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ROSHELLE BORN

BORN
05|06 UNIVERSITY OF WI-MADISON
B.A. Art History + Business Marketing [May06] GPA 3.8/4.0
UW-Madison Graduation
with Distinction Illumination: Undergraduate Journal of the Humanities
Marketing Director, Founding Member [Sept04- May05] Art Editor [May05-May06]
UW-Madison Porter Butts Collaborated with six other students and faculty for the formation of a high quality, bi-annual humanities
Creative Arts Scholarship publication, designing print + online formats, + an art gallery space.
Awarded annually to a student
who has exhibited outstanding Wisconsin Union Galleries
leadership in the arts Associate Director of Marketing [May04-June06] Art Director [Sum05] Curator [Spr05]
Volunteer Project Designed print + digital advertisements as well as sought unique, alternative outlets to pique the interest of the
Manager Village of the Arts + community + press for monthly exhibitions.
Humanities, Philadelphia Installed exhibitions with an interest in how art + space work together to engage viewers.

06|07 UNIVERSITY OF WI-MILWAUKEE


Master of Architecture [Dec09] GPA 3.6
Graduate School Fellow
ROSHELLE

Selected as 1 of 14 fellows from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Milwaukee, WI


UW-Milwaukee Graduate School Teaching Assistant [Aug06-May08 ]
Program Introduction to Architectural Theory
International Study The Virtual Modeling
City as an Artifact: France, Italy, Architectural History
Germany, Switzerland
Presented special topics lectures on 20th c. avant-gardes in art + architecture.
Discussed issues covered in lecture with students in weekly discussions sections.
07|08 Evaluated + provided feedback on undergraduate work.
International Studio The Hammel, Green, + Abrahamson
Palimpsest of Urban Memory: India Architecture Entry Designer, Healthcare [Feb07-Dec08]
Collaborated with a team of designers on all aspects of the design process, centered primarily on schematics +
Solar Decathlon UW- design development.
Milwaukee Carbon +/- House was
selected as 1 of 20 international Communicated design decisions through sketches, digital models, + presentations.
teams to compete on the National Implemented + maintained an interoffice blog intended to provide a virtual platform for sharing information +
Mall in Washington, D.C., Oct 2009 inspiration.

08|09 DISTINGUISHED VISITING CHICAGO DESIGN CRITIC STUDIO


Distinguished Visiting Professor Neil Frankel, FAIA [May09]
Chicago Design Critic Selected for a design studio that combines social research with design excellence.
Studio Selected as 1 of 12 from Collaborated with a group of students on research, formation of a business concept, design + presentations in an
the UW-Milwaukee School of interiors + detail oriented studio.
Architecture + Urban Planning. Attended various outside lectures + exhibitions in the city as part of course requirements.
ANALYSIS:
MAPPING THE CITY
|01 MADHAVPURA MARKET, INDIA
Diagrams of the subtleties of the indian urban THE PALIMPSEST OF URBAN MEMORY
environment in collaboration with graduate
architecture students from CEPT, Ahmedabad. INTERNATIONAL URBAN PLANNING + DESIGN STUDIO
MANU SOBTI, PhD

Established 4 centuries ago, Madhavpura Market is entrenched in history despite the rapidly changing urban environment in which
it exhists. The wholesale market obstinately survives in the midst of an urban legislation that cares little for history or memory. Ad-
ditionally, the once advantageous location on the axes of 2 majors streets outside of the city wall has been engulfed by the growing
congestion of the old city, + the emergence of digital clearinghouses for goods has the potential to change the current condition of
the market, or eliminate its necessity completely.

The Marketplace struggles to come to terms with the need for new infrastrcuture+ the subsequent loss of familiar space; yet the
SYNTHESIS:
A FRAMEWORK |02 merchant guild + its mahajan [guild leader] see a future where they can reinvent themselves as successfull as they have in the past.
A dynamic framework was developed using
patterns drawn from the city.
As a result, an intervention for Madhavpura Market must deal wtih the conflict, contestation, adjustment + reconciliation between the
past, present + future; it must concurrently esteem, embrace + innovate. The proposed project creates a framework that enhances
the current functioning of the wholesale market, while allowing for and encouraging the natural evolution that is innate to the Indian
urban environment. The project has no intention of streamlining or making ‘efficient’ the perceived chaos of the market, but instead
recognizes the need to reexamine the notion of chaos from the western perspective when dealing with the Indian urban environment.

The ability of the proposed framework to evolve, communicate, + interweave with the existing fabric of the city is dependent on the
ability of the built form to address the contextual norms related to place +reality. To be contextual, a building must recognize the
patterns that exist within the environment.

