dessert 365 day

of the
recipes for

every day

of the year

Kim Laidlaw

contents
january 8 february 32 march 54 april 78 may 102 june 126 july 150 august 174 september 198 october 222 november 246 december 270

A DESSERT FOR EVERY DAY
From golden crisps to biscuit-topped cobblers, crunchy cookies to tender cupcakes, fruit-laden pies to flaky pastries, creamy custards to over-the-top sundaes—this collection of scrumptious dessert recipes covers all your cravings. Whether you want a light fruit dessert to end a weeknight meal, an elaborate layer cake for a birthday celebration, or a silky panna cotta to serve at an elegant dinner party, you’ll find inspiration for both favorite classics and updated delights throughout this book. With 365 tempting recipes, this colorful, calendar-style cookbook will inspire you to make a dessert any day of the year. Each month highlights the raw ingredients and occasions that coincide with the season. In the spring, the fresh flavors of strawberries, rhubarb, and lemon mingle with tangy cheeses, toasted almonds, and vanilla. During the warm-weather months, draw on the abundance of stone fruits to star in compotes, crisps, tarts, and frozen desserts. You’ll find plenty of crowd-friendly recipes suitable for summer barbecues and picnics. When it’s back-to-school time, pack lunch boxes with easy brownies, blondies, bars and cookies, and make good use of autumn’s apples and pears in pies, cobblers, cakes, and crepes. In the cold, wintry months, warm up with comforting desserts filled with spices, chocolate, and nuts. From pumpkin pie to biscotti to bûche de noël, choose from numerous desserts fit for the holidays in November and December. Throughout the year, discover homey classics like triple-chocolate brownies, brown butter pound cake, old-fashioned apple pie, ice cream sandwiches, and nectarine and almond galette. Dessert takes on a new spin with updated ideas like Guinness ice cream floats, ricotta cheesecake with blood orange glaze, chocolate–ancho chile cake, waffle s’mores, frozen chai, chocolate– fromage blanc cupcakes, and passion fruit pavlovas. If light and refreshing is what you are craving, try poached peaches with thyme, grilled pineapple skewers drizzled with rum, blueberry-vanilla panna cotta, strawberries with lemon and mint, orange crème caramel, or Meyer lemon sorbet. And who can resist those beloved desserts that speak to the kid in all of us: pink lemonade ice pops, banana splits, glazed lemon cookies, double chocolate donut holes, and banana-butterscotch pudding. With this vast collection of tantalizing recipes as your guide, and mouthwatering color photographs to illustrate the way, you’re sure to find the perfect sweet treat for any occasion, any day of the year.

ja n ua ry

9

Double-Chocolate Crinkle Cookies
makes about 30 cookies
4 oz (125 g) unsweetened chocolate, chopped 4 Tbsp (2 oz/60 g) unsalted butter 11⁄ 2 cups (7 1⁄ 2 oz/235 g) all-purpose f lour
1 ⁄ 2 cup (11⁄ 2 oz/45 g) unsweetened Dutch-process cocoa powder

10
ja n ua ry

Lemon Pudding Cake
serves 6
2–3 large lemons 1 cup (8 oz/250 g) sugar
1⁄4 1⁄ 8

cup (11⁄ 2 oz/45 g) all-purpose f lour tsp kosher salt

4 Tbsp (2 oz/60 g) unsalted butter, melted 3 large eggs, separated 11⁄4 cups (10 f l oz/310 ml) whole milk
1⁄4

With a crisp, crackled exterior and a chewy, fudgy interior, these cookies satisfy serious chocolate cravings. To make it easier to form into balls, refrigerate the batter until it is firm.

2 tsp baking powder
1 ⁄4

tsp kosher salt

4 large eggs 2 cups (1 lb/500 g) granulated sugar 1 tsp pure vanilla extract 11⁄ 2
1⁄ 2

cups (9 oz/280 g) miniature semisweet chocolate chips cup (2 oz/60 g) confectioners’ sugar

Place the unsweetened chocolate and butter in the top of a double boiler over (not touching) barely simmering water, and heat, stirring often, until melted. Remove from over the water and let cool slightly. In a bowl, stir together the flour, cocoa powder, baking powder, and salt. In the bowl of a stand mixer, beat the eggs, granulated sugar, and vanilla on medium speed until light in color and thick, about 3 minutes. Beat in the melted chocolate mixture on low speed until blended. Beat in the dry ingredients until incorporated. Mix in the chocolate chips. Cover the bowl and refrigerate the dough for about 2 hours. Preheat the oven to 325°F (165°C). Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper. Sift the confectioners’ sugar into a small bowl. Roll rounded tablespoonfuls of the dough between your palms into balls, then roll in the confectioners’ sugar. Space the balls about 3 inches (7.5 cm) apart on the prepared sheets, pressing them down onto the sheet and flattening them slightly. Bake the cookies, 1 sheet at a time, until the tops are puffed and crinkled and feel firm, 13–17 minutes. Let the cookies cool on the sheets for 5 minutes, then transfer to wire racks to cool completely.

This tangy pudding cake seems as if it is made by magic, but it’s really just a trick of texture, separating into a gooey, custardy bottom and a light, ethereal top as it bakes. For the loftiest results, take care not to over-whip the egg whites—beat them just until they hold stiff peaks.

tsp cream of tartar

Whipped Cream (page 295; optional)

Preheat the oven to 350°F (180°C). Have ready an 8-inch (20-cm) square baking dish and a 9-by-13-inch (23-by-33-cm) baking pan. Grate the zest from the lemons and squeeze 1 ⁄ 3 cup (3 fl oz/80 ml) juice. In a large bowl, whisk together 3 ⁄4 cup (6 oz/185 g) of the sugar, the flour, and salt. Add the butter, lemon juice and zest, and egg yolks and whisk until smooth. Whisk in the milk. In a large bowl, using an electric mixer, beat the egg whites and cream of tartar on medium-high speed until foamy. Slowly add the remaining 1 ⁄4 cup (2 oz/60 g) sugar and beat until the whites hold stiff, glossy peaks, about 1 minute. Using a rubber spatula, fold one-third of the egg whites into the batter to lighten it. Fold in the remaining whites just until no white streaks remain. Pour the batter into the 8-inch baking dish. Place the dish in the larger pan and pour hot water into the pan to reach halfway up the sides of the dish. Bake until the top of the cake is evenly light brown and firm, about 40 minutes. The top may have small cracks. Remove the baking dish from the water bath and place on a wire rack to cool. Serve warm, at room temperature, or cold. Accompany with whipped cream, if you like.

