Beginner Guitar Sitemap

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beginner guitar lesson guitar parts how to string a guitar how to hold a pick how to tune a guitar open chords barred chords

Beginner Acoustic Guitar Lessons

"A man ceases to be a beginner in any given science and becomes a master when he has learned that he is going to be a beginner all his life." ~Robin G. Collingwood If you are beginning acoustic guitar lessons, The Guitar Suite is a great place to come learn to play guitar. Because there are so many things for the beginner guitarist to learn, The Guitar Suite has organized the topics so that it becomes easy to learn acoustic guitar. In the beginner acoustic guitar lessons section, you will learn the very basics of guitar.

Basic acoustic guitar
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parts of an acoustic guitar What acoustic guitar strings and electric guitar strings are good to use How to put strings on a guitar How to hold a pick How to play basic open chords How to play basic barred chords How to tune a guitar

Beginner Guitar Video Lessons
Once you go through each beginner acoustic guitar lesson, check out the other sections on guitar. The Guitar Suite offers free guitar lessons in music theory so you can understand from a beginner to advanced level what you are playing. You will also learn more intermediate and advanced guitar techniques. If you are more interested in the songwriting process, I have lessons for that too. Finally, The Guitar Suite shows you actually how to get the most out of your guitar practice sessions. All the acoustic guitar lessons here are self-paced and designed for you to learn on your own. All the lessons here are FREE. When you finish TheGuitarSuite lessons, move on to the Jamplay lessons.

Parts of the guitar

Guitar headstock
Tuning Machines Tuning machines are the knobs that wind the strings. When you are looking for a guitar, make sure that these turn smoothly and evenly. If they don't, they probably are not of very good quality. Grover tuners are a respected brand you can't go wrong with, but a bit pricey. All in all, if you buy a decent guitar, the tuners that come with it will be good. Tuning Pegs: Guitar strings wrap around these. Truss rod access: Unless you know a bit about adjusting the neck of your guitar, it's best to let a professional do the adjusting. This can be tricky. Nut: this is the piece on which the string pass over to attach to the tuning pegs.

The neck of the guitar

The neck is usually made of a hardwood. It can be glued or bolted into the body. Or it can extend from the body as one piece.It also contains a "truss-rod" which can be accessed through the sound hole and adjusted if you find it's out of line. Fretboard or Fingerboard: Consists of usually from 20 to 24 frets. The fretboard is made of hardwood usually and it is a separate piece laid on the neck. It also usually contains pearl "inlays" that reference the 3rd, 5th, 7th, 9th, 12th, 15th, 17th, etc. frets. We'll get into "why" later. Frets: The metal strips that lay across the fingerboard are your frets. These are what determine your tones. When you press the string to the fingerboard down between these frets and pluck or strum it, you get a tone. Where you press on the fingerboard determines your note. Inlays: These are usually made of mother of pearl and mark (normally) the 3rd, 5th, 7th, 9th and 12th frets.

The body of the acoustic guitar
Upper Bout:

The upper bout is the area above and including the sound hole. Your neck connects to the body of the guitar here. Generally, the upper bout has little effect on the tone or sound of the guitar. This guitar has a cutaway for easier access to upper frets. Also, sometimes the upper bout on the top holds electronics if you have a pickup or transducer installed on your acoustic.It's primary purpose is for resting the guitar on your leg. Sound Hole: All of your sound comes out here. On acoustic / electric guitars, pickups may be placed inside here to pick up the vibrations of the strings and electrify the guitar.

The Lower Bout The lower bout is the area of the guitar that generates the sound and the depth of sound of your guitar. They come in differernt sizes, from smaller classical or performance styles to larger, boomier, jumbo sizes. This particular guitar is made of koa. The type of wood your guitar is made of is a determining factor of the tone that it has. I will teach you more about that later . But for now remember that smaller is punchier, larger is boomier.

Bridge: This is where the pins hold the strings in place on the body of the guitar. Bridge Pins: These pin the strings into bridge to keep tension on them. The electric bridge and nut On some electric guitars are "locking." This means you can use a whammy bar or your fingers to bend and pull the strings without it going out of tune because there are bolts at the nut that lock the strings in place. Strap pegs Are common on both guitars so you can stand and play. It's a good idea to get locks so.

Guitar Strings
There are many different types of strings out there. But you have to buy electric guitar string for electric guitars and acoustic guitar strings for acoustic guitars. If you have a classical, or nylon string guitar, you have to buy nylon strings, otherwise go with steel strings or nickel wound strings. A good way to extend the life of your strings is to wipe them down with a clean rag after each use.

Elixir: probably the longest lasting strings, they have a coating that extends the life. o Kenny Loggins

How to put strings on a guitar .• • • • • • • Erik Mongrain Dan Tyminski Lucas Reynolds Keller Williams Keith Moseley Nickel Creek D'Addario o Andy Timmons o Joe Satriano o Larry Carlton o Pete Yorn o John Frusciante o Earl Klugh o Alex Skolnick GHS Boomers o Carlos Santana o Dave Mustaine o FLEA (Red Hot Chillpeppers) o Eric Johnson o Foo Fighters o Neal Schon (Journey) o David Gilmour (Pink Floyd) Martin Dean Markley o Chris Daughtry o Dwight Yoakam o Al Petteway o Bruce Springsteen o Russ Freeman o Sugarland o Vince Gill Ernie Ball o Slash o Eric Clapton o Jimmy Page o Angus Young o John Mayer o Steve Morse o lots of other fantastic guitarists! Everly DR o o o o o o Check out how to string a guitar or hold a pick.

Run the string to the inside of the tuning peg. Step 4: . from bottom to top of the fretboard • • • • B G D A Remove the bridge pin and insert the ball of the string into the bridge hole.. high E. You string from the back of the guitar. Step 1: Step 2: Replace the bridge pin ( it will still be a little loose. Remove the bridge pin from the top. there are no bridge pins in an electric.The Order of the Strings: The thinnest string.. or soundboard of the guitar. then. don't worry) Step 3: Extend the string up and place it in the groove on the nut. On the left is an electric guitar bridge hole. On the right is a steel string acoustic. goes on the bottom of the fretboard.

A. Make sure that the last coilpoints toward the bottom of the guitar and IS BEHIND the edge of the bridge. loop it back towards the neck of the guitar and loop it under itself where you slipped it in the bridge hole (loop it from underneath the bottom towards the top) 3. Weave it UNDER the string and pull it UP. the string will lock itself into place) Step 6: Wind the tuning machine until the string is in tune. weave the string back to the inside of the head of the guitar. Again loop it back towards the back of the guitar. Once through. This locks the string in place. Coil the string around itself 2x for bass (top 3) strings and 3x for the bottom 3 strings. . Then run the end of the string through the hole in the tuning peg. 4. (When you start turning the tuning machine.Wrap the string around the tuning peg about 3 times to the outside of the head of the guitar. Slip string through the hole towards the back of the guitar. Step 7: Cut off any excess string Stringing a classical or nylon string: The bridge: 1. 5. wrapping it UNDER the itself . Insert string here. Look at the photo below to see an illustration. 2. this time feeding the string under itself. Step 5: As the string exits the hole.

All you do is place the palm of your hand lightly on the string near the bridge of the guitar and strike the string. Wraps around itself 2x for bass strings and 3x for 3 high strings.. not your elbow. . You should use an UP and DOWN motion when you pick.. Slides under itself behind the bridge to lock itself in. Comes out here and feeds back down towards C. Picking Techniques String Muting String muting is a common practice in heavy metal music. Alternate Picking Alternate picking is a technique that allows you to pick faster. (Pull tight) Go to how to tune a guitar. E. C. Oila. this helps it slide across the strings more easily. you have performed a palm mute.B. All of the movement should come from your wrist. or neck of guitar. D. Loops under itself here and heads back towards the back of the guitar. How to hold a pick • • • • • Relaxed hand Index finger across the back of pick Pad of thumb holding front of pick Wrist relaxed and not arched back The pick should be held at a slight angle downward .

there are 2 basic kinds: electronic tuners for electric guitars and tuners for acoustic guitars. But nonetheless. Fingerpicks . Nothing can turn an audience off or kill the mood of your masterpiece than a flat or sharp note. This can sometimes be troublesome because the microphones are very sensitive and they can pick up other noises.Rest Stroke A rest stroke is when you strike DOWN on the string and the pick comes to rest on the next string below it. buying an electronic tuner is well worth the investment.. As far as electronic tuners go. you need to be able to tune your guitar yourself. strike a string and you read the display that tells you how close to being in tune your string is. Many "chickin' pickers" use fingerpicks and thumbpicks. Classical guitarist don't use them. This gives you a more powerful sound when you pick. A good brand of fingerpick is Alaskapik fingerpicks. or not? Some people use fingerpicks when they play fingerstyle. If on eisn't available. Using harmonics to tune 3. If you want a tuner for an acoustic guitar.. Some tuners are small enough to keep in your gig bag or case. How to tune a guitar There are three main ways to tune your guitar 1. The tuners for electric guitars have an input jack that you simply plug your guitar into. These are called onboard tuners and they just clamp right on to your guitar's headstock. An electronic tuner 2. Using open strings to tune The electronic tuner The most accurate way to tune your guitar. you should look for one that has an internal microphone in it. The Harmonics Tuning Method . They take very much care of their fingernails. These are good if you have a hard time growing your fingernails or don't want to use fake nails.

