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Advanced Scenario Book
For C&C Ancients, by Joe Bisio (Designer of Paths of Glory, Hannibal: Rome vs Carthage etc.)
Contents
For C&C Ancients, by Joe Bisio ...................................................................................................................... 1 The Battle for Albania 65 BC - Roman vs Albanian ....................................................................................... 2 “300 Spartans”: The Pass of Thermopylae (The Last Day): 480 BC Spartan vs Persian .......... 7

OLIMPIC GAMES - 364 BC - Elean vs Arcadian ............................................................................................ 10 Heraclea: 280BC (The Main Battle) Pyrrhus Against Rome I The Ambush of Litana - 216BC Epirotes vs Romans ................................ 14

Gallic vs Romans ................................................................................. 18 .......................... 21

Deep in Celt-Iberia 207 BC - Mago Barca's Defeat - Carthaginians vs Romans

The Final Revolt 174BC - Romans vs Celtiberians ....................................................................................... 24 The Ambush of Segeda - The Roman Battle with the Belli 153 BC - Romans vs Celtiberians ..................... 27 End of the Triumvirate The Battle of Carrhae 53 BC (The Initial Main Battle) Parthians vs Romans .. 32

TRIBOLA - 147 BC - Roman vs Lusitanian........................................................................................... 38 End of the Triumvirate The Battle of Carrhae 53 BC (The Initial Main Battle) Second Mithridatic War Battle of the Halys River 82 BC Parthians vs Romans ... 41 ........................... 47

Romans vs Mithridatic

Roman Civil War The Battle of Forum Gallorum 43 BC -Antonian vs Senate

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The Battle for Albania 65 BC - Roman vs Albanian
From Pompey’s Campaigns in the Caucasus

The Albanians were one of the 14 peoples of the East that Pompey claimed to have defeated at his grand triumph in Rome in 61 BC. Pompey (from 67 BC onwards) also closed down the pirates of the Mediterranean, finished out the 3rd Mithridatic War with King Mithridates and his royal relations in Armenia, then campaigned against the Iberians, Albanians, and various other tribes of the Caucasus area, saw to the political settlement of Syria and other kingdoms of the East, besieged Jerusalem and invaded the Jewish temple, and finally (circa 63 BC) conducted a punitive expedition against the Nabataeans in a desert region which is today part of the Kingdom of Jordan. Historical Background ―Oroeses (the Albanian king) had mustered a sizeable army, numbering some 60,000 foot and 22,000 horse according to Strabo, although Plutarch gives the number of cavalry as 12,000. Roman numbers are not stated in our sources, but may well have been substantially less than the 40-50,000 Pompey had mustered against Mithridates in the previous year. Many troops were needed to act as garrisons or to mop up the last fragments of resistance in the recently conquered territory, whilst the problems of supplying men and animals in the often difficult terrain anyway discouraged the use of too large a force. Pompey may have had a force half the size of the one he led in 66 BC and could well have been heavily outnumbered by the Albanians. The latter certainly had an advantage in cavalry, some of whom were heavily armored cataphracts, and Pompey needed to find some way of dealing with these as the king, obviously intent on forcing a pitched battle, advanced to meet him.‖ ―Throwing out his own horsemen as a screen, he (Pompey) advanced down on to a level plain flanked by hills. Some of his legionaries were concealed in defiles on this high ground, the men covering their bronze helmets with cloth to prevent the sun from reflecting on the metal and giving away their position. Other cohorts of legionaries knelt down behind the cavalry, so that they could not be seen from the front. Oroeses advanced against what seemed to be no more than a line of horsemen. Pompey repeated another tactic he had used against Mithridates, ordering his cavalry to attack boldly and then, feigning panic, to withdraw. The Albanian cavalry pursued them eagerly…and as they did so lost much of their order. The Roman auxiliary horsemen retired through the gaps between the infantry cohorts, which then stood up. Suddenly the Albanians were faced with a fresh and well-formed line of infantry who came forward against them, yelling their battle cry. Behind the legionaries the Roman Cavalry rallied and moved round behind the line to attack the enemy flanks, whilst more cohorts emerged from the concealing defiles to threaten the enemy rear. The position of the Albanian army was hopeless, but in spite of this the warriors appear to have fought very hard. One account claims that Pompey fought

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hand to hand with the king‘s brother and killed him in the best traditions of Alexander the Great or Marcellus. Although a hard fight, the battle proved decisive, for Oroeses soon accepted the peace terms imposed on him.‖ (The above selection is from In the Name of Rome: The Men Who Won the Roman Empire by Adrian Goldsworthy pages 197-198)

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War Council

Roman Army: Leader: Pompey 6 Command Cards Albanian Army: Leader: Oroeses 5 Command Cards Move First Victory Romans 11 Banners, Albanians 7 Banners (scored in the usual way). Special Rules Command Rules: All Albanian & Roman Leaders may cancel a retreat or a sword hit if present with the unit. Units on both sides involved in close combat with the support of a Leader may only count one helmet hit amongst those rolled to inflict a hit on an opposing unit, unless Pompey is the supporting leader---then up to two helmet hits may be counted.. Only Pompey & Oroeses can support friendly units engaged in close-combat or battle-back on adjacent hexes—all the other Leaders can only support units they are stacked with in combat. Units and the Rally Card:. No unit can be rallied to beyond five blocks or its strength at the start of the game whichever is less. If a Player rolls ―swords‖ when attempting to rally he may freely chose which unit gets a block back. Heavy & Medium Foot Special Ordered non-Combat Moves: Heavy and Medium Foot units on both sides ordered to move with any card except ―Double Time‖ or ―Line Command‖ may move two hexes as long as they do not start or end or pass through hexes adjacent to enemy units. (note: this rule was added to increase mobility on this extended map for both sides). Roman Legionary Infantry & other Special Roman Army Rules: The following types of infantry units in the game on the Roman side are assumed to be Roman Legionaries: ALL Roman Heavy & Medium Infantry. Roman Pilum: Each Roman Legionary Infantry unit starts with a Pilum Marker. The Pilum is a one-time use weapon that is generally fired right before a Roman Legionary unit attacks in close-combat or is itself attacked by the enemy in close-combat. Once the Pilum is fired the Pilum marker is removed from the Roman unit to indicate that the Pilum has been expended and the unit may not throw Pilum for the rest of the battle.Just before a Roman unit with Pilum is attacked or is itself attacked by the enemy for the very first time in the battle in close-combat it throws its Pilum— roll one die and apply normal hits for swords, color, or a Flag/retreat hit Afterwards remove the Pilum marker. The act of throwing the Pilum is not considered to be part of the Close-Combat— so any result of the Pilum throw is resolved before the Close-combat. An attached Leader may use his special ability to cancel a ―swords‖ hit that was inflicted via a Pilum hit (see special

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Command rules) on the unit he is stacked with. Roman units, adjacent to the enemy, that have not expended their Pilum may also be ordered to throw Pilum if the card ―Darken the Sky‖ is played by their commanding player. The Player picks one adjacent enemy unit and throws two dice –apply the results just as one would before close combat—and remove the Pilum Marker. Roman Relief Moves & Cohort Maneuvers: Adjacent and on the same side Roman Legionary Infantry & Roman Auxillia, instead of moving, may switch places in a ―Relief/Cohort Maneuver‖. Relief/Cohort Maneuvers may only be conducted through the play of Section cards ONLY. Instead of ordering one unit via a section card, the controlling Player may order a pair of adjacent Legionary Infantry and/or Roman Auxillia units to switch hexes—at least one of the units switching places must not be adjacent to an enemy unit. A unit that switched places via the Relief/Cohort Maneuver into a hex adjacent to the enemy may close combat in the same player-turn. A Roman Auxilla unit may switch places with Roman Legionary unit via the utilization of this rule and procedures. Roman Veteran Initiative: Up to Two Roman Legionary Heavy Infantry (and/or Elite Heavy Infantry) units per Roman Player-turn that are ordered by Line Commands or an ―Order Heavy Troops‖ card may move two hexes and close combat at their option. Roman Elite Mercenary Slingers The Roman Slinger units hit on swords when executing missile fire & battle-back. Roman Cavalry Discipline: Roman Medium & Light Cavalry units only retreat two hexes per Flag result inflicted on (or taken voluntary) by them. Roman Cavalry units may make ordered moves through and evade through (in the first hex a two hex evasion) friendly foot units. Elite Legionaries Note two of the initial Roman Heavy Infantry units start the game with five blocks rather than the normal four blocks. These are crack veteran troops, they are treated as normal Roman Legionary Heavy Infantry for all other purposes, but have the advantage of an extra block and may rally back to a full five block strength through use of a rally card. The Albanian Oriental Army Special Rules Oriental Army: The Albanian Army is assumed to be a typical, but somewhat well trained Oriental ‗horde‘, greatly outnumbering, but inferior in equipment, discipline, skill. and fighting spirit to the forces of the Roman Republic‘s Legions---In Close Combat and Battle Back ALL Albanian units, save their Heavy Cavalry & Warrior foot make no hits on their enemies if Swords are rolled—always consider Swords to be a ‗miss‘ when rolled by the Albanian Player unless the unit is a Cataphract Heavy Cavalry or the Warrior foot unit involved in the closecombat or battle-back. Albanian Cataphracts: ALL Albanian Heavy Cavalry is heavily armored—therefore they always ignore the first sword hit inflicted upon them in close-combat or battle-back, or hits from

C1 etc . Albanian Horse Archers: When missile firing at a three hex range Albanian Light Horse Archers do so with only 1 dice regardless of whether or not they have moved. The arriving units/Leader enter those clear hexes as their initial entry hex and then move one hex and battle on their turn of entry. The presence of friendly units or impassable terrain does not negate an ―Outflanked‖ situation in any way. B1. On his very first Player-turn the Albanian Player must attempt to attack (regardless of any resulting Roman evasion) at least two different Roman cavalry units via close-combat. Units on the board edges (and not surrounded by six adjacent hexes) cannot be ―Outflanked‖.6 missile or pilum fire. Albanian Levy Foot: All Albanian Auxillia have no missile fire capability. or hexes adjacent to an enemy unit. and unlike most other Albanian units hit on sword rolls as noted above. Effects of being Outflanked: ―Outflanked‖ units when battling back roll only half the normal number of dice they would be normally entitled to rounded up—to a maximum of only two dice—―Outflanked‖ units when battling back never hit on helmet rolls even if supported by a leader.through to I1 on Map 1 or A1. The Roman Player may not enter his off-map units/leader until his 3rd Player-turn or later. If he fails to do so the Roman Player immediately gains 2 Banners. Outflanking This is an easy way of introducing facing and flanks to the game with little fuss—it can be retrofitted to other scenarios where appropriate: A unit is said to be ―Outflanked‖ if it is surrounded in all six adjacent hexes by either enemy units. Optional Rule: Albanian Initial Attack Imperative: Note: This optional rule requires the Albanian Player to attack the Roman Cavalry just as the Albanians historically initially attempted to do when they were suckered in by Pompey‘s stratagem). The off-map units/leader arrive in any vacant hex on the Roman mapboard right section in mapedge hexes numbered 1 (A1. D1 on Map 2). Albanian Heavy Cavalry may never evade battle. . A unit‘s ―Outflanked‖ situation is judged at the instant it battles back. B1. Entry of initially off-map Roman units/leader onto the map: In order to bring on all his off-map units and the initially off-map Legate Leader. All Albanian Auxillia retreat 2 hexes per Flag result taken or inflicted upon them. the Roman Player may bring them on by playing any Leadership Card (regardless of type or section) in lieu of using the card to order units on the map. C1.

Scenario Note: The scenario probably requires the use of at least two C &C sets.7 “300 Spartans”: The Pass of Thermopylae (The Last Day): 480 BC Spartan vs Persian ―…Go tell the Spartans. however folks with access to miniatures can probably improvise something. . That here obedient to their laws we lie…‖ Historical/Hollywood Scenario Background The ―300 Spartans‖ scenario should be considered the ―Hollywood‖ version of this semi-mythic historical event. In the set-up and special rules I have tried to be true to the movie version of an epic battle. as opposed to trying to come up with a strictly historical scenario. passerby.

8 War Council: Spartan/Allied Army: Leader: Leonidas. Victory: Persian Player: The Persian Player scores two (2) Banners each for eliminating Leonidas. Rampart hex tiles DO NOT Block the line of sight. and Spartan Heavy Infantry/Hoplite units. Greek Camp: The one Greek Camp hex tile (in B9) is considered to be un-fortified. Scenario Special Rules: Terrain Special Rules: Broken Ground: Persian cavalry and chariot units may not close-combat or move/retreat/evade to broken ground hexes. Leonidas—if he evades off the map. Spartan/Allied units occupying Rampart tiles & hit by missile fire (Flag or color hit) shot through the front hexides roll one normal six sided dice for each such hit—if the roll is ―5-6‖ that hit is ignored. (He would have been disgraced and exiled at the very minimum after such a cowardly retreat) Spartan Player: 15 Banners or eliminate Xerxes---if Xerxes evades off the map he is not considered eliminated for victory purposes. Co-King of Sparta 5 Command Cards (one initial card must be ―Leadership in Any Section‖. the other four are chosen randomly before play starts. units entering the camp must cease movement. Ramparts: The Ramparts represent the ―Middle Gate‖ wall that the Spartans had refurbished when they arrived at the pass of Thermopylae. King of Kings 5 Command Cards (all chosen randomly)---reduced to four cards if Xerxes evades off-map— discard one card immediately upon such an evasion. Leaders may move through broken ground hexes when ordered by themselves and do so as if these were clear hexes. He also scores 2 Banners if the Greek Camp tile is eliminated from the map (see special rules below)—All other Greek units (Medium Infantry & Auxillia) score one (1) banner each. Victory is 10 Banners. and the camp tile is removed from the map—thereby converting the hex to clear. Units conducting close combat Attacks (not battle-back) through the front hexsides of such hex tiles while targeting a unit on the tile do so at one less dice than ‗normal‖. The Spartan/Allied Player . also see special rules on Greek Camp) Move First Persian Army: Leader: Xerxes. is considered eliminated for victory purposes. it only blocks line of sight.—if this hex is entered by Persian units the first Persian unit to enter the hex loses one block (as men split off to loot) immediately. Persian cavalry and chariot units may not close-combat through such hexsides in either direction—(although they can move through such hexes. and battle-back through the front hexsides). The above rules for the Rampart tiles are in lieu of those found in the rulebook.

