You are on page 1of 17

FURNITURE

Furniture can be a product of design and is considered a form of decorative art. There are several types of furniture - residential; lodging; food service; office/administration; maintenance/warehouse; recreation; medical; educational; religious, and squadron operations. Furniture should be purchased for its functionality, durability, and aesthetic features. Furniture can be made from many materials, including metal, plastic, and wood. Furniture can be made using a variety of woodworking joints which often reflect the local culture.

SHELF IN WOOD, STEEL, PLASTIC AND FABRIC

Wood furniture is made of various tree woods, such as- Shegun, Gamari, Shal, Mango etc. Among these names, Shegun and Gamari wood are the most preferred woods for furniture. Gypsum Board furniture are the cost-effective way to achieve the impression of wood furniture. For furniture made of GB, veneers are used for decoration. Veneers are thin sheets of wood that are glued to base materials, then stained and finished. At present, another cost-effective way for wood furniture is to import from China. For these imported furniture, they are either made of softwoods which are evergreens, like-Spruce, Cedar etc; or hardwoods which are deciduous, like-maple, oak etc. Softwoods are used for residential grade Furniture, while hardwoods are used to construct seating frames, base cabinetry, and solid furniture. Hardwoods make good surface finishes.

Wood

Veneer Board

Particle Board

MDF Board

Ply Wood

Ply wood refers to a laminated wood-panel construction used to gain the advantage of stability, strength in both directions, and greater resistance to checking and splitting. Modern plywood panels also make possible the use of thin veneers producing a consistent matched appearance impossible in solid wood. Solid wood will vary greatly in color and grain direction, while thin veneers are consistent in grain and color since they are cut from the same piece of wood.

“Ply wood is a wood panel product made by bonding veneers together under heat and pressure, usually with the grain of adjacent piles at right angles to each other. High density overlay (HDO) is a wood panel product that has a resin- fibre overlay on both sides, providing a smooth, hard, abrasion-resistant surface.”(ching)

Ply Wood Ply wood refers to a laminated wood-panel construction used to gain the advantage of

Ply wood Appearance Grades:

Softwood panels:

N

For natural finishes

A

Smooth face suitable for painting

B

Utility panel

Hardwood Panels:

Premium (A) slight imperfections only

Good (1) Sound (2) For natural finishes Smooth for painting
Good (1)
Sound (2)
For natural finishes
Smooth for painting
Ply wood Appearance Grades: Softwood panels: N For natural finishes A Smooth face suitable for painting

Gypsum board-often called drywall or plasterboard-consists of a gypsum core surfaced with paper or other covering material. It may be finished by painting or by the application of ceramic tile or a flexible wall covering.

Major types of gypsum board include:

Regular gypsum board for interior walls and ceilings

Moisture-resistant gypsum board used as a backing for ceramic tile in high-moisture conditions

Fire-resistant (type-X) gypsum board used in fire resistant construction

Pre-finished panels are also available in a variety of colors, textures, and patterns

Gypsum board -often called drywall or plasterboard-consists of a gypsum core surfaced with paper or other
Veneer
Veneer

The veneers used for plywood vary in thickness from about one-twentieth of an inch to one-eight. Veneers are cut three ways: sawing, rotary cutting, and slicing.

Sawing: Sawn veneer is produced in long strips by sawing, as its name implies. These veneers are about one- eighth of an inch thick. This method is seldom used today.

Rotary-cut veneer is made by placing the log in a lathe and rotating it against a knife. The wood is un-peeled in one continuous sheet, like the peeling from a huge pencil sharpner.

Veneer The veneers used for plywood vary in thickness from about one-twentieth of an inch to

Sliced veneers are produced by moving a log against a heavy knife. The longest slicer presently in use is about sixteen feet long, which is the maximum length of a veneer (however, the average flitch size is usually much shorter). It is also possible by the use of end matching to give the veneers the appearance of great length. The sheets of veneer cut from a log are called a “flitch”.

Sliced veneers are produced by moving a log against a heavy knife. The longest slicer presently
Sliced veneers are produced by moving a log against a heavy knife. The longest slicer presently