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College of Arts and Humanities

School of Music

UNDERGRADUATE COURSE HANDBOOK

2012-13

Minor changes have been made throughout this handbook. Your attention is particularly drawn to the following sections, which are new or heavily revised: 3.14. Instruments and other equipment belonging to the School 3.19. Access to the University network 3.20. Email, intranet, Blackboard and Bangor 360 4.11. Regulations and Codes of Practice 4.12. The Student Charter 5.9. Other Students’ Union societies 6.5. Residence 6.6. Monitoring your attendance 6.7. Attendance matters affecting International Students 6.13. Instrumental and vocal tuition 6.14. Performance Scholarships 6.15. The course rep system 6.18. Bangor Employability Award 7.10. Research ethics 8.2. Procedure for submitting assignments and Projects (see especially section 8.2.1 on electronic submission of notated work) 8.4. Submitting work late without an extension (see especially section 8.4.1 on penalties) 8.5. Length guidelines and penalties for work that is underlength or overlength 8.8. Submission of module folders at the end of each semester 8.9.7. Study Skills website 8.11. Return of marked work 8.13. Special procedures for modules and projects in Solo Performance 10. Academic misconduct (cheating) Appendix: The Student Charter

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CONTENTS
1. 2. Page Contact details ........................................................................................................................................... 7 Staff ............................................................................................................................................................. 7 2.1. List of staff members ..................................................................................................................... 7 2.2. Summary of staff duties, 2012-13 .................................................................................................. 9 2.3. Staff specialisms ............................................................................................................................. 9 Facilities .................................................................................................................................................... 3.1. List of buildings and facilities ...................................................................................................... 3.2. Opening hours and access ............................................................................................................ 3.3. Music Office ................................................................................................................................. 3.4. Notice boards ............................................................................................................................... 3.5. Pigeonholes .................................................................................................................................. 3.6. The Common Room ..................................................................................................................... 3.7. Instrument Store ........................................................................................................................... 3.8. Lockers ......................................................................................................................................... 3.9. Practice rooms .............................................................................................................................. 3.10. Other practice and rehearsal facilities .......................................................................................... 3.11. Booking of teaching rooms .......................................................................................................... 3.12. Library facilities ........................................................................................................................... 3.13. The studios ................................................................................................................................... 3.14. Instruments and other equipment belonging to the School .......................................................... 3.15. Reporting faulty equipment or instruments .................................................................................. 3.16. Smoking ....................................................................................................................................... 3.17. Security ........................................................................................................................................ 3.18. Health and Safety ......................................................................................................................... 3.19. Access to the University network ................................................................................................ 3.20. Email, intranet, Blackboard and Bangor 360 ............................................................................... Getting help and advice .......................................................................................................................... 4.1. Advisory tutors ............................................................................................................................. 4.2. Female advisors ............................................................................................................................ 4.3. Peer Guides .................................................................................................................................. 4.4. Seeing the School Administrator ................................................................................................. 4.5. Seeing the Head of School ........................................................................................................... 4.6. Harassment ................................................................................................................................... 4.7. Student Grievance Procedure ....................................................................................................... 4.8. Disability ...................................................................................................................................... 4.9. Other support from outside the School of Music ......................................................................... 4.10. Reporting serious extenuating circumstances .............................................................................. 4.11. Regulations and Codes of Practice ............................................................................................... 4.12. The Student Charter ..................................................................................................................... Practical activities, concerts, etc. ........................................................................................................... 5.1. Curricular performance activities ................................................................................................. 5.2. University Chamber Choir ........................................................................................................... 5.3. University Symphony Orchestra .................................................................................................. 5.4. University Chorus ........................................................................................................................ 5.5. Early Music Bangor ..................................................................................................................... 5.6. Bangor University Opera ............................................................................................................. 11 11 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 13 13 13 13 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 15 15 15 15 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 17 17 18 18 18 18 18 18 18

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................................ Year 3 Projects ....... 6...........3............................8................................................... Year 1 ... 27 7........................................................................ 29 7........... General principles ................................... Performance Scholarships ........................ Transferable skills .............. 27 7.....7....................................................................... 6.... 28 7...............................................12............................................... Compulsory modules ................... Bangor Employability Award .................................. Year 3 Special Projects ... 30 7.....................................................5................... 25 7............7........................................... 31 7. 25 7................ 6.................... Choosing modules ....................9....10...... 6...................................................................................... Project work ..7............... Genre and Composer Studies .......................................... Year 2 Options ......19......... 7...........4.................. 18 Bangor University Music Society ..................................................7.......................................................... 6..........................7...................................................... 6.. Music at Bangor Concert Series ................................................................................................................. 28 7.......................3...............2.......................................................................... Year 3 Options ........................... Timetables .................................1............ 6................................................ 6........................................................................................2.................................................. 27 7.................. 26 7..........5.................. 29 7............................................................................................................................. 28 7......5..........6............................................ 6....... Teaching .................... Writing Project proposals .... 6.17..............................18.......... The course rep system ...........9................... 24 7......6................................4..........................................................................................................................................................................16.......... 6.. Year 2 .................................. Further study and careers .......................................... 6..........................3.............................. Pre-requisites .............4.................. 24 7...........................................3... Community Arts Project .............. Module choice for Year 1 .......................................................2......................................................................................................10...1................................................. Student workload ...................................................... 24 7................................................................ 6....................1................... 29 7......3..2.................................................................................................. 25 7................ General principles ..................... Reading Weeks ..............................1................................................................................................... Year 3 Add-on Projects ...................... Supplementary Research Projects .5.................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................4...... Core and compulsory modules ......................................................................................1..... The modular scheme ................ 6............... Instrumental and vocal tuition .................. 18 19 19 19 20 20 20 20 21 21 21 21 22 22 22 22 22 23 23 23 23 Course delivery .... Year 1 Options ..............................................6................................7........................................................................3.................11...................... 6......................................................................................... Year 3 ............ Course content and module choice .....................................................................................15. The academic year .....5..................................................................................................................4.... 30 7...................................... 6............. Course length .............. Attendance matters affecting International Students ......................................................................................5..................................4................................................3......................... Monitoring your attendance .....2.... 6.............................................................6.................................. 31 4 .6..................3...... Changing modules ..... Duration and frequency of classes ...9...................................... 5............. Core and compulsory modules ........ Module choice for Years 2 and 3 .................................................................................................................................................................. 30 7................ 18 Other Students’ Union societies ........ 26 7........................................ 6.......................................................................................................... Choosing Year 3 Projects .......8.............................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 30 7.................... Aims and objectives ........................2............. 6...................................................... 24 7........................................... 30 7..... 24 7............................... Module descriptions ..............1............................. 31 7....................6................ Residence ................7.......................... Course and module feedback ..............................................................................7.............................................................................................14..............................................13.........................................8.... 6..........................1.....................................5.........................................................2.......... 30 7.....................................................4......... Research ethics ............ 5....

............................................................ Explicit Marking Criteria for Composition ........... 37 8...........1......................... Seminar contributions ...............6....................... Assessment of modules ................. 37 8......1................................................................... 47 8................9..........13.......... 46 8...........................9..........2......................... Procedure for submitting hard copies of assignments ..............................................................................................................1......13..................................................14............... 42 8..........3....9......................5.................. Acceptable and unacceptable reasons for requesting an extension ..... Anonymity .....................................................................................9............................................................... 40 8......8......12.....1.......................... Advice on undertaking written work ....................... 42 8..........12...........................4...................................... 42 8............................................10............... 5 .............................7.. Explicit Marking Criteria for Editing ......................2.................................................................................. 41 8........ 43 8....2.......3........................3...15...... 44 8..... 47 8............ Where to begin ....................................... Accompanists ..... Progression from Level 4 to Level 5.............................................................................1....................................................... Submitting scores (or equivalent) ............................................................................................ 39 8............................ Grading systems ......................................13................................................. Programme notes ............................................................................2. 36 8.................................6................................. 35 8................ 9............9.......................................................... 48 48 48 48 48 49 9. 46 8.....................................................12.............................. 38 8. 9................... Types of assessment ........1.................. 46 8................................................... 38 8...........9......5........ 47 Progression and degree classification ........11.......................7. 9....12. 47 8............................. Submission of module folders at the end of each semester .......... 41 8......................4..................................... Procedure for submitting electronic copies .............. 38 8.............. Written work ................................... 32 8.... 37 8...12..................... Calculation of degree classifications . 35 8............. Advice on giving a seminar presentation ................. Notification of overall results for modules ........1......................... 45 8....................................... 32 8...6... 35 8.6............ 37 8................................................... Procedure for submitting hard copies of Projects .13.................2........ 37 8........ 47 8......... 32 8....................................6...... examinations and seminar presentations ............... Payment of debts ...................................................................................................13....13.....................2......................................... 46 8............................. 35 8......2.................. Interviews ......... Length guidelines and penalties for work that is underlength or overlength ....... Other matters relating to style and presentation ........2..................... Preparatory research and note-taking .............. Programme proposals ...........................................5......................................................................... 47 8...2......................................................................14. Technical requirements ...................................................................................4..................5.......................................................................... 46 8....... Using quotations ....... bibliographies and discographies .....14...................................4..................................... 32 8............................. Explicit Marking Criteria for Performance ....................................................3... Explicit Marking Criteria for Musicology .......................8...... Planning and writing the essay .......................................................3. Keeping copies of assessed work ............................ 9.............................. 39 8. 36 8............... Procedure for submitting assignments and Projects .....................4...................... General observations .........3............................................................................................................ Minimum attainment at Level 6 .............................................4...........................................12.. 33 8.................................................................................3.................................................................. Laying out footnotes..........................................2..3................. Submitting work late without an extension .......3... 40 8....4.....1.......... Tests............. Requesting an extension for a piece of coursework or a presentation ................................. 41 8.................2............ Requesting an extension for an assignment or Project .. 46 8................................................................... 34 8..................5......9..................... Procedure for submitting assignments that have been granted an extension ...................... Explicit Marking Criteria: general principles ......... Ways to ensure that your work is submitted on time ........13..... 36 8..... 9..6................... 36 8...................... Grades and marks ..................... Return of marked work ...................................................................................................................4.................................................2....3...........................................3.............................................. Seminar presentations .......................9................ Special procedures for modules and projects in Solo Performance ......1... Penalties . Performance of jazz.................. 42 8...............12...... Extensions ..3....... Absence from assessments ........... and from Level 5 to Level 6 ....... 34 8............................ traditional and rock music .... Completing work in Welsh for English-medium modules ..............................1......2.................................. Study Skills website .................................................... 38 8..................16................2.....

............................................ 9........................................................... 9.......................................6.......... 53 Appendix: The Student Charter .......... Supplementary Assessment ........................ 11................9...............................................................6.................7........ 9.................................................................................................................................................6.................................................................................................................... 10...........8...................................... 51 Frequently asked questions ..................... 9........................... Queries relating to results and the Appeals procedure .................................. Back cover 6 ......................................... Having your name excluded from pass lists ....... BA and BMus pass list ...........................2.... Level 5 pass list ..................6........................................... 49 49 49 49 49 50 Academic misconduct (CHEATING) ..................................... 9........................3..... Publication of pass lists ...................................................................................................... 55 Summary of your responsibilities .......1........

ac. School of Music) (01248) 383809 o. List of Staff Members Head of School Dr Chris Collins (First floor.ac.uk Dr Hana Vlhová-Wörner (Music Annexe) (01248) 382181 h.llwyd@bangor.uk Professor Professor Andrew Lewis (Ground floor.ac.uk 7 .uk Website: www.ac.harper@bangor.thomas@bangor.leitmeir@bangor.uk Mr Wyn Thomas (currently Pro-Vice Chancellor for Welsh Medium and Civic Engagement) (First floor.uk Dr Owain Llwyd (Ground floor.cunningham@bangor.ac.uk/music 2.o.ac.pestova@bangor.jones@bangor.ac.uk Senior Lecturers Dr Sally Harper (Music Annexe) (01248) 382126 s.ac.uk Dr Xenia Pestova (Ground floor.uk Dr Pwyll ap Siôn (First floor. Main Arts) (01248) 382188 a. Main Arts) (01248) 388278 j.ac.uk Miss Gwawr Ifan (Music Annexe) (01248) 382181 g.uk Dr Guto Puw (Music Annexe) (01248) 382173 g.lewis@bangor.ac.1.uk Dr Craig Owen Jones (Music Annexe) (01248) 388759 c.ac.bangor. School of Music) (01248) 382185 x.uk Deputy Heads of School Dr Christian Leitmeir (Music Annexe) (01248) 383258 c. School of Music) (01248) 388108 c.ac. Main Arts) (01248) 383808 papsion@bangor.ac.p.e.ac.collins@bangor.vlhova-woerner@bangor. STAFF 2.1.puw@bangor.alessandrini@bangor.uk Lecturers Dr Patricia Alessandrini (Ground floor.ac. Main Arts) (01248) 382182 w.p.ifan@bangor. Main Arts) (01248) 382181 p. CONTACT DETAILS Address School of Music Bangor University College Road Bangor LL57 2DG United Kingdom Telephone (+44) (0)1248 382181 Fax (+44) (0)1248 383895 Email music@bangor.ac.uk Dr John Cunningham (Mezzanine floor.

evans@bangor.uk Clerical Assistant Miss Sara Evans (First floor.wood@bangor.evans@bangor.ac.wright@bangor.ac.ac.p.Mr Stephen Rees (seconded to the Coleg Cymraeg Cenedlaethol) (Ground floor.ac.uk Sacred Music Studies Administrator Mr Keith Beasley (Music Annexe) (01248) 382490 k.uk Miss Gwawr Jones mupa0e@bangor.ac.griffith@bangor. School of Music) (01248) 382181 s.gill@bangor.uk Mr Gwyn L.uk Music Librarian Mr Geraint Gill (Music Library) (01248) 382187 g. School of Music) (01248) 382181 g.uk Dr Jochen Eisentraut j.harper@bangor.ac.ac.ac. School of Music) (01248) 382184 s.uk Mr Nicholas Hardisty mupa0c@bangor.ac.ac.uk Professor Bruce Wood b.uk Lecturers (part-time) Dr Tristian Evans (Music Annexe) (01248) 388759 tristian.uk Emeriti Professors Professor Robert Pascall r.ac.a.beasley@bangor.uk Dr Edward Wright (Ground floor.uk Additional teaching staff Miss Twila Bakker mup00a@bangor.c.uk School Administrator Mrs Gillian Griffith (First floor.uk 8 .rees@bangor.ac.uk Miss Mared Emlyn mupa0c@bangor.ac.ac.uk Mr Kimon Grigoriadis mupa08@bangor.ac.uk Miss Diane Temme mupe0e@bangor.ac. Main Arts) (01248) 383660 ed.com Research Professor Professor John Harper j.pascall@bangor.eisentraut@bangor.m.ac. Williams bryn_gwyn@me.

......... Dr Craig Owen Jones Access to Masters Co-ordinator ............. The classical record industry....................................... Musical form......... Choral and orchestral conducting................. and multimedia)...... Semester 2: Professor Andrew Lewis Library Officer ........ Semester 1: Dr John Cunningham . Sketch studies............................................................. Mr Stephen Rees Senior Tutor ................................................. Dr Hana Vlhová-Wörner First-year Tutor ...................... Dr Xenia Pestova Director of Teaching and Learning ............................................................ Early twentieth-century European music (especially in France............................2.......................... Dr Tristian Evans Website Officer ......... Computer-assisted composition and orchestration.............. Staff specialisms Dr Patricia Alessandrini Composition (especially electroacoustics.......... Dr Christian Leitmeir Publicity and Marketing Officer ................................. Paradigms and techniques of synthesis........2. Dr Christian Leitmeir Co-Director of Postgraduate Studies ............................... Spain and Scandinavia).................... Professor Andrew Lewis Director of University Music ............. Dr Sally Harper Unfair Practice Officer ..... Dr Christian Leitmeir Head of Composition .................................................. Miss Gwawr Ifan Ethics Officer ....... 2012-13 Head of Teaching and Learning .. Dr Patricia Alessandrini Welsh Language Scheme Coordinator ................................ Experimental techniques in instrumental practice and experimental notation Dr Chris Collins Manuel de Falla. Dr Chris Collins Computing Support Officer ...... Summary of staff duties.... Relations between text and music 9 ............. Dr Chris Collins Head of Research ........................... Semester 2: Dr Guto Puw Studio Director ......3...... Dr Hana Vlhová-Wörner Disability Officer .............................. Exoticism in music............................................................. Miss Gwawr Ifan Timetable Officer ..................... Dr Owain Llwyd Editor of the Course Handbook ................................................................. interaction.................................................... Dr John Cunningham Erasmus Officer . Dr John Cunningham Research Seminars Coordinator .... Dr Craig Owen Jones Director of Postgraduate Studies ............................................................... sound processing and real-time interaction (particularly techniques including physical modelling........................ Semester 1: Dr Edward Wright ............. Dr John Cunningham Health and Safety Officer .............. Dr Pwyll ap Siôn Head of Performance ......................... Dr Chris Collins Chair of the Board of Examiners .................................. Dr Hana Vlhová-Wörner 2........ and MIR)... motion capture................................................... Dr Owain Llwyd Admissions Tutor ....................

Human-computer interaction and digital musical interfaces. Archival and sustainability issues in live electronic repertoire. Medieval music theory. Music and politics 10 . Source studies. Music of John Metcalf Mr Stephen Rees Fifteenth-century French secular music. Modernism and ‘Post-Modernism’. multimedia theory). semiotics. Traditional fiddling styles Dr Pwyll ap Siôn Composition. Music as social capital. particularly secular vocal and instrumental music in the British Isles. Music of Michael Nyman. Traditional music and instruments in Wales. Music and its cultural context. Music for two pianos. Contemporary classical music (especially from a Welsh perspective). Music at the threshold between Viennese Classicism and early Romanticism. Music for toy piano Dr Guto Puw Composition. Arts administration Miss Gwawr Ifan Music in health and well-being. Chant in British Benedictine manuscripts. Traditional music in north-west Europe. Welsh traditional music and instruments. English-language Welsh popular music. Contemporary classical recordings in Wales Dr Sally Harper Music in Wales. Electroacoustic music. Traditional performers in Wales. 17th-century English consort music (and sources). Music between Late-Romanticism. Medieval liturgy. Early Welsh texts on music theory. Organology. Analysis and analytical techniques. Analysis of acousmatic music Dr Owain Llwyd Film and Media Composition. Medieval manuscript studies. especially community music in social health and well-being in Wales. Traditional music of Celtic countries. Popular music culture in Wales Mr Wyn Thomas Ethnomusicology. 1880-1950. William Lawes. Music Technology. Music in the British Isles before 1600. Medieval liturgical poetry. Orchestration. Music Technology Dr Xenia Pestova European music since 1900. Cataloguing and editions of medieval music and liturgical manuscripts. History and development of Music Therapy in Wales Dr Craig Owen Jones Welsh-language popular music. Music and gender. especially rock and hip-hop. The piano in the twentieth century. Renaissance polyphony and its contexts. Music education. Performance practice with electronics. Editing Dr Tristian Evans Analysis (Schenkerian techniques. Music in the community. Music of Olivier Messiaen. Historiography and history of musicology Professor Andrew Lewis Composition. Palaeography and musical notation.Dr John Cunningham Baroque music. Minimalism and post-minimalism (especially the music of Philip Glass). Women in music Dr Hana Vlhová-Wörner Medieval music. Early twentieth-century French music. Punk rock Dr Christian Leitmeir Sacred music through the ages. Music and drama in early modern England. Music of the Russian and early Soviet Avant-Garde.