Patterns addressed in the project include: hierarchy, embeddedness, incremental growth, the soft urban edge, plinth, space/activity
GENESIS:
GROWTH + ADAPTATION |03 symbiosis, identity within conformity, parallel wall systems, shops as a container, + climatic responses. In addition to patterns ad-
The dialogue between the urban environment dressed in the project, two additional patterns were created: adaptability + sustainability.
+ the intervention is best conveyed as imagined
isolated stills within a trajectory of a virtually
animate field.
DIVIDE/
CONNECT
|01 BOATHOUSE, ARID STEEP RIVER SITE
The mast slices the low roof plane, while the the ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN STUDIO I
boat deck bridges the docks.
KYLE TALBOTT

The boathouse is a small freestanding building with a simple program made exclusively of wood. The directness of the type is
countered by a powerful dialogue with the natural landscape, the visible joinery of construction, as well as with the fisherman that
cyclically engage the space.

The boat travels from up river, pausing at a linear, disconnected pier. At this pier, the fishermen unload their nets to hang them to dry.
As the nets dry, they serve as a colorful, textured facade. The boat progresses forward to the boathouse, made up of a storage pier on
DESERT/
PROTECT |02 the exterior half + the workspaces that finger into the cool cliffside. The mast of the boat slips between the low plane of the roof +
piers, completing the forms of both. The rhythm of the light coming through the wooden slats marks their arrival. The items left in
The low inward-looking forms shield the space
from the harsh Chilean climate. When the boat the storage pier have been safe since the fisherman’s early departure, as there is no easy way to access the pier when the boat is not
is at sea, the outer piers are secure as islands docked in place.
away from the shore.
The loneliness of the boathouse is an embodiment of the fishman’s experience at sea; the vast expanse transforms into a compressed,
low-lying space, while the introspective quality of both experiences endures.

EXPANSIVE/
COMPRESSIVE |03
|0
The spaces finger into the cool cliffside,
furthering the dialogue between the expansive
loneliness of the sea, and the introspective
quality of the boathouse.
ORIGIN:
THE STORY |01 MELTWATER: UW-MILWAUKEE CARBON +/- HOUSE
Using nature not only as a resource, but as SOLAR DECATHLON PROJECT
a model, Meltwater raises awareness of the
possibilities of our particular region + the COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN STUDIO
distinct responsibilities we have to it. CHRIS CORNELIUS
summer

winter

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UW-Milwaukee was selected as 1 of 20 colleges to participate in an international competition hosted by the U.S. Department of
Energy to design, build, + operate the most attractive and energy-efficient solar-powered house. The project is carried out over
the course of 6 semesters, culminating in the construction of the home on the National Mall in Washington D.C., October 9, 2009.
Following the competition, the home will be re-constructed at a site in the Menomenee River Valley, Milwaukee, WI as a educational
facility.

MELTWATER IS: EARTH-SHAPING STRENGTH


REGION:
MELTWATER |02 The concept of the home is wedded to our region, as meltwater landforms makeup much of our recognizable landscape. Using nature
Just as the glaciers transformed our landscape as a model, the form of the roof signifies the carving away of the earth’s surface while the facade represents the layers of subsurface
thousands of years ago, many components of
our design have the ability to change states,
stratification. The sustainably harvested white pine from the Aldo Leopold Foundation forms the topographical façade sweeping
breathing new life + energy into their forms. across the front of the building, reminding us where the building + its makers come from, an indelible tie to our region. The powerful
change-of-state involved in melting the glaciers during the Wisconsin Glaciation Period provided the model for the home’s many
multi-functional components that adapt to the changing needs of its inhabitants. The form + potential of the home takes on the
strength characterized by the natural processes that reworked our regional landscape.
0 1’ 3’ 6’

SHEAR

OGIVE
MELTWATER IS: ENERGY COLLECTION, RELEASE + RECIPROCITY
MORAINE
Using nature as a resource, Meltwater harnesses infinite solar power + fosters the collection of our finite freshwater supply. The
distinct valley of the roof + the prominent placement of the photovoltaic panels communicate the value placed on these resources
FLOAT BERG
wardrobe
do
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disturb
in the functioning of the home + our environment. Additionally, each material was carefully chosen with respect to the location of
origin + quality in order to create a home that is both sustainable + has the ability to capture the essence of our region. Created of our
region + for our region, Meltwater addresses the resources and needs specific to our place.
RESPONSE:
DETAILS |03
Communicating the energy efficiency, cost,
target market analysis,
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50 m
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100 m
mi

200 mi
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300 mi
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400 mi
4

500 mi

1,000
1 000 mi

construction costs lifecycle financial trends


0.6% Division 2—Site Work $725
9.5% Division 3—Concrete 12,000
0.0% Division 5—Metals 0
21.3% Division 6—Wood &Plastics 27,000
15.8%

