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DORDT COLLEGE ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT

TEXTBOOK ERRATA (last update 1/25/2013)

Sedra & Smith,
Microelectronic Circuits, 6th Ed. ISBN-10 0-19-532303-3 ISBN-13 9780195323030

Oxford, 2010.

This list was prepared from the first printing of the textbook. Some of these errata have been corrected in later printings, which is easy to understand. Some additinal errata have been accidentally introduced into later printings! Where I have information on errata unique to later printings, I have included appropriate corrections.

Page 46, Problem 1.39 part (b) Change "v = 10 μV" to "vI = 10 μV" Page 112, Problem D2.34 part (d)

(Posted 9/06/2012)

Add the word "Norton" so that part (d) reads as follows: (d) If the amplifier is fed with a Norton current source having a current of 0.2 mA and a source resistance of 10 K , find iL.

Page 217, Figure P4.3 part (b) The top diode should be labled D1 and the bottom diode should be labeled D2.
(Posted 9/16/2010)

Page 220, Problem 4.22 Part (d)
Delete part (d) from the problem. (It is a duplicate of Part(b)) (Posted 9/20/2010)

Page 226, Problem 4.75 Part (C)
Add, "during conduction" to part (c) so that it reads, "(c) What is the average diode current during conduction?"
(Posted 10/21/2010)

Page 226, Problem 4.76.
In part (b) of the statement from problem 4.75, replace the word "diode" with "rectifier." The problem then reads (b) For what fraction of a cycle does the rectifier conduct? In part (c) add the phrase, "through each diode during conduction." and delete one instance of the word "diode." The question then reads. . . (c) What is the average current through each diode during conduction? In part (d) add the phrase, "through each diode?" and delete one instance of the word "diode." The question then reads. . . (d) What is the peak current through each diode? Also see below for a clarification of this problem.

Page 226, Problem 4.77.
In part (b) of the statement from problem 4.75, replace the phrase, "does the diode conduct" with the phrase, "is there conduction through the secondary winding of the transformer." The problem then reads (b) For what fraction of a cycle is there conduction through the secondary winding of the transformer? In part (c) add the phrase, "through each diode during conduction." and delete one instance of the word "diode." The question then reads. . . (c) What is the average current through each diode during conduction?

Problem D5. Also.24 In the problem statement replace "(a)" with "(i)" and replace "(b)" with "(ii). First.76. In the first line of the problem statement delete the space between the number 2. There are two parts to the problem. In the needed smallsignal analysis those DC sources get set to zero or ground. Second. "A particular MOSFET has VA = 50 V. a total of four things to consider. Problem 5. In the first line of the problem statement change. P5. instead allow the distortion to be included in the calculation.59 (As printed µnCox = 2. (d) What is the peak current through each diode? Also see below for a clarification of this problem. .5 µA/V is a correct reading but that was not the author's intention.5 Replace the last line of the problem statement with. as the author intended. Change equation 5." . put the number in parenthesis. Problem 5.64 part (c) Replace the phrase.8 V." ("Replace the transistor. "disregard" meaning assume a linear approximation as if no distortion existed. . Replace the first sentence with: "Model the NMOS amplifier shown in Fig. For operation in saturation at" (Posted 10/12/2012." misleads students into thinking that the DC sources. . Problem 5.) Page 343. "and by using equations valid for large signals." with the phrase. "maximum allowed VGS of 1.) Page 333. "do not use a small-signal approximation to eliminate the distortion from the calculation.35 to read as follows: (Posted 12/04/2010) Page 327. Page 270.) Page 331.5 and the "µp".) Page 339. . Equation 5. (Posted 10/25/2012. Problem 5.35 The equation given is not the definition of Av.) Page 338. . "and disregarding the distortion caused by the MOSFET's square-law characteristic." (Posted 10/12/2012.88. The first line then ends with this expression: µnCox = (2. "through each diode?" and delete one instance of the word "diode.) Page 341." . part (i) and part (ii) and each of those parts needs to be considered once for (a) the n-channel MOSFET and once for (b) the p-channel MOSFET. .5)µpCox = Better: just specify directly what is intended: µnCox = 20 µA/V2. "in cascade.24 as thay are." The question then reads." Leave the "(a)" and "(b)" in Figure P5. Problem 5. Problem 5. "disregard" meaning. (The printed phrase is ambiguous. "is cascade" to.31 Add "in saturation" near the end of the first line of the problem statement so that the first line becomes.59.76 using a T equivalent circuit. It has at least two equally valid interpretations. µpCox = 8 µA/V2 Also see the errata on the answer to problem 5. assuming λ = 0.In part (d) add the phrase. VDD and VSS play a part in the solution.