List of buildings and facilities Music Building First floor Music Office Mathias Room (School Administrator’s office) Staff and coursework pigeonholes Dr Collins’s office Ground floor Music Hall Crossley-Holland Room (Archive of Traditional Welsh Music) Teaching rooms: Hywel Room Smith-Brindle Room Parry-Williams Room Music Library (scores.3. 3 and 4 Staff offices First floor (access from back staircase opposite entrance to Powis Hall) Staff offices Tower (door to the left of Prichard-Jones organ) Tower Rooms 2 and 3 (for singing and instrumental tuition) The Music Annexe Crossley-Holland Archive Welsh Pop Archive College of Arts and Humanities Research Students’ Study Room Staff offices 11 . CDs. FACILITIES 3. music periodicals) Listening and Computer Room Postgraduate Room Harper Room (piano practice room) Davies Room (soundproofed practice room) Student pigeonholes Toilets Staff offices Basement Student Common Room (with store room for instruments) Student lockers Practice rooms (with pianos) The Main Arts Building Ground floor Powis Hall Prichard-Jones Hall Orchestral Storeroom Studios 1.1. DVDs. video cassettes. records. some reference books. 2.

Keep the code to yourself. public lectures and other miscellaneous events are displayed on the notice boards opposite the side door (though during assessment periods some of these boards are used for information relating to examinations and assessment. Access to the building at weekends is normally available between 9am and 11pm. it is in both Welsh and English. Information on the course. Details of concerts. You may leave letters and work for academic or Office staff in the pigeonholes outside the Office between 9am and 4pm on any week day. 3. Do not put up notices on walls and paintwork. Please see the School Administrator. Staff pigeonholes are located outside the Music Office. and between 2pm and 4pm from Monday to Friday. Access is via a coded door. If you put up a general public notice.9. The Common Room The University Music Society Committee organizes the use of the Student Common Room in the basement. and all day at weekends. Practice rooms in the Music Building are bookable via booking sheets on the door of each room.4. with the Welsh uppermost. Chamber Choir. and may be changed during the course of year. Music Society publicity and student notices are displayed opposite the course notices. University Chorus and University Symphony Orchestra are displayed in the corridor outside the Music Hall. the timetable. drink or smoke in the practice rooms. Urgent official messages are displayed on the notice board at the foot of the stairs: keep a check on it. Posters relating to Performance modules. Before 9am and after 6pm. 3. Pigeonholes Student pigeonholes are located by the front door of the Music Building. or remove music stands from practice rooms. Instrument Store The small room beyond the Student Common Room in the basement is available as a place to leave large instruments (e. who will allocate you a locker of appropriate size and give you a key. Practice rooms Practice rooms are only available to registered students studying in the School of Music. teaching groups and other academic matters is displayed on the notice boards in the main corridor near the front door. 3. You must check your pigeonhole at least once a day. firstserved basis.2. 3. but please return them after use. An unbooked room may be used on a first-come. please ensure 3. Keys should be returned to the Office at the end of the academic year. but will generally be closed during weekends. Postgraduate notices are also displayed outside the Music Hall. Access for evening and weekend practice and rehearsals in the Music Hall will normally be via the front security door. on the first floor of the Music Building.g. The code is given out to authorized students at the beginning of each academic year. You may reserve one for the year by paying a deposit of £5. Notice boards There are various notice boards in the Music Building. Should the building be locked. Please keep it to yourself.3. 12 . The code is given out to bona fide users at the beginning of the academic year. call at the Security Desk in the Main Arts Building to obtain entry.5. Music Office The Office is open for student enquiries (including making appointments and booking rooms) between 9am and 10.8. Please do not eat. Ensure that they are covered by your personal insurance as the University insurance will not cover them.6. and you should consult them regularly).45am. Opening hours and access The School of Music building is normally open between 8am and 11pm each weekday during term time. Do not move the pianos. Please note that the building will be searched and locked by the porters at 11pm for security reasons.7. During vacations the building will be open between 8am and 6pm on weekdays. The security code is available from the School Administrator.3. If you need several stands for an ensemble rehearsal. 3. cellos) for short periods. 3. borrow them from the Music Hall or the Orchestral Storeroom (outside P-J Hall). Lockers A limited number of lockers are available. No student is permitted to remain in the building after this time. the outer doors of the Music Building are secured by a digital access lock.

N. Music Hall: The grand piano in the Music Hall is not available for everyday practice but may be used to prepare for a lunchtime recital in the week of that recital. You will need to ask Security to let you in to the Hall.g. CDs and DVDs may only be used in the Listening Room during opening hours. Records. Books about music are shelved in the Richards Room (first floor).B. Music reference books and books related to Welsh music are in the Shankland Reading Room (first floor). The small Collins chamber organ may be used for practice when the Hall is free. Prichard-Jones Hall: Only persons approved by the Head of School may use the Prichard-Jones organ. Facilities in the Music Building or other rooms allocated to the School of Music are not available to students themselves to undertake instrumental or vocal teaching. obtainable from the School Administrator. they may not be taken away by students. and Saturday and Sunday from 12 noon to 5pm. Other practice and rehearsal facilities Harper Room: There are two pianos in this room. Booking of teaching rooms If you wish to use any room in the Music Building for ensemble rehearsals or performance.13. You will need a pass. and between 2pm and 5pm during vacations. The studios Studio facilities are bookable by authorized students between 8am and 4am seven days a week (see the sheets outside Studios 1 and 2). If you need to practice during the evenings. Bookings may be made on the sheet displayed on the Harper Room door. Main Arts Library The Main Arts Library is open during term time on Monday to Thursday from 8. Davies Room: This room houses the School’s percussion instruments and harps. Music books on rota are kept on the ground floor and may be borrowed by students for short periods. Pianos in Powis and Prichard-Jones Halls: The grand pianos are not available for practice except for those preparing for a lunchtime recital on that specific piano (in the week of the recital only) and for those preparing for a degree recital (in the semester of the recital).10. you should see the School Administrator (during Office hours) to book the Hall. Please note that the Music Hall is a centrally timetabled room.11. please see the School Administrator to make arrangements.30am to midnight. 3. Photocopiers are available for student use outside the Lloyd Reading Room (ground floor). collected editions and other material may be transferred to the Main Arts Library. and may be used for teaching purposes by other Schools. Piano students and small ensembles featuring piano(s) have priority in its use. under the prefixes ML and MT. e. It is also frequently used for instrumental lessons. Please note: It is anticipated that a major library restructuring will take place during the academic year. There are likely to be periods (sometimes without warning) when the organ is unavailable due to examinations and other bookings. Friday from 8. on presentation of your student identity card. 13 . The library catalogue may be consulted using computers on all three floors of the library. Less frequently used books on music are kept in the stack (basement). Bookings may be made on the sheet displayed on the Davies Room door. Please be considerate to others wishing to practice in the Hall. If you are asked to move on. Students and staff are expected to be as quiet as possible in the Music Library and there should be no talking (or use of mobile phones) in the reading area. 3. but please ensure that the outer doors to the Hall are shut and that you do not use the Principal stop during Library hours. In this process. Library facilities Music Library The Music Library is normally open from Monday to Friday between 9am and 5pm during term time. and please bear in mind that you may be asked to move on if the Hall has been booked by another School of the University.3. unless it is an approved part of their course. 3.12. please do so immediately and courteously. Keys may be obtained from the Security Lodge in the Main Arts Building. Staff place books on rota when they are likely to be in heavy demand by students. Opening hours are reduced during vacations.30am to 10pm. Harpists and percussionists have priority in its use. You will need to ask the Head of Performance for a piano pass. postgraduate performance modules and Teaching Techniques for Solo Performance (Year 3). Powis Hall: You are encouraged to make full use of Powis Hall for practice purposes whenever it is available.

This will enable you to use School and University computers. and to use networks of other Universities via the eduroam scheme. Copies of the policy are distributed at the beginning of each academic year. 3.3. or by configuring your own computer to access your University email account. particularly electrical equipment: the University will not accept responsibility for any injury incurred as a result of violation of this instruction.bangor.uk/library). Any 14 . please notify the School Administrator immediately.ac. advicecentre@undeb. The main hub for electronic resources in Bangor is the University intranet (inside. the number to call is 01248 382795. It is therefore most important that you mark all your belongings clearly and make sure that valuables are properly insured. the University Symphony Orchestra). harps. The School also owns a large number of music stands. Instruments and stands must not be taken off-site in any circumstances without express permission from the Director of University Music. Blackboard. to connect to the network from your own computer via a wi-fi hotspot. From your mobile phone.14. or email helpdesk@bangor. via webmail (email. The University accepts no responsibility for personal belongings. It is vitally important that you check Bangor 360 regularly and ensure that your personal information is up to date.20. Under no circumstances should any student attempt to repair or modify any item of equipment.ac. particularly in the practice rooms. Email.ac. you will need the username and password supplied at registration. even for the briefest period. instruments or equipment left anywhere on its premises. and a collection of Baroque bows. and may wish to arrange private insurance cover as appropriate. Your username and password also give you access to a range of online resources via the Library website (www.bangor. Please note that the Music Building is unlocked between 9am and 6pm each weekday. a harmonium). or playing them in one of the School’s performing ensembles (e.ac.uk. Leave nothing unattended. If anything is faulty or broken.ac. You can contact by ringing 2795 from the internal phone in the basement of the Music Building or in the studios.15.uk). a full set of orchestral percussion. This may be done easily via any computer on the University network. a chamber organ. Health and Safety The School of Music has its own Health and Safety policy.16. Reporting faulty equipment or instruments All instruments and equipment in the School are regularly maintained. The University is pleased to provide advice and guidance to any student wishing to give up smoking.bangor. studentservices@bangor. a clavichord. See the IT Services website for more information (www.uk/itservices). From here you can access the Blackboard virtual learning environment. Smoking Smoking is not allowed anywhere on University premises. 3. If you are experiencing difficulties connecting to the network.bangor. Security Break-ins and thefts inevitably occur in the University on occasion. a drum kit. where your personal details and marks are recorded.uk). 3.ac.uk) or the Student Services Centre (01248 382024. intranet. which all students must read carefully.g.19. Please contact the Student Union Advice Centre (01248 388015. and Bangor 360 It is important that you check your University email daily. so you must take care to ensure the security of your own belongings. and Bangor 360. which are kept in the Orchestral Storeroom outside the Prichard-Jones Hall. suspicious activity seen in the buildings should be reported immediately to a member of staff.bangor. or within 5 metres of any University building.uk). 3. Instruments and other equipment belonging to the School In addition to the large suite of pianos. 3. Students using these instruments are responsible for their safekeeping. the School owns other keyboard instruments (harpsichords. 3. These may be used only by those taking lessons on these instruments.18.17.ac. you may contact the IT Services helpdesk on 01248 388111. Access to the University network In order to access the University network.

performance on modules. and is in liaison with Year 1 personal tutors. the Senior Tutor (in years 2 and 3). This will ensure that all staff are aware of the facts. All tutors will normally identify four 30-minute periods during the week when you can be sure of finding them in their rooms for consultation or advice.3. You can contact your Peer Guide via the student pigeonholes (near the front door) or the Peer Guide notice board in the Common Room. GETTING HELP AND ADVICE In an emergency or crisis any member of staff will help you or give advice. He/she will know where to get help on a range of issues. you decide you would like to be a Peer Guide in your second year. and from the Director of Teaching and Learning. please ask the Senior Tutor to assign you a new one.1. assessment and examination. including attendance. If you give your permission. please inform the First-Year Tutor. assessment and examination. their personal tutor or the Senior Tutor about any personal difficulty. if you have an illness such as epilepsy or diabetes. University. to confidential personal matters and career advice. However. if you would like to change to another Peer Guide. You will be allocated a personal tutor during Welcome Week of your first year. you may wish to consider divulging them to one staff member. Your personal tutor will normally arrange to see you at least twice in each semester. The Senior Tutor (Dr Hana Vlhová-Wörner) also deals with general course matters related to all undergraduates. but withholding them from the wider staff body. on the same basis as a personal tutor. He/she will happily answer your questions. which might affect you during a class or rehearsal). your circumstances will be reported to the Student Support Group. but you should not put off consulting him or her if you have any kind of problem. this will be respected. Your tutor will not discuss your problems with others without your permission. and chairs the Staff-Student Liaison Committee. Your personal tutor will be available for consultation on any matter that concerns students. but it is sometimes helpful for all the staff who teach you to be aware of the difficulty (for instance. Advisory Tutors There are various kinds of advice and support available: from your allocated personal tutor. the First-Year Tutor can arrange this for you. it will limit the support and assistance the staff can offer to some extent. from information on your progress and other academic affairs. 4. student performance. If you do not want a Peer Guide. He co-ordinates all matters relating to firstyear courses and students. please inform the First-Year Tutor. call at one of these times to make a longer appointment. and they will be ready to help or support you if necessary. Female Advisors Female members of staff are happy to assist those who would prefer to discuss any matter with them. The Senior Tutor is in liaison with personal tutors.4. including attendance. Firstyear students may consult him. If you need to talk for more than 10 minutes. Similarly. If. If you ask that the specific nature of your medical condition or other extenuating circumstances be withheld. you should establish regular contact with your tutor at the beginning of your University career and maintain it throughout (you will normally have the same tutor for all three years).2. and Bangor itself.or third-year Music student who has volunteered to help you settle in to University life. The Director of Teaching and Learning (Dr Craig Owen Jones) deals with the general direction of the undergraduate course (although not directly with student problems). Should you find yourself unable to talk on the same wavelength as your personal tutor. If your tutor is unable to help you with a particular problem. he/she will advise you 4. 4. Peer Guides All first-year Music students are assigned a Peer Guide: a second. but there is also a more formal network of support. If your problems are of a confidential nature. of course. Additionally you can talk to the Head of School (see page 16). which meets regularly during term time. Even if you do not have any problems. where to find guidance of a more specialist nature. the First-year Tutor (in year 1). The First-year Tutor (Dr Owain Llwyd) will be available to clarify all Year 1 academic and course matters. when you have settled into Bangor and the School of Music. 15 . and show you round the School.

If for any reason you are not satisfied with the response you receive from the School of Music.uk). A 24-hour service is available every day from the Samaritans (telephone 01248 674985 or 08457 909090).ac.10.7. Reporting serious extenuating circumstances You may feel that you have serious extenuating circumstances (such as extreme ill health.ac. Disability If you have a disability. This is your responsibility and no staff member can do it for you. is available from the Miles Dyslexia Centre behind Cae Derwen on College Road (telephone 383620 or email dyslexstudent@bangor. In addition.uk). or for those who suspect they may be dyslexic. 4. You can ring up to talk about anything which is worrying you. advicecentre@undeb. Support is also available from the Advice Centre in the Students’ Union (01248 388015. Other support from outside the School of Music If you need help or support with personal problems there are College Counsellors whose rooms are in Neuadd Rathbone on College Road (01248 388520.ac. You must also report difficulties to the School Administrator. 16 . You must ensure you do this in time for the information to be made available to the Board of Examiners before the relevant meeting (meetings are held at the end of the first semester. who will then deal with the matter according to University procedures. you should report such difficulties to your personal tutor (or. and in weeks 14-16 of the second semester). 4. it is vital that you report them officially. Discussions are in confidence and relevant information will be shared on a ‘need to know’ basis.6. the matter should be discussed in the first instance either with a specific lecturer (where appropriate) or with your personal tutor. Your personal tutor and the School Disability Officer (Miss Gwawr Ifan) will also be happy to advise. or suspect that you may have one. you should submit a doctor’s certificate and/or a letter from your specialist. advice and support is available from the Disability Unit.ac. Harassment The School of Music takes any allegation of harassment very seriously indeed. Support for dyslexic students.ac. to ensure that your case can be evaluated properly.9. also in Neuadd Rathbone (telephone 01248 382032 or email disabilityservice@bangor. bereavement or severe personal difficulties) which are affecting your work and academic progress. If you feel that you have to raise any matter in this regard. In the case of illness.bangor. 4. when appropriate and with your permission.4. so that the Board of Examiners can take them into account as appropriate. 4. Doctor’s certificates are acceptable if they meet the following criteria: 4.4. Seeing the School Administrator The School Administrator may be consulted during the office hours displayed on the door of the Mathias Room. details of which may be found at http://www. teaching and learning facilities or support services. Your difficulties must be fully documented. Nightline is open from 8 pm to 8 am every night. you may bring it to the attention of the Senior Tutor or the Head of School. which is available from the reception desk in the Main Arts building. Seeing the Head of School The Head of School keeps periods most days when he is available to see students. 4.8.bangor. This is a confidential listening and information service run by students for students. If you wish to take the matter further. counselling@bangor. you must report your difficulties to the Academic Registry on the official form.uk). you may embark upon the Student Grievance Procedure. Student Grievance Procedure If you believe you have a complaint with regard to the course. If this is the case. If you wish to preserve your anonymity there is the student Nightline (telephone 01248 362121).uk). if he/she is unavailable. In the first instance.uk/regulations. who is responsible for ensuring that information submitted relating to extenuating circumstances is available for consideration by the Board of Examiners. please approach a member of the administrative staff in the first instance. to the Senior Tutor or First-Year Tutor).5.

• The certificate should be signed by a medical practitioner who saw you during the illness or immediately afterwards, when it was possible to seek help. • The certificate should indicate the date at which you first sought assistance, and the dates of any subsequent visits. • Whilst not breaching confidentiality, the certificate should indicate the nature and seriousness of your problem, to enable assessment of the possible effects of illness or accident on your academic performance. • The certificate should indicate the degree of your incapacity and the likely duration of such incapacity. If your difficulties are personal rather than medical, the documentation will depend on the nature of the difficulty, but it should corroborate your account of the circumstances and indicate the likely effect on your academic performance, and the likely duration of that effect.

4.11. Regulations and Codes of Practice
The regulations and codes of practice governing your study in Bangor may be found at www.bangor.ac.uk/regulations.

4.12. The Student Charter
Your attention is drawn to the Student Charter, which has been drawn up by the University in consultation with the Students’ Union. It sets out the University’s commitments to you, and your commitments to the University. It is reproduced in full in the Appendix to this handbook.

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5. PRACTICAL ACTIVITIES, CONCERTS ETC.
5.1. Curricular performance activities
The School of Music offers a range of practical options within the framework of the course, such as Ensemble Performance (Years 2 and 3) and Conducting (Year 3). Bangor. Rehearsals run throughout the year, and all singers are welcome to audition for parts.

5.7. Music at Bangor Concert Series
The Music at Bangor Concert Series is managed by the University centrally, with artistic direction from the School of Music. Chamber concerts are usually held in Powis Hall on Thursday evenings at 8.00pm. Larger scale concerts are held in PrichardJones Hall, and usually take place on Saturday evenings at 7.30pm. A wide range of artists visits Bangor, with programmes ranging from piano recitals to full-size orchestral concerts, and from traditional music to electroacoustic music. Residencies are held by Ensemble Cymru, the Orlando Consort and the Benyounes Quartet. A special annual season ticket covering most concerts in the series is available to students at a substantially reduced rate. This may be purchased at any concert or online from the concert series website: www.bangor.ac.uk/concerts. Students are always welcome to get involved in the running of the concert series and its outreach activities. For more information, contact the Director of University Music.

5.2. University Chamber Choir
This is a small group of about thirty singers, made up primarily of Music students who are selected by audition. The choir performs at least once in each semester. Its repertory includes both sacred and secular music from all periods. Rehearsals are normally on Wednesday from 1.30 to 3pm.

5.3. University Symphony Orchestra
Open to all members of the University and the local community. Auditions are held during the first weekend of the autumn semester. The orchestra rehearses on Mondays at 7.30pm in the PrichardJones Hall, and gives at least three concerts a year (November/ December, February/March and April/May).