11.8%

5.5%
Division 7—Thermal &Moisture Protection
Division 8—Openings
Division 9—Finishes
20,000
15,000
7,000
((-))
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4.7% Division 11—Equipment 6,000


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projected costs
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9.5% Division 12—Furnishings 12,000


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15.8% Division 15 & 16—Mechanical & Electrical 20,000


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5.5% Division 22—Plumbing 7,000


pla
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Sub Total: 126,725


10% Contingency 12,673

780 S.F. Total: $139,398


1 bedroom, 1bath

$179 per sq ft
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0.4% Division 2—Site Work $716


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$1

5.0% Division 3—Concrete 10,072

11.8%
10.0%
2.2% Division 5—Metals
Division 6—Wood &Plastics
Division 7—Thermal &Moisture Protection
4,427
23,592
19,890
((+))
13.2% Division 8—Openings 26,399
5.2% Division 9—Finishes 10,297
projected revenue
6.9% Division 11—Equipment 13,725
4.7% Division 12—Furnishings 9,360
37.5%
3 Division 15 & 16—Mechanical & Electrical 74,844
3.1% Division 22—Plumbing 6,469

Sub Total: 199,791


10% Contingency on Hard Construction 6,899
PV Solar Hot Water
System: System: Total: $206,690
$44,098.36 $17,246.00
780 S.F.
1 bedroom, 1bath $265 per sq ft
summer

winter

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extra seating
SHEAR sliding door
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FLOAT washer+dryer BERG


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186
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55
polycarb
l 72 73 s.i.p.
27 p.. panelss
50 mi
m

100 m
mi

200 mi
m

300 mi
m

400 mi
4

500 mi

1,000
1 000 mi

construction costs lifecycle financial trends


0.6% Division 2—Site Work $725
9.5% Division 3—Concrete 12,000
0.0% Division 5—Metals 0
21.3% Division 6—Wood &Plastics 27,000
15.8%

11.8%

5.5%
Division 7—Thermal &Moisture Protection
Division 8—Openings
Division 9—Finishes
20,000
15,000
7,000
((-))

g
in
4.7%

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Division 11—Equipment 6,000
projected costs

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9.5% Division 12—Furnishings 12,000

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15.8% Division 15 & 16—Mechanical & Electrical 20,000

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5.5% Division 22—Plumbing 7,000

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Sub Total: 126,725
10% Contingency 12,673

780 S.F. Total: $139,398


1 bedroom, 1bath

$179 per sq ft

t
k n
pa ove 025
ac me
0.4% Division 2—Site Work $716

yb rn
g 11,
5.0% Division 3—Concrete 10,072

$
11.8%
10.0%
2.2% Division 5—Metals
Division 6—Wood &Plastics
Division 7—Thermal &Moisture Protection
4,427
23,592
19,890
((+))
13.2% Division 8—Openings 26,399
5.2% Division 9—Finishes 10,297
projected revenue
6.9% Division 11—Equipment 13,725
4.7% Division 12—Furnishings 9,360
37.5%
3 Division 15 & 16—Mechanical & Electrical 74,844
3.1% Division 22—Plumbing 6,469

Sub Total: 199,791


10% Contingency on Hard Construction 6,899
PV Solar Hot Water
System: System: Total: $206,690
$44,098.36 $17,246.00
780 S.F.
1 bedroom, 1bath $265 per sq ft
SWOT +
BRANDING |01 MAKE CHANGE: CREDIT UNION FOR THE GREATER GOOD
Research on the current state of the financial EXPERIENTIAL TRANSACTION GROUP PROJECT [IN PROGRESS]
industry informed the business model + design
concept. DISTINGUISHED VISITING CHICAGO DESIGN CRITIC STUDIO
NEIL FRANKEL, FAIA
GREEDY 32%

IMPERSONAL 32%
As the banking industry stumbles through the crisis that has gripped the financial world, consumers are reframing their values +
OPPORTUNISTIC 26%
MAKE
CHANGE.
needs when it comes to financial services. The project seeks to address the shifts taking place as a result of the global economy in the

ORG
DISTANT 22%
A CREDIT UNION SERVING THE GREATER GOOD

design of a pilot program for the next generation of credit unions in Chicago’s award-winning 111 South Wacker Drive building. The
TRUSTWORTHY MAKE CHANGE.
motivation behind this project is to generate an architectural discussion regarding the development of a financial services facility that

ORG
ORG
15% A CREDIT UNION SERVING THE GREATER GOOD

HONEST10%
MAKE CHANGE.
will create an experiential brand design concept intended to resonate with the next generation of consumers’ needs + expectations
ORG
ETHICAL 5% A CREDIT UNION SERVING THE GREATER GOOD

SYMPATHETIC

TRANSPARENT
3%
3% for financial services. Major issues addressed in the business concept include the shift from physical to digital transactions + the
relationship these transactions have with the physical space, in addition to the current general distrust in the financial services
industry.
BRAND
EXPERIENCE |02 Our concept seeks to confront the current issues in the financial industry by designing a credit union that serves the greater good.
Integrating the brand into the spatial
experience.
The credit union, Make Change, combines both financial + philanthropic endeavors to forge and strengthen relationships between
members, as well as with the phyisical space. At the gateway to Chicago’s financial district from major commuter networks, Make
Change is a highly visible, optimistic vision for the future of the industry.

