You are on page 1of 2

Brldgoporl Chlld Dovolopmonl Conlor A program of One Hope United

3053 S. Mormol Avonuo, Chlcogo, lL 60616 312.842.5566


Monthly
Calendar
Monthly
N
ews
B
ulletin
YOUR TRUSTED PARTNER IN EARLY CARE AND EDUCATION
ConneCt with us
onehopechilddevelopment.org facebook.com/1hopeunited twitter.com/1hopechildcare
H
e
a
l
t
h
y

L
i
f
e
s
t
y
l
e
s

C
u
r
r
i
c
u
l
u
m
Overall HealtH exercise NutritiON eNvirONmeNtal sustaiNability
The Importance of Water for Our Children
F
o
u
r

C
o
m
p
o
n
e
n
t
s

o
f

t
h
e
Water is one of the bodys most essential
nutrients. People may survive six weeks
without any food, but they couldnt live
more than a week or so without water.
Thats because water is the cornerstone for
all body functions. Its the most abundant
substance in the body, accounting for
up to 75 percent of body weight. It helps
keep body temperature constant at about
P8.6F dogroos, ond ll lronsporls nulrlonls
and oxygen to all cells and carries waste
products away. Water helps maintain
blood volume, and it helps lubricate joints
and body tissues such as those in the
mouth, eyes and nose. And water is truly
a liquid asset for a healthy weightits
sugar free, caffeine free, andmost
importantlycalorie free.
Every parent knows the importance of
drinking water. Here are BPCD I, we have
several water fountains and we work hard
to keep the children hydrated during the
course of the day. As adults we should be
drlnklng oboul 8 olghl ounco glossos ol
water a day, but how much water should
our children drink?
As a rule of thumb, to get enough water,
your child or teen should drink at least
six to eight cups of water a day and eat
the recommended number of servings of
fruits and vegetables every day. Also pay
special attention to your childs or teens
water consumption when he or she is
physically active. Before, during and after
any physical activity, kids need to drink
plenty of water, especially in hot weather.
The goal is to drink one-half to two cups
ol wolor ovory 15 lo 20 mlnulos whllo
exercising.
Source: http://www.eatright.org/kids/article.aspx?id=6442470651
July 2013
July 2013
SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRlDAY SATURDAY
1 2 3 4
Center Closed
5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15
Bridgeport
Parent
Meeting
16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31
Kids Total Daily Water Requirements
Age Range Gender Total Water
(Liters/Day)
4-8 yoors Clrls & boys 1.3
P-13 yoors Clrls 2.1
Boys 2.4
14-18 yoors Clrls 2.3
Boys 3.3
Our students, teachers and staff are all excited
about the summer months. The warm weather
and exploration has prompted some great ques-
tions from our students. Almost all the studies at
BCDC include activities that take place outdoors.
There is also a good amount of science investi-
gations occurring, which allows our children to
sharpen their skills in investigating.
Classroom News Stories:
Room 2 ls sludylng plonllng lhls monlh. Boons
were planted on the roof and the students are
excited to see them grow. The classroom is also
strengthening their social emotional skills as they
say goodbye to friends and teachers. A farewell
porly wos hold Frldoy, Juno 21, so lhol lho chll-
dren can say goodbye to friends who are leaving
for the summer, as well as to Ms. Amy and Ms.
Sheena. The children are learning that though
missing someone can be sad, it is important to re-
member the fun that was had together. Ms. Joanne
(from classroom 1) will be working with Ms. Jan
during these transitions while we are looking for a
new classroom teacher.
Room 4 ls sllll vory much ongogod ln lholr lroo
study. The children have been very interested in
the sizes of different trees in the neighborhood of
BCDC and around their homes. The children have
been expanding their math skills by using differ-
ent instruments to measure the height and width of
lroos. Rulors, lopo moosuros ond llnks woro somo ol lho molorlols usod. Room 4s lood oxporlonco lor lho monlh
was also directly related to their tree study. They used fruits that grow on trees to make a healthy and tasty fruit salad.
lho chlldron loornod oboul unlls ol moosuro os lhoy oddod spoclhc omounls ol lrulls lnlo lholr losly solod.