16

9
ja n ua ry

f e b r ua ry

15

15
f e b r ua ry

Blood Orange Tartlets
serves 6
Cream Cheese Tartlet Dough (page 294) 2 large whole eggs, plus 3 large egg yolks
1⁄ 2

cup (4 f l oz/125 ml) fresh blood orange juice, strained 2 Tbsp fresh lemon juice, strained cup (6 oz/185 g) sugar

16
f e b r ua ry

Brown Butter Blondies
makes about 16 blondies
11⁄ 2 cups (7 1⁄ 2 oz/235 g) all-purpose f lour 1 tsp baking powder
1⁄ 2 2⁄ 3

tsp kosher salt cup (5 oz/160 g) unsalted butter

Blood oranges lend a stunning ruby-rose color to the curd that fills these tartlets. If you cannot find them, the juice of regular oranges can be substituted. Blood orange juice is typically more tart than the juice of other varieties, so you will need to reduce the amount of sugar in the filling to 2 ⁄ 3 cup (5 oz/155 g).

3⁄4 1⁄ 2

1 cup (7 oz/220 g) firmly packed light brown sugar
1⁄ 2

cup (4 oz/125 g) unsalted butter, cut into pieces 2 tsp grated blood orange zest, plus more for garnish (optional) Whipped Cream (page 295)

Cut the dough into 6 equal portions, and place one portion in each of six 4-inch (10-cm) tartlet pans. Press the dough evenly over the bottom and up the sides of each pan until it is even with the rim. Trim any overhang. Freeze until the dough is firm, about 30 minutes. Preheat the oven to 400°F (200°C). Line the tartlets with foil and fill with pie weights. Place on a baking sheet and bake until the crusts start to look dry, about 15 minutes. Remove the weights and foil. Reduce the oven temperature to 350°F (180°C) and continue to bake until the crusts are lightly browned, about 5 minutes. Let cool on the sheet. Reduce the oven temperature to 325°F (165°C). In the top of a double boiler over (not touching) barely simmering water, whisk together the whole eggs, egg yolks, orange juice, lemon juice, and sugar. Whisk constantly until the mixture is thick enough to coat the back of a spoon and registers 160°F (71°C) on an instant-read thermometer, about 12 minutes. Remove from over the water and pour through a medium-mesh sieve into a bowl. Add the butter and orange zest and stir until the butter melts and is incorporated. Let stand for 10 minutes, then spoon into the cooled tartlet shells. Bake the tartlets until the centers are set, 12–15 minutes. Let the tartlets cool on the sheet on a wire rack for 20 minutes. Cover and refrigerate for at least 3 hours or up to overnight. The filling will thicken further. To serve, unmold each tartlet and top with a dollop of whipped cream and a sprinkle of zest, if you like.

Cooking butter until it is a deep, rich brown produces a nutty flavor that enhances the traditional blondie. These blondies go well with an ice cream made with nuts, such as honey pecan (page 140) or toasted almond (page 286).

cup (4 oz/125 g) granulated sugar

2 large eggs 2 tsp pure vanilla extract 1 Tbsp fresh lemon juice, strained Confectioners’ sugar for dusting

Preheat the oven to 325°F (165°C). Butter an 8-inch (20-cm) square baking pan. Sift the flour, baking powder, and salt into a bowl. In a frying pan, melt the butter over medium-low heat, swirling the pan often, until the butter is toasty brown and fragrant, about 4 minutes. Scrape the butter into a small bowl and let cool slightly. In a large bowl, stir together the brown butter, brown sugar, and granulated sugar until blended. Mix in the eggs, vanilla, and lemon juice until smooth. Stir in the dry ingredients just until incorporated. Pour the batter into the prepared pan, spreading it evenly. Bake until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out almost clean or with a few moist crumbs clinging to it, 35–45 minutes. Transfer to a wire rack and let cool completely. Dust with confectioners’ sugar. Cut into squares and serve.

45

1
march

Lemon Meringue Pie
serves 6–8
Flaky Pie Dough for single crust (page 294) For the lemon filling 11⁄4 cups (10 oz/315 g) sugar 3 Tbsp cornstarch 4 large whole eggs, plus 4 large egg yolks 2 Tbsp finely grated lemon zest 1 cup (8 f l oz/250 ml) fresh lemon juice 4 Tbsp (2 oz/60 g) unsalted butter, cut into pieces For the meringue 1 Tbsp cornstarch 4 large egg whites
1⁄ 2 1⁄ 2

This classic pie is sweet, tart, and hard to resist. The lemon pudding offsets the heaps of airy meringue on top. It makes a perfect ending to a Sunday supper of roast chicken and asparagus.

thick, about 2 minutes. Let cool. In a bowl, using an electric mixer, beat the egg whites and cream of tartar on high speed until foamy. Reduce the speed to medium and sprinkle in the sugar, beating constantly. Increase the speed to high and beat until the whites form a ribbon that folds back on itself when the beaters are lifted. Stir in the cornstarch mixture and beat on high speed until soft, glossy peaks form, 2–3 minutes. Heap the meringue onto the filling and spread to the edges of the crust. Use the back of a spoon to make large swirls. Bake until the meringue is light gold, 15–18 minutes. Transfer to a rack and let cool completely before serving.