2.. 4. The reason the open chord is easy is because you only have to press down on a few strings to form the chord. If you hear a difference. 2. 1. 3. Press the fifth fret of the 6th string (low E) and pick it. the strings are in tune. you should learn the essential 5 open chords that make up the open chord family. open A chord open C chord open D chord open E chord . Check out the samples below and then look to see how you can learn this way of tuning. The Open String Tuning Method This is the third most effective way to tune your guitar. Listen below. Tuning a guitar with harmonics: 1. If you don't and they sound like the same wave. leaving the rest of the strings open to ring out. Open Chords What is an open chord? An open chord is the typical old "cowboy chord.. Learning to play open chords As a beginner guitarist. 3. 3. Repeat with the other strings except the B to E.This is the second most accurate method of tuning your guitar because you can actually hear the difference in sound waves. On the B string press the 4th fret. If you hear what sound like sound waves. the string are out of tune. It's probably the easiest to do but not as accurate as the other 2 ways. Place your index finger lightly above the metal just behind the 5th fret and pick it. If they sound exactly the same they are in tune. they are out of tune. They are the. Click which string you want to see and hear and then roll over the notes with your mouse to hear the note. 2. Now place your ring finger above the metal just behind the 7th fret on the next string down and pick it. Here's how you do it: 1." These are the chords that people learn first because they are the easiest guitar chords to form. Now pick the open A string.

For some reason. Internet Explorer doesn't like Flash Files in many instances. the theory behind chords. try using Firefox or Google Chrome. After that go on to the music theory section to learn what's going on behind the scenes and to learn a lot more chords. then Learn and Master Guitar is by far the best available Home Study Guitar Course for you. If you want a series of lessons that really will show you the ins and outs of playing chords. you can find some good tips under the relaxing page to help you get better at playing barred chords. Barred Chords What is a barred chord? A barred chord is one of the first types of guitar chords you will learn. How to form open chords Click the arrow below to hear the open chords in action. Because this is the beginner guitar lesson section. move on to the barred chords. Usefulness of barred chords . It's very high quality and lots of guitarists have learned to play using it. Challenges of playing a barred chord A lot of times it's a little hard to play a barred chord if you are a beginner guitarist. Let's take a look at how to form these chords. But if you go to the acoustic guitar techique section. Moving beyond open chords Once you become good at playing these chords. as you'll see in the Music Theory section. If it's not working for you. It takes some time to work up the strength to play them correctly without any buzz for the strings. open chords and otherwise. Sorry for the inconvenience. a barred chord is a chord that requires you to put one or more of your fingers flat across more than one string (usually 4-6 strings) to form the chord. Then scroll over the chord names to switch between open chords. Basically.5. open G chord These are the first chords to learn because they are possibly the easiest to learn and they can be used as a base for forming many other chords in different positions on the neck. we will look at just major barred chords and minor barred chords. using chords in songs and rhythms.

Below you can see the five major barred chords shapes that are moveable. Also we'll show you how these barred chords can move up and down the fretboard. Sorry for the inconvenience. Incidently if you go back to open chords you'll see that they are the same as these barred chords. which can learn more about in the music theory section. Although there are many moveable shapes for chords. You can memorize these by the anacronym CAGED. Seeing barred chords in action Music Thoery Sitemap Music Theory • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • music theory guitar chords major chords minor chords moveable chords caged theory diminished chords augmented chords 6th chords 7th chords 9th chords music intervals music intervals TAB interval worksheet (PDF) guitar scales pentatonic scales major scale major scale exercises minor scales minor scale exercises guitar mode positions guitar modes charts Reverence: a study . But here we'll go into moving on beyond major chords into major barred chords and minor barred chords. Internet Explorer doesn't like Flash Files in many instances. For some reason. If it's not working for you. These are the open chord shapes but they also work up and down the fretboard.Barred chords are great to know for mobility on the fretboard. try using Firefox or Google Chrome. barred chords are the first step in learning them.

That's okay." ~Leonardo da Vinci How music theory can help you Many people play guitar and take guitar lessons without ever really studying the music theory behind what they're playing. Of course. Music theory topics Guitar Chords To understand music theory it's important to be able to form chords on your guitar. minor chords. But if you really want to get the most out of your guitar playing and songwriting. and diminished chords. you will learn all of this and more in a proven and effective lesson format.• • • • • • • • • mode chart worksheet (PDF) minor mode chart worksheet (PDF) Blank Tab (PDF) chord progressions cadences chord journal (PDF) chord leading-resolving circle of 5ths chord substitution Music Theory "He who loves practice without theory is like the sailor who boards ship without a rudder and compass and never knows where he may cast. augmented chords. Guitar Solo . moveable chords. knowing some music theory can give you a lot of musical insight and ideas. with Learn and Master Guitar. In this section you'll learn guitar chords: major chords.

But if you want a more structured and helpful way to learn to solo. You'll also learn about intervals. Understanding the theory of music behind the guitar scales is important if you want to be able to solo really well. G. Here you'll learn the circle of 5ths. If it's not working for you. Beginner Guitar | Guitar Practice | Guitar Technique | Music Theory | So Caged Guitar Theory Remembering Chords based on CAGED and modal positions If we look at the modal positions we can see that we can figure out different chord positions as well. Basically with CAGED we can create chord forms up and down the fretboard from the formation of the chords C.Music theory doesn't stop at chord formation. All it is really is a different way of looking at what you've already learned in guitar chords. E and D in that order. Internet Explorer doesn't like Flash Files in many instances. check out the lessons on advanced chord theory. CAGED chord charts A chords . • Below click any of the RED TEXT to interact with the CAGED guitar lesson. Learn and Master Guitar is the best resource I have found to teach you how to apply music theory to your guitar playing. try using Firefox or Google Chrome. chord leading. and chord substitution. I'll show you a lot of scale formations here. Basically this process is based on what is called the CAGED system. A. Advanced Chord Theory After you have gone through all of the other music theory lessons. First let's look at the chord formations for each of these chords. CAGED guitar theory in action For some reason. Sorry for the inconvenience.

B CHORDS C CHORDS D CHORDS E CHORDS .

F CHORDS G CHORDS Go on to Chord Leading Major Chord How to play and use the major chord By far. the major chord is the most used type of chords in popular music. . They lack any hint of mystery. So. sadness. B chord has B and so on. Very simple. They carry an upbeat. full sound. go to the Beginner Section and look at the open chord page there. a C chord will have C as the root. If you haven't already. The root note is what defines the chord. It shows you some great pictures and audio on how to play major chords. funkiness or anything of the like. hopeful. fear. We are able to figure out the position of every major chord based on our intervals and our root note.

Internet Explorer doesn't like Flash Files in many instances. The structure of the chord is also simple. E. The 3 is a major third above that: A = C# B = D# C=E D = F# E = G# F=A G=B And the 5 is a perfect fifth above 1: A=E B = F# C=G D=A E=B F=C G=D So together the Major Chords are as follows: Major Chord Tonic 3rd 5th A A C# E B B D# F# C C E G D D F# A . If you simply learn these you'll have an incredible array of chords and a very strong foundation to be able to nail any chord at any pace up the neck For some reason. it tells you what chord letter to assign like A. many chords that belong in the major category. F or G. The main thing is that the chord has a major 3rd in it. If it's not working for you. there can be many. The major chord formula is: 1-3-5 So the root is 1. B. But as you will see below. Sorry for the inconvenience. This is what makes it a major chord. What these charts do is take the basic 5 positions for each of the chords and gives you one way of playing them in order to cover the entire fretboard.The major chord family The major chord family can consist of many chords. C. try using Firefox or Google Chrome. D .

E F G E G# B F A C G B D A Major Chords B Major Chords C Major Chords D Major Chords E Major Chords F Major Chords G Major Chords .

I tend to gravitate towards the use . Look at the chart and try to figure out as many possible fingerings for a major chord as you can. structure. If you look at the chord charts above.the 3rds and the 5ths on the fretboard. Next we'll look at the minor chords and their. you see them in the chart below. The chart below shows the pattern for all of the tonics (1) . So any combination of these 3 notes on the fretboard creates a major chord for that tonic. Check out minor chords or 7 chords. they express a feeling more intimate sounding than the major chords.So there you go. feel and positions. Check it out. Minor Chords Playing and using minor chords Minor chords can be used for a variety of reasons. TAN= the tonic or 1 BLUE= the 3rd RED= the fifth If you can find the tonic you can find the distance from the 3rd and 5th. Learn and Master Guitar is an excellent guitar instrucational DVD series that can teach you how to use chords in a comprehensive home study course. But for the most part. there are many positions for each of the major chords.

The structure of the chord is also simple. B. and others.of minor chords. go to the Beginner Section and look at the open chord page there. mystery. If you haven't already.Ab . longing. The minor chord formula: 1 . desire.D Minor chord guitar charts .Eb .5 So the root is 1. D . F or G.G D=D-F-A E=E-G-B F = F . C. Some of the feelings I try to get across though this type of chord are sadness.C G = G .Bb . reflectiveness. it tells you what chord letter to assign like A.D . The 3 is a minor third above that: A=C B=D C = Eb D=F E=G F = Ab G = Bb And the 5 is a perfect fifth above 1: A=E B = F# C=G D=A E=B F=C G=D So together the minor Chords are as follows: A=A-C-E B = B .F# C = C . It shows you some great pictures and audio on how to play minor chords.b3 . E.

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Check it out. So any combination of these 3 notes on the fretboard creates a minor chord for that tonic. If you look at the chord charts above. Look at the chart and try to figure out as many possible fingerings for a minor chord as you can.The chart below shows the pattern for all of the tonics (1) .the minor 3rds and the 5ths on the fretboard. If you can find the tonic you can find the distance from the minor 3rd and 5th. Check out major chords or 7 chords. you see them in the chart below. . Learn and Master Guitar is an excellent guitar instrucational DVD series that can teach you how to use chords in a comprehensive home study course.