Persian Cavalry: All Persian Light and Medium Cavalry may (or must) retreat a maximum of 2 hexes per Flag rolled against them—they may not close combat or move/retreat/evade into or through broken ground hexes. with the exception of the Asiatic Army rules concerning ignoring sword rolls above which affect ALL Persian units regardless of type. Starting with the second Persian Player-turn the Persian Player may choose to bring them onto the map. Xerxes must remain attached to the ―immortal‖ Infantry unit he starts the game stacked with. They may than be ordered by the card the Persian is about to play as appropriate. The presence of friendly units or impassable terrain . may ignore up to one retreat/flag result from the combat at the option of the Spartan/Allied Player. Asiatic Levies: All Auxilla in the Persian host are considered to be the standard regular Asiatic infantry levies of the Persian Army. once all block losses are taken in a combat (hand to hand or missile). but inferior in both equipment and fighting spirit to the forces of the free Greek city-states---In Close Combat and Battle Back ALL Persian units make no hits on their enemies if Swords are rolled—always consider Swords to be a ‗miss‘ when rolled by the Persian Player. Immortals: All Medium Infantry units in the Persian host are considered to be Xerxes‘ ―immortals‖. Spartan Hoplite Special Rules: All Heavy Infantry on the Spartan side is considered to be the personal Spartan Hoplite bodyguard of King Leonidas. or hexes adjacent to an enemy unit. Persian Leaders & Xerxes. greatly outnumbering. These units have no missile capability. Persian Army Special Rules: Asiatic Army: The Persian Army is assumed to be a typical Asiatic ‗horde‘. Persian Chariots: When attacking Persian Chariots roll only three dice rather than the normal four dice— they may not close-combat or move/retreat/evade into or through broken ground hexes.9 must discard one card randomly from his hand the instant the Greek camp tile is removed by the Persian Player—his hand will stay at four cards for the remainder of the game. He may not leave that unit until it is reduced to 2 blocks or less. Once on the map they cannot leave it again save by elimination. Before playing his card for a Player-turn he may chose to place the eligible to enter off-map units in any vacant map-edge hex from I4 through I12. Spartan Hoplite units that still have three or four blocks. but are otherwise treated the same as Medium Infantry. only to replace a lost Persian unit of the same type on a one for one basis. Off Map Persian units: Five Persian units start the game off-map…these may enter in a vacant hex on or between I4 to I12. The eliminated units the off-map units are replacing still count for banners scored by the Spartan/Allied Player. these units may move when ordered exactly like Auxillia in the normal rules. Outflanking This is an easy way of introducing facing and flanks to the game with little fuss—it can be retrofitted to other scenarios where appropriate: A unit is said to be ―Outflanked‖ if it is surrounded in all six adjacent hexes by either enemy units. King of Kings Units on the Persian side involved in close combat / battle back with the support of a Leader may only count one helmet hit amongst those rolled to inflict a hit on an opposing unit.

made their sacrifices. Before this time they (the Eleans) had been looked down on as soldiers by the Arcadians and Argives. instead. prepared to celebrate the Olympic Games together with the Pisatans. they again turned their attention to the Eleans. and about four hundred Athenian cavalry. the Arcadians were the ones they met first and they routed them at once. on this day they led their allies into battle as though they were the bravest men alive. As for the Arcadians. while they themselves were fighting on ground level. they then stood firm against the Argives. and now they came marching along the road to Olympia. to back them up-about two thousand hoplites from Argos.Elean vs Arcadian Historical Background ―Now that the Arcadians were no longer concerned with Cromnus (where they had defeated the Spartans in a siege). stones and weapons were raining down on them from the roofs of the porticos. A unit‘s ―Outflanked‖ situation is judged at the instant it battles back. they and the Pisatans were busy organizing the festal gathering. who came up in support. However.‖ ―By this time the Eleans in fighting order had already reached the sacred precinct. they did not go forward to meet them. fighting as bravely as ever and pushing the enemy back towards the altar. But when the month of the Olympic Games came round and the days had arrived when the great assembly gathers. the commander of the Three Hundred (a socially upper-class Elean political/military faction). They put a stronger garrison into Olympia and. and among these was Stratolas himself (an Elean oligarchic political leader). But the Arcadians and their allies were so terrified of what the next day might bring that they never even rested during the night. After this they (the Eleans) retired to their own camp. However. who claim to have been the first people to have had charge of the holy place. As for the Arcadians.10 does not negate an ―Outflanked‖ situation in any way. They then drove the enemy back to the space between the Council House and the Temple of Hestia and the theatre nearby. too. And now the Eleans formed up their line on the other side of the river. The competitors who had got as far as the wrestling event had left the racecourse and were now wrestling in the space between it and the altar. since an Olympic year was coming on. some of them were killed. the Council House. and were victorious over these too. and also by the Achaeans and the Athenians. having no idea that the Eleans would march against them. OLIMPIC GAMES . and the Temple of Zeus. and at once moved forward into action.364 BC . spending the time demolishing the splendid pavilions that had been built . they formed into line along the river Cladaus…They had allies. Effects of being Outflanked: ―Outflanked‖ units when battling back roll only half the normal number of dice they would be normally entitled to rounded up—to a maximum of only two dice—―Outflanked‖ units when battling back never hit on helmet rolls even if supported by a leader. who would appear but the Eleans? They had made their preparations openly. They had already held the horse-race and the first four events of the pentathlon. they had called on the Achaeans to help them. Units on the board edges (and not surrounded by six adjacent hexes) cannot be ―Outflanked‖.

The courage that they had shown in battle was no doubt something which a god by his inspiration could produce in a day. they withdrew to their own city. It is believed he died shortly thereafter-perhaps sometime in the late 350s decade BC).Xenophon apparently wrote this particular part of the work in circa 360 BC or later—a few years after the events described. but it would take human beings a very long time to produce such a quality in men who were not naturally brave already.11 (for the Games) and using the material for constructing a stockade. War Council Elean Army: Leaders: Elean Strategos & Stratolas . The stage is set. The battle lines are drawn and you are in command. but when they saw the strength of the stockade and the numbers of men who climbed up to the roofs of the temple.‖ ―As for the Eleans. they advanced again the next day.‖ (The Selection below is from Xenophon‟s „History of My Times‟ (or Hellenica) Book VII Chapter 4. The rest is history.

Units not on a river hex involved in a closecombat/battle-back into a river hex suffer no penalty whatsoever. Note that Hoplite units gain no direct combat advantage for themselves when defending in Public Buildings/Temples hexes. Hoplites in this scenario—due to the small scale of this battle. or Main Altar hex wherein an Elean unit was the last to enter that objective hex the Eleans can lose Banners if the hex initially captured is retaken/re-entered by an enemy unit. Camp/ pavilions. Special Rule Command: A Leader attached (stacked with) a friendly unit may cancel one sword hit on the unit in lieu of canceling a retreat hit. .12 5 Command Cards ( one is a ―Double Time ― card the rest randomly chosen) Move First Arcadian/Allied Army: Leader: Arcadian Strategos 4 Command Cards (randomly chosen) Victory Victory for the Arcadian/Allied side is 6 Banners scored in the usual way. Peltasts: All Auxillia in the game are assumed to be Peltasts—therefore they are allowed to evade per the normal rules if attacked by Enemy Heavy or Medium Infantry only in close combat. Note that there are a total of nine objective hexes on the map for the Eleans (x7 Public Building/Temples. A unit involved in close combat with the support of a Leader may only count one helmet hit amongst those rolled to inflict a hit on an opposing unit. Treat as normal Auxillia otherwise. Special Troop Rules: Hoplites: Both sides Heavy and Medium Infantry are assumed to be heavily armed and armored Greek warfare fighting style Hoplites—therefore such units always ignore the first sword hit inflicted upon them. may move two hexes and not battle (like Auxillia or Julian Legions rules) when normally ordered with any applicable card save a Double Time or Line Command. Terrain Special Rules: “River Cladaus” Fordable River: The River is assumed to be not much of an obstacle— therefore its hextiles do not inhibit movement in any way. and only retreats 2 hexes per flag result taken or inflicted upon it. Victory for the Elean side is 10 Banners scored in the usual way and additionally the Eleans get one Banner for each Public Building/Temple. Athenian Cavalry & Light Cavalry: The Arcadian/Allied Medium Cavalry unit may missile fire if ordered. Light Cavalry on both sides‘ only retreat 3 hexes per flag result taken or inflicted. x1 Main Altar. Its only combat effect is to reduce by one dice the ‗normal‘ number rolled by a unit located in such hexes that is close-combat attacking/battling back out of a river hex. and x1 Camp/ Pavilions). Once the Banner is lost by the Eleans in a recapture of an objective hex it cannot be regained for the same hex even if the objective hex in question comes back under Elean control via Elean unit re-entry.

Final Rules Note: The standard ‗outflanking‘ rule used in many of my other scenarios is not used for this particular fight due to both the rather small scale of the battle and the general character of the combat among the buildings and temples of Olympia. d) Line of Sight: Public Buildings/Temples hexes block the line of sight. b) Missile Fire From: As an exception to the normal missile fire rules ordered Foot units located in a Public Buildings/Temples hex may missile fire at adjacent enemy units if the unit firing is capable of missile fire. only one dice can be rolled against it regardless of whether or not the firing unit has moved. Close-Combat attacks (but not battle-backs) by Hoplites into Public Buildings/Temples are always at one dice less than ‗normal‘. retreat. evade or even attack into Public Buildings/Temples hexes—not even attacks with missile fire from Cavalry is allowed into Public Buildings/Temples —Cavalry may battle-back normally into such hexes if attacked from a Public Buildings/Temples hex. The Main Altar hex blocks the line of sight.13 Hills: Use normal rulebook rules. however no close-combat/ battle-back may take place in either direction between Hill hex B9 and the adjacent ―Temple of Hera‖ hex (hex C9). If a Non-Hoplite unit is taken under missile fire when located in a Public Buildings/Temples hex. A unit defending on the Altar hex can also ignore one retreat flag. The Altar does not inhibit movement The Camp/Pavilions is not fortified—the only combat effect the camp has is to block line of sight. Main Altar & Camp/ Pavilions: A Unit battling back only from the Main Altar does so with one extra dice. “Public Buildings/Temples”: Public Buildings/Temples does not inhibit movement (except cavalry see a) below) a) Cavalry: Cavalry units may not enter. All Close-Combat attacks (but not battle-backs) into the Main Altar hex are at one dice less than ‗normal‘. . c) Benefits for Occupants/Combat Effects: Non-Hoplite units located in and defending in Public Buildings/Temples may ignore the first sword hit and the first retreat flag inflicted on them by enemy close-combat attacks. An ordered missile capable foot unit located in a Public Buildings/Temples hex may only fire (if it decides to missile fire) at an adjacent enemy unit (not one 2 hexes away) if there is currently one or more enemy units adjacent to its hex. The Camp/ Pavilions does not inhibit movement.

The Roman horse was at this time. smartly attacked the van of Pyrrhus‘ army. and as Laevinus imagined successfully. which completed the defeat. when they deployed into line…. Seven times the Roman charge broke on the phalangial masses…The one could not break the other. as often did the legionaries arrest its onset with their own fierce charge and greater front. with whom the king is stated by Plutarch to have exchanged armor-for what purpose is not clear-for the second time threatened the destruction of the phalanx from sheer demoralization at the supposed death of its leader. On the rolling plain between Heraclea and Pandosia. Pyrrhus had the slightly superior force. According to Dionysius fifteen thousand Roman legionaries lay dead or wounded upon the field.‖ ―The two lines of heavy foot met. and Laevinus felt sure of victory. and drove it in on the main body. in the fray of Megacles. and from across the Siris observed its orderliness…he could not conceal his surprise. The phalanx recovered and once more moved to the attack. the Roman Legion first measured its strength against the Grecian Phalanx. and to see him revived their courage. until now held in reserve. on the Siris. it met a foe as it had never encountered. the consul Publius Laevinus had in the Spring of 280BC again invaded Lucania with the usual consular army of twenty thousand men. Startled at this audacious advance and sudden check. but failed to pierce the legion. He saw that they were not barbarians but a disciplined army to fight. ― ―When the king came in sight of the Roman camp. while the Romans were correspondingly cheered. Pyrrhus galloped to the front with his three thousand cavalry. Nor was his surprise quickly lessened. Hieronymus says seven . for no sooner did the Romans perceive the approach of the enemy than they filed from their camp with their usual promptness and perfect order. unable to make headway. with bared face. which none had yet beheld. but managed to hold the fords against the king‘s pursuit. and although thrown from his horse. Pyrrhus launched his Thessalian cavalry upon the cohorts. sustained by a column of horse through the river ford. one of Pyrrhus‘ general officers. pushed some light troops. brought to the front his elephants.14 Heraclea: 280BC (The Main Battle) Pyrrhus Against Rome I Epirotes vs Romans Historical Background: ―While his colleague…. The fall. and which now suddenly appeared behind a roll of ground…the horse fell back in confusion and broke through the line of the legion in its panic. In vain did the sarissa of the Epirots force back the Roman line. which was holding the ford. seriously. was engaged in Etruria. nor could this tear its foe asunder…‖ ―Finally Pyrrhus. one indeed whose organization was superior to his own. and devastated it. The Roman van held the fords and enabled the legions to cross. The Roman forces fled across the river. the ponderous Phalanx struck its fearful blow. threatening Pyrrhus‘ flank. at which for a moment his army was somewhat abashed. rode through the ranks. Pyrrhus advanced to meet him. but Pyrrhus. Appalled by the aspect of these huge creatures. soon reestablished the matter along his own front. The lines clashed again and again.