tsp cream of tartar cup (4 oz/125 g) sugar

Prepare the dough and chill as directed. On a lightly floured work surface, roll out the dough into a round about 12 inches (30 cm) in diameter and about 1 ⁄ 8 inch (3 mm) thick. Line a 9-inch (23-cm) pie pan with the dough round. Trim the edge, leaving a 3 ⁄4-inch (2-cm) overhang. Fold the overhang under itself and pinch to create a decorative edge. Refrigerate or freeze the dough until firm, about 30 minutes. Preheat the oven to 400°F (200°C). Line the pie shell with foil and fill with pie weights. Bake until the crust starts to look dry, about 15 minutes. Remove the foil and weights, and continue baking until golden, about 15 minutes longer. Let cool completely. To make the filling, in a bowl, whisk together the sugar and cornstarch. Add the whole eggs and egg yolks and whisk until pale yellow. Whisk in the lemon zest and juice, then the butter. Transfer to a saucepan and cook over medium heat, stirring constantly, until the mixture begins to bubble and is very thick, about 10 minutes. Pour through a medium-mesh sieve into the baked crust, and spread evenly. Press a piece of plastic wrap directly onto the surface. Refrigerate until well chilled and set, 3–4 hours. Preheat the oven to 375°F (190°C). To make the meringue, in a saucepan, whisk together the cornstarch and 1 ⁄4 cup (2 fl oz/60 ml) water. Cook over medium heat, stirring, until » —›

2
march

Dark Chocolate Pudding
serves 6
2 cups (16 f l oz/500 ml) whole milk 6 large egg yolks
3⁄4

cup (6 oz/185 g) sugar

3 Tbsp all-purpose f lour 2 Tbsp unsweetened natural cocoa powder 6 oz (185 g) semisweet chocolate, finely chopped 2 oz (60 g) unsweetened chocolate, finely chopped 1 tsp pure vanilla extract Whipped Cream (page 295; optional)

This bittersweet chocolate pudding is easy to adapt. You can turn it into a parfait with layers of whipped cream and fresh raspberries. Or, try stirring in a little rum, Amaretto, or Frangelico, then garnish the top with crushed chocolate wafer cookies or shaved semisweet chocolate.

In a saucepan, warm the milk over medium heat until small bubbles appear along the edge of the pan. Remove from the heat. In a bowl, whisk together the egg yolks and sugar until smooth. Sift the flour and cocoa powder over the yolk mixture and whisk until smooth. Whisking constantly, slowly pour in the hot milk. Pour the mixture into the pan and cook over medium heat, stirring constantly, until it comes to a boil and thickens, about 4 minutes. Reduce the heat to low and cook, stirring constantly, for 1 minute. Pour the pudding through a fine-mesh sieve into a bowl. Add the chocolates and stir until melted. Stir in the vanilla. Spoon into serving cups. Refrigerate until chilled, about 2 hours. Serve with whipped cream, if you like.

56

2
march

17
april

Strawberry-Rhubarb Pie
serves 6–8
Flaky Pie Dough for double crust (page 294) 11⁄ 2 cups (12 oz/375 g) sugar 2 Tbsp cornstarch 2 Tbsp quick-cooking tapioca Pinch of kosher salt 4 cups (1 lb/500 g) strawberries, hulled and quartered lengthwise (12-mm) 8 rhubarb stalks, cut into pieces (about 4 1⁄ 2 cups/221⁄ 2 oz/700 g) 1 Tbsp cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces Vanilla bean ice cream for serving (optional)
1⁄ 2 -inch

18
april

Vanilla Bean Ice Cream
makes about 1 qt (32 fl oz/1 l)
11⁄ 2 cups (12 f l oz/375 ml) whole milk 11⁄ 2 cups (12 f l oz/375 ml) heavy cream 1 vanilla bean, split lengthwise 6 large egg yolks
1⁄ 2

cup (4 oz/125 g) plus 2 Tbsp sugar

Technically a vegetable, rhubarb is treated like a fruit and is traditionally paired with strawberries, which complement its tart flavor. In late spring, seek out field rhubarb, which is cherry-red and has a more pronounced flavor than its hothouse kin. Slice the rhubarb no wider than 1 ⁄ 2 inch (12 mm) thick to avoid strings, and make sure to discard the mildly toxic leaves.

Prepare the dough and chill as directed. Transfer the dough to a lightly floured work surface and cut in half. Roll each half into a round at least 12 inches (30 cm) in diameter and about 1 ⁄ 8 inch (3 mm) thick. Transfer one round to a 9-inch (23-cm) pie pan and ease into the pan. Trim the edge, leaving a 3 ⁄4-inch (2-cm) overhang. Set the second dough round in a cool place until ready to use. In a small bowl, stir together the sugar, cornstarch, tapioca, and salt. Place the strawberries and rhubarb in a large bowl, sprinkle with the sugar mixture, and toss to distribute evenly. Transfer to the doughlined pan. Dot with the butter. Position the reserved dough round over the filled pie. Trim the edge, leaving a 1-inch (2.5-cm) overhang. Fold under the edge of the bottom round and crimp to seal. Using a knife, cut a hole or slits in the top. Refrigerate until the dough is firm, 20–30 minutes. Preheat the oven to 375°F (190°C). Bake the pie until the crust is golden and the filling is thick and bubbling, 50–60 minutes. Transfer to a wire rack and let cool completely. Serve with scoops of vanilla ice cream, if you like.

This is a lusciously rich ice cream with the robust flavor of vanilla bean. Heap scoops of it over cake, pie, or brownies, or savor it on its own. If you can’t find vanilla beans, substitute 2 tsp vanilla extract.

