You are on page 1of 4

All about the Girl from Ipanema

Manuscript of "Garota de Ipanema" and Héloise Pinheiro.


The legend
IN 1962, ON her way home from school Héloisa Pinheiro regularly passed the Bar Veloso on Rua
Montenegro in Rio de Janeiro's fashionable Ipanema district. The composer Antonio Carlos Jobim and poet
Vinícius de Moraes, who were collaborating on a musical comedy, were hanging out in the bar. Every
afternoon they watched her pass by, and were inspired to write "Garota de Ipanema". Later Jobim said, "She
had long, golden hair, these bright green eyes that shone at you and a fantastic figure: let's just say that she
had everything in the right place. ..." [Harold Emert, Insight Guide to Rio de Janeiro pp. 138-139] Now the
street has been renamed "Rua Vinícius de Moraes" and the bar, "A Garota de Ipanema". But heartbreakingly
beautiful girls still walk by every day. . . .
The truth
It has already been explained, but people find it hard to accept the truth: Jobim and Vinícius did not write
"The Girl from Ipanema" | "Garôta de Ipanema" in the Veloso bar (today called Garota da Ipanema), which
was on the street that used to be known as Rua Montenegro and is now Rua Vinícius de Moraes, at the
intersection with Rua Prudente de Moraes (no relation). It was never the duo's style to write music sitting at a
table in some bar, although they had probably spent the best hours of their lives in them. Jobim composed the
melody meticulously on the piano at his new home in Rua Barro da Torre, and it was originally intended for
a musical comedy entitled "Dirigível" | "Blimp," which Vinícius already had worked out in his head but had
not yet committed to paper. Vinícius, in turn, had written the lyrics in Petrópolis, near Rio, as he had done
with "Chega de Saudade" six years earlier, and it took him just as much work. To begin with, it wasn't
originally called "Garota da Ipanema," but "Menina que passa" | "The Girl Who Passes By," and the entire
first verse was different. As for the famous girl, Jobim and Vinícius did in fact see her pass by as they sat in
the Veloso bar, during the winter of 1962— not just once, but several times, and not always on her way to
the beach but also on her way to school, to the dressmaker, and even to the dentist. Mostly because Heloísa
Eneida Menezes Paes Pinto, better known as Helô, who was eighteen years of age, five feet, eight inches tall,
with green eyes and long, flowing black hair, lived in Rua Montenegro and was already the object of much
admiration among patrons of the Veloso, where she would frequently stop to buy cigarettes for her mother—
and leave to a cacophony of wolf-whistles.
—Bossa Nova: The Story of the Brazilian Music That Seduced the World, by Ruy Castro, Pp. 239-
240."Garôta de Ipanema" was first recorded by Pery Ribeiro in 1962.
Called Bar Veloso in 1962, now called “Bar Garota de Ipanema”
The girl? Yep. She's real.
From Bossa Nova: “The Story of the Brazilian Music That Seduced the World”, by Ruy Castro
"As for the famous girl, Jobim and Vinícius did in fact see her pass by as they sat in the Veloso bar, during
the winter of 1962— not just once, but several times, and not always on her way to the beach but also on her
way to school, to the dressmaker, and even to the dentist. Mostly because Heloísa Eneida Menezes Paes
Pinto, better known as Helô, who was eighteen years of age, five feet, eight inches tall, with green eyes and
long, flowing black hair, lived in Rua Montenegro and was already the object of much admiration among
patrons of the Veloso, where she would frequently stop to buy cigarettes for her mother—and leave to a
cacophony of wolf-whistles."

Heloísa Eneida Menezes Paes Pinto, better known as Helô then


This is Helô today. She even has her own website; http://www.garotadeipanema.com.br

Tall and tan and young and lovely,


The girl from Ipanema goes walking,
And when she passes each one she passes goes "a-a-ah!"
When she walks she's like a samba that,
Swings so cool and sways so gentle,
That when she passes each one she passes goes "a-a-ah!"
Oh, but I watch her so sadly,
How can I tell her I love her?
Yes, I would give my heart gladly
But each day when she walks to the sea,
She looks straight ahead not at me
Tall and tan and young and lovely,
The girl from Ipanema goes walking,
And when she passes
I smile, but she doesn't see,
She just doesn't see,
No she doesn't see
This document was created with Win2PDF available at http://www.win2pdf.com.
The unregistered version of Win2PDF is for evaluation or non-commercial use only.
This page will not be added after purchasing Win2PDF.