according to Roman legend. ―One more such victory and I am lost‖ quoth he.Pyrrhus visited the field thus won.A. the Epirots 8 Banners. Dodge‘s 1891 masterwork Hannibal p. Hieronymus only four thousand killed.15 thousand.110-113) War Council: Epirotean Army: Leader: Pyrrhus 6 Command Cards Roman Army Leader: Laevinus 5 Command Cards Move First Victory: The Romans must reach 9 Banners to win. If the Epirots reach 8 Banners . But the smaller figure was a terrible loss…. Dionysius gives thirteen thousand as his casualties.‖ (The above was from T. two thousand were captured. He saw that all the dead Romans lay with faces to the foe. Pyrrhus had suffered equally.

a) Clear Terrain Combat Bonus: When involved in Close Combat with an enemy Infantry unit. Phalanx Infantry may engage in normal Momentum Movement and Momentum Combat regardless of the direction of the combat—although without the Phalanx Clear terrain Combat bonus if involved in Momentum Combat (see a) above). b) Phalanx Infantry cannot utilize ―double time‖ Movement or Order activation per the Double Time card. see special rules below on the armor switch). and also when Battling Back (but see exception in d) below). Phalanx Infantry operates under a set of special rules as follows in a) through e) below. A unit involved in close combat with the support of a Leader may only count one helmet hit amongst those rolled to inflict a hit on an opposing unit. After the ―Elephant Reserve Move‖ he . Note: Non-moving Ordered Phalanx units may always engage in Close Combat.16 at any time play through the next complete Roman Player-turn—if the Romans reach 9 Banners during their next Player-turn the result is an historical ―Pyrrhric Victory‖ otherwise the game ends in a Epirot Victory. The bonus does not apply to any Momentum Combat. 2) Leader Special Rules: A Leader attached (stacked with) a friendly unit may cancel one sword hit on the unit in lieu of canceling a retreat hit. Example of ―Front‖ hexes: A Phalanx Infantry unit in hex H7 would have the following two hexes adjacent: G8 & G7 as its ―front‖ hexes. c) Phalanx Infantry may not engage in Close Combat if they have just moved before combat their maximum of one hex. Scenario Special Rules: 1) All Epirot Medium and Heavy Infantry are considered to be Phalanx Infantry. a Phalanx Infantry that still has three or four blocks on map receives an extra (+1) dice if both of the involved opposing units are in clear hex with no terrain tile present.e.: ―front‖ as in towards the initial setup position of the opposing army) of the moving Phalanx Infantry unit. 3) Epirotean Elephant Reserve Special Rules & Shock effect Once per game the Epirot side can declare before playing their card for their player-turn a special ―Elephant Reserve Move‖…The Epirot Player may immediately move any of his elephant units not adjacent to the enemy up to 4 hexes as if the elephants were making a normal move. d) Phalanx infantry units that ―Battle Back‖ at enemy units located in hexes other than the ―front hexes‖ roll a maximum of three dice (and even this could be reduced further by terrain factors). unless the move was into one of the two hexes toward their ―front‖ (i. The Romans get 2 Banners (instead of 1) if Pyrrhus is eliminated (but initially it is not know which Epirot Leader is Pyrrhus. and that moving Phalanx unit than proceeds to engage in close combat with an enemy unit in one of its ―front‖ two hexes in the new hex it moved to. however this move may not enter hexes adjacent to enemy units. This is both for any initial Close Combat Attack. e) Phalanx Infantry units located in clear terrain that also still have three or four blocks on map at the start of the close-combat or battle back ignore the first sword hit inflicted on them by an enemy unit attacking or battling back from a ―front‖ hex. Phalanx Infantry may not be ordered at all by play of a Double Time Card. This advantage is also granted in any Momentum Combat.

Since this was the first time in history the Romans ever faced elephants. The Elephant Reserve Move may not be executed during the first three Epirot turns of the game. When Megacles was struck down a brief panic ensued in the ranks of the Epirot Army until the king showed his face among the ranks of the phalanx. 4) Megacles and Pyrrhus and the Armor Switch Before the battle an annalist tells us. each Epirot elephant unit while at full strength (two blocks) gets a +1 dice bonus throughout the battle when in close combat or battle back. If Pyrrhus is eliminated the Roman Player may select three Epirot Phalanx units to each lose one block immediately—Phalanx units may not be eliminated by this subtraction. .17 plays his card normally and may even have the elephants move again and have combat—being ordered via the card. for some now obscure reason we are told that Pyrrhus switched armor with his favorite general Megacles. General Rule: When the first Epirot Leader is eliminated in combat roll one die: on a Swords or Helmet result—Pyrrhus has been eliminated (probably killed or sorely wounded) any other result means that Megacles gets the chop.

from both sides of the track at once. arms. had been killed in Gaul and his army wiped out. Down they came-all were nearly cut through at the base and were only precariously keeping upright-each tree bringing to earth its tottering neighbor. The Gauls were lying in wait for him on the edge of the forest. Postumius who was with them. for while these proceedings were still going on. were dispatched by the Gauls who were waiting. and carried their spoils in triumph to the most hallowed of their temples. fought to the end to avoid capture and was killed. and the rest bewildered by the unexpectedness of the horror.as there had been no attempt to escape and consequently no dispersal of military gear and equipment. Lucius Postumius. The consul-elect. more bad news arrived. There they cleaned out the head. gilded the skull. On both sides of the track the Gauls had cut the trees in such a way that they remained standing but were ready to fall at the slightest impulse. fortune was piling one disaster upon another.216BC . A few only out of such a large force were taken prisoner: they had made for a bridge over the river. and men beneath…The greater number were killed by the falling trunks and broken branches. and were cut off.‖ (This selection is from Book XXIII of Livy‘s: ‗The History of Rome From its Foundation‘ originally written in the late 1st century BC) . it seemed. but found it already occupied.18 The Ambush of Litana . horses. all round the fatal spot. as their custom is. and as soon as he entered the stretch of the road prepared for the trap. which thereafter served as a holy vessel to pour libations from and as a drinking cup…The spoils from the battle were hardly less valuable to the Gauls than the fact of their victory…. and all overwhelming. they pushed over the trees at the end of the line. known to the Gauls as Litana.000 men. everything else was found lying in place along the whole column of dead men. Postumius had two Roman legions and had also enlisted such a number of allied troops from the Adriatic coast that he was entering enemy territory with a total force of 25. He was about to march by way of a desolate stretch of forest. The Boii stripped his body.Gallic vs Romans Historical Background: ―That year. sword in hand. cut off the head.

The Players than take alternate turns as normal for the remainder of the game.19 War Council: Gallic Army: Leader: Boii Chief 5 Command Cards Move First—The Gallic Player moves twice at the start of the game before the Roman Player takes his first move. Before first Movement resolve the one-time ―tree fall‖ event per the special rules below. . Roman Army: Leader: Postumius 2 Command Cards to start with ( drawn at random—at the end of the 1st Roman Turn 2 cards are drawn boosting the Roman hand to 3 cards—at the end of the 2nd Roman turn 2 cards are also drawn bringing the Roman hand to 4 cards—their maximum for the remainder of the game) Victory: The Gallic Player needs to score 8 banners to win the historical victory. The Roman Player need only score 4 banners before the Gauls reach 8 banners to claim victory—such a result causes the Gauls to break off the attack thereby allowing the Roman survivors to flee the killing ground.

A13. Special Scenario Rules: Gallic Elite Warriors: 1) The two Gallic Medium Infantry units are treated as Warrior units for all purposes. and D12 exactly like Gallic units from their safe zone hexes. Retreats and Evasion: 3) a) Roman units may not evade throughout this scenario b) Gallic units may retreat/evade normally toward one or the other (not both at the same time) of the two long map edges. close combat attack into. Units may never evade or retreat off the map per the normal rules. Tree falls cannot cause the loss of the Roman Leader. The exiting ordered unit. C13. Note that leaders may also retreat/evade only off these respective map edges per the rulebook. Tree fall is a one-time event that is resolved before normal game play starts—it is not executed at any time afterwards. any retreat/evasion route that would bring the retreating unit adjacent to a Roman unit—Gallic units may use such a route of retreat/evasion adjacent to the Romans only if no other retreat route is possible. if possible. moves into the safe zone hex and may exit if it is able to move another hex—or can exit if ordered to move from the hex on a succeeding turn. Roman units may not and can never retreat through clear hexes that have a Gallic unit adjacent to that hex. Exited units/leaders never return to play.20 The Romans can also win by exiting enough of their units/leaders (five or more) from the map so that the Gauls are unable to claim their 8 banners for victory by elimination. Exiting the Map: 5) Gallic units/leader may exit the map via normal movement from their safe zone hexes. or fire missiles into board-edge hexes A1 to A9. Tree Fall: 2) The Gallic Player rolls all seven dice once at the very start of play to simulate the tree fall on the Roman column that opened the ambush. Roman units may battle back if attacked in close combat from such hexes. Roman units/leader may exit the map only from the following hexes B12. retreat into. Results are inflicted as follows: Color result: remove one block of any one Roman unit of that color—Gallic Player picks unit Sword result: remove one block of any one Roman unit at the choice of the Gallic Player Flag result: Tree misses target—no blocks lost Helmet result: remove one block of any one Roman unit at the choice of the Roman Player A given unit may lose no more than one block total as a result of the tree fall rolls. but additionally have one added to their maximum dice (over and above any terrain considerations) when engaging in any kind of close combat (or battle back) for the very first time in the game. c) Roman units. Gallic Safe Zones: The deep forest and trackless backcountry of Litana 4) Roman units may never enter. or board-edge hexes I1-I13. but must avoid. . if forced to retreat via flag results may retreat in any direction as long as the unit ends the retreat the specified retreat distance from their pre-retreat hex.

Surprise Effect: 7) Roman units. Hanno appears to have sent his soldiers across piecemeal from the Punic camp. Then he advanced in order of attack.Mago Barca's Defeat . and the battle became a murderous affair of single and group combats. Mago‘s recruiting scheme in Celt-Iberia gets crashed by a Roman force under Scipio‘s lieutenant Silanus.Carthaginians vs Romans Scenario Note: A fun little battle in harsh wooded & thicketed terrain. with most of the cavalry. about nine thousand in number. and arrived at the Punic training area without the enemy‘s being aware of his approach. escaped to join Hasdrubal in the Baetis . The Bridge hex may only be entered or close combated into from hexes E11 & C12. Silanus marched as fast as he could through difficult country. whose imperium.21 Special Terrain Considerations: 6) Gallic units treat forest hexes as clear for movement purposes only. Scipio. the mercenaries. went into Celtiberian country and started to raise recruits there. in which the weapon training Scipio had imposed on his men paid a handsome dividend. The Celtiberian recruits. were in one slackly guarded camp. had been prorogued again. The Roman Player may not use a Line Movement Order card per the jargon on the card—instead only he (not the Gallic Player who uses the card normally) may utilize the card to move any two Roman units/leader (in reality there are no lines—this is an ambush situation). sent his colleague at the head of ten thousand foot and five hundred horse to deal with Hanno. and he joining forces with Mago. 2. and Hanno himself and those who joined the battle when it was all but over were captured. Mago barely had time to ride over from his own camp and get the Spaniards into some sort of order before the Romans were upon them. and 3 always roll one die less than their normal throws due to the affects of being suddenly ambushed amid falling trees. The broken ground covered with thickets compelled the two armies to fight in open order. and those of the infantry who had seen battle before and could gauge the inadvisability of lingering upon the field. using Celtiberian guides. in another a little further off. the loyalty of whose inhabitants had been shaken by the events of the previous year. Hasdrubal Gisgonis (the other major remaining Carthaginian general in Spain)…. Silanus was able to approach to within three miles of the former. when battling back on Gallic Turns 1. like that of Silanus. otherwise it is treated as clear terrain for all other rule concerns. Hanno. dump his baggage. Historical Background ― Following Hasdrubal Barca‘s withdrawal from Spain (he was on his way to Italy by land to try to join his brother Hannibal) the home government sent out another general. with the result that they were swept away in the rout of the Celtiberians. observing proper camp discipline. Deep in Celt-Iberia 207 BC . with reinforcements for the army of occupation. Mago. feed his men and then put them in order of battle without being seen by the enemy.moved up into the Baetis Valley.

‖ (the above selection with slight changes was taken from Brian Caven‘s book ―Punic Wars‖ pages 116-117) War Council Carthaginian Army: Leader: Mago 4 Cards Roman Army: Leader: Silanus 5 Cards Move First Victory: Romans—6 Banners (they also receive one banner also for each camp hex they over-run) Carthaginians—5 Banners (normal scoring only) Special Rules: .22 Valley.

Leaders. Outflanking This is an easy way of introducing facing and flanks to the game with little fuss—it can be retrofitted to other scenarios where appropriate: A unit is said to be ―Outflanked‖ if it is surrounded in all six adjacent hexes by either enemy units. A unit involved in close combat with the support of a Leader may only count one helmet hit amongst those rolled to inflict a hit on an opposing unit Line Command Card Limits: Due to the rough & wooded terrain no more than four foot units may be activated by a Line Command Card in this scenario. The presence of friendly units or impassable terrain does not negate an ―Outflanked‖ situation in any way. regardless of side. Such units that fail to attack are said to have ―balked‖—immediately retreat Warrior units in such a situation one hex once all own side close combats are finished. They retreat only 2 hexes per flag result inflicted and when battling back hit on sword rolls. Units on the board edges (and not surrounded by six adjacent hexes) cannot be ―Outflanked‖.23 Command: A Leader attached (stacked with) a friendly unit may cancel one sword hit on the unit in lieu of canceling a retreat hit. the Warrior unit has failed its requirement to close-combat attack given the length of its pre-combat move. . Special Terrain Rules Thickets There are x10 Thicket Hexside markers (I used some plastic model bushes that fit perfectly & look great from some Lego-type set) in the Terrain setup.. Effects of being Outflanked: ―Outflanked‖ units when battling back roll only half the normal number of dice they would be normally entitled to rounded up—to a maximum of only two dice—―Outflanked‖ units when battling back never hit on helmet rolls even if supported by a leader. ―Barbarian Rush‖: Limits to Warrior Momentum Combat: Warrior units. Units that just passed through a hedge hexside in the same player-turn may not normally attack in close-combat or by missile fire. The one hex ―Barbarian Balk‖ retreat is conducted in the normal fashion just as if the unit was forced to retreat one hex after a battle—and it is not optional and cannot be canceled in any way—even by the presence of a leader. A unit‘s ―Outflanked‖ situation is judged at the instant it battles back. Special Troop Rules: Warriors: (Both Sides) ―Barbarian Balk‖: If a Warrior unit (of whatever side) moves 2 hexes (or 3 hexes using ―Double Time‖) to a hex adjacent to enemy unit(s) to close combat them and then is unable to do so due to the enemy unit(s) being retreated or eliminated by other attacks. reduced to one or two blocks May Not Engage in momentum combat unless a friendly leader is attached to the unit in question. Set-up each marker as listed above each pair of hexes mentioned denotes the hexside to place a Thicket Marker on Effect of Thicket Hexsides on Movement: It takes a unit‘s entire ordered move to move through a Thicket hexside—the unit must start its move on the other side of the thicket hexside it passes through. Carthaginian Veteran Medium Infantry: Carthaginian Medium Infantry when ordered may move exactly as if they were Auxillia. Mago may cancel both a sword and a retreat hit if stacked with a friendly unit. Carthaginian Light Cavalry: The Carthaginian Light Cavalry are elite Numidian troops. or hexes adjacent to an enemy unit. moving on their own without being attached to a friendly unit ignore the effects of Thicket hexsides and may pass through them as if they do not exist.