In a saucepan, combine the milk and 1 cup (8 fl oz/250 ml) of the cream. Using the tip of a sharp knife, scrape the seeds from the vanilla bean into the saucepan and then add the pod. Cook over medium heat until bubbles form around the edge of the pan, about 5 minutes. In a bowl, whisk the egg yolks, sugar, and remaining 1 ⁄ 2 cup (4 fl oz/125 ml) cream until the mixture is smooth and the sugar begins to dissolve. Gradually whisk about 1 ⁄ 2 cup (4 fl oz/125 ml) of the hot milk mixture into the egg mixture. Whisk until smooth, then pour into the saucepan. Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly and keeping the custard at a low simmer, until it is thick enough to coat the back of a spoon, about 5 minutes. Do not let it boil. Strain through a fine-mesh sieve into a bowl. Discard the vanilla bean. Set the bowl in an ice bath and stir the custard occasionally until cool. Press a piece of plastic wrap directly on the surface of the custard and refrigerate until well chilled, at least 3 hours or up to 24 hours. Pour the custard into an ice-cream maker and freeze according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Transfer the ice cream to a freezer-safe container. Cover tightly and freeze until firm, at least 3 hours or up to 3 days, before serving.

92

17
april

30
m ay

Passion Fruit Cupcakes with Coconut Frosting
makes 12 cupcakes
For the passion fruit curd 4 ripe passion fruits, or 1⁄4 cup (2 f l oz/60 ml) thawed frozen passion fruit pulp 2 large egg yolks
1⁄ 3

the speed to medium-high and beat until light and fluffy, 1–2 minutes. Beat in the eggs, one at a time. Reduce the speed to low and add the dry ingredients in 3 batches, alternating with the cream mixture in 2 batches. Beat just until combined. Spoon the batter into the muffin cups, filling them nearly full. Bake until the centers spring back when pressed lightly with a fingertip, about 20 minutes. Let the cupcakes cool in the pan for 10 minutes, then transfer to a wire rack and let cool completely. In a bowl, using the stand mixer, beat the remaining 1 ⁄ 2 cup (4 oz/125 g) butter with half of the confectioners’ sugar on mediumlow speed until crumbly. Add the remaining confectioners’ sugar and beat until powdery, about 1 minute. With the mixer on medium speed, slowly add the coconut milk and beat until blended. Increase the speed to medium-high and beat the frosting until light and fluffy, about 1 minute. Using a paring knife, cut a cone-shaped core about 11 ⁄ 2 inches (4 cm) wide halfway down into the center of each cupcake. Gently remove the cores and set aside. Fill each cupcake with about 1 Tbsp of the curd and replace the cores. Spread the frosting over the top of the cupcakes and sprinkle with the toasted coconut. Let the frosting set for about 15 minutes before serving.

The pulp of passion fruit is intensely sweet and sour and has an exotic taste with hints of citrus and flowers. In this recipe, vanillascented cupcakes are filled with passion fruit curd then finished with coconut frosting.

cup (3 oz/90 g) granulated sugar

Pinch of kosher salt 3 Tbsp unsalted butter, cut into pieces 13⁄4 cups (9 oz/280 g) all-purpose f lour 2 tsp baking powder
1⁄ 2

tsp kosher salt

1 cup (8 f l oz/250 ml) heavy cream 1 tsp pure vanilla extract 11⁄4 cups (10 oz/315 g) unsalted butter
2⁄ 3

cup (5 oz/155 g) granulated sugar

2 large eggs 3 3⁄4 cups (15 oz/470 g) confectioners’ sugar
1⁄ 3

cup (3 f l oz/80 ml) unsweetened coconut milk

1 ⁄ 2 cup (2 oz/60 g) sweetened shredded dried coconut, toasted (page 295)

To make the curd, cut the passion fruits in half and scoop the pulp into a fine-mesh sieve set over a bowl. Press on the pulp to push it through the sieve; discard the seeds. Measure 1 ⁄4 cup (2 fl oz/60 ml) pulp and juice and place in a saucepan. Whisk in the egg yolks, granulated sugar, and salt. Cook over medium-low heat, whisking constantly, until the mixture thickens and turns a bright orange-yellow (do not let it boil), 2–3 minutes. Remove from the heat, whisk in the butter, and then strain through a fine-mesh sieve into a bowl. Let cool for 15 minutes. Press a piece of plastic wrap directly onto the surface of the curd. Refrigerate until cold, about 2 hours. Preheat the oven to 375°F (190°C). Line 12 standard muffin cups with paper liners, or grease with butter and dust with flour. Sift the flour, baking powder, and salt together into a bowl. Combine the cream and vanilla in a liquid measuring cup. In the bowl of a stand mixer, beat 3 ⁄4 cup (6 oz/ 185 g) of the butter and the granulated sugar on low speed until blended, then increase » —›

31
m ay

Strawberries with Lemon & Mint
serves 4–6
1 lb (500 g) strawberries, hulled and sliced Finely grated zest from 1 lemon 2 Tbsp minced fresh mint 2–4 Tbsp sugar

Macerating fresh strawberries in lemon and sugar, then tossing them with mint is a simple way to showcase their delicate flavor.

In a bowl, toss together the strawberries, lemon zest, mint, and sugar to taste. Let stand at room temperature for 15 minutes to macerate. Spoon the strawberries and their juices into bowls and serve.

12 4

30
m ay

june

15

15
june

Almond-Cherry Turnovers
makes 6 turnovers
1 sheet frozen puff pastry (about 1 lb/500 g), thawed 2 Tbsp ground almonds 2 Tbsp confectioners’ sugar 1 cup (6 oz/185 g) pitted fresh, thawed frozen, or drained canned Bing or sour cherries
1⁄ 2

16
june

Glazed Lemon-Buttermilk Icebox Cookies
makes about 48 cookies
2 cups (10 oz/315 g) all-purpose f lour
3⁄4 1⁄ 2 3⁄4

tsp baking soda tsp kosher salt cup (6 oz/185 g) unsalted butter

Cherries, especially sour cherries, have a hint of almond flavor, which intensifies when you pair them with the real thing. These hand pies will be a hit at backyard barbecues. The filled turnovers can be wrapped and frozen for up to 3 months and then topped and baked directly from the freezer, just increase the baking time to 30 minutes.

cup (4 oz/125 g) granulated sugar, plus 2 Tbsp 1 Tbsp all-purpose f lour 1 large egg white, lightly beaten