35.34.) Also note minor errata on the answer to Problem 8.111 part (d)." Also see the additional note on this problem. (Posted 2/21/2011) Page 668. Cπ = 14 pF. change it to "IB". the discussion associated with Fig. and the answer posted in the back of the textbook. (Miller's approximation and Miller's theorem are synonymous. Change "let the BJT be very large:" to "let the BJT = 100:" (Part d requires that = 100. Problem *5.64. Change "vid = vG2 – vG1" to "vid = vG1 – vG2" Also note that in one place the problem statement mentions "iD2/iD1" and in another place it is "iD1/iD2". so the formulae developed in parts a-c should include finite ). in all three instances change the annotations on the graph of "vBE =" to "iB =". Page 402 and 403.34 and 6." (Posted 2/21/2011) Page 576. Problem 7. Add. Bottom half of the page The discussion of signal-to-interference ratio presented (as printed) is in .) Page 346. Problem D5.15. Page 672. 8.38 Page 792–793. That is not errata (but it could be confusing). Change. "see Appendix G" to "see Appendix H" Also see the errata on the answer to problem D5. Add this sentence to the problem statement: "Assume the transistors have identical specifications.(Posted 10/26/2010) Page 345." Page 811.114. . 12/04/2010. 11/02/2010.8 MΩ" to "RG = 4. Problem D8.7 MΩ.5. for both bias levels. Delete the last sentence of the problem statement.11." to the last line of the problem statement so that the last line reads: "voltage gain vo/vsig. Page 541. Figures 6. Problem 7.11. In Figure 6.108 (Updated. (The above correction makes the problem consistent with Eq. in all four instances change the annotations on the graph of "vBE =" to "iB =". Problem D5. Change part (b) by adding " = ∞" to the list of given values. In the equation for Av change the "equals" sign (=) to an "approximately equal" (≈) sign. 8.38. In Figure 6. "for both bias levels.19 has introduced the industry-standard method of illustrating transistor characteristics. . Change "RG = 4." (Posted. Then the second line of part (b) will read: "for the case = ∞. Problem 9.35.41.108. Problem *9. . Also see errata on the answer to Problem D8. This method should continue to be used in the following sections of the chapter.) Page 345. Replace: "and thus determine the current through r02" with "and thus determine the current through r03" (Figure 6. In the only instance of "VBE".) (Posted 1/22/2011) Page 569.) (Posted 4/27/2011) Page 794. Problem 8.2.76.