Gracchus. and there are no other combat effects other than line of sight blocking. Appius Claudius hoisted the signal for action and after addressing a few words to the soldiers made a simultaneous sortie from three gates. The Celtiberi met them as they emerged and for a short time the fighting was equal on both sides. after their defeat. Then they made a sudden charge which the Celtiberi could not withstand.Romans vs Celtiberians Historical Background The following selection is from Book 41 of Livy‘s History of Rome: [41. remained quiet during M. Missile fire into woods.24 Effect of Thicket Hexsides on Command: Friendly Units in a ―block‖ or ―blob‖ of units for Command purposes and being ordered by the cards are NOT considered to be adjacent to each other for Card Command purposes if the units in question are separated by a thicket hexside. Camps The Celt-Iberian Camp Tiles have minimal defenses—Roman units close-combat attacking into the Celt-Iberian Camp do so at minus one dice. The day had hardly dawned when the sentinels on the rampart and the men on outpost duty at the gates caught sight of the enemy advancing in the distance and gave the alarm. On the arrival of Appius Claudius they resumed hostilities and began by a sudden attack on the Roman camp. broken ground. The Second Celtiberian War The Final Revolt 174BC . Units that are adjacent to each other through a thicket hexside may still offer support to each other. In less than two hours . or camp hexes or through thicket hexsides is always at one dice only even if the firing unit has not moved. The Celt-Iberian and Carthaginian camp tiles are removed the instant a Roman unit enters them and one banner is scored by the Roman for each such tile removed. They also are NOT considered adjacent to each other for Leader Command influence in combat. Thickets also block lines of sight for missile fire—no missile fire may take place through a thicket except into a hex adjacent to the thicket or from a hex adjacent to a thicket. Carthaginian Camp Tiles and the Carthaginian Rampart use normal rules in combat. because owing to the confined space the Romans could not all get into action.26] In Spain the Celtiberi who. Titinius' administration. Effect of Thicket Hexsides on combat: The ―Normal‖ dice when close-combat attacking or battling back through a Hedge—the normal dice is 2 dice either way—of course that can be increased depending on the card or rule used to bring on the battle. had submitted to Ti. As soon as they got clear of the rampart they followed those in front of them in a compact mass in order to be able to deploy into line and extend their front to the same length as that of the enemy by whom they were being surrounded.

000 were either killed or taken prisoners. War Council Roman Army: Leader: Appius Claudius Command: 5 Cards Move first Celtiberian Rebels: Leader: Celtiberian Chief Command: 4 Cards Victory Victory is 7 Banners initially for both sides scored in the normal way. Their camp was stormed the same day and the war brought to an end. 32 standards were captured. After that they submitted quietly to the authority of Rome. The survivors from the battle dispersed to their various towns. however the Celtiberians also receive 1 Banner for each Roman Camp Core hextile they manage to remove. 15. .25 they were defeated.

or hexes adjacent to an enemy unit. Iberian Skirmish Style Combat: Auxillia on both sides may evade the close-combat attacks of enemy medium or heavy foot. or conduct an ordered move or momentum move into Campworks hexes regardless of who owns them. Roman Cavalry Discipline: Roman Medium Cavalry only retreat 2 hexes per Flag result taken. B4. Celtiberian Foot units may only enter Campworks tiles if they are ordered from a starting position in an adjacent hex to move in (and they must then halt the move in the adjacent Campworks hex and remove the tile). They may battle-back into such . A5. E6. Celtiberian Warrior units reduced to one or two blocks may not engage in Momentum Combat unless stacked with a Leader. E8. A7. evade. C10. If a Player rolls ―swords‖ when attempting to rally he may freely chose which unit gets a block back. E7.E5. Outflanking---This is an easy way of introducing facing and flanks to the game with little fuss— it can be retrofitted to other scenarios where appropriate: A unit is said to be ―Outflanked‖ if it is surrounded in all six adjacent hexes by either enemy units. C4. E9. If the campworks hextile is removed by Celtiberian action and converted to a clear terrain hex (see paragraph below) the initial camp trace is no longer considered for the now clear hex in relation to Roman foot ordered moves or momentum moves. Roman foot units may never conduct an ordered move. Campworks block line of sight. Auxillia for both sides battle-back normally with only two dice. D9. Units on both sides involved in close combat with the support of a Leader may only count one helmet hit amongst those rolled to inflict a hit on an opposing unit. (in other words Hexes outside the Map 1 initial camp trace counterclockwise listed ―doughnut‖ of: A9. retreat. A8. The presence of friendly units or impassable terrain does not negate an ―Outflanked‖ situation in any way. Barbarian Indiscipline & Exhaustion: No more than six Celtiberian units in a single linked ―blob‖ of hexes may be ordered by the Celtiberian Player via play of a single line Command Card. Cavalry units on both sides may not close-combat attack. Terrain Special Rules: Roman Campworks: Roman foot Units occupying their own Campworks hextiles that are not in an outflanked condition Battle-back with one extra dice and may ignore the first Flag result inflicted upon them. A unit‘s ―Outflanked‖ situation is judged at the instant it battles back. B9)…Roman units may close-combat/missile attack from their campworks tiles to a hex outside the initial Roman camp trace. D4. or as a result of a Momentum Move after combat into the Campworks hex. A6. Units on the board edges (and not surrounded by six adjacent hexes) cannot be ―Outflanked‖.26 Special Rules: Command: All Leaders may cancel a retreat or a sword hit if present with the unit. Campworks tiles are removed (and the hex reverts to clear terrain) when an opposing Celtiberian unit enters the hex for any reason. Units and the Rally Card: No unit can be rallied to beyond its strength at the start of the scenario. or a momentum move from a campworks hex into a hex outside the initial Roman camp trace of the Roman campworks & gates. Effects of being Outflanked: ―Outflanked‖ units when battling back roll only half the normal number of dice they would be normally entitled to rounded up—to a maximum of only two dice—―Outflanked‖ units when battling back never hit on helmet rolls even if supported by a leader.

they fled with their wives and children to the Arevaci and begged that the latter would receive them. It persuaded some of the smaller towns to settle in its own borders. a large and powerful city of a Celtiberian tribe called the Belli. Roman foot units occupying a Roman Gate hex may ignore the first Flag result inflicted upon them. a neighboring tribe.000 others with him. and ordered the inhabitants to furnish a contingent for the Roman army. but in the end he gained a splendid victory.Romans vs Celtiberians Historical Background [§44] [154 BC] Some years later another serious war broke out in Spain for the following reason: Segeda. The battle was for a long time doubtful. As to the tribute and the military contingent they said that they had been released from these requirements by the Romans themselves subsequently. Finally night put an end to the conflict. but do block line of sight. This was true. but the Senate. On the third day after his election he placed 20. Camp Core Hextiles: Roman Camp Core Hextiles confer no combat benefit to Roman units occupying them. [§45] [153 BC] Accordingly the praetor [Quintus Fulvius] Nobilior was sent against them with an army of nearly 30. was included in the treaties made by Gracchus. to join in the undertaking. As to the wall the Celtiberians replied that they were forbidden by Gracchus to build new cities. but not forbidden to fortify existing ones. demanded the tribute imposed by Gracchus. who was performing prodigies of valor.The Roman Battle with the Belli 153 BC . Roman Camp Gates Hextiles: Combat and Battle-back into or out of Roman Camp Gate Hextiles is always at minus one normal dice. The Ambush of Segeda . When the Senate learned this. fell upon him and killed Carus himself.000 men. and also chose a Segedian named Carus. always added that they should continue only during the pleasure of the Roman people. when granting these exemptions. and then surrounded itself with a wall seven kilometers in circumference. their wall not being yet finished. 6. So great a disaster befell the city on that day. for this was one of the stipulations of the treaty made with Gracchus. But while he was engaged in a disorderly pursuit after the victory. The Arevaci did so. Roman Camp Gates hextiles are removed if entered by a Celtiberian unit for any reason and the hex reverts to clear terrain. as their general. It also forced the Titthi. and not less than 6.27 hexes however. it forbade the building of the wall. the Roman horsemen. When the Segedians learned of his coming.000 foot and 500 horse in ambush in a dense forest and fell upon the Romans as they were passing through. who were guarding the baggage. This disaster happened on the day on which the Romans are accustomed to celebrate the festival of Vulcan [23 August . Camp Core tiles are removed (and the hex reverts to clear terrain) when a Celtiberian unit of any type enters the hex for any reason. whom they considered skillful in war.000 Roman citizens being slain.

28 153]. For which reason. from that time on. (The above selection is from Appian of Alexandria‘s Annals of Rome) War Council (Neither side starts the game with Line Command Cards) Roman Army: Leader: Nobilior Command: 4 Cards Celtiberian Rebels: Leader: Carus Command: 5 Cards Move first Victory Victory is 7 Banners for both sides scored in the normal way. . no general will begin a battle on that day unless compelled to do so.

Effects of being Outflanked: ―Outflanked‖ units when battling back roll only half the normal number of dice they would be normally entitled to rounded up—to a maximum of only two dice—―Outflanked‖ units when battling back never hit on helmet rolls even if supported by a leader. Barbarian Exhaustion: Celtiberian Warrior units reduced to one or two blocks may not engage in Momentum Combat unless stacked with a Leader. Barbarian Indiscipline & Ambushed Romans: No more than five Celtiberian foot units in a single linked ―blob‖ of hexes may be ordered by the Celtiberian Player via play of a single line Command Card. A unit‘s ―Outflanked‖ situation is judged at the instant it battles back. If a Player rolls ―swords‖ when attempting to rally he may freely chose which unit gets a block back. They ―normally‖ close-combat attack and battle-back with four (4) dice instead of the three (3) listed in the rules. Roman Cavalry Discipline: Roman Medium Cavalry only retreat 2 hexes per Flag result taken. No more than six Roman foot units in a single linked ―blob‖ of hexes may be ordered by the Roman Player via play of a single line Command Card. When located atop a hill hex-tile their ‗normal‘ dice is 3 dice (instead of the two (2) dice per the rulebook) in battle-back or close-combat attack. Outflanking---This is an easy way of introducing facing and flanks to the game with little fuss— it can be retrofitted to other scenarios where appropriate: A unit is said to be ―Outflanked‖ if it is surrounded in all six adjacent hexes by either enemy units. Units on both sides involved in close combat with the support of a Leader may only count one helmet hit amongst those rolled to inflict a hit on an opposing unit—except if the Celtiberian Leader Carus is supporting then up two helmet hits count. or hexes adjacent to an enemy unit. Units on the board edges (and not surrounded by six adjacent hexes) cannot be ―Outflanked‖. Neither side may start the game with a Line Command Card in hand. . Auxillia for both sides battle-back normally with only two dice. Units and the Rally Card: No unit can be rallied to beyond its strength at the start of the scenario. Iberian Skirmish Style Combat: Auxillia on both sides may evade the close-combat attacks of enemy medium or heavy foot.29 Scenario Special Rules: Command: All Leaders may cancel a retreat or a sword hit if present with the unit. Heavy Forest Cover: Missile Fire into Forest Tiles is always at one dice regardless of whether or not the missile unit moved before firing. The presence of friendly units or impassable terrain does not negate an ―Outflanked‖ situation in any way.

30 .

31 .