5.4. University Chorus
This large SATB choir gives at least two concerts a year (November/December and April/May). While Music students make up a significant contingent of the Chorus, membership is open to students and staff from all departments of the University, and some places are also made available to members of the local community. Students are not required to audition, and there is no membership fee. Rehearsals take place on Wednesdays at 7.30pm, in P-J Hall.

5.8. Bangor University Music Society
The Music Society is a student-run organisation affiliated to the Student’s Union, which elects its own committee on an annual basis. The society has its own choir and orchestra, and plans regular concerts, including Tuesday lunchtime concerts, featuring student soloists and ensembles. The main rehearsal nights are Tuesday and Friday. See the Music Society website for details: www.bumusoc.co.uk.

5.5. Early Music Bangor
This grouping of various ensembles performs an eclectic range of music from the tenth to the eighteenth centuries, including plainsong, Renaissance vocal polyphony, Baroque instrumental music, and pre-classical symphonies. Membership is by audition, and rehearsals are arranged on an ad hoc basis.

5.9. Other Students’ Union Societies
There are several other musically-themed societies affiliated to the Students’ Union, including a Brass Band, a Concert Band, a Jazz Band, a String Ensemble and a Musicals Society. More information can be found at the Students’ Union website: www.undeb.bangor.ac.uk.

5.6. Bangor University Opera
The University opera group mounts a fully-staged production every year, accompanied by either the University Symphony Orchestra or Early Music

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6. COURSE DELIVERY
6.1. Aims and objectives
Each element of each course has its own detailed aims and objectives, but there are more general aims and objectives which are applicable to the School’s whole approach to the learning experience. Above all this is a course for you to shape and enjoy. The design of the programme enables you to establish a foundation (whatever your musical and educational background), to choose and shape your pattern of study within a strong but diverse range of optional modules, and to work independently on projects – first at a modest level, and then on a larger scale. Year 1 Students arrive at Bangor with widely differing educational and musical backgrounds and experiences. The first year of study aims to provide a firm basis for further study by • consolidating existing skills and knowledge; • introducing new areas of musical study and musical awareness; • exploring new skills and methods of study; • encouraging you to work confidently and articulately in groups; • developing your independence in work and judgement. The content and level of each first-year module should be sufficiently sound for you to return to the field of study in later years and to make use of the skills and knowledge you acquired for further independent study. Work carried out in the first year is really a springboard for further development in subsequent years. Years 2 and 3 From year 2 onwards, the programme places the initiative in your hands. Many of the detailed aims and objectives are defined by you. There is no rigid syllabus or curriculum. Instead there is the clear framework of the course structure. This framework supports a range of optional modules which encourage you to explore a wide choice of areas. You can choose to broaden or focus your studies, to build on existing strengths or to acquire new ones, or to pursue a middle ground. You can follow modules that attract or motivate you to develop skills, explore new fields of music, new modes of musical practice or study, and to enlarge your understanding both of music and of more general processes and phenomena. You can construct a pattern of studies which leads in a very specific direction (towards preparation for a subsequent career, or towards a specific intellectual or musical pursuit) or else maintains a broad balance. The pattern of study you construct may result in a ‘traditional’ broad music degree or one with specific emphases. This offers you the chance to work closely with other motivated students and with specialist tutors. It also aims to stimulate your own independent studies in readiness for project work. In the projects, you select a subject or area on which you work independently, with guidance from a specialist academic tutor or practical instructor. Here you take most of the responsibility for shaping and developing your work. No two students have yet followed exactly the same pattern or emphasis of study, but the programme does offer everyone the same opportunity for academic, musical and personal development, which comes from the individual elements of the modules and from their co-ordination and interaction (at an organisational as well as an educational level). Look at the section on transferable skills (page 23) to get some idea of the issues you can address, in addition to the variety of music and musical experiences you can explore.

6.2. Course length
All courses run for 3 years full time except for BA joint-honours courses in Music and Modern Languages (French, German, Italian or Spanish), all of which run for 4 years, with the third year spent abroad. Each year of the course is described as a ‘Level’, as follows: • • • Level 4 = Year 1 Level 5 = Year 2 Level 6 = Year 3 (or Year 4 for joint-honours courses with Modern Languages).

It is necessary to pass each Level satisfactorily in order to proceed to the next. More information on progression may be found in section 9.2 (page 48). It is also possible to study for an undergraduate degree on a part time basis, over a period no longer than 7 years.

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in order to give future employers an accurate assessment of your attendance (though medical and other mitigating circumstances will of course be taken into account). practical tests. 6. The academic year The academic year is divided into two semesters. Any requests for absence during Reading Week must be made in writing to the Director of Teaching and Learning at least three weeks in advance. Reading Weeks present an opportunity for you to work on coursework and assignments. To support your absence. e. ensuring that each student makes the most of the learning opportunities available to them. A points-based system will be used to record unauthorised absences and the School will monitor your attendance record throughout the year. If you find it necessary to miss classes.3. instrumental/vocal lessons. 6. In 2012-13.g. If any absences occur due to special circumstances (e. with vacations at Christmas and Easter. The School will monitor: • Your attendance at lectures.4. Residence It is expected that full-time students studying at Bangor University will normally live in Bangor or in the immediate vicinity for the full duration of the academic year. as may instrumental lessons and classes in other Schools. The School may use your attendance record in prioritising 2nd. In line with the Student Charter. tutorials. and to the Academic Registry via Bangor360. illness or family bereavement) you must collect an absence form from the tray in the Music Library. and you should ask the student to summarise what you have missed. The year is also divided into three terms.and 3rd-year module choice. examination and assessment.5. you must contact the Senior Tutor (Dr Hana Vlhová-Wörner) or the Director of Teaching 20 . The norm for satisfactory attendance is 100%. The remaining weeks (the ‘assessment period’) are taken up with completion of main assignments. a doctor’s note. Term dates for 2012-13 • Welcome Week: 24-28 September • Autumn term: 1 October – 21 December • Spring term: 14 January – 22 March • Summer term: 15 April – 7 June and Learning (Dr Craig Owen Jones) for approval of your plans in advance of your absence. complete it.6. Any change of address or telephone number must be communicated to the School Administrator in person. including the assessment periods and Reading Weeks. 6. and the spring semester is 16 weeks long. Monitoring your attendance The University has a duty of care to its students. Reading Weeks will take place in Week 7 of Semester 1.g. It is important to note that rehearsals for choirs. Points awarded will depend upon the event/activity missed. and on professional placements • Your attendance at exams • Your submission of assignments • Your attendance at Personal Tutor / Supervisor meetings Any unauthorised absences will be recorded by the School. All students must provide an up-to-date address and contact telephone number whilst studying at the University. You are expected to attend all classes in every module for which you are registered. and Week 12 of Semester 2. during which there are no lectures or seminars in the School of Music. Students are taught in weeks 1-12 of each semester. The autumn semester is 14 weeks long (plus Welcome Week). Reading Week In every semester there is a Reading Week. revision. students are expected to attend ALL timetabled teaching sessions for their degree programme. Where your attendance record gives cause for concern. It is therefore essential that students remain in Bangor during Reading Week. and submit the top half to the class tutor and the bottom half to the School Administrator as soon as possible so that your records can be updated.6. orchestras and other performing groups will continue during Reading Week. seminars. and staff will often set further specific tasks (often reading or listening) for you to complete during that time. and when writing references. the School will contact you to discuss the reasons for this and also to identify any additional support that you may require. the School may seek additional evidence. you should ask another student in each class to collect work. handouts and notes. If you require time away from University and from your studies.

please contact the International Student Support Office. and it is likely that the students themselves will dictate the direction of the seminar. Therefore it is extremely important that you attend all of your timetabled teaching sessions and inform the School in advance if you have any planned absences. Full-time students study 120 credits in each academic year.10. the School will contact you to discuss further why you have been absent. In Year 3. Students on other courses Just as BA Music students may take modules in other subjects. according to the subject and the tutor involved. Types of teaching include: Lectures These are large classes for all students on a module. and perhaps to work together in small groups. and 40 credits per year in the School of Music. BMus single-honours Music BMus students take all their modules in the School of Music throughout the course. They need to meet minimum entry requirements. BA English with Songwriting / BA Creative Welsh with Popular Music Students following these courses study 80 credits per year in the School of English or the School of Welsh. Attendance matters affecting International Students As an International Student. This includes formal classes. BA single-honours Music BA single honours students may also take all their modules in the School of Music. Even in lectures. BA or BSc Music Technology and Electronics This course is taught jointly by the School of Music and the School of Electronic Engineering. students work in greater detail under the guidance of a tutor. If you plan to be absent from the University at any point during your studies as a registered student. The other 60 credits are taken in the student’s other School. 20. Teaching Teaching is done in a variety of ways. International students are asked to make travel arrangements in plenty of time. Seminars are taught in much smaller groups than lectures. the University is obliged by UK law to inform the UK Border Agency.9. reading. you should contact the School as soon as possible. Tutors and lecturers will plan their modules with this in mind. all modules must be taken in the School of Music. as specified in the published module descriptions. and up to 10 credits per semester in Year 2. Seminars In seminars. 30 or 40 credits each. 21 . so that they can be present in Bangor for the full duration of each term. Work may be carried out individually or in small groups. so the School of Music welcomes students from other Schools to take modules with us. if you miss a succession of timetabled teaching sessions. normally 60 in each semester. Individual tuition Instrumental and vocal tuition is carried out on a one-to-one basis. coursework and assignments. 6. If you need help with your visa application. study and preparation. BA joint-honours Music and another subject BA joint-honours students study 60 credits in Music in each year. This may have consequences for your student visa and on your ability to continue studying in the UK. you must inform the Senior Tutor (Dr Hana Vlhová-Wörner) or the Director of Teaching and Learning (Dr Craig Owen Jones) of your plans well in advance of your absence and ensure that your contact information is up to date.8. with 60 credits taken in each School each year. worth 10. 6. If the reasons for your unauthorised absences are not deemed satisfactory. Many modules will include multiple teaching methods. Please remember that you must have a valid student visa for the whole duration of your university course. The modular scheme All courses in the University are organized in units known as modules.If you feel that an unauthorised absence has been mistakenly recorded.7. 6. plus directed listening. Student workload Every 10-credit block is intended to represent a total student workload of 100 hours. but BA students also have the opportunity to take modules in another School: up to 20 credits per semester in Year 1. 6. students are required to contribute. depending on the module.

Duration and frequency of classes Most lectures and seminars in Music last 50 minutes (normally from ten minutes past the hour to the hour). please see the Head of Performance (Dr Xenia Pestova) for advice.15. it will normally be possible to put you in touch with a suitable teacher. Year 1 lectures are given weekly.12. 6. Individual consultations may also be available in other modules. wish to change instrument. you MUST give the teacher as much notice as possible. 6.11. The Year 3 scholarship will cease to be awarded after 2013-14. and no later than the end of Week 12 of Semester 2 (Friday 10 May 2013). fortnightly. You are expected to attend ALL your scheduled instrumental/vocal lessons unless you are prevented from doing so by illness or extreme mitigating circumstances. If you are unhappy with your teacher. who provide feedback on course content and assessment.6 above). or if you wish to continue with lessons without following a Solo Performance module. the only suitable instructors are based elsewhere.13. or have any other difficulties. 6. as follows: • three BA Music students (one from each year) • three BMus students (one from each year) • three Music Technology and Electronics students (one from each year) • three other joint honours students (one from each year) • three Welsh-speaking undergraduates (one from each year) • one taught postgraduate student 22 . You must take responsibility for ensuring that you receive your full entitlement of lessons.14. In most cases you will receive tuition in Bangor. Performance Scholarships For Year 1 students. scores or similar purchases. but may claim up to £100 for scores. up to a total of £75 for the year.Individual supervision In Years 2 and 3. and will count against your record (see section 6. and the general academic experience of their fellow students. All requests for reimbursement should be submitted in writing to the School Administrator. Some Year 2/3 modules meet several times during the semester for longer workshop sessions instead. course structure and teaching/learning approaches. If you wish to learn a second instrument. from an instructor engaged by the School of Music. You will be required to pay for these lessons yourself. and in these instances the School of Music will normally meet the costs of your travel. 6. a number of Performance Scholarships will be offered following Admissions Day auditions. The course rep system Students in the School of Music annually elect their own course reps. making a total of 18 hours across the year instead of 12. Year 3 scholars are not entitled to extra lessons. Year 2 scholars are entitled to an extra 6 hours’ tuition. Existing arrangements for Performance Scholarships in years 2 and 3 are in the process of being phased out. and/or contributions to fees for courses or masterclasses. If you are unable to attend a lesson for a genuine and compelling reason.uk/timetable or on Bangor360. independent project work is supported by one-to-one supervision. and may claim reimbursement for sheet music.bangor. Any lessons that you have not received by the end of the academic year are forfeited. Timetables Timetables may also be viewed online at www. Year 2/3 classes are normally taught weekly. Instrumental and vocal tuition Students taking modules in Solo Performance receive practical tuition on their first-study instrument or voice. masterclasses or consultation lessons.ac. There are 17 course rep positions in the School. 6. Absence from lessons will impede your progress and waste valuable resources. At present. Contact the School Administrator for more information. Sometimes. or less frequent. students should check the timetable carefully. If you are unsure whether or not an item is suitable for reimbursement under this scheme it is advisable to check before you make the purchase. It is not normally possible to make changes to teaching arrangements in the middle of a semester. however. Seminars may be weekly. Receipts must be submitted as one entire claim. Please note that the Year 2 scholarship will be phased out at the end of this academic year. Scholars receive a fee remission of £300 in their first year.

interview skills and reasoning tests) and your personal development planning (through reflection. College Road). is designed to help you develop your employability skills through the extra and co-curricular activities you choose to take part in throughout your University life. Individuals elected by and from the students on this committee also serve on the Board of Studies (the official committee which has responsibility for academic matters in the School of Music). and the Students’ Union Course Rep Council. skills analyses and role identification). These activities may include parttime work. skills with information technology.uk/careers/employability 6. and at the end of the previous academic year for students in Years 2 and 3. Tutors will be alert to these factors in teaching modules. you should inform your rep(s) in advance of the meeting. and to make comments and criticisms. volunteering or taking part in a club or society. communication skills. if they do not appear on the menu. which is co-chaired by the Senior Tutor and a senior course rep. run by the Careers Service. 6.19. the College of Arts and Humanities Staff-Student Liaison Committee. meeting deadlines. Bangor Employability Award All undergraduate students are encouraged to register for the Bangor Employability Award (BEA). and of course. to visit the centre and take advantage of the advice available. All course reps sit on the School’s Staff-Student Liaison Committee. you can suggest your own activities for consideration for inclusion. It is important that you do this so that we can monitor the effectiveness of the course and improve it. you will also find that you are developing other important skills which can be transferred to subjects other than Music and can be useful after your degree course: study skills. Transferable skills Although you are studying Music and acquiring skills in many areas of the subject. If you identify any personal weaknesses and want help. or.16. Students in years 2 and 3 are advised 23 .17. The Head of School and the Director of Teaching and Learning also sit on this committee. visit the BEA website: http://www. the perceived value to potential employers. interpersonal skills. then consult your personal or module tutor.18. the range and level of transferable skills you have the opportunity to improve. Seek advice within the School of Music or from the Careers and Employability Service (Neuadd Rathbone. The value of each activity is determined from various criteria. The BEA is divided into two parts. The Core Programme is made up of sessions to improve your career management skills (including CVwriting. Course and module feedback At the end of each year you will be asked to provide feedback on the course in general and on specific components. time management. participating in or leading group discussions. Names of course reps may be found on noticeboards in the School of Music. co-ordinating and completing different (sometimes conflicting) tasks in the same day. making decisions. to give your views.ac. Bear in mind these implications for the future when you make your choice of modules at the end of your first and second years. the time and effort involved. organising your own work and activities. The Service provides comprehensive information on a wide range of occupations.bangor. although they may not be strongly emphasised. Your main enthusiasm and motivation will be for Music but be aware of all the non-musical skills you rely on and can develop.• one research postgraduate student Elections of representatives are held early in the autumn semester for Year 1 students. In the Activities Programme activities can be chosen and tailored to you from a wide-ranging menu. or the Director of Teaching and Learning. including the role fulfilled. and via the ‘Current Students’ tab of the School website. 6. working independently. 6. Choice of modules may affect your choice of projects. Meetings are held four times a year. For more information. Further study and careers As the degree progresses you have increasing flexibility and responsibility for the studies you follow. further study after your first degree. and your career plans. This scheme. making choices. The dates for meetings in 2012-13 are as follows: • Wednesday 24 October 2012 • Wednesday 21 November 2012 • Wednesday 20 February 2013 • Wednesday 20 March 2013 If you have any issues for discussion by the StaffStudent Liaison Committee.

Year 1 7.2. or to choose a portfolio of modules in different languages.6 (page 37) for more information on this procedure. Year 2: chosen options. which provides details of the curriculum. COURSE CONTENT AND MODULE CHOICE 7. you must attend that version of the module. At the first class of each module. Many modules are offered in both Englishlanguage and Welsh-language versions. and full instructions for the assessed work. as follows: – 40 credits in The Study of Music (either WXM1001 The Study of Music or WXC1001 Astudio Cerddoriaeth) (core) – 20 credits in Harmony and Counterpoint (either WXM1004 Introduction to Harmony and Counterpoint or WXM1008 Higher Harmony and Counterpoint or WXC1004 Cyflwyniad i Harmoni a Gwrthbwynt or WXC1008 Harmoni a Gwrthbwynt Uwch) (compulsory). Although you have an element of choice in selecting modules for study.7.bangor.3. tutors will provide even more detailed information about the module. Once registered for a module. take the same module in both English and Welsh. submit written work in Welsh for any English-medium module. often in the form of a booklet. You are welcome to choose modules all in one language. Descriptions are also available online at http://admint. You may. They may choose either WXM1002 The Study of Music (20 credits) or WXC1002 Astudio Cerddoriaeth: o c. there are no core or compulsory modules in Music in Year 1. BA Music Technology students must take 60 credits of compulsory modules in Music. as follows: – WXM1007 Media and Popular Music Culture or WXC1007 Y Cyfryngau a Cherddoriaeth Boblogaidd (10 credits) – WXK1012 Practical Music Technology or WXC1012 Technoleg Cerdd Ymarferol (10 credits) – WXK1015 Introduction to Max/MSP Programming (20 credits) – WXK1019 Music Software Minor Project 1 (20 credits) For BA English with Songwriting and BA Creative Welsh with Popular Music students.ac. the assessment method. Year 3: more options and independent project work. 24 . All programmes have certain compulsory modules which you must take. however. BA joint-honours students must take 20 credits of core modules in Music. you may not change freely between Welsh and English versions of the same module.1. See section 8. pre-requisites.uk/gazonline. 7. and a list of Learning Outcomes (skills and knowledge that you should have mastered at the end of the module). as follows: – WXM1007 Media and Popular Music Culture or WXC1007 Y Cyfryngau a Cherddoriaeth Boblogaidd (10 credits) – WXK1012 Practical Music Technology or WXC1012 Technoleg Cerdd Ymarferol (10 credits) – WXK1015 Introduction to Max/MSP Programming (20 credits) – WXK1017 Music Creation Minor Project 1 (20 credits) BSc Music Technology students must take 60 credits of compulsory modules in Music. This will contain a week-by-week schedule.3. which are the same as compulsory modules except that you cannot in any circumstances proceed to the next level without passing them. Core and compulsory modules BMus and BA single-honours Music students must take 60 credits of core/compulsory modules.1. Module descriptions Every module has an official description.1900 (20 credits) or WXC1003 Astudio Cerddoriaeth: Cyfnodau Cynnar a Chyfoes (20 credits). Copies of these module descriptions are available in folders in the Music Office. your choice will be limited by various factors depending on your degree programme. 7. Some also have core modules. 1600 hyd c. General principles Every undergraduate degree course in the School of Music has the same logical progression: • • • Year 1: broad foundation. and the Common Room. the Music Library. You may not. recommended reading and listening lists. however.