Moveable Chords THERE ARE MANY FLASH FILES ON THIS PAGE. Moveable chord charts Moveable MAJOR CHORDS 6th string 5th string . on the 6th string. Below are the forms for the major. Internet Explorer doesn't like Flash Files in many instances. on the 5th string. Go to CAGED for more explanation (may load slow lots of pix) Types of moveable chords Root 6 Moveable chords Root 6 chords have their root or tonic. you guessed it. Some of these you can see come from the Root 6 chords. you guessed it. For some reason. If it's not working for you. minor and the dominant root 6 chords. Below are the forms for the major. Keep in mind that these are all moveable up and down the fretboard. minor and the dominant root 4 chords. on the 5th string. Just like the Root 6 chords. try using Firefox or Google Chrome. Just like the Root 6 and Root 5 chords. Just click on the type of chord you want to see below and the fretboard will show up and show you the Root 6 Moveable chords. Below are the forms for the major. Just click below to view the fretboard and the Root 6 moveable chords. Root 5 Moveable chords Root 5 chords have their root or tonic. Keep in mind that these are all moveable up and down the fretboard. you guessed it. Keep in mind that these are all moveable up and down the fretboard. minor and the dominant root 5 chords. Root 4 Moveable chords Root 4 chords have their root or tonic. Click on the name belowe of the type of chord you want to see and the fretboard will appear. Sorry for the inconvenience.

4th string minor CHORDS 6th string 5th string 4th string MAJOR 7 CHORDS 6th string 5th string 4th string minor 7 CHORDS 6th string 5th string 4th string DOMINANT 7 CHORDS 6th string 5th string .

4th string DIMINISHED CHORDS 6th string

5th string

4th string AUGMENTED CHORDS 6th string

5th string

4th string

Learning MOVEABLE CHORDS
1. Learn every note on the first 2 strings. 2. Then I memorize one form for the 6th string Major chords. Play it up the string naming each chord as you go along. 3. Then I do it over again with the 2nd chord formation if there is one. 4. Finish the 6th string then move on to the 5th string and do the same thing. Then the fourth. 5. After the major chord forms are pretty well memorized go on to the minor chord forms: 6th string 1st, 5th string then 4th string. 6. Then move to the 7 chords. All the while note the difference in their sounds and characteristics. After the 7 chords try the diminished then the augmented. Once you get all of these chord forms try to play around and figure out more difficult or complicated chords.

Diminished Chords
What is a diminished chord

Diminished chords are unstable chords, they are very dissonant. They seem like they lack something, they need something. And usually that something ends up being the major chord a half step up from that diminished chord. Diminished chords are usually written like "o" or "-" or "dim". And they are usually used as passing chords. You don't stay on them too long. They lead to other chords One reason for this is that the diminished tends to be a 7 chord, and we'll get into the theory of chord progressions later. But for now just know that, for example, a c# diminished chord would naturally want to lead into a D major chord. Or an Edim would want to go into an F major chord Now there are really three different kinds of diminished chords that are commonly heard.
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diminished triad diminished 7th (fully) half diminished 7th

Diminished chord formulas:
diminished triad 1 - b3 (m3) - b or O5 (basically this is playing 3 minor 3rds in a row) half diminished 7th 1 - b3 (m3) - b or O5 - b7 (also called min7b5) diminished 7th 1 - b3 (m3) - b or O5 - bb7 (actually a M6 interval) Diminished Triads The min7b5 chords (half diminished) fully diminished 7th chords A = A - C - Eb B=B-D-F C = C - Eb - Gb D = D - F - Ab E = E - G - Bb F = F - Ab - B G = G - Bb - Db A = A - C - Eb - G B=B-D-F-A C = C - Eb - Gb - Bb D = D - F - Ab - C E = E - G - Bb - D F = F - Ab - B - Eb G = G - Bb - Db - F A = A - C - Eb - F# B = B - D - F - G# C = C - Eb - Gb - A D = D - F - Ab - B E = E - G - Bb - C# F = F - Ab - B - D G = G - Bb - Db - E

Diminished Chord Charts

Diminished chords on teh fretboard (key of A)

Check out augmented chords or 7 chords. Or if you really want to understand how you can use all this information, check out Learn and Master Guitar.

Augmented chords
What is an augmented chord?
Augmented chords are unstable, or tense sounding chords. They are typically written as "+" or "aug". They are usually used as a passing chord between to other chords because

E .F## C = C .D# .E# B = B .#5 (or +5) (basically this is playing 3 Major 3rds in a row) So augmented triads are as follows: (thanks for the tips Jim in Michigan) A = A .F# . The augmented chord formula is: 1 . They also tend to be lead by that sharp 5th to the next half step up.G# D = D .A# E = E .G# .3 .B# F = F .C# .B .A .D# .C# G = G .of the tension in their sound.

By far the best guitar instructioanl program out there. If you want more complete lessons on how to play guitar chords. augmented or diminished. Try out some of the chord formations and see if they can fit into your repertoire.Check how to play diminished chords or 7 chords. . we recommend tyring Learn and Master Guitar. 6 chords What is a 6 chord? Sixth chords are peculiar sounding chords. It's the kind of chord you'd think a harp would play. It can be major or minor. The 6th chord (major) can probably be best described as whimsical.

C# F=F-A-C-D F = F .C# E = E .A . The 6th is not flatted.B . it tells you what chord letter to assign like A.B .3 (b3) .G# B = B .D# . the 5 is a perfect fifth above the 6 is a major 6th above 1: 1: A = C# (C) A=E A = F# B = D# (D) B = F# B = G# C = E (Eb) C=G C=A D = F# (F) D=A D=B E = G# (G) E=B E = C# F = A (Ab) F=C F=D G = B (Bb) G=D G=E So together the Major 6th Chords are as So together the minor 6th Chords are as follows: follows: A = A .6 So the root is 1.D .C .G .Bb .C . The 6 chord formula is: 1 .A D = D . C.D G=G-B-D-E G = G .D .5 .G# C=C-E-G-A C = C .Eb .F# A = A .F# .E The 3 is a third above that: Major 6 Chords .G . F or G. E.F# B = B .F# .E .Ab . B.G # .B D=D-F-A-B E = E .E .F# .The structure of the chord is the same as the major or minor plus an added 6th note. this would make the chord a C 6 flat or C minor 6 flat.C# . D .

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The chart below shows the pattern for all of the tonics (1) . you see them in the chart below. 5ths and 6ths on the fretboard. If you can find the tonic you can find the distance from the 3rd. If you look at the chord charts above. Look at the chart and try to figure out as many possible fingerings for a 6th chord as you can. 5th and 6th.the major 3rds. It is the best and most comprehensive guitar instructional available. If you are looking for a guitar system to help you truly understand how to use chords in your style of playing. check out Learn and Master Guitar. So any combination of these 4 notes on the fretboard creates a 6th chord for that tonic. .

It tends to work better melodically than the 7th. It naturally sounds twangy. A seventh chord can be major. The 3 is a third above that the 5 is a perfect fifth above 1 the 7 is a flatted 7th above 1 A = C# A=E B = D# B = F# A=G C=E C=G B=A D = F# D=A C = Bb E = G# E=B D=C . As with all minors. A minor 7th chord is your flatted third plus the flatted 7th. D .7 The minor 7th chord formula is: 1 .b7 The major 7th chord formula is: 1 . Remember that the 3rd is the note that determines whether it is major or minor. The seventh note is one of the notes that really defines the sound of the chord. E. if it's only one fret above your tonic it's called a major 7th chord. soft jazz feel.7 chords What is a 7 chord? Seventh chords are very common chords. The minor 7th also is very jazzy sounding. The 7th chord formula is: 1 .b7 So the root is 1. It is contemplative but can also be used to get your groove on. It sound a bit confusing but we'll look at the charts. 7 chord formation The seventh automatically assumes the seventh note is a flatted seventh.3 . C. Now the major 7th is decidedly jazzy. it doesn't lend itself to uplifting melodies. It's one of the strongest notes.5 .3 .5 . B. It has a very soft. the 7th is used a lot in jazz and in country music. And it's pretty. minor.5 . If it is not.) It's a fun loving chord.b3 . or the note a whole step (2 frets) above the octave of your tonic. F or G. Much of jazz is based upon 7th progressions. it tells you what chord letter to assign like A. And it's better for comping or rhythm than melodic use. not as uplifting as the major chord (not the major 7th. augmented or diminished. Using the 7 chord As far as use of 7th chords. but it's more complex sounding than the major 7th.

Eb G = G .D# .C# .G# B = B .F# 7th Chords (for minor 7th just flatten the 3rd .move it down 1 fret) ..E .D# F=F-A-C-E G = G .F# .A .D .A C = C .C# .Bb D=D-F-A-C E=E-G-B-D F = F .Ab .Eb .G .Bb D = D .B .C E=E-G#-B-D F = F .D# .F# .D .C .F# .F# .F=A G=B F=C G=D E=D F = Eb G=F The minor 7th Chords are as follows: A=A-C-E-G B = B .A .Eb G=G-B-D-F The Major 7th Chords are as follows: A = A .Bb .C# E = E .F So together the 7th Chords are as follows: A = A .A .B .F# ..E .D .C .A C = C .G .E .G B = B .G # .A# C=C-E-G-B D = D .

the charts below are a much better way to learn them. Guitar Theory: 7 Chord Charts . But if you really want to know the fretboard and.The charts above are a good quick reference.

3 .9 The major 7th minor 9th chord formula is: 1 . check out Learn and Master Guitar. 9 chord What is a 9 chord? 9 chords are exactly like the 7 chords but we add a 9th to it.b7 .3 . Or if you want to really learn how to play guitar.9 So together the 9 Chords are as follows: The minor 9 Chords are as follows: .7 .5 .5 .b7 .9 The minor 7th minor 9th chord formula is: 1 .b3 .Check out 6 chords or 9 chords.5 . A 9th is an octave higher than the tonic and then add a second (2 frets up) The 9th chord formula is: 1 .

