ost value and help in all study w ork and practices of the Order. T h is manual has been demanded fo r years, urged, and awaited. Now it is ready. T h e first and only Ro sicru cian Manual con tain in g m a tte r suggested by the M asters, Officers, and M em bers of our various L odges. A private book, not to be sold on the open market, not published f o r profit and the biggest boon to the w o rk of the O rd e r ever devised. W H A T IT C O N T A IN S and illustrated. A special article fully explaining the origin of the Great W h i t e L o d g e and its existence, and how to attain P sy ch ic Illum ination, written fo r this Manual by the I m perator. T h e R o sicru cia n Code of Life, with the thirty laws and regu lations. S h o r t biographical sketches of Rosicrucians. Instructiv e articles on such su bje cts as N um erology and the law of Num bers. A number of portraits o f prom in ent Rosicrucians, including M a ste r K -H , the illustrious (with hitherto secret facts about his activ ities). Q uestio n s often asked, with official A nswers. NOT A PART OF T H E LESSO N W O R K No m em ber is required to purchase this bo o k as an absolute necessity to his studies. I t is simply a wonderful compilation of facts and mystical m atter which every seeker along R o s i crucian paths will value as an extra aid in his advancement. E v e r y m em b e r owning the bo o k will save its price in a few m onths through the saving in buying elsewhere, other small b o o ks fo r reference.

I t is divided into a number of parts, each com plete and invaluable as a guide and reference work. T h e fol lowing is a partial list of the co n te n ts: explanation o f all the term s, signs and symbols used in var ious parts of the teachings. A c o m plete w orkin g manual of all the rules and regulations of the Order. E x t r a c t s from the Constitution. D escriptions of T em ples, L o d g es and other parts of our assem b ly places, with laws pertaining to convocation and sy m bolical ceremonies. A synopsis of the s ub je cts covered in all the lectures of b o th the National L o d g e corresp on dence w ork and the T e m p le L ectu re s of the higher grades. Charts, dia grams and illustrations of the various lectures requiring such helps. The F o r m a tio n of A tom s and Molecules, laws of Crystallography, M agnetism, illustrated and explained. Dalton's e x periments and alch em ical and chemical laws illustrated and explained. A c o m plete R osic ru cian D ictio n ary of the term s used in all lectures. Ancient and modern m ystic symbols explained

C om plete

P R I C E : T h e b ook is stro n g ly bound with attractiv e clo th binding over the heavy covers, and stamped in gold. S in gle copies of the book by mail anywhere in the U. S. A., $2.30, I n Canada or foreign countries, by mail, $2.40. H O W T O O R D E R : P le ase observe carefully these instructions. Make your checks or M oney O rd ers for this bo o k payable only to A M O R C F U N D S . I f you send cash, be sure to reg ister the letter or we will not be responsible. O rders for b o o ks sent to us not in accord ance with these rules will be returned. A M O R C S U P P L Y B U R E A U , R O S IC R U C IA N P A R K , SA N JO S E , C A L I F .

ulfjp A#l(!M(!l of Nortl| Ammra


Affiliated solely with the Rosicrucian Brotherhood, internationally known as A N TIQ U U M ARCANUM O RD IN EM RO SA E E T A U R EA E CRUCIS with associated bodies operating throughout the world under the title of A. M. O. R. C. (or translations of the same). Adhering to the ancient traditions of the Order, the North American Jurisdiction was incorporated as a non profit organization, and its name and symbols are protected by Registration in the United States Patent Office. T he A. M. O. R. C. is not, and never has been, affiliated or remotely connected with any other fraternal or secret society or any cult or movement other than Rosicrucian; and its system of operation is distinctly different from that of all other fraternities in Constitution, Land marks, Ritual, and Teachings. It is the only fraternal organization in America represented in the International Rosicrucian Congresses.
THE N ORTH A M E R IC A N J U R I S D I C T I O N

(Including the United States, Dominion of Canada, Alaska, Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, Nic aragua, Costa Rica, Republic of Panama, the West Indies, Lower California, and all land under the protection of the United States of America.) H. S p e n c e r L e w i s , F. R. C., Ph. D Imperator for North America R a l p h M. L e w i s , K. R. C......................................................................Supreme Secretary for North America

GIlaHHtftrattmt uf fHrtnhprahtp
(The following classifications of membership applies to the North American Jurisdiction as out lined above, and to parts of other Jurisdictions. The fees or dues vary in other Jurisdictions, however.)
G e n e ra l S tu d e n t M e m b e r s h ip : M e m b e r s lo c a t e d in a n y p a r t o f th e N o r t h A m e r ic a n J u r i s d i c t i o n w h o c a n n o t a ffilia te w ith a L o d g e a n d a tte n d le c tu r e s , f o r v a r io u s r e a s o n s , a re p e r m itte d to ta k e a p r e p a r a to r y c o u r s e a n d th e n re c e iv e th e r e g u la r le c tu r e s , w e e k ly , in p e r s o n a l fo rm , w ith s p e c ia l e x p e r im e n ts , t e s t s , le c tu r e -le s s o n s a s s ig n e d to m e e t in d iv id u a l r e q u ir e m e n t s , e t c . T h e y a ls o r e c e iv e th e m o n th ly m a g a z in e a n d fu ll m e m b e rs h ip b e n e fits . R e g is t r a t io n F e e , five d o lla r s w ith a p p lic a tio n . D u e s , tw o d o lla r s m o n th ly , p a y a b le a t th e S u p re m e L o d g e b e fo r e th e S th o f e a c h m o n th . C h a rte re d G rou p L o d g e s : W h e r e a c e r t a in n u m b e r o f G e n e r a l S t u d e n t s l i r e in a n y lo c a li t y a n d a re n o t a ffilia te d w ith a n y r e g u la r L o d g e , th e y m a y h a v e th e b e n e fit o f th is fo rm o f m e m b e r s h ip . T h e b e n e fits a re a s s o c ia tio n e a c h w ee k w ith o t h e r m e m b e r s , th e d is c u s s io n o f th e le c tu r e s , th e c o m p a r is o n o f e x p e r i e n c e s , s p e c ia l r e a d in g s a n d t a lk s , e t c . A d d re s s D e p a r t m e n t o f G ro u p s f o r f u r t h e r p a r tic u la r s . T h ere a re n o fe e s in c o n n e c tio n w ith g r o u p m e m b e r s h ip . C h a rte re d L o d g e C o lle g e s : C o n s is t o f 1 4 4 a d v a n c e d m e m b e r s , r e c e iv in g t h e ir le c tu r e s a n d in s t r u c t io n in c la s s e s m e e tin g u n d e r a M a s t e r a n d c o m p le te s e t o f o f fic e r s in t h e ir o w n T e m p le s . S u c h L o d g e s a re lo c a te d in th e p r in c ip a l c e n te r s o f p o p u la tio n in N o r t h A m e r ic a . F e e s a n d d u es in t h e s e L o d g e s a re o p tio n a l w ith e a c h L o d g e . F o r d ir e c t o r y o f D i s t r i c t H e a d q u a r t e r s , s e e b e lo w .

D IR E C T O R Y T h e follow ing principal branches are D istrict H eadqu arters o f A M O R C


N ew Y
ork

C it y :

S an F

r a n c is c o ,

C a l if .:

New York Grand Lodge, M r. Louis Lawrence, K. R. C., Grand Master.


B osto n , M
a ss. :

Calif. Grand Lodge, M r. H. A. Green, K.R.C., Grand Master, AMORC Temple, 1655 Polk Street. Los A n g e l e s , C a l i f . : Hermes Lodge, Nos. 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, and 46, AMORC T E M P L E , 316J4 West Pico Street, Dr. J. C. Guidero, Master.
S an J o se, C a l if .:

Mass. Grand Lodge, Mrs. M arie Clemens, S. R. C., Grand Master, Lodge Building, 739 Boylston Street.
W
a terbu ry,

C onn.:

Conn. Grand Lodge, Grand Secretary, P. O. Box 1083.


P it t s b u r g h , P a . :

Penn. Grand Lodge, Dr. Charles D. Green, K. R. C., Grand Master, P. O. Box 558, N. S. Dimond Street Branch.
P
h il a d e l p h ia ,

Egypt Lodge No. 7, Mr. A. Leon Batchelor, K. R. C., Master, Rosicrucian Park.
F
l in t ,

ic il

a. :

Delta Lodge, AMORC, 767 North 40th Street.


H a rtfo r d , C o n n . :

Michigan Grand Lodge, George A. Casey, Grand Secretary, 1041 Chevrolet Avenue.
P a tterso n ,

Isis Lodge, AMORC, M r. W . B . Andross, Master, Box 54, South Windsor, Conn.
T
a m pa,

N. J . : New Jersey Grand Lodge, Dr. Richard R. Schleusner, K. R. C., Grand Master, 33 Clark Street. Oregon Grand Lodge, E . L . Merritt, K . R. C., Grand Master, 19 E. Killingsworth Avenue.

F l o r id a :

Florida Grand Lodge, M r. L. H. Sawin, K. R. C., Grand Master, 904 Twenty-sixth Avenue.
San A
n t o n io ,

P ortla n d , O r e c o n :

'o '
p -T U -U IJj

ex a s:

Texas Grand Lodge, Mrs. C. Wanblom, S.R.C., Grand Master, 1133 South Laredo Street.

C l e v e l a n d , O h io :

Ohio Grand Lodge, Mrs. Anna L. Gaiser, S. R. C., Grand Master, 15804 Detroit Street. (Directory Continued on Next Page)

C h ic a g o , I l l i n o i s :

N ew

Illinois Grand Lodge, Dr. Anita B . M cCall, Grand Master, 728 No. Pine Avenue. W a s h in g t o n , D. C.: Columbia Grand Lodge, Jos. F. Kimmel, K. R. C., Grand Master, 215 Second St., S. E.
A tlan ta, G
e o r g ia :

W e s t m i n s t e r , B. C.: M r. A. H. P. Mathew, Master, 1313 7th Ave.

V ic t o r ia ,

B. C.: Secretary, AMORC, Box 14.

E d m o n to n , A l t a .:

Dr. James C. Oakshette, Master, 405 Grand Bldg.

M r. James Clements, K . R. C., Master, 9533 Jasper Avenue, E.

CANADA

S P E C IA L B R A N C H E S
A C h a r t e r e d B r a n c h has been selected in each of the following cities to represent the Order in its district: Atascadero, C alif.; Stockton, C alif.; Santa B ar bara, C alif.; Laguna Beach, Calif. Milwaukee, W ise.; Superior, W ise.; Green Bay, W ise.; Madison, Wise. Denver, Colorado; Grand Junction, Colorado; Greeley, Colorado. Buffalo, N. Y . ; Lakewood, N. ; Woodside, N. Long Island, N. ; Omaha, Nebr. Toledo, Ohio; Dayton, Ohio; Massillon, Ohio; Detroit, Michigan. South Bend, Indiana; Sioux City, Iow a; W i chita, Kansas; W ichita Falls, T e x as; Galveston, T exas; Wilmerding, Penna.; Salt Lake City, U tah; Asheville, N. C .; Shreveport, Louisiana; Minneapolis, M inn.; Panama City, Republic of Panam a; York, Penna.; Seattle, Wash.

ancouver,

B. C.: Canadian Grand Lodge, Dr. J . B. Clark, K . R. C., Grand Master, AMORC Temple, 560 Granville Street.
Q u ebec:

on trea l,

AMORC, English Division, Albert E. Poad, K. R. C., Master, Apt. No. 4, 1431 Mackay Street.
M
o n trea l,

Q u ebec:

Societe detude dAMORC (French Section). Adrien Arcand, K . R. C., Master, Apt. No. 7, 5317 St. Denis Street.
V erdu n , Q u e b e c :

Y.;

Y.

Y.

M r. R. A. Williamson, Master, 3809 W elling ton Street.


W
in n i p e g ,

a n .:

Mr. Thos. P. Ross, Master, 257 Owena Street.


L a sh b u r n , S a sk .:

M r. V. W illiam Potten, Master, P. O. Box 104.

S P A N IS H -A M E R IC A N S E C T IO N
This jurisdiction includes the Mexican and Central American sections of the North American Continent, and all the Spanish countries of South America, as well as the Antilles. The S u p r e m e Lodge for the Spanish American Jurisdiction is located at San Juan, Puerto Rico, Hon. Manuel Rodriquez Serra, F. R. C., Supreme Grand Master, P. O. Box (Apartado Postal) 702, San Juan, Puerto Rico. T h e Mexican Grand Lodge of the Spanish American Section is located at Mexico City, and the principal Branches in Mexico are located at Tampico, Tams, and Torreon, Coah. The work of the Spanish American section is carried on in Spanish and English, and two magazines arc published by this Jurisdiction. Address all correspondence to the Supreme Grand Master at Puerto Rico.

A F E W O F T H E F O R E IG N JU R IS D IC T IO N S
E
n glan d:

n d ia :

The AMORC Grand Lodge of Great Britain, M r. Raymund Andrea, K. R. C., Grand Master, 41 Berkely Road, Bishopton, Bristol, England.
S c a n d in a v ia n C o u n t r ie s :

T he Supreme Council, A M O R C , India.


D
u tch

Calcutta,

a st

I n d ie s :

T he AMORC Grand Lodge of Denmark, Com mander E. E. Anderson, K. R. C., Grand M as ter, Manogade 13th Strand, Copenhagen, Den mark.
N
e th e r l a n d s:

W . J . Visser, Grand Master, Bodjong 135, Semarang, Jav a.


Egypt:

The Grand Orient of AMORC, House of the Temple, Grand Secretary, Nasreih, Cairo, Egypt.
A f r ic a :

T he AMORC Grand Lodge of Holland, Mr. F. A. Lans, K. R. C., Grand Secretary, Schuyststraat 244, T h e Hague, Holland.
F ra n ce:

The Grand Lodge of the Gold Coast, AMORC. Mr. Stephen H. Addo, Grand Master, P. O. Box 424, Accra, Gold Coast, West Africa.
B
r it is h

The AMORC du Nord, Mr. Charles Levy, Grand Secretary.


G
erm any and

u ia n a

A u s t r ia :

M r. Frederick E. Charles, Master, Victoria Village, Demerara, British Guiana.


C osta R ic a :

The M ystic T riangle Jd y 1929

M r. Many Cihlar, K . R. C., Grossekretar der AMORC.


C h in a
and

u s s ia :

T he United Grand Lodge of China and Russia, 8/18 Kavkazskaya St., Harbin, Manchuria.
A
u s t r a l ia

W illiam T . Lindo, F. R. C., Grand Master, P. O. Box 521, Limon, Republic of Costa Rica, C. A. The addresses of other foreign Grand Lodges and Secretaries cannot be given general pub licity.

T he Grand Council of Australia, Adelaide.

Special Announcement
T H E BOO K D EM A N D ED

"Rosicrucian Principles for the H om e and Business" By T h e Imperator


jO W many times have you desired some way or means, or explana tion of how to apply the Rosicrucian principles in meeting the a f fairs of your business, and the little personal matters that arise in your home? How many times have you said to yourself, Now just how shall I go about applying the principles in meeting this condition?" T his book is the answer to those who are looking for a practical way of applying the Rosicrucian principles, and it is especially prepared by the Imperator for that purpose. It presents, in a very readable and understandable way, the many M Y S T IC A L L A W S , P S Y C H O L O G IC A L P R IN C IP L E S , and P R A C T IC A L M E T H O D S whereby men and women may M A S T E R C O N D IT IO N S that D E A L W I T H M A T E R IA L P R O B L E M S . Dr Lewis has been consulted on these subjects for many years by thousands of business men, and the experience of those years is brought to you in this book. C H A P T E R S O F T H E BO O K T h e Truth About Affirmations, T h e Cosmic and You, M ental Alchemy, Commanding Cosmic Help, Securing M oney, T h e Attainment of W ealth , Seek ing Employment, Impressing Others, and Unusual Help in Need. T H E P R A C T IC A L S ID E O F IT T h e book answers thousands of questions regarding the securing of em ployment; raising capital for business or social purposes; selling property; im proving the health; attaining fulfillment of material dreams; attracting the help of influential persons; and the promotion of business. T h e matter is new, convincing, exceedingly practical, and inspiring. T h is book, of course, does not contain the secret teachings of the Order, as none of the books released by A M O R C contain the teachings, which are given only to those who are members, in lecture form. It may be purchased by those who are not members of the Order, however, and it will be helpful to all persons in all stations of life. H O W T O ORDER T h is book is attractively printed, in clear type, on soft paper, nicely bound in flexible style, and stamped in gold. Price per copy, postage paid, $2.25. M ake your checks and money orders payable only to A M O R C Funds. If you send cash, be sure to register the letter, as we cannot be responsible for money lost.

AM ORC Supply B u reau , R osicrucian P ark, San Jo se, C aliforn ia .


(W rite for Free Book of Suggestions)

W : h V'

ru m
R E G IST E R E D

U.

All official Instructio re issued only througl ;me Council of the M. O. R. C. undep g fte ab!RLemblem, which w registered in the JfipTted StatvBPatent Office for purpose of prot^fipg all the ^Hy;ed, engraved, t ritten and pha^Kaphic copies ^Rfficial, prescri and copyrighted lectures, d issertat^ R scientific p dations, philojpWical discourses aWBcademic stu diagrams, iiy|pations and charts, as^Rhorized by H : Imperato^M A M O R C. The content^R^rein are lie used fo^^fe purpose intended, and foW ^other, a Sall rightgpltfd privileges are retained by th eo R jerato AMORC is tlSAnly rized to use the abdBBRe the Imperator has t K s o l above to other allied Prganization authole and symbols, and grant the use of the is or movements.

THE

P R I N T E D IN U . S . A . RO SIC R U C IA N P R E S S . SAN

JOSE

S u g g e s tio n s
ROSICRUCIAN EM BLEM S
M em b ers d esiring R o sicru cia n em blem s m ay obtain them from H ead qu arters. T h e y are made o f gold, b eautifully inlaid w ith enam el, neat in size, and co n sist o f the trian g le surm ounted by the E g y p tian cro ss. M en s sty le em blem w ith screw back, $2.00. W o m e n s style, w ith patent safety catch pin, $2.25.

"U N T O T H E E I G RA N T"
T h is is one of the rarest, o ccu lt, m y stical m an uscripts and boo ks ever given to the public. I t con tain s som e of th e true, secret teach in g s of T h ib e t, and w as w ritten over 2,000 years ago. T h e first issue of this b ook wa9 tran slated w ith special perm it of the G rand L am a o f d isciples of the secre t co lleg e o f the G rand T e m p le o f T h ib e t, and authorized by the E m p e ro r of China. T h e soul of the rare w ritings, the sp irit of the teach in gs, and the sublim e beauty o f exp ressio n , has not been altered o r modified, only the physical body, new er paper, and new cov er, have been added to the w onderful elem ents still liv ing and b re a th in g in the m ost sacred of m an uscripts of the T em p le o f the land o f m y stical, unknow n beauty. M any attem p ts have been made, and thousands o f claim s have been p resented p u rp o rtin g to secu re and reveal the inner, secret, and sacred teach in g s o f the M aste rs in T h ib e t, w ho are con sid ered to be the m ost highly developed m y stics on earth. B u t no au th en tic copy o f the. teach in g s like th is m anuscript has ever been given to the world. T h is bo o k is printed on heavy paper and w ell-bound, and sold at a special price of $1.50 per copy, p o stag e paid by us.

"A TH O U SA N D Y E A R S O F Y E S T E R D A Y S
R e in carn atio n made sim p le! L earn ed te ach e rs have alw ays said : F a c ts and prin ciples to ld in story fo rm are N E V E R F O R G O T T E N and are m ore easily understood. A fa scin a tin g fiction sto ry o f rein carn atio n was w ritte n by the Im p e ra to r som etim e ago and becam e very popular. I t is in terestin g , in stru ctiv e, and show s how the " Y E S T E R D A Y S of the p ast are revealed. A s a story, it is e x c e lle n t; as an exp lanation of rein carn atio n , it is unequalled. T h is second edition is prepared at such a price that all m ay secu re it 75 cen ts each, plus 10 cen ts for postage,

A U TO EM BLEM S
W e have at last secured an em blem fo r your car. W e have had m any req u ests fo r an a ttra ctiv e em blem that m em bers could a tta ch to the rad iato r o f th eir car to serve th e sam e purpose as other fra te rn ity em blem s. T h e s e beautiful R o sicru cia n em blem s are in the form o f a cro ss surm ounted on an E g y p tian triang le. T h e y are finished with duco enam el, w hich preserves them ag ain st h e a t; the cro ss and trian g le are finished in gold, th e ro se in red, and stem s and leaves in green. I t has a special arran gem en t p erm ittin g it to b e fasten ed to the rad iato r o f a car. T h e size o f the em blem is five and o n e-q u arter inches. T h e y are intended solely fo r use on au to m o biles, and are eco n o m ically priced at $1.50, postage paid b y us.