1⁄4

cup (1 oz/30 g) sliced almonds

Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. On a floured work surface, roll out the puff pastry into an 18-by-12 inch (45-by-30-cm) rectangle about 1 ⁄ 8 inch (3 mm) thick. Cut the rectangle into six 6-inch (15-cm) squares. In a small bowl, stir together the ground almonds and confectioners’ sugar. In another bowl, stir together the cherries, 1 ⁄ 2 cup granulated sugar, and flour. Place 2 tsp of the almond mixture in the center of each square. Divide the cherry mixture among the squares, placing it on the almond mixture. Brush 2 contiguous sides of each square lightly with the egg white and fold in half to form a triangle. Crimp the edges with a fork to seal. Place the pastries on the prepared pan, spacing them at least 11 ⁄ 2 inches (4 cm) apart. Refrigerate for about 30 minutes. Preheat the oven to 425°F (220°C). Recrimp the edges of each triangle. Brush the tops lightly with the egg white. Sprinkle with the sliced almonds and then with the 2 Tbsp granulated sugar. Cut 2 small vents in the top of each triangle. Bake for 20 minutes. Reduce the heat to 350°F (180°C) and continue to bake until the turnovers are puffed and golden, 10–15 minutes. Let cool on the pan on a wire rack. Serve warm.

Buttermilk gives these cookies a cakelike texture, and plenty of lemon zest and juice results in full lemon flavor. To store the dough in the freezer for sliceand-bake cookies at a moment’s notice, wrap the dough log tightly in layers of parchment and plastic wrap, then freeze for up to 1 month.

1 cup (8 oz/250 g) sugar 1 large egg 2 Tbsp finely grated lemon zest 3 Tbsp buttermilk 1 tsp fresh lemon juice For the lemon glaze 2 cups (8 oz/250 g) confectioners’ sugar, sifted Finely grated zest of 1 lemon
1 ⁄4 cup (2 f l oz/60 ml) fresh lemon juice, or more if needed

In a bowl, whisk together the flour, baking soda, and salt. In a large bowl, using an electric mixer, beat the butter and sugar on medium-high speed until light and fluffy, 2–3 minutes. Add the egg and lemon zest and beat on low speed until the egg is incorporated. On low speed, mix in the dry ingredients. Add the buttermilk and lemon juice and beat until just incorporated. Form the dough into an even log about 12 inches (30 cm) long. Wrap tightly in parchment paper and refrigerate until firm, at least 3 hours or up to overnight. Position 2 racks evenly in the oven and preheat to 350°F (180°C). Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper. Unwrap the dough and cut into slices 1 ⁄4-inch (6 mm) thick. Arrange on the prepared sheet about 1 inch (2.5 cm) apart. Bake until the edges are lightly golden, about 12 minutes, rotating the sheets about halfway through. Let the cookies cool in the pan for 5 minutes, then transfer to a wire rack and let cool completely. To make the glaze, in a bowl, whisk together the confectioners’ sugar, lemon zest, and lemon juice until smooth. Add more lemon juice if the mixture is overly thick. Spread the glaze over the tops of the cookies. Let the glaze set for about 1 hour before serving.

13 9

j u ly

8

7
j u ly

Cornmeal Shortcakes with Blueberries & Cream
serves 8
6 pt (3 lb/1.5 kg) blueberries
1⁄ 2

cup (4 oz/125 g) sugar

1 Tbsp fresh lemon juice 2 cups (10 oz/315 g) all-purpose f lour
1⁄ 3

8
j u ly

Poached White Peaches with Thyme
serves 8
1 bottle (750 ml) Provençal dry rosé 3 fresh thyme sprigs, plus sprigs and/or leaves for garnish (optional) Juice from 1⁄ 2 lemon
1⁄ 2

Blueberries are a little more assertive than strawberries. Match their tartness with crunchy cornmeal biscuits, hearty with grain. Lavish the shortcakes with warm blueberry compote and sweet cream.

cup (1 1⁄ 2 oz/45 g) yellow cornmeal tsp kosher salt

2 tsp baking powder
1⁄ 2 1⁄ 2

cup (4 oz/125 g) plus 2 Tbsp cold unsalted butter, cut into pieces 1 cup (8 f l oz/250 ml) heavy cream, plus more if needed Whipped Cream (page 295)

Preheat the oven to 400°F (200°C). Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Pour 4 pt (2 lb/1 kg) of the blueberries into a large bowl. In a saucepan, cook the remaining 2 pt (1 lb/500 kg) blueberries, the sugar, and the lemon juice over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until most of the berries have burst and are very juicy, 8–10 minutes. Pour over the blueberries in the bowl and stir gently to combine. In another large bowl, whisk together the flour, cornmeal, baking powder, and salt. Add the butter and, using a pastry blender, work into the dry ingredients until the texture resembles coarse meal. Drizzle in the 1 cup cream and stir until evenly moistened. The dough should be moist and cohesive. If the dough feels dry, stir in more cream, 1 Tbsp at a time, until it comes together. On a lightly floured work surface, pat the dough into a round 1 ⁄ 2 inch (12 mm) thick. Using a 3-inch (7.5-cm) round pastry cutter, cut out as many rounds as possible. Arrange on the prepared baking sheet. Gather the dough scraps together and repeat; you should have 8 rounds. Reduce the oven temperature to 375°F (190°C) and bake the shortcakes until golden brown, 16–18 minutes. Let cool completely on the baking sheet on a wire rack. Halve the shortcakes horizontally. Place the bottom halves, cut side up, on plates. Top each with the blueberry mixture, dividing it evenly, then with whipped cream. Cover with the top halves and serve.