Ab .Eb .B .F# .Bb .C# .G# .D# .F# .B .A# .F .C# C = C .D .F# .D .G # .F# .D .C .E .D D = D .G .E .A .D C = C .B B = B .F# F = F .E D=D-F-A-C-E E = E .C .D# .A .C .C# .A .D# .A .D .Bb .A .Eb .G .G .A = A .D .Eb .C# B = B .G .A The Major 9th Chords are as follows: A = A .B A=A-C-E-G-B B = B .G G=G-B-D-F-A G = G .Bb .B .F# F=F-A-C-E-G G = G .E .F# .F# .C# .B .A Guitar Chords: 9 Chords .G # .G F = F .F# E = E .C# C=C-E-G-B-D D = D .E E = E .

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minor or perfect interval being illustrated. Distance between Notes Interval 1 fret minor 2nd 2 frets major 2nd 3 frets minor 3rd 4 frets major 3rd 5 frets perfect fourth (no minor or major of this) 6 frets tritone (tense and dissonant sounding) 7 frets perfect 5th (no minor or major of this either) 8 frets minor 6th 9 frets major 6th 10 frets minor 7th 11 frets major 7th 12 frets octave So if you look at the charts below.. If you want to learn how to apply chords to your guitar playing style. you'll see the root note (the note you start on) and you'll see the major. check out Learn and Master Guitar. Count 1 fret up on the same string and you . and that equals an octave between the first fret and the last fret.Learn how to play augmented chords or diminished chords. Look at one string of the guitar. Music Intervals What is an interval? An interval is simply the distance between 2 notes.. • • The root note (note 1 of a scale) is the note you start on .for example in the key of A it would be the A note on the 6th string/5th fret. There are 7 general intervals: o 2nd o 3rd o 4th o tritone o 5th o 6th o 7th o (there are also unison and octave) This may help understand a little better. The root note is in tan. you have 12 frets. For example the first chart shows the 2nd interval.

Another example would be the 5th interval. From there you can see where these same notes are on all of the other strings. This is a perfect interval because there are no minor or major notes for it.. count up 7 frets and you see the perfect interval on the 12th fret. Count 2 frets up and the blue note (the major 2nd) is right there.. A B C D E Hope this helps a bit. In this example the root note is an A on the 6th string. Interval Charts for Guitar . So the perfect 5th of an A is E . Look at its chart. it's all by itself because it's perfect.see that the black note (the minor 2nd) is right there.

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There seems to be friction or the notes sounding together sound unstable.Tips for learning guitar intervals: Practice playing the notes on the fretboard and try to learn how the location of each interval relates to its root note. . Or there doesn't seem to be much friction in their relationship aurally. They feel stable. Consonant Intervals: • • • • • • Octave (perfect consonance) can only be perfect. When they go to a major tone or chord this is called resolution. Some key terms and concepts: Consonance: This refers to when an interval is more harmonious. augmented or diminished Fifth (perfect consonance) Fourth (perfect consonance) Major Third (imperfect consonance) Minor Third (imperfect consonance) Minor Sixth (imperfect consonance) Major Sixth (imperfect consonance) Dissonance: This refers to when an interval in not very harmonious. Dissonant intervals feel like they need to go somewhere.

4ths 3rds Look at the chart below to get an idea what's going on. when you lower and raise notes. minor. augmented or diminished) Minor Second Major Second Minor Seventh major Seventh If you look at any of the charts and study them.1 fret (1/2 step) Interval + one fret (1/2 step) diminished perfect augmented diminished minor Major minor Major augmented --diminished minor or perfect major or perfect augmented --- . 7ths Great. It reveals that certain intervals are closely related. you'll see that the positioning of the notes on the fretboard reveal something. 2nds unisons . for example. so it becomes a minor 2nd. INVERTING INTERVALS In general terms this is what happens when you invert intervals Starts as Perfect Major minor diminished augmented unisons 2nds 3rds 4ths 5ths 6ths 7ths octaves Becomes Perfect So.Dissonant Intervals:the Tritone • • • • (major. you're changing intervals. If you take an A note and play its major 7th interval. This is called interval inversion. what does augmented and diminished mean? 6ths 5ths Well. Major augmented Take a few minutes to experiment on the fretboard and figure out diminished each interval's position and then its inverse on the fretboard. That C an minor octave lower is going to be a fifth lower. you end up playing a G# (2 strings down and one fret up). Now where is that note compared to the A note's octave? A half step up. You'll octaves learn the fretboard in no time. a perfect fourth of an open G is C. Second intervals and seventh intervals are closely related.

These are called enharmonic intervals or notes. Well it is. . The Guitar Suite endorses a fantastic guitar instructional series called Learn and Master Guitar. Or if you want more thorough guitar lessons. Some tones or intervals are named with several notes. Intervals Tab Use the tabs below to help you learn how each interval feels and sounds on the guitar fretboard.Okay so that seems like too many notes for the fretboard. Check out the exercises for playing intervals on yor guitar.

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you form a basic understanding about chord formulas. it doesn't mean you have to use them all in a solo. you begin to gain strength and dexterity in your fingers. ~Kirk Hammett Importance of guitar scales The guitar scale is the basis from which all chords come. you begin to hear intervals. Some may be considered modes of certain scales. Try to find the life in each one.Check out our interval worksheet or go on to guitar scales. And understand the theory behind each one. Types of guitar scales There are several guitar scales. BUT. you start to hear musical relationships. When you practice playing scales on the guitar. there is no structure to music. • • • • • • • • • • major scale / aka ionian mode minor scale / aka aeolian mode major pentatonic scale minor pentatonic scale blues scale chromatic scale guitar modes o dorian mode o phrygian mode o lydian mode o mixolydian mode o locrian mode harmonic minor scale melodic minor scale whole tone scale . be careful that you don't simply practice going up and down the scales in your guitar lessons. Without the scale. You should examine and explore scales. But we'll go ahead and lump them all together even though technically a scale mode isn't the same thing as a scale. The benefits of learning scales is endless. Check out Learn and Master Guitar Guitar Scales Just because you know umpteen billion scales.

Guitar legends have been made from this scale. W . everything. It's commonly used in country. Also by eliminating the 7th it makes the scale more universally usable. W .. Pentatonic Tried and true. Without defining it the scale can fit over more chords. folk.. . This may be the reason it is easier to remember... but learning how to apply them is something else. remember. W + H . Major Pentatonic Scale Lets start with the Pentatonic major scale. Above you can see that there seems to be fewer notes than the major and minor scales. Every single major pentatonic scale for every single key signature follows the same pattern: W .W + H or Whole step .. The good news is that it's one of the easiest scales to remember and it fits in just about everyone's style in some way or another. rock... Below is the fretboard chart (in A) for it then we'll talk about what's going on in it.. You should. The 7th note. jazz.• • whole-half diminshed half-whole diminished Beyond guitar scales It's all well and good to practice these scales. Learn and Master Guitar is a great instructional series that can truly help you become a better and more knowledgeable guitarist.Whole step . sets the flavor of the chord.Whole step and a half Whole step . this is the scale we all love to use. It's true. The major pentatonic eliminates the 4th and the 6th of the major scale. metal.Whole step and a half A step is the distance between 2 notes: half step = 1 fret whole step = 2 frets On the guitar you can play a whole major scale up to the 12th fret and see the pattern on one string. Check it out.

My bad yo.Whole step .... I made a mistake on the B string. W or Whole step and a half . or 1st note to 3 frets below. Every single major pentatonic scale for every single key signature follows the same pattern: W + H . So the chart's notes remain the same but the root or tonic is different. Below is a chart that shows every key's major pentatonic scale.A very good idea would be to try to memorize or learn the major pentatonic scale for each of the keys A through G. Take a look..Whole step . W . Without defining it the scale can fit over more chords... W ... It's true. remember. sets the flavor of the chord. the blue fretted note on the 3rd fret should actually be on the 2nd fret.Whole step and a half .. Also by eliminating the 7th it makes the scale more universally usable. Tonic (major pentatonic scale) A B C D E F G 2nd 3rd 5th 6th B C# E F# C# D# F# G# D E G A E F# A B F# G# B C# G A C D A B D E Minor Pentatonic Scale The minor pentatonic pretty much is the major pentatonic scale except you shift the tonic.Whole step . hehe Above you can see that there seems to be fewer notes than the major and minor scales.. W + H . The 7th note. The major pentatonic eliminates the 4th and the 6th of the major scale. This may be the reason it is easier to remember.

All of this talk about chords. modes and scales begs a question. They also have modal positions just like the major and the minor scales. you can do one of two things. Here are the scales as they relate. . Use the blank tab sheet on the web site or above to TAB out your exercises if you'd like. T The other pages in theis section of the site will be dedicated entirely to figuring out chordal. And the process is the same. which I really hope you do. apply it. modal and scalar relationships and how they relate to one another. You can take all of this information and explore it. I would practice each modal position for each scale. "How do we tie them all together?" Well. Right now let's wrap up with a little study that incorporates some of the stuff that we talked about so far in a study Hope you like it. combine and create with it yourself.A step is the distance between 2 notes: half step = 1 fret whole step = 2 frets So here are the notes for all of the minor pentatonic scales Tonic (minor pentatonic scale) A B C D E F G flat 3rd 4th 5th flat 7th C D E G D E F# A Eb F G Bb F G A C G A B D Ab Bb C Eb Bb C D F So obviously these two scales are related because each major pentatonic shares the same notes with its pentatonic minor scale. Major Pentatonic Scale A B C D E F G Relative Minor Pentatonic Scale F#m G#m Am Bm C#m Dm Em Of course all of these scales should be practiced across the fretboard.

Whole step . Major Scale Pattern / Formula Every single major scale for every single key follows the same pattern: W-W-H-W-W-W-H or Whole step . We'll get the theory out of the way so we can get into some phrasing exercises and some reflections on how to use this thing we call the major scale. Above you can see every major scale note on the fretboard.Major Scale Major Scale Theory All right let's start with a left brained approach to the major scale. And unless you've spent a whole lot of time studying the lesson on Intervals (see the songwriting section).Whole step .Whole step .Half step .Whole step Half step Step the distance between 2 notes: • half step = 1 fret • whole step = 2 frets Major scale on the guitar fretboard On the guitar you can play a whole major scale up to the 12th fret and see the pattern on one string. you probably haven't mastered every note and every phrasing on it yet. .