A T T R A C T IV E SEA LS
T h e se R o sicru cian seals are abou t the size, o f a tw enty-five cen t piece, beautifully p rinted in red, and em b ossed gold, and have th e sym bol o f the c ro s s and ro se, and the w ords A M O R C , R o sicru cian O rd er, S a n Jo s e , C alifo rn ia, on th e ir face. T h e s e seals can be used by m em bers on le tte rs o r com m u nications to friend s o r business acquaintan ces. I f you would lik e to spread th e nam e of th e o rg an izatio n to your friend s, and at the sam e tim e have an attra c tiv e little seal fo r your statio n ery , we would su gg est that you secu re them . T h e y m ay be had a t the ra te o f fifty cen ts per hundred, o r p ractically w hat th ey cost, p ostag e paid by us.

(C O N T IN U E D

ON

I N S ID E

O F BA CK

COVER)

Published Monthly by

he

S u prem e C

o u n c il

of A M O R C

Rosicrucian Park, San Jose, California

S E P T E M B E R , 1929

V O L U M E V II. No. 8

Contents
The lmperators M onthly Message .................................................................... "The W hite Brother..................................................................B y Raymund Andrea A re Miracles of Healing Possible?.......................................... By Royle Thurston W h y Are We? ..................................................................................By Eugene Cassidy Pictures of Headquarters ......................................................................................... Report of the Egyptian Tour (Installment Seven) B y the Trip Secretary The Chatter Box ..................................................................... B y The Listener-In The Power W ithin ..................................................................B y W illiam H. M cKegg

HOW TO ADDRESS LETTERS This is Very Important


Always address your envelopes to: A M O R C , Rosicrucian Park, San Jose, California. In the lower corner of your envelope, write the name of one of the following departments, which is to give immediate attention to your letter. For general information: "Supreme Secretary. Payment of dues or fees: "Financial Secretary. Purchase of supplies: "Supply Bureau. Regarding lost lectures, missing mail, errors, etc., "Complaint Dept. Regarding the formation of groups, distribution of propaganda literature, and furtherance of the work: "Extension Dept. Regarding this magazine and its departments: "T rian gle Dept. Regarding help in illness or strictly personal problems: W elfare Dept. Personal letters to the Imperator should be marked in the corner: "Imperator's Secretary. Make checks and money orders payable only to "A M O RC FU N DS. Unless you notify us within thirty days after issuance of a magazine that you have not received your copy, we cannot rectify errors.

'S h e Im perators eTXlonthly


V V V V V
O W good it is to know th a t som ew here in th e w orld th e re a re th o se who s y m p a th e tic a lly u n d e rsta n d , and w ith an un d e rsta n d in g h e a rt re a ch out to h elp us and to c h e e r u s ! M an has alw ay s fo u g h t fo r so -c a lle d freed om and in d ep en d en ce and th e g r e a t stru g g le s th ro u g h o u t th e p h y si c a l w orld today seem to c e n te r around th e am bitio n in h eren t in a ll liv in g c re a tu re s to be fr e e , and to have th e fr e e e x e rc ise o f in d ep en d en ce and in d ep en d en t liv in g . W h ile a ll is p e a c e fu l, jo y f u l , h a p p y , and p ro sp e ro u s, m an lit tle re a liz e s th e need he has o f co m p an io n sh ip , o f a n a tu re th a t is th e v ery o p p o site o f th e co n d itio n im p lied b y h is c ry fo r freed om . I t is on ly w hen so rro w , g r ie f , p e rp le x ity , and w ant com e in to h is l if e th a t m an seek s fo r and re a liz e s th e need fo r hum an a sso ciatio n th a t is clo se enough and in tim a te enough to bind him to a ll o th e r b ein gs. I t is th is f a c t b ro u g h t to m a n s co n scio u sn ess in m an y w ay s, and in con d itio n s m o st im p re ssiv e , th a t h as led to th e e s ta b lish m en t o f a sso c ia tio n s, fr a te r n itie s , and b ro th erh o o d s. I t is th e c ry o f th e soul th a t b rin g s m an c lo s e r to G o d , and lead s man to seek con so latio n and g u id an ce in a ttu n e m en t w ith G o d s C o n scio u sn ess. I n a le s s e r d eg ree m an lik ew ise seek s th e com p an io n sh ip o f o th e rs, who can s y m p a th e tic a lly u n d erstan d h is n eed s, and out o f the e x p e rie n c e s o f l if e sp eak th o se w ord s or s u g g e st th o se th in g s w hich w ill b rin g co n s o la tio n , s tre n g th , h e lp , and g u id an ce. I n th e v ery e a rly h is to r y o f c iv iliz a tio n , th o se w hose h e a rts had been tou ch ed by th e sorro w s o f l if e , and w hose m inds had been d istu rb e d b y th e p e rp le x itie s o f e a rth ly p ro b le m s, un ited and band ed to g e th e r to o ffe r and re c e iv e m u tual help and co o p eratio n . M an soon le a rn e d th a t th e p ro b lem s w hich co n fro n te d him h ad a serio u s e ffe c t upon o th e rs , and th a t th e w an ts and n eed s, lik e th e ach iev em en ts, d e s ire s, and am b itio n s o f o th e rs , had an e ffe c t upon him . T h u s th e re cam e in to e x iste n ce th e se c re t fr a te r n itie s and the open asso ciatio n s w hich led to th e e sta b lish m en t o f the gu ild s and fe llo w sh ip s out o f w hich h as gro w n th e bro th erh o o d m ove m en t th ro u g h o u t th e w orld. F o r e m o st am on g th e se h as alw ay s been th e R o s ic ru c ia n B ro th e rh o o d , th e O rd e r o f th e R o s ic ru c ia n s . D o w n th rou gh th e ages, and th ro u g h th o se tim es know n as the d a rk p erio d s w hen a rts and scie n c e s, when m a te ria l p ra c tic e s and custom s w ere sh a k en fro m th e ir fo u n d atio n s and m an s faith in m a te ria l th in g s b ecam e d eth ro n ed , th e s p ir it o f b ro th erh o o d rem ain ed , and help ed th e p ro g re ssiv e m inds to c a r r y on and e v e n tu a lly re e s ta b lish th e o rg a n iz a tio n s o f m an and b rin g ab ou t th e R e n a is sa n c e , the r e b irth s o f th e a r ts , w hich developed th e c u ltu ra l sta n d a rd s o f c iv iliz a tio n . T o d a y th e R o s ic ru c ia n O rd e r is one of th e la rg e s t u n iv ersal o rg a n iz a tio n s know n to m an. O th e r fr a te r n a l bodies a re divided in to in d ep en d en t iso la te d gro u p s o p e ra t in g in d iff e r e n t la n d s, o fte n in o p p o sitio n to one a n o th e r. B u t th e R o s ic ru cia n s are u n ited . T h e y h av e th e ir ju r is d ic tio n s , th e ir g e o g ra p h ic a l d iv isio n s, and th e ir m a t e r ia l se p a ra tio n s. B u t in th e s p ir it o f th e ir w ork , and in th e fu rth e ra n c e o f th e ir h u m a n ita ria n a c tiv itie s , th e y a re un ited as s o lid ly and as co m p le te ly as thou gh it w ere n ot o n ly one p h y sic a l bo d y , but one body w ith n e ith e r g e o g ra p h ic a l, p o litic a l, n a tio n a l, o r any o th e r d iv isio n . T h u s the R o s ic ru c ia n O rd e r to d ay o f fe rs to m en and women o f c u ltu ra l ten d e n cies and o f a s p ir in g m inds th e o p p o rtu n ity not on ly to re ce iv e th a t in stru c tio n , g u id a n ce , and h elp w hich d ir e c ts them su c c e s s fu lly in th e d ev elop m ent o f th e ir own in h e re n t and in n e r a b ilitie s , b rin g in g about ra p id ly and w ith le ss su ffe rin g and sorrow th e ev olu tio n o f th e ir c h a ra c te r and p e r s o n a lity , b u t it o ffe rs a com p an io n sh ip and a sy m p a th e tic u n d e rsta n d in g in th e m eet in g o f th e tr ia ls and trib u la tio n s o f life so th a t p ro g re ss and c o n siste n t ad v an ce m en t to th e a tta in m e n t o f p e rso n a l m a s te r sh ip m ay b e achiev ed . T h e p o rta ls o f th e o rg a n iz a tio n are open to e v ery s in ce re see k e r w ith o u t re lig io u s, p o litic a l, or com m ercial o b lig a tio n , and the re a l s p ir it o f frie n d ly com p an ion sh ip w el com es ev ery se e k e r to e n te r th e p o rta ls and d w ell in P e a c e P ro fo u n d .

The M ystic T riangle Sep tem b er

1929

c3 h e

IjOhite Brother
V V V V V

By R a y m u n d A n d r e a

H E R E is a c la s s o f book w hich n ev er fa ils to in te re s t th e o c cu lt s tu d e n t: th a t w h i c h sp e a k s o f th e p e rso n al co n t a c t o f a p u p il w ith a M a ste r. A kind m em ber o f our O rd e r re c e n tly sen t me a book ca lle d an o ccu lt au tob io g r a p h y ; and sin ce it b elo n g s to th e cla ss above m en tio n ed , I b elie v e our m em bers w ill b e p a r tic u la r ly in te re ste d in som e a c cou n t o f i t and in to ce rta in item s o f o ra l te a c h in g im p a rte d b y th e B r o th e r to his p u p il. I n the first p la c e , I th in k th a t, on re a d in g a book o f th is n a tu re , a w ise d is crim i n ation should be m ade on c e r ta in p o in ts. T h e B r o th e r th e re in re fe rre d to , fo r in s ta n c e , is c a lle d M ; and it is ju s t p o ssib le th a t som e m ay im m ed iately ju m p to th e co n clu sion th a t th is in d iv id u al is none o th e r th a n th e M a s te r M know n to m any o f us in o cc u lt lite r a tu r e . T h is w ould be a p ro fo u n d m ista k e . T h o s e o f us who h av e an y j u s t con cep tio n o f w hat a W orld M a s te r m u st b e , o f th e v ast w orks under h is su p erv isio n and h is w ell know n tr a d i tio n a l alo o fn e ss fro m p h y sic a l c o n ta c t in m undane a ffa irs , w ould n ev er id e n tify th e B r o th e r M in th is book w ith th e G r e a t M a s te r M o ry a . T h e c o r re c t view to ta k e o f th is m a tte r, it seem s to m e, is, th a t an a s p ira n t o f o ccu lt p ro m ise, such as th e w rite r o f th is a u to b io g ra p h y , m ay c o n ta ct a B r o th e r , who to h im , m ay un d o u b ted ly o ccu p y the p o sitio n o f M a s te r to p u p il; b u t th a t M a s te r is n o t to be con sid ered b y th e re a d e r fo r one m om ent as one o f th e au g u st C h ie fs o f th e B ro th e rh o o d . W ith a ll due re s p e c t to th is p a rtic u la r w rite r, we can n o t co n ceiv e, in th e fa c e o f a ll our stu d ies on th e s u b je c t, o f such a M a s te r d w ellin g in L o n d o n , ta k in g p a r t in th e m eetin g s o f lit tle g ro u p s o f s tu d en ts, su b m ittin g to in te rro g a tio n upon all kin d s o f to p ics, o cc u lt and o th e rw ise , and ta k in g h is pu p il fo r an o cc a sio n a l e x c u r sion on th e a s tr a l or m e n tal p la n e . H a p p ily , th e w rite r h im s e lf m ak es no such

" T he W h ite B r o t h e r

references

c la im : b u t it is asto n ish in g w hat claim s som e o f h is re ad e rs m ig h t m ak e fo r him , and it is th ese cred u lou s sou ls I am th in k in g o f. I f th e y w ill b e a r in m ind th a t th e G r e a t M a s te rs hav e u n der th e ir su p e rv is ion in itia te s o f v ario u s d eg rees o p e ra tin g a ll over th e w o rld , we sh a ll p la ce th is p a r tic u la r c a se in its p ro p e r s e ttin g and p r o fit by its p u b lica tio n . N o doubt it was one o f th e se in itia te s th a t m ad e h im se lf know n to th e w rite r o f th is book w ith the d efin ite in te n t o f p e rso n a l in s tru c tio n . A s th e B r o th e r h im s e lf s a y s : a m an s M a s te r m ay b e w a itin g ju s t arou nd th e c o rn e r, o r liv in g in th e sam e hou se, b u t he w ill not m ake h im s e lf know n to h is p ro sp e ctiv e p u p il u n til th e rig h t m om ent fo r c o n ta c t and re co g n itio n . A nd such M a s te r s , as a g e n e ra l ru le , are in itia te s , a g e n ts, or m es sen g ers o f th o se h ig h e r, y e t in th e sca le o f o c c u lt ev olu tion th e y a re th em selv es un d er th e su p e rio r su p erv isio n o f a G r e a t M a s te r. A nd th e se in itia te s a re p re p a re d and sen t fo rth to c o n ta ct and in s tr u c t th o se who a re re a d y to p ro fit b y th e kn ow led ge th e y can im p a rt and equip them in tu rn fo r g r e a te r sp h e re s o f s e r v ice. T h e au th o r say s th a t h is book is th e ch ro n ic le o f a stu d en t who sou gh t and b e cam e th e p u p il o f one d eep ly le a rn e d in th e kn o w led ge o f th e D iv in e S c ie n c e s. O n th a t s ta te m e n t, th e r e fo r e , we a c ce p t th e a u th e n tic ity o f his book, and th e v ariou s fra g m e n ts o f te a ch in g giv en b y th e B r o th e r to h is p u p il a p p e a r to leav e no d oubt th a t th e n a r ra tiv e is a u th e n tic . W e s h a ll be s])e c ia lly in te re ste d in th e acco u n t o f th e a u th o rs e a g e r m e n ta l p ilg rim a g e fro m one p e rsu a sio n o f th o u g h t to an o th e r, each to be th ru s t asid e in tu r n as u n sa tis fy in g to th e hu n ger o f th e d ev elo p in g sou l, u n til fin a lly th e u n e x p e cted m ee tin g took p la c e w hen he w as giv en th a t p e rso n a l in n e r a s sista n c e w hich en ab led him to m a n ip u la te c e r ta in o cc u lt fo rc e s and ta k e his own h ig h e r ev olu tio n c o n scio u sly in han d , som e h in ts o f w hich a re giv en in th e book. M em b ers o f th e N in th G ra d e o f our

te a ch in g s w ill be in te re ste d a t th is p o in t in con n ectio n w ith th e in s tru c tio n th e re in w hich d eals s p e c ific a lly w ith th e p re p a r a ton fo r m ee tin g a p e rso n al M a s te r . T h e au th o r tou ches the m a tte r v ery b r ie fly , b u t it is c le a r th a t he w as acq u ain ted w ith som e a sp e cts o f th e R o s ic ru cia n te a ch in g s and it is l e f t to c o n je c tu r e w h eth er th e B r o th e r w as n o t h im s e lf a m em ber o f the O rd e r, sin ce the m eetin g , we are to ld , took p la ce in th e room o f an o rg a n iz a tio n w hich is unnam ed . A nd th in k in g o f our own m em bers in th e N in th G ra d e , I am led to r e f e r to th e ca se o f one o f th e se m em bers whom I re c e n tly co n ta cte d fo r th e first tim e. T h is m an h as been a clo se stu d en t o f o cc u lt lite ra tu re fo r m any y e a r s ; and h is lam en t to m e w as, th a t in s p ite o f a ll his e a g e r re s e a rch , he had not y e t m ad e th e c o n ta c t he d esired . H e f e lt th a t he had not been in any d efin ite w a y ; his kn ow led ge l a jr b ro ad and deep in h is m ind , lo g ic a lly b u ilt up and d uly assim i la te d , b u t he had not f e lt a p a rtic u la r c a ll in any d irec tio n . T h e c a se is n o t e x c e p t io n a l; th e re a re o th e rs in a s im ila r p o si tio n . A nd I am thro w n b a ck upon th is th o u g h t in co n sid erin g i t : th a t in such a l if e th e re is a c y c le o f K a rm a to be liq u id a te d , th a t his lo n g and sin ce re e f fo r ts can by no m ean s h av e b een in v a in ; th a t he is, p e rh a p s q u ite u n co n scio u sly , s te a d ily p ro g re ssin g to a p o in t w here all h is kn o w led ge and e x p e rie n c e w ill b e re q u is itio n e d ; fo r it is need ed , d eep ly n eed ed , and any d ay th e h in d e rin g con d i tio n s m ay p ass and h is m ission b e r e vealed .

used

th e p a th and e v en tu a lly c o n ta ct an in itia te in th is w ay , have had an ard uous stru g g le w ith circ u m sta n ce s and have been sev e re ly sch oo led in v ario u s ad verse con d itio n s b e fo re com ing in to th e ir ow n. T h is is th e v e ry o p p o site o f w h at th e a v e ra g e stu d en t e x p e c ts to find. H e im agin es th a t th e p riv ileg ed one m u st have had ev ery a s sista n ce and con v en ien ce th a t c ircu m sta n ce s cou ld affo rd and been sh e lte re d from a n y th in g in th e n a tu re o f th e in im ical re s tric tio n s and op p o sitio n s th a t have fa lle n to lo t. Y e t he is e n tire ly w ron g in th is assu m p tion . T h o s e who hav e gone up th e m oun ta in have had to do th e ir own clim b in g , b u t in th e m a jo r it y o f c a se s we know n o th ing o f th e d iffic u ltie s th e y h av e had to e n co u n te r. In th is book th e w rite r ta k e s us u n re se rv e d ly in to h is con fid ence. P e r h a p s i t is w ell fo r him th a t h e w rite s, as I th in k , under a pseud onym .

his

F o r th a t m em b er, and o th e rs lik e him , th is book m ay have a m essag e. F ro m p o v e rty , throu gh d oubt, and onw ard to in c re a sin g kn o w led ge, th e au th o r p re sse d o n , n ev er d e sp a irin g th a t a t len g th he would find th e tru e n u rtu re fo r the sou l. T h e B r o th e r was th e re and kn ew him fro m a f a r , bu t w aited u n til th e h ou r fo r re co g n itio n cam e, u n til the accu m u lated k n o w l edge and w orld e x p e rie n c e o f his p ro sp e c tiv e p u p il had m atu red to th e p o in t o f rig h t use and cou ld be s a fe ly u tilized . I can o n ly touch b r ie fly on th e m ain p o in ts o f th e au to b io g rap h y le ad in g up to th e tim e o f th e m e e tin g , and th en no te one o r tw o o f th e a s p e cts o f in stru ctio n given b y th e B r o th e r . A nd first I wish to o b serv e how o fte n it is the fa c t th a t th o se who m ak e som e e x c e p tio n a l p ro g re ss on