10 Correct answers are (a) 3." Page I-2.15 mA (b) –0. WileyInterscience. Posted 9/22/2010) .16 change. 0 mA. 4th ed.5 V.00 V.14 to S/I = Vs2/Vn2 Change the line above Equation 10. page 16 and pages 525-526. The following changes make the text conform to industry standard practice. 1972.terms of a voltage ratio.14 by adding the word "power" so that the line reads: "amplifier." (Posted 9/16/2010) Page I-2. . Wiley. The answer for part (a) should be "–5. 0. Analog Signal Processing. De Boer could find with this error in it. p70. Answer to Problem 1. .2 parts a and d Some negative signs are missing from the textbook. "Signal-to-noise ratio. p382. 1969. . Integrated Electronics: Analog and Digital Circuits and Systems. —Millman and Halkias. Answer to Problem 4.00 V. Microelectronics Circuit Analysis and Design. 2nd ed. The signal-to-noise power ratio for this amplifier is" Change Equation 10.2.16 by adding the word "power" so that the line reads: "Thus the signal-to-noise power ratio at the output becomes" Change Equation 10. "which is A2 times higher" to." Change the line just above Equation 10.3 by adding the word "power" in two places so that the line reads: ". Electronics: A Top-Down Approach to Computer-Aided Circuit Design.P. — Hambley. Some examples are: —Gray and Searle. . 2nd edition. Also fix the grammar: Just before the first instance of "a 157" add the word "with". 1999.18 Change "0. This is not a common practice in the industry." The answer for part (d) should be "–5. Change the second instance of "157" to "106"." A few other authors along with Sedra and Smith treat signal-to-noise ratio (or signal to interferance ratio) as a voltage ratio (not a power ratio). p403. 0 mA. 1989. 1 mA. Answer to Problem 4. Answer to Problem 4. Electronic Principles: Physics.) —Donald Neamen." —A discussion of Signal to Noise ratio as a power ratio can be found in the Wikipedia article . p622. 1994. 2005. Usually the signal-to-interference ratio is defined as a power ratio. Page I-1. The Art of Electronics. "which is A22 times higher". and Circuits. Macmillan. —B. Lathi.0 V. Cambridge. McGraw Hill.9.. 2010. However.to increase the ratio of signal power to interferance power. Change the second line under heading 10. the signal-to-interference ratio is a special type of signal-tonoise ratio. Oxford. More generally. References: —The definition of signal-to-noise ratio as a power ratio (not a voltage ratio) can be found in most handbooks of electrical engineering and also in. —The definition of signal-to-interferance ratio as a power ratio and as a special case of a signal-to-noise ratio can be found in the Wikipedia article "Signal-to-interference ratio. nevertheless.9 part b The answer should be "–1. 0 A Page I-2. Page I-2. —Horowitz and Hill. (This is the earliest published book Prof. it does not agree with industry practice. Models. p859. Linear Systems and Signals. p434.345V" to "173 mV" (Contributed by Alice. McGraw Hill.16 to In the line below Equation 10. which is also a power ratio. . . Answer to Problem 4. —Pallas-Areny and Webster.00 V.

03 mA 6.43 and up.9 V.2 V. 0. Answer to Problem 4.154. 100 V. 0. Answer to Problem 6. add one to all the remaining Chapter 6 problem numbers except change 6. "For what fraction of a cycle is there conduction through the load?" Answer: 94.718 V. change problem number 6.7 V. The authors' intent was only to give "selected" answers.54 in the fifth edition." (Posted 9/28/2010) Page I-2. Also note that the list is not in numeric order. 0.22 mA to 6.1 active.28 (a) 1 mA. Page I-2.) (Posted 12/04/2012.587 V 6.52 (a) 0.35 μA 6.) (Updated 12/04/2012.152 to 6.35 V" to "–4. active. 0. (–1 V. In this case.) (Posted 1/19/2011.99 mA 6.2 mA to 6.6 V) 6. The correct answers are: 6.44 33.952.24 0. 0. 54 mW" (This erratum has been corrected in later printings. A corrected list in proper order to replace the Chapter 6 answers (in the first printing at least) is shown here: 6.3 V. Similarly.44. updated 1/25/2103) Page I-3.38 0.8.3.0 mA. 125.6 V (1. Answer to Problem D5.06 V.59. 6 V. 3 V 6. If your textbook shows an answer to problem 6.909. Answer to Problem 6. 1. change the question.09 mA. cutoff.4%. Answer to Problem 5. 135 mW" to "1.12 1.46 1. Some of the given answers are incorrect." (Alternatively.982 6.17 –0.8 V.22 –2 V. Page I-2. 0. 2.Page I-2.3 kΩ. –0. 0. updated 1/25/2013) Page I-3. 3.667. (This erratum has been corrected in later printings.5 V.8 60.) (Posted 12/04/2012. 9.) After making the above change.12.55 –0.108.7 V.74 V. –4. (c) 0 V. Change "3 to 15 mA. 9.5 μA". 0.7 V. saturation. 0.05 mA. Answer to Problem 6.995.43 (in blue type) to 6.7 0. Change "94.474 mA 6.7%) Page I-2. Specifically change. updated 1/25/2103) Page I-3.22 to 6.28 part (d) Change "0.1 active. The correct answer for part b is 0. Change "4.70.82 mA. –0.995 6.5.59 (b) is inaccurate. 1.991. (b) 0.6 μA" "to 4. Students should express answers to part (b) that are accurate to at least 3 significant figures—one more than given in this answer key. active. (c) 1 mA: 1 V: (d) 0.10 0.984" (This erratum has been corrected in later printings.57 V 6.70.91 mA. 0. cutoff 6. active.13. +2.57 0. Answers to Problems in Chapter 6 numbered 6.72 mA. 2. (b) –2 V.982" to "60.3 V. 20 kΩ 6.907 mA. you have an early printing of the textbook.48 150.2 to 6. 0.3 kΩ 6.803 V.05 to 15. Also see errata on the problem statement for 5.54 V 6. saturation.02 mA. 34 V.02 mA 54 mW 6. 2. delete the answer to Problem 6. (This erratum has been corrected in later printings.1.199 mA. Change "53.68 Delete "0.999. Answer to Problem 6.70. but it is now deleted from this edition of the textbook. saturaton.965 mA. . +4. 1/25/2013) Page I-3. and there are too many answers. (Increasing RD cannot increase the current!) Also see errata on the problem statement for D5.40 3. +5 V). (This was problem 5.475 V 6. 0.108 Part (b) is wrong. 3.0 mA. active.8%" to "47. "For what fraction of a cycle does each diode conduct?" to.475 V" Also note that not all answers to this problem are given here. saturation. 0. 1. 0. in the list of answers on page I-3. 0. Answer to Problem 4. 4.