We'll look at a couple here: • • static dynamic.A very good idea would be to try to memorize or learn the major scale for each of the keys A through G. Scale 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th A B C# D E F# G# B C# D# E F# G# A# C D E F G A B D E F# G A B C# E F# G# A B C# D# F G A Bb C D E G A B C D E F# As you notice. . Static positions: Major Scale Boxes When we play the scale in one place at a time without running up the fretboard. Dynamic Positions: Major Scale Boxes Playing the major scale dynamically is basically just you practicing moving between nmajor scale boxes. or many positions to play it in anyway. Below is a chart that shows every key's major scale. C is the only major scale that has no sharps or flats: C D E F G A B There are many ways to play the major scale. Look below and you can see all of these positions for the C major scale.

These exercises are to help remember the structure and the placement of the notes and to practice with a metronome to build clarity and speed. They're not supposed to create interesting phrasing yet.Okay now that you can see the charts and where the notes fall on the fretboard. Major Scale Guitar Major Scale Exercises Major Scale Exercise 1 |---------------------------4-54--------------------------------------------| |-----------------------5-7-------75----------------------------------------| |-----------------4-6-7---------------7-64----------------------------------| |-----------4-6-7---------------------------7-64-----------------------6-7-9| |-----4-5-7---------------------------------------7-5-4---------4-57S9------| |-5-7---------------------------------------------------7-5-57--------------| |---------------------------------------------------------------------------| |----------9-109------------------------------------------------------------| |-6-7-9S11--------11-9S7-6-------------------------------1-21---------------| |--------------------------9-7-8---------------------2-4-------42-----------| |-------------------------------9-7S5-4-------2-4-5----------------5-42-----| |----------------------------------------7-55---------------------------5---| Major Scale Exercise 2 |-----------------------------5--------------------------------| |-------------------------7-9---9-7----------------------------| |-------------------6-7-9-----------9-7-6----------------------| |-------------6-7-9-----------------------9-7-6----------------| |-------5-7-9-----------------------------------9-7-5----------| |-5-7-9-----------------------------------------------9-7-5----| Major Scale Exercise 3 |---------------------------------------------------------------------| |-----------------------------------------------------------5---5-7-5-| |-----------------------------------------4---4-6-4-6-7-6-7---7-------| . lets start in on some exercises.

|-----------------------4---4-6-4-6-7-6-7---7-------------------------| |-----4---4-5-4-5-7-5-7---7-------------------------------------------| |-5-7---7-------------------------------------------------------------| |---4---4-5-4-5-7-5----| |-7---7----------------| |----------------------| |----------------------| |----------------------| |----------------------| Major Scale Exercise 4 |--------------------------------------------------------------| |--------------------------------------------------------------| |-----------------------------------------------4-----4-6------| |-----------------------4-----4-6---4-6-7-4-6-7---6-7-----7----| |-----4-5---4-5-7-4-5-7---5-7-----7----------------------------| |-5-7-----7----------------------------------------------------| Major Scale Exercise 5 |---------------------------------------------------------------------| |---------------------------------------------------------------------| |-------------------------------------------------4-------4-6-----4-6-| |-------------------4-------4-6-----4-6-7---4-6-7---4-6-7-----6-7-----| |-----4-5-7---4-5-7---4-5-7-----5-7-------7---------------------------| |-5-7-------7---------------------------------------------------------| Major Scale Exercise 6 |-----------------------------------------------4---5-4-7-5----| |---------------------------------------5---7-5---7------------| |---------------------------4---6-4-7-6---7--------------------| |---------------4---6-4-7-6---7--------------------------------| |---4---5-4-7-5---7--------------------------------------------| |-5---7--------------------------------------------------------| |-5-7-4-5---4--------------------------------------------------| |---------7---5-7---5------------------------------------------| |-----------------7---6-7-4-6---4------------------------------| |-----------------------------7---6-7-4-6---4------------------| |-----------------------------------------7---5-7-4-5---4------| |-----------------------------------------------------7---5----| .

Major Scale Exercise 7 |---------------------------------------------------------4-7-5----| |-----------------------------------------------5-6---7-5-----5----| |-----------------------------4-----6---4-7---6-----7---------6----| |-----------4-----6---4-7---6---4-7---6-----7-----------------7----| |---4-7---5---4-7---5-----7----------------------------------------| |-5-----7----------------------------------------------------------| |-7-4---5-----4-------------------------------------------------------| |-----5---7-----5---7-----5-------------------------------------------| |-----------7-----6---7-4---6---7-4---6-----4-------------------------| |-----------------------------7-----6---7-----6---7-4---6-----4-------| |-----------------------------------------9-----7-----5---7-----5-----| |-----------------------------------------------------------9-----7---| |----------------| |----------------| |----------------| |----------------| |-7-4---5--------| |-----5---7-4----| Major Scale Exercise 8 |--------------------------------------------------------------| |--------------------------------------------------------------| |---------------------------------------------------4----------| |---------------------------4-------6-4---4-7-6-4-6---7-6-7----| |---4-------5-4---4-7-5-4-5---7-5-7-----7----------------------| |-5---7-5-7-----7----------------------------------------------| |--------------------------------------------------------------| |--------------------------------------------------------------| |--------------------------------------------------------------| |-7-4-6-7-6---4-6-4-----4--------------------------------------| |-----------7-------5-7---7-4-5-7-5---4-5-4-----4---------4----| |-----------------------------------7-------5-7---7-4-5-7-5----| Major Scale Exercise 9 |-------------------------------------------------------------------| |-------------------------------------------------------------------| |---------------------------------------------------------4---------| |---------------------4---------4-6-------4-6-7-----4-6-7-----4-6---| |-----4-5-7-----4-5-7-----4-5-7-----4-5-7-------5-7---------7-------| |-5-7-------5-7---------7-------------------------------------------| |----------------------------------------------------------------------| |----------------------------------------------------------------------| |---4-6----------------------------------------------------------------| .

Look at Zack Wylde. Think of movement when you solo. guitarist for Ozzy Osbourne. sing along with them. remember the intervals and their feel. Learn it well and you'll be able to do wonders with it. Try to throw some of them purposefully and strategically into the solos. or Eric Clapton. Don't simply play a bunch of phrases (see the songwriting section) thrown together. if you look hard enough you can create any chord from the major scale. use a note in particular as a reference point and always go back to it. You can know the major scale and create really nice licks and solos. First of all.|-7-----6-7-7-6-4-----7-6-4-------4---------------------------------7--| |---------7-------7-5-------7-5-4---7-5-4-----7-5-4-------5-4-------7--| |---------5-------------------------------7-5-------7-5-4-----7-5-4-5--| Major Scale Technical Exercises and Tips Create your own major scale exercises using the blank tab When you create them. so to speak Use these patterns to figure out where different chords lie in them. We'll discuss them with guitar chords later on an intermediate and then on an advanced level. If you're using the major scale to solo. There may be some deviations but every chord can stem from the patterns you just learned. They use the pentatonic scale just about exclusively in their solos and they're awesome. Secondly. You just need to learn them inside and out. it would take a heck of a long time to do that. At this point they are simply to learn the positioning and practice the positioning of the major scale. Creative Exercises and Tips for playing the major scale When you play your major scale patterns. play different patterns or riffs then come back so that your notes have a home. You don't need to shred. You don't need to know every mode to every scale. Some comments on the major scale and soloing The major scale and its theory can get very complex. being an accomplished guitarist . The major scale and every other scale is the same way. They know what feel they want in the playing and they know that scale well enough to express that feeling. think of a melody and try to work it into the solo to keep it interesting.

Keep the major scale intervals in mind W-W-H-W-W-W-H Check out the minor scale or take a look at Learn and Master Guitar. anywhere you want. the 6th and the 7th. the 6th position of the major scale is the natural minor. . a phenomenal guitar instructioanl series that will have you soloing with the major scale in no time. Say something with your music and people will love it. Relative Minor Scale Chart: Tonic (rel. Natural Minor / Relative Minor Scale the Natural minor scale The aeolian mode.has more to do with musicianship than technicality. regardless of how complex or simple it is. So basically you'd play the aeolian mode pattern to play the natural minor scale And basically what the relative minor scale does to the major scale is flatten the 3rd. Or you just move them up a fret towards the headstock. The major scale is a great tool to have and use in your playing. Take a look at the next modal positioning charts and learn them. You'll be able to play the major scale at will. Minor Scale 3 types of minor scales : • • • the natural or relative minor the harmonic minor the melodic minor. minor scale) 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th A B C D E F G B C# D E F# G A C D Eb F G Ab Bb D E F G A Bb C E F# G A B C D F G Ab Bb C Db Eb G A Bb C D E F Let's look at the A relative minor scale on the fret board to get a visual of the pattern.

Depending on how you use it. This scale has a bit of a classical feel to it. it may sound middle eastern as well.Natural/Relative Minor Formula: W-H-W-W-H-W-W or Whole step . A is the only relative minor scale that has no sharps or flats: ABCDEFG That's because it shares the same notes as the C major chord/scale. .Whole step Step The distance between 2 notes: • half step = 1 fret • whole step = 2 frets On the guitar you can play a whole major scale up to the 12th fret and see the pattern on one string. As you notice.Whole step .Whole step . natural minor first then play it again but this time sharpen the 7th.Half step . So play the relative. That leaves a step and a half between the 6th and the 7th notes of the scale.Half step .Whole step . This is the harmonic minor scale. It shouldn't be flatted from the major scale. Harmonic minor scale Harmonic minor scale This scale is exactly like the previous one except we leave the 7th alone.