CHICAGO RESPONSE |03


Curving paths within the regular grid + layers of
space contribute to a city-specific intervention.
GREEDY 32%

IMPERSONAL 32%

OPPORTUNISTIC 26%
MAKE
CHANGE.

ORG
DISTANT
A CREDIT UNION SERVING THE GREATER GOOD

22%

TRUSTWORTHY MAKE CHANGE.

ORG
ORG
15% A CREDIT UNION SERVING THE GREATER GOOD

HONEST10%
MAKE CHANGE.

ORG
ETHICAL 5% A CREDIT UNION SERVING THE GREATER GOOD

SYMPATHETIC 3%
TRANSPARENT 3%

MAKE CHANGE.

ORG
A CREDIT UNION SERVING THE GREATER GOOD
ADVENTURE +
ANTHROPOLOGY |01 UNTITLED, 01
The intervention will explore the potential
of the surface as a means for engagement, MIXED MEDIA
primarily through the study of installation
art and architecture. Site anthropology
GRADUATE SCHOOL THESIS PROJECT [IN PROGRESS]
investigates the highly complex and specific set PROFESSOR DON HANLON
of contemporary circumstances at hand in the
stalled building project at 121 W. Wacker Drive. The current recession has provided us with an opportunity to pause and take a critical look at the infrastructures that support the
circulation and display of art. The inflation and sensation of the previous decade was precarious as the infrastructure that supported
it was designed centuries ago; this highlights the need for a more sustainable approach to art specific to today’s complex set of
circumstances. Parallel to the shift away from a sense of self dependent upon a stable physical place, to a sense of self cultivated
through a multiplicity of experience, art, as a virtual place, is no longer characterized by rootedness but by responsiveness and
interconnectivity. This shift calls for an infrastructure that supports an alteration of stillness and motion, stability and
change, place and space.

There is a deep-seated sense that the grounds for art are shifting beyond the territory ordinarily prescribed for art, likely for reasons
more pragmatic than romantic. Historically, especially during periods of economic recession, similar moves have been made by
artists. In the past, there were attempts to initiate dialogue with easily distributed mediums such as photography and video, as well
as through undistributable ones, such as happenings or earthworks. The former attempted to engage the popular culture, while the
latter sought to exclude it; though both sought to reveal the hidden agendas of popular media. Today, however, the nature of
popular media is participatory, shifting the focus from the “reveal” to engagement.

The question then arises, how do you engage people in a way that is responsive to a highly complex and specific set of
contemporary circumstances, yet add some sort of lasting value? The strategy seeks to create spatially and temporally
specific interventions that preclude permanency, serving as a catalyst in the urban environment and as a model for
future critical engagements and interventions.

The approach takes a stalled building project and activates the latent energy at the site through temporarily appropriating the space
for site-specific interventions. The building’s frame serves as the gallery, in a sense, and the intervention, the art. The intervention
will explore the potential of the surface as a means for engagement, primarily through the study of installation art and architecture;
particularly, the art of Robert Irwin, James Turrel, Ann Hamilton, Anish Kapoor, Anya Gallaccio, Alfredo Jaar, Robert Gober, and Kathy
Predergast and architects Shigeru Ban, Diller, Scofidio and Renfro, Herzog and deMeuron, Cecil Baumond and James Carpenter.
Architecture is a great assemblage of bodies that cut across a wide range of scalar and material regimes, both existing and yet to
be created. A specific site, Waterview Tower, has been chosen as the lens of focus with the understanding that there is the potential
for a dynamic network of interventions in stalled building projects across Chicago, the country, and throughout some parts of the
world. Each site offers up its own opportunities and constraints, producing a multiplicity of reactions and dialogues within the greater
critique.

Each intervention has the potential to produce an urban ripple effect, but the long term value is not in the intervention itself, but in
the dialogue it engenders with a dynamic conception of infrastructure, not rooted in time or place, but in ideas and experiences. The
intervention responds and challenges, while the dialogue endures. How will the interventions manifest themselves once building
resumes? What opportunities might exist in the inimitable complexities of the future?