H e w as bo rn in a p o v e rty -s tric k e n q u a r te r o f a g r e a t c ity , p ro b a b ly L o n d o n , and w as a w an d erer bu rd ened w ith the cro ss o f p o v e rty , am ong a p o p u lace o f sou ls m ade w eak th ro u gh su ffe rin g and o f low and un developed c h a ra c te r . O n ce he liv ed in a c o u rt, su rrou nd ed w ith a ll th a t w as fo u l, d ru n k en , and sord id and w hich, to a sen sitiv e and im ag in ativ e ch ild , was a h eav y and con tin u al h o rro r. H is ed u ca tion w as o f th e m e a n est, provided b y the a u th o ritie s fo r the c h ild re n o f p a re n ts who w ere con sid ered th e scum o f so cie ty , w here an y sig n o f p e rs o n a lity in a ch ild w as im m ed iately a tta c k e d and su p p ressed and th e view s and d o ctrin e s o f th e E d u c a tio n a l B o a rd reig n ed o m n ip o ten t. He s a t a t h is d esk , lik e a fo o l, u n in sp ired . A nd p a ssin g fro m school in to m an y tra d e s in none o f w hich he e x c e lle d , he looked b a c k a t th e age o f eig h te e n to r e a l ize th a t on ly one id eal had e v er p ossessed him to w rite a book. T h e n he b e g a n to ta k e n o tice and soon reach e d a p o in t w here he becam e a con sciou s and d eterm in ed re b e l a g a in s t c ir cu m stan ce s and g rew a p a ce in ego tism and c y n icism . In th is fa v o ra b le m ood he fe ll in w ith an a th e is t, and ath eism was ch am pioned fo r a w h ile w ith sou nd in g rh e to ric and y o u th fu l v ir ility . B u t th e w ay was h ard and p ro g re ss slo w , and he p assed as su d d en ly in to th e prom ised land o f s o c ia l ism . In th is e n ch an ted realm g r e a t hopes sp ru n g up and he e a g e rly sou gh t to g a th e r m a te ria l fo r th re e v a st volum es on E g o

tism P a s t, P re s e n t, and F u tu r e . A step fu r th e r , b lin d ly , and lie e n te re d th e d a rk v a lle y s o f a n arch ism , and jo in e d th e noble arm y o f a n a rch is ts pled g ed to d estro y a ll ty r a n ts and rev o lu tio n ize so c ie ty . T h is ta s k was h a rd e r s t i l l ; en th u siasm c o o le d ; an d , in a p e a c e fu l in te rlu d e , he rep osed fo r a w hile in the n o u rish in g bosom o f p h ilo so p h y . B u t th is proved a d isq u ietin g re s tin g p la ce fo r a o n e-tim e a th e is t, fo r sp iritu a lism and th eosop h y w ere a lre a d y th re a te n in g h is rep o se. H e stu d ied th e th e o so p h ica l lite r a tu r e , jo in e d th e lib r a ry , and en tered the so c ie ty . T h e r e he found frie n d s but g o t on ill w ith them . T h e y lived in a seren e a ir o f u n th in k in g fa ith and h is in te rro g a tio n s u p set them . The S e c r e t D o c tr in e he read , b u t un d erstood little o f. S o m e o f th e c h a ra c te r s in th e grou p he was allie d w ith are d escrib ed and c la s sifie d w ith keen d iscrim in a tio n . T h e y w ere a s tra n g e p eo p le and prov o ked his cu rio sity . W ith one or tw o o f h is m y stic a l in ti m ates he v isited in the ev en in gs th e c a fe s o f S o h o , th e re so rt o f ev ery ty p e o f a r t is t, and th e re observed l if e in m an y o f its m ost u n e d ify in g a sp e cts. Y e t th is p erio d was m arked b y th e ir g r e a t d evotion to th eosop h y. B u t th eo sop h y w as one th in g : th e T h e o s o p h ic a l S o c ie ty an o th e r. Y e t we sta y e d on in th e so cie ty he w rite s, b ecau se we w ere e n ch an ted b y th e sh ad ows and em o tio n al fo u n ta in s th a t p lay ed upon our sen se s, b e co m in g m ore and m ore som n o len t, and it w as a lo n g tim e a ft e r th a t we w ere fo rc e d to ad m it th a t a ll we could le a rn w as o f an in te lle c tu a l n a tu re , w hich cou ld only lead us in to a p e rp e tu a l m irag e. F o r , above a ll, w hat we re a lly d esired w ere re a liz a tio n s th a t would e n a b le us to com p reh en d th e m ean in gs o f l if e , to u n d e rstan d w hy h u m an ity s u ffe re d , and the c u r e ; fo r we no lo n g er believ ed th a t lif e w oke fro m th e un con sciou s p a s sions o f th e elem e n ts to sn a rl and te a r its w ay up a s ta ir c a s e b u ilt fro m th e bones o f le ss e r liv e s. F o r th re e y e a rs he had stu d ied th eo sop h y and grow n w eary , not o f its d o ctrin e s , b ut o f th e la c k o f s p ir it ual in c id e n t, w hen , u n e x p e c te d ly , he m et th e B ro th e r. I t w as in th e room o f an o rg a n iz a tio n w hich, he s a y s , h a s lo n g sin ce p assed aw ay . A few stu d en ts had m et fo r d iscu ssio n and w e re a w a itin g th e a rriv a l o f him w hose id e n tity w as e v id e n tly not su sp e cte d . As soon as he en te re d the

w rite r say s he f e lt an im m ed iate d if f e r e n ce in th e m e n tal a tm o sp h e re . T h is m e e t ing led to a p erso n al in v ita tio n fro m th e B r o th e r to v isit him . F ro m th a t tim e o n w ard he receiv ed v ariou s fra g m e n ts o f te a ch in g and in stru c tio n fro m th e B r o th e r , som e o f w hich I w ill r e fe r to. H a v in g on one o ccasio n h eard him sp eak o f th e M a s te rs , the au th o r asked th e B r o th e r i f he w ould define th e ir s ta te o f con sciou sn ess. I n an sw er to th is th e B r o th e r b ro u g h t him a book, w hich was none o th e r th an th a t know n as th e abou t w hich an a rtic le a p p eared in th is m ag azin e not lo n g sin ce , in tro d u cin g it to m em bers, and in w hich is giv en on p ag e 2 9 7 a d efinition o f th e M a s te r. T h e B r o th e r p ointed ou t th a t th is book con tain ed m uch tru th and th a t the com m en taries had been w ritte n by one who had e x p e rie n ce d c e r ta in illu m in atio n s. W e a re to ld th a t th e B r o th e r did n ot confine h im s e lf so le ly to o cc u lt m a tte rs but was also c o n v ersa tio n a l on m any u n related to jh e s . F ie in d ica te d th e ta le n ts o f his p u p il, and en cou rag ed him to con tin u e his e a rly e ffo rts in v erse w ritin g . H e was told m an y th in g s abo u t h im s e lf w hich nobody e lse could p o ssib ly have know n, and given c le a r d e sc rip tio n s o f p eo p le p e rso n a lly un know n to th e B r o th e r b u t w ell know n to th e w rite r, th e ir h a b its, ta le n ts , and so fo rth . O n q u e stio n in g th e B r o th e r about th e e le m e n ta ls, th e book above m entioned w as in d ic a te d as a sou rce o f re lia b le and firs t hand in fo rm a tio n . I t is in te re s tin g to note the re m a rk s o f th e B r o th e r on m a rria g e . H e p oin ted out th a t th e stu d en t w as p e r fe c tly fre e to do wrh a t he w ould, though it w'ould be in a d v isab le to m a rry a p erso n who w as below him in c a s te and d ev elo p m en t, fo r th en h e w ould b e m ore o fte n h in d ered th a n h elp ed , p a r tic u la r ly i f he m a rried w hen y o u n g ; th o u g h , o f co u rse , m a rria g e som e tim es cou ld also h e lp , fo r the stu d en t seek s b a la n c e , and i f the stu d en t a rriv e s a t th a t s ta g e th e re is litt le to fe a r. H e th en m en tion ed a case o f a m a rried M a s te r w ith a fa m ily , w hose w ife w as co m p le te ly ig n o r a n t o f the fa c t th a t h e r hu sband was d if fe re n t from th e o rd in a ry ty p e o f m an kin d , save fo r the e x ce p tio n th a t he p ossessed a

de G a b ilis

C om te

v ast kn ow led ge th a t su rp rise d his fa m ily . I am rem in d ed , on th is to p ic , how th a t o n ce, in co n v ersatio n w ith a th eo sop h ical le a d e r, a book cam e up fo r d iscu ssion in

The M ystic T riangle S ep tem b er 1929

w hich it w as sta te d th a t c e r ta in o f th e M a s te rs m a rry . T h is sta te m e n t is s tro n g ly re p u d iate d and th e book w as c o m p le te ly d isco u n ted b ecau se o f it. N ow , w h at p a r tic u la r ly com m ends it s e l f to m e in th e B r o t h e r s co n v ersatio n w ith h is p u p il is th e b re a d th and to le ra n ce o f h is view s upon v exed q u estio n s o f th is n a tu re , and th e e n tire ab sen ce o f a sse rtiv en e ss and b ig o try w hich so s tro n g ly c h a ra c te r iz e som e o f th o se who w ould hold us in b o n d age to th e ir n arro w and p reco n ceiv ed o p in ion s. S p e a k in g o f fa ilu r e s , th e B r o th e r said th a t m any o f his p u p ils had fa ile d throu gh s e x , eg o tism , and je a lo u s y , b u t thou gh th e y had fa ile d th e y w ere n ot fo rg o tte n , and a tim e w ould com e w hen th e fa lle n p u p il would be giv en an o th e r o p p o rtu n ity , fo r th e T e a c h e r s are v ery p a tie n t and can u n d erstan d th e w eakn esses o f m an kind b e cau se th e y had also su ffered in th e p a st b e fo re s u c ce e d in g ; tre a d in g th e p a th is a ca se o f c o n sta n t e ffo rt and th o u g h y e a rs m ay p a ss, p e rs is te n c e in c a rry in g out th e v ario u s e x e rc ise s w ill u ltim a te ly b e r e w ard ed w ith su c ce ss, fo r n o t th e s m a lle st e ffo rt is w asted , and th e m om ent com es when som eth in g is op ened , som e s le e p in g fo rc e aw ak en ed , and th e seek ed h as a new re a liz a tio n o f l if e , an ex te n sio n o f th e sen ses th a t m ak es one m ore s en sitiv e o f th in g s p assed u n noticed b e fo r e . A nd le t us p a r tic u la r ly n o te t h is : T h e re is no a u to c ra t am ong a g ro u p o f p u p ils, fo r each te a c h e r is som ew hat o f a s p e c ia lis t alo n g c e r ta in giv en lin e s , also it can h ap p en som etim es th a t th e a p p a r e n tly le sse r evolved m em bers m ay becom e th e te a ch e r to th e r e s t o f th e g ro u p , thou gh even th en he w ould not a tte m p t to com m and or fo rc e obed ience from the re s t, fo r th e freed om o f each stu d en t is con sid ered sa c re d , th o u gh a ll a re supposed to w ork in p e r fe c t h arm o n y fo r th e good o f a ll and fo r th e good o f m an kind . O ne o f th e sad d en t m om ents in a te a c h e r s lif e is when he is c h a lle n g e d b y his p u p il fo r kn o w led g e, fo r th e p u p ils soul m u st b e giv en freed om o f e x p re ssio n , and a n y th in g th a t ten d s to lim it th e so u ls e x p re ssio n b rin g s upon th e te a c h e r th e K a rm ic re s p o n sib ility . A b ove a ll, le t p eo p le alone w ith freed om fo r th e ir so u ls e x p re ssio n . T h e tru e stu d en t ask s th e o th e r m an s soul how h e can h e lp it, and th e s tu d e n ts own soul w ill tra n s m it th e m essag e. K e e p th e m ind calm , fo r th is is th e h ig h e r form o f

c la irv o y a n c e , and the co n fe ss io n a l, i f done im p e rs o n a lly , is a s p iritu a l th in g . T h e c h a p te r devoted to v ariou s o ccu lt te a ch in g s co n tain s m an y in s tru c tiv e f r a g m en ts. T h a t on in itia tio n is e n lig h te n in g : W ith in th e soul o f e ach m o rta l d w ells a w a tc h e r, one who w aits p a tie n tly fo r th e tim e w hen his c h a rg e w ill c ry ou t fo r a con sciou sn ess o f the d ivine r e a litie s , and w hen th a t o c c u rs, th e in n e r w atch e r gu ides th e see k e r in to a se rie s o f e x p e rie n c e s th a t w ill p e r fe c t and m ake him f it to e n te r th e te m p le s o f T r u th . W h e re v e r the s e e k e r d w e lls, w h eth er he b e w h ite, y e llo w , or b la c k , w h eth er he d w ells in a hovel o r a p a la c e , d ir e c tly he d esire s to becom e a h e lp e r fo r h u m an ity and w ork in u n ity w ith the law s o f the s p ir it, d ir e c tly he lis te n s to th e c o m p e llin g voice o f in tu ition th a t bid s him see k beyond th e glam ou r o f e v en ts, and he o b ey s it , th e n th e w a tch e r w ith in ta k e s him upon a v o yage th a t can o n ly end w hen th e see k e r h as found his ow n. B u t w hen g u id in g him , th e w a tch e r also giv es to him v ariou s k e y s, k ey s th a t w ill open each o f th e seven doors th a t lead in to a n c ie n t ch a m b e rs, w herein can be found books w ritte n b y th e o th e r selv es o f th e p a s t, w orks w herein a re in scrib e d th e sym b ols o f d iv ine po w ers. O n ly b y p e rse v e ra n ce and re le n tle s s p u rsu it can th e see k e r a tta in h is d esire s. F o r in his a s p ira tio n fo r in itia tio n , he m u st n o t p e r m it h is e n e rg ie s to be fr itte r e d aw ay in th e m e n tal clam o u r and voices o f p a r a s itic and v agu e in te re s ts , th a t a re sh ap ed from m ist and b rin g o n ly te m p o ra ry n o u rish m en t. F o r in itia tio n c o n sists o f d isco v e r in g o n e s ow n lim ita tio n s , th ro u g h one also d isco v ers an a ffin ity to th e elem en ts o f n a tu re and th e u n iv erse. A nd a tim e com es in his occxilt stu d ies w hen he e n te rs th ro u g h th e c u rta in s o f a ir, and he d isco v ers new re g io n s, new la w s, and tr u th s , w hich he end eavors to bu ild in to his c h a r a c te r , and p ossess p o w ers th a t can dem o n s tra te to h u m anity th e e x iste n ce o f h ig h e r kingdom s and fo r c e s . O th e r fra g m e n ts on a r t, con scio u sn ess, and sym bolism are o f ab so rb in g in te re st bu t are too lo n g to give h ere. T o a b b re v ia te them w ould be to lose th e ir im p o rt, sin ce th e B r o th e r is econom ical in the use o f la n g u a g e ; ev ery sen te n ce te lls and is n e c e ss a ry to th e ev olu tion o f the m ain idea. T h e co n clu d in g c h a p te r on tra v e l on the m en tal p la n e m e rits a tte n tio n . F o r ov er

tw o y e a rs th e p u p il p ra c tise d v ariou s e x e rc ise s p re scrib e d b y th e B r o th e r and e v en tu a lly c e rta in h ig h e r fa c u ltie s w T ere aw aken ed . H e w as soon a f te r to h av e b is first e x p e rie n c e o f jo u r n e y in g out o f the body in to th e m e n tal w o rld . O n th is o c ca sio n , he s a y s , th o u gh tra v e llin g was v agu e he w as n o t e n tra n c e d ; his sen ses w ere m ore acu te and sen sitiv e to th e s lig h te s t sound th an ev er b e fo re , and th e B r o th e r s voice sounded loud er alth o u g h h e sp o ke in low to n es. T h is jo u r n e y was a p relu d e to m any m o re, u n til h is m en tal s ig h t becam e c le a r and re lia b le . I s e le c t th e fo llo w in g fro m sev e ra l e x p e rie n c e s. I t is v ery a rr e s tin g . O ne ev en in g M took me upon a m en tal tr ip , w herein I tra v e le d w ith g r e a t d iffic u lty . S o m e th in g seem ed to p u ll me d ow nw ard and it w as o n ly w ith M s h e lp th a t I m an aged to a rriv e a t th e p la ce he d esired to show m e. I t was a sm all room in w hich a yo u n g ch ild w as w ritin g , w hile th ro u g h a n e a rb y w in dow a g r e a t s h a ft o f silv e r lig h t cam e flow in g. I looked a t th e ch ild and seem ed to reco g n ize him as som ebody I had know n long ago . I ask e d M i f he cou ld t e ll m e who th e ch ild w as and h eard w ith a sto n ish m en t th a t it w as m y s e lf upon th is m en ta l p la n e . I n o tice d th a t as th e ch ild g azed up in to th e stre am o f lig h t, th e fa c e g rew y o u n g e r ; but w hen he b e n t dow n, th e fa c e

grew v ery old . M to ld me I w as w ritin g a book th a t w ould a p p e a r in the fu tu re , w hich did not su rp rise m e, fo r I had o fte n seen com p lete new poem s in m y d ream s, fo r in sle e p th e soul jo u r n e y s to its realm o f tru e b ein g , w ith c le a r m e tric a l form s and s u b je c ts , w hich w ere u ltim a te ly w ritte n , thou gh m any w ere also u n w ritten , as I could n o t re c o lle c t th e w ord s. A p rolo g u e to one o f th e c h a p te rs in th e book m ay su ita b ly con clu d e th is a r tic le . I t is e n title d H u m an S p e c tr a . P o n d e re rs p e e rin g th ro u g h th e m ist, b u ild e rs o f m in a rets o f san d , g h o sts who w alk and lau g h and w ork. Y o u are b e w itch ed by th e shad ow s, th e th o u g h ts, th e d ream s o f th e hidden p eo p le. T h e y are in y o u r room , h o ld in g in th e ir han d s th e se c re ts th a t wrould m ake you as god s. T h e y o versh adow you w ith th e ir sh e k in a h s, in v isib le , th e y w h isp er to you , and you b e com e in sp ire d . T h e y c a ll th em selv es th e hu m ble s e rv a n ts o f G o d , and you c a ll y o u rselv e s m a ste rs o f E a r t h . A nd y e t you a re as sp e ctru m s, r e fle c tin g th e ir th o u g h ts, th e ir e m o tio n s, b u t d iv e rtin g th e ir s h a fts o f p o w e r, o fte n fo r e v il m o tiv es, and flo o d in g th e e a rth w ith sta in e d beam s o f th o u g h t th a t re tu rn to th e in stru m en t, b rin g in g w ith th em d e stru ctio n . Y e t in th e aeg is o f th e ir love and th e ir d ivine p a tie n ce th e y s t ill g u id e you in to fre sh re a lm s o f e x p e r ie n c e .

V V V V V

W A R N IN G

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OUR M EM BERS

E v e r y so o fte n wre le a rn th a t som e p e r s o n , u su a lly a m an b u t o c c a s io n a lly a w om an, is tra v e llin g ab ou t th is co u n try re p r e s e n tn g h im s e lf o r h e r s e lf to be a m em b e r o f o u r o rg a n iz a tio n , in u n fo rtu n a te c irc u m s ta n c e s , and ask in g fo r fin a n cia l h elp and o th e r form s o f h e lp . I n n e a rly ev ery ca se th e se p erso n s a re n o t co n n ected w ith our o rg a n iz a tio n , and a re fa m ilia r o n ly w ith m a tte r th a t h as been p u b lish ed in T h e L ig h t o f E g y p t , and in our c irc u la rs . W e ad vise e v ery m em ber to d isco u rag e any fo rm o f s o lic ita tio n , and e sp e c ia lly , to do n o th in g fo r any one who p re te n d s to be a m em ber o f our o rg a n iz a tio n and can n o t show p ro p e r id e n tific a tio n . I f in d o u bt, t e le g rap h us b e fo re you lo se y o u r m oney, and n o t a fte rw a rd s . A t th e p re se n t tim e , a m an c la im in g to hav e been h elp ed out o f p riso n b y our o rg a n iz a tio n and g iv in g th e la s t nam e o f H o w a rd is v is itin g m an y o f o u r b ra n ch e s and so lic itin g c o n sid era b le sum s o f m oney u n der v ario u s p re te n sio n s. I f h e a p p e a rs a t y o u r lo d g e, you should n o tify the p o lice a u th o ritie s so th a t he w ill be p re v e n te d fro m co n tin u in g th is fo rm o f a c tiv ity am on g th o se w rho m ay n o t see th is w arn in g .