Advised by his officer staff to stretch out in classic formation with the infantry flanked by cavalry. rode all around them.000 men. They advanced toward the smaller and less impressive Parthian force far too confident. The vaunted Parthian cataphracts were small in number.32 End of the Triumvirate The Battle of Carrhae 53 BC (The Initial Main Battle) . and the already rattled Crassus. Cassius. Publius was overwhelmed. commanded the wings. the Parthian force seemed to be only about 10. surrounding it with horse archers and the cataphracts. He didn't allow his men to rest or make camp. expecting that the enemy would come to close quarters with them. The Roman advance was stopped fast by the Parthians. Nor did death come to them either easily or quickly. and the cataphracts seemed invincible. He commanded the middle while his son Publius and another officer. As they approached with 35. Publius drove back the horse archers. and raising great masses of sand which fell from the air in a continual shower. Initially. In the convulsion and agony of their pain they would writhe as the arrows struck them. but found himself far away from the main Roman body. However. Crassus meanwhile got word that his son was in trouble. seems to have . Huddled together in a narrow space and getting in each other‘s way. and the Roman force was butchered.Parthians vs Romans ―The Romans halted. they were shot down by the arrows. His troops were exhausted and poorly prepared for battle after a long and fast march through the Mesopotamian desert. so that the Romans could scarcely see or speak. As the battle opened a hail of Parthian arrows pinned down the Romans. Crassus seems to have panicked. Though the Gauls fought bravely and ferociously. However the Parthians merely stationed their armored cavalry in front of the Romans and with the rest of their cavalry in loose order. mainly light horse archers. The Parthians cut off his force.‖ (From Plutarch‘s ‗Life of Crassus‘ describing the plight of Publius‘ detachment under the rain of arrows of the Parthian horse archers) Historical Background After receiving word from his scouts about the presence of a Parthian army near Carrhae . Publius ordered his own death at the hand of one of his men.000 men. they would break them off in their wounds and then lacerate and disfigure their own bodies by trying to tear out by main force the barbed arrow heads that had pierced through their veins and muscles. Crassus instead ordered hollow square formations to allow defense against flanking. Crassus ordered his son Publius to attack the archers with his Gallic cavalry and a force of infantry. the Parthian commander Surena ordered cavalry positioned at the rear uncover their concealed armor. as they approached. but their heavy armor was definitely an impressive and intimidating sight. Trapped away from his father and the army. just as pressure was diverted from his own lines to that of Publius' force. As this was getting under way however. the Parthians who had defeated the Gallic cavalry rode in front of the Romans with the head of Publius on a spear. Crassus reformed his lines in the traditional Roman style and ordered a general advance. tearing up the plain with their horses hooves. but instead began to form lines for battle. since there were so few of them.

threatened his life if he didn't accept the offer. Of the original force. As the Romans were too pre-occupied with western concerns and the political turmoil that was about to erupt. The death of Crassus helped signal the end of the triumvirate between he. only about 5. save for 20 men who were allowed to flee for displaying exceptional bravery. At the meeting. The lost standards of Crassus' lost legions remained in a Parthian temple Rome's first emperor. the situation with Parthia was largely ignored for nearly another 30 years. settled the Roman prisoners in an eastern territory called Sogdia. Crassus and the remaining Roman army reached the relative safety of Carrhae and probably prepared for a siege. managed to escape. Crassus however.33 lost the will to fight.000 captured. desperately leaving the wounded on the field.000 wounded legionaries were put to the sword as the Parthians came in pursuit the following morning. Another 4 cohorts had been separated from the main body and were surrounded and killed. Caesar and Pompey. Parthian king Orodes II ordered the death of Surena shortly thereafter. but even if he had lived its doubtful that civil war wouldn't have erupted eventually anyway. In the confusion and desperation of the Roman retreat. but the legionaries. Once again a Parthian spy duped him. The spy led the Romans to inescapable terrain and the Parthian main force approached. the Parthians seized and executed Crassus and the Roman party.000 men under Cassius. afraid and exhausted. the Han Chinese later captured this area and the Roman transplants were likely among the first westerners to meet the Chinese directly. Cassius and Octavius ordered a retreat intended to save the army during the night. the great bulk of the Roman army was hunted down and killed or captured. They offered a parlay. and the Parthians did little to press their advantage in eastern Roman territories. At first he refused. His legates. including an offer of peace if Crassus himself joined the negotiation. Nearly 20. Augustus.000 were killed and another 10. Remaining cavalry fled the battle immediately. In the end. was still obviously unsettled. The Parthians meanwhile. as many as 4. Interestingly. negotiated their return in 20 BC (The above was lifted with a few modifications from a Historical Website) . leaving Crassus without scouts. They rode first to Carrhae to inform the garrison of the battle and then hurried on to Zeugma to avoid the disaster that was sure to come. sending the Romans into further disarray. and the cavalry that departed early. this time into fleeing the safety of the town.

. however the levels for victory are different depending on the player… Roman Victory: 6 Banners scored by Roman Player Parthian Victory: 8 Banners scored by Parthian Player Scenario Special Rules: Command Rules: Surena can cancel a Retreat and a Swords result inflicted on the unit he is stacked with.34 War Council Roman Army: Leader: Crassus 5 Cards Parthian Army: Leader: Surena 6 Cards Move First Victory Use normal Banner rules.

If a Player rolls ―swords‖ when attempting to rally he may freely chose which unit gets a block back. or hexes adjacent to an enemy unit. Failure to make a full retreat draws the usual penalties outlined in the rules. Otherwise use normal rules on evasion. Cavalry Retreat: ALL Cavalry in the game need only retreat. Effects of being Outflanked: ―Outflanked‖ units when battling back roll only half the normal number of dice they would be normally entitled to rounded up—to a maximum of only two dice—―Outflanked‖ units when battling back never hit on helmet rolls even if supported by a leader. No unit can be rallied to beyond five blocks or its strength at the start of the game whichever is less. Retreats in Carrhae: Units retreating due to Flag results must end their full retreats in a hex not adjacent to enemy units.35 Other Leaders can cancel a Retreat or a Swords result inflicted on the unit they are stacked with. Units and the Rally Card:. if such a hex is not available one hex away is OK. Only the first helmet hit inflicted by a unit supported by a Leader in close-combat or battle-back is counted unless the Leader is Surena in which case up to two helmet hits are counted. Outflanking---This is an easy way of introducing facing and flanks to the game with little fuss— it can be retrofitted to other scenarios where appropriate: A unit is said to be ―Outflanked‖ if it is surrounded in all six adjacent hexes by either enemy units. A unit‘s ―Outflanked‖ situation is judged at the instant it battles back. Please follow the special rules outlined below for retreat and evasion by both players. Roman Legionary Retreat: A Roman Legionary unit which suffers one or more Flag hits may retreat up to 2 hexes (in lieu of the normal one hex) to satisfy the first Flag hit being taken—this is only done at the option of the Roman player and in accordance with the other retreat rules outlined in this section. but must evade the full number of hexes chosen away from their initial hex position. Parthian Army Special Rules: Parthian Cataphracti: . A retreating unit must end its retreat the full number of hexes taken in the retreat from its pre-retreat hex location. and are allowed to retreat only two hexes per uncanceled Flag—not the normal distances listed in the rules. Both Parthian Leaders may move up to four hexes if ordered to move by themselves. Units on the board edges (and not surrounded by six adjacent hexes) cannot be ―Outflanked‖. Units that can only end their evasion adjacent to an enemy unit MAY NOT evade. Retreat & Evasion Scenario Special Rules: In this scenario units & leaders may retreat or evade in any direction ---there are no set mapedges in the scenario for the players to retreat or evade towards. The presence of friendly units or impassable terrain does not negate an ―Outflanked‖ situation in any way. Leaders alone may end their evasion adjacent to an enemy unit. Evasion in Carrhae: Units must end their evasion move in a hex not adjacent to enemy units at least two hexes away.

for possible later use. the evading unit normally and if the evading unit survives it throws one dice for the Parthian Shot and inflicts a hit (remove one block) if it shows the correct color of the attacking unit. Parthian Horse Archers: All Parthian Light Cavalry are considered to be elite Horse Archers and have the following add‘l capabilities: 1) Their normal Missile range is 3 hexes—when firing at 3 hex range only one dice is used and the unit must remain stationary during the Parthian Player-turn before the missile attack is executed. if subjected to a Parthian shot. or a Flag/retreat hit Afterwards remove the Pilum marker. adjacent to the enemy. If the ―Parthian Shot‖ roll shows a Flag result the evading Parthian unit must evade normally four hexes (to an eligible hex four hexes away instead of the normal two hexes).36 All Parthian Heavy Cavalry ignore the first swords result inflicted upon them in close-combat or battle-back—they may also use this capability to ignore ―sword‖ pilum hits. Roman Army Special Rules The following types of infantry units in the game the Roman side are assumed to be Roman Legionary units: ALL Roman Heavy & Medium Infantry. other than Flag or the appropriate color have no effect. the Romans simply retain their pilum. which evade when not in an outflanked situation may choose to attempt a ―Parthian Shot‖ at their attackers while evading. may advance into the just vacated Parthian unit‘s hex. The Player picks one adjacent enemy unit and throws two dice –apply the results just as one would before close combat—and remove the Pilum Marker. but may not move further or attack again. Roman units. Just before a Roman unit with Pilum is attacked or is itself attacked by the enemy for the very first time in the battle in close-combat it throws its Pilum—roll one die and apply normal hits for swords. An attached Leader may use his special ability to cancel a ―swords‖ hit that was inflicted via a Pilum hit (see special Command rules) on the unit he is stacked with. Roman Relief Moves & Cohort Maneuvers: . The Pilum is a one-time use weapon that is generally fired right before a Roman Legionary unit attacks in close-combat or is itself attacked by the enemy in close-combat. The attackers first resolve their attack vs. All other Parthian shot results rolled. 3) Parthian Light Cavalry. Roman Pilum: Each Roman Legionary Infantry unit starts with a Pilum Marker. color. in this case. that have not expended their Pilum may also be ordered to throw Pilum if the card ―Darken the Sky‖ is played by their commanding player. 2) When Parthian Light Cavalry Battle-back only they do hit on swords. The act of throwing the Pilum is not considered to be part of the Close-Combat—so any result of the Pilum throw is resolved before the Close-combat. Once the Pilum is fired the Pilum marker is removed from the Roman unit to indicate that the Pilum has been expended and the unit may not throw Pilum for the rest of the battle. if unable to evade the full four hexes the ―Parthian Shot‖ unit evades normally and loses 1 block. The attacking Roman unit. 4) Roman Legionary units (see below) may not toss pilum at evading Parthian Light Cavalry that are not outflanked in the hex they started the evasion from.

fastened their horses in the centre. Therefore all Roman Light Archers have a range of only two hexes in this scenario.‖(From Plutarch‘s ‗Life of Crassus‘) The Parthians utilized composite bows and probably seriously out-ranged the Roman mercenary Archers attached to Crassus‘ army. and the blows fell powerfully and heavily upon the Romans. By all accounts these crack troops died bravely fighting with Publius‘ detachment. the Gauls who were not accustomed to either heat or thirst. There was thus no escaping the arrows which rained down on them all alike as they stood there in misery at having reached this inglorious and ineffectual end.‖ ―With Publius were two Greeks. the controlling Player may order a pair of adjacent Legionary Infantry units to switch hexes—at least one of the units switching places must not be adjacent to an enemy unit. but here on the rising ground made them stand. Historical Footnote: The End of Publius & His Detachment: ―However. curved so as to give maximum impetus to the arrows. Relief/Cohort Maneuvers may only be conducted through the play of Section cards ONLY. which was friendly to the . the man behind always being higher up than the man in front of him. Roman Light Archers: ―They merely kept on shooting their great strong bows. suffered very intensely from both. Roman Gallic Mercenary Cavalry: The Roman Medium Cavalry unit. Besides the extra initial one block advantage this Gallic Cavalry unit adds one dice to its normal throw in battle back or close-combat if the unit is at three or four block strength at the instant the dice are rolled. in tiers. represents the 1. They had lost most of their horses through driving them onto the long spears (of the Parthian Cataphracti). may switch places in a ―Relief/Cohort Maneuver‖. A unit that switched places via the Relief/Cohort Maneuver into a hex adjacent to the enemy may close combat in the same playerturn. Seeing a small hill of sand nearby they all retired to it. They imagined that in this formation they would best be able to resist the attacks of the natives. who lived nearby at Carrhae.(Publius had distinguished himself as a cavalry officer at the Battle of the Vosges in 58 BC against the Germans and in other actions). and made a ring of locked shields on the outside. Roman Veteran Initiative: Up to Two Roman Legionary Heavy Infantry units per Roman Player-turn that are ordered by Line Commands or an ―Order Heavy Troops‖ card may move two hexes and close combat at their option. taking with them Publius. Hieroymus and Nicomachus. which starts the game with 4 blocks. as it were. who was now badly wounded. And so they were forced to fall back to the infantry. but it turned out in just the opposite way.37 Adjacent and on the same side Roman Legionary Infantry. On level ground the front ranks do afford a certain amount of protection to those behind. They both urged him to slip away with them and escape to the city of Ichae. instead of moving.000 Gallic mercenary cavalry that Caesar had lent to Crassus from his Gallic campaigns where Crassus‘ son Publius had served as a junior officer. Instead of ordering one unit via a section card.

and not far off. Vetilius. killed him. with instructions to rendezvous in Tribola. as if to give battle to the Romans. moving quickly to join the rest of the Lusitanians at Tribola. for fear of it.38 Romans. 6. but seeing that he was old and fat. Not more than 500. But Publius said that there was no death so terrible that. Censorinus. He had the Lusitanians line up outside the city gates. They were about to surrender when Viriathus. Megabacchus killed himself. Then.000 Romans. he presented his side to his shield-bearer and ordered him to run him through with his sword.147 BC . they say. ― ―Vetilius followed. as did others who were of most note. he then ordered the rest to scatter in different directions. were taken prisoners. rose in assembly to remind the Lusitanians of Roman promises and Roman deeds—and then to persuade them to an escape attempt…. since he was unable to use his hand. Gaius Vetilius. When these irregulars fell on the pursuing Romans. only to retreat before they could be effectively engaged—a strategy that Appian described as ―dashing around on the (same) field‖. which had been pierced through with an arrow. The Lusitanian cavalry constantly attacked the Roman line. and considering him worthless. had surrounded a force of ten thousand Lusitanian rebels. Viriathus set up an ambush in a dense thicket. Asprey Volume I pages 23-24) ―Viriathus‘s plan was simple. but effective. Viriathus doubled his main force back to the attack: (Appian says) ‗Vetilius himself was taken prisoner. they say.. he would abandon men who were dying on his account.000 of the best warriors in reserve.‖ ―Viriathus and Vetilius fought a running battle for two days. Of the 10. but was unable to keep up with the lightly armored Lusitanians. and the man who captured him not knowing who he was. The Parthians then cut off Publius‘ head and at once rode off against Crassus.(From the two volume work: ―War in the Shadows: The Guerilla in History‖ by Robert B. After the second day .000 with difficulty made their way to the city of Carpessus on the seashore‘….‖ ―During his retreat.‖ (From Plutarch‘s ‗Life of Crassus‘) TRIBOLA . The survivors fought on until the Parthians came up the hill and rode them down with their long spears. in (circa) 148BC. He bade them farewell and told them to look after their own safety. Keeping 1.‖ . He tracked Viriathus deep into Lusitanian territory. the wheel of Roman treachery turned full circle. did not give chase. Viriathus and his men quit the field of battle under cover of darkness. walking into an ambush—nearly half the legionaries who entered the Lusitanian highlands never returned—Vetilius among them. a minor guerrilla leader who had escaped the earlier Galba massacre (which happened during a supposed peace conference). died in the same way.Roman vs Lusitanian Historical Background ―…a few years later. unwilling to run down the fleeing raiders when Viriathus appeared to offer him an easy victory. A new governor.