Half step .Half step .Whole step . Take a close look and compare.Whole step and a half Half step The Melodic Minor Scale Melodic minor scale The last minor scale to learn is the melodic minor scale.Harmonic minor scale charts: Tonic (harm.H or Whole step . So the fretboard for A melodic minor going up would look like below.H . minor scale) 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th A B C D E F G# B C# D E F# G A# C D Eb F G Ab B D E F G A Bb C# E F# G A B C D# F G Ab Bb C Db E G A Bb C D E F# Harmonic minor scale pattern: W .H .W1/2 (3 frets) . Except you raise sharpen the sixth and seventh on the way up (ascending) and play the regular natural minor notes on the way back down to the tonic (descending).Whole step . On the way back to the tonic refer to the natural minor chart. It looks a lot like the chart above but you can see the difference between the 6th and the 7th. Melodic minor scale charts: .W . It's based upon the natural minor.W .

Minor Scale in the key of A |-----------------------------5--------------------------------| |-----------------------5-6-8---8-6-5--------------------------| |-----------------4-5-7---------------7-5-4--------------------| |-------------5-7---------------------------7-5----------------| |-------5-7-8-----------------------------------8-7-5----------| |-5-7-8-----------------------------------------------8-7-5----| Minor Scale Triplets |---------------------------------------------------5---7-5----| |---------------------------------------5---6-5-8-6---8--------| |---------------------------4---5-4-7-5---7--------------------| |-------------------5---7-5---7--------------------------------| |-------5---7-5-8-7---8----------------------------------------| |-5-8-7---8----------------------------------------------------| |-7---5---------------------------------------------------------| |---8---6-8-5-6---5---------------------------------------------| |---------------7---5-7-4-5---4---------------------------------| |---------------------------7---5-7---5-------------------------| |-----------------------------------8---7-8-5-7---5-------------| |-----------------------------------------------8---7-8-5-7-3-5-| . And it works just like the major scale. It's a lot of theory but try it and see if you can chart them out! Of course. try out the minor scale exercises too.. check out the relative minor scale page. Minor Scale Exercises If you're not sure what the relative minor scale is. just like in the major scale. Learn and Master Guitar will certainly be enough to help you thoroughly understand guitar scales and how to apply them. phrygian starts with note 3 and so on. dorian starts with note 2.For all of these scales there are modes also. where the ionian starts with note 1 of the scale. If they aren't enough..

you can figure out what note to start on or reference in your soloing based on the chord being played in the progression. You use the same pattern for any key. The root of the key is the same as the starting position of the scale. The root of the key becomes a minor 6th to the starting note of the scale. you'll see that all these modes put together actually are nothing but the major scale covering the span of 12 frets. With modal positions and scales. If you're still in the key of A major but you solo over a B. you're going to use that B note as your reference point to return to. Dorian Mode: this is the second position of the majorscale. It's a great instructional series. Phrygian Mode: this is the third position of the major scale. For example if you are playing in the key of A major and you are playing the A major scale. anywhere on the fretboard. if you keep returning to the A note.If you want some tips for practicing scales. as long as you know the key and the progression. So you just start the scale on the second note of it. Guitar Modes What is a guitar mode or a scale mode? Essentially a scale mode is a scale played with a different interval structure. all you do is move up the fretboard. It sounds complicated but once you figure out the patterns you'll find it's not that bad. If you study the charts below. check out the major scale exercises. in this case B. you are in the Ionian mode (or A Ionian/major mode). So no matter what key you are playing in. So you still play the A major scale but you start and return to the B note. The Guitar Suite endorses and recommends Learn and Master Guitar. . The root of the key becomes a minor 7th to the starting note of the scale. Ionian Mode: this is the first position of the major scale. If you really want to learn scales inside and out and how to relate them to chords and implement them into your playing.

this would be the A relative minor scale. Aeolian mode: this is the sixth position of the major scale. The root of the key becomes a perfect 4th to the starting note of the scale.Lydian Mode: this is the fourth position of the major scale. they're both the same thing. Mixolydian mode: this is the fifth position of the major scale. So if you are playing in the key of A major. I just showed A . The root of the key becomes a minor 3rd to the starting note of the scale. Locrian mode: this is the seventh position of the major scale. Remember a couple of things: a mode is not a scale. Or the E aeolian mode. This also the relative minor scale of the key you are playing in. The root of the key becomes a perfect 5th to the starting note of the scale. so a D major scale played in dorian position is actually E dorian the interval pattern is the same for all keys. Above you can see that all the modes put together = the major scale. The root of the key becomes a minor 2nd to the starting note of the scale.

6th. Locrian . Dorian . just like the major scale (ionian) having several positions. Aeolian . Mixolydian . the only key with no sharps or flats. Phrygian . you would choose the appropriate mode for the chord being played. Ionian . then based on the feel you want.1st. Lydian . We'll talk about all of this and go through some examples in later lessons.7th Guitar Mode Charts C major scale Mode Notes Ionian mode: C D E F G A B Dorian mode: D E F G A B C Phrygian mode: E F G A B C D Lydian mode: F G A B C D E Mixolydian mode: G A B C D E F Aeolian (minor) mode: A B C D E F G Locrian mode: B C D E F G A What this means above is that if you are in the key of C and you play a chord derivative of the C major scale. The important thing is to reference or start the scale on that particular note for the scale.the patterns I've shown you can be played in different ways.3rd.5th. We already did C.2nd.4th. Tonic is A or A major scale Mode Notes Ionian Mode A B C# D E F# G# Dorian B C# D E F# G# A Phrygian C# D E F# G# A B Lydian D E F# G# A B C# Mixolydian E F# G# A B C# D Aeolian (minor) F# G# A B C# D E Locrian G# A B C# D E F# Tonic is B or B major scale Mode Notes Ionian Mode B C# D# E F# G# A# Dorian C# D# E F# G# A# B Phrygian D# E F# G# A# B C# Lydian E F# G# A# B C# D# Mixolydian F# G# A# B C# D# E Aeolian (minor) G# A# B C# D# E F# . That is to say. so too do the modes. For now let's chart out all of the notes in every key just to prime us for that step.

Locrian A# B C# D# E F# G# Tonic is D or D major scale Mode Notes Ionian Mode D E F# G A B C# Dorian E F# G A B C# D Phrygian F# G A B C# D E Lydian G A B C# D E F# Mixolydian A B C# D E F# G Aeolian (minor) B C# D E F# G A Locrian C# D E F# G A B Tonic is E or E major scale Mode Notes Ionian Mode E F# G# A B C# D# Dorian F# G# A B C# D# E Phrygian G# A B C# D# E F# Lydian A B C# D# E F# G# Mixolydian B C# D# E F# G# A Aeolian (minor) C# D# E F# G# A B Locrian D# E F# G# A B C# Tonic is F or F major scale Mode Notes Ionian Mode F G A Bb C D E Dorian G A Bb C D E F Phrygian A Bb C D E F G Lydian Bb C D E F G A Mixolydian C D E F G A Bb Aeolian (minor) D E F G A Bb C Locrian E F G A Bb C D Tonic is G or G major scale Mode Notes Ionian Mode G A B C D E F# Dorian A B C D E F# G Phrygian B C D E F# G A Lydian C D E F# G A B Mixolydian D E F# G A B C Aeolian (minor) E F# G A B C D Locrian F# G A B C D E Now to put those on the fretboard. Once you memorize these fingerings you will ha Reverence: Guitar Study .

My apologies I don't have a MIDI or MP3 yet but I'll work to put one on soon. .

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the Guitar Suite.com: Reverence: A study Part 2 .

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some of them are major chords. Some of them are minor chords.. You can build chords on each of these notes.. 3. Major IV . diminished vii Chord / Key I ii iii IV V vi Vdim A b minor D E f# minor G# dim A B c# minor E F# A# dim B C C D D E f# minor A B c# minor D# dim E F F G G d minor e minor F G B dim G A C# dim g minor a minor B C E dim C D F# dim c# minor d# minor e minor f# minor g# minor a minor b minor g# minor a minor b minor d minor e minor Major chord progression charts THE FILE BELOW IS A FLASH FILE. IV and V may be substituted for other major family chords the Major Chord Progression Pattern: Major I . minor ii . For some reason. There are 7 notes in the major scale. Internet Explorer doesn't like Flash Files in many instances.. the combinations of them are virtually unending. each made up of different intervals. 1. 2. . some of them are diminished chords. So we'll start with the old standby. minor iii .. REMEMBER THAT CHORDS CAN BE SUBSTITUTED BY OTHER CHORDS IN THEIR FAMILY so the I. Sorry for the inconvenience. the MAJOR SCALE and how it affects chord progressions..Chord Progressions THE MAJOR SCALE AND PROGRESSION THEORY GET THE GUITAR PROGRESSION CHORD CHARTS (sorry they're too big for HTML so I put them in PDF) 420k but it's worth the download!!!! There are so many chords and chord progressions. minor vi . try using Firefox or Google Chrome.. Major V ... If it's not working for you.....