the transistor saturates" then add (in the margin in front of the existing "6. 20 mA/V.2 V/V 6.45 150 kΩ. 1.56 0.924 V.0 V" Otherwise.106 8. 0 V.9004 mA to 1. Change "164 k.07 mA" and also skip to the next item in this errata list and perform that correction too because your textbook is an early printing with different errata compared to later printings. 0.7 V.53 V.73 V. 77.64 V/V The answers in the list above are not the answers that were intended to be revealed by the authors of the textbook. 164 V/V 6.865 mA to 1.986 V/V. (b) 148. 0.7 V. 0.46 kΩ (b) 120 kΩ.71 mA.9 V.107 0.1 mA.73 V.075 V. 1. (c) –0. Answer to Problem 6.16 V.996 V/V.5 Ω.3 V. –0.51 2.21 kΩ 0.154 (a) 1.98 6. updated 1/25/2013) Page I-3.7 V. 12 kΩ. 21." to "198 kΩ.61) If your textbook shows "6.43 and up are as follows: 6.246 V.43 V.8 V.62 (a) –0. 0. updated 1/25/2013) Page I-3. 77. 0. 68.51 (a) 1.2 V.64") "6.4 V.52 (possibly erroneously labeled 6. 6. 9.8 V. 2. If you happen to have an earlier printing.7 V.3.09 kΩ.38 mV 6. –0.86 V 6. 1.6 V 6. (posted 1/22/2011.5 mA/V.106 8.33 V.5 mA/V. 4. 1.52 (a) 0.9004 mA to 1.78 –100 V/V.05 mA. 0. –120 V/V. 1.86 V. 13 k. –0. 0. 0.33 mA.8 V.9004 mA to 1. 1. (b) 0. 68. –0. 1.99 mA.76 –80 V/V" (This erratum has been corrected in later printings. 10 kΩ. (It is entirely missing from some printings. 1. (c) –0. (posted 1/25/2013) Page I-3. 0 V.93 V/V. –0.64 198 kΩ. 1.8 Ω.64 V/V The above answers appear in later printings of the textbook.4 V.) (posted 1/22/2011.62 (possibly erroneously labeled 6.58 V.95 0. (e) 0. –1. 10 kΩ. (d) 1.76 –80 V/V 6. 1. Answer to Problem 6.872 V.9 V.154 (a) 1. –0. (d) 1. –0. here is the list of answers your peers with newer textbooks have.64 198 kΩ. 20 mA/V. –8. (It is entierly missing from some printings. 0. 14.7 V. (d) 1. Answer to Problem 6.7 V. –10.15 μA. –0.7 kΩ. 2. 9.3 V.38 mV" Otherwise. updated 1/25/2013) Page I-3. 0 V. 7.61 (a) –0. (c) –0. –0.54 V. 1. 164 V/V 6. 1.71 (possibly erroneously labeled 6.71 –160 V/V.9 V.43 V. Answer to Problem 6.73 mA.107 0.21 kΩ. +5 V" change it to "6. updated 1/25/2013) Page I-3.46 kΩ.64 If your textbook shows "6.5 V 6.7 V.6 V.92 V/V (c) 18. but many students have them in their textbooks--you may as well see them too.5 mA. 0. 0.4 V.08 kΩ. 2.65 1. (b) 0.5 mA. 14. 12 kΩ.000 V/V 6.76 (erroneously labeled 6. The answers the authors intended to print for problems numbered 6.7 V. 1. 7.79 3 mA. –0. –0. 2 mV" change it to "6. 4.71 –160 V/V.74 mA. 0.75) If your textbook shows "6.5 MΩ 6. 10 k.07 mA.785 mA.6 kΩ. insert this answer which is entierly missing in some printings. –0. 23 mA/V.872 V.904 V/V 6. 0. 0. 4.51) If your textbook shows "6.) (posted 1/22/2011. insert this answer.7 V. 6. –100 V/V. (b) 1.3 kΩ 6. (b) 1.33 V.224 V. 1.33 V.11 mA.6 kΩ.7 kΩ. 3.76 V/V 6.07 mA" (posted 1/25/2013) .3 V. The above list includes corrections of some errata that reamin in the newer printings.16 V.5.209 V. 0.) (posted 1/22/2011. (c) 18. the transistor saturates.37 V 6.955 mA.75 –100 V/V" change it to "6. 52. 3.62 (a) –0.40 kΩ.33 V.61 2. 12 kΩ.26 V 6.17 to –4.05 mA. Otherwise.01 mA. –6. Answer to Problem 6.8 mV. 2.64 1.102 –1000 V/V.8 ma. 2.4 V. 1. (e) 1. 0. –6.58 V 6.7 V.70 –360 V/V.66 V.103 135.2 V/V 6.7 V.95 0. Otherwise insert this answer.2 kΩ. 10 A. 41.76 –80 V/V 6. 1.53 V. change it to "6.70) If your textbook shows "6. (c) 0 V. (e) 0. 0.43 0.904 V/V 6. 10 kΩ. 0. (c) 0 V.7 V. (b) 1.