White peaches have a more subtle flavor than yellow. Simmer them gently in a summery rosé wine, until the flesh becomes plump and fork-tender. Fresh thyme infuses bright earthiness to the mix. This is the perfect dessert when you want to finish a meal with something simple yet elegant.

cup (4 oz/125 g) sugar

8 white peaches, peeled (page 164), halved, and pitted

In a large saucepan, combine the rosé, thyme sprigs, lemon juice, and sugar. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, and stir until the sugar dissolves. Add the peach halves and immerse them in the liquid. Reduce the heat to a gentle simmer and cook until the peaches are tender, about 10 minutes. Remove from heat and let the peaches cool in the syrup. Refrigerate until ready to serve. Arrange the peach halves on small plates or in bowls. Drizzle with a little syrup, garnish with thyme, if you like, and serve.

157

22
au g u s t

Tres Leches Cake
serves 10–12
For the cake
1⁄ 2

cup (4 oz/125 g) vegetable shortening

11⁄ 2 cups (12 oz/375 g) sugar 2 large eggs 2 1⁄4 cups (9 oz/280 g) sifted all-purpose f lour 2 tsp baking powder
1⁄ 2

Poke the cake all over with a fork, and spoon the sauce over the surface, a little at a time, allowing the cake to absorb the sauce before adding more. A little sauce may pool on the platter, but the cake should absorb almost all of it. Cover the cake with plastic wrap and refrigerate for about 1 hour. To make the frosting, in a saucepan, bring the sugar and 1 ⁄ 2 cup (4 fl oz/125 ml) water to a boil over medium-high heat, stirring to dissolve the sugar. Reduce the heat and simmer, washing down the sides of the pan as crystals form with a pastry brush dipped in cold water. While the sugar is cooking, in a clean metal bowl, using an electric mixer, beat the egg whites and cream of tartar on high speed until stiff peaks form. Cook the sugar syrup until a candy thermometer registers 230°F (110°C), 10–12 minutes. Slowly add the boiling syrup in a thin stream to the beating egg whites until all the syrup is incorporated. Continue beating until the meringue frosting is cooled and glossy. Cover and refrigerate until ready to use. Spread the meringue frosting on the cake, cover, and refrigerate until well chilled, at least 3 hours and up to 8 hours. Serve chilled, cut into squares.

Tres leches cake is made throughout Latin America. In this version, a simple white cake is soaked in luscious sauce made from three milks and a hit of rum, then spread with a fluffy, glossy meringue. For a colorful presentation, serve garnished with tropical fruits like papaya, mango, and pineapple.

tsp kosher salt

1 cup (8 f l oz/250 ml) whole milk 1 tsp pure vanilla extract For the tres leches sauce 1 can (14 f l oz/430 ml) sweetened condensed milk 1 can (12 f l oz/375 ml) evaporated milk
1⁄ 2

cup (4 f l oz/125 ml) heavy cream

3 Tbsp dark rum 1 tsp pure vanilla extract For the meringue frosting
3⁄4

cup (6 oz/185 g) sugar tsp cream of tartar

3 large egg whites
1⁄4

Preheat the oven to 350°F (180°C). Butter a 9-by-13-inch (23-by-33-cm) baking pan. Dust with flour and shake out the excess. To make the cake, in a bowl, using an electric mixer, beat the shortening on high speed until fluffy. Add the sugar a little at a time, beating until fluffy between additions. Reduce the speed to low and add the eggs one at a time, beating until incorporated after each addition, about 2 minutes total. Sift the flour, baking powder, and salt into a large bowl. In a small bowl, whisk together the milk and vanilla. Add one-third of the milk mixture to the egg mixture and beat until well mixed, then add one-third of the flour mixture. Repeat twice more, beating well after each addition. Scrape the batter into the pan. Bake until a toothpick inserted into the center of the cake comes out clean, about 35 minutes. Let cool in the pan on a wire rack for 10 minutes, then invert the cake onto a platter and let cool completely. To make the tres leches sauce, in a bowl, whisk together the condensed milk, evaporated milk, cream, rum, and vanilla. » —›

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au g u s t

Cherries with Vanilla Mascarpone
serves 4–6
11⁄ 2 lb (750 g) Rainier cherries, pitted and halved 2 Tbsp plus 1 tsp sugar 1 cup (8 oz/250 g) mascarpone cheese 1 tsp pure vanilla extract

Blushed with pink, yellow Rainier cherries are pretty on a cheese plate, but even more alluring sprinkled with sugar and topped with a dollop of creamy mascarpone.

In a bowl, combine the cherries and 2 Tbsp sugar. Set aside for 30 minutes to macerate. In a small bowl, beat the mascarpone, vanilla, and 1 tsp sugar together until smooth. Divide the cherries and their juices between serving bowls and top each with a dollop of the vanilla mascarpone.

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27
september

Mississippi Mud Pie
serves 8–10
For the crumb crust 11⁄4 cups (4 oz/125 g) chocolate wafer crumbs 5 Tbsp (2 1⁄ 2 oz/75 g) unsalted butter, melted 3 Tbsp sugar 1 cup (6 oz/185 g) semisweet chocolate chips

28
september

Carrot Cupcakes with Mascarpone Icing
makes 10 cupcakes
1⁄ 3 3⁄4

cup (3 oz/90 g) unsalted butter, at cool room temperature cup (6 oz/185 g) granulated sugar

1 Tbsp maple syrup or honey 1 Tbsp finely grated orange zest 2 large eggs 1 cup (4 oz/125 g) grated carrot 1 cup (5 oz/155 g) plus 2 Tbsp all-purpose f lour 2 tsp baking powder 7 Tbsp (3 1⁄ 2 f l oz/105 ml) fresh orange juice, warmed 1 tsp baking soda For the mascarpone icing
1⁄ 3

Cookies, candy, ice cream, and fudge all come together in this guilty pleasure. You can find packaged toffee bits in the baking section of well-stocked markets, or chop up a toffee candy bar. Kids will love the sugary crunch, but leave out the toffee bits if you like and just double the toasted almonds.

