Fuzzy Logic Project; A Fuzzy Heater/Air Conditioner Fionnán Howard 07365098

1. Introduction
Almost every household in the world has a heater or air conditioner of some description. Nowadays, the two are often combined into a single unit in countries where both may be necessary at any point in the year. The aim of our project was to design a fuzzy system whereby a heater like this could be operated with the most effectiveness given several climatic variables. As a secondary aim, we also wished to create a system which wasted the minimum amount of energy while still providing an effective heating/cooling system. Our model focuses on a heater/air conditioner designed for domestic use which is mostly automated but does require a user input also. The flaw identified with normal heaters for example, was one of the following; either the room would be heated to a desired temperature at which point the heater would automatically switch of and the room temperature immediately begin to fall again, perhaps re-activating the system or; The system would simply have to be turned on and off manually by the user continually. Our claim is that both systems aren’t as effective as they could be once fuzzy logic is applied correctly. The system was designed using the fuzzy toolbox in MATLAB.

2. System
The meteorological elements we took into account were the ‘room temperature’ and the dew point of the room; ‘humidity’. We started by modelling with the more commonly used relative humidity but soon realised that the calculations of this figure are already based on the temperature thanks to [1]. So we refer to humidity as the amount of water vapour currently in the air of the room. We hypothesised that the ideal humidity was around 10 degrees Celsius, with a comfortable range between 8-12 based on [2]. The room temperature is usually higher than air temperature so we modelled five categories of room temperature to reflect this accurately. These membership functions take values between 0 and 30 degrees Celsius but values below 0 and above 30 can simply be treated as equal to 0 and 30 respectively. User input is required for our other two variables; ‘user input’ and ‘energy saving’. The first variable is set as the desired temperature of the room and is a choice between low, medium and high chosen on a knob between 0 and 30 degrees Celsius which is marked with the aforementioned choice of settings. The energy saving setting is chosen as how much the user wants the system to concentrate on saving energy on a scale from 0 to 1 with 0 being the least energy conscious setting and 1 being the highest. The output ranges from -15 to 15 where -15 is the highest heat output and 15 is the highest cooling output. The system reflects the fact that high humidity means the room will feel warmer and that the desired energy saving setting should mean that the output is less severe for those who wish to save more energy. The fuzzy sets used were as follows; 1. Room Temperature (Very Warm, Warm, Mild, Cold, Very Cold)

Medium. meaning the air conditioner was still cooling the room. we hadn’t actually included an ‘off’ membership function which made the variable a non-fuzzy one. Humid) 3. Initially. and is less worried about using energy when this setting is low. Thus these two situations carry the most weight in our system. The extremes of temperature (Very cold. but not as quickly thus using less energy.2. off) in such a way that allows the user to set any desired degree of energy conservation. crisp values for room temperature are delivered to the system by the thermometer and humidity by the hygrometer. Thankfully we fixed that. Very warm) have a large effect on the output values of the system because we thought these two conditions to be the ones when the system is most required to operate. when energy saving is high. almost (but not entirely!) irregardless of the other variables. We can see that when the energy setting is low and the room temperature is average (from about 13-17 degrees Celsius) then the output values aren’t often zero for varying room temp. there are many output values near 0 for average room temperatures.7 for example. which takes a value anywhere between 0 and 1 as described above. Humidity (Dry. . However. The energy saving level in particular is mapped to its linguistic variables (on.7 5. Energy Saving (On. 4. The energy saving value also greatly affects the output at its extremes (like temperature does) but there isn’t as much variability in intermediate values like between 0. both of which could easily be built-in components. This means the system is using less energy at average room temperatures. Process Firstly. if we look at the far side of the graph when the energy setting is high.24 So the output was much lower under the energy conscious setting. Off) 3. which is interpreted as the ‘user input’. Optimum. Simulation The effect described above of the energy saving setting is depicted in the following where we chose average values for all other variables. as well as the energy saving level on another knob. The fuzzy values are converted to an output setting for the heater/air conditioner which takes values between -15 and 15. (I describe this better in the part 4). but switch the energy saving from 0 (no saving) to 1(most energy saving). High) 4. Room Temperature 20 20 Humidity 10 10 User Input 15 15 Energy Saving 0 1 Output 12.3-0. User Input (Low. but lie somewhere in between. we had graphed the energy saving wrongly in that. The user sets a value on the desire temperature knob. or extremely energy wasting. The MATLAB picture below is particularly useful for explaining how the energy saving feature works compared to room temperature. The values were as follows. This fuzzification of energy consciousness is something we thought vital to our model as most people aren’t either extremely energy saving.

and the desired room temperature. It depicts the degrees to which the system is activated and its advantages over a simple heater which would be a discrete graph instead. We’ve shown the two most important variables. Conclusion The fuzzification of the input variables to the linguistic ones was particularly effective here. Allowing the user to set different degrees of temperature and energy saving is undoubtedly advantageous to the modern household both in terms of wasting energy. the room temperature. and energy bills. This last diagram is essential for understanding this. The output heated or cooled air was affected mostly by extremes of room temperature and energy saving. This advantage over a conventional heater or air conditioner shows how the fuzzy system we’ve created here is useful for a range of different needs depending on the individual’s preferences. . while the other input variables have a lesser influence.5.

6.[0 7.5 30] .[0 0 7. Programme Code [System] Name='Matlab' Type='mamdani' Version=2.5 15] MF3='Warm':'trimf'.0 NumInputs=4 NumOutputs=1 NumRules=90 AndMethod='min' OrMethod='max' ImpMethod='min' AggMethod='max' DefuzzMethod='centroid' [Input1] Name='Room_Temp' Range=[0 30] NumMFs=5 MF1='Very_Cold':'trimf'.5] MF2='Cold':'trimf'.[15 22.