There are no other core/compulsory requirements in Music for jointhonours students in Year 2. BA Music Technology students must take 60 credits of compulsory modules in Music. Year 1 Options Students must choose additional modules to fulfil their credit requirements. as follows: – WXM2203 Writing about Music or WXC2203 Ysgrifennu am Gerddoriaeth (10 credits) (core) – WXJ2252 Supplementary Research Project or WXC2252 Project Ymchwil Atodol (10 credits) (compulsory) – At least two Genre or Composer Studies (one in each semester. 25 .4. 20 credits each) – WXC1004 Cyflwyniad i Harmoni a Gwrthbwynt (20 credits) – WXC1005 Dadansoddi (10 credits) – WXC1006 Diwylliannau Cerddoriaeth Byd-Eang (20 credits) – WXC1007 Y Cyfryngau a Cherdd Boblogaidd (10 credits) – WXC1008 Harmoni a Gwrthbwynt Uwch (20 credits) – WXC1011 Cyfansoddi Blwyddyn 1 (20 credits) – WXC1012 Technoleg Cerdd Ymarferol (10 credits) – WXC1016 Perfformio Unawdol Blwyddyn 1 (20 credits) 7. There are no other core/compulsory modules in Music in Year 2 for students on this programme.) Please note that all modules have pre-requisites that you must be able to satisfy. The number of additional credits that must be taken in Music for each degree course is as follows: • BMus single-honours Music: 60 credits • BA single-honours Music: 60 credits (of which up to 40 credits may be taken in other Schools) • BA joint honours: 40 credits • BA English with Songwriting: 40 credits • BA Creative Welsh with Popular Music: 40 credits (BA/BSc Music Technology students do not choose any optional modules in Music in Year 1. These are specified in the module descriptions. See section 7. Core and compulsory modules BMus and BA single-honours Music students must take 40 credits of core/compulsory modules.1.3.7. Year 2 7. as follows: – WXK2235 Acousmatic Composition (20 credits) – WXK2236 Max/MSP Programming 2 (10 credits) – WXK2238 Music Creation Minor Project 2 (20 credits) – WXK2268 Recording Techniques (10 credits) BSc Music Technology students must take 60 credits of compulsory modules in Music. The full list of Year 1 options available in 2012-13 (including those that are core/compulsory for some degree programmes but optional for others) is as follows: Modules in English – WXM1001 The Study of Music (40 credits) – WXM1002 The Study of Music for joint-honours students and students from other Schools (20 credits) – WXM1004 Introduction to Harmony and Counterpoint (20 credits) – WXM1005 Analysis (10 credits) – WXM1006 Music Cultures of the World (20 credits) – WXM1007 Media and Popular Music Culture (10 credits) – WXM1008 Higher Harmony and Counterpoint (20 credits) – WXK1011 Composition Year 1 (20 credits) – WXK1012/WXK1013 Practical Music Technology (10 credits) – WXK1015 Introduction to Max/MSP Programming (20 credits) – WXP1016 Solo Performance Year 1 (20 credits) – WXK1017 Music Creation Minor Project 1 (20 credits) – WXP1019 Music Software Minor Project 1 (20 credits) Modules in Welsh – WXC1001 Astudio Cerddoriaeth (40 credits) – WXC1002/WXC1003 Astudio Cerddoriaeth for joint-honours students and students from other schools (2 versions. 10 credits each) (compulsory).2.8 (page 31) for more general information on pre-requisites. BA joint-honours students must take at least one Genre or Composer Study (10 credits) as a compulsory module. but this is not compulsory.4. as follows: – WXK2235 Acousmatic Composition (20 credits) – WXK2236 Max/MSP Programming 2 (10 credits) – WXK2237 Music Software Minor Project 2 (20 credits) – WXK2268 Recording Techniques (10 credits) BA English with Songwriting students are expected to take WXK2191 Songwriting Skills.

Modules offered in 2012-13 are as follows (Welsh-language options are indicated with an asterisk): List A – *WXC2122 Cerddoriaeth Cymru Heddiw – WXM2197 Ralph Vaughan Williams – WXM2228 Approaches to Early Music List B – WXM2115 Minimalism – WXM2127 Music on the English Stage.BA Creative Welsh with Popular Music students are expected to take WXC2191 Medrau Ysgrifennu Caneuon.2. You may choose to take more Genre and Composer Studies if you wish. but this is not compulsory.4.2 above) – WXM2178 Words and Music (20 credits) – WXK2191 Songwriting Skills (20 credits) – WXM2201 Music Analysis: Schenkerian Techniques (10 credits) – WXM2202 Music Analysis: Thematic and Semiotic Techniques (20 credits) – WXM2203 Writing about Music (10 credits) – WXM2205 Notation and Editing (20 credits) – WXM2207 Harmony and Counterpoint Year 2 (20 credits) – WXM2221 Arts Administration (10 credits) – WXM2222 Music in the Community (10 credits) – WXM2223 Community Arts Project (10 credits) – WXK2231 Orchestration (20 credits) – WXK2233 Composition Year 2 (20 credits) – WXK2234 Composing for Film and the Media (20 credits) 26 . Genre and Composer Studies change from year to year.4. 16001695 – WXM2154 Wagner – *WXC2220 Cerddoriaeth Cymru: Gw!r wrth Gerdd List C – *WXC2115 Minimaliaeth – *WXC2185 Hanes Cerddoriaeth Bop Gymraeg – WXM2193 The Renaissance Madrigal – WXM2194 Antonín Dvo"ák List D – WXM2155 Cage and Experimental Music – *WXC2189 Ligeti – WXM2198 Handel – WXM2216 Music in Twentieth-Century Wales List E – WXM2189 Ligeti – WXM2196 Hildegard of Bingen – WXM2209 Brazilian Music and Culture – *WXC2216 Cerddoriaeth Cymru: Y 20fed Ganrif List F – WXM2160 The Beatles – WXM2180 The Solo Concerto – *WXM2215 Cerddoriaeth Cymru: Y 19eg Ganrif 7. these 20 credits may be taken in other Schools if you wish) • BA joint honours: 50 credits • BA English with Songwriting: 40 credits • BA Creative Welsh with Popular Music: 40 credits (BA/BSc Music Technology students do not choose any optional modules in Music in Year 2. you may not take more than one Genre or Composer Study in each ‘List’.4. The number of additional credits that must be taken in Music for each degree course is as follows: • BMus single-honours Music: 80 credits • BA single-honours Music: 80 credits (of which 20 credits may be identified in advance as electives. BA and BMus single-honours Music students must take at least one Genre or Composer Study per semester. 7. Genre and Composer Studies As noted above. See section 7.) Please note that all modules have pre-requisites that you must be able to satisfy. while BA jointhonours students must take one per year. The full list of Year 2 options available in 2012-13 (including those that are core/compulsory for some degree programmes but optional for others) is as follows: Modules in English – Genre and Composer Studies (see section 7. Year 2 Options Students must choose additional modules to fulfil their credit requirements. However. There are no other core/compulsory modules in Music in Year 2 for students on this programme.8 (page 31) for more general information on pre-requisites. as these modules are timetabled concurrently. List G – WXM2117 The Twentieth-Century Symphony – WXM2125 Sonic Experiments in Instrumental Music – *WXC2160 Y Beatles All Genre and Composer Studies are worth 10 credits.3. These are specified in the module descriptions. c. and will not count towards your final degree classification.

4. These are indicated with an asterisk in section 7. Year 3 Projects Year 3 Special Projects are available in 30-credit and 40-credit versions. 7.5. BA English with Songwriting students must take WXK3299 Songwriting Project (40 credits) as a compulsory module. BA Music Technology students must take WXK3291 Music Creation Major Project (40 credits) as a compulsory module.5. Their total Project work must account for between 30 and 60 credits. BA Creative Welsh with Popular Music students must take WXC3299 Project Cyfansoddi Caneuon (40 credits) as a compulsory module. It is also possible to take a shorter Project in the following area: Add-on Project in English • WXM3275 Dissertation in Music in the Community (20 credits) 7.2 above) – WXC2187 Cyflwyniad i Gerddoriaeth mewn Iechyd a Lles A (10 credits) – WXC2186 Cyflwyniad i Gerddoriaeth mewn Iechyd a Lles B (10 credits) – WXC2191 Medrau Ysgrifennu Caneuon (20 credits) – WXC2203 Ysgrifennu am Gerddoriaeth (10 credits) – WXC2207 Harmoni a Gwrthbwynt Blwyddyn 2 (20 credits) – WXC2221 Gweinyddu’r Celfyddydau A (10 credits) – WXC2222 Cerddoriaeth yn y Gymuned (10 credits) – WXC2223 Project Celfyddydau yn y Gymuned (10 credits) – WXC2225 Gweinyddu’r Celfyddydau B (10 credits) – WXC2232 Cerddorfaeth Ffilm (20 credits) – WXC2233 Cyfansoddi Blwyddyn 2 (20 credits) – WXC2235 Cyfansoddi ar gyfer Ffilm a’r Cyfryngau (20 credits) – WXC2241 Perfformio Unawdol Blwyddyn 2 (20 credits) – WXC2252 Project Ymchwil Atodol (10 credits) BA joint-honours students must take at least one Year 3 Special Project as a compulsory module. 27 .3 below. and may be taken in the areas listed below: Special Projects in English • WXM3276 Dissertation (30 credits) • WXM3277 Dissertation (40 credits) • WXM3282 Edition (30 credits) • WXM3283 Edition (40 credits) • WXK3288 Composition (30 credits) • WXK3289 Composition (40 credits) • WXP3297 Solo Performance (30 credits) • WXP3298 Solo Performance (40 credits) Special Projects in Welsh • WXC3276 Traethawd Hir (30 credits) • WXC3277 Traethawd Hir (40 credits) • WXC3282 Golygiad (30 credits) • WXC3283 Golygiad (40 credits) • WXC3288 Cyfansoddiad (30 credits) • WXC3289 Cyfansoddiad (40 credits) • WXC3297 Perfformio Unawdol (30 credits) • WXC3298 Perfformio Unawdol (40 credits) You may not take more than one Special Project in the same area.5. Year 3 7. Students taking only one 30-credit Special Project must choose an additional 10 credits of Year 3-only modules.5.– WXK2235 Acousmatic Composition (20 credits) – WXK2236 Max/MSP Programming 2 (10 credits) – WXK2237 Music Software Minor Project 2 (20 credits) – WXK2238 Music Creation Minor Project 2 (20 credits) – WXP2241 Solo Performance Year 2 (20 credits) – WXP2243 Ensemble Performance 1 (10 credits) – WXP2244 Ensemble Performance 2 (10 credits) – WXP2247 Historical Performance Studies (10 credits) – WXJ2252 Supplementary Research Project (10 credits) – WXM2268 Recording Techniques (10 credits) Modules in Welsh – Genre and Composer Studies (see section 7. Their total Project work must account for between 30 and 80 credits.1.2. BSc Music Technology students must take WXK3290 Music Software Major Project (40 credits) as a compulsory module. Compulsory modules BA and BMus single-honours Music students must take at least one Year 3 Special Project as a compulsory module.

You must identify the module to which your Supplementary Research Project is related by Week 3 of Semester 2. Others are for Year 3 students only. and must relate to the linked module in specific ways: consult the module description for further details. 7. students must take optional modules to take their total number of credits in Music up to the required total (120 for single-honours Music students. but this must be approved by the supervisor.6.Add-on Project in Welsh • WXC3275 Traethawd mewn Cerddoriaeth yn y Gymuned (20 credits) More information on Projects can be found in section 7.6 below. with the exception of Ensemble Performance. The full list of Year 3 options available in 2012-13 is as follows: Modules in English – Genre and Composer Studies (see section 7.4. Supplementary Research Projects are only allowed in certain areas. Projects are to be submitted on Friday of Week 13 on Semester 2 (17 May 2013).3. 28 . the first ‘2’ in the module code must be replaced by a ‘3’) – WXC3187 Cyflwyniad i Gerddoriaeth mewn Iechyd a Lles A (10 credits) – WXC3186 Cyflwyniad i Gerddoriaeth mewn Iechyd a Lles B (10 credits) – WXC3191 Medrau Ysgrifennu Caneuon (20 credyd) – WXC3221 Gweinyddu’r Celfyddydau A (10 credits) – WXC3222 Cerddoriaeth yn y Gymuned (10 credits) – WXC3223 Project Celfyddydau yn y Gymuned (10 credits) – WXC3225 Gweinyddu’r Celfyddydau B (10 credits) – WXC3232 Cerddorfaeth Ffilm (20 credits) – WXC3234 Cyfansoddi ar gyfer Ffilm a’r Cyfryngau (20 credits) 7. 7. and the preferences of the tutor. and Year 3 Special Projects are also supported by a series of seminars. The frequency of your individual supervisory sessions will depend on the nature of the project. Once again. Supplementary Research Project Year 2 10 credits The Supplementary Research Project consists of an assignment related to a module you are taking in the same semester. these are marked with an asterisk in the list below. you must take the initiative in requesting supervisory sessions. the first ‘2’ in the module code must be replaced by a ‘3’) – WXK3191 Songwriting Skills (20 credits) – WXM3201 Music Analysis: Schenkerian Techniques (10 credits) – WXM3202 Music Analysis: Thematic and Semiotic Techniques (10 credits) – WXM3205 Notation and Editing (20 credits) – WXM3221 Arts Administration (10 credits) – WXM3222 Music in the Community (10 credits) – WXM3223 Community Arts Project (10 credits) – WXK3234 Composing for Film and the Media (20 credits) – WXP3243 Ensemble Performance 1 (10 credits) – WXP3244 Ensemble Performance 2 (10 credits) – WXP3247 Historical Performance Studies (10 credits) – *WXP3249 Conducting (10 credits) – *WXM3261 Editing Medieval Music (10 credits) – *WXM3267 Teaching Techniques for Solo Performance (10 credits) – WXM3268 Recording Techniques (10 credits) Modules in Welsh – Genre and Composer Studies (see section 7. in Year 3. The precise topic is to be agreed upon in consultation with the tutor of that module (who will normally then act as your supervisor for the Supplementary Research Project).4. please note that different pre-requisites will apply for each module. 60 for joint-honours students and Music Technology students). in Year 3. Year 3 Options In addition to the Project work noted above. Your supervisor will offer advice at all stages of the project.6. your preferences. Some of these modules are co-taught with students in Year 2.2 above. but you must not expect him/her to act as a ‘spellchecker’ or ‘ghostwriter’.2 above. You are very welcome to propose your own topic.1. You may not take a module you have already studied at Year 2.5. or which you have already taken in the previous semester. in which you may take up to a total of 20 credits’ worth across Years 2 and 3. All are supported by individual supervision from a staff tutor. the tutor does not take responsibility for this. Project work There are several different types of project work in the course. However.

7. • Composition: c.4. However. For more information on these requirements. depending on the complexity and pacing of the music (see module description for more information) • Other notated projects (e.As noted above.6.2. A Dissertation in Music in the Community will normally take the form of an essay of c. 18 minutes. 100 bars of music + written submission of c.3. Please see the module description for more detail. depending on the complexity and pacing of the music • Performance: recital of c.g. Areas and topics for Special Projects must be approved by the Board of Studies in Semester 2 of your second year. 7000-8000 words.6. depending on the complexity and pacing of the music • Performance: recital of c. 100 bars of music + critical commentary and other apparatus • Composition: c. . supported by seminars and individual tutorial supervision.6. 8000-9000 words • Edition: Please consult staff for guidance. As noted above. Your supervisor will advise you on appropriate extent for the work. 5-12 minutes. orchestration): c. The deadline for the complete project is Friday of Week 10 of Semester 2 (26 April 2013). the discovery of significant new materials). programme notes for Special Projects in Solo Performance must be submitted by Tuesday 19 March 2013 (Week 8 of Semester 2). 35-40 minutes (excluding breaks) + programme notes Please note that analytical dissertations may include substantial graphic and/or tabular presentations which will count in lieu of words for these purposes. 4000 words or equivalent • Editing: c.000 words • Edition: Please consult staff for guidance. 4000 words or equivalent 29 . 11. Scope: c. Year 3 Special Projects Year 3 30 or 40 credits Special Projects allow you to study topics and areas in your third year that particularly interest you. refer to the module descriptions.g. Year 3 Add-on Projects Year 3 20 credits It is possible to take an Add-on Project in the form of a Dissertation in Music in the Community.2 above). in addition. Submission arrangements are the same as those for Special Projects (see section 7. except for Projects in Solo Performance. all Year 2 single-honours students must take a Supplementary Research Project in Semester 2. The submission deadline is on the Friday of Week 10 of Semester 2 (26 April 2013). Those undertaking Special Projects in Solo Performance must give an interim performance at the end of Semester 1 and an oral presentation during Semester 2. Community Arts Project Year 2 and 3 10 credits This is available to Year 2 and Year 3 students who have successfully completed a module in Arts Administration or Music in the Community. 7. you will be required to complete additional items of work during the course of the year. In addition to the final project. the placement and the aims of the project are identified (in consultation with a member of staff) and approved early in Semester 1. Those undertaking dissertations and editions will need to complete an essay and give a presentation at the end of Semester 1. • Composition: c. 7. to the Director of Teaching and Learning. you will need to write programme notes and submit these by Monday of Week 9 of Semester 2 (15 April 2013). Application for such changes must be made in writing. 20-25 minutes (excluding breaks) + programme notes Scope of final submission in 40-credit Special Projects • Dissertation: c. Scope of Supplementary Research Projects • Prose: c.6. 22 minutes. The project is carried out in the second semester. Changes in project weighting after two weeks into Semester 1 are not normally permitted.000–12. The work is independent. 1500 words Scope of final submission in 30-credit Special Projects • Dissertation: c. giving exceptional and compelling reasons for a change in weighting (e. Those undertaking Special Projects in composition will be required to complete an interim submission at the end of Semester 2. recitals for which will be heard in Week 12 of Semester 2 (6–12 May 2013).