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A N I N T E R E S T IN G D IS C U S S IO N O F A VERY IM P O R T A N T Q U E S T IO N

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V V V V V
|E h e ar it said c o n sta n tly th a t m any o f th e m ira c le s reco rd ed in th e B ib le , w hich a re p r a c tic a lly d u p lica te s o f m ira c le s reco rd ed in o th e r sa cre d w rit in g s o f th e O rie n t, m u st be e ith e r e x a g g e ra tio n s in s t a te m e n ts, o r m isco n cep tion s o f th e fa c ts . S o o fte n is th is p o in t arg u ed and so s tro n g ly , th a t we find a v e ry la rg e c la s s o f p erso n s who doubt m an y o f th e o th e r im p o rta n t p a ssa g e s o f th e B ib le sim p ly b ecau se th e y hav e no fa ith in th e s ta te m e n ts p e rta in in g to th e so -c a lle d m ira c le s . T h is , o f co u rse , is te n d in g to b re a k down th e re lig io u s fa ith o f m an y p e o p le , and it is one o f th e im p o rta n t arg u m en ts used b y th e a th e ists o f th e a th e is tic s o cie ty o f A m e r ic a in th e a tte m p t to sp re a d its h o rrib le p ro p a g a n d a . M o st g e n e r a lly th e ones who arg u e a g a in s t th e p o s sib ility o f th e m ira c le s as re co rd ed in th e B ib le and a g a in s t any p re s e n t-d a y m ira c le s o f h e a lin g a re those p erso n s who a re som ew hat fa m ilia r w ith a few o f th e p h y sio lo g ica l, p a th e lo g ic a l, and b io lo g ica l law s o f th e hum an body. T h e ir kn o w led ge o f th e se law s and p rin cip le s is so s u p e rfic ia l th a t it is lik e all s u p e r fic ia l kn o w led ge o f any kind a d an gero u s th in g . W h en we find a p erson who h as o n ly a lit t le kn ow led ge o f a su b je c t , he is v ery a p t to hav e fa ls e co n clu sions d eriv ed fro m in co m p le te re a so n in g , r e s u ltin g n a tu ra lly fro m h is la c k o f th o r ough in s ig h t; th e se fa ls e con clu sio n s v ery serio u sly a ffe c t h is th in k in g and a c tin g . O fte n those p erso n s who b eliev e th ey have a f a ir u n d e rstan d in g o f a ll s c ie n tific p rin c ip le s w ill a tte m p t to arg u e s c ie n tific a lly a g a in s t any kind o f m ira c le s in h ealin g . O n th e o th e r h an d , a few m en , em in en t sp e c ia lis ts in m ed icin e and su rg e ry , who have been th o ro u g h )' tra in e d in th e m a te ria l scie n ces r e la tin g to m ed icine and su rg e ry , also claim th a t m ira c le s are im p o ssib le and base th e ir con clu sio n s and b e lie fs upon th e ir reaso n in g . T h e ir re a so n in g is also fa u lty b ecau se th e ir ed u catio n lias been lim ited to m a te ria l law s o f n a tu re o r th e law s o f m a te ria l fu n ctio n in g in n a tu r e ; b ro ad and p ro fo u n d as th e ir kn ow led ge m ay b e , it is s till in co m p le te i f it does not in clu d e an u n d e rstan d in g o f th e m e ta p h y sic a l law s o f life . O n e o f th e arg u m en ts g e n e r a lly pu t fo r w ard b y th e s u p e rfic ia lly in fo rm ed or by th e le a rn e d p h y sic ia n s and su rg eon s is th a t a con d ition th a t h as been e sta b lish e d in the hu m an body fo r som etim e can n o t be in s ta n tly ch an g ed b y any m ira c le , ev en o f a d ivine n a tu re , sin ce n a tu re h as c e rta in fu n d am en tal law s w hich a re im m u tab le, and w hich re q u ire tim e and con d itio n s fo r a l te ra tio n o r m o d ific a tio n . T h e y rig h tly a rg u e th a t i f an e y e is m u tila te d o r ta k e n ou t o f its so c k e t in th e h ead , a new eye can n o t b e gro w n in its p la ce in th e f r a c tio n o f a second by any m ira c le b ecau se n a tu re h as c e r ta in law s fo r th e g ro w in g o f e y e s and th e d ev elo p m en t o f such o r g a n s, and th e se law s re q u ire tim e. T h e y also rig h tly a rg u e th a t i f a lim b h as been am p u tate d , a new one w ill n o t grow in a m om ent b y an y m iracu lo u s a p p lica tio n o f an y law , b ecau se lim b s can be gro w n on ly b y n a tu re in c e r ta in w ays re q u irin g a c e r ta in le n g th o f tim e. S u c h p e rso n s also arg u e th a t i f we ta k e a p e r fe c tly norm al arm and b an d ag e it fa s t to th e body in a cram p ed p o sitio n , and leav e it ban d aged in th is m an n er fo r sev eral y e a r s , th a t it w ill becom e s tiff and the m u scles atro p h ie d o r below n orm al in size from n o n -u se, and th a t th e sh ru n ken arm ca n n o t be u n b an daged and im m ed iately pu t in to good use by any m ira c le s know n to m an or to the s p ir itu a l M a s te rs . T h e y say th a t o n ly in the co u rse o f tim e , and in a cco rd a n ce w ith c e r ta in n a tu ra l la w s, ca n th e sh ru n ken and atro p h ie d p a rts o f the arm becom e norm al in size a g a in , and fle x ib le enough to fu n c

The M ystic T riangle S ep tem b er

1929

tio n so th a t th e arm ca n b e used in a n o r m al m an n er. T h u s th e re is a c e r ta in am ou nt o f sou nd n ess and san en ess in th e ir arg u m en ts, o r a t le a s t th e re seem s to b e, and we a re alw ays r e lu c ta n t to q u estion such sta te m e n ts b e cau se w hile our op inions d iffe r, th e se p e r sons hav e a t le a s t th e b e n e fit o f r a tio n a l ism on th e ir sid e and th e y can p ro d u ce a p red om in an ce o f te stim o n y to show th a t th e ir con clu sion s are c o r re c t. O f c o u rse , i f we a c c e p t th e B ib le sta te m e n ts and the m ira c les th e re in p re s e n te d , we hav e evi d ence to th e c o n tra ry . B u t, it is im pos sib le to b rin g th e ev id en ce o f th e B ib le in to any arg u m en t w ith th e s e p e rso n s, b e cau se th e y sa y th a t th e w itn esses to th e B ib le m ira c le s are n o t d ep en d ab le and th a t we a re n o t su re th a t th e m ira c le s ev er h ap p en ed . H o w ev er, we find th a t o cc a sio n a lly som eth in g h ap p en s in th ese m odern d ays t h a t lends c o lo r a t le a s t to th e p o s sib ility o f m ira c le s. B e fo r e te llin g you o f one o f th e se m odern m ira c le s , I w ould c a ll you r a tte n tio n to th e fa c t th a t we s till ad h ere to th a t in te re stin g p ro p o sitio n p re se n te d b y Ja m e s , th e em in en t p s y c h o lo g ist, as s ta te d a nu m ber o f tim es in our le ctu re s to th e e ffe ct th a t, I t ta k e s b u t th e p re s ence o f one w h ite crow to p ro v e th a t a ll crow s are n o t b la c k . I t ta k e s b u t th ese o ccasio n al m od ern m ira c le s to p o in t out c le a rly th e p o s sib ility o f m an y o f the m ira c les reco rd ed in th e B ib le and in th e sa cre d lite r a tu r e o f th e fa r E a s t . N ow le t us look a t one o f th ese m od e rn m ira c le s . H e r e in our ow n lo c a lity th e re has lived fo r a n u m b er o f y e a rs a m an who a t one tim e w as w e alth y and p ro sp ero u s in h is b u sin e ss, b u t who w as so in ju r e d in an a c cid e n t th a t it le ft him w ith a ll o f th e lo w er p a r t o f h is body and h a lf o f th e u p p er p a r t co m p le te ly p a r a ly zed . F o r tw e n ty y e a rs he h as lived in a w heel c h a ir, h a rd ly a b le to feed h im s e lf, and in c a p a b le o f d re ssin g h im s e lf, a tte n d in g to h is p e rso n a l n eed s, o r co n d u ctin g any b u sin ess to su p p o rt h im s e lf in a finan c ia l w ay. T h ro u g h th e n on-u se o f lim bs and arm s and h an d s, and p a r t o f th e fa c e fo r tw e n ty y e a r s, th e m u scles and sin ew s o f c e r ta in p a rts o f h is body had becom e su b n o rm al in size and w ere con sid ered atro p h ie d b y e x p e rts who h ad exam in ed him . D u rin g th e first y e a rs o f h is p a r a ly s is , h is la rg e incom e w as sp e n t ra p id ly

throu gh tre a tm e n ts , e x a m in a tio n s, and te sts b y em in en t e x p e r ts and e v ery th in g fa ile d to giv e him th e use o f the p a ra ly z e d p a rts o f h is b od y . H e fin aly b ecam e a poor m an liv in g alm o st on c h a r ity , d e sp on d en t, h o p e le ss, and in e v ery w ay a p itifu l ca se . I am su re th a t i f we had seen him try in g to s tru g g le on h is han ds and kn ees down th e hig h w ay o f an y one o f our c itie s , we w ould hav e seen a c r ip ple lik e unto th o se p ictu re d and d escrib ed in th e B ib lic a l sto rie s . C e rta in ly ev ery p h y sic ia n and s c ie n tis t, s p e c ia lis t, and re nowned a u th o rity ag reed th a t n o th in g less th an a m ira c le could re sto re lif e and a ctio n to the p a ra ly z e d p a r t s . H ow f r e e ly th e s e s c ie n tists and s p e c ia ls ts m ake th ese sta te m e n ts w hen th e y find th em selv es b a lk e d in ev ery a tte m p t to b rin g r e lie f to s u ffe r in g h u m an ity . I do not m ean m y w ords to b e a c ritic is m o f th e m ed ical or s u rg ic a l scie n ces and a r ts , and I know th a t m o st o f th e se m en sp eak hon e s tly and w ith s in ce re con v ictio n w hen th e y say th a t n o th in g le ss th a n a m ir a c le can ch an g e th e con d itio n s o f som e o f th e ir p a tie n ts . Y e t , th e iro n y o f it a ll is t h a t th ese sam e s p e c ia lis ts and s c ie n tists who m ak e such sta te m e n ts have lit t le o r no fa ith in the p o s s ib ility o f any m ira c le ev er d oin g a n y th in g fo r anyone. P e r h a p s th a t is b e ca u se th e y hav e been tra in e d to th in k a lo n g c e r ta in lin es and b ecau se m ira c les so seldom h ap p en . T o re tu rn to th e m an who w as p a r a ly zed h e re in C a lifo r n ia , ho w ev er, we w ant to say th a t in th e la s t few y e a rs he b e cam e so d esp ond ent and such an o u tca st o f s o c ie ty , so frie n d le s s, and h o m eless, in m an y w ay s, th a t he b ecam e ob sessed w ith th e id ea th a t d eath or tra n s itio n w as the o n ly w ay o ut o f h is p e rm a n e n t m isery . I f w e, as m y stic s, or any s c ie n tis t as a sp e c ia lis t w ould hav e d ared to step fo rw a rd and s ta te in th e p re se n ce o f w itn esses or in an y lite r a tu r e o r in a m ag azin e a r tic le o f th is k in d th a t th e re w as a w ay b y w hich th e m an cou ld b e cu red o f h is p a r a ly s is and in th e tw in k lin g o f an e y e g iv en fu ll p o ssesio n o f a ll o f his b od y , so th a t he cou ld stan d e re c t and w alk and use h is han d s and arm s and fa c e and o th er o rg an s and p a rts o f h is body in a norm al w ay , we w ould b e c ritic iz e d and th e fin ger o f rid ic u le and c h a rla ta n ism p o in ted a t u s. W h o am ong us is b ra v e enough to fa c e th is s o rt o f th in g in our own com m u n itie s? P e r h a p s th e th o u g h t o f rid icu le

instantaneously

cau ses m an y o f us to k eep our th o u g h ts to o u rselv es and in sile n c e p e rfo rm our d u tie s, re m ain in g co n ten ted w ith th e k n ow led ge w hich we h av e, b u t w hich we h e s ita te to p ro cla im b e fo re th e d o u b tin g m u ltitu d e s. C e rta in ly , to have claim ed th a t th is m an in th is c ity cou ld hav e b een cu red so in s ta n tly as to be a m iracu lo u s cu re o f an in sta n ta n e o u s n a tu re w ould have been to in v ite serio u s com m ent o f a c r itic a l n a tu re . A nd who would have b e liev ed i t ? B u t ju s t see w h at h ap p en ed . I n his d esp o n d en cy th e o th e r d a y , th is p o o r, c rip p le d , h o p eless m an d ecided to com m it su icid e. T o m ake su re th a t he w ould b rin g abou t tra n s itio n in a q u ick and p o sitiv e m an n er, he p lace d h im s e lf in a fu ll tub o f w a te r, tu rn ed on the g a s , and d ecided th a t i f th e g a s ov ercam e him , his body would s lip in to th e w a te r and d row n in g would b rin g abou t his tra n s itio n . T h e n he added a th ird m ethod to his p la n , and d ecided to c u t th e u p p er a r te r y o f h is th ro a t w ith a ra z o r b lad e . T h is he did. B u t b e fo re th e lo ss o f blood cou ld b rin g tra n s itio n to h im , o r th e gas o r w ate r end h is l if e , he w as d iscov ered in h is p re d ica m en t and h asten ed to a h o s p ita l. T h e r e th e flow o f blood w as stop p ed and con sciou sn ess w as g r a d u a lly re sto re d in a few m in u tes. U p on th e re tu rn o f co n scio u sn es, th e n u rse, the p h y sic ia n s, and th e frie n d s o f th e m an w ere s ta rtle d to find th a t his p a ra ly s is had l e f t him and th a t he w as c a p a b le o f m ov in g ev ery p a r t o f h is bo d y . T h e ca se cau sed w id esp read in te re s t, s p e c ia lis ts

c a lle d to see h im , and th e m an is to d ay ra p id ly re c o v e rin g fro m th e s e lf-in flic te d i n ju r y and is re a d y to s ta r t lif e over ag ain in fu ll p o ssessio n o f h is fa c u ltie s and th e fu n ctio n s o f h is b o d y , and c a p a b le o f c a r r y in g on in a n o rm al m an n er. T h is is n o t th e o n ly c a se th a t we hav e on reco rd in our file s a t H e a d q u a rte rs s im ila r to th is. W e know o f a n u m b er o f in stan tan e o u s cu res th a t cam e a b o u t, n o t th ro u g h m e ta p h y sic a l tre a tm e n t, n o t th ro u g h any act th a t w as in ten d ed to c u re or re lie v e the con d itio n . T h e o u tsta n d in g fa c t, how ever, is th a t e ith e r b y an in ju r y or sh o ck to th e n erv ou s sy ste m , an in stan tan e o u s ch an g e w as b ro u g h t ab o u t in th e p h y sic a l o r m e n ta l body w hich re sto re d it to a n o r m al co n d itio n , and in th a t w ay a n a tu ra l m ira c le i f we m ay use th a t te rm was p e rfo rm e d . T h is f a c t p rov es th a t such case s are n o t h o p e le ss, even thou gh m ed i cin e and su rg e ry hav e n o t le a rn e d th e se c r e t o f th e se in sta n ta n e o u s c u re s. It p ro v e s, fu rth e rm o re , th a t n a tu re does not alw ay s re q u ire tim e and c e r ta in con d itions fo r th e re s to ra tio n o f h e a lth or n o rm a lity . A nd such case s open up th is p o s s ib ility : I f a m a te ria l e ffe c t upon th e nervous or m e n ta l sy stem ca n re s u lt in an in s ta n ta n eous re a c tio n upon th e p h y sic a l bo d y , m ay we n o t find som e m e ta p h y s ic a l m eans o f a p p ly in g such a stim u lu s to th e nervous and m en tal body as w ould b rin g about the sam e r e s u lt? T h is is som eth in g fo r the m em bers o f ou r O rd e r to th in k ab o u t, and p e rh a p s we w ill hav e m ore to say about th is s u b je c t in fu tu re issu es.

V V V V V
AN A PO LO G Y

1929

T he M ystic T riangle S ep tem b er

D u rin g th e m onth o f J u l y , we a tte m p te d to p re v e n t an in te rru p tio n o f th e heav y w ork th a t would o ccu r d u rin g th e con v en tio n d ay s a t H e a d q u a rte rs in A u g u st by con fin in g a ll o f th e v a ca tio n p erio d s o f our la rg e s ta ff o f em p lo yees to th e fo u r w eeks o f J u l y . I t w as a new e x p e rim en t and one w hich we sh a ll n ev er tr y a g a in . T h e in te r ru p tio n to our corre sp o n d e n ce and th e f illin g o f o rd e rs and sp e cia l re q u ests fo r lite r a tu r e , and h e lp o f a ll k in d s, w as so g r e a t th a t w e soon foun d o u rselv es tw o w eeks in a r r e a r s in ta k in g c a re o f book o rd ers and s p e cia l co rre sp o n d e n ce . F o r tu n a te ly the p re p a ra tio n and m a ilin g o f th e le ctu re s w a s n o t in te rru p te d , alth o u g h a few m istak es o ccu rre d . W e ap o lo g ize fo r th e d ela y a n d an n oy an ce th a t we hav e cau sed our m em b e rs , and assu re th em th a t we a re now c a u g h t up w ith our ro u tin e and m e rely fa c e the usual p ro b lem o f e n la rg in g our sy stem c o n sta n tly to m eet th e con tin u ed g ro w th o f our a c tiv itie s .

c W kyj<fAre
THE GROW TH OF KNOWLEDGE
By E u g e n e H. C a s sid y

V V V V V
AN h as in h a b ite d th e E a r th fo r an unknow n p e rio d , p ro b ab ly e x te n d in g in to m illio n s of y e a r s . T h e r e a re few who w ould d en y th a t d u rin g his cord s phen om ena. T h e p o et g ra sp s th e ir re la tio n to lif e . I t fo llo w s th a t th e scie n t i s t s fa c ts , though o rg an ized am ong th em s elv e s, are m ean in g less w ithou t th e p o e ts v ision to o rie n t them w ith th e Cosm os. T h e s e d iffe re n t a ttitu d e s to tru th have th e ir c o rre sp o n d in g m odes o f ex p re ssio n . S in c e s cie n ce em p h asizes fa c tu a l e x a c t n e ss, th e s c ie n tific m an n er o f e x p re ssio n is d eta ile d and te c h n ic a l. W o rd s a re used d en o ta tiv e ly r a th e r th a n co n n o ta tiv e ly . A bove a ll, th e s c ie n tific m ethod is lite r a l. T h e p o e tic m an n er is d ir e c tly opposed to a ll th is. T h e em p h asis is n ev er fa c tu a l. In d e e d , fa c ts m ay even be u n tru e w ithout d e s tro y in g th e v alu e o f T h e astro n o m y o f P a ra d is e L o s t is g e n e r a lly b eliev ed to b e fa ls e , y e t th e ep ic has n o t lo s t its hu m an s ig n ific a n c e . M il to n s p u rp o se w as n o t to com m u nicate fa c ts b u t an e x p e rie n c e .

W //MMM earthly soj urn

) J I 1 p h y s ic a lly . P e r h a p s a g r e a te r nu m ber w ould n o t ad m it an y co n siste n t s p iritu a l e v olu tio n , b u t even so, b y f a r th e g r e a te r p a r t o f hu m an ity sees in s p ir itu a l, r a th e r th a n m a te ria l p ro g re ss , th e v ery p u rp o se o f e x iste n ce .

*las ev ivcd

S u c h s p ir itu a l and m en tal d ev elop m ent is an in d iv id u al r a th e r th a n a r a c ia l m a t te r. T h a t is to s a y , th e re is no av erag e g a it o f p ro g re ss w hich th e w hole ra ce fo llo w s c o n sis te n tly . I n e v ery ag e th e re a re n e c e ss a rily som e few who hav e a c q u ired a g r e a te r kn ow led ge and a w ider u n d e rstan d in g th a n th e re s t o f th e ra ce . T h is is, o f co u rse , obviou s, b u t w h at is u su a lly overloo k ed is, th a t sin ce com m uni catio n is n ev er co m p le te , th e se m ore a d v an ced in d iv id u als m ay b e ahead o f th e fo re m o st o f th e n e x t g e n e ra tio n . Thus w hile th e g e n e ra l tre n d o f th e m ass, as w ell as o f th e in d iv id u al, is fo rw a rd , it d oes n o t fo llo w th a t th e re is an o b se rv ab le r e g u la rity in th e ad van ce o f th e in te lle c t u al le a d e rs o f m an kin d . T h e g r e a te s t th in k e rs o f an ag e a re n o t n e c e ss a rily in ad v an ce o f th o se b e lo n g in g to th e age o r ag es p a s t. N o r does m ere re c e n cy o f d isco v e ry e sta b lish th e g r e a te r tru th o f a th e o ry o r b e lie f. M a n h as em p lo yed tw o m eth od s o f see k in g kn o w led ge. T h e one m o st com m only re co g n iz e d is th e s c ie n tific , fo r scie n ce is o b v io u sly s e a rch in g fo r new fa c ts to co n q u e r. T h e p o e tic ap p ro a ch to tru th is n o t so g e n e r a lly un d erstood as a m ean s o f e n la rg in g th e realm o f kn ow led ge s u b ju g a te d b y h u m an ity . T h is em p h asis on th e one m eth od is u n fo rtu n a te fo r th e tw o a re co m p lem en tary and can n o t fu n ctio n alone. T h e s c ie n tis t o b serv es, d e s c rib e s , and re

the expression.