What is the source resistance of the sensor? (Posted 9/06/2012) Page 112 Problem D2.9? 0.) (posted 1/22/2011." (posted 02/05/2011) Page I-3.3 kΩ. Answer to Problem 6.106 1 mA.24 An equivalent problem (Implying the same questions and giving the same answer) is as follows: Suppose a temperature sensor is at a temperature of T degrees centigrade.95 (possibly erroneously labeled 6. for which the ratio of drain currents iD2/iD1 is 1. 28. Answer to Problem D8. 164 V/V" (posted 1/22/2011." Otherwise insert this answer. –0.65 1.6 kΩ. 150 V/V" change it to "6.2 V/V" Otherwise insert this answer.11. 0. Also note errata on the problem statement for 8. 0. In part c change "4 V" to "4. 143 V/V" change it to "6.15 Change "1.996 V/V. the transistor saturates.986 V/V.7 kΩ. Answer to Problem 6.107 (possibly erroneously labeled 6. A 10 kΩ load resistance is now connected but the temperature is not changed.) Also note the clarification of the problem statement.106 (possibly erroneously labeled 6. 10 k " to 0.08 kΩ. The terminal voltage of the sensor is reduced to V – 10 millivolts. Answer to Problem D8-11 Answers to the quesitons.5? 0. 20 mA/V. It is observed that the temperature was increased 10 degrees centigrade to accomplish this. Answer to Problem 6. 20 mA/V. Now the temperature is increased until the terminal voltage returns to V millivolts.4 mA.64) If your textbook shows "6.94) If your textbook shows "6. At this temperature and without the load resistance connected.63 V/V" or if it shows "6. 20 mA/V.904 V/V" (posted 1/22/2011. the transistor saturates.25 V." change it to "6. Answer to Problem 7.95 0. (It is entierly missing from some printings.Page I-3.95 1.38 Additional notes: (Clarifications--not errata) Page 45 Problem 1.07 V. The output of the sensor is now V + 20 millivolts. 77.105) If your textbook shows "6.6 kΩ.0? 0. updated 1/25/2013) Page I-3. an ideal voltmeter shows the output voltage to be V millivolts.99?" are not given. Now the load is disconnected but the temperature is held constant at the elevated amount of T + 10 degrees centigrade.63 V/V" change it to "6. updated 1/25/2013) Page I-3. Answer to Problem 6. vid = vG1 – vG2." Also note errata on problem D8.94 1. if your textbook shows "6. 1/25/2013) Page I-3.4 V2" to "1. 0.107 0. 7.5 mA.107 1 mA. 0. Page I-3. "What is the differential voltage.04 V" In part d change "0.40 kΩ. updated 1/17/2013.34 part (b) The output resistance of the "current amplifier" is requested.25 V.64 1.105 9. updated 1/25/2013) Page I-3. 0. The variable vo designates the output of the "operational amplifier" which is . (It is entierly missing from some printings. 150 V/V" Or.404 mA.65 (possibly erroneously labeled 6.106) If your textbook shows "6. "10 k .996 V/V.38 Change "(I/2)" to "(αI/2)" in each instance of parts a and b.9 V. (posted 1/22/2011.106 8.