and a sample bibliography. Modules in Solo Performance are not available to students outside the School of Music. and the possible or likely directions of your future career. stating the following information: • Dissertation: a provisional title and brief outline. (See section 7. Auditions for Ensemble Performance in Years 2 and 3 are held in March of the preceding year. General principles In making your choices you should consider carefully the balance of your course. Module choice for Years 2 and 3 Module descriptions for the following academic year are published in March. Once you have presented your preference form in March. it is not normally possible to change your allocations. Please discuss this with your personal tutor first. A detailed proposal for a dissertation might include the works/composers you intend to study. Please note also that undersubscribed modules may not run.7.7. and is to be submitted in Week 2 of Semester 1 of your third year. Entry to certain modules is by audition. If your preferred module is already full. Auditions for Solo Performance in Year 1 are held in Welcome Week.7. Students entering Year 3 are given priority over those entering Year 2. titles of chapters. • Edition: the period and type of works to be edited.7.7. Your proposal will then be considered by members of the Board of Studies. requests for changes will be considered if they are submitted in writing to the Head of School. The Board of Studies is aware 7. Choosing modules 7. you will be allocated a place on the next available module in your ranking.5.7. you will be assigned a supervisor and you can begin thinking in earnest about the detail of your project. Owing to space and timetabling limitations.4. Choosing Year 3 Projects In choosing the area(s) for your Project(s). These may change if pre-requisites are not met in assessments carried out at the end of the year. and are required to bring their choices to the Music Office in person on a specified date. This is especially the case in Years 2 and 3. exemplary attendance records. and rehearse in advance. You must ensure that you meet the pre-requisites specified in the module descriptions. Detailed proposal The next stage is to complete a detailed proposal.2.3. usually towards the end of March. Please note also that you may follow no more than 20 credits of Ensemble Performance in total across Years 2 and 3.3 below. only joint-honours students on placements abroad will be excused from this requirement. 7. you may ask the Director of Teaching and Learning to approve your request. Writing Project proposals Brief proposal In Semester 2 of your second year. Module choice for Year 1 Year 1 students make an initial choice of modules shortly before arriving in Bangor. where most modules are capped at 20 students. • Composition: a brief outline of the type of piece(s) you intend to write and the forces you intend to use. you should check the pre-requisites stated in the module description carefully. • Performance: no proposal required at this stage. Students are informed of their provisional allocations during the third term. Modules are then allocated following the preferences marked on the form. so you are advised to form your ensemble. including the range of skills you will develop. the approach you intend to take. 7. 7.) If you wish to undertake a module for which you do not fulfil the pre-requisites. plan your repertoire. Once approved. Your presence is essential on this date. This should be done in consultation with your supervisor. you will be asked to provide a brief proposal of your topic. In exceptional circumstances. The procedures and processes for allocating modules are set out in 7.1. You should discuss your intentions with an appropriate tutor. Final allocations are made during the summer vacation. Staff will check your form while you wait. it is not possible to guarantee your first choice of modules. Students entering Years 2 and 3 are asked to rank the modules by order of preference on a specially prepared form.7. until modules are fully subscribed.7.8 below for more information on pre-requisites. This choice is then confirmed at Registration during Welcome Week. and precedence may be given to students with 30 . when you have decided what kind of Project(s) to undertake. and obtain their signature on the proposal form.

it requires ethics approval from the College of Arts and Humanities. you will need to identify an alternative module that has space to accommodate you. See section 8. However. Research projects that represent only minimal risk to subjects are usually processed significantly faster.10. If you are not granted the right to re-audition. If you are only using publiclyavailable secondary data. Changing modules If you are following a module you dislike or find very difficult.c. information sheets. questionnaires. For example. Once you have integrated your supervisor’s comments. the School Administrator will contact you to arrange registration for an alternative module.e. Some cases have been fully approved within 10 days. patients. etc. The first step is to read the ‘Ethics Approval Procedures’ and ‘Research Ethics Guidelines’ documents. For projects in Solo Performance. data that has been collected by somebody else. Some pre-requisites (especially in Solo Performance modules) involve passing a module at a certain level.jones@bangor.that the creative nature of a composition project makes it difficult to form a detailed proposal in some cases. your project does not require ethics approval (good examples are census data. Your next step is to meet with your supervisor in order to discuss the first draft of the application. documents from national archives. you need to meet with the School’s Ethics Officer (Dr John Cunningham).) should then be sent to Linda Jones. see the School Administrator as soon as possible. Completed application forms and supporting documents (e.bangor. question. you decide to change modules. after consultation with your personal tutor. you are usually required to have taken a related module in Year 1 or 2.g. your grade for Solo Performance at the previous Level will remain unchanged. and corpora like CHILDES or TalkBank). or if you are not successful in your audition. If.ac. When selecting first-year modules.) To do so. you can submit the forms for consideration by the Research Ethics Committee. Research ethics Any research project undertaken within the College of Arts and Humanities that involves human participants must adhere to the Ethical Review Process outlined in the guidelines and procedures. The audition is purely for the purposes of progressing to the next Level. Your supervisor will be able to advise you. to take a Special Project in Editing. 7.ac. Your detailed project proposal should be signed by your supervisor before submission. That audition will be held at the beginning of the new academic year. Pre-requisites All modules in the School of Music have prerequisites.uk/cah/ethics. you must have passed the module at the previous Level with a mark of 60% or higher. This applies to all staff and students (undergraduate and postgraduate). Most Year 1 modules require A-level Music or equivalent. or earlier if convenient. you should attempt to give as much detail as possible. These are specified in the module descriptions. i. you should discuss it with the module tutor and your personal tutor as soon as possible. especially when subjects include children. you need to have first passed WXM2205 Notation and Editing with a mark of 60% or above. 7. This information (and links to the supporting documentation) is available with more detail on the School’s website: follow the ‘Research Ethics’ link which can be found by clicking on ‘Research in Music’. Supervisors will advise on the level of detail required for proposals for Editing projects. For modules in Years 2 and 3.9.. you are entitled to re-audition if you wish. Special rules apply for progression to Solo Performance in Years 2 and 3.uk).8.4 (page 46) for more information. and then complete the ‘Student Application Form’: all available at www. You may be able to change modules within the first two weeks of the semester in 31 . (This is extended to three weeks for students in the first semester of Year 1. Research Administrator of the College of Arts and Humanities (l.13. 7. To proceed to the next Level. etc. you may wish to look at pre-requisites at higher levels so that you can ensure that you meet the requirements for modules you may wish to study in the future. the programme proposal (submitted in Week 6 of Semester 1) takes the place of the detailed proposal. Obtaining approval can take 4-6 weeks. If your project involves collecting primary data from human subjects. After the Ethics Officer and your supervisor agree that the documents are ready. consent form. If your mark for Solo Performance at the previous level is between 54% and 60%.

you may not write an essay and give a seminar presentation on the same topic. Information Services provide tutorials for students who are unfamiliar with computers and/or 32 . and are typically set on a weekly or fortnightly basis. recorded or electronic). Any exceptions to this rule will be clearly identified in the module description. others less so. you must gain an average mark of 40% or higher. You will encounter various types of assessment in the School of Music. you may prefer to use that. Questions and/or instructions are supplied in the detailed module information given out by the tutor in the first class. you are required to give a seminar presentation.1.8. You may invite a small audience of friends to recitals in Years 1 and 2 if you wish. you will often have a list of tasks to choose from. There are PCs available in the Music building. The tutor may ask you to submit a folder of your work at the end of the semester as part of the assessment process. Types of assessment Your attainment in each module is evaluated through the assessment of defined items of work. the tutor will evaluate your contributions to seminar discussions and group tasks. items of coursework are usually much smaller than exams. it is important that you avoid duplication. 8.1. Assignments are usually (but not always) submitted towards the end of the semester. These take place during the Assessment Period in the University’s central examinations rooms. to be submitted at a subsequent class.4 (page 36) for more information. Seminar contributions In some modules. typically towards the end of the teaching period. ASSESSMENT OF MODULES 8. which you write and present to the rest of the class. failure to do so results in the work being considered ‘late’ (see section 8. General observations Deadlines for each assignment may be found in the relevant module description. If you have your own computer. Submission must be punctual: any work submitted late will be penalised. Recitals Performance-based modules are usually assessed by means of a recital.1 on page 36). among others. Some coursework tasks may be set via the Blackboard virtual learning environment. often illustrated with visual and/or audio material. All written assignments must be word-processed.2. These are specified in the module description.2.13 (page 46) for more information on assessment of modules in Performance. Seminar presentations In many modules in Years 2 and 3. There are plenty of computers available for your use across the University. Procedure for submitting assignments and Projects 8. You may also use the computers in CR1. In order to pass a module. They may take the form of an essay. you may be eligible to enter Supplementary Assessment in the summer vacation (see section 9. some formal. Coursework Like assignments. on the third floor. This is a short talk. coursework may take any number of forms. on the first floor of the New Arts Building.4. Your presentation is to be given on the date specified by the tutor. Assignments are set at the beginning of the semester. However. or a notated item of work (such as a harmony exercise). In choosing topics for your assessed work. For instance. See section 8. Recitals for Year 3 Special Projects in Performance are given in public. usually as a means of evaluating the knowledge you have acquired over the course of the module. Class tests The assessment for some modules includes a test. a composition (either notated. Types of assessment include: Assignments Assignments are fairly large-scale items of assessed work.7 on page 49). Formal end-of-module examinations A small number of modules have formal examinations at the end of the semester. See section 8. a written report. Tutors will normally give you a choice of topics for seminar presentations at the beginning of the term. and you may be invited to suggest your own. Each module will normally require you to complete several different kinds of assessment. Programmes must be agreed in advance. or CR2. If you fail a module.

dissertations. Notation and Editing. as follows: Year 1 students submit: Prose submissions (essays. Orchestration. reports. you must also read and sign the declaration at the foot of the report form. (For further information on academic misconduct.g. Unless otherwise indicated in the module description. Sibelius or Finale) you must ADDITIONALLY submit electronically a copy of the original document (i. • the module number. with timings. Special Projects.2. Sibelius notation software is available on the computers in the Listening Room. It is important to note that work submitted incorrectly or late will be penalised. 33 .) ONE hard copy and an electronic copy ONE hard copy and an electronic copy Year 2 and 3 students submit: ONE hard copy and an electronic copy ONE hard copy and an electronic copy (see paragraph below) TWO hard copies See also the following sections below: • 8. If your assignment is on paper. where necessary – little annoys an examiner more than being unable to find the piece a student has composed! (CDs should be checked in an ordinary CD player before submission. even if it has been completed by hand. written analysis). • the module title. Acousmatic Composition. Assignments must be submitted to the assignments box outside the Music Office by 12 noon on the day of the deadline (normally a Monday or a Thursday: check the module description in each case). etc. The contents should be listed on the envelope. Please note that a PDF of all notated work must be submitted electronically. confirming that the submission is entirely your own work and does not include any plagiarism or any other forms of academic misconduct. etc. If the work has been handwritten. recorded and computer-disk submissions (e. Unless otherwise indicated in the module description.word-processing applications (such as Microsoft Word).sib document for Sibelius. This information should also go at the top of every page of the assignment itself. written analyses. attach it with a staple or paper clip (a paper clip is better if there are large pages attached. this should be in the form of a PDF. etc. but do not place it in a plastic sleeve. or a . you are strongly recommended to do so where feasible. Acousmatic Composition). and pages should be numbered. • blue for notated. as in Orchestration for example). 8. ONE hard copy — TWO hard copies and an electronic copy As regards electronic submission of notated work. Submissions in the form of computer disks and CDs should be labelled clearly on the disk itself and placed in an envelope. they will not be accepted unless they are submitted to the correct location.) Projects (Supplementary Research Projects. reports.) Notated submissions (e. you should collect a colour assignment report form from the Music Library and fill in the following information: • your full name.) This envelope should then be attached to the report form with a staple. it will be necessary for you to scan the paper copy. In addition.g. with clear details of where each piece is located.e.4 Submitting work late without an extension (page 36). Where work has been completed using music notation software (e.g. all assignments must be submitted both electronically and in hard copy.g. Tonal Studies.) Report forms are colour coded as follows: • pink for prose submissions (essays. also labelled. please see pages 51-52. See the paragraph immediately underneath the table below for more information. it is not necessary to process notated work electronically. a . However. etc.) Recorded and computer-disk submissions (e.2. The signed report form must be firmly attached to your assignment. • 8. • the date. Procedure for submitting hard copies of assignments When you have completed your assignment. Computer problems are NEVER accepted as an excuse for late submission.3 Extensions (page 35). Do not place assignments in the tutor’s pigeonhole. to ensure they work.mus document for Finale). Make back-up copies and print-outs regularly.

and post the original by recorded delivery (retaining the receipt). • A list of the assignments for that module now now appears in the right-hand window. Mozilla Firefox. click on ‘View/Complete’ below the title of the assignment you are submitting.ac.2. You should ascertain that this is indeed the file that you intend to submit. Any work submitted after the deadline will normally be penalised. click on the title of the assignment you are submitting.Assignments are collected from the pigeonholes at noon and date-stamped. You should print this out and keep it safely filed away so that you have proof that you submitted the work in the event of any technical error on the part of the system. Procedure for submitting electronic copies Assignments and Projects are to be submitted electronically via the University’s Blackboard system.uk. You will need to request permission in advance (and in writing) from the Director of Teaching and Learning. your degree.2. select the name of the module from the list of ‘My courses’. To resolve this issue. include music examples.2 (page 35) for instructions for submitting work that has been granted an extension. For notated assignments. • Type the following URL into the address bar: blackboard. The procedure for submitting work electronically is as follows: • Using a computer connected to the internet or the University network. If you are having difficulty uploading the file. The process is now complete for notated assignments. and the year clearly labelled on the spine. to arrive in time to meet the deadline. 8. Special Projects and Add-on Projects must be bound professionally (in either soft or hard binding). If permission is granted. Submission of work by post is permitted only in exceptional circumstances. Technical difficulties will not normally be accepted as an excuse for late submission. For written assignments. Monday of Week 13 – assignments may be received in one of the teaching rooms instead.uk. If this is not done. one of which will be returned to you once the assessment process is complete. or email helpdesk@bangor.2. you should keep a full copy of the work. it may be that it is too large. two hard copies must be submitted. and try uploading this version. If problems persist. (Alternatively.3. • Complete the information on the next page and choose the file that you wish to submit. click ‘Submit’. there is one further stage.2 above). launch any browser application (Internet Explorer. there is no need to 34 . a new page opens containing a ‘receipt’. This is also how Projects are submitted. so you should ensure that the work is submitted ahead of schedule. Arrangements for this will be clearly publicised on notice boards in the School of Music building.). bearing the following information: • the title of the project • your full name • the name of the institution (‘Bangor University’) • the full date of submission • the statement ‘Submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirement for the degree of Bachelor of Arts/Music/Science’ (as appropriate). because you are required to be resident in Bangor during term time (see page 20). delete any graphical material (photos. there should be a title page. Please note that for all Projects (including Supplementary Research Projects).3. Electronic submission must be completed before 12 noon on the day of the deadline.ac. • When written assignments have been successfully uploaded. See section 8. save it under a different filename. please contact the IT helpdesk on extension 8111 (01248 388111 from an outside line such as a mobile telephone). • For written assignments. 8. In addition.bangor.4. Click on ‘Assignments’ in the list on the left-hand side of the page. Once you have done this. Procedure for submitting hard copies of Projects Supplementary Research Projects are submitted in the same way as assignments (see 8. • On the next page. you can access Blackboard via the home page of the University intranet. music examples. the title of the project. On busy submission days – e. For written assignments. etc.g.) • Login using your Bangor University username and password. A preview of your assignment appears in the window. etc. • A new page opens.). open the file containing the assignment. • Click on ‘Upload’ (for written assignments) or ‘Submit’ (for notated assignments). photographs or other graphical material in the electronic submission. with your name.

8. • You should observe the ‘new’ deadline strictly and submit your work direct to the module tutor by that date. This procedure applies to main assignments for all undergraduate modules (e.g. the essay for Genre and Composer Studies. and only if you have a very good reason (e. available from the Music Library.3.). • If your module tutor grants you an extension. who will try to obtain a decision for you immediately.g. he will write a ‘new’ deadline on the form.4 below). Verbal applications and applications which do not use the official form will not be accepted.2 above (page 33). you must also ensure your work is submitted electronically.3. serious illness). including those that are also submitted electronically. except that you should submit the extension form directly to the module tutor. and the work will be awarded 0%. Extensions 8. you will still need to see the School Administrator.4. rather than to the Senior Tutor or the School Administrator. Please note. Do not place it in the module pigeonhole or in the tutor’s pigeonhole. Requesting an extension for an assignment or Project N. In fact. The usual penalties for failing to submit electronically will still apply. If the extension is granted. a doctor’s note). ‘B X’.g. however. Requesting an extension for a piece of coursework or a presentation N.3. attach a completed and signed report form as instructed in section 8. you should submit your form in person to the School Administrator. You should take along any supporting evidence (e. When your work is returned to you. This is simply for our records. If you do not attach the extension form.B. or the weekly coursework for Harmony and Counterpoint. and return it to you. You should then see the School Administrator. e. 2. An application for an extension must normally be made not less than 48 hours in advance of the deadline. etc.1 on page 36).the assignment will be penalised in the same way as any other late submission: it will receive 0%. • You should use the official extension form.3. These are usually set by the module tutor. etc.1.B. Applications submitted after the deadline are not valid. with the extension form attached. If the Senior Tutor is not available. 8. and (in the case of coursework) submitted in class. on the official form (available from the Music Library). with the extension form (and any doctor’s certificates) stapled to it. and submit it by hand to the School Administrator. and for any notated assignments that have been processed using a computer. that only the Senior Tutor is able to grant you an extension. he will probably be able to give you a decision immediately. the work will be assumed to be late. or the main ‘end of semester’ assignment for Tonal Studies. If you see the Senior Tutor in person to submit your extension form.3. 35 . who will countersign the form. Electronic submission is compulsory for all written assignments. the work must also be submitted electronically.g.g. The procedure is exactly as in section 8. Where required. you should apply to the Senior Tutor for an extension. If circumstances prevent you from completing an assignment or Project on time. You are required to submit hard copies of all assignments. You should not assume that you will be granted an extension. sign it. To reiterate: the hard copy must be submitted directly to the School Administrator.3. and you will be penalised (see section 8. Please note: • You will normally still be required to provide medical or other evidence (see section 8. Important reminders: 1. extensions are granted very rarely. the presentation for Genre and Composer Studies. the grade awarded will be followed by ‘X’. It also applies to Projects. You should inform your module tutor that you are applying for an extension. • Where required. 8. Procedure for submitting assignments that have been granted an extension You should complete the work by the ‘new’ deadline. to have your extension form counter-signed. This procedure applies to coursework and presentations for all undergraduate modules (e.2.1 above. and does not indicate a penalty.).3.2.

2. In certain circumstances the Board of Examiners reserves the right to lift the penalty. It is important to note that late work will still be marked. and School of Music staff are not authorized to override them. in case you run into difficulties.or 40%. or need to seek advice from a member of staff. Submitting work late without an extension 8. prevent you from gaining a degree at all. 8.1. A piece of work carrying 0% may severely affect your profile for the module concerned.uk/regulations for details).4. please consult the Director of Teaching and Learning. Low marks in the second and third years can affect the degree class you are awarded. the lateness will be noted in the same way.bangor.4. If you are ill you should attach a copy of your doctor’s certificate to the extension form (you should always keep a copy for your own records). For example. staff will record on the report form the standard of the work (in grade form).4. or. you may receive a piece of late work which is marked ‘C+ LL = F(3)’. In the following circumstances an extension will normally be granted: • Serious personal illness. 8. you should bear in mind the acceptable and unacceptable reasons for requesting an extension outlined above. though of C+ standard. If you need clarification of these rules. the degree of lateness (L for up to 1 week late. and continue to improve. When the Examiners meet at the end of the semester. Start work for large assignments in plenty of time.3. the mark will be capped at D. It is therefore important that you submit your work even if you have missed the deadline. with a doctor’s certificate (a self-certified medical note will not normally be accepted) • The death of a relative or close friend • Serious family problems such as divorce. Ways to ensure that your work is submitted on time It is vital that your work is submitted on time. and the actual grade awarded. you may be asked to provide evidence before an extension is granted. This means that the work was C+ standard but has been capped F(3) because it was submitted over 1 week late. If it is submitted within 1 week of the deadline. the work will be awarded F(3) or 0%. so.g. When the work is marked. If your difficulties are personal rather than medical. failure of modules may prevent you from continuing with your degree (see the Code of Practice for Assessment of Students at http://www.ac. The following reasons for requesting an extension are NOT acceptable. you should make back-up copies and print hard copies regularly. they will be aware of the standard of any late work. so that you can assess your progress. separation or eviction.4. use a diary and plan your work schedule carefully. If you have been granted an extension. computers and studio equipment. Penalties ANY WORK SUBMITTED AFTER THE DEADLINE WITHOUT AN AUTHORIZED EXTENSION WILL BE PENALISED. the work receives a mark of D-). cannot get access to the relevant materials. If you are refused an extension and disagree with the decision. The failure of electronic equipment is not accepted as a valid reason for late submission. and of the degree of lateness. e. and reinstate the grade the work itself is worth. C+ X L = D. and no extension will be granted: • Having examinations • Having other work to do • Not having access to a computer • Having computer or printer problems • Being on holiday • Not being able to find any/enough books on the subject • Not having enough studio time • Having technical problems in the studio Please note that these rules are part of the University’s regulations.(which means an extension was granted but the ‘new’ deadline was missed by less than 1 week. LL for over 1 week late). you should put your case to the Head of School in writing. In the first and second years. 36 . However.8. Acceptable and unacceptable reasons for requesting an extension The extension form asks your reasons for requesting an extension. but have not met the ‘new’ deadline. Setting and submission dates are advertised well in advance. in extreme cases. If it is more than 1 week late. When using word processors.