I t fo llo w s th a t p o e tic e x p re ssio n can n ev er b e lit e r a l. T h e p o et d eals w ith m a te r ia l fo r w hich th e re is no te c h n ic a l vo c a b u la ry . H e can o n ly su g g e st and to do th is he m u st use fig u rativ e lan g u ag e. T h e re la tio n o f p o e tic and s c ie n tific e x p re ssio n is a s u b je c t w hich ca n n o t b e d e v elo p ed h e re . T h e only d istin ctio n o f p re s e n t im p o rta n ce is th a t s cie n ce is lite r a l, w h ile p o e try is fig u rativ e . C o n seq u en tly , in o rd e r to u n d erstan d an e x p re ssio n , it is im p e ra tiv e th a t we know w h eth er it is s c ie n tific a lly lite r a l or p o e tic a lly fig u r a tiv e . I t is o bv iou sly im p o ssib le to a rriv e a t a v alid con clu sio n w ithout s e ttlin g th is m a tte r first. T h e r e is u su ally lit tle d iffic u lty in d is tin g u ish in g b etw een th e lite r a l and th e fig u ra tiv e in m od ern w ritin g , b u t th e re is o fte n v e ry co n sid erab le d iffic u lty in m ak in g th e sam e d istin ctio n s in o ld e r w rit in g s. A nd even a ft e r a w ork is understood to b e fig u ra tiv e th e re rem ain s th e ta s k o f tr a n s la tin g a figu re w hich is no lo n g e r fa m ilia r .

I t is s a fe to say th a t th e m ore p ro fo u n d an c ie n t w ritin g s a re m ore o fte n fig u rativ e th a n lite r a l. T h e reaso n fo r th is is not g e n e r a lly u n d erstood . I t is tru e th a t th e p o e tic ap p ro a ch to tru th w as m o st com m on, and fig u rativ e e x p re ssio n co n se q u e n tly m o st n a tu ra l. B u t it m u st be p o in ted out th a t lite r a l e x p re ssio n w as not p o ssib le even when d esired , sin ce th e an c ie n t sag es w ere see k in g to e x p re ss kn ow l edge so f a r beyond th e g ro w th o f la n g u a g e th a t a lle g o ry w as th e on ly m ean s open to them . F o r th e ir own p u rp o ses th e y used p ic to ria l sym bols w hich hav e com e down to us, b u t w hich a re seldom u n d erstood . I t was th e im p o ssib ility o f tr a n s la tin g from p ic to ria l to lin g u a l sym bo ls w hich led to th e alm o st u n iv e rsal use o f fig u rativ e la n gu ag e. C osm ogon ic th e o rie s a rc in e v ita b ly bound up w ith th e w hole sy ste m o f hum an k n o w led ge, and d evelop acco rd in g to the g e n e ra l p rin c ip le s laid down. B o th th e s c ie n tific and p o e tic a p p ro a ch e s hav e been em p lo y ed , and b o th lite r a l and fig u ra tiv e ex p re ssio n s h av e re su lte d . I t is p o ssib le to d ivide an h is to r ic a l c o n sid e ra tio n o f cosm ogony ro u g h ly in to a n c ie n t and m od ern, and th e m od ern again in to s c ie n tific and p h ilo so p h ica l. T h e an c ie n t cosm ogonies a re th o se em bod ied in m y th s, w h eth er a lle g o r ic a l or n o t. I t m ay pro v e p r o fita b le , th e n , to d iscu ss th e su b je c t under th e se th re e h e a d in g s: m y th o l o g y , scie n c e, and p h ilo so p h y .
P art

I.

M ytho logy

T he M ystic T riangle S ep tem b er 1929

S o m e m y th s are ob v io u sly a lle g o r ic a l, som e a re p o ssib ly a lle g o r ic a l, w hile s till o th e rs have no know n fig u ra tiv e m ean in g. I t fo llo w s e ith e r th a t som e m y ths are fig u rativ e and o th e rs lit e r a l, o r th a t a ll m yths w ere inten d ed a lle g o r ic a lly bu t som e have lo st th e ir sig n ifican ce. I f this qu estion could be decided i t would p ro v e o f im m ense v alu e in u n d erstan d in g th e le a rn in g o f a n c ie n t p eo p le s. I f a ll m y ths w ere o rig in a lly a lle g o r ic a l, we m u st c re d it the au th o rs w ith g r e a te r in te llig e n c e and d eep er wisdom th a n i f th e y w ere expou nd ed as lite r a l e x p la n a tio n s o f n a tu ra l phenom ena. T h a t th e y cam e to be believ ed lite r a lly is o f co u rse tru e , b u t it does not n e c e ssa rily fo llo w th a t th e ir o rig in a to rs intend ed th a t th ey should. I t is the fa te o f a ll fig u rativ e e x p re ssio n s to b e understood fo r a tim e , th en to be believ ed lite r a lly , and fin ally to be rep u d iated as absu rd in th e ir

su p p osed ly lite r a l m ean in g. T h a t th is has h ap p en ed to m an y m y th s is w ell know n, and one is tem p ted to ju m p to th e con clu sion th a t such has b e e n th e h is to ry o f them a ll. U n fo iffu n a te ly su ch a position can n o t be a d eq u a te ly su p p o rte d and co n seq u en tly th e prob lem ca n n o t so e a sily be s e ttle d . W e ca n n o t say d e fin ite ly th a t all m y ths have an o rig in a l fig u ra tiv e m ean in g. O n the o th e r hand we are n o t ju s t i f ie d in say in g th a t c e r ta in m y th s h av e n o t. A ll th a t can s a fe ly b e said is th a t no such s ig n ifican ce is know n. W ith th e in fo rm a tio n a t our d isp o sal it is im p o ssib le to b e d o g m atic as to th e tru e m ean in g o f any m y th . W h e n on ce it has b een d ecid ed to tr e a t a giv en e x p re ssion as fig u rativ e so m uch scop e is a l low ed th e im ag in atio n o f th e in te rp re te r th a t his con clu sio n s m ay be q u ite u n w ar ra n te d by th e m e ag re h in ts w hich served as h is s ta r tin g p o in t. T h u s we have D r . S c is s a tte m p tin g to find a com p le te fo re shad ow ing o f th e B ib le in th e nam es and fig u res o f th e s te lla r c o n ste lla tio n s. I t is d ifficu lt to t r e a t su ch a th e o ry serio u sly . A G od who cou ld c re a te such a u n iverse would be n o t on ly an th ro p o m o rp h ic b u t in fa n tile . O n th e o th e r hand an in siste n ce on th e lite r a l m ean in g o f such an acco u n t as th e sto ry o f th e c re a tio n in G e n esis lead s to q u ite as lu d rieo u s re s u lts. I n f a c t it is alm o st im p o ssib le to tr a n s la te an y o f th ese a n c ie n t sto rie s w ith o u t kn ow in g b e fo r e hand w hat th e w rite rs w ere try in g to e x p re ss. T h e e x tre m e ig n o ra n ce ab ro ad as to the tru e m ean in g o f our lite r a r y h e rita g e from the p a s t has p ro d u ced an u n w arran ted ten d en cy to la b e l th e w hole as m y th o lo g y . N ow a m y th is , s tr ic t ly sp e a k in g , devoid o f tru th and w ithou t h is to r ic a l fo u n d atio n . O b v io u sly , th e n , we have no rig h t to ap p ly th e m ore o r le ss d e ro g a to ry title o f m yth to s to rie s w hich w ere n e v e r in ten d ed lit e r a lly and w hich, w hen p ro p e r ly un d ersto od , em body e te rn a l tru th s as sig n ifica n t to d ay as a t th e daw n o f h is to ry . A s soon as a sto ry is show n to h av e a fig u rativ e in te r p re ta tio n , it cea se s to be a m y th . T h u s the g r e a t m a jo r it y o f so -c a lle d m y th s a re foun d n o t to be m y th s a t a ll. I f th ey are m y th s, th e n fo r th e sam e re a so n s, and on th e sam e g ro u n d s, th e g r e a te r p a rt o f the O ld T e s ta m e n t is sim p ly a co lle ctio n o f m y th s. W ith th is d is tin ctio n m ade c le a r we m ay re tu r n to th e p o p u la r loose p h ra se -

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(Continued on Page 245)

pictures; of Heabquarterg
V V V V V
On the fo llo w in g pages, we present groups of photo' graphs showing various scenes at H eadquarters. M any scenes o f interest to our m em bers who xi.sit Head' quarters are not shown in these pages fo r lack o f space. For instance, w e do not show here the interesting R esearch and Library R oom with its large collection o f rare books, used by the editors o f the magazine and lectures; neither do we show scenes o f the B ookkeepin g and R ecording Department, the Secretary's O ffice, the R eproduction D epartment, w here lectures are reproducd in typew ritten form , nor the R ecep' tion Room to the temple, the R adio Broadcasting R oom and its equipm ent, and other departm ents with the many env ployees busily engaged daily at the tasks which help to keep the routine w ork o f A M O R C up to its standard. W e hope that by showing you these few scenes you will becom e better acquainted with H eadquarters, and perhaps visualize the various departm ents when you are writing to us or thinking about us. W e w elcom e visitors, o f course, and many call each day. T h e m ore you know about us, and the way in which your affairs and our affairs are handled, the m ore intim ate will becom e the spirit o f Brotherhood which we strive to maintain in all our w ork.

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T he M ystic T riangle Septem b er

1929

THE R O S IC R U C IA N O R D E R
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T h e N o rth A m erican In d ia n s hav e an astou n d in gly v aried tra d itio n sin ce each trib e or fam ily o f trib e s p rod u ced its own m y th o lo g y . A m ong th e se th e re a re m ore o f the a p p a re n tly lite r a l ty p e th an in a n y o th e r collectio n . A cco rd in g to th e W in tu In d ia n s , S a s hated his so n -in -law T u lc h u h e rris and trie d m any tim es to k ill him . A t la s t he proposed a p in e-b en d in g c o n te st h op in g th a t his son -in -law w ould clim b to th e top and th a t he cou ld , th e r e fo r e , k ill him . H o w ev er, T u lc h u h e rris w as w arn ed and though he clim bed to th e to p o f th e tre e he slip p ed off w hen S a s b e n t it dow n, so th a t he rem ain ed u n h u rt, m uch to th e m y s tific a tio n o f h is fa th e r-in -la w , w ho, o f co u rse, th o u g h t he had b een th ro w n off as th e tre e stra ig h te n e d . W h en S a s clim bed in tu rn , T u lc h u h e rris u rged him to th e very to p o f th e tre e and w as a b le to th row him up in to th e h eav en s w here he s p lit w ith a noise lou d er th a n th u n d er. The la rg e r p a r t o f him b ecam e th e su n, the sm a lle r, th e m oon. W . T . O lc o tt qu otes th is m yth in g r e a t d eta il fro m M y th s o f P rim itiv e A m e r i c a , b y Je r e m ia h C u rtin . I t would seem e x tre m e ly d ifficu lt to read any v ery g r e a t d ep th o f u n d e rstan d in g in to th is acco u n t o f th e cre a tio n o f th e sun and m oon. I t is alm o st c e r ta in ly l i t e ra l and i f so is r e a lly a m y th , fo r it has no fo u n d atio n in any a c ce p te d fa c ts as to th e o rig in o f th e sun and moon. A s a sou rce o f s c ie n tific kn ow led ge it is o f no im p o rta n ce , but as a w ork o f lite ra tu re it is o f v ery high valu e. I t s coh e re n ce and d etaile d d ev elo p m en t re p re s e n t a v ery cre d ib le e ffo rt o f th e im ag in atio n fo r a p eo p le con sid ered so p rim itv e . F a r d iffe re n t is th e fo llo w in g cre a tio n sto ry quoted fro m S c r ib n e r s E n c y c lo p e d ia o f R e lig io n and E t h ic s . T h e M u sk h o g ees b eliev e th a t b e fo re the c re a tio n a g r e a t body o f w ate r alo n e w as v isib le . O v e r th e d re a ry w aste tw o pigeon s flew to and fro , and a t la s t esp ied a b lad e o f g r a s s risin g to th e s u rfa c e . D r y lan d g r a d u a lly fo llo w ed , and th e m ainland and isla n d s to o k th e ir p re s e n t sh ap es. I n , was th e c e n te r o f the h ill, th e house o f E sa u g e tu h E m ise e , th e M a s te r o f B r e a t h , who m oulded th e first m en fro m th e c la y w hich su rrou nd ed his abode.

N u n n e C haha

T h e w a te rs s till covered th e e a rth so th a t he w as com p elled to bu ild a g r e a t w all to d ry th e m u d -fash io n ed m en upon. W h en th e s o ft mud had h ard en ed in to fle s h and bone, he d ire c te d th e w a te rs to th e ir p re s oen t p la ce s and g av e th e d ry lan d to th e men whom he had m a d e . T w o th in g s are re m a rk a b le ab o u t th is acco u n t. F i r s t , th e tw o p igeo n s re p r e s e n t in g the tw o p rin c ip le s , p o sitiv e and n e g a tiv e , w hich pro d u ce a ll m a n ife s ta tio n s , f l y in g ov er th e illim ita b le w aste o f w a te rs, o r the u n m a n ife st. T h is is a p ro fo u n d con cep tio n o f c re a tio n . S e co n d ly th e sto ry is re m a rk a b le fo r its s im ila rity to th e B ib l i ca l d esc rip tio n o f th e fo rm a tio n o f m an out o f d u st. W e hav e seen th e M a s te r o f B r e a t h . I t is obvious th a t th is acco u n t o f c re a tio n is in an e n tire ly d iffe r e n t c la ss fro m th a t quoted p re v io u sly . T o c a ll them both sim p ly m y th s is m islead in g to say th e le a st. T h e m y th s o f E g y p t a p p e a r to b e en tir e ly m isu n d ersto od . W . M a x M u lle r a s sig n s th e ir o rig in to anim ism . A cco rd in g to him they re p r e s e n t a fo rm o f id o la try w hich g rew out o f th e cru d e p e rs o n ific a tion and d e ific a tio n o f an im als. W . T . O lc o tt is led ju s t as f a r a s tra y . H e s a y s , h im s e lf, T h e p rie sth o o d o f th e sun w ere noted fo r th e ir le a rn in g . T h e y e x c e lle d in th e ir kn ow led ge o f astron o m y and a ll b ran ch e s o f s c ie n c e . Y e t he a t trib u te s to them a c h ild ish id o la try q u ite in co m p a tib le w ith such le a rn in g and w is dom. A s h a s b een p o in ted o u t, p o p u la r b e lie fs do n ot m easu re th e g r e a te s t u n d er s ta n d in g o f an age. S om e o f u s, a t le a s t, w ould d ep lo re b e in g ju d g e d by th e id eas c u rre n t even in th is en lig h te n e d ag e, and in d eed , an h o u r sp e n t in lis te n in g to an y g a th e rin g o f w o rk in g m en w ould d isp el any illu sio n s as to th e p a rtic u la r e n lig h t en m en t o f our d ay and g e n era tio n . O lc o tt fo rg e ts th a t th e com m on p eo p le o f any p erio d a re p ro n e to b elie v e in a lite r a l and slav ish w ay w h at is intend ed to be a m ere ly fig u rativ e su g g estio n . I n so f a r as th e y m ad e th is m ista k e and w orsh ip p ed the sym bol fo r th e r e a lity , th e y w ere id o la te rs, b u t su re ly it is n o t a ju s t c ritic is m to la b e l th e relig io u s system as id o la try b e cau se o f th is. I f so th e C ru cifix o f th e R o m an C a th o lics is as g ro ss an idol as any o f a n tiq u ity . T h e m isu n d erstan d in g a rise s fro m a t trib u tin g th e o rig in o f th e sy stem to an i-

misrn. T h e tru th o f th e m a tte r is, th a t the w hole body o f E g y p tia n m y th s is an a l le g o ric a l acco u n t o f th e o rig in , c o n stitu tio n , and p u rp o se o f th e u n iv erse. The p rie sts th em selv es w ere a h ig h ly tra in e d c la s s o f p h ilo so p h ers and m a th e m a ticia n s who could th in k a b s tr a c tly as none o f th e com m on p eo p le cou ld. C o n seq u en tly th ey used a sy ste m o f sym bols q u ite beyond th e com p reh en sion o f th e n atio n a t la rg e . T h e so -c a lle d m y th s a ro se out o f th e n e c e ss ity fo r e x p la n in g th e m ore obvious s ig n ific a n c e o f th e se sym bo ls to th e com m on p eo p le. T h is w as done b y th e sam e m ethod em ployed in th e p a ra b le s o f th e B ib le . I n th e sam e w ay th e sto rie s w ere c le v e rly c o n stru cte d to b e in te re stin g even when read lite r a lly so th a t th e hidden m ean in g w ould n o t a p p e a r e x c e p t to th e e a rn e s t and w o rth y stu d en t. T h e m y th s o f G r e e c e , or a t le a s t th e sig n ifiica n t o n es, had th e sam e o rig in and in m an y case s w ere sim p ly tra n s la tio n s o f the E g y p tia n w ith G r e e k nam es. T h u s the d eath o f D io n y su s is th e sam e sto ry and has th e sam e sig n ifica n ce as th a t o f O siris . M a n y o f th e so -c a lle d G re e k h ero es a re sun gods sim ila r to R a , A m ura, and O siris . T h e E g y p tia n and G re e k re lig io n s as o rig in a lly in ten d ed w ere n e ith e r p o ly th e istic n o r id o latro u s. I t is ob v io u sly im p o ssib le even to m en tion th e m y th o log ies o f a ll co u n trie s h ere.

T h e m y th s o f In d ia , fo r in s ta n c e , a re ju s t as fu lly d ev elo p ed and q u ite as in te re stin g as th o se giv en as e x a m p le s, b u t th e y a re so h e a v ily en cu m b ered w ith sig n ific a n t but difficult n am es th a t th e y a re u seless u n less serio u sly stu d ied . E v e n thou gh i t is im p o ssib le to giv e e x am p les o f m y th s fro m a ll co u n trie s it should b e m en tion ed th a t th e re is a very s tr ik in g re la tio n betw een a ll m y th o lo g ies, w hich p o in ts to som e com m on sou rce. T h e p a ra lle lis m s in th e E g y p tia n and G re e k sy stem s hav e b een m en tioned . S im ila r ag re em e n t can be tra c e d to th e m y th s o f In d ia . W h a t is s t ill m ore asto n ish in g , th is com m on th re a d ca n b e c le a r ly fo llo w ed in th e m y th s o f A m e ric a , e sp e c ia ly th o se o f C e n tr a l A m e rica . P e r h a p s th e m o st un i v e rsa l sto ry is th a t o f th e floo d . D o n n e lly m ak es a s tro n g ca se in fa v o r o f h is co n ten tio n th a t th is tra d itio n h as an h is to ric a l fo u n d atio n in th e su b m erg en ce o f A tla n tis . P e r h a p s enough h as been said to show th a t th e m od ern p a tro n iz in g a ttitu d e to w ard p a s t g e n era tio n s is w a rra n te d n e ith e r b y our w isdom n o r th e ir fo o lish n e ss. W e m u st rem em ber th a t th e re have been g re a t th in k e rs in a ll ages and th a t w isdom w ill n o t d ie w ith us. I t is the m ark o f tru e w isdom to b e a t a ll tim es m ore re a d y to le a rn th a n to scoff. ( P a r t 2 w ill fo llo w n e x t m o n th .)

V V V V V

A P P R E C IA T IO N

T h is is to th a n k e ach o f you in d iv id u a lly who aided in th e re c e n t C irc le N in e a c tiv itie s . I t show s a w o n d erfu l resp o n se on th e p a r t o f th e m em bers and th e lo y a lty o f e ach o f you w hen A M O R C a sk s fo r y o u r aid in an y m a tte r. I t h as o n ly been a few w eeks ago t h a t we a p p e a le d to e ach m em b er to a s s is t in

The Mystic T riangle

th is C irc le N in e m a tte r re g a rd in g th e e x te n sio n

of

th e

O rd e r in

th is

c o u n try , and I am su re you

S ep tem b er 1929

th o u g h , o f co u rse , ev eryon e h as n o t h ad th e o p p o rtu n ity o f p e rfo rm in g h is little d u ty in re g a rd , th e m a jo r ity o f th e m em bers have, and m ore do each d ay . w ill re ce iv e in re tu r n m uch b e n e fit fro m y o u r kin d n ess in th is m a tte r.