War Council Roman Army Leader: Vetilius 2 Command Cards to start with (at the end of the 1st Roman Turn 2 cards are drawn boosting the Roman hand to 3 cards—at the end of the 3rd Roman turn 2 cards are also drawn bringing the Roman hand to 4 cards—their maximum for the remainder of the game) Lusitanian Rebels: Leader: Viriathus 5 Command Cards . Issue 4 page 20 in an article called „Flame of Freedom‟ by Ed Healy).39 ―Thus began an eight-year guerilla campaign on the part of the Lusitanians. The rest is history. under Viriathus‘s able leadership…‖ (The above overview was from Ancient Warfare magazine Volume I. The battle lines are drawn and you are in command. The stage is set.

additionally they have the same missile capability as Light Cavalry. The presence of friendly units or impassable terrain does not negate an ―Outflanked‖ situation in any way. Effects of being Outflanked: ―Outflanked‖ units when battling back roll only half the normal number of dice they would be normally entitled to rounded up—to a maximum of only two dice—―Outflanked‖ units when battling back never hit on helmet rolls even if supported by a leader. Line Commands in the Scenario: No more than five units can be moved by play of a single Line Command Card in the scenario for both sides Roman and Lusitanian. The village blocks line of sight and may be attacked via missile fire generated only by a unit that has not moved—the not moving/missile firing unit may only roll one die when firing on a unit in the village—any Flag hits generated by missile fire directed at a unit in the village are always ignored. At the end of this ―minimum move‖ he draws another card as normal. All other terrain in the game uses the rules found in the rule-book. Lusitanian Rebel Force Rules: Lusitanian Auxillia: Lusitanian Auxillia may evade if attacked by Roman Heavy or Medium infantry. Units on the board edges (and not surrounded by six adjacent hexes) cannot be ―Outflanked‖. however Lusitanian light foot units entering such hexes via ordered moves may attack during the same player-turn. or hexes adjacent to an enemy unit. Forest Hexes: Use Normal Rules. Outflanking---This is an easy way of introducing facing and flanks to the game with little fuss—it can be retrofitted to other scenarios where appropriate: A unit is said to be ―Outflanked‖ if it is surrounded in all six adjacent hexes by either enemy units. A unit‘s ―Outflanked‖ situation is judged at the instant it battles back.40 Move First Victory 6 banners Special Rules Roman Minimum Move: The Roman Player may always discard any one card from his hand and use that card to order any one of his units in lieu of taking a normal turn. Lusitanian Medium Cavalry: Lusitanian Medium Cavalry may evade just like Light Cavalry. Terrain Special Rules: Village of Tribola: Units defending in the village ignore one Sword and one Flag hit when defending in close-combat and also battle back when attacked with one extra dice. .

The Parthians cut off his force. commanded the wings. He commanded the middle while his son Publius and another officer. As the battle opened a hail of Parthian arrows pinned down the Romans. Advised by his officer staff to stretch out in classic formation with the infantry flanked by cavalry. and the cataphracts seemed invincible.Parthians vs Romans ―The Romans halted. Nor did death come to them either easily or quickly. Though the Gauls fought bravely and ferociously. Crassus seems to have panicked. Publius was overwhelmed. In the convulsion and agony of their pain they would writhe as the arrows struck them. The vaunted Parthian cataphracts were small in number. tearing up the plain with their horses hooves. so that the Romans could scarcely see or speak. surrounding it with horse archers and the cataphracts.‖ (From Plutarch‘s ‗Life of Crassus‘ describing the plight of Publius‘ detachment under the rain of arrows of the Parthian horse archers) Historical Background After receiving word from his scouts about the presence of a Parthian army near Carrhae . mainly light horse archers. Trapped away from his father and the army. the Parthian commander Surena ordered cavalry positioned at the rear uncover their concealed armor. and the Roman force was butchered. Crassus meanwhile got word that his son was in trouble. He didn't allow his men to rest or make camp. Crassus instead ordered hollow square formations to allow defense against flanking. rode all around them. Initially. the Parthian force seemed to be only about 10. Publius ordered his own death at the hand of one of his men. but instead began to form lines for battle. As this was getting under way however.41 End of the Triumvirate The Battle of Carrhae 53 BC (The Initial Main Battle) . the Parthians who had defeated the Gallic cavalry rode in front of the Romans with the head of Publius on a spear. Cassius. seems to have .000 men. Publius drove back the horse archers. However the Parthians merely stationed their armored cavalry in front of the Romans and with the rest of their cavalry in loose order. Crassus ordered his son Publius to attack the archers with his Gallic cavalry and a force of infantry. His troops were exhausted and poorly prepared for battle after a long and fast march through the Mesopotamian desert. and raising great masses of sand which fell from the air in a continual shower. but their heavy armor was definitely an impressive and intimidating sight. As they approached with 35. However. as they approached. The Roman advance was stopped fast by the Parthians. they were shot down by the arrows. Crassus reformed his lines in the traditional Roman style and ordered a general advance. they would break them off in their wounds and then lacerate and disfigure their own bodies by trying to tear out by main force the barbed arrow heads that had pierced through their veins and muscles. but found himself far away from the main Roman body. Huddled together in a narrow space and getting in each other‘s way. They advanced toward the smaller and less impressive Parthian force far too confident. just as pressure was diverted from his own lines to that of Publius' force. and the already rattled Crassus. since there were so few of them.000 men. expecting that the enemy would come to close quarters with them.

42 lost the will to fight. Augustus. the situation with Parthia was largely ignored for nearly another 30 years.000 captured. Cassius and Octavius ordered a retreat intended to save the army during the night. but the legionaries. save for 20 men who were allowed to flee for displaying exceptional bravery. Nearly 20. threatened his life if he didn't accept the offer. Crassus and the remaining Roman army reached the relative safety of Carrhae and probably prepared for a siege. At first he refused. leaving Crassus without scouts. Interestingly. including an offer of peace if Crassus himself joined the negotiation. They offered a parlay. In the confusion and desperation of the Roman retreat. but even if he had lived its doubtful that civil war wouldn't have erupted eventually anyway. and the Parthians did little to press their advantage in eastern Roman territories. The Parthians meanwhile. sending the Romans into further disarray. managed to escape. as many as 4.000 were killed and another 10. Once again a Parthian spy duped him.000 men under Cassius. this time into fleeing the safety of the town. settled the Roman prisoners in an eastern territory called Sogdia. Parthian king Orodes II ordered the death of Surena shortly thereafter. and the cavalry that departed early. afraid and exhausted. In the end. The death of Crassus helped signal the end of the triumvirate between he. Crassus however. Of the original force. desperately leaving the wounded on the field. the great bulk of the Roman army was hunted down and killed or captured. They rode first to Carrhae to inform the garrison of the battle and then hurried on to Zeugma to avoid the disaster that was sure to come. The lost standards of Crassus' lost legions remained in a Parthian temple Rome's first emperor. His legates. Another 4 cohorts had been separated from the main body and were surrounded and killed. At the meeting. The spy led the Romans to inescapable terrain and the Parthian main force approached.000 wounded legionaries were put to the sword as the Parthians came in pursuit the following morning. the Han Chinese later captured this area and the Roman transplants were likely among the first westerners to meet the Chinese directly. Remaining cavalry fled the battle immediately. the Parthians seized and executed Crassus and the Roman party. As the Romans were too pre-occupied with western concerns and the political turmoil that was about to erupt. negotiated their return in 20 BC (The above was lifted with a few modifications from a Historical Website) . was still obviously unsettled. Caesar and Pompey. only about 5.

however the levels for victory are different depending on the player… Roman Victory: 6 Banners scored by Roman Player Parthian Victory: 8 Banners scored by Parthian Player Scenario Special Rules: Command Rules: Surena can cancel a Retreat and a Swords result inflicted on the unit he is stacked with. .43 War Council Roman Army: Leader: Crassus 5 Cards Parthian Army: Leader: Surena 6 Cards Move First Victory Use normal Banner rules.

No unit can be rallied to beyond five blocks or its strength at the start of the game whichever is less. Please follow the special rules outlined below for retreat and evasion by both players. Roman Legionary Retreat: A Roman Legionary unit which suffers one or more Flag hits may retreat up to 2 hexes (in lieu of the normal one hex) to satisfy the first Flag hit being taken—this is only done at the option of the Roman player and in accordance with the other retreat rules outlined in this section. Units that can only end their evasion adjacent to an enemy unit MAY NOT evade. Otherwise use normal rules on evasion. or hexes adjacent to an enemy unit. but must evade the full number of hexes chosen away from their initial hex position. A retreating unit must end its retreat the full number of hexes taken in the retreat from its pre-retreat hex location. Effects of being Outflanked: ―Outflanked‖ units when battling back roll only half the normal number of dice they would be normally entitled to rounded up—to a maximum of only two dice—―Outflanked‖ units when battling back never hit on helmet rolls even if supported by a leader. Units and the Rally Card:. Both Parthian Leaders may move up to four hexes if ordered to move by themselves. Failure to make a full retreat draws the usual penalties outlined in the rules. Only the first helmet hit inflicted by a unit supported by a Leader in close-combat or battle-back is counted unless the Leader is Surena in which case up to two helmet hits are counted. and are allowed to retreat only two hexes per uncanceled Flag—not the normal distances listed in the rules. Units on the board edges (and not surrounded by six adjacent hexes) cannot be ―Outflanked‖. Parthian Army Special Rules: Parthian Cataphracti: . Retreats in Carrhae: Units retreating due to Flag results must end their full retreats in a hex not adjacent to enemy units. Outflanking---This is an easy way of introducing facing and flanks to the game with little fuss— it can be retrofitted to other scenarios where appropriate: A unit is said to be ―Outflanked‖ if it is surrounded in all six adjacent hexes by either enemy units. if such a hex is not available one hex away is OK. The presence of friendly units or impassable terrain does not negate an ―Outflanked‖ situation in any way. Cavalry Retreat: ALL Cavalry in the game need only retreat. A unit‘s ―Outflanked‖ situation is judged at the instant it battles back.44 Other Leaders can cancel a Retreat or a Swords result inflicted on the unit they are stacked with. Leaders alone may end their evasion adjacent to an enemy unit. Retreat & Evasion Scenario Special Rules: In this scenario units & leaders may retreat or evade in any direction ---there are no set mapedges in the scenario for the players to retreat or evade towards. If a Player rolls ―swords‖ when attempting to rally he may freely chose which unit gets a block back. Evasion in Carrhae: Units must end their evasion move in a hex not adjacent to enemy units at least two hexes away.

Once the Pilum is fired the Pilum marker is removed from the Roman unit to indicate that the Pilum has been expended and the unit may not throw Pilum for the rest of the battle. 3) Parthian Light Cavalry. Roman Army Special Rules The following types of infantry units in the game the Roman side are assumed to be Roman Legionary units: ALL Roman Heavy & Medium Infantry. adjacent to the enemy. 2) When Parthian Light Cavalry Battle-back only they do hit on swords. The act of throwing the Pilum is not considered to be part of the Close-Combat—so any result of the Pilum throw is resolved before the Close-combat.45 All Parthian Heavy Cavalry ignore the first swords result inflicted upon them in close-combat or battle-back—they may also use this capability to ignore ―sword‖ pilum hits. All other Parthian shot results rolled. An attached Leader may use his special ability to cancel a ―swords‖ hit that was inflicted via a Pilum hit (see special Command rules) on the unit he is stacked with. The Pilum is a one-time use weapon that is generally fired right before a Roman Legionary unit attacks in close-combat or is itself attacked by the enemy in close-combat. the evading unit normally and if the evading unit survives it throws one dice for the Parthian Shot and inflicts a hit (remove one block) if it shows the correct color of the attacking unit. in this case. may advance into the just vacated Parthian unit‘s hex. The attackers first resolve their attack vs. The Player picks one adjacent enemy unit and throws two dice –apply the results just as one would before close combat—and remove the Pilum Marker. or a Flag/retreat hit Afterwards remove the Pilum marker. which evade when not in an outflanked situation may choose to attempt a ―Parthian Shot‖ at their attackers while evading. for possible later use. that have not expended their Pilum may also be ordered to throw Pilum if the card ―Darken the Sky‖ is played by their commanding player. Roman units. 4) Roman Legionary units (see below) may not toss pilum at evading Parthian Light Cavalry that are not outflanked in the hex they started the evasion from. the Romans simply retain their pilum. The attacking Roman unit. but may not move further or attack again. Parthian Horse Archers: All Parthian Light Cavalry are considered to be elite Horse Archers and have the following add‘l capabilities: 1) Their normal Missile range is 3 hexes—when firing at 3 hex range only one dice is used and the unit must remain stationary during the Parthian Player-turn before the missile attack is executed. if subjected to a Parthian shot. Roman Pilum: Each Roman Legionary Infantry unit starts with a Pilum Marker. if unable to evade the full four hexes the ―Parthian Shot‖ unit evades normally and loses 1 block. color. Roman Relief Moves & Cohort Maneuvers: . other than Flag or the appropriate color have no effect. Just before a Roman unit with Pilum is attacked or is itself attacked by the enemy for the very first time in the battle in close-combat it throws its Pilum—roll one die and apply normal hits for swords. If the ―Parthian Shot‖ roll shows a Flag result the evading Parthian unit must evade normally four hexes (to an eligible hex four hexes away instead of the normal two hexes).