" The output of the "current amplifier" is found at the two terminals of RL. The assumption of an "ideal" op-amp makes these resistors unimportant to the operation of the circuit.76 Here is the question stated in one piece.69 and 4. Page 192 Example 4. Then the output of the "current amplifier" is at the two terminals marked by these new polarity marks. with the input of the "current amplifier" zeroed (iI = 0 or open) find iL in terms of VL.) Page 118.) What is the average current through each diode during conduction? d.7 V drop for any forward current. is necessarily 5 mA. Problem *2. the non-inverting input of the top op-amp should be connected to node A through a 6. the equation means the same thing. (In the figure.21. The non-inverting input of the bottom op-amp should be connected to ground through a 7. It only means that if IZ is 5 mA then VZ will be 6.) Let the diodes be silicon diodes that can be modeled to have a 0. in the denominator of the equation the second instance of j could be inside the parenthesis." replace RL by a test source. for a voltage amplifier a zero input is a connection to ground. Augment this rectifier circuit with a capacitor chosen to provide peak-to-peak ripple voltage of (i) 10% of the peak output and (ii) 1% of the peak output. in both parts (a) and (b).76 Let the full-wave rectifier circuit shown in Figure 4.) What average output voltage results? b. Note that for a current amplifier. Let the transformer have a 5:1 (step down) turns ratio.93 For stylistic consistency. Then.5 k resistor.) For what fraction of a cycle is there conduction through the rectifier? c. For this circuit. (For each half of the secondary then the turns ratio is 10:1. Resistor RL is the load on the "current amplifier. See text page 27 for the basic theory. no matter what their values are.8 V.) What is the peak current through each diode? Note: a "rectifier" is a diode or—in this case—a set of diodes used to convert alternating current to direct current. Problem 4.22 because problem 4.68.confusingly.77 The two resistors connected to the non-inverting ("+") inputs of the opamps are not the optimal values.68 refers by name (not by figure number) to Figure 4. a zero input is an open. VO = VZ. Problem 4. Also see above for errata on this problem. not the output of the "current amplifier.77 and Figure P2.67 k resistor.8 V at IZ = 5 mA is given. (Whereas. Then the output resistance is Ro = VL/iL." To find the output resistance of the "current amplifier.75. Add label VL under RL and polarity marks "+" and "–" on either side with the "+" on the left. these two resistors reduce the effect of input bias currents. The complete denominator is then [1 + (ω1/jω)][1 + (jω/ω2)] Either way.22 (page 198) operate from a 120 V (rms) 60 Hz residential supply line. with errata corrected: 4. If the op-amps are not ideal.69 refers to . This does not mean that the actual diode current. In each case: a. Vx such that VL = Vx. Page 226 Problem 4. Page 120.7 In the statement of the example problem VZ = 6.75 refers to Problem 4. (The original problem statement refers to problem 4. but students are supposed to substitute figure 4. labeled in blue as "IZ" on the figure. Let the load resistor be 1 kΩ. ask professor De Boer about it. If this makes no sense to you and you are further interested. Problem D**2.