^Report of the Egyptian c(5our


INSTALLMENT NUMBER SEVEN
R ep orted by T h e T r i p S e c r e t a r y
F T E R we l e f t L u x o r , we rode fo r th e w hole d ay th ro u g h the N ile V a lle y to C airo . O u r p u r pose in talcing th e d ay rid e w as not o n ly to see as m uch o f th e N ile and its m an y an c ie n t s e ttle m e n ts as p o ssib le , bu t to p ass clo se to th e old c ity o f A k h n a ton, fo rm e rly know n as T e l-e l-A m a rn a . W e p resu m e th a t a ll o f our m em bers know that, our p a s t G ra n d M a s te r A m enho tep I V aband oned th e p a la c e s and ro y al hom es a t T h e b e s and as a fu r th e r step in the e sta b lish m e n t o f th e first m o n oth eistic relig io n in th e w orld , d irecte d th e b u ild in g up o f a new ro y a l c ity in th e fo o th ills o f T e l-e l-A m a rn a on a b e a u tifu l b a y o f th e N ile . H e re he n ot o n ly b u ilt a w o nd erfu l m y stic te m p le , but p a rk s , lib r a rie s , sch o o ls, and m an y hom es. T h e nam e, A k h n a to n , w hich w as th e nam e he had ad op ted fo r h im s e lf w as given to th is c ity , and it la te r b ecam e know n as th e C ity o f th e S u n . H is ch an g e in th e a rt and a rc h i te c tu re o f th e co u n try and h is unusual ad v an ced kn o w led ge o f s c ie n tific fa c to r s en te rin g into th e m ore m od ern m an n er o f liv in g, en ab led him to hav e th e a r c h ite c ts and b u ild e rs c re a te hom es th a t w ere a su rp rise to th e in h a b ita n ts o f E g y p t. R e c e n t e x c a v atio n s in th is c ity h av e re v e a le d hom es th a t had k itc h e n s w ith p e r fe c t s a n ita r y a r ra n g e m e n ts, b e a u tifu l g a rd e n s , and m an y con v en iences n ev er know n b e fo re his p e r iod, and lo st to th e E g y p tia n p eo p le s h o rt ly a fte rw a rd . W ith in th e g r e a t te m p le , th e id eals o f R o sic ru cia n ism w ere rig id ly p ra c tic e d and th o u san d s o f p e rso n s lived in A m en h otep s c ity in p e r fe c t p e a c e and h arm o n y . T h e sto ry o f th is c ity h as been to ld in so m an y books and is re fe r r e d to in a c h a p te r o f th e new book ab ou t to be issu ed , e n title d C o m p lete H is to r y o f th e R o s ic ru c ia n O rd e r, so th a t we do n o t fe e l it n e c e ssa ry to sp eak ab ou t th e c ity a t th is tim e. Som e y e a rs ago th e A M O R C co n trib u te d la rg e ly to th e co st o f e x c a v a tions in th is c ity , and in fa c t financed th e reo p en in g and co n tin u an ce o f th e e x c a v a tio n s th e re fo r the p u rp o se o f secu rin g fu r th e r fa c ts re g a rd in g th e o rig in a l te a c h ings o f th e m y stic s o f E g y p t. A s a re s u lt o f th e se e x c a v a tio n s, m any w o n d erfu l r e l ics w ere sen t d ir e c t fro m th e e x ca v a tio n s to th e A M O R C H e a d q u a rte rs in C a lifo r n ia , and are now a p a r t o f th e r a r e c o lle c tion in th e o rie n ta l m useum in S a n J o s e owned b y th e A M O R C . our re a d e rs w ill p ro b a b ly u n d erstan d w hy it w as our d esire to p ass clo se to th is e x ca v a ted c ity and hav e a b e a u tifu l view o f it, a f t e r h av in g p assed th ro u g h th e in itia tio n in one o f A m e n h o te p s e a r lie r te m p le s in L u x o r . I t w as sh o rtly a f te r noon w hen we p assed b y the C ity o f th e S u n , and th e b r illia n t su n lig h t s p a rk lin g on th e h ills o f w hite ch a lk s to n e b a c k o f th e e x ca v a ted ru in s m ade an im p re ssio n th a t we sh a ll nev er fo r g e t, and th e p ic tu re s th a t w ere m ade fro m th e tr a in w ill be p re se rv e d in our co lle ctio n fo r som e tim e.

So

I t w as la te in th e ev en in g w hen we reach ed C a iro , and we w ere a ll tire d enough to tu rn to our h o tel fro m w hich we had d ep arte d e a rlie r in th e w eek. T h e n e x t d ay we h ad to o u rselv es, and it w as w el com e in d e e d ; m an y o f us had to re p le n ish our k o d ak su p p lie s, and th e re w ere o th e r p u rch ase s th a t we w an ted to m ak e. W e found th e Im p e ra to r v ery b u sy d u rin g th is h a lf d a y in our itin e r a r y , v istin g one o f th e lo d g es and tem p les in C a iro , and s e c u r in g a nu m ber o f ta p e s tr ie s and E g y p tia n m y stic a l re lic s and sou venirs w hich w ere c ra te d in la rg e b o xes to be sh ip p ed to S a n J o s e fo r th e o rie n ta l m useum th e re , and th e re s t o f us sp e n t th e tim e in v isits to p la ce s th a t we w ished to exam in e m ore c lo s e ly . So m e o f th e Egypt o rg an ized R o s ic ru c ia n a sm all B r o th e r s p a r ty in

o f th e

m ore ad van ced m em bers o f A M O R C , and to o k them to th e G r e a t P y ra m id , and by

The M y stic T riangle S ep tem b er 1929

sp e cia l a rra n g e m en t e sco rte d them in to th e se c re t p assag ew ay and th ro u gh th e inner p a r t o f th e P y ra m id to th e m y stic in itia tion room s and in itia tio n ch am b ers. I wish I m ig h t be p e rm itte d to go in to fu ll d etail re g a rd in g th is e x p lo ra tio n o f th e old P y r a m id , b u t I b e lie v e I hav e in tim ate d in sev e ra l p la c e s th a t th e re w ere m an y fe a tu re s o f th is tr ip th a t w ere lim ited to th e h ig h e r m em bers and officers, and w hich ca n n o t b e e x p la in e d in a g e n e ra l p u b lica tio n o f th is kin d . O ne th in g is c e r ta in , and th a t is th at the v ariou s sto rie s to ld ab ou t the a r ran g em en t o f th e ch am b ers and h a ll o f il lu m in atio n in th e P y ra m id are n o t tru e , and th a t th o se who d en y th a t th e re are such ch am b ers th e re sim p ly sp eak w ithout k n o w le d g e ; and those who have le a rn e d a few o f th e fa c ts and hav e a tte m p te d to w rite m uch ab o u t th em , do not know h a lf th e s to ry . T h e r e a re th o se now in our p a r ty who are w ell q u alified to s u b sta n t ia te th e m y stic a l cla im s m ad e fo r the P y ra m id , and who know w h e reo f th e y sp e ak . O n e o f th e la rg e n e w sp ap e rs o f C a iro p u b lish ed on th is d ay a fu ll a c cou nt o f o u r m y stic a l e x p lo ra tio n s in and around C a iro , and th e P y ra m id s , and sta te d th a t n ev er b e fo re h ad such a to u r p a r ty v isited th a t p a r t o f the co u n try and e n jo y e d such e x p e rie n c e s. T h e paper sta te d th a t w h ereas so m an y A m e rica n to u rists w ere bo red w ith th e la c k o f t h r ill ing e x p e rie n c e s w hile v isitin g C a iro , the A M O R C p a rty under th e le a d e rsh ip o f its Im p e ra to r, and w ith th e co o p eratio n o f th e n a tiv e R o s ic ru c ia n s , knew how to e n jo y th e re a l th r ills th a t C airo and its env irons o ffe r th e unusual to u r is t. T h e p a p e r paid h igh com p lim en ts to th e I m p e r a to r s f a m ilia r ity w ith th e con d ition s and h isto ry o f E g y p t , and sta te d th a t th e re w ere few who w ere b e tte r qu alified to b rin g an A m e rica n p a rty o f to u ris ts to v isit the m ys t ic a l p la c e s o f the F a y y u m and th e N ile , as w ell as C airo . T h e n e x t d ay our jo u r n e y led us b y au to m o b iles ag ain to H e lio p o lis . F i r s t we v isited th e V irg in T r e e , w here M a ry and J o s e p h w ith th e in fa n t Je s u s hid fo r aw hile d u rin g th e ir flig h t to E g y p t. T h e n we v isited th e a n cien t ru in s o f th e c ity o f H e lio p o lis , o r C ity o f th e S u n , as it was o rig in a lly c a lle d , and w here th e M a ste r J e s u s liv ed and stud ied fo r aw h ile d u rin g H is p erio d o f y o u th fu l p re p a ra tio n fo r H is m in is try . T h e fa c ts o f th is p a r t o f th e life o f J e s u s a re so co m p le te ly set

fo rth in th e Im p e r a to r s new b oo k, T h e M y s tic a l L i f e o f J e s u s , th a t I w ill not a tte m p t to rev iew th em h e re . W e knew th a t th e I m p e r a to r w as m ak in g p h oto g ra p h s and in te rv ie w in g c e r ta in perso n s d u rin g th is tr ip fo r th e p u rp o se o f g a th e rin g c o n firm a tio n and new fa c ts fo r his book, and we w ere c e r ta in ly th rille d to be in th e a n c ie n t ru in s o f th e o ld e st R o s ic ru c ia n or m y stic a l m o n a ste ry in E g y p t . I t w as fro m th is s ite th a t th e tw o g re a t o b elisk s th a t are in L o n d o n and N ew Y o r k w ere rem oved. T h e th ird o b e lisk s till re m ain s sta n d in g in H e lio p o lis . W e also v isited th e m a g n ific e n t new h o tel in th e n ew er section o f H e lio p o lis , w hich is co n sid ered th e la rg e s t and m ost b e a u tifu l h o te l in th e w T orld . L a t e in th e a fte rn o o n we re tu rn e d ag ain to C a iro , and p re p a re d fo r our final leave o f th is b e a u tifu l c ity . T h e n ig h ts in C airo a re m ag n ifiie e n t, and re a lly im p ressiv e to the m y stic a lly in clin e d , b ecau se o f th e vi b ra tio n s , th e m u sic, th e n ativ e c h a ra c te r s th a t one m e e ts, and th e o p p o rtu n ity to stu d y a n c ie n t custom s and h a b its. Y e t the c ity is so m od ern in m an y o th er w ay s, and th e h o te l, sh o p p in g , and o th e r fe a tu re s w hich are im p o rta n t to the to u ris ts a re all th a t one cou ld a sk fo r in a fo re ig n c ity . A f t e r p a c k in g our th in g s v e ry c a r e fu lly a g ain fo r a n o th e r lo n g t r ip , we l e f t C airo b y tr a in and ap p ro ach e d th e M e d ite rra n ean a t th e b a y o f th e c ity o f A le x a n d ria . O u r rid e w as in te n se ly in te re stin g , ta k in g us th ro u g h th e D e lta se c tio n o f th e N ile , w ith th e fin est a g r ic u ltu r a l lan d s on each sid e o f th e ra ilro a d th a t we had seen an y w here in ou r jo u r n e y s . W e boai'ded the L a u r e n tic and found c o m fo rta b le room s assig n ed to u s, b u t o u r tr ip acro ss th e M e d ite rra n e a n in th is b o a t w as u n p le a s a n t in som e w ay s b ecau se th e b o a t was sm a ll, and was n o t o rig in a lly intend ed fo r such se rv ic e , b u t i t w as th e only one a v a il ab le a t th is p erio d o f our itin e r a ry . L e a v ing th e b a y o f A le x a n d ria , and say in g fa re w e ll to E g y p t , w as one o f th e sad d est and h a rd e s t fe a tu re s o f our w hole trip . E v e r y cam era in th e p a r ty w as b u sy c lic k in g aw ay a t th e sh o re lin e , and a t th e b o a ts, and n a tiv e s a t th e d o ck s m ak in g la stin g im p ressio n s o f our E g y p tia n fa r e w ell. T h e r e w as n o t one o f us who was n ot read y to g e t o ff o f th a t b o a t and go b a c k in to E g y p t w h ere w e retu rn ed to L u x o r to sta y fo r a lo n g tim e. W e re a liz e d , how ev er, th a t we h ad to com p lete th e itin -

e ra rv and t h a t fo r som e o f us it w ould be the la st tim e we m ig h t see th a t w o n d erfu l lan d . N o m a tte r how you lo ok a t it, or how' you m ay arg u e w ith y o u r s e lf ab ou t it, you alw ay s com e to th e final con clu sio n th a t E g y p t c a sts a sp e ll o v er th o se to u r ists who can e n te r in to th e s p ir it o f the m y ste ry , m y sticism , rom ance and in trig u e th a t is an in s e p a ra b le p a r t o f h er h isto ry . U p to th e p re s e n t tim e in our jo u r n e y we have n o t tou ched an y p la ce in E u ro p e or A f r ic a , S y r ia , or A sia , th a t had th e deep c a ll to our in n e r selv es as had E g y p t. A s th e sun w as s e ttin g , and our sh ip moved out in to th e M e d ite rra n e a n , leav in g n o th in g but a few dom es o f m osques and m in a re ts risin g above th e sh o re lin e o f E g y p t, to giv e us th e la s t v isib le im p ressio n o f th a t co u n try , our h e a rts w'ere h e av y , and I know th a t som e o f us m ade th e vow th a t i f wre liv ed , and it w as th e w ill o f the M a s te rs , we w ould re tu rn a g ain to sta y lo n g er and dw ell in th a t p eace th a t seem s to abide now here e lse . I n fa c t, on the b o a t d u rin g our la s t p a rtin g m om ents, w'hen th e n e w sp ap e r p h o to g ra p h e rs and re p o rte rs w ere in te rv ie w in g th e Im p e ra to r, we p led g ed th e R o s ic ru cia n s o f E g y p t th a t w re w ould com e a g a in , and we hope th a t th o se o f you who have looked fo rw ard to v is itin g E g y p t som etim e in y o u r lives w ill n ot fa il to ta k e ad v an tag e o f the n e x t to u r p a r ty w hich is a lre a d y b ein g p lan n ed fo r th e sum m er and fa ll o f 1 9 3 1 . I t is p lan n ed to have th is n e x t tr ip s ta r t d u rin g th e sum m er m o n th s, so th a t th o se who ca n n o t g e t aw ay from b u sin ess d u rin g th e w in te r m onths m ay ta k e p a rt o f th e trip w ith us. T h e n e x t to u r w ill p ro b a b ly go e n tire ly arou nd th e u 'o rld , bu t w ill be bro k en up into th re e len g th s or la p s. T h e first lap w ill in clu d e a to u r o f th e a n cien t m y stic c itie s o f S o u th e rn F r a n c e , and th e sh o res o f th e M e d ite rra n e a n , w ith a tr ip thro u gh P a le s tin e and into P e r s ia and In d ia . T h e second lap w ill b egin in In d ia and go on th ro u g h E g y p t and o th e r land s and b ack th ro u g h E u r o p e , and th e th ird la p w ill co n tin u e fro m E g y p t and go throu gh the O rie n t, in clu d in g J a p a n and C h in a. T h o s e who can be ab sen t o n ly d u r in g th e sum m er and the firs t p a rt o f the fa ll w ill b e a b le to ta k e th e first and second la p s o f th e tr ip , and th ose who can be ab sen t on ly d u rin g th e sum m er w ill b e a b le to ta k e th e first la p , b u t w ill e n jo y th e com p anio nship o f a ll th e m em b ers, and th e le c tu r e s , le sso n s, and o th e r m a tte rs

d ire c te d b y th e Im p e ra to r. M o re d e ta ils about th is pro p osed tr ip w ill ap p e a r fro m tim e to tim e , b u t I sh a ll be g la d to h ear p e rs o n a lly from an y who a re anxiou s to be in clu d ed in it. O u r t r ip a cro ss th e M e d ite rra n e a n con stitu te d the tu rn in our itin e r a r y , and we knew we w ere hom ew ard boun d, even though th e re w ere m any w o n d erfu l sig h ts s till to be seen . O u r sh ip stop p ed a t S y r a cuse and th en w ent on to th e b a y o f N a p le s , on ce ag ain . T h is w as our second sto p a t N a p le s , and th e sam e autom o biles w ith th e red tria g le s on them w ere at the p ie r w a itin g fo r us a g a in , and th is tim e it w as n o t ra in y , b u t c le a r and p le a sa n t in ev ery w ay. P a s s in g ra p id ly th ro u g h th e c ity o f N a p le s , we w ent to th e ra ilro a d s ta tio n w here a sp e cia l tra in h u rried us on th ro u g h th e b e a u tifu l p a rts o f I t a l y to R o m e. W e w ere a h ap p y lo t in th is tr a in , fo r -we had c o m fo rta b le s e a ts and co m p a rtm en ts, and the m eal th a t was served on th e tra in was v ery good ind eed , and th e re w'ere m any o p p o rtu n itie s fo r d iscu ssio n s and in te re stin g ta lk s . T h e Im p e ra to r k e p t h im s e lf b u sy b y g o in g fro m one co m p artm en t to an o th e r and s ittin g down in th e m id st o f th e seven and eig h t in each com p artm en t and g iv in g them sh o rt ta lk s or an sw erin g th e ir q u estio n s, and in betw een tim es p h o to g ra p h in g th e sce n e ry and th e gro u p s o f m em bers w ith h is m oving p ictu re ca m e ra . E v e ry w h e re we had the utm ost in con v en ien ce and cou rteo u s a tte n tio n . W e w ere co n sta n tly im p ressed w ith th e fine serv ic e ren d ered b y th e A m e rica n E x p r e s s C o m p an y , who c e r ta in ly hav e p e rfe c te d th e ir tra v e l serv ice fo r to u ris ts to an id eal d eg re e . W e had h u nd red s o f p ie ce s o f b a g g a g e , and th e se w ere a lw ay s ca re d fo r b y th e E x p re ss C om p an y so th a t w e had to give th is d etail no c o n ce rn , and w henever we a rriv e d at a c ity w here we w ere to stop o v ern ig h t, our b ag g ag e w as ta k e n d ir e c tly to our h o tel room s from w hich it was rem oved a g ain b y th e A m erican E x p r e s s C o m p a n y ; o n ly a few p ieces su ffered any d am ag e, and so f a r as I have been ab le to le a rn , no p ieces w ere lo st. T h e b a g g a g e w as so h eav y and so la rg e in nu m ber o f p ie ce s th a t it o fte n c o n stitu te d sev e ra l tru ck lo ad s. A nd th is is a b ig p ro blem in m ak in g th e h u rrie d stop s and o ut o f the w ay v is its th a t we m ad e, and had it not been fo r th e e x c e lle n t serv ice w ith w hich

eat together in the sam e large dining room

we w ere tra v e llin g , we c e r ta in ly would h av e h ad m an y d ifficu lties. T h is is one a d v an tag e in tra v e llin g in a to u r p a rty u n der th e d irec tio n o f a tra v e llin g com pany. W e a rriv e d in R om e la te in th e a f t e r noon and w ent d ir e c tly to our h o te l, w hich w as one o f th e fin est in th e c ity , and w here we w ere su rp rise d w ith th e m an y m od ern con v en ien ces, even to p riv a te b a th s , e le c tr ic lig h ts , and e v ery th in g . A ll o f us w ere a t th e sam e h o te l, and re s e rv a tio n s had been m ade so th a t we m ig h t a ll

w here we found th e food and th e serv ice equ al to th e v e ry b e s t in A m e rica . W e found la t e r

that this hotel is generally

s ele cte d by w ealth y A m e rica n s who tra v e l to R o m e, and th a t it is ackn ow led g ed to be one o f th e b e st in th e c ity . O n ce a g ain we found th a t th e p ro v isio n s m ade b y A M O R C fo r our co m fo rt and con v en ience in clu d ed th e b e st th a t w as o b ta in a b le un d er th e circ u m sta n ce s. I t m u st b e rem em b e re d th a t n o t ev ery h o tel in fo re ig n c itie s is a b le to a c c e p t a la rg e nu m b er o f g u ests a t one tim e , fo r it m ean s th e e n tire occu p a n c y o f a h o te l in som e c a se s, and in o th e rs it m ean s m ore th a n any one hotel can ta k e c a re o f. In my I o f our in te re s tin g e x p e rie n c e s in R o m e, and in o th e r c itie s on our w ay th ro u g h E u ro p e .