the man behind always being higher up than the man in front of him. Relief/Cohort Maneuvers may only be conducted through the play of Section cards ONLY. Besides the extra initial one block advantage this Gallic Cavalry unit adds one dice to its normal throw in battle back or close-combat if the unit is at three or four block strength at the instant the dice are rolled. but it turned out in just the opposite way. They imagined that in this formation they would best be able to resist the attacks of the natives. Roman Veteran Initiative: Up to Two Roman Legionary Heavy Infantry units per Roman Player-turn that are ordered by Line Commands or an ―Order Heavy Troops‖ card may move two hexes and close combat at their option. Therefore all Roman Light Archers have a range of only two hexes in this scenario. and the blows fell powerfully and heavily upon the Romans. On level ground the front ranks do afford a certain amount of protection to those behind.000 Gallic mercenary cavalry that Caesar had lent to Crassus from his Gallic campaigns where Crassus‘ son Publius had served as a junior officer. Roman Light Archers: ―They merely kept on shooting their great strong bows. instead of moving. represents the 1. as it were. They had lost most of their horses through driving them onto the long spears (of the Parthian Cataphracti). And so they were forced to fall back to the infantry. but here on the rising ground made them stand. who lived nearby at Carrhae. Seeing a small hill of sand nearby they all retired to it.46 Adjacent and on the same side Roman Legionary Infantry. who was now badly wounded. fastened their horses in the centre. Historical Footnote: The End of Publius & His Detachment: ―However. There was thus no escaping the arrows which rained down on them all alike as they stood there in misery at having reached this inglorious and ineffectual end. which was friendly to the . may switch places in a ―Relief/Cohort Maneuver‖. which starts the game with 4 blocks. in tiers. A unit that switched places via the Relief/Cohort Maneuver into a hex adjacent to the enemy may close combat in the same playerturn. the Gauls who were not accustomed to either heat or thirst. Instead of ordering one unit via a section card. suffered very intensely from both. and made a ring of locked shields on the outside. taking with them Publius. They both urged him to slip away with them and escape to the city of Ichae.‖ ―With Publius were two Greeks. Hieroymus and Nicomachus. Roman Gallic Mercenary Cavalry: The Roman Medium Cavalry unit.‖(From Plutarch‘s ‗Life of Crassus‘) The Parthians utilized composite bows and probably seriously out-ranged the Roman mercenary Archers attached to Crassus‘ army. the controlling Player may order a pair of adjacent Legionary Infantry units to switch hexes—at least one of the units switching places must not be adjacent to an enemy unit. curved so as to give maximum impetus to the arrows. By all accounts these crack troops died bravely fighting with Publius‘ detachment.(Publius had distinguished himself as a cavalry officer at the Battle of the Vosges in 58 BC against the Germans and in other actions).

and not far off. since he was unable to use his hand. but had gone away after the terms had been fulfilled by acts.[2] When Murena had delivered his answer he began robbing forthwith. and he went into winter quarters in Cappadocia. being ambitious of a triumph. and by working on him persuaded him to anticipate Mithridates in beginning hostilities. went to war with the Colchians and the tribes around the Cimmerian Bosporus [1] who had revolted from him. meantime. for fear of it. Murena marched suddenly through Cappadocia and attacked Comana. Megabacchus killed himself. and killed some of the king's cavalry. they say.47 Romans. Censorinus. Mithridates. after his return to Pontus. with a rich and renowned temple. although he had served him well in Asia in the battles with Fimbria. were taken prisoners. but waited for the return of his embassy. which had been pierced through with an arrow. [May 83] The latter. a very large country town belonging to Mithridates.‖ ―When the king's ambassadors appealed to the treaty he replied that he saw no treaty. for Sulla had not written it out. but against the Romans. as their ruler. The Parthians then cut off Publius‘ head and at once rode off against Crassus. died in the same way. and soon afterward put him to death. The Colchians asked him to give them his son. for he had not yet restored the whole of Cappadocia to [king]Ariobarzanes[I Philoromaeus]. not sparing the money of the temples. ― ―The king suspected that this was brought about by his son through his own ambition to be king. sought trifling pretexts for war. who had been left by Sulla with [Gaius Flavius] Fimbria's two legions to settle affairs of the rest of Asia.Romans vs Mithridatic Historical Background ― The Second Mithridatic War began in this way. Mithridates. Murena returned to Phrygia and Galatia loaded down with plunder. had passed over the river Halys. But Publius said that there was no death so terrible that. The king offered no opposition. ― ―There he met [Quintus] Calidius. ― ―Mithridates sent an embassy to the Senate and to Sulla to complain of the acts of Murena. [Lucius Licinius] Murena.‖ (From Plutarch‘s ‗Life of Crassus‘) Second Mithridatic War Battle of the Halys River 82 BC . but still retained a part of it. he presented his side to his shield-bearer and ordered him to run him through with his sword. He thought that the latter had yielded more than was necessary to Sulla in his negotiations in Greece. The magnitude of his preparations gave rise to the belief that they were made not against those tribes. he would abandon men who were dying on his account.‖ ―Against the tribes of the Bosporus he built a fleet and fitted out a large army. they say. who had been sent from Rome on account of the complaints . He bade them farewell and told them to look after their own safety. Not more than 500. He captured 400 villages belonging to Mithridates. and when he did so they at once returned to their allegiance. Accordingly he sent for him and first bound him with golden fetters. Then. The survivors fought on until the Parthians came up the hill and rode them down with their long spears. ― ―He also had suspicions of Archelaus. as did others who were of most note. which was then swollen by rains and very difficult to cross. When Archelaus heard of this he became alarmed and fled to Murena.

as he had not broken the treaty. to retaliate on their villages. After losing many men Murena fled over the mountains to Phrygia by a pathless route. Neither of them began the fight until Mithridates came up with a larger army. The latter retreated to a strong hill where the king attacked him. thinking that open war had been ordered by the Romans. After he had thus spoken he was seen talking to Murena alone.48 of Mithridates.‖ ―Murena abated nothing of his violence. when a severe engagement immediately took place on the banks of the river. crossed the river. both private citizens and soldiers. Gordius. Gordius straightway seized and carried off a large number of animals and other property and men. and took position against Murena himself. but again invaded the territory of Mithridates. severely harassed by the missiles of the enemy. but he declared in the hearing of all that the Senate ordered Murena not to molest the king. The latter. Mithridates prevailed. Calidius did not bring a decree of the Senate. and got the better of Murena decidedly. directed his general. with a river flowing between them.‖ (A Selection From the Histories of Appian of Alexandria) War Council Roman Force Leader: Murena Command: 4 Cards .

If a Player rolls ―swords‖ when attempting to rally he may freely chose which unit gets a block back. Roman /Roman Trained units. that have not expended their Pilum may also be ordered to throw Pilum if the card ―Darken the Sky‖ is played by their commanding player. the controlling Player may order a pair of adjacent Legionary Infantry units to switch . Roman/Roman Trained Pilum Each Roman/Roman Trained Legionary Infantry unit starts with a Pilum Marker. An attached Mithridatic Leader may use his special ability to cancel a ―swords‖ hit that was inflicted via a Pilum hit (see special Command rules) on the unit he is stacked with. Roman/Roman Trained Relief Moves & Cohort Maneuvers: Adjacent and on the same side Roman/Roman Trained Legionary Infantry. The Pilum is a one-time use weapon that is generally fired right before a Roman Legionary unit attacks in closecombat or is itself attacked by the enemy in close-combat. Mithridatic/Pontic Victory: 7 Banners Special Rules: Command Rules: All Mithridatic Leaders may cancel a retreat or a sword hit if present with the unit. No unit can be rallied to beyond five blocks or its strength at the start of the game whichever is less. may switch places in a ―Relief/Cohort Maneuver‖. color. Once the Pilum is fired the Pilum marker is removed from the Roman unit to indicate that the Pilum has been expended and the unit may not throw Pilum for the rest of the battle. Just before a Roman/Roman Trained Legionary Infantry unit with Pilum is attacked or is itself attacked by the enemy for the very first time in the battle in close-combat it throws its Pilum— roll one die and apply normal hits for swords. unless Mithradates is the supporting leader---then up to two helmet hits may be counted. Instead of ordering one unit via a section card. Units on both sides involved in close combat with the support of a Leader may only count one helmet hit amongst those rolled to inflict a hit on an opposing unit. instead of moving. The act of throwing the Pilum is not considered to be part of the Close-Combat— so any result of the Pilum throw is resolved before the Close-combat.49 Mithridatic/Pontic Army: Leader: Mithridates Command: 5 Cards Move First Victory Conditions: Roman Victory: 13 Banners—Romans score 2 Banners if they manage to eliminate Mithridates. adjacent to the enemy. or a Flag/retreat hit Afterwards remove the Pilum marker. Roman Legionary Infantry & Roman Trained Pontic units The following types of infantry units in the game on both sides are assumed to be Roman (or Roman Trained) Legionaries: ALL Heavy and Medium Infantry in both forces. Relief/Cohort Maneuvers may only be conducted through the play of Section cards ONLY. The Player picks one adjacent enemy unit and throws two dice –apply the results just as one would before close combat—and remove the Pilum Marker. Units and the Rally Card:.

50 hexes—at least one of the units switching places must not be adjacent to an enemy unit. Mithridatic Asiatic Levy: All Mithridatic Auxillia units are assumed to be the standard Asia Minor Infantry Levy of the Mithridatic Empire—these units have no missile capability. Some aspects of the setup are drawn from the historical fiction work ―The Last King‖ which allow the initial placement of the Pontic heavy horse on the Roman side of the river. or rolled in close combat or Battle-back by a Mithridatic-Pontic Heavy Cavalry unit—these results ONLY count as normal hits.00020. Order of Battle Notes: Murena probably had about three legions plus various auxiliaries & mercenaries. A unit‘s ―Outflanked‖ situation is judged at the instant it battles back. Effects of being Outflanked: ―Outflanked‖ units when battling back roll only half the normal number of dice they would be normally entitled to rounded up—to a maximum of only two dice—―Outflanked‖ units when battling back never hit on helmet rolls even if supported by a leader. but inferior in both equipment and fighting spirit to the forces of the Roman Republic‘s Legions---In Close Combat and Battle Back ALL Mithridatic-Pontic units (with two exceptions) make no hits on their enemies if Swords are rolled—always consider Swords to be a ‗miss‘ when rolled by the Mithridatic Player unless the swords result was rolled as a result of pilum fire by Roman-trained Pontic Legionary Infantry. A unit that switched places via the Relief/Cohort Maneuver into a hex adjacent to the enemy may close combat in the same player-turn. Outflanking---This is an easy way of introducing facing and flanks to the game with little fuss— it can be retrofitted to other scenarios where appropriate: A unit is said to be ―Outflanked‖ if it is surrounded in all six adjacent hexes by either enemy units. For all other purposes Mithridatic Auxilla are treated as regular Auxilla units Mithridatic Cataphracti: Mithridatic Heavy Cavalry is heavily armored—therefore they always ignore the first sword hit inflicted upon them in close-combat or battle-back. If attacked by Roman Heavy infantry the Mithridatic Auxillia may attempt to evade.000 men. or hexes adjacent to an enemy unit. . Gordius. at the river. greatly outnumbering. Units on the board edges (and not surrounded by six adjacent hexes) cannot be ―Outflanked‖. Mithridates likely brought more than double or triple that number to the battlefield from Pontus to reinforce his general. The Mithridatic Asiatic Army Special Rules Asiatic Army: The Mithridatic/Pontic Army is assumed to be a typical Asiatic ‗horde‘. Mithridatic Heavy Cavalry hits on sword rolls in close-combat and battle-back. The presence of friendly units or impassable terrain does not negate an ―Outflanked‖ situation in any way. some 15.

but. When Pansa was drawing near with his army. was collecting recruits throughout Italy. collected money. Pansa." In this way he conciliated the soldiers and attached them to himself. he proceeded to Picenum. he placed his two best legions in ambush in the marsh. which had been thrown up artificially. fellow-soldiers. shared the command of the forces with Octavian. Octavian yielded to him in everything and they shared with each other and went into winter quarters together. with only the Martian legion and five other cohorts. and Hirtius and Octavian advanced towards Mutina lest Antony should receive in surrender Decimus' army which was now weak with famine. Hirtius. Antony had disdained to occupy the defile as it served no other purpose than to hinder the enemy. betook himself to Caesar's colonies. and the other one. where he recruited another legion and waited to see what would happen. as Antony had a much larger force of horse. and that it will be expressed to you abundantly if the gods grant success to our undertakings. they did not venture to come to close quarters with him at once. They removed most of the women and children in a panic. where they were concealed by the reeds and where the road. When Ventidius learned this he turned his course towards Antony. where he was well known. then a gleam here and there of shield and helmet. In the meantime. which was cut up by torrents. that my gratitude will be due to you for these things. but waited for Pansa. and looked over the marsh on either side. 67 Carsuleius and Pansa hurried through the defile by night. and said to his army: "I owe these honours of mine to you. was narrow. These paid without complaining in order to avoid calumny. There was a suspicious agitation of the rushes. procured arms by inducing the armourers to work without pay. and Cicero himself fled from the city.51 Roman Civil War The Battle of Forum Gallorum 43 BC Antonian vs Senate Historical Background: (the selection below is from Appian of Alexandria‘s account) 65 Meditating thus to himself he (Octavian) performed the sacrifices appertaining to the command assigned to him. and as he was secretly ordered to do it by the Senate he demanded as his share the two legions that had deserted from Antony. until Publius Ventidius. who had served under Gaius Caesar and who was a friend of Antony. Octavian and Hirtius sent Carsuleius to him with Octavian's praetorian cohort and the Martian legion to assist him in passing through the defile. deprived him of the advantage of numbers. in the absence of the consuls. and having no chance to win distinction with his cavalry. He held frequent assemblies. and exacted heavy contributions from the Antonians. 66 Such was the course of events round Mutina. eager to fight. and brought over two legions to Antony and hastened to Rome to seize Cicero. one of the consuls. The consternation was extreme. but the difficulty of the ground. but being intercepted by Octavian and Hirtius. Cicero took the lead by public speaking. At Rome. knowing that they were the most reliable in the army. which was still free from enemies. not now merely but from the time when you gave me the command. for the Senate conferred them upon me on account of you. Know. and Antony's praetorian cohort suddenly shewed itself directly in their . therefore. but as Mutina was closely hemmed in by Antony. because the ground was marshy and cut by ditches. As winter advanced Decimus began to suffer from hunger. There were frequent cavalry engagements. At daybreak. unable to endure the exactions of Cicero. they entered upon the high road above mentioned.