Completing work in Welsh for Englishmedium modules 8. this will need to be done at least two weeks in advance of the date of the presentation. Keeping copies of assessed work Systems are in place to keep track of all work submitted in the School. different penalties may be applied to work that is too long or too short. In assignments and Projects that include original research (such as some ethnomusicological topics). Any penalties that differ from the above systems will always be clearly set out in the module description. 8. allowing time for applause where appropriate. etc. for compositions and performances. B+ to B) 8. Indeed. or given to him/her directly on a disk. Work that is significantly longer than the length specified in the module description will be marked on the basis of the standard attained. questionnaires. You should not include time spent off the stage (such as a short interval in a Year 3 Solo Performance Project recital).g. You may find that you have several main assignments due in at the same time.) as an appendix. Do not count words in the bibliography or in those appendices where the material is supplementary to the essential text. You should inform the module tutor of your intention by week 3 of the semester at the very latest. 8.2 Seminar presentations Welsh speakers following English-medium modules are also welcome to give their seminar presentations in Welsh if they wish to do so. you should include gaps between movements and pieces.) • • 20%-30% too long: reduction by 2 grades (e. Lack of studio time is not accepted as a valid reason for late submission. you are advised to complete at least some of your Semester 1 assignments before Christmas.6. Length guidelines and penalties for work that is underlength or overlength Length guidelines are given for all assignments and Projects in module handouts. For this reason you are required to keep a good copy of ALL work you submit. include in the main text only those extracts or quotations which are really essential for the examiner to read. The file(s) will need to be emailed to the tutor. He/she may request an electronic copy of your script and handouts so that translation can be arranged.g. it is unlikely that it will fulfil the intellectual or creative requirements of the assignment.Students undertaking work in the studios should book slots well in advance. Non-Welsh-speaking staff will need to arrange to have the work translated. Written work Welsh speakers following English-medium modules are welcome to submit assessed work in Welsh.g. length guidelines are usually given in minutes.6.5. In particular. if the work is significantly too short. so that he/she can make suitable arrangements for assessment. B+ to C+) No explicit penalty is applied to work that is underlength. (Please note however that Projects cannot be submitted in advance of the advertised submission date. so it is important that you inform the tutor that you intend to complete the work in Welsh well in advance. In assessing word-count for written submissions. including footnotes and appendices which are essential to the understanding of the assignment or Project (and which the examiner will therefore have to read). 37 . 8. but on rare occasions a piece of work may be temporarily mislaid. In assessing lengths for performance recitals. It is important that your work is the correct length.7. if you have several assignments due in at the beginning of January. you must resist the temptation to delay working on them until the Christmas vacation. The following criteria are normally applied in deciding the penalty: • • up to 10% too long: no penalty 10%-20% too long: reduction by 1 grade (e. you should count all the words that the examiner will need to read. this usually takes the form of a word count.1. where the brief of a particular assignment is to write or compose to a very precise length).g. You MUST plan your work in advance. you are encouraged to present evidence (interview transcripts. B+ to B-) More than 30% too long: reduction by 3 grades (e. and to submit them before you leave at the end of term. In some circumstances (e.6. but that mark may then be penalised. For written work. However. and it is therefore very likely to receive a low mark.

On occasion. In the case of essays requiring close discussion of a particular repertoire. websites should be used with extreme caution. however. which the tutor will fill with any work that he/she is still marking. You are likely to be asked to submit coursework. Work for each separate module should be submitted in a cardboard wallet file (NOT a ring binder). you should be well on the way to answering the question. assessed assignments. articles and the internet). making notes as you go along. it is good to read as widely as you can around the subject of the essay. Wallet files will be handed out at the beginning of each module. you will be expected to demonstrate a good knowledge of the subject. Failure to submit all the requested material will normally result in your work being penalised. and express your findings in a clear and intelligent manner. The required content of the module folder will be stated either in the module handout. overlook titles that have been put on Short Loan – these are usually the most relevant sources. In general. Your written work should demonstrate that you understand the material you have studied. and begin by thinking about what you will need to do in order to complete the assignment.g. Once you have made some observations of your own.1. you should listen to the work(s) carefully (probably several times). Deadlines for the submission of Year 1 folders may differ from those noted above. Year 1 students may also be asked to submit folders for some modules.9. and 13 May 2013 in Semester 2). You will probably come across other things you had not thought of.8. and examine the score(s) closely. and report forms from practical tests. expected of you. presentation scripts. books. and then to progress to more detailed. Preparatory research and note-taking The first stage should always be to familiarise yourself with the music under discussion. taking notes as you go. you may be asked to submit an empty folder. In most modules. subject-specific books and articles. Module folders are then retained by the School until the end of the academic year. you should begin by identifying the types of questions you need to address. An hour spent browsing the shelves in the Richards Room can result in some very serendipitous discoveries too. When you have done this. Do not. using the library’s online reservation system to ensure that the books are available when you need them. and you are advised to use them to keep your coursework in good order. 8.9. clearly labelled with the module code and title and your full name. You must be present in Bangor on these dates.9. structure your own arguments. and that you have fully assimilated the information you have found. Plan your work well in advance. This does not mean simply regurgitating material derived from other sources (e. What sort of things will you be writing about? Will you need to discuss specific pieces of music? Are you required to give your own opinions? What kind of information will you need to find. Submission of module folders at the end of each semester In Years 2 and 3.2. or on a cover sheet and check list which will be given to you when the folders are handed out at the beginning of the module.8. Advice on undertaking written work 8. you are required to submit a folder for each module at the end of each semester. as well as an ability to think critically. It is likely that much of what you read in books and articles will corroborate the observations you have already made yourself. the same is not true of material posted on the internet. In the case of more theoretical essays. A frighteningly large proportion of websites are therefore misleading or simply incorrect. and how will you go about looking for it? The Learning Outcomes listed in the module description will help you to work out what is 38 . so that External Examiners may moderate your work. Whereas books and articles are read and checked by teams of experts before they are published (making it difficult for inaccuracies to find their way into print). You may identify some particularly interesting (or 8. It is often best to begin with standard works of reference such as The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians. Detailed bibliographies may be found at the end of each article in The New Grove. and module tutors often distribute lists of recommended reading at the start of the semester. Module folders are submitted on the Monday of Week 13 of the relevant semester (14 January 2013 in Semester 1. Any such requirement is stipulated in the module description. The School will allow you an opportunity to view your work and read any feedback on a specified date within 3 weeks of the end of the assessment period. Where to begin Read the question or title carefully.

date and place of publication. a contemporary description of an historical event). as the following examples indicate: • ‘According to Reck’s definition. you should never blindly accept what you have read. (Do not just copy out music examples used by other authors. go back to the score and select your own. Instead.9. Make sure that the points you make are all directly relevant to the question and that you clearly explain their relevance: you will gain no credit for going off on tangents. or • as direct evidence of someone else’s ideas or opinions. Never use quotations just for the sake of it.4. make sure that you write down all the information you need to be able to cite the sources fully and correctly in your footnotes. (Note that indenting the paragraph is not the same as applying centre-justification to it. You may find that an author expresses a view or opinion that is different to your own. and how you want to conclude it. Some of your observations may be strengthened by including music examples. debate. (At the simplest you may want to outline your intentions in the introduction. Develop this skeleton into more detailed notes for each section. Once you have completed your listening. the title of the book or article. 39 . but there are other approaches.g. A good essay will demonstrate your own thought processes.) Finally. opinions. If this happens. and it is worth taking some time to identify appropriate excerpts. which carries very serious penalties (see pages 51-52). or for stating the obvious. and be ready to reorganize them so that they make a coherent series of observations which follow on from one another and combine to make a convincing argument. If you are including a brief quotation ‘place it in quotation marks’.9. evaluation. Failure to do so constitutes PLAGIARISM.9. more than one line of text).) If you make use of material taken from other sources (quotations. the score of the work under discussion) and check to see whether or not you disagree. There are many ways of acknowledging your sources.) 8. the title of book. instead. Planning and writing the essay Think of your essay in terms of argument. you should decide how you want to introduce the essay. which will allow you to support your arguments.’ • ‘An example given by Whittall refers to …’ In addition. even just other authors’ ideas). 8.6 below. When you take notes from books or articles.g. (Brief advice on how to lay out footnotes is given in section 8. Furthermore. make sure that you clearly differentiate between your own words. You will almost certainly find factual information of a historical or contextual nature. you should go back to the original material (e.) Other observations may be backed up with quotations from or direct references to books and articles. sources should be precisely identified each time you use them by inserting a FOOTNOTE into the essay. you should not rely too heavily on other sources. However. or as a means of stating factual information. (For a book. give yourself time to think about the issues raised by the question. stating the name of the author. A good essay will present differing interpretations or points of view. this information would include the name of author. and draw together your main points in the conclusion. set it in smaller type and indent it as a separate paragraph like this.e. Plan out the main points of the essay using headings and sub-headings.3. you must always remember to ACKNOWLEDGE THE SOURCE. and those which are directly copied from the author. informed and multi-faceted discussion – it should not be just a straightforward account or a one-sided discussion. or • where the quotation supports your own arguments. the place and date of publication. reading and study for the essay. or • as historical evidence (e. Using quotations Quotations should be used • as something for you to comment on or discuss. and the number of the page(s) on which the original information is found.controversial) comments that you can quote in your essay. and the number of the page from which you are making notes. If it is a more extended quotation (i. together with supporting arguments for each. a musical instrument is …’ • ‘Griffiths suggests that Stravinsky’s late works look back to the Renaissance …’ • ‘Jones describes how among the Aboriginal peoples of north-western Australia …’ • ‘Wolff proposes that the Brandenburg Concertos were composed in Weimar.) Do not include quotation marks.

Items within works (e. In addition. 1980).’ for ‘pages’) – not ‘pg’. 6 May 2005. Music examples should be headed as Ex. 1924). except for footnotes and quotations. ‘The nocturnes and studies: selected problems of piano texture’. ‘Agony and ecstasy’. (Again. The order is important.kevin-ho. but not in bibliographies. pp. The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians (London. <http://www.htm>. as is the punctuation and the use of italics and brackets. note the use of Roman numerals – cxxviii – to identify the volume number. 2001). write them out in full (‘do not’. bibliographies and discographies All first-year Music students receive full advice on laying out footnotes and bibliographies in the core module The Study of Music.). 30-70. Avoid contractions like ‘don’t’. and make sure all the pages are securely fastened together with a staple or paperclip.g.1476959. Journal of the Royal Musical Association. but formal style. ‘Continuo’. • Steven Jan. last accessed 4 July 2012.B. p. Always proof-read your work from a hard copy rather than from the screen. articles.6. where appropriate. 1976).) Internet sources: • Stephen Everson. 2001). book: Trevor Herbert. Check your spelling and syntax carefully. the ‘iv’ refers to the volume number.guardian. Page numbers should be included in footnotes. However. 152. and you should identify the source of the example as precisely as possible (giving the bar number and. When citing sources in footnotes and bibliographies. (Advice on laying out the bibliography is given below.12102. avoiding overuse of the first person.com/Text/ archiv_mus_mahler. The following examples should serve as a reminder. Every essay must include a bibliography (and discography. The Musical Times (Summer 2003). Items should be listed in alphabetical order according to the surname of the author.). 143-65. Johann Sebastian Bach: The Learned Musician (Oxford. which should be single-spaced. ‘The Mahler revival’. (N. Note that Special Projects must be bound (see section 8. ‘can’t’.9. Chopin Studies (Cambridge. The same applies to titles of books (italic) or articles and chapter titles (‘in quotation marks’). last accessed 28 June 2012.00. miniature score (London: J. acknowledging the source of the quotation. in Stanley Sadie (ed. ‘and’).) Articles in journals: • Peter Holman. you are expected to use the standardised layout shown in the examples below. 1). ‘1st’ and ‘&’. iv. 1988). 1 or Example 1 (not e. 685-99. so you need to communicate your subject and argument as directly as possible.co. 196.html>. ‘first’. Scores: • Manuel de Falla. and never rely on your computer’s spell-checker. 13-22. specifying the instrument playing). p.uk/arts/fridayreview /story/0. The abbreviation ‘p. • Kevin Ho. (In the last example. • Christoph Wolff. Avoid colloquialism and slang. Write in a clear. cxxviii (2003). where appropriate) which lists all the books.) Articles or chapters in multi-authored books and encyclopaedias: • Zofia Chechli!ska. in Jim Samson (ed. 8. scores and recordings you have consulted in preparing and writing it. 8. ‘cannot’. Books: • Charles Rosen. pp. you should avoid writing a series of short sentences. Proper titles of complete works (or albums) should appear in italic (The Rite of Spring). composer or artist. <http://www. ‘The Evolution of a “Memeplex” in Late Mozart: Replicated Structures in Pamina’s “Ach ich fühl’s”’. ‘Did Handel invent the English keyboard concerto?’. Chester.5. Other matters relating to style and presentation All written work must be DOUBLE-SPACED.2.’ should be used for ‘page’ (and ‘pp. Laying out footnotes.) You should number each page.9. Do not make your sentences long and convoluted: be ready to divide a long sentence into two.g. El amor brujo. accessible. Music in Words (London. Guardian Online. individual arias within an opera or songs featured in an album) normally appear within quotation marks (‘The Dance of the Chosen One’). you are advised to refer to advice in the following 40 .And do not forget to provide a footnote. instead.4 above). pp. and W. • Peter Williams. provide a wordcount at the end. London. The Classical Style (revised edition. Remember that your words will be read by someone else. pp.

Study Skills website Further generic advice on undertaking written work may be found at the University’s Study Skills website (studyskills. • Purcell. 436 992-2. Compact disc. normally within 10 working days. Assignments completed at the end of the semester are retained by the School. and decide how many words to devote to each issue. Parlophone. scores.8 on page 38). is it clear? Is it in the right order? What challenges am I making to my listeners to force them to address questions and think about issues? A dummy run spoken to a friend or into a voice recorder can be very helpful.) Sort out the order in which you need to raise each issue. Do not assume you will be able to use the photocopier immediately before the class.7. If you do not receive feedback within a reasonable period of time. with at least brief comments. Assignments Mid-semester assignments are normally returned to you within three weeks of submission.uk). Compact disc. or (if at the end of the semester) within 3 weeks of the end of the assessment period. Chorus and Orchestra of The Academy of Ancient Music.11.• G. 41 . Christopher Hogwood. You are expected to submit the materials used for the presentation (including any handouts or transparencies you have used) to the module tutor immediately after the presentation. including a provisional grade. 8. Dido and Aeneas. 1994. 1992). Use short sentences. and a provisional grade if applicable. Handel. CDP 7 46442 2.bangor. Calculate how many words you will have time to say in your presentation (work on the basis of 100 words per minute delivery). Return of marked work Coursework All coursework will normally be returned to you within two weeks. but you are given an opportunity to read any feedback. Recordings: • The Beatles. Make sure that you choose a large print size (24 to 30 point if you are preparing it on a word processor). a report form will be issued to you with a provisional grade.8 above (page 38). A handout can be useful. Module tutors will be happy to advise if you do not understand anything relating to the comments you have received or the marks you have been awarded. approach the module tutor in the first instance but bear in mind that work submitted at the end of the semester will be retained for longer (for second marking and for scrutiny by the External Examiners). journals. and the order of the series of points relating to each issue. Messiah. He/she may stop you before you have finished if your presentation exceeds the time allocated. Personal tutors and the Director of Teaching and Learning may also be consulted on such matters. Sgt. 1967. Ask yourself. though you may use notes or bullet points if you prefer. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. think about the way it will come across to your listeners. 8. see section 8. especially as a way of making clear the headings you want to address. and recordings you need for preparation. (You may find it helpful to raise them as questions with yourself.ac. even if you do not refer to them as questions in the presentation. This is vital for the examination and assessment process. Observe the time limit the tutor has set. together with a report on the standard form.9. Advice on giving a seminar presentation Before you start. If you need to photocopy handouts and prepare overhead transparencies on the Music Office photocopier. edited by Watkins Shaw (revised edition. vocal score. 8. Practical tests Where the assignment takes the form of a practical test. It may help to script your text. and your grade may be affected if you have not made the relevant points. L’Oiseau-Lyre. make sure that you are clear what topic you are required to address and how long the presentation is supposed to last. Be clear about the specific issues you wish to address. please do so well in advance. F. Make sure that you have – or know where to find – all the books. Overhead transparencies or PowerPoint slides can also be helpful. As you write.10. Limit yourself to one or two sides of A4. London: Novello. but do not prepare one just for the sake of it. Please ensure all materials are also submitted in your module folder at the end of the semester (see section 8. Soloists.

12. inability to address the topic. These are: • categorical marking. in modules in Solo Performance. Any mark may. the mark will be limited to this level by such things as: mere repetition of information without demonstration of real understanding. weak and confused discussion which demonstrates serious misunderstandings or ignorance. for instance. and in class tests where answers are clearly correct or incorrect. Categorical mark A** A* A+ A AB+ B BC+ C CD+ D DE F F(1) F(2) F(3) Percentage range 100% 90%-99% 84%-89% 78%-83% 70%-77% 67%-69% 64%-66% 60%-63% 57%-59% 54%-56% 50%-53% 47%-49% 44%-46% 40%-43% 35%-39% 30%-34% 10%-29% 1%-9% 0% Fail Degree classification 8. reliance on previously gained knowledge (for example at ALevel) which has not been re-negotiated.2. inability to distinguish the relevant from the irrelevant. poor expression. Explicit Marking Criteria: general principles Examiners formulate a grade for each piece of work by means of the Explicit Marking Criteria laid out below. Failure usually comes from insufficient study.1. Third Class: D. and. illiterate writing. at the discretion of the Board of Examiners. Explicit Marking Criteria for Musicology Fail: E and below (0%-39%) Failure at honours level comes automatically from: plagiarism.to D+ (40%-49%) The crucial achievement is demonstration of a basic grasp of what the topic is about. However. despite other aspects of the work being of the quality of a lower category. Total marks for entire modules are always expressed in percentages. lack of footnotes/endnotes (except in the rare cases where footnotes/endnotes are not required). But sometimes there will be an overlap to some extent – an exceptional achievement in one characteristic might just merit a mark in a higher category. scrappy presentation. this is the case. inability to grasp ideas. The three systems are interrelated. seriously defective bibliographical or footnoting skills. 42 . lack of a bibliography (except in the rare cases where a bibliography is not required). sorted into a coherent order and Upper Second Class Lower Second Class Third Class Fail/Pass degree In the School of Music. It may also be the result of passive and inaccurate reliance on your sources. expression of unexamined value judgements. as shown in the following table. for Year 1 and Year 2 modules.to C+ (50%-59%) The main quality which warrants marks in this category is the amassing of a reasonable body of relevant material drawn from a fairly wide range of reading or other forms of information retrieval. confusion of argument which indicates a failure to properly understand the material. most individual items of work will be returned to you with a categorical mark. knowledge and/or understanding. and the sort of material involved. • degree classifications. ignoring teaching and handout instructions. by the Senate Examinations Board. inclusion of factual errors. First Class 8.12. Grades and marks 8.12. All grades are provisional until verified by the Board of Examiners.8. you will receive a percentage mark instead. while your overall mark at the end of the course will be graded in terms of a degree classification. Lower Second Class: C. On occasion.3.12. or the provision of an obviously bogus bibliography. failure to fulfil the module’s stated learning outcomes. The qualities which are looked for in each successive category are progressive – Upper Second Class work will have Lower Second Class qualities as well as those which earned the Upper Second Class mark. be moderated at any time up to and including the final examiners’ meeting of the academic year. • percentages. Grading systems The University uses three systems for grading your work.