n e xt installm ent

w ill tell you

V V V V V
S O U V E N IR C O P IE S A d d itio n a l co p ies o f th is issu e o f th e m ag azin e m ay b e secu red fro m th e A M O R C S u p p ly B u re a u . I th in k it w ould be to th e ad v an tag e o f ev ery m em ber to secu re one o r p e rh a p s se v e ra l ad d itio n al cop ies as w ell as h is p e rso n a l cop y to lo an to frie n d s o r giv e to th em , b e ca u se o f th e s p e c ia l a r tic le s co n tain e d and s p e cia l se c tio n o f a ttr a c tiv e p h o to g ra p h s o f th e d ep a rtm e n ts and th e T e m p le a t H e a d q u a rte rs . W e have arra n g e d fo r a d d itio n a l nu m b ers o f th is issu e to be p rin te d in our p rin tin g d ep artm e n t in o rd e r to su p p ly y o u r d em and s im m e d ia tely . W r ite and e n clo se a re m itta n c e to th e A M O R C S u p p ly B u re a u , th is ad d ress, an d th e cop ies w ill b e sen t you fo r 2 5 c e a ch , p o stp a id .

his

V V V V V
C O N V E N T IO N R E P O R T IN O U R N E X T IS S U E

The M y stic T riangle S ep tem b er 1929

O u r m em bers w ill be g la d to know t h a t in our n e x t issu e , w hich w ill be p rin te d in S e p te m b e r, and m ailed b e fo re th e f i r s t o f O c to b e r, th e re w ill a p p e a r a v e ry com p lete re p o rt o f th e R o s ic ru c ia n C on ven tion now b e in g h eld in S a n J o s e . A s th e p re s e n t issu e is g oin g to p re s s, th e d ele g a te s a n d v is itin g m em bers fro m e v ery p a r t o f N o rth A m e rica a re h e re in S a n J o s e a tte n d in g th e la r g e s t R o s ic ru c ia n C on vention ev er h eld in N o rth A m e rica . H u n d red s o f d e le g a te s and m em bers a re re g is te re d a t th e v ario u s h o te ls and a tte n d n g the a fte rn o o n a n d ev en in g sessio n s o f th e C o n ven tio n as w ell as co n su ltin g w ith th e Im p e ra to r and th e S u p re m e officers in re g a rd to m an y new fo rm s o f a c tiv ity and th e in tro d u ctio n o f m a n y in te re s tin g fe a tu re s in to th e A M O R C w ork fo r th e com ing y e a r s. T h e jo y and h a p p in e s s , and th e s p ir it o f e n th u sia s tic in te r e s t th a t is b e in g m a n ife s t h e re in th e e x e c u tiv e offices d u rin g th e s e la s t few d ays o f A u g u st b e a u tifu lly illu s tr a te s th e s p ir it o f b ro th e rh o o d th a t e x is ts in our o rg a n iz a tio n in a ll la n d s. F r o m fo re ig n lan d s and fro m g ro u p s and b ra n c h e s n o t p e rs o n a lly re p r e sen ted a t th e C on ven tio n hav e com e c a b le g r a m s and te le g ra m s e x p re ss in g lo y a lty , W e a re su re th a t e v ery h av e a cop y o f n e x t m o n th s issu e c o n ta in in g a su m m ary o f th e sp e ech e s, ad d resses, le c tu r e s , and o th e r fe a tu re s o f th e in te r e s tin g w e e k s p ro g ra m . E v e r y m em b er m ay r ig h tfu lly fe e l prou d o f th e w o n d erfu l re p r e s e n ta tio n a t th e C o n v en tio n , w here e v ery m em ber and d e le g a te ty p ifie d th e high c h a r a c te r , c u ltu ra l d ev elo p m en t, and s u cce ssfu l c a re e r o f th e A M O R C R o s ic ru cia n s th ro u g h o u t N o rth A m e rica and th e r e s t o f the w orld .

good w ishes, and personal greetings.

m em ber w ill w ant to

he Chatter tBox
B y T h e Listener-In.

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H A V E not w h isp ered a n y th in g to you fo r som e few m o n th s, and I have so m uch th a t I could t e ll you th a t it would ta k e th e w hole o f th is m ag azin e to even be b rie f. eig h th ed itio n on o r b e fo re th e end o f th e m on th. A s m an y as six hu nd red co p ies a d ay o f T h e L ig h t o f E g y p t hav e gone o ut b y m a il, and th e re m u st be m an y hun d red s o f thou sand s o f cop ies o f th is b o ok le t in c irc u la tio n to d ay . T h e Im p e r a to r s la te s t b o o k , T h e M y s tic a l L i f e o f J e s u s , h as also had an unusual s a le . I n f a c t, th e dem and fo r th is boo k d u rin g J u l y u p se t a ll o f our m ailin g and s h ip p in g sy stem s and fo r sev eral w eeks we w ere in a q u an d ry as to how to even ack n o w led g e re c e ip t o f th e o rd ers th a t cam e in e ach m o rn in g s sa ck s o f m ail. T h e r e hav e a p p e a re d m an y v e ry fin e com m en ts ab ou t th e book in v ario u s m ag azin e s, and la rg e e a ste rn n e w sp a p e rs, and m any m em b ers who hav e re a d th e bo o k have o rd ered one, tw o , o r th re e ad d itio n al co p ies fo r frie n d s. I t m u st be rem em bered t h a t e ach tim e we issu e a new bo o k, we sen d fro m th re e hu nd red to five hu nd red c o m p lim e n ta ry cop ies to th e p rin c ip a l p u b lic lib r a rie s o f th e U n ite d S ta te s and C an ad a. T h is is a c o n sid era b le e x p e n se , bo th fo r th e c o s t o f th e b o o k s, th e w rap p in g , and m ailin g . W e also send co m p li m e n ta ry cop ies to p ris o n s, a sy lu m s, sa n i ta riu m s, h o s p ita ls , arm y and n av y lib r a r ie s, and o th e r p la ce s w here th e p oor and w o rth y m ay ben efit. T h e M y s tic a l L if e o f J e s u s h as b een h ig h ly p ra ised b y our m em b ers, and I o fte n w onder how m any o f our m em bers re a liz e how p le ase d an au th o r is to receiv e le tte r s fro m the re a d e rs o f his book in w hich com m ents are fr e e ly m ad e re g a rd in g th e v ario u s c h a p te rs or im p o rta n t p o in ts o f th e book. S u c h le tte r s , I know , h elp w rite rs in g ra sp in g th e view p oin t o f th e re a d e rs and in p re p a rin g o th e r books to m eet th e ir w ish es o r req u ire m e n ts. H a v e you ev er th o u g h t o f th is ? A new book b y th e Im p e ra to r is about to be p rin te d . I t is c a lle d , R o s ic ru cia n Q u estio n s and A n sw e rs ; it co n ta in s a com p lete h isto ry o f th e O rd e r. I t p ro b a b ly w ill n o t be off th e p re s s fo r an o th e r th ir ty or fo rty -fiv e d a y s, and we hope th a t

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V is ito rs to th e con v en tio n h av e b een flo c k in g arou nd H e a d q u a rte rs fo r th e p a st ten d ay s lik e bees arou nd a hiv e. S o m e o f our m em bers found a good excu se in th e C on vention to spend a sum m er in th e S a n ta C la ra V a lle y , and th e y a re th o ro u g h ly d e lig h te d . T h e re m a rk s m ade b y th e se v isi to rs rem ind us o f th e f a c t o fte n im p ressed upon us, n am e ly , th a t i f o n e -h a lf o f one p e r cen t o f th e p e rso n s in th e U n ited S ta te s who say th a t th e y in ten d to , ev en tu a lly com e to C a lifo r n ia to liv e, do so, it is on ly a q u estio n o f a few y e a rs tim e w hen C a lifo r n ia w ill be v e ry d en sely p op u late d . A ll th ro u g h th e E a s t one h e a rs th e e x p re ssio n , W e hope som e d ay to give up b u sin e ss, r e tir e , and s e ttle in C a lifo r n ia fo r th e r e s t o f our liv e s . A m ong th e v isito rs in S a n J o s e fro m th e E a s t , we m u st m en tio n th e fa th e r and m o th er o f our Im p e r a to r , an e ld e rly cou p le who a re m ak in g th e ir firs t v isit in C a lifo r n ia . T h e y hav e been in our m id st fo r five or six w eeks, and a re th o ro u g h ly e n jo y in g th em selv es.

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Y o u p ro b a b ly r e c a ll th a t I used to w h isp er to you ab o u t th e bo oks th a t th e Im p e ra to r w as p la n n in g to w rite or was a c tu a lly p re p a rin g . P e r h a p s you w ould be g la d to know th a t th e s a le o f som e o f th o se books h as gone beyo n d a ll e x p e c ta tio n s. A lth o u g h th e bo ok, R o s ic ru c ia n P r in c ip le s , w as offered to our m em bers o n ly in F e b r u a r y , it h as a lre a d y reach ed a second and e n la rg e d e d itio n , and th ird e d itio n is im m in en t. T h e R o sic ru cia n M an u al is in its second e d itio n , and n e a rly read y fo r a th ird ed itio n . A new and re v ised sev en th ed itio n o f T h e L ig h t o f E g y p t w as issu ed e a rly in J u l y , and an

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th o se am bitio u s re a d e rs who are sen d in g ad van ce o rd e rs fo r the R o s ic ru c ia n Q u e s tio n s and A n sw e rs w ill be p a tie n t. I o v erh eard th e b o o k k ee p e r sa y in g th a t his file o f ad van ce ord ers w as g e ttin g p r e tty fu ll, and th a t he hoped one o f th e c o r resp o n d en ce d e p a rtm e n ts was in fo rm in g ev ery o n e th a t th e book is n ot q u ite re ad y . M a n y hu nd reds o f cop ies o f th is book are g o in g to be sen t to u n iv e rs itie s, n e w sp a p e rs , e d ito rs, p u b lish e rs, and o th e rs who o fte n hav e to r e fe r to h is to r ic a l books fo r fa c ts when th e y are w ritin g sp e cia l m a t te r , fo r th is new book w ill c o n ta in the m ost com p lete h is to ry o f th e R o sic ru cia n O rd e r ev er p u b lish ed , and th e fa c ts in it w ill un d ou bted ly p le a se and su rp rise m any o f our m em b ers.

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S p e a k in g o f th e b o o k k eep er and h is d e p a rtm e n t, I ov erh eard tw o o f th e w ork ers in th a t d ep a rtm e n t com m en tin g on the fa c t th a t th e y have a la rg e file th e re ca lle d T h e M o rg u e . In it th e y have c h e ck s, m oney o rd e rs, and som e en v elo p es c o n ta in in g c a s h ; th ese have been receiv ed d u rin g th e p a s t y e a r fro m p erso n s who e ith e r signed th e ir nam es so ra p id ly th a t th ey cou ld not be read , or else fo rg o t to sig n th e ch eck o r the le tte r at a ll, and the re s u lt is th a t a la rg e sum o f m oney is in th is file w a itin g fo r p erso n s to com p lain abou t th e ir re m itta n ce s and give us som e clu e w h ereby we can id e n tify th e re m it ta n c e and p ro p e rly reco rd it. I saw one ch eck go thro u gh th e m ail th e o th e r d ay d ated from L o s A n g e le s, w ith a sig n a tu re so h ie ro g ly p h ic th a t none o f us could read it , and a slip o f p a p e r en clo sed w ith th e c h e ck m e rely said , F o r A u g u st d u e s. T h e y d ecid ed in th is case to send the ch eck to th e L o s A n g eles b an k and see i f th e b a n k th e re cou ld id e n tify th e re m itte r. T h e r e w as no nam e o r ad d ress on the o u t sid e en v elop e. I learn e d th a t in th e R e co rd in g D e p a rtm e n t, a lso , m an y le tte r s a re receiv ed s ta tin g th a t a m ag azin e was n o t rece iv e d , o r so m eth in g e lse w ent a s tr a y , and th e w rite rs o f th e se le tte r s have e ith e r fa ile d to sig n th e ir nam es a t a ll, or have sig n ed them in such a w ay th a t th ey can n o t be id e n tifie d and th e e rro r or loss com p lain ed o f can n o t be re c tifie d . I f you a re ta k in g th e tim e to send a re m itta n c e o r w rite a le tte r to H e a d q u a rte rs , k eep in m ind th a t th e m ost im p o rta n t th in g abou t y o u r w hole com m u nication or re m itta n c e

is y o u r n am e, and th a t no m a tte r how le g i b le and co m p le te you m ake y o u r le tte r , i f you h u rrie d ly s c rib b le you r nam e, you d e fe a t th e w hole p u rp o se o f th e le tte r . C e rta in ly ou r m em bers w ould save a v a st am ount o f tim e in h av in g th e ir le tte rs answ ered p ro m p tly , i f th ey would alw ays p u t th e ir ad d resses a t the to p o f the le tte r o r ju s t u n d ern eath th e ir n am es, as w ell as th e ir k ey le tt e r s . I liste n e d to one o f th e s e c re ta rie s d ic ta tin g a sco re o f le tte rs one a fte rn o o n , and in m o st o f th e case s he b eg an th e le tte r in th is w ise : M rs . Jo h n J o n e s , no ad d ress, no c ity , no s ta te . P le a s e look up h e r ad d ress in th e f i le s . N ow , th a t m eans th a t the ste n o g ra p h e r had to go to th e la rg e ind ex files in a n o th e r d e p a rtm e n t o f th e b u ild in g , and hunt up th a t nam e. S h e had to look thro u gh the long lis t o f J o n e s in a ll o f the s ta te s and tr y to tra c e a Jo h n J o n e s , w hose w ritin g w as som ew hat lik e th e w ritin g in th e le t te r. M u ltip ly th is by hu nd reds o f le tte rs a d a y , and you w ill see why co rre sp o n d e n ce is d elay ed in b e in g an sw ered . A nu m ber o f our m em bers who a re a c custom ed to bu sin ess m ethod s have volu n ta r ily ad op ted a sy stem in th e ir c o r re sp ond en ce th a t p rov es th a t th e y a re f a m ilia r w ith b u sin ess ro u tin e. W h en ev er th e y w an t to hav e som e qu estion s an sw ered q u ic k ly and w ith th e le a s t am ount o f tro u b le a t H e a d q u a rte rs , th e y w rite th e ir q u estio n s on a sh eet o f p a p e r and ask A M O R C to m e rely ta k e a p en cil and w rite y e s o r n o o r a b r ie f e x p la n a tio n in th e b la n k sp a ce s u n der th e q u estio n , and re tu rn th e o rig in a l sh e e t to the w rite r. I hav e seen the v ario u s officers in th e d if f e r en t d e p a rtm e n ts answ'er a sco re o f such q u estio n s on a sh e e t o f p a p e r in a few m in u te s. S u ch q u estio n s a s : A re th e re any m ore o f the F e b r u a r y issu es o f T h e M y s tic T r ia n g le on hand fo r s a le ? o r, D o you recom m end th e re a d in g o f M a rie C o rr e l li s book, A r d a th ? o r, H ow soon w ill a new book be p u b lish e d ? o r, H o w m any le ctu re s a re th e re in th e F o u rth G r a d e ? can e a sily be an sw ered w ith y e s o r n o o r a few b r ie f w ords on the sh eet o f p a p e r w ith ou t th e d elay in d ic ta tin g a fo r m al le tte r . I f such q u estion s a re w ritten on a sh eet o f p a p e r, a se lf-a d d re s se d and stam p e d en v elo p e en closed w ith it, it w ill be an assu ra n c e o f a p rom p t and co m p lete re p ly .

The M y stic T riangle S ep tem b er 1929

C e rta in ly we h av e had a g r e a t d eal o f rad io p u b licity in th e la s t y e a r. N o t only h as A M O R C o fficially b ro a d ca s t p ro g ram s o f o rie n ta l m u sic and b r ie f ta lk s on oirr p rin c ip le s th ro u gh som e o f th e la rg e s t rad io sta tio n s in th e c o u n try , bu t som e o f our b ra n ch e s have u tiliz e d the lo ca l rad io sta tio n s fo r e x c e lle n t p ro g ra m s such as th a t giv en o v er one o f the rad io sta tio n s in W a s h in g to n , D . C ., and sev e ra l o f th e la rg e s t sta tio n s have used som e o f our m a tte r fo r th e ir e d u catio n al p ro g ram s. F o r in s ta n c e , one o f the b ig sta tio n s in N ew Y o r k used a c h a p te r each d ay from th e R o sic ru cia n P r in c ip le s , fo r its afte rn o o n e d u catio n al p ro g ram d ea lin g w ith th e su b je c t o f p sy ch o lo g y and bu sin ess. W ith our p e rm issio n , th e m a tte r was b ro a d ca st in ord er to h elp as m any as p o s s ib le ; w hile c re d it w as given to A M O R C and the R o s i cru cian id eals w ere thu s e sta b lish e d in the m inds o f m an y, A M O R C w as on ly too g lad to have its co p y rig h ted m a tte r d is trib u te d as w id ely as p o ssib le b ecau se o f th e g e n e ra l good it would do to th o se who could not affo rd to buy the book o r who m ay n ev er have h e ard o f th e book. L e t te rs com ing to us fro m a ll p a rts o f th e U n ited S ta te s d a ily show th a t th e se rad io p ro g ram s have been w id ely h eard and c a r e fu lly noted . W e have even receiv ed le tte rs fro m A la s k a fro m p erso n s who had h e ard our w eekly p ro g ram s from the L o s A n g eles sta tio n . W h en p erso n s liv in g th a t d ista n c e ca n u n d erstan d th e w ords R o s ic ru c ia n , R o s ic ru c ia n P a r k , and A M O R C d is tin c tly enough to ad d ress a le tte r th a t reach es us, it show s how c le a rly and how w idely our rad io p ro g ram s have been b ro a d ca st. I know th a t th e Im p e ra to r and th e o th e r officers a re h ig h ly p leased at th e w o nd erfu l co o p eratio n given by m any o f our m em bers even in C a n a d a in th e b ro a d ca stin g o f e x c e lle n t p ro g ra m s on b e h a lf o f A M O R C . W e hav e n ev er heard o f any o th e r fr a te r n a l o r m e ta p h y sica l o rg a n iz a tio n b e in g so g e n e r a lly know n on th e a ir as is A M O R C . O f c o u rse , A M O R C w as th e first to use rad io fo r ed u catio n al p u rp o ses. Y e a r s ago it s ta rte d such w ork o v er w e ste rn ra d io s ta tio n s , and i t has been a le a d e r in th is re g a rd e v er sin ce .

m any o f th e se v isito rs a re n o t m em b ers o f th e o rg a n iz a tio n , o f co u rse , alth ou g h m an y m em bers v isit it d a ily . A ll a re a g re e a b ly su rp rise d a t th e v ery la rg e c o l le ctio n o f s c a ra b s , E g y p tia n je w e lr y , t a l ism an s, am u lets, and o th e r v alu ab le a r ti c le s in th e v ariou s g la s s c a se s , and the w om en a re e sp e c ia lly a ttr a c te d to the n e c k la ce s , p ieces o f s ilk s , ta p e s tr ie s , and o th er p ie ce s o f o rie n ta l clo th in th e case s and on th e w alls. T h e re lic s fro m th e e x c a v a tion s o f A m en h o tep s T e m p le in E g y p t w hich stan d upon th e to p s o f case s and sh elv es p la in ly lab eled a re alw ay s in te re s tin g to E g y p to lo g is ts , and th e le tte rs in th e fra m es on the w a ll, signed b y the officials o f th e E g y p t E x p lo r a tio n S o c ie ty , c le a r ly s ta te how th ese unusual re lic s cam e in to th e han d s o f A M O R C as a re s u lt o f A M O R C s la rg e c o n trib u tio n s to the e x c a v atio n s m ade som e y e a rs ago. V is ito rs to th e m useum a re p e rm itte d to spend as m uch tim e th e re as th e y d e s ire , and th e museum is open and fre e to th e p u b lic ev ery d ay e x c e p t S a tu rd a y s and S u n d a y s. I n ad d itio n to the o p en in g o f th e m u seum , a la rg e e x te n sio n to th e a d m in istra tion b u ild in g was opened a m onth ago in o rd e r to ta k e c a re o f th e e n la rg e d m ailin g and s h ip p in g d ep a rtm e n ts and th e fo ld in g and p re p a ra tio n o f th e le ctu re s. T h is is th e th ird tim e th a t b u ild in g o p e ra tio n s have been c a rrie d on in our new lo catio n h e re in S a n J o s e , and re c e n tly p la n s w ere filed w ith th e c ity b u ild in g d ep a rtm e n t fo r a la rg e c o lle g e c o n sistin g o f au d ito riu m , lib r a r y , and c la s s room s, on th e p a rk p ro p e rty a d jo in in g th e tem p le and a d m in istra tion b u ild in g .