Room 6 hos boon ongogod ln o grool sludy ol bugs. lho chlldron oro lnvosllgollng bullorNlos, onls, boos ond lody-
bugs. lho chlldron loornod lhol oll lho provlously monllonod bugs oro closslhod os lnsocls, bocouso lhoy hovo lhroo
main body parts and six legs. The children are also learning about spiders and how they are different from insects.
Art was a big part of this study, as the children made cement during a large group activity, and then painted their
creation to look like ladybugs or ants by using their thumb prints.
Important Reminders
Cym shoos: For your chllds sololy gym shoos wllh socks oro rocommondod lor your chllds solo porllclpollon ln pro-
grom ocllvlllos. Sondols, Nlp Nops, shoos wllhoul bocks [lncludlng gym shoos wllhoul bocks), or ony olhor opon-lood
shoe may cause accident or injury are not allowed at the center. Please do not send your child to the center in these
types of shoes for safety reasons!
lloms lo brlng: lho lollowlng lloms should bo kopl ln your chllds lockor ovory doy: Swlm sull, lowol, o plosllc bog lor
wet clothes, a lightweight jacket or sweater for cooler temperatures and a change of clothes. Pool shoes for sprinkler are
recommended for your childs safety. If you would like our staff to apply sunscreen and/insect repellant for your child,
you musl complolo lho pormlsslon lorm, ovolloblo ln lho olhco, ond provldo lhoso producls ond lorms lo your Fomlly
Support Worker. These items must in the original container with a valid expiration date and clearly labeled with your
childs name.
July Focus: Summer Safety Tips
The safety of your children is one of our highest priorities here at BCDC. As the summer heat approaches in
Chicago, teachers and staff are aware that we have to keep a watchful eye on our children while engaging in
outdoor gross-motor-play. As parents, we understand that you also will be making sure your children and other
family members stay safe in the summer heat.
Horo oro sovorol summor sololy llps lor boollng lho hool:
Drlnk moro Nulds rogordloss ol your ocllvlly lovol. Do nol woll unlll youro lhlrsly lo drlnk.
Do nol drlnk llqulds lhol conloln lorgo omounls ol sugor-lhoso ocluolly couso you lo loso moro body Nuld.
Also, avoid very cold drinks, because they can cause stomach cramps.
Stay indoors and, if at all possible, stay in an air-conditioned place. If your home does not have air conditioning,
go lo lho shopplng moll or publlc llbrory-ovon o low hours sponl ln olr condlllonlng con holp your body sloy
cooler when you go back into the heat. Call your local health department to see if there are any heat-relief shelters
in your area.
Electric fans may provide comfort, but when the temperature is in the high 90s, fans will not prevent heat-related
illness. Taking a cool shower or bath, or moving to an air-conditioned place is a much better way to cool off.
Voor llghlwolghl, llghl-colorod, looso-hlllng clolhlng.
NEVER leave anyone in a closed, parked vehicle.
Although anyone at any time can suffer from heat-related illness, some people are at greater risk than others.
Chock rogulorly on:
lnlonls ond young chlldron
Pooplo ogod 65 or oldor
Pooplo who hovo o monlol lllnoss
lhoso who oro physlcolly lll, ospoclolly wllh hoorl dlsooso or hlgh blood prossuro
Visit adults at risk at least twice a day and closely watch them for signs of heat exhaustion or heat stroke.
Infants and young children, of course, need much more frequent watching.
ll you musl bo oul ln lho hool:
Try to keep your outdoor activity to morning and evening hours.
Cul down on oxorclso. ll you musl oxorclso, drlnk lwo lo lour glossos ol cool, non-olcohollc Nulds ooch hour. A sporls
bovorogo con roploco lho soll ond mlnorols you loso ln swool. Vornlng: ll you oro on o low-soll dlol, lolk wllh your
doclor boloro drlnklng o sporls bovorogo. Romombor lho wornlng ln lho hrsl llp [obovo), loo.
Try to rest often in shady areas.
Protect yourself from the sun by wearing a wide-brimmed hat (also keeps you cooler) and sunglasses and by putting
on sunscroon ol SPF 15 or hlghor [lho mosl ollocllvo producls soy brood spoclrum or UVA,UVB prolocllon on
their labels).
Source: http://www.cdc.gov/features/KidsSafety