Upper Second Class work may contain many of the same qualities which apply in First Class work. some basic. Explicit Marking Criteria for Composition Fail: E and below (0%-39%) Failure at honours level comes automatically from: plagiarism and/or failure to fulfil the module’s stated learning outcomes. attempts to achieve musical shaping and control phrases. Third Class: D. as opposed to straightforward diligence. Compositions in this category usually exhibit a majority of the following: an indistinct and/or ineffective global structure. limited evidence of serious thought. sonorities or textures. sustained and coherent discussion. variability in the appropriateness of the use of instrumental. pacing. though with some significant lapse. gestures. insufficient knowledge or understanding of compositional technique. Work at this level will probably demonstrate initiative in carrying out research beyond the obvious sources. 8.and A (70%-83%) The distinguishing quality is evidence of real intellectual and independent thought in a sustained discussion. musical ideas few and/or of questionable value. gestures. ability to identify and rigorously confront problems in the topic. and/or unfamiliarity with (or unwillingness to engage with) relevant contemporary repertoire. tempo. First Class: A+ to A** (84%-100%) Work at this level is highly original and of a standard that attains or closely approaches professional standards.12. indications of wide knowledge beyond the narrow confines of the topic addressed. or argument which is defective in some way. and will be of such a quality that it either stands up to publication in its submitted state or has the potential for publication with presentational amendments.to B+ (60%-69%) The distinguishing quality is the ability to construct focused argument which is properly evidenced. the conveyance of a general knowledge and understanding of the topic as a whole.4. Lower Second Class: C. limited evidence of a broad knowledge and understanding of the topic. sonic and/or technological resources. The work will therefore probably demonstrate the ability to understand the discussion of a work of art and to apply that knowledge to different works. or of continual. competent bibliographical and footnoting skills. Factors which may limit a mark to this level include: a simplistic or over-complex global structure not supportive of or supported by the material of which it consists.to C+ (50%-59%) The main quality meriting a mark in this category is the creation and technical realisation 43 . effective communication of ideas and argument. limited or defective bibliography or footnotes. dynamics. observational and analytical skills of a high order. though not always successful. and materials that may need some revision to be of practical use in performance. sonorities and textures. inappropriate and/or ineffective use of instrumental. mostly inadequate presentation and/or materials which would present very significant problems in performance. vocal. Qualities which limit the mark to this level are: incoherent arguments. ability to bring together material from disparate sources. or the work may be outstanding in one First-class characteristic but significantly deficient in another. and of a more detailed knowledge and understanding of specific areas. ability to evaluate critically sources used. uncontrolled change suggestive of randomness or disorganised thinking. very little discernible musical argument. limited understanding of ideas or argument. with the potential of musical ideas left largely unexplored. ability to see problems and contradictions within source reading. Upper Second Class: B. displayed either through excessive use of verbatim and redundant repetition with little sense of direction or purpose. articulate expression. vocal. technique restricted to a rather basic level. but they will be demonstrated at a less independent level. poorly judged combination. very few genuine musical ideas. contradictions in texts. or lacunae in available evidence. pacing. little evidence of an attempt to control or shape phrases. an obvious imbalance of unity and diversity.to D+ (40%-49%) The crucial element is the creation of musical ideas. musical argument only intermittently discernible with only limited exploration of materials. inappropriate and/or poorly executed technical means. the ability to employ knowledge to illuminate musical texts. an imbalance in unity and diversity at the expense of sustained interest (especially through uncritical repetition of material verbatim).expressed intelligibly. The work will demonstrate in a consistent manner all of the features listed in the A-/A (70%-83%) category. sonic and/or technological resources. Failure usually comes from insufficient time given to work on the composition. juxtaposition and relationship of ideas and materials. mostly adequate presentation. skills in observation and analysis. tempo. dynamics. First Class: A.

dynamics. The composition exhibits a majority of the following: a well articulated and effective global structure. In undergraduate performance studies. occasional inappropriate use of instrumental. confident. evidence of acute sensitivity to the effectiveness of. a clearly discernible musical argument. dynamics. such that interest and coherence are sustained throughout. missed lessons and/or a lack of progress in following your teacher’s instructions. dynamics. and assured control over. This mark can be limited to this level by weakness in technique. presentation of a good standard. with excellent attention to detail and full consideration of the practicability of performing materials (whether for live performance or the realization of electroacoustic presentation). sonorities and textures. sonic and/or technological resources. sonorities and textures. Third Class: D.12. Lower Second Class: C. and the combination. issues in coordination with an accompanist and poor presentation (stage presence). mixed success in the effective juxtaposition and relationship of ideas and materials. good sensitivity to the shaping of phrases. tightly constructed global structure. sonorities and textures. sonic and/or technological resources. some imbalance in unity and diversity (especially though overuse of material without development). musical ideas conceived and articulated with evident flair and imagination. First class: A+ to A** (84%-100%) Compositions in this category would be convincing and credible within a programme of professionally composed works. constructed through the exploration and development of musical ideas and materials. with good attention to detail and some evident consideration of the practicability of performing materials. phrasing and memorisation of music or text. Explicit Marking Criteria for Performance Fail: E and below (0%-39%) Failure is the direct result of inadequate preparation and inability to present your recital programme at an appropriate standard. intonation. lack of 44 . such that the composition achieves a good degree of interest and coherence. 8. technical realisation and organisation of imaginative musical ideas to create an aesthetically convincing overall outcome. technique solid but not always assured and fluent. distinctive. engaging and aesthetically satisfying overall outcome through sustained musical imagination and technical command.to D+ (40%-49%) Demonstration of a basic grasp of technique and stylistic awareness appropriate to the repertoire chosen. some aspects of musical ideas left unexplored or under-developed. Some qualities which will limit the mark to this level include technical inaccuracies. a cogent. some presentational lapses.5. sonic and/or technological resources contributing to creative ends.to B+ (60%-69%) The distinguishing quality is the creation.and A (70%-83%) The distinguishing quality is the creation of a compelling. gestures. vocal. tempo.of musical ideas to achieve an effective overall outcome. Marks in this band will only be awarded in exceptional cases in which the composition offers an utterly compelling musical experience achieved through real creative originality combined with an absolutely assured technical realization. You will fail if you do not display sufficient preparation required to coherently play through the pieces that were set by your teacher and deemed appropriate for your level of development. diction (singers). projection. juxtaposition and relationship of ideas and materials. with some limitations as to the practicability of materials in performance. First class: A. tempo. vocal. vocal. unity and diversity well balanced. intermittent lapses in the cogency of musical argument. invention present but limited. and some degree of originality. Upper Second Class: B. imaginatively conceived and articulated musical ideas. this will be due to poor technique because of insufficient practice and discipline or inability to eradicate bad habits. creative and idiomatic use of instrumental. pacing. stylistic awareness and consideration of interpretative decisions. intermittent and limited musical shaping and control of phrases. inaccuracies in rhythm or conveying tempi. limitations of dynamic control. constructed through the exploration and development of the full potential of musical ideas and materials. appropriate and effective use of instrumental.to C+ (50%-59%) This category is awarded for a coherent presentation of a performance showing technical preparation. tempo. Factors which may limit a mark to this level include: a global structure not always fully supportive of or supported by the material of which it consists. assured use of appropriate technical means. impressive presentation. The composition exhibits a majority of the following: a coherent. pacing. fluent and discerning use of appropriate technical means. gestures. convincing and sustained musical argument. pacing. an entirely appropriate (but not necessarily equal) balance of unity and diversity. dynamics and other details. the shaping of phrases and gestures. showing an appreciation of their overall effect on the musical outcome.

missing bars or whole passages. Failure may be the result of severe shortcomings in the transcription of the musical notation (e. be limited to this level by such things as: frequent shortcomings in the transcription of the musical notation. the following criteria apply in addition to those for musicology for the prose elements of the edition (see section 8. based on a expert description and transcription of the sources and a comprehensive critical apparatus.6. An edition at this level will essentially be publishable as it stands. yet deficient in another. inconsistent. presentation. In addition. lack of a critical apparatus. evidence of a lack of background research into the repertoire performed. clefs or transpositions) or seriously inadequate and thus undecipherable music typesetting.and A (70%-83%) The distinguishing quality is the accomplished presentation of a musical text and critical apparatus based on a full understanding and a convincing as well as intelligent evaluation of the sources. First class: A+ to A** (84%-100%) This category will be awarded in the exceptional case should the performance exceed the criteria listed under A-/A (70%-83%). inadequately reasoned editorial decisions. incomplete or inadequate description of sources. the work may be outstanding in one category. critical apparatus) and will show thorough research. The result will show a very solid technical standard. the candidate will demonstrate compelling performance ability approaching professional standards exemplified by readiness for the international competition stage. Qualities which limit the mark to this level are: occasional flaws in the transcription of the sources and their typesetting/presentation. Upper Second Class: B. failure to properly address the relationship of the sources. Upper Second Class: B. notation.original thought as portrayed by aiming for a purely technical proficiency or imitation of interpretative decisions made by other performers instead of showing original intent. The work will be flawless or near flawless in all technical aspects (transcription.g. clearly developed creative understanding and the ability to make original and convincing interpretative decisions in a compelling and expressive performance. It will be flawless in every aspect of editorial technique. All issues arising from conflicting readings or illegible passages will be resolved convincingly and imaginatively.12.12. comparison and evaluation of the sources. Lower Second Class: C. some shortcomings in the description. initative and originality in discussing the sources and their relationship. consistent misreading of rhythms. typesetting.to D+ (40%-49%) The crucial achievement is demonstration of a basic grasp of technical/notational skills and the rules of source philology. Third Class: D. however. successful use of rhythmic and dynamic control as creative communication. Explicit Marking Criteria for Editing For editions. In addition to the qualities required to achieve a first-class grade. However. The musical text and the critical apparatus contain only minor errors. comprehensively argued and well presented. the student will demonstrate a high level of technical competence. First Class: A. notation and presentation.to C+ (50%-59%) The main quality which warrants marks in this category is the adequate presentation of a musical text. consistent flaws in the typesetting and presentation of the musical text.and A (70%-83%) The main quality is evidence of independent thought and background preparation that includes knowledge of the historical issues and performance practice concerns in repertoire studied. and respect for the composer’s intentions. poorly presented and/or incomplete critical apparatus/list of variants. some lack of argument or lacunae in the critical apparatus/list and evaluation of variants.to B+ (60%-69%) The distinguishing achievement is the ability to present a secure and focused performance that demonstrates original thought in addition to technical control and consideration of performance practice aspects. the mark will 45 .3 above). Fail: E and below (0%-39%) Failure comes automatically from: lack of a description of the sources used. The work will convey a full understanding of the sources and their relationship. First Class: A. based on a complete description and transcription of the sources and a competent critical apparatus. complete lack of arguing editorial decisions or understanding of the relationship of the sources. it 8. First Class: A+ to A** (84%-100%) Work of this calibre will display all qualities of First Class work to an exceptional degree. Work at this grade may contain many of the same qualities which apply First Class work.to B+ (60%-69%) The distinguishing quality is the fully satisfactory presentation of a musical text. demonstrating a wide knowledge of relevant philological issues..

2. 8. facilities for the playback of a backing track). Furthermore. you should write to the School Administrator. 8.will analyse and present the sources. You will have an opportunity to rehearse with the accompanist beforehand.g.g. WXP3297.4. traditional and rock music If you plan to perform any jazz. The proposal must also state if you require any technical equipment for your recital (e.13. Special procedures for modules and projects in Solo Performance Certain additional procedures apply if you are studying modules in Solo Performance (WXP1016.1. you must inform the Head of Performance of your requirements by Week 6 of the semester in question. see section 8. If you are taking a Year 3 Project in Solo Performance and feel you have good reason to request additional rehearsal time with the professional accompanist. Rehearsal allocations are published in the module descriptions. their relationship and their variants in an original and entirely convincing fashion.13. The School of Music cannot 8. Programme proposals 8. If you are studying Solo Performance in Years 2 or 3 (but not Year 1). For jazz.13. and then put your request (and reasons) to the Head of School. Note that it is your responsibility to ensure that the timings in your proposal are accurate. The deadlines for programme proposals are as follows: • Solo Performance Year 2 (WXP2241 or WXC2241): Thursday 6 December 2012 (Week 10 of Semester 1) • Year 3 Special Project in Solo Performance (WXP3297. substandard accompaniment is likely to affect your marks detrimentally. 8. Technical requirements If you require any technical equipment for an assessed performance (e. If you wish to arrange your own accompanist (or any other accompanying ensemble). a solo part alone will not be acceptable). WXP3298 or WXC3298). by week 8 of the semester at the latest. Submitting scores (or equivalent) All students taking Solo Performance modules (in any year) are required to submit a score (or other appropriate notational representation) of the music they will play in the test/recital to the Music Office by the last working day before the test/recital.13.5 below (page 37). you will not be examined. If you fail to meet this deadline. Approval of a proposal does not mean that the timings have been verified. Students in Years 2 and 3 should include this information in their programme proposals (see 8. setting out the proposed change and giving your reasons. for the reproduction of a backing track). but you should discuss this in advance with the Head of Performance.3. WXC3297. you will be required to submit your complete programme proposal – with timings for each piece – for consideration by a subgroup of the Board of Studies.13.13. You must submit a full score (including the accompaniment. the name of the composer. rock or traditional styles you may instead submit a detailed lead sheet. Changes are not normally permitted after that date. Performance of jazz. traditional or rock music as part of any assessed performance. WXC2241. 8. you should be aware that examiners may stop any recital that overruns by more than 10% of the specified length. and so your fellow musicians should be of an appropriately high standard. you must inform the Head of Performance of your intention in writing by Week 4 of the semester in question. in writing.4 below). Penalties may apply for a recital that is too long or short. you should discuss the matter with the Head of Performance first. Requests must be received by Friday of Week 1 in Semester 2 (1 February 2013). contribute towards the cost if you choose to use your own accompanist(s). WXC3297 or WXC3298): Thursday 8 November 2012 (Week 6 of Semester 1) If you find at a later stage that there is good reason to change your programme slightly. WXC1016. This is so that the School can ensure that there is a qualified examiner available. WXP3298. and the 46 . The copy should be clearly labelled with your name. Accompanists A professional piano accompanist will be provided for practical tests and recitals.13. a rehearsal schedule is published in the period before the tests. you must details (including names) to the Head of Performance for approval by Week 6 of the semester. WXP2241. You should note that other musicians’ contributions to your recital form an inherent part of your performance. This requires careful thought and planning and you should ensure that you discuss it thoroughly with your teacher during your first lessons of the new academic year.5.

examinations and seminar presentations If you miss a formal examination. In the case of a missed seminar presentation.6. If this proves impossible.14. You will therefore have to re-sit the module. These must be set out in a specified format (Times New Roman. In Semester 2. all other work (including coursework. In addition. Given the extent to which assessment methods in the School require you to be visible (in performance recitals and in seminar presentations. assignments and projects) is to be labelled with your full name. Seminar contributions If you miss a class in which informal contributions are assessed. Notification of overall results for modules Overall results for modules are expressed in percentages. you should inform the module tutor as soon as possible. Programme notes Students taking a Year 3 Project in Solo Performance must also write programme notes. 8. This is at the discretion of the module tutor. See section 9. 47 . other means of assessment will be arranged. 8. The work will still be awarded 0%. you may be asked to submit a complete script (not notes or bullet points) to the School Administrator within 24 hours of the time of the class. 8. You should note that if you miss an assessed test for certain Performance modules without good reason. which are assessed as part of your recital. for example). If you have a bona fide reason for your absence.14. the copy may be retained until the end of term for the use of the External Examiners. page 51).2.16. If you know in advance that you will be absent from a test or examination. 8. the tutor may give you some alternative work to complete. 8.6. Tests. Alternatively. Semester 1 Provisional results for modules completed during Semester 1 are released by Week 4 of the second semester. this approach maximises consistency and fairness. and the School will also arrange for notes in Welsh to be translated into English.13. If you have a bona fide reason for absence from an assessed test. Absence from assessments 8. you may be required to enter Supplementary Assessment in the summer vacation.title of the work. Depending on your overall result for the module. You are reminded to avoid plagiarising other sources (see section 10 below. Further advice on the writing of programme notes will be given during the course of the module.14. examination or seminar presentation (supported by a relevant medical certificate or similar documentation) you will not be penalised for missing it. but you may be given an opportunity to give the presentation at a later date. single-spaced) and submitted electronically via Blackboard by Monday of Week 9 of Semester 2 (15 April 2013). you will receive 0% for that element of the module. you should contact the module tutor as soon as possible. Please note that these results are provisional until ratified by the External Examiners (Years 2 and 3) and the Senate Examinations Board (Years 1 and 2). you may be able to redeem marks by attending another seminar group. Every effort will be made to reschedule the assessment. It also enables staff to give feedback which is individually tailored to meet your needs – both in written form and in person.1. No results are released at this stage for modules that continue into Semester 2.15. 14 point. Semester 2 Results for all modules completed in Semester 2 (including modules that run across both semesters) are released in July. The programmes themselves will be printed by the School. They are released via Bangor 360.1 (page 49) for more information about this. you will be awarded 0% for the entire module (because some of these modules are assessed on the basis of one test only). a pass list of Year 2 students eligible to proceed to Year 3 is posted in the School of Music on or before the last day of the summer term. in which case the tutor may allow the mark to stand. Anonymity The School of Music operates a system of student anonymity in formal examinations only. assessed test or seminar presentation without good reason.

and from Level 5 to Level 6 In order to progress to the next Level. If you fail to achieve this. • For single-honours students and BA/BSc Music Technology students. If you fail with average marks below 25% in all modules and marks below 40% in modules worth 80 credits or more. • For single-honours Music students (BA and BMus) and BA/BSc Music Technology students. these correspond to one another as follows: • • • Level 4 = Year 1 Level 5 = Year 2 Level 6 = Year 3 (or Year 4 for joint-honours courses with Modern Languages). • Interviews are never used to depress marks already achieved. • At least 80 credits must be passed at 40% or higher. all 120 credits taken at Level 5 contribute 33. you will not be entitled to progress to the next Level. 9.2.7 (page 49) for more information on Supplementary Assessment.1. • All core modules must be passed at 40% or higher.33% of your final result. BA single-honours students have the option of nominating 20 credits of ‘elective modules’ which are not included in the calculation of your degree classification (see section 7. Modules taken at Level 6 carry twice the weight of Level 5 modules. 48 . Progression from Level 4 to Level 5. but proportionately at a lower level than your Level 6 modules. If you fail the year with an average mark across all modules of 25% or higher. your marks will remain as previously fixed. Please note: • An interview is used only to ascertain that due consideration has been given to any mitigating circumstances that may have affected a student’s performance. 9. PROGRESSION AND DEGREE CLASSIFICATION This chapter of the Handbook refers to HE Levels rather than Years.33% to your final degree class. • For BA joint-honours students.67% of your final degree class. the Board of Examiners may choose to interview the student concerned at the very end of their final year. The Board of Examiners will around that time post a timetable for any interviews on the notice board at the foot of the stairs.4. Third-year students and taught postgraduates are therefore asked to be present in the Music Building at around 11am on that morning. • If you are invited to an interview and do not attend. As noted in section 6. Modules taken at Level 5 count towards your degree. you may in very rare circumstances be eligible for Supplementary Assessment. Calculation of degree classifications No Level 4 module contributes to your final degree classification. Any such interviews are normally held on the penultimate or last day of the summer term (this will be confirmed during the summer term). all 120 credits contribute 66. Minimum attainment at Level 6 In order to be considered for a degree.4. • All core modules must be passed at 40% or higher. you are entitled to undertake Supplementary Assessment during the summer vacation with the aim of redeeming enough marks to enable you to proceed to the next Level.67% to your final result. and with marks below 40% in modules worth no more than 70 credits.9. 9. • No remaining modules may have a mark below 30%. • For BA joint-honours students. all 60 credits taken in Music at Level 5 contribute 16.2 above. your attainment at the preceding Level must match all of the following criteria: • The average across all modules must be 40% or higher. the 60 credits taken in Music contribute 33. • Each interview will be conducted in either Welsh or English as appropriate. you must have attained the following at Level 6: • At least 80 credits at Level 6 must be passed at 40% or higher. See section 9. 9.3 above).3. Interviews If there is any residual uncertainty about special circumstances which may have affected a student’s performance.