[0 0 16 20] MF2='Medium':'trimf'. 1 (1) : 1 1 1 3 1. 1 (1) : 1 1 2 1 1.[-6 0 6] MF3='Cool':'trimf'.5 30 30] MF5='Mild':'trimf'. 1 (1) : 1 2 1 1 1. 1 (1) : 1 1 3 1 1. 4 (1) : 1 1 3 2 1.[-27.[22. 2 (1) : 1 .[0 0 1] [Output1] Name='Heat_Setting' Range=[-15 15] NumMFs=5 MF1='Heat':'trimf'. 4 (1) : 1 1 2 2 1. 1 (1) : 1 2 2 1 1.5] [Input2] Name='Humidity' Range=[0 30] NumMFs=3 MF1='Dry':'trapmf'.[9 15 27] MF4='Heat_Slightly':'trimf'. 4 (1) : 1 2 1 3 1.[-15 -9 0] MF5='Cool_Slightly':'trimf'.[14 18 30 30] [Input3] Name='User_Input' Range=[0 30] NumMFs=3 MF1='Low':'trapmf'.[16 20 24] MF3='High':'trapmf'.[8 12 16] MF3='Humid':'trapmf'.32 -15 -9] MF2='Off':'trimf'.[7.[0 9 15] [Rules] 1 1 1 1.[20 24 30 30] [Input4] Name='Energy_Saving' Range=[0 1] NumMFs=2 MF1='On':'trimf'.5 15 22. 2 (1) : 1 2 1 2 1.[0 1 1] MF2='Off':'trimf'.MF4='Very_Warm':'trimf'. 1 (1) : 1 1 3 3 1. 1 (1) : 1 1 2 3 1. 4 (1) : 1 1 1 2 1.[0 0 6 10] MF2='Optimal':'trimf'.

4 (1) : 1 1 1 1 2. 4 (1) : 1 2 2 2 2. 2 (1) : 1 3 3 1 1. 3 (1) : 1 4 2 2 1. 1 (1) : 1 1 1 2 2. 3 (1) : 1 4 3 3 1. 1 (1) : 1 1 2 3 2. 4 (1) : 1 2 3 1 1. 2 (1) : 1 2 3 2 2. 1 (1) : 1 2 2 3 2. 2 (1) : 1 4 1 1 1. 2 (1) : 1 4 3 1 1. 4 (1) : 1 2 3 3 2. 4 (1) : 1 5 2 1 1. 1 (1) : 1 1 1 3 2. 1 (1) : 1 2 1 3 2. 1 (1) : 1 1 3 1 2. 2 (1) : 1 5 1 3 1. 4 (1) : 1 3 1 1 1. 1 (1) : 1 1 2 1 2. 2 (1) : 1 5 2 3 1. 2 (1) : 1 3 1 3 1. 5 (1) : 1 3 3 3 1. 1 (1) : 1 . 2 (1) : 1 2 3 2 1. 3 (1) : 1 3 2 2 1. 1 (1) : 1 2 1 1 2. 3 (1) : 1 3 3 2 1. 2 (1) : 1 4 2 1 1. 3 (1) : 1 4 3 2 1. 4 (1) : 1 1 3 2 2. 5 (1) : 1 5 1 1 1. 5 (1) : 1 3 2 3 1. 2 (1) : 1 5 3 3 1. 1 (1) : 1 2 2 1 2. 4 (1) : 1 1 2 2 2. 4 (1) : 1 2 3 3 1. 2 (1) : 1 5 2 2 1. 1 (1) : 1 1 3 3 2. 2 (1) : 1 5 1 2 1. 4 (1) : 1 5 3 1 1. 5 (1) : 1 5 3 2 1. 5 (1) : 1 4 1 3 1. 3 (1) : 1 4 2 3 1.2 2 2 1. 4 (1) : 1 2 2 3 1. 5 (1) : 1 3 1 2 1. 4 (1) : 1 2 1 2 2. 3 (1) : 1 4 1 2 1. 4 (1) : 1 3 2 1 1. 1 (1) : 1 2 3 1 2.

3 (1) : 1 4 3 3 2. 3 (1) : 1 4 2 2 2. 3 (1) : 1 3 3 2 2. 5 (1) : 1 5 2 1 2. accessed 01/02/2011] . 2 (1) : 1 3 1 3 2. 3 (1) : 1 4 1 2 2.html. 3 (1) : 1 4 1 3 2. 4 (1) : 1 3 2 1 2.pdf. 4 (1) : 1 7. 3 (1) : 1 3 2 2 2. 1 (1) : 1 5 3 3 2. 3 (1) : 1 5 3 1 2.com/wxfaqs/humidity/humidity. 5 (1) : 1 3 2 3 2.3 1 1 2.shorstmeyer. 3 (1) : 1 3 3 3 2. 3 (1) : 1 3 1 2 2.in/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/Fuzzy-Logic-Control-of-AirConditioners. 5 (1) : 1 4 3 1 2. 5 (1) : 1 4 2 1 2. 3 (1) : 1 5 1 1 2. 2 (1) : 1 5 3 2 2. 3 (1) : 1 4 2 3 2. 2 (1) : 1 4 1 1 2. 4 (1) : 1 3 3 1 2. 4 (1) : 1 5 2 2 2. 5 (1) : 1 5 1 3 2. accessed 01/02/2011] [2] – [http://www. 3 (1) : 1 5 1 2 2. 1 (1) : 1 5 2 3 2. 3 (1) : 1 4 3 2 2. References [1] – [http://aptnk.

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