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I am g o in g to w h isp er an o th er little s e c re t th a t I hav e h eard in m y rounds th ro u gh th e v ariou s offices and d e p a rt m e n ts. I t seem s th a t fo r sev eral y e a rs c e r ta in m em bers have w ritte n from tim e to tim e ask in g i f it was p o ssib le to have p e r son al in stru c tio n in th e h ig h er w ork o f th e O rd e r, in c la s se s o p e rate d as a co lle g e . T h e Im p e ra to r and o ffice rs have been w ait in g to see how m uch o f a d em and th e re w as fo r th is s o rt o f th in g , and th ese le tte r s h av e been p u t in to a sp e cial file fo r fu tu re re fe re n c e . I t a p p e a rs now th a t a g r e a t m an y a re ask in g th e sam e q u e stio n , and th a t m any have volu n teered to m ak e con trib u tio n s tow ard th e b u ild in g o f such a c o lle g e , the first o f its kind in th is cou n t r y , i f o th e rs w ere in te re ste d to th e sam e

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T h e o rie n ta l m useum h e re a t H e a d q u a rte rs is one o f m y h u n tin g g ro u n d s b e cau se I love to s te p in to th e m useum and sile n tly look arou nd w hile lis te n in g to the com m ents m ade bv th e v is ito rs. A g r e a t

e x te n t. T h e Im p e ra to r h as been re lu c ta n t to m ak e any move in th is re g a rd u n til he is con v inced th a t it would be a g e n e ra l d e s ir e th e p a rt o f th o se who m ig h t n ev er d ir e c tly b en efit fro m th e o p e ra tio n o f th e co lle g e . I t would c e r ta in ly b e an im p ressiv e th in g , and an im p o rta n t a sse t to our O rd e r in A m e rica to have a N a tio n a l c o lle g e , and th e o n ly co lle g e o f its kind in th e c o u n try . S u r e ly we should hav e w hat th e O rd e r has h ad in o th e r lan d s in p a s t c e n tu rie s, and I am su re th a t i f som eone w ith in itia tiv e s ta rte d th e p la n in o p e ra tio n , our m em b ers w ould c a r r y it th ro u gh to com p letio n in th ir ty d ays so f a r as th e fin an cin g o f th e p la n is co n cern ed .

on the part o f m ost m em bers, even on

room s b y a h o ste ss, and the com m on com m en t on th e p a r t o f ev ery o n e is th a t th e w hole in s titu tio n is n e a t and c le a n , and

everyone seem s to be enthusiastic, hap py,


and in te re ste d in the w ork he is doing.

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A p a c k a g e a rriv e d h e re th is m o rn in g ad d ressed to M rs. M a rie C lem en s, who is to b e one o f th e d ele g a te s fro m th e G ra n d L o d g e o f M a ss a c h u s e tts. I have n ev er m et S is t e r C lem en s, b u t I u n d erstan d th a t she is one o f th e M a s te rs o f th e O rd e r, who has been in th e O rd e r as lo n g as th e o ld est m em b ers, and has been u n u su ally su c ce ss fu l in th e m ain te n an ce and o p eratio n o f a v e ry fine lod g e in B o sto n . S h e w as an im p o rta n t d e le g a te a t th e C on vention in P itts b u rg h in 1 9 1 8 , and I u n d erstan d th a t m any o f th e officers a t H e a d q u a rte rs a re lo o k in g fo rw a rd to m eetin g h er in person a g a in . S o m e d ele g a te s a re com ing from as f a r as th e n o rth e rn p a r t o f C a n a d a , and th e sou th ern p a r t o f M e x ico , and in f a c t P o rto R ic o , and H o n o lu lu w ill be r e p r e sen ted a t th e con v en tio n . T h e p rin c ip a l h o te ls o f the c ity a re re ce iv in g m any re s e rv a tio n s from a tte n d in g d ele g a te s and v is ito rs, and th e la rg e ch u rch a d jo in in g R o s ic ru cia n P a r k h as offered its a u d ito r ium to th e A M O R C fo r tw o o f its la r g e s t sessio n s, and th e C h am b er o f C om m erce o f S a n J o s e has o ffered its au d ito riu m g ra tu ito u sly to th e O rd e r fo r any session s it m ay w ish to hold th e re . T h e n ew sp a p e rs , th e v ariou s civ ic c lu b s, and th e de p a rtm e n ts o f the c ity , a re c o o p era tin g to m ak e th e con v en tion a g r e a t su cce ss, and I hav e n o tice d th a t even th e c le rk s in the v ariou s d e p a rtm e n ts a re p u ttin g new b lo t te rs on th e ir d esks and o th erw ise c le a n in g up th e scru p u lo u sly cle an p a r ts o f th e ir d e p a rtm e n ts fo r th e <:-xpected in flu x o f v is ito rs. O u r re g is tr y book show s th a t we hav e from five to te n grou p s o f v isito rs d a ily , who a re e sco rte d th ro u gh th e T e m p ie , th e m useum , a ll th e o ffic e s and w ork

The M y stic T riangle S ep tem b er 1929

I n o tice th a t th e re is a q u a n tity o f la rg e en v elop es receiv ed e ach w eek fro m W a s h in g to n , I ) . C ., and som e o th e r p o in ts, a d d ressed to th e Im p e ra to r, th e se con tain n e w sp a p e r and m a g azin e c lip p in g s, p re se n tin g th e la te s t or d iffe r e n t s c ie n tific d isco v e rie s and fin d in g s; on in q u iry I foun d th a t in m an y c a se s th e officers did n o t know th e nam es o f th e sen d ers o f th ese th in g s, b u t th e y voiced th e ir th a n k fu ln e ss to th e C o sm ic, and hoped th a t th e se sile n t c o n trib u to rs d ep arm e n t w ould con tin u e th e ir good w ork. A lso , I n o tice th a t as q u ic k ly as an o rg a n iz a tio n , sch o o l, o r te a c h e r issu es an y new p am p h le ts o r lite r a tu r e in re g a rd to any ty p e o f cou rse o f in s tru c tio n , o r new book, th a t our m em bers send th ese le a fle ts and c ir c u la rs to our re s e a rch d ep a rtm e n t fo r th e file s or fo r com m ent. I t is in te re stin g and som etim es la u g h a b le to n o te th a t som e o f th e se c irc u la rs re a c h us b e fo r e th e y hav e g e n e ra l d istrib u tio n . I n one c a se , a v ery p ro m in en t p riv a te te a c h e r had a c irc u la r p rin te d , s e ttin g fo rth a p la n th a t w as a co p y a f t e r som e o u r lite ra tu re . th is c ir c u la r w as ta k e n ou t o f th e p rin t shop fo r m a ilin g to th o u san d s o f p e rso n s, th e p r in te r , who w as a m em ber o f our o r g a n iz a tio n , reco g n ize d th e s im ila rity a n a fo rw a rd e d a cop y o f th e c ir c u la r to us. M a n y tim es th is so rt o f th in g hap p en s and we have even read m a tte r secu red th ro u g h m e ta p h y sic a l m eans b e fo re it w as o ffered to th e p r in te r to be p rin te d , and in m an y in s ta n ce s p e rso n s hav e been p re v ented fro m m ak in g a serio u s m ista k e in w h at th e y in ten d ed to do. I n o tice also th a t m an y o f our m em bers sen d o fte n a p o lo g ize fo r d o in g so, h op in g th a t th ey are not d u p lica tin g books we a lre a d y h av e , o r an n oy in g us b y sen d in g such tilin g s . S p e a k in g fo r th e lib r a ria n , I w ould say th a t th e H e a d q u a rte rs w elcom es re c e ip t o f th e se b o o k s, and even i f th ey a re d u p lic a te s, th e y can alw ay s be u se d ; I am su re th a t m an y o f our m em bers have books in th e ir hom es th a t th ey do not need , o r hav e d u p lica te s o f books w hich th e y can s p a re and i f th e y w ill send them to H e a d q u a r te r s it w ill be g r e a tly a p p re c ia te d .

V V V

to the research

of

B efore

occasional hooks to our library, and

^ohe Tower Within


By Wm. H.
M cK eg g

V V V
H E N ew T e s ta m e n t is re a d , or m erely g lan e e d ov er, by th e m a jo r ity . F e w re a d e rs see the d ivine r e a litie s w ith in th e ir g r a sp w hile re ad in g w ith th e ir eyes th e te ach in g s o f C h rist. T h e ir h e a rts n ev er open to th e G r e a t V e ile d M y s te rie s expound ed in th e B ib le . P e o p le are p e rh a p s not so m uch to b lam e, tra d itio n h as tied down the hu m an ra c e and fe d it w ith fa ls e id eas o f w h at d o g m atic d o ctrin e s re g a rd as rig h t and w rong. S o c a su a lly do th e m an y p ro fe sse d C h ristia n s ta k e th e g lo rio u s te a ch in g s o f th e M a s te r C h ris t, th a t i f you w ere to te ll them th a t a p a r t o f G od w as in th em , to h elp them ach iev e a ll th e s p iritu a l g r e a t ness th e y w ish ed , you w ould be m et w ith in cred u lo u s sm iles. O h , y e s. I b e lie v e in G o d , m ost w ould s a y . I go to ch u rch . B u t th e re a re m an y th in g s we p o or m o r ta ls can n ev er u n d erstan d o r le a rn . T h in g s hidden beyond our g ra sp and m ean in g. I t is b e st fo r us to ta k e th in g s fo r g r a n te d . D o es not S t . J o h n s a y : T h e r e w as the tru e lig h t, even th e lig h t w hich lig h te th ev ery m an , com ing in to th e w o rld . A nd C h ris t s a id : T h e F a th e r is in m e, and I am in th e F a t h e r . A g a in : H e th a t b elie v e th on m e, th e w ork th a t I do sh a ll he do a ls o . D o not th e se tw o m essag es e x p la in to u s, p la in ly and d is tin c tly , th a t ev ery hu m an b ein g, i f he so w ills it, can a tta in the m astersh ip o f g r e a t s p iritu a l p o w e rs? Y e t m any h ig h ly ed u cated p eo p le to d ay would deem it b lasp h e m y fo r an y o n e to m en tion th is. T o com p are o n es s e lf as an equ al o r to wish to becom e an e q u al o f C h rist would seem lik e see k in g th e im p o ssib le. Y e t is it n o t g r e a te r b lasp h e m y fo r a n y one to say th a t no such ach iev em en t could o cc u r? B y sa y in g so he a t once d e c la re s his u n b e lie f in C h r is ts p la in tru th s . T o un d erstan d any th in g we m u st stu d y and to u n d erstan d w e ll, stu d y h ard . A casu al sm a tte rin g at an y stu d y leav es our m inds p a r tly in stru c te d b u t vague. T h e m eans by w hich we m ig h t stu d y is l e ft to our ow n w ish. U n d o u b te d ly , the p h ilo so p h y w hich seek s in c lo s e st c o n ta ct w ith th e C osm os is th e b e st. T h e R o s ic ru c ia n O rd e r is lik e a code to th e m y stic te a ch in g s o f C h rist. T h ro u g h it we can d elv e in to H is m essag es and fe e l, and e v en tu a lly r e a liz e , th e b eau ty o f m an. H ow g r e a t is th e e v e rla s tin g beau ty th a t com es to any o f us who re a liz e the tru th o f th e G od w ith in . E v e n as we slow ly fe e l th e tru th u n fo ld in g it s e lf to our m in d s, we g e t th a t beau ty o f the un i v erse sw eep ing th ro u g h our b ein g s, m ak in g us see th a t n o th in g m a te ria l se ts us b a c k on th e p a th we hav e ch osen to fo l low . D ifficu lties in l if e and th e re are m an y a re e a sily overcom e w hen we fa c e th em w ith our G od -giv en p ow er. T h e en e m ity and h a tre d o f our fo e s becom e as n o th in g w hen co n fro n te d w ith s p iritu a l eyes. O n e o f th e m o st w o n d erfu l th in g s th e R o s ic ru c ia n p h ilo so p h y te ach e s us, is th a t w hich aids th e se e k e r a ft e r lig h t to aw aken th e p ow er w ithin him . T r u e , a g r e a t d eal can b e a tta in e d in one life tim e b y m an y ze alou s w o rk e rs ; b u t even th e y ca n not e x p e c t to ach iev e th e v e ry h ig h e st p ow ers. S e v e ra l life tim e s a re as a few m om ents to the C osm os. H u m ility in our h e a rts w hile see k in g fo r th e L ig h t g iv es us a b e tte r ch an ce to su cceed bu t we m u st th ro w aw ay a ll our p reco n ceiv ed id eas. W e m u st becom e lik e little c h ild re n w h ich , as C h ris t to ld us, w as the o n ly w ay we cou ld hope to le a rn . A ch ild is su sce p tib le to g r e a t tru th s , fo r it has no p re co n ceiv ed op in io n s on tilin g s. T h e wisdom o f a c h ild is o fte n g r e a te r th a n th a t o f a grow n up p erson . A c h ild s m em ory is m ore te n acio u s b e cau se th e re a re no c o n flic tin g arg u m en ts in its m ind. T r a d itio n h as n o t h ad tim e to sp o il it. A cc o rd in g to th e view s o f th e a v e ra g e p e rso n , we m ig h t as w ell giv e up a ll hopes and a s p ira tio n s . H ow can we w ork to w ard a g o al i f a ll our s triv in g is in v a in ?

M an y would have us th in k th a t w av. Y e t w hy are in th e world led by th a t s tra n g e son g c h a n te d s o ftly w ithin th e ir m in d s? T h a t fa in t c ry w hich m u st, at le a st one in a life tim e , c a ll to ev ery in d iv id u al. T h e see k e rs find th e m eans o f m ak in g our liv es in th is w orld m ore b e a u tifu l. T h e s e c re t is not so g r e a t e ith e r. W h a t is said o f the P h ilo s o p h e rs S to n e ? 'That, it tu rn s b ase m e ta ls in to g o ld . H ow e a sily th a t can be done b y u sing th e p o w er and lig h t

so m a ny

w ith in us. B a se n e ss has no sw ay w here L ig h t sh in es. B y p e rc e iv in g and d ev elo p in g our own G o d -g iv en L ig h t, we can tra n sm u te not o n ly o u rse lv e s, b u t all th in g s we to u ch . p eop le who com e c o n ta c t w ith us

M any

in

w ill fe e l th e tru th . T r u th m an y rev ealed see k e rs to a re

B y le ttin g our " lig h t th em le a rn in g , find ing, th a t as

sh in e b e fo re m en , th e y , to o , m ay have T h e

F a th e r is in us and we in th e F a t h e r .

V V V V V
N O T IC E TO TH E M E M B E R S OF TH E M. C. E .

C .................. N o o ffic ia l com m u nication o f sp e cia l d u ties fo r th is p erio d h as been sen t to any m em ber. D e c e m b e r ca rd s w ill n o t be issued u n til la te th is f a ll. S o m e o f y o u r h ig h e st re p re s e n ta tiv e s w ill b e p re s e n t a t th e con v en tio n in S a n J o s e . A g r e a t w ork is b ein g p re p a re d fo r a ll m em b ers. Y o u r c h ie f is alw ay s g la d to h e a r from you . T h e new book, T h e M y s tic a l L if e o f J e s u s , co n tain s key s th a t you should p o ssess.

V V V V V

IN C ID E N T A L S
B e c a u s e o f th e re q u ests fo r s ta tio n e ry th a t m em bers m ay sec u re , we hav e a g a in p rep ared B u re a u h as b o xes o f fin e s ta tio n e ry c o n sistin g o f tw e n ty -fo u r sh e e ts and tw e n ty -fo u r en v elo p es o f a ttr a c tiv e b lu e , b ro a d clo th lin en . E a c h sh eet has a s y m b o lica l em blem w ith th e w ords A M O R C , R o s ic ru cia n O r d e r p rin te d upon it in a r tis tic O ld E n g lis h ty p e . T h e s e bo xes w ill be sen t to our m em b ers p o sta g e p re p a id fo r $ 1 .2 5 a bo x. T h e S tatio n e ry is id eal fo r p e rso n a l use, and is s im ila r to th e la te s t cln b o r fr a te r n ity S ta tio n e ry .

a dup licate o f our recent su p p ly of attractive stationery. T h e A M O R C S u p p ly

V V V V V
FO R YO U R HOM E

M y stic T riang le S ep tem b er 1920

A g r e a t m an y o f th e m em b ers have secured th e a ttr a c tiv e w all c a rd w hich is l l b y 14 in c h e s, in s e v e ra l co lo rs and go ld co n ta in in g th e C o n fe ssio n s to M a a t. T h is *s a b e a u tifu l and u se fu l d eco ra tio n fo r any san ctu m . I am su re th a t th o se o f you who secu re th is c a rd w ill fin d a b e a u tifu l ad dition to y o u r san ctu m . I t m y be had at 3 5 c , p o sta g e p re p a id b y us. S en d a ll orders to A M O R C S u p p ly B u re a u , R o s ic ru cia n P a r k , S a n J o s e , C a lifo r n ia . Tw o H undred Fi[ty~six

Special Announcement
T H E BOOK DEM ANDED "Rosicrucian Principles for the H om e and Business By The Imperator O W many times have you desired some way or means, or explana tion of how to apply the Rosicrucian principles in meeting the af fairs of your business, and the little personal matters that arise in your home? How many times have you said to yourself, Now just how shall I go about applying the principles in meeting this condition? This book is the answer to those who are looking for a practical way of applying the Rosicrucian principles, and it is especially prepared by the Imperator for that purpose. It presents, in a very readable and understandable way, the many M Y STIC A L LA W S, P SY CHOLOGICAL PRIN CIPLES, and PRA CTICA L M ETH O D S whereby men and women may M A STER C O N D ITIO N S that DEAL W IT H MA TER IA L PRO BLEM S. Dr Lewis has been consulted on these subjects for many years by thousands of business men, and the experience of those years is brought to you in this book. C H A PTERS O F T H E BOOK The Truth About Affirmations, The Cosmic and You, Mental Alchemy, Commanding Cosmic Help, Securing Money, The Attainment of Wealth, Seek ing Employment, Impressing Others, and Unusual Help in Need. T H E PRA CTICA L SID E O F IT The book answers thousands of questions regarding the securing of em ployment; raising capital for business or social purposes; selling property; im proving the health; attaining fulfillment of material dreams; attracting the help of influential persons; and the promotion of business. The matter is new, convincing, exceedingly practical, and inspiring. This book, of course, does not contain the secret teachings of the Order, as none of the books released by AM ORC contain the teachings, which are given only to those who are members, in lecture form. It may be purchased by those who are not members of the Order, however, and it will be helpful to all persons in all stations of life. H O W T O ORDER This book is attractively printed, in clear type, on soft paper, nicely bound, and stamped in gold. Price per copy, postage paid, $2.25. Make your checks and money orders payable only to AM ORC Funds. If you send cash, be sure to register the letter, as we cannot be responsible for money lost.

AM ORC Supply B u reau , R osicrucian P a r k , San Jo se, C aliforn ia .


(W rite for Free Book of Suggestions)

All official Instructioi ;me Council of the a b W k em b lem , which w S t a f e a t e n t O ffice for the ^ ^ t e d , engraved, t copies o i official, prescri d isserta^H k scientific p courses a n A c a d e m ic stuc charts, as^ttkhorized by The contents tlibrein are tended, and foflAL other, a retained by th^^fe>erato A M O RC is t ^ B n l y I rized to use the aboK nR e the Im perator has t ^ B p l above to other allied

ire issued only througl M. O. R . C. u nd o^ K ie registered in the jf lT t e d purpose of prot^H Tg all written and photographic and copyrigh t^M ectures, ilations, philom anical disdiagrams, iiy H fa tio n s and : Im p e ra to t AMORC. te used f^ ^ R e purpose inall rightijH fd privileges are rganization authoe and symbols, and grant the use of the s or movements.

THE

P R I N T E O CN U . S . A . RO SIC RU CIA N P R E S S SAN

JOSE