The Antonians got themselves in line under compulsion. had put in readiness for them while the battle was in progress. not to join in the fight lest they should cause confusion by their inexperience. but ranged themselves near it. although the latter did not pursue. They needed neither admonition nor encouragement. but he fell upon the new levies and made a great slaughter. There were wounds and slaughter but no cries. Thus there were two battles in two marshes. When they were overcome by fatigue they drew apart from each other for a brief space to take breath. who gave way. and performed against this foe also many splendid deeds of valour. being apprehensive of the marshy ground. and with loud cries. if they came up. No blow missed its mark. corpses. at first step by step. The other troops divided themselves into two parts and advanced into the marsh on either side. they hoped to decide the whole war by this single engagement. and some even who were unhurt . but the Martians for fear of shame did not enter into the camp. and half-dead men. at a distance of sixty stades. and since neither could dislodge the other they locked together with their swords as in a wrestling match. and neither division could see the other by reason of the elevated road. since experience made each one his own general. The one side was moved by shame lest its two legions be beaten by one. As darkness was coming on he allowed them to escape. The Antonians were determined to punish the Martians for desertion as being traitors to themselves. Recognizing in each other the flower of either army. Amazement took possession of the new levies who had come up. they met together in close order. but little by little. Being veterans they raised no battle-cry. since they could not expect to terrify each other. which the quaestor. 69 All put forth superhuman exertions. nor in the engagement did they utter a sound. the other by ambition that its single legion should overcome the two. either as victors or vanquished. near Mutina. While they were in loose order Hirtius made his appearance in perfect order with his legion complete and fresh. but they held out with equal bravery on both sides until Pansa was wounded in the side by a javelin and carried off the field to Bononia. 68 Thus urged on by animosity and ambition they assailed each other. ordered the new levies. Torquatus. not in disgraceful rout. heard of this flight. so much more does training contribute to bravery than race. When the new levies saw this they fled in disorder.52 front. as in gymnastic games. as well as the Martians. As there could be neither flanking nor charging amid marshes and ditches. only groans. apprehending that it might be needed. as they beheld such deeds done with such precision and in such silence. The Martian legion. surrounded on all sides and having no way to escape. The praetorians of Octavian confronted the praetorians of Antony. and the praetorians of Octavian perished to the last man. Antony refrained from attacking the Martians as being a troublesome business. The Martians were equally determined to punish the Antonians for condoning the slaughter of their comrades at Brundusium. Although fatigued they were still furious and ready to fight to the bitter end if anybody should attack them. the one commanded by Pansa and the other by Carsuleius. considering this their own affair rather than that of their generals. but being wearied by their recent exertions they were overcome by the fresh army opposed to them. Those of the Martians who were under Carsuleius got the better of those opposed to them. It was already evening and the victorious Antonians were returning singing hymns of triumph. The new levies crowded into it confusedly although they were Italians. to their camp. he hurried thither with the other legion that had deserted from Antony. wounded men. but afterwards they turned and hurried as if in flight. while along the road itself the praetorian cohorts fought another battle of their own. A wide stretch of the marsh was filled with arms. 70 When Hirtius. and when one fell he was instantly borne away and another took his place. and the greater part of them were slain in this encounter by Hirtius. Those under Pansa were likewise in difficulties. and then rushed again to the encounter. Then his soldiers retired.

He encamped without entrenchments in a village near the plain. after he had fought splendidly. named Forum Gallorum. Some they put on horseback in their own places. Antony's cavalry. War Council Neither Player may start with a ―Line Command‖ in his initial hand Antonian Army: Leader: Antony 5 Commmand Cards Move First Senate Army: Leader: Pansa 4 Command Cards . The loss of Hirtius was slight. destroyed by the coming of Hirtius. The whole of Octavian's praetorian cohort perished. still others they urged to take hold of the horses' tails and run along with them and so secure their safety.53 mistrusted their strength by reason of their fatigue. went to their assistance and collected them through the entire night. Antony and Pansa each lost about one-half of their men. as many as he had with him. Thus were Antony's forces.

If a Player rolls ―swords‖ when attempting to rally he may freely chose which unit gets a block back. This particular scenario utilizes a different Command Card Deck than the original C & C Ancients Deck. Scenario Special Rules: Command Rules: The ―Marian‖ Command Card Deck Historical Note: Combat in the 1st Century BC between Roman Legions was somewhat different than the wars between civilized states in the 3rd Century BC. and for the Antonian side over-running and removed the Senate Army‘s Camp Hextiles.54 Victory: Banner Victory is not used in this game Victory is won instead by eliminating enemy troop unit blocks. and battles probably tended to be more of the nature of hand to hand full bore slugfests. . x1 ―I Am Spartacus‖. Units and the Rally Card: No unit can be rallied to beyond five blocks or its strength at the start of the game whichever is less. Units on both sides involved in close combat or battleback with the support of a Leader may only count one helmet hit amongst those rolled to inflict a hit on an opposing unit. x2 ―Move-Fire-Move‖. Line Command Limit: No more than six (6) foot units can be ordered by play of a single Line Command Card in a given player-turn. Leaders may only support in close combat or battleback in the scenario units they are stacked with. x1 ―Mounted Charge‖--note that one Mounted Charge‖ card is still retained in the deck. Eliminating a Senate Camptile scores 4 blocks for the Antonian side Both sides receive one bonus block score for totally eliminating an enemy cavalry unit. The following eight cards are removed before play and put aside to create the Marian Deck: X4 ―Order Light troops‖. & Rally Special Rules: Antony can cancel both a retreat and a sword hit if present with the unit receiving such hits. Eight (8) Cards are removed from the original deck leaving 52 Cards for scenario play. unless Antony is the supporting leader---then up to two helmet hits may be counted. except Antony he can support units adjacent to his location. This new deck is called the ―Marian Deck‖ and it is named after Caesar‘s uncle Gaius Marius who reorganized the Roman Legions in roughly 105-103BC (several years before Caesar was born) to meet the challenges of the Germanic Tribal invasions that threatened the Roman Republic of the time. All other Leaders may cancel a retreat or a sword hit if present with the unit. Anthony. Leader Command. Eliminating an enemy unit block counts as one block for the Victory Levels listed below: Victory for the Antonian side: 44 Blocks Victory for the Senate side: 40 Blocks Eliminating an enemy Leader unit counts as 4 blocks (6 blocks if Antony is eliminated for the Senate Player) towards victory.or an Elite Praetorian Heavy Infantry unit. enemy leaders. There was less room for combined arms tactics and maneuver.

3) They cannot execute or participate in Relief/Cohort Maneuver Moves. adjacent to the enemy. Apply the second and subsequent normally in all such combat situations. Roman Pilum:Each Roman Legionary Infantry unit starts with a Pilum Marker. If two Roman Legionary Infantry units that have not thrown pilum yet engage the attacker resolves his pilum throw first. ALL of these units are considered to be Roman Legionary Infantry. A unit that switched places via the Relief/Cohort Maneuver into a hex adjacent to the enemy may close combat in the same player-turn. An attached Leader may use his special ability to cancel a ―swords‖ hit that was inflicted via a pilum hit (see special Command rules) on the unit he is stacked with. Roman units. The Pilum is a one-time use weapon that is generally fired right before a Roman Legionary unit attacks in closecombat or is itself attacked by the enemy in close-combat. Once the pilum is fired (or lost see below) –the Pilum marker is removed from the Roman unit to indicate that the pilum has been expended and the unit may not throw Pilum for the rest of the battle. The combatants in this era of civil war often recruited non-citizens from different areas of the Roman Republican Empire into their Legions and as a result the quality of such forces varied widely. Missile Ranges & Effectiveness in Forum Gallorum: a) Archers and Slingers only have a range of 2 hexes in this scenario—and may missile fire at . that have not expended their Pilum may also be ordered to throw Pilum if the card ―Darken the Sky‖ is played by their commanding player. Roman Relief Moves & Cohort Maneuvers: Adjacent and on the same side Roman Legionary Heavy Infantry. Instead of ordering one unit via a section card. and Medium Infantry. Just before a Roman unit with pilum is attacked or is itself attacked by the enemy for the very first time in the battle in close-combat it throws its pilum—roll one die and apply normal hits for swords. or a Flag/retreat hit Afterwards remove the Pilum marker. may switch places in a ―Relief/Cohort Maneuver‖. instead of moving.55 Roman Legionary Infantry Rules: The following types of infantry units in the game on BOTH sides are assumed to be Roman Legionaries: Heavy Infantry. but for the following changes: 1) In their battle-back they only roll three dice normally—not the normal four dice 2) The first swords result they roll in an individual combat roll is always ignored in close-combat or battle-back—treat as a miss. however. color. The ordering Player picks one adjacent enemy unit and throws two dice –apply the results just as one would before close combat—and remove the Pilum Marker. the controlling Player may order a pair of adjacent Legionary Heavy Infantry units to switch hexes—at least one of the units switching places must not be adjacent to an enemy unit. 4) They never hit on swords when throwing pilum. The act of throwing the pilum is not considered to be part of the Close-Combat—so any result of the pilum throw is resolved before the Close-combat. The Senate Medium Infantry units. The Senate Medium Infantry units may not utilize this rule since they are actually very recent recruits Senate Recruit Levy-Legionary Medium Infantry: The Medium Infantry in the game represents the recent recruits the Senate was able to levy for the campaign against Anthony—Treat as normal Legionary Medium Infantry. do not hit on ‗swords‘ when throwing pilum. Relief/Cohort Maneuvers may only be conducted through the play of Section cards ONLY.

The units that were just placed may then close-combat any adjacent enemy units. Mounted units and Leaders moving alone pay 2 MP for only the first Marsh hex entered during that move. A unit‘s ―Outflanked‖ situation is judged at the instant it battles back. The Senate Player should keep a careful count of how many Player-turns he has played since the start of the scenario. Entering Available Senate Reinforcements: The Senate Player enters the available Reinforcements at the start of any Player-turn in lieu of playing a Command Card. Arrival of Senate Reinforcements: The Senate Reinforcements are as follows: x1 Elite Heavy Infantry (5 blocks). Start by placing Hirtius in any vacant mapedge hex from A1 to A3 or A6 to A13. Effects of being Outflanked: ―Outflanked‖ units when battling back roll only half the normal number of dice they would be normally entitled to rounded up—to a maximum of only two dice—―Outflanked‖ units when battling back never hit on helmet rolls even if supported by a leader.56 adjacent enemy units. or hexes adjacent to an enemy unit. On his 8th and 9th player-turns on a ―1-3‖. and x1 Leader (Hirtius). Units located in Marshes do not count for ‗support‘ for preventing retreat by adjacent units and cannot receive support themselves from adjacent units when in a marsh hex. Senate Campworks: Senate foot Units occupying Campworks hextiles that are not in an outflanked condition Battle-back with one extra dice and may ignore the first Flag result inflicted upon them. Campworks tiles are removed (and the hex reverts to clear terrain) when an opposing . Once they become available no further turn start rolls need be made. x4 Heavy Infantry. Turn 10 or later on a ―1-4‖. Units on the board edges (and not surrounded by six adjacent hexes) cannot be ―Outflanked‖. Marshes do not block line of sight. All the Reinforcement units are placed in any vacant hex within one or two hexes of Hirtius. After those combats (and any Momentum move/combat) takes place the Antonian player conducts his normal Player-turn. Closecombat and Battle-Backs into or out of a marsh hex is at a ―normal‖ 3 dice maximum (with any of the normal + for cards). Cavalry units in Marsh hexes may not evade if attacked in close-combat. Outflanking---This is an easy way of introducing facing and flanks to the game with little fuss— it can be retrofitted to other scenarios where appropriate: A unit is said to be ―Outflanked‖ if it is surrounded in all six adjacent hexes by either enemy units. The Infantry arrive with their pilum markers. c) The Antonian Slinger unit hits on swords when missile firing at Medium or Light enemy foot units. At the start of his 7th player-turn roll one six-sided die: on a ―1-2‖ ALL Reinforcements are available. The Reinforcements cannot be entered on the map until they are available. Senate Reinforcements may enter the map in the same Player-turn that they become available. except one of the units must be placed in the hex with Hirtus. The presence of friendly units or impassable terrain does not negate an ―Outflanked‖ situation in any way. Terrain Special Rules: Marsh: Foot units must stop when they enter a marsh hex and may only enter a marsh hex when ordered from a starting hex directly adjacent to the marsh hex moved to. and retreat one hex less than normal per Flag if their retreat started from a Marsh hex. b) An ordered unit may either missile fire or conduct close-combat in a turn—never BOTH.

Place a Campworks tile in the hex that ‗dig in‘ occurred at the end of that Senate player-turn. Senate Camp: For combat and removal the Senate Camp Tiles are treated exactly like campworks—the only effective difference is that the Antonian player receives four blocks credit toward victory for each Senate Camptile removed from the map. but does not inhibit movement. and probably a separate double-strength Elite Praetorian Cohort so he starts with 11 Legionary Heavy infantry units in the scenario plus some cavalry. Octivian‘s & Antony‘s Elite Praetorian Heavy Infantry Cohorts: The sole Elite Praetorian Heavy Infantry (6 block) unit in each of the opposing armies may ignore the first Flag result inflicted upon it from missile fire. OB Notes: Each Legionary unit in the game represents from one to three cohorts. Senate Campworks Building: Senate Medium Infantry units in a clear terrain hex stacked with a Leader and ordered by a Section Card may in lieu of moving and attacking can instead ―dig in ― a Campworks tile. in support. Another Senate Legion (the other veteran one that had also deserted Anthony) arrived with other consul Hirtius at the end of the fight to save the day. Elevated Roadway: Close-combat or Battle-back into or out of an Elevated Roadway hex tile is always one less die than normal when conducted between Elevated roadway hexes or between Clear and Elevated Roadway hexes. or battle-back. Elevated Roadway blocks the line of sight.57 unit enters the hex for any reason. Crags: These two hexes are impassable Hills: Use normal rulebook rules. entered the marsh with a total of 15 Cohorts and had behind him an additional force of at least one to two Legions of new levies. Campworks block line of sight. Anthony had two crack Legions engaged (20 Cohorts). Units in Marsh hexes may not close-combat into an Elevated Roadway hex although they could battle-back into such hexes if attacked from them— these battle-backs & the original attack into the marsh from the roadway is at the normal 3 dice maximum for marshes (with any of the normal + for cards). close-combat. of which he had a surplus. The ‗dig in‘ option is not permitted if the Senate Medium Infantry unit in question is adjacent to an enemy unit. who was mortally wounded in the battle. . A maximum of two such ‗dig in‘ options in two clear hexes may occur per game. The consul Pansa.