1⁄4 1⁄4

cup (2 oz/60 g) unsalted butter cup (2 f l oz/60 ml) heavy cream

2 Tbsp light corn syrup 1 cup (4 oz/125 g) confectioners’ sugar, sifted 1 tsp pure vanilla extract
1⁄ 2

cup (2 1⁄ 2 oz/75 g) toffee bits

1 qt (32 f l oz/1 l) coffee ice cream, softened
1⁄ 2

cup (2 1⁄ 2 oz/75 g) chopped whole almonds, toasted (page 295)

Much-loved carrot cake is ideal for adapting into cupcakes, which stay incredibly moist. Sneak in a few flavorful updates: some orange zest, a splash of maple syrup, and creamy mascarpone frosting.

To make the crust, preheat the oven to 350°F (180°C). In a bowl, stir together the crumbs, melted butter, and sugar until the crumbs are evenly moistened. Pat the mixture firmly and evenly into the bottom and up the sides of a 9-inch (23-cm) pie pan or dish. Bake until the crust is firm, 5–10 minutes. Place the chocolate chips, butter, cream, and corn syrup in the top of a double boiler set over (not touching) barely simmering water, and heat, stirring occasionally, until the chocolate is melted. Add the confectioners’ sugar and vanilla and mix well. Reserve 1 ⁄ 2 cup (4 fl oz/125 ml) of the chocolate mixture for the top of the pie. Spread the remaining mixture evenly in the bottom of the cookie crust. Sprinkle with half of the toffee bits. Refrigerate until well chilled, about 1 hour. In a large bowl, using an electric mixer, beat the ice cream on medium speed until it is spreadable but not runny. Immediately mound into the pie shell and spread evenly. Freeze until the ice cream is firm, at least 2 hours or up to overnight. Reheat the reserved chocolate mixture in the top of the double boiler over barely simmering water until it is spreadable but not hot. Spread it over the ice cream. Sprinkle with the remaining toffee bits and the almonds. Freeze the pie until completely firm, 3–4 hours, before serving.

cup (3 oz/90 g) unsalted butter, at cool room temperature 11⁄ 2 cups (6 oz/185 g) confectioners’ sugar

1 tsp grated lemon zest 4 oz (125 g) cold mascarpone or cream cheese

Preheat the oven to 350°F (180°C). Line 10 standard muffin cups with liners or grease with butter and dust with flour. In a bowl, beat the butter, granulated sugar, maple syrup, and orange zest until pale and creamy. Beat in the eggs one at a time. Stir in the grated carrot. Sift the flour and baking powder together into a bowl. Stir the orange juice and baking soda together in a small bowl. Stir the dry ingredients into the butter mixture in 2 additions alternately with the orange juice mixture in 2 additions, until the batter is smooth. Do not overbeat, or the cupcakes will be tough. Spoon the batter into the prepared muffin cups, dividing it evenly. Bake until the cupcakes have risen and are lightly golden, about 20 minutes. Let cool in the pan on a wire rack for 10 minutes, then turn out onto a wire rack and let cool completely. To make the icing, in a bowl, beat the butter and confectioners’ sugar until light and fluffy. Beat in the lemon zest and mascarpone until well blended and smooth. Spread the icing on the cupcakes and serve.

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september

october

17

17
october

Tiramisù
serves 8–10
1⁄ 2

cup (4 oz/125 g) sugar

11⁄ 2 cups (12 f l oz/375 ml) freshly brewed espresso
1⁄ 3

cup (3 f l oz/80 ml) dark rum

For the filling
1⁄ 3

Delicate ladyfingers soaked in espresso and rum, layered with mascarpone custard, and dusted with cocoa make up this favorite Italian dessert. To make individual portions, layer the soaked ladyfingers and custard in individual cups or bowls, cutting the ladyfingers as needed to fit the cups. You might not need as many ladyfingers depending on the size of the cups.

cup (3 oz/90 g) sugar cup (4 f l oz/125 ml) heavy cream

6 large egg yolks
1⁄ 2

the rubber spatula, evenly spread one-third of the filling over the ladyfingers. Soak another 15 ladyfingers in the espresso mixture, and place them over the filling and evenly spread with half of the remaining filling. Soak the remaining ladyfingers, place them in the pan, and top with the remaining filling, again spreading evenly. Gently tap the pan against the counter to settle the ingredients. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 6 hours or up to overnight. Run a small knife around the inside edge of the pan to loosen the sides. Dust the top with cocoa powder and serve.

11⁄ 2 cups (12 oz/375 g) mascarpone cheese 11⁄ 2 tsp pure vanilla extract 45 ladyfingers or savoiardi Unsweetened cocoa powder for dusting

In a small saucepan, bring the sugar and 1 ⁄ 3 cup (3 fl oz/80 ml) water to a simmer over medium heat and cook, stirring, until the sugar is dissolved, about 3 minutes. Remove from the heat, stir in the espresso, and let cool to room temperature. Stir in the rum. Pour the espresso mixture into a wide, shallow bowl and set aside. To make the filling, select a heatproof bowl that fits snugly in the rim of a saucepan. Pour water to a depth of about 2 inches (5 cm) into the saucepan and bring to a gentle simmer. In the bowl, whisk together the sugar and egg yolks until the sugar has dissolved and the mixture is pale yellow and creamy, about 2 minutes. Place the bowl over (not touching) the simmering water in the pan. Using an electric mixer, beat the yolk mixture on medium speed until thick and tripled in volume, about 6 minutes. Remove the bowl from over the heat and set the yolk mixture aside to cool completely, stirring often as it cools. In another bowl, beat the cream on mediumhigh speed until stiff peaks form. Add the mascarpone and vanilla to the cooled yolk mixture. Beat with the mixer on medium speed just until smooth and well blended. Using a large rubber spatula, fold in the whipped cream just until combined. Working in batches, immerse 15 ladyfingers in the espresso mixture, then arrange the ladyfingers in a single layer in the bottom of a 9-inch (23-cm) square cake pan. Using » —›

18
october

Grilled Caramelized Pears with Cinnamon
serves 4
1 cup (8 f l oz/250 ml) dry red wine
1⁄ 2

cup (6 oz/185 g) honey

1 tsp ground cinnamon 1 tsp finely grated fresh ginger 4 just-ripe red pears, cored and quartered 1 tsp unsalted butter Crème fraîche for serving

Certain pear varieties, such as Anjou, blush as red as the leaves this time of year. Play to the color and poach pear quarters in a dry red wine before tossing them on the grill. The results are smoky and sweet.