Problem 5. which is –VGS (corresponding to a drain current of I).23 because problem 4.that by name and by way of superceding problem 4. Because of this propagation time.) Figure 5." but just as for a wire. the resistance of the cable from end-to-end is (practically) zero.75 refers to Problem 4. let I = 0. In Figure 5.) What average output voltage results? b.60(a).) Asking students to ferret through all this just to gain given information for the problem is a waste of their time.41 refers to Figure E5. This problem makes reference to Figure 5. Note that this bias .114. RL = 15 kΩ and ignore the Early effect.117 In this problem we investigate the large-signal operation of the source follower of Fig. The "50.70 and 4. Problem 5.68.37 cannot be understood apart from Exercise 5. In each case: a. Augment this rectifier circuit with a capacitor chosen to provide peak-to-peak ripple voltage of (i) 10% of the peak output and (ii) 1% of the peak output. k'n(W/L) = 1 mA/V2. the signal at the transistor source terminal will be vo = –V superimposed on the dc bias voltage. This current will subtract from the bias current I. Let the transformer have a 10:1 (step down) turns ratio. Thus the goal of the problem is to make Ri2. Specifically. Let the load resistor be 1 kΩ. Let the negative signal voltage at the output be –V. Students have a hard time understanding the question!) (updated 10/21/2010) Page 346. Specifically.) For what fraction of a cycle is there conduction through the secondary winding of the transformer? c.37 (also on page 315.77 Let the bridge rectifier circuit shown in Figure 4. Students have a hard time understanding the question!) (updated 10/21/2010) Page 226 Problem 4.) What is the average current through each diode during conduction? d. (The original problem statement refers to problem 4. 5. with errata corrected: 4.114.coaxial cable" is just a wire with a shield around it. We can thus find the signal voltage at the gate.23 (page 199) operate from a 120 V (rms) 60 Hz residential supply line. The reisistance from the drain of Q1 to the source of Q2 is 0 .70 refers to that by name and by way of superceding problem 4.68 refers by name (not by figure number) to Figure 4.5 mA.75. Page 347. the resistance looking into the source of Q2. Exercise 5.68. consider the situation when negative input signals are applied.77 Here is the question stated in one piece. This cable is designed for a 50 load. The current in RL will flow away from ground and will have a value of V/RL. the cable works better when the load on the cable is of the specific value for which the cable is designed. thus it is called a "50 cable. One can use this current value to determine vGS. Now. resulting in a transistor source (and drain) current of (I – V/RL). *5.37 (page 315.68. Problem 4.7 V drop for any forward current.60(a).41 (page 322). vi. but students are supposed to substitute figure 4. be 50 so that the cable works as well as possible with respect to transferring high-bandwidth (fast) signals. the resistance from one end of the cable to the other is ZERO.) What is the peak current through each diode? Also see above for errata on this problem. Let the diodes be silicon diodes that can be modeled to have a 0.21. Also see errata on problem *5.117. the cable is long enough so that it takes a noticable amount of time for a signal to travel through the cable (or wire).60(a) (page 321) and Exercise 5. Problem 4. However. Here is the problem restated with all the given information included.

41 (page 322). Then in Figure 10.65. Remember that R22 = 1/h22. Repeat for vo = –5. In parts b and c of Figure 10.) If the transistor has β = 50.65 Consider the pnp transistor in the circuit of Fig. Problem 7. This is not the author's intent nor is it an interesting problem. What is the largest possible negative-output signal? (Posted 12/04/2012) Page 473.95. b.) Using the value for RC found in part (a). and vo = –7. the circuit element h22 has units of conductance (siemens).41 on apge 321.14 h22 is shown in parallel with RL. This list is offered as is. find vi if vo = –1. For both the MOSFET and the BJT ignore the Early effect. Pages 826. P6. Av found in Excercise 5. Problem D6. Figures 10.65. R22. Professor De Boer has no connection to the book's publisher or the authors of the textbook.situation is similar to that used in Exercises 5.15. For the BJT transistor assume is infinite. It is likely to be incomplete at the least. find the large signal gain. This is not a miss-print since conductors and resistors share the same symbol.14. find the value for RC to obtain VC = +3 V. 828. . At each output voltage.14. For this circuit. (The problem as stated in the textbook leads most students to simply repeat part (a) with β = 100 to find a new value for RC.37 on page 315 and Excercise 5. what happens if the transistor is replaced with one having β = 100? Also note the errata on the answer in the back of the book. a.15 this same conductance is shown instead as a resistance. and 10. vo = –6. with no guarantee of any kind. It is just a matter of notation. The actual resistance is (1/h22) . vo/vi and compare to the small signal value. The problem should be re-worded as follows: D 6. In part (c) of Figure 1. Disclaimer: This list of errata is provided by Professor De Boer for the use of his students in his courses.) (Posted 1/20/2011) Page 584.