1-6-4 . 2-4-5 .... 1-7-5 1-6: .. 2-6-5 .. 2-3-1 .. 3-6-5 .... 2-4-1 . 1-6-1 ... 2-5-3 . 2-6-7 . 3-2-1 ... 1-5-3 ... 3-2-6 . 3-1-2 . 2-1-6 ... 1-7-1 3 CHORD PROGRESSIONS FROM THE 2 2-1: ... 3-4-7 .. 3-5-2 .... 1-3-7 .... 3-7-2 3-4: . 3-2-3 . 2-3-5 ... 2-5-1 .. 2-7-4 2-5: . 3-6-4 ..... 2-3-2 .. 2-7-1 2-3: . 2-7-6 2-7: ... 2-4-1 . 1-7-2 1-3: .. This may seem like a whole lot to do.... 1-4-2 .... 3-6-1 ... 2-1-3 .. 3-2-4 . Then play the following chord combinations in one key to get the feel... 1-3-6 . 1-7-4 1-5: ... 1-2-6 .. 2-3-6 ... 3-6-2 . 3-2-5 . 2-1-5 ..... 1-7-6 1-7: .. 1-6-2 ..... 1-2-4 .... keeping note of your ideas along the way.. 2-5-6 ......... 2-7-3 2-4: . We can combine any chord with any others in any order from a scale.. But start with the major scale chords.. 3-4-2 .... 2-3-7 ..... 2-6-4 .. 1-6-5 .... 1-5-1 .. 1-3-2 ... 2-7-6 2-6: .... 3-2-7 .... 3-7-4 3-5: . 2-7-1 3 CHORD PROGRESSIONS FROM THE 3 3-1: . now that you know a little bit more about chords and scales and how they fit together.... 3-4-1 . 1-2-1 .... 2-1-7 . 3-1-3 ... 3-1-7 ...... 2-3-4 .... 2-6-1 ... 1-5-2 ....... 1-7-3 1-4: . 3-1-5 .. 2-6-1 ... 1-4-3 ......... 1-5-4 . 1-5-6 . 3-5-7 .. 1-6-7 .. 2-1-4 ....... Print it out... 3-5-3 .. 2-6-7 ... 2-6-3 . 1-2-7 .. 2-5-4 . 3-5-1 ....... 1-4-1 .... 1-6-3 .. 1-3-4 . 3-4-6 .... 3 CHORD PROGRESSIONS FROM THE 1 1-2: . 1-3-1 ... Now as you can see from the major chord progressions and the minor chord progressions pages we looked at before.. Let's take a look.. So the combinations below can be used with any chord scale in any key.... 2-4-3 ... lets look at some progressions.... 1-5-7 ......Cadence Okay..... 1-4-7 .. the possibilities are limitless essentially.. 3-5-4 . 3-1-6 .. 3-1-4 .... 3-7-1 3-2: ... 1-3-5 .. 1-2-3 .. and then we can even change keys within a song. 2-5-1 ...... 3-5-6 . 3-4-5 . 2-4-6 . 2-4-7 .. 1-4-5 ... 2-1-2 .... 1-2-5 . 3-7-5 .. 1-4-6 . Look at the combination and try it in any of the chord scales or your own....... 3-4-3 ..

.... 6-5-1 .. 6-7-4 6-5: .... 4-1-4 .. 5-6-5 . 5-2-4 . 4-3-6 ... 5-4-2 . 4-3-7 ...... 7-2-6 . 4-1-7 .... 5-3-7 ....... 6-2-4 .... 7-6-2 . 6-7-3 6-4: ... 5-2-6 ... 7-6-3 .. 6-2-5 ... 5-1-5 .... 7-3-6 . 7-6-4 ... 6-4-1 ... 4-7-5 4-6: . 5-4-7 . 4-7-2 4-3: . 4-2-7 .. 4-1-6 ... 7-2-1 .... 5-3-2 . 7-4-7 7-5: .... 5-1-2 ......... 6-5-2 . 5-7-6 5-7: ........ 6-1-6 ... 6-2-6 . not even 4 chrd chord progressions. 4-2-5 . 3-6-3 . 7-3-1 ... 4-6-5 ...... 7-4-5 ... 4-3-4 . 6-5-6 ...... 5-7-3 5-4: ... 6-7-6 3 CHORD PROGRESSIONS FROM THEE 7 7-1: ........ 4-5-1 ... 7-2-5 ..... here specifically. 4-3-5 ...... 4-5-2 ... 5-1-4 . 5-2-3 ..... 7-1-2 ..... 5-6-7 .... 4-5-3 ..... 5-1-3 .. 6-5-3 .. 6-4-5 .. 6-2-3 . 7-4-2 .. 7-1-5 ... 7-1-4 .... 5-3-4 . 4-1-3 . 4-1-5 .... 7-6-7 And that's just 3 chord progressions. 5-3-6 .. 6-3-7 . 6-4-3 . 7-5-4 . 7-1-7 7-2: . 4-7-1 4-2: ... The point is for you to ... 4-6-2 . 4-5-6 .... 4-6-4 . 6-3-1 ....... 7-4-6 .. 4-2-6 . 5-2-7 .... 5-3-1 ... 4-1-2 .... 5-1-7 ...... 7-3-2 ..... 3-7-3 3 CHORD PROGRESSIONS FROM THE 4 4-1: ... 7-5-7 7-6: ... 5-6-2 .. 4-2-1 ........ 4-6-3 .... 6-3-5 . 6-2-1 . 4-2-3 . 6-3-2 . 5-6-4 ..... 6-5-7 ... 7-3-7 7-4: . 7-4-3 . 4-7-3 4-5: . 7-5-3 ..... 6-2-7 . 5-7-2 5-3: ..... 4-5-7 .... 4-7-4 3 CHORD PROGRESSIONS FROM THE 5 5-1: ...... 4-7-6 4-7: .... 3-6-7 .. 4-2-4 .. 6-5-4 .. 5-4-5 . is NOT to give you prefabricated progressions to which you can write songs or even an explanation as to why they sound the way they do. 5-2-5 . 5-7-1 5-2: . 7-6-5 ..... 7-5-6 . 6-7-1 6-2: . 5-7-5 3 CHORD PROGRESSIONS FROM THE 6 6-1: .. 6-1-4 . 5-6-3 .. 7-4-1 .... 5-4-3 . 6-3-6 .. 7-5-1 .... 7-2-4 .. 5-4-6 .. 5-1-6 . 7-1-3 ... 5-7-4 5-6: . 7-6-1 .. 6-1-5 .. 4-6-1 .. 7-2-7 7-3: ......... 6-4-6 .. 7-5-3 .. 5-3-5 . 6-7-2 6-3: . The point..... 6-1-3 ....... 6-4-2 .. 4-3-1 .. 6-3-4 . 4-3-2 ...... 7-1-6 ....... 7-3-4 .... 4-5-4 ....... 5-6-1 ... 6-1-2 .. 5-2-1 . 3-7-6 3-7: ... 4-6-7 ......... 6-1-7 . 5-4-1 .... 7-2-3 .... 6-4-7 ... 6-7-5 6-7: ..... 7-3-5 ...3-6: ..

feel free to add chords here and there. All you are doing with these chord progression exercises is learning chordal intervals. but if you set yourself to play through and use these exercises. It is the feeling that it needs to move somewhere else. or the 7th chord of the progression. honestly all notes have a tendency to go somewhere. and movement form there.. Then play them fingerstyle.) Chords resolve to othe chords more stable in the key. you can compose whatever you want. Chord resolution Resolution is the need to end up somewhere (on a particular note. This is the important thing. As we'll see. Now once you go through all of the chords above. This was a short lesson. You can add an incredible amount of texture and depth. Subtle resolution is generally done in half steps. Check out Learn and Master Guitar for a great instructional that teaches you all about chord progressions. How does chord leading? Leading and resolution are directly tied to one another. If you recognize and learn the relationship between notes and chords. The strongest tendency to resolve is from the 7th tone. As you know. The reason this is because the 7th is one half step up from the tonic or root. the leading tone is the 7th tone of the scale. Some have stronger tendencies than others.if you have the technical ability. It has to do with resolution. To find out what leads to what and to a lesser degree. though. You can have subtle and smooth resolution or strong resolution. This is why the 7th .explore your more creative and reflective side and experiment with these combinations and recognize their relationships to one another. Which chords lead to which? Well. Chord Leading What is chord leading? It is the tendency for one chord to lead to the next chord. Sometimes you use a chord that isn't even in the key and they have to be resolved to a chord in key. Well. you could use this page for weeks worth of practice. And you can play whatever you hear. that is the whole reason for this section. why.

That's the main reason I had you go through all of those chord cadences above. But the further away the chord lies from the tonic.)? Each one of these terms describes a relationship between it and the tonic or root of the chord / key.. The 5th to the 1st would be considered a strong resolution. But once you do doors will open for you musically. etc. This is simply a chart explaining how strong of a relationship the chords in a key have with regards to leading and cadences. The chord next to it is the most natural move to get it to the tonic. the stronger it is on its own it is or less it needs to be resolved to the tonic. because it leads or resolves so naturally to the tonic. Chord Leading Chart • • • • The following chart DOES NOT explain what chords HAVE to do. What do all those names mean? (TONIC.chord is called the leading tone. to gain that feel. Do I need to know what they mean? No. TONIC CATEGORY: (RESTFUL CATEGORY) . Basically this chart shows the PATH OF LEAST RESISTANCE. SUPERTONIC.. In our discussion of the chord flow chart. You can learn by ear what strength each of these chords does in relation to the tonic. I'll explain what each one means and does in detail. not really. MEDIANT. Any of these chords CAN RESOLVE DIRECTLY TO THE TONIC. Gaining this feel is one of the hardest things to do.

sometimes it shows up in the SUBDOMINANT CATEGORY. This is where the 7 chord (leading chord. Otherwise it contains the 7 leading tone.I one of the most common progressions. Often used to replace the tonic in a progression.The TONIC is home base. Both of these notes make this chord resolve very strongly to the tonic. as if they didn't need to go anywhere. The 6 most naturally moves to the 2 chord. The 3 can resolve anywhere. The leading chord contains no shared notes with the tonic. The chords in this section share 2 common tones. It shares the 3-5 tones of the tonic. If we resolve from the 4 to the tonic directly. which causes them to have a similar restless feel. So basically you can move to any chord from these without sounding bad. Also if you move up one 5th degree from the 5th or the root. So basically it's 2 5ths away from the root. The 3 (mediant) and the 6 (submediant) are separated by a fifth. Remember of course it can move to other chords as well but it makes a loud statement when it move to the tonic." . DOMINANT CATEGORY: These are the chords that most WANT to go to the tonic. calming effect. It is the closest related chord to the tonic so it stands alone best. Often called the "Amen" cadence. SUBDOMINANT CATEGORY: (MODERATE MOVEMENT) The 2 (supertonic) is a very common chord used. you get to the second. All roads lead to here. And it is usually followed by 5 (dominant) it shares 2 notes with this chord. So the ii and the IV share the 4 tone. The dominant shares one note with the tonic and that is the 5 tone. not a 7th chord) comes in. Very consonant. It feels like it needs to go "home. we get a very smooth. That's why it's furthest away. If this happens it progresses to the 5th chord nicely.V . This makes the ii . But it does have two notes that resolve 1/2 step up. Otherwise it most naturally resolves or leads to the dominant 5th. Remember we said that 1/2 step resolutions are very smooth and logical. The 4 (subdominant) is a feel good tone. none of which are the 4 tone. But. The four tone is restless so these all have a restful feel. We'll talk a little more about this in the Circle of Fifths lesson.