In a nonreactive saucepan, bring the wine, honey, cinnamon, and ginger to a boil over medium-high heat. Boil for 5 minutes. Remove from the heat and add the pears, turning to coat evenly. Let stand at room temperature, turning occasionally, for about 30 minutes. Prepare a fire in a charcoal grill for cooking over medium heat or preheat a gas grill to 350°F (180°C). Lightly oil the grill rack. Using a slotted spoon, lift the pears from the liquid and set aside on a plate. Bring the liquid to a boil over high heat, skimming any foam from the surface. Add the butter and boil, stirring occasionally, until the mixture is reduced by half and is thick and syrupy, about 5 minutes. Grill the pears until they are lightly caramelized, about 2 minutes per side. Serve the pears drizzled with the reduced syrup, with a dollop of crème fraîche.

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23
n ov e m b e r

Bread & Butter Pudding with Orange Marmalade
serves 8
1 loaf (1 lb⁄500 g) challah or brioche, ends trimmed, cut into 12 slices 3 Tbsp unsalted butter, at room temperature 3 large whole eggs. plus 5 large egg yolks 13⁄4 cups (14 f l oz⁄430 ml) whole milk 1 cup (8 f l oz⁄250 ml) heavy cream
1⁄ 3 1⁄ 2

24
n ov e m b e r

Brown Sugar Pumpkin Pie
serves 6–8
Flaky Pie Dough for single crust (page 294) 1 can (15 oz⁄470 g) pumpkin purée (about 11⁄ 2 cups)
2 ⁄ 3 cup (5 oz⁄155 g) firmly packed light brown sugar 1⁄ 3

cup (3 1⁄ 2 oz⁄105 g) maple syrup cup (5 f l oz⁄160 ml) whole milk cup (4 f l oz⁄125 ml) heavy cream

At first it may seem like a lot of liquid in the pan, but when the pudding emerges from the oven, it will be puffy and golden. This comforting dessert melts in the mouth and is gilded with a thin layer of tangy orange marmalade. Try using eggy challah bread, as it imparts great flavor and texture, but you could also use brioche or any other good-quality, somewhat dense white bread.

cup (3 oz⁄90 g) sugar tsp kosher salt

1 tsp pure vanilla extract Pinch of ground cinnamon Pinch of freshly grated nutmeg
1⁄ 2

cup (5 oz⁄155 g) orange marmalade

Whipped Cream (page 295)

Preheat the oven to 325°F (165°C). Generously butter a 9-by-13-inch (23-by33-cm) baking dish. Spread the challah slices evenly with the butter. Cut the slices in half crosswise and lay in the prepared dish so they overlap slightly. In a bowl, whisk together the whole eggs, egg yolks, milk, cream, sugar, salt, vanilla, cinnamon, and nutmeg. Pour evenly over the bread. Let stand for about 30 minutes so that the bread soaks up the custard, occasionally pressing down on the bread. Bake the pudding for 30 minutes. While the pudding is baking, warm the marmalade in a small saucepan over medium-low heat. Remove the pudding from the oven and carefully spread the marmalade over the top. Return to the oven and bake until the top is crisp, brown, and sticky, about 10 minutes. Let stand for about 10 minutes. Serve the pudding garnished with whipped cream.

A Thanksgiving feast just isn’t complete without a big slice of homemade pumpkin pie topped with an equally big dollop of whipped cream. This flavorful version is sure to become your favorite. The creamy pumpkin custard is spiced with cinnamon, nutmeg, and ginger and sweetened with brown sugar and maple syrup. Toasted, chopped pecans make a festive garnish.

2⁄ 3 1⁄ 2

2 large eggs, lightly beaten 2 Tbsp all-purpose f lour 1 tsp ground cinnamon
1⁄4 1⁄ 8 1⁄ 2

tsp ground ginger tsp freshly grated nutmeg tsp kosher salt

Whipped Cream (page 295)

Prepare the dough and chill as directed. On a lightly floured work surface, roll out the dough into a round about 13 inches (33 cm) in diameter and 1 ⁄ 8 inch (3 mm) thick. Line a deep 9-inch (23-cm) pie pan with the dough. Trim the edge, leaving a 1 ⁄ 2 inch (12 mm) overhang. Tuck the dough under itself, and pinch to form a decorative edge. Chill in the freezer for about 20 minutes. Preheat the oven to 400°F (200°C). Line the pie shell with foil and fill with pie weights or dried beans. Bake until the crust starts to look dry, about 15 minutes. Remove the foil and weights and bake until the crust is just barely golden, about 5 minutes. Remove from the oven and reduce the oven temperature to 350°F (180°C). In a large bowl, whisk together the pumpkin, brown sugar, and maple syrup. Add the milk, cream, and eggs and whisk until smooth. Sift the flour, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, and salt over the pumpkin mixture and whisk to combine. Place the pie pan on a baking sheet. Pour the filling into the shell. Bake until the filling is just set and still jiggles very slightly in the center when the pan is gently moved, 60–70 minutes. Let cool on a wire rack for at least 1 hour. Serve wedges of the pie with whipped cream.

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Copyright © 2013 Weldon Owen, Inc. and Williams-Sonoma, Inc. All rights reserved, including the right of reproduction in whole or in part in any form. Printed and bound in China by Toppan-Leefung Printing Limited First printed in 2013 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 Library of Congress Control Number: 2013937277 ISBN 13: 978-1-61628-434-3 ISBN 10: 1-61628-434-X Weldon Owen is a division of

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Weldon Owen wishes to thank the following people for their generous support in producing this book: David Bornfriend, Becky Duffett, Judith Dunham, Eve Lynch, Jennifer Newens, Elizabeth Parson, and Abby Stolfo

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