late in the afternoon on the penultimate or last day of the summer term. If you originally failed the module because of penalties applied to work submitted late. you may not be eligible for Supplementary Assessment. 9. It shows student names and the degree classes they have been awarded. as the results are dependent on results being released from other Schools. to Blackboard) by a specified deadline in mid-August. available at http://www.3. in late June. If you do NOT wish to have your name published on the class list. In certain circumstances (for instance. where required. 9.9.1. to undertake a practical test. 9. Publication of pass lists 9. This includes fees (for Halls and your course). Even if you do enter Supplementary Assessment.e. It is not normally possible to publish degree classes for joint-honours. Occasionally. if the original submission would have scored less than 40% even if it had not been late. or submit the work in person. if the work you have submitted for Supplementary Assessment brings your mark for that module to 50%. you may be required to be present in Bangor on specified dates in the summer vacation. specifying the work you are required to complete for your Supplementary Assessment. a revised version of it). It is therefore very important that you make every effort to pass all modules at the first attempt.7.2. or to complete a set task (e. Work completed as Supplementary Assessment must be submitted to the School of Music Office (and. Payment of debts Students will not be permitted to graduate until they have paid all fees and fines owing to Bangor University. achieved a minimum of 40% in each Level 5 Music module taken). It simply shows the names of those who have satisfied the examiners in all their Level 5 Music modules (i. Notification of your degree classification will be posted to your home address (or an alternative address if you specify one in your letter) on the morning of Monday 10 June 2013. You will also receive a letter from the School of Music. it may be possible for you to resubmit the original piece of work (or. please inform the School Administrator in writing by Friday 10 May 2013. you will receive only 40%. 9. In other words.6. Normally. and who have therefore met the requirements to progress to the next academic year. At Level 5. if you fail a large number of modules). an alternative piece of work will be set (for example. letter from the Academic Office in early July informing you of this. Having your name excluded from pass lists Data Protection regulations allow you to choose to have your name excluded from these lists. Supplementary Assessment If you fail the year but are eligible to enter Supplementary Assessment. but it is your responsibility to ensure that the work reaches the Music Office by the deadline. Work received after the deadline will receive 0%.5. You may submit work by post. You will receive a breakdown of your results at the same time as the other graduands. The criteria for determining eligibility for Supplementary Assessment are specified in University’s Code of Practice for Assessment.g.6. at Level 5 the overall mark for the module will still be capped at 40%. However. you may be required to write a short essay in lieu of giving a seminar presentation).ac. Students who have failed the year will not appear on the list (even if they are eligible for Supplementary Assessment).6. you will receive a 49 . you will be required to resubmit items of work that received a mark of less than 40%. to sit a formal examination. It is recommended that you use registered post. fines (for late registration and library fines) and any money owed to the School of Music. you should nevertheless complete all items of work to the best of your ability. Level 5 pass list The Level 5 pass list is normally published at the end of the penultimate or last day of the summer term.6. Music Technology work to be done in the Studios).uk/regulations. the maximum mark that can be received in a module for which you have entered Supplementary Assessment is 40%. BA and BMus pass list The BA and BMus pass list is normally posted on the notice board at the foot of the stairs. Sometimes.bangor. A separate list will show the names of those who have between 30% and 40% in no more than 40 credits. Music Technology and English with Songwriting students at this stage.

Queries relating to results and the Appeals procedure Queries relating to results should be addressed to the Head of School in the first instance. 50 .bangor.ac.uk/regulations. The University’s Verification and Appeals procedure may be consulted at www.8.9.

Read them and be aware of them so that you do not fall into this trap and suffer the consequences. The following are examples of academic misconduct. ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT (CHEATING) Academic Misconduct is defined by the University as any attempt by a student (or any attempt by an individual to aid a student) to gain an unfair advantage in any assessment by deception or fraudulent means. rather than by examinations. copying from another student. claiming false extenuating circumstances to obtain exemption from penalties relating to late submissions misconduct in tests or exams: this includes the use of crib notes in the examination room. the performance of a piece in a practical test which you have played in a previous test. All written assignments are now automatically submitted to the TurnitinUK service. and presenting the result as your own unaided work commissioning another person to complete work and submitting it as your own computer fraud: the unacknowledged use of another author’s material available in digital form (for example. or e-mail list. the usual form of cheating . the use of material taken from an essay written in a previous year.is plagiarism. or for a previous qualification (including A-level). It is viewed very seriously by the School of Music and by the University as a whole. as your own. to gain more favourable marks) collusion: working with others without authorisation. reports. Welsh-speaking students should be particularly aware the translating from a source in English does not constitute rewording. sitting an examination on behalf of another student. plagiarism: the representation of another person’s work. or asking someone to do this for you.10. CD or record notes. or it may be in the form of lecture slides. The School regards any such misconduct as a serious breach of trust. website. handouts or notes. or Internet materials. or it be from a published source such as books. taking any stationery from an examination room. to gain advance knowledge of examination questions. and is a variety of unacknowledged paraphrasing. The work may belong to another student. except where this is expressly permitted) false declarations: e.when it occurs . the use of the same material in a presentation and an essay for a module. • • • • • • aiding and abetting dishonest practice bribery: offering financial or other inducement to another student or to a member of staff in order to gain an unfair advantage (for example: to obtain a copy of another student’s work. which provides staff with detailed printouts of sources used and the degree of plagiarism. 51 . without acknowledgement. and staff are very vigilant.g. journals. material from a CD-ROM. leaving the examination room to look at notes. • • • As the majority of Music modules are assessed by coursework and assignments. or any material downloaded from the internet and used without proper acknowledgement) duplication: the inclusion of material which has already been submitted for another assessment in the University or elsewhere (e. Plagiarism can take several forms: • copying: more than a single phrase from another text • translating: taking someone else’s work written in one language and translating it into another • unacknowledged paraphrasing: slight rewording of text without acknowledgement of the author • unacknowledged summarising: slight rewording and reducing to fewer words without acknowledgement of the author • taking ideas: presenting someone else’s ideas or train of thought as your own.g.

It is better to incur late penalties for work which is your own than to resort to plagiarism. In short. the awarding of 0%) for the entire module in question • cancellation of the candidate’s marks for the module and the reduction of the degree result by one class • cancellation of the candidate’s marks for the academic year and the disqualification of the candidate from any future University examination. Any suspected academic misconduct will be investigated thoroughly. with a requirement to re-write the work for a maximum of 40% • cancellation of the candidate’s marks (i.bangor. and by inserting quotation marks around any phrases directly quoted]. The last penalty meant the student leaving Bangor at the end of three years without a degree. By cheating you are letting yourself down. and proven cases are dealt with very severely.e. 1977). or other forms of cheating. 4-5: Plagiarism may take the form of repeating another’s sentences as your own. Do not take the risk – DO NOT CHEAT! The University regulations concerning Unfair Practice (another name for academic misconduct) are available at www. Each time you submit an assignment you will be asked to read and sign a declaration to confirm that the work is your own. or even presenting someone else’s line of thinking in the development of a thesis [or essay] as though it were your own.ac.g. Theses and Dissertations (New York. to plagiarise is to give the impression that you have written or thought something that you have in fact taken from another. Any member of the academic staff will be pleased to advise you if you need further clarification regarding plagiarism or other forms of academic misconduct. copying.e. and you should never be tempted to do so.uk/regulations. the awarding of 0%) for the assessment component in question (e. There is no excuse for cheating. adopting a particularly apt phrase as your own. 52 .The following definition of plagiarism is taken from the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers. even if you are under pressure to produce several items of work by a strict deadline. Although a writer may use other persons’ words and thoughts they must be acknowledged as such [by the use of appropriate references. a plagiarised essay) • cancellation of the candidate’s marks (i. paraphrasing someone else’s argument as your own. You should note that penalties actually used in recent years include the following: • written reprimand.

write to the Director of Teaching and Learning or the Senior Tutor for permission (see page 20). If you know in advance. 5. Borrow notes from another student and try to catch up. you should get a doctor’s certificate and • Please note the examples of acceptable and unacceptable reasons for requesting an extension. It is better to receive a low mark for this than to be awarded D. and submit it directly the Music Office. 53 . If you are likely to miss a deadline. What happens if I have to go home in an emergency? Occasionally family circumstances may mean that you have to be away from University for a short time. Take particular care with symptoms of meningitis. If the work will be late because of other mitigating circumstances. Ask the lecturer for copies of handouts and work set. a Hall warden). even if you were absent. and to advise you on time management. 6. there is no point in applying for an extension (see page 36 for examples of acceptable and unacceptable reasons for requesting an extension). In addition. What if I miss a lecture or seminar? • • • • Complete an absence form as soon as possible (see page 20). If you are ill for longer (more than 3 days). attach a copy of your doctor’s certificate to the extension form (a ‘self certificate’ will not be accepted). Instrumental/vocal lessons are as important as lectures. If your work is likely to be late without good reason. submit a copy to the School Administrator. If you are ill for a short time you can deal with your absence as outlined in the answers to questions 1 and 2 above (unless you miss a deadline). owing to illness or other mitigating circumstances? • Apply to the Senior Tutor for an extension in advance of the deadline. attach evidence or a letter of explanation. you should leave a message on the Music Office answering machine (01248 382181). • • • 2. complete the work by the ‘new’ deadline (entered on your form by the Senior Tutor). How can I avoid submitting work late? Please read the advice on page 36. What if I miss an instrumental/vocal lesson? You should make every effort to contact your teacher in advance. What should I do if I am ill? See a doctor if necessary. 1. You should aim to submit the work by the deadline. you should inform the School Administrator and module co-ordinator immediately.(40%) or F(3) (0%) because the work is late without an authorised extension (see page 36 for details of the penalty for late work). see the important information on page 47). If the work will be late because of illness. Where appropriate. Remember you must complete any work set. If an extension is granted.g. and cost the School of Music a substantial sum of money. your personal tutor or the module tutor may be willing to help you plan your work schedule. even if it is not entirely finished. If you cannot contact your tutor straight away. If you are likely to miss a test or examination.11. with the extension form (and any doctor’s certificates) stapled to it. unless illness or other mitigating circumstances prevent you from doing so (see question 5 below). 3. It should be submitted on time. printed on page 36. you should apply to the Senior Tutor for an extension (see question 5 below). Students who repeatedly miss lessons without explanation and good reason risk failing the module and being barred from studying Performance modules in future years. you should let someone in Bangor know where you will be (e. and then contact your tutor by phone as soon as possible. If you missed giving a seminar presentation. 4. using the form available from the Music Library (see pages 35-36). What should I do if my work is likely to be late. you must also submit the work electronically (see page 34). If you have to leave in an emergency. FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS These answers are not comprehensive and in each case you should consult the more detailed advice on the pages noted.

He/she will put you in touch with the Dyslexia Unit. 13. What should I do if I have to leave University? This is rare. If you need help urgently. you should discuss it with the module tutor and your personal tutor as soon as possible. Staff should respond to all emails within 24 hours. you should receive an out-of-office reply. you may ask the Senior Tutor to assign you a new one. you may then invoke the Student Grievance Procedure (see page 16). You may have to change your module choices if the clash cannot be resolved. See page 31 for advice on changing a module. What should I do if I have a timetable clash? See the School Administrator immediately. 11. see the School Administrator or ask any member of staff. 12. What should I do if I cannot find my personal tutor or another member of staff? If you need to see your tutor or any other member of staff and he/she is unavailable. The University imposes strict deadlines on the changing of modules. and with your personal tutor. and if you leave it too late you will not be permitted to change. What should I do if I am getting low grades? Try to identify the reasons for this. If they are unavailable for longer. but there can be many varied reasons which cause a student to leave University. The Head of School will also offer advice. What should I do if I suspect I am dyslexic? See your personal tutor immediately. What should I do if I feel that I have not been fairly treated by a member of staff? You may discuss the matter with the Head of School. What if I don’t like a module? If you are following a module you don’t like or find very difficult. See page 16 for sources of advice and support outside the School of Music. The Dyslexia Unit may arrange for you to be tested. Do not hesitate to discuss these with your personal tutor. Take examples of your work to your personal tutor. 14. arrangements can normally be made for you to return at a later date to complete your studies. What should I do if I have a problem I cannot discuss with my personal tutor? You may consult any member of staff with whom you feel comfortable.7. or any other member of staff. If you experience difficulties in communicating with your tutor. You should discuss your work with the module tutor. send him/her an email. If the matter remains unresolved. 9. 54 . 8. 10. If you have to leave. and for you to receive any support you need.

professional bodies and student representatives in course design o Utilising a range of modes of course delivery Ensure that we engage with you promptly and proactively by: o Providing clear information about your modules and course / research programme o Communicating with you as quickly and effectively as possible o Setting a clear deadline for the provision of feedback on academic work o Giving you advance notice of your timetable and any changes to it o Responding to any complaints promptly and fairly Ensure that your environment is inclusive. welcoming and supportive by: o Providing appropriate academic and pastoral support. including the opportunity to participate in the Bangor Employability Award scheme o Providing access to careers advice and publicising employment opportunities Ensure that through our bilingual policy you can choose to: o Study wherever possible through the medium of Welsh o Submit assessments and receive feedback (wherever possible) through the medium of Welsh. irrespective of the language of tuition o Have access to support services through the medium of Welsh o Interact with the University through the medium of Welsh o Learn Welsh or further develop Welsh language skills through classes and specific modules • • • • • 55 .APPENDIX THE STUDENT CHARTER BANGOR UNIVERSITY: Our commitments to all our students: To help you make the most of your time at university. relevant and research-led by: o Regularly reviewing our modules and courses to ensure quality in delivery and content o Seeking advice from employers. disability and financial advisory services o Fostering cultural wealth and community involvement o Fostering a safe environment. we will endeavour to: • Ensure the highest possible standards of teaching and learning by: o Providing an excellent academic programme inspired by the latest top-quality research o Providing quality teaching. free from negative discrimination or harassment. based on mutual respect Ensure that you are prepared for employment and lifelong learning by: o Helping you to develop skills to support your learning and employability o Giving you opportunities to develop your employability. o Ensuring ready access to general information about the university and its organisation o Ensuring easy access to counselling. learning and research facilities o Supporting an active Course Representative system o Regularly asking for and responding to your feedback o Regularly asking for and responding to feedback from independent external sources o Operating an effective system for assuring academic quality and standards o Providing relevant staff development Ensure that our curriculum is flexible.

student societies and volunteering projects o supporting and providing activities that further your extra-curricular skills and contribute to your employability • • BANGOR UNIVERSITY STUDENTS: Your commitments to the University: To help you make the most of your time at university. should you feel you need it o Making full use of our personal tutor system Act responsibly by: o Abiding by all university regulations o Treating our diverse student and staff community with courtesy. independent advice and guidance service. join and lead athletic union clubs. Assist and support you with academic issues by: o Operating a free. you are encouraged to: • Take an active part in your learning community by: o Attending all timetabled sessions o Reading your course and module handbooks o Preparing for classes and reading set texts in advance o Undertaking independent study and engaging in research o Participating fully in group work whether face-to-face or on-line o Completing and handing in your assessments by set deadlines o Collecting your marked work promptly and reflecting on feedback to improve your future work o Taking advantage of opportunities to participate in extra-curricular activity and work experience Give us feedback and information by: o Making use of opportunities to provide us with feedback o Regularly checking your University e-mail account and Blackboard o Keeping your personal information up-to-date Seek support and advice when you need it by: o Keeping us informed of anything that is affecting your studies so that we can support and advise you o Proactively seeking personal support. o Ensuring that everything we do upholds our commitment to equal opportunities and our diverse student body. including when using social media o Respecting your environment on and off campus and being considerate towards the local community to which we all belong • • • 56 . dignity and respect.BANGOR UNIVERSITY STUDENTS’ UNION: Our commitments to all our members: To help you get the most from your time at University. o Campaigning on issues relevant to you by gathering evidence and proactively seeking your views on our work. o Working with the Postgraduate Students Forum to represent postgraduate students Support your personal development by: o Providing you with the opportunity to create. o Facilitating a University-wide Course Representative system and providing adequate training for these representatives. we will: • Represent you effectively by: o Employing elected student officers who work full-time to extend and defend your rights as students at the University.

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tutor meetings. or if you are experiencing difficulties with your work.10 of this handbook. you will be informed of these in writing. • You must take the initiative in arranging to see members of staff for supervision sessions. • You must abide by University regulations (which you may consult at www.uk/music) under ‘Information for Students’. seminars. you must submit an absence slip (see section 6. Halls of Residence. You must read section 10 of this handbook (pages 51-52) very carefully. and can be reached via the Music home page (www. you must take responsibility for the following: • You must read this handbook carefully. • You must be resident in Bangor or the immediate surrounding area during term time. This must be done via the School Administrator. • You must ensure that you are registered for 120 credits of modules. • You must respond promptly to any requests for information from the School or the University. once a day.5 of this handbook for more information. • You must inform the School of Music and the University immediately if there are any changes to your contact details (including your mobile telephone number).6 of this handbook). If you do so. .bangor.ac. • You must submit all assessed work on time and in the correct way(s). • You must check your pigeonhole and your University email account regularly – at the very least.ac. See section 6.g. Please note: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information in this Handbook is correct at the time of going to press. • You must take full responsibility for the security of your own personal belongings and any items belonging to the School (including musical instruments). • You must not engage in academic misconduct. IT Services. This document is published for information only and does not form part of any contract. The Undergraduate Course Handbook is also published online.uk/regulations).). The School of Music cannot accept responsibility if a student is unaware of the rules and regulations in force in the School because he/she has failed to read or understand it. • You must read and abide by the School’s Health and Safety Policy. • You must attend all lectures. • If you miss a class owing to illness or personal circumstances. at the earliest possible opportunity. the penalties are extremely severe. and also electronically via Bangor360. supervisory sessions and instrumental/vocal lessons for the modules on which you are registered. etc. and consult a member of staff if you require any clarification of its contents. illness or personal issues affecting your work. Requests to be absent must be made well in advance. See section 8.bangor. • You must inform the School about any disability.YOUR RESPONSIBILITIES As a student in the School of Music. See section 4. and take full responsibility for catching up on missed work.2 of this handbook. All students registering for a module in Music are expected to read and abide by the rules and regulations given in this handbook. If any amendments are made. and any regulations set by departments within the University (e.