check out the lessons on chord leading before this lesson Using the Circle of 5ths To use the Circle of 5ths. C = 0 sharps 2. Each key as you go down adds the 7th sharp: o G adds F# . The circle of fifths helps us identify that key and those chords. you know you know what chord to go back to. you can see how many sharps each key or major scale contains. 1. Or if you are looking for an incredible guitar instructional. check The Guitar Suite endorses and recommends Learn and Master Guitar.Check out all the other lessons in our music theory section. Then the hard part is knowing only what chords are in that key. If you know the key. at the very least. LESSON 1: SHARPS • • • • • • C = 0 sharps CDEFGAB G = 1 sharp GABCDEF# D = 2 sharps DEF#GABC# A = 3 sharps ABC#DEF#G# E = 4 sharps EF#G#ABC#D# B = 5 sharps BC#D#EF#G#A# F# = 6 sharps F#G#A#BC#D#E# • With the Circle of 5ths. you have to figure out what key you are playing in. Circle of 5ths If you haven't already.

... F# . Now we take the flat 7th away. Now go up a 5th from Gb to Db. f# g a b c d e o To remember the order of these.. Let's look at F# and Gb F# .” . freak” LESSON 2: FLATS • • • • • • C has no flats CDEFGAB F has 1 flat FGABbCDE Bb has 2 flats BbCDEbFGA Eb has 3 flats EbFGAbBbCD Ab has 4 flats A bBbCDEbFG Db has 5 flats DbEbFGbAbBbC Gb has 6 flats GbAbBbCbDbEbF • This is basically a continuation from the sharps side.. F#G#A#BC#D#E# Gb . which would be “Cb. because we'd get into double sharps and all that nonsense. “Cool Guitarists Do Absolutely Everything Better . they're all the same notes.. GbAbBbCbDbEbF See.... just different names. We switch to flats to make life simpler.adds C# .. So instead of adding more sharps we take away flats. Gb and F# are the same notes. 3.D keeps F#. Each of these new sharps just happens to be a perfect 5th from the first sharp. remember this quote or make up your own.

Don't include F EXAMPLE: Key of Db (we know that Db has 5 flats) From F we have B. Eb. but it helps to remember the order of the keys. which is Ab Next we move up another 5th from Bb to F and take away the 7th flat.Next we move up another 5th from Db to Ab and take away the 7th flat. which is Db Next we move up another 5th from Eb to Bb and take away the 7th flat. We'll look at this a few more times in its entirety and make a few observations. To be honest with you we could analyze the hell out of this thing for hours and hours and still be digging deeper and deeper. C#. Gb SIMPLE RIGHT? . Ab. which is Gb Next we move up another 5th from Ab to Eb and take away the 7th flat. Include F EXAMPLE: Key of A (we know that A has 3 sharps) From F we have F. E. G# Flats: Take your key and the flats will be the notes leading to that key from F again plus the next note. A. “Cool freakin' BEAD g” Yeah. D. Now for another cheezy little quote to remember the order of the flats from the c counterclockwise. If not just make something up. C and G (counting 3 from F) so the sharps = F# . G so those will be the flats Bb. I know. Db. Guitar Theory: Uses of the Circle of 5ths • Find out how many sharps and flats are in each key: ALWAYS START on the F and REMEMBER THE ORDER OF THE NOTES ON THE CIRCLE Sharps: Take your key and the sharps will be each of the notes leading to that key from F. which is Eb. That leaves us with Bb only.

A E B are minor. the next 3 chords are minor. There you go. Finding major and minor keys in the Circle of 5ths Looking at the Circle of Fifths: the left and right hand man of the key you want are major. which we know is diminished.• Find out what chords are in a key and what their flavor is. So it is diminished.Then you arrive at the 7th. G C D are Major. Put them in order = G a b C D e F# G a b C D e F# Major minor minor Major Major minor diminished I ii iii IV V vi VIIo remember that the outer circle is major . We know that F# is the 7th of the G because it's the letter that precedes the G alphabetically. So for G = (G C D) (A E B) (F#) are what we get . After that.. In that key we know that there is one sharps and that is F#. Take the G major key. and F# is diminished..

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. 4.Guitar Theory: Summary of Circle of Fifths So now we know that the circle of fifths shows us: 1. 2. the notes in every major scale and minor scale how many flats and sharps are in each key signature what keys share key signatures how to quickly see what relative minor belongs to what key what the dominant and subdominant of every chord / key and consequently where each dominant resolves 6.. 3. 5. the more we study it. Memorize how many sharps and flats each gets: 0123456 (respectively) 3. the more we will understand the movement and relationship between chords and notes So where do we start?!! That's a ton of info! 1. . Memorize how to remember what's flat and sharp: START WITH F . Let's start with memorizing the notes and where they are on the Circle of Fifths: MAJOR KEYS: STARTING WITH C KEYS WITH SHARPS: down the right side CGDAEBF KEYS WITH FLATS: down the left CFBbEbAbDbGb 2.

. subdominant.. 4 ..Sharps = count the number of sharps your note has clockwise and those are your sharps.. Cm .. D#m KEYS WITH FLATS: down the left side: Am . 6 (respectively) 7.. 3 . G#m . above 5.. F#m . Where the minor keys lie in the Circle of Fifths: MINOR KEYS: STARTING WITH Am KEYS WITH SHARPS: down the right side: Am . mediant. Where the relative minor is in relation to the MAJOR keys and consequently what Keys share Key Signatures.. Realize where tonic category chords are. Don't count F as a flat.. subdominant chords are and dominant chords are on the circle.. supertonic.... . (major / minor / diminished) 8. Bbm . Memorize how many sharps and flats each gets: 0 ..... Flats = count the number of flats your note has counterclockwise from F and those are your flats.. Where the tonic. 1 .. Bm ... Em ... 2 . Gm . Fm . Include F as a sharp.. Dm .. 4.. C#m ... dominant. submediant and leading tones occur on the circle and what their flavor is for Minor keys and Major keys... Cbm 6.. C G D A E B F MAJOR KEYS and KEY SIGNATURE a e b f# c# g# d# minor keys that share key sig...... 5 .

major keys. relative minor to key chords OUTSIDE 1 LEFT 1 RIGHT 2 RIGHT 3 RIGHT 4 RIGHT 5 RIGHT across 4th sbdominant Major chord 5th dominant Major chord 2nd supertonic minor chord 6th submediant relative minor chord 3rd mediant minor chord 7th leading tone diminished chord b5th tritone INSIDE 1 LEFT 4th sbdominant minor chord 1 RIGHT 5th dominant minor chord 2 RIGHT 2nd supertonic diminished chord . major chords forms. key signatures INSIDE: minor scale. minor chord forms.CLOCKWISE: every degree separated by 5ths COUNTERCLOCKWISE: every degree separated by 4ths OUTSIDE: major scale.

But it is well worth it to have done this. we'm not going to cover extended chords here like 9ths. .. Take a look at it.. I VIIo . 6ths.. Of course don't forget to check out Learn and Master Guitar. tension or direction than the one you want to change or substitute simply won't work. I'd suggest going to the chord progressions page and learning the patterns on that page.. A chord with a different feeling.. V GENERAL COMMENTS Chord substitution overview: • • • Any chord in the dominant family can substitute for another dominant family chord Any chord in the major family can substitute for another major family chord Any minor can substitute for another minor family chord Okay now the complicated explanation Chord substitution can be a complex and wonderful thing.. Chord Substitution ii . add whatever and all of those. I VIIo . So what we need to do is find out what the chord is that shares the same tension. IV III. It'll take some time to really understand the theory and then be able to apply it. Then walk away and come back to it.. Study the charts. For the sake of simplicity.. tensions and directions... If you want a short cut. The idea that chords can substitute other chords depends and the fact that chords have feelings. vi . It will end up sounding out of place or awkward.3 RIGHT 4 RIGHT 5 RIGHT across 6th submediant Major chord 3rd mediant minor chord 7th leading tone Major chord b5th tritone This stuff cna be very confusing. IV III. vi .. V ii .. This will provide us with a good idea of how most substitutions in progressions work and give us some ideas to try to incorporate into our writing. We're going to stick to our basic chords from the Circle of Fifths and the chord scale tones. feeling or direction.

But let's give it a shot to see if we can't figure it out. Actually.. chord scale tones. any dominant chord can substitute for any other dominant chord. 2. As we stated already in the chord leading section. any chord from the subdominant category can substitute for any other subdominant chord.and? 1. we may even already know the answer. moderately restless and restless.. . and circle of fifths section. based on all the stuff we just went over in the chord leading. First let's look at all the notes that chords share in a Key: grey are shared notes 1234567 C dm em F G am Bdim yeah. So what happens is that every chord shares 2 notes with at least 2 other chords. Every note is shared between 3 chords. We'll see.Now obviously. figuring our why is probably going to be an in-depth endeavor. there are notes that are restful. The chords that share restless tones Tonic Category I iii VI The chords that share moderately restless tones Subdominant Category ii IV The chords that share restless tones Dominant Category V VIIo Chord Substitution Summary: any chord from the tonic category can probably substitute for any other tonic chord. So why can't we substitute any of these for any of the others? Because it has to do with what tones these chords share.

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