You are on page 1of 109

J.

Mart´ınez Tarraz´ o
Resoluci ´ on de problemas
W. Feller. And Introduction to Probability
Theory and Its Applications. Volume I.
3rd edition. Wiley, 1968
July 19, 2013
Springer
Contents
1 The Sample Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
2 Elements of Combinatorial Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
3 Fluctuations in Coin Tossing and Random Walks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
4 Combination of Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
5 Conditional Probability. Stochastic Independence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
1
The Sample Space
1.1. Among the digits 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 first one is chosen, and then a second selection is
made among the remaining four digits. Assume that all twenty possible results have
the same probability. Find the probability that an odd digit will be selected (a) the
first time, (b) the second time, (c) both times.
1.2. In the sample space of example (2.a) attach equal probabilities to all 27 points.
Using the notation of example (4.d), verify formula (7.4) for the two events A
1
= S
1
and A
2
= S
2
. How many points does S
1
S
2
contain?
1.3. Consider the 24 possible arrangements (permutations) of the simbols 1234 and
attach to each probability
1
24
. Let A
i
be the event that the digit i appears at its natural
place (where i = 1, 2, 3, 4). Verify formula (7.4).
1.4. A coin is tossed until for the first time the same result appears twice in succes-
sion. To every possible outcome requiring n tosses attribute probability 1/2
n
. De-
scribe the sample space. Find the probability of the following events: (a) the experi-
ment ends before the sixth toss, (b) an even number of tosses is required.
1.5. In the sample space of example (5.b) let us attribute to each point of (*) contain-
ing exactly k letters probability 1/2
k
. (In other words, aa and bb carry probability
1
4
,
acb has probability
1
8
, etc.) (a) Show that the probabilities of the points of (*) add
up to unity, whence the two points (**) receive probability zero. (b) Show that the
probability that a wins is
5
14
. The probability of b winning is the same, and c has
probability
2
7
of winning. (c) The probability that no decision is reached at or before
the kth turn (game) is 1/2
k−1
.
1.6. Modify example (5.b) to take account of the possibility of ties at the individual
games. Describe the appropriate sample space. How would you define probabilities?
1.7. In problem 1.3 show that A
1
A
2
A
3
⊂A
4
and A
1
A
2
A
/
3
⊂A
/
4
.
2 1 The Sample Space
1.8. Using the notation of example (4.d) show that (a) S
1
S
2
D
3
= 0; (b) S
1
D
2
⊂ E
3
;
(c) E
3
−D
2
S
1
⊃S
2
D
1
.
1.9. Two dice are thrown. Let A the event that the sum of the faces is odd, B the
event of at least one ace. Describe the events AB, A∪B, AB
/
. Find their probabilities
assuming that all 36 sample points have equal probabilities.
1.10. In example (2.g), discuss the meaning of the following events: (a) ABC, (b)
A−AB, (c) AB
/
C.
1.11. In example (2.g), verify that AC
/
⊂B.
1.12. Bridge (cf. footnote 1). For k = 1, 2, 3, 4 let N
k
be the event that North has at
least k aces. Let S
k
, E
k
, W
k
be the analogous events for South, East, West. Discuss
the number x of aces in West’s possession in the events
(a) W
/
1
, (b) N
2
S
2
, (c) N
/
1
S
/
1
E
/
1
, (d) W
2
−W
3
, (e) N
1
S
1
E
1
W
1
, (f) N
3
W
1
, (g) (N
2
∪S
2
)E
2
.
1.13. In the preceding problem verify that
(a) S
3
⊂ S
2
, (b) S
3
W
2
= 0, (c) N
2
S
1
E
1
W
1
= 0, (d) N
2
S
2
⊂W
/
1
, (e) (N
2
∪S
2
)W
3
= 0,
(f) W
4
= N
/
1
S
/
1
E
/
1
.
1.14. Verify the following relations.
1
(a) (A∪B)
/
= A
/
B
/
.
(b) (A∪B) −B = A−AB = AB
/
.
(c) AA = A∪A = A.
(d) (A−AB) ∪B = A∪B.
(e) (A∪B) −AB = AB
/
∪A
/
B.
(f) A
/
∪B
/
= (AB)
/
.
(g) (A∪B)C = AC∪BC.
1.15. Find simple expressions for
(a) (A∪B)(A∪B
/
), (b) (A∪B)(A
/
∪B)(A∪B
/
), (c) (A∪B)(B∪C).
1.16. State which of the following relations are correct and which incorrect:
(a) (A∪B) −C = A∪(b−C).
(b) ABC = AB(C∪B).
(c) A∪B∪C = A∪(B−AB) ∪(C−AC).
(d) A∪B = (A−AB) ∪B.
(e) AB∪BC∪CA ⊃ABC.
(f) (AB∪BC∪CA) ⊂(A∪B∪C).
(g) (A∪B) −A = B.
(h) AB
/
C ⊂A∪B.
(i) (A∪B∪C)
/
= A
/
B
/
C
/
.
(j) (A∪B)
/
C = A
/
C∪B
/
C.
(k) (A∪B)
/
C = A
/
B
/
C.
(l) (A∪B)
/
C =C−C(A∪B).
1.17. Let A, B, C be three arbitrary events. Find expressions for the events that of A,
B, C:
1
Notice that (A∪B)
/
denotes the complement of A∪B, which is not the same as A
/
∪B
/
.
Similarly, (AB)
/
is not the same as A
/
B
/
.
1 The Sample Space 3
(a) Only A occurs.
(b) Both A and B, but not C, occur.
(c) All three events occur.
(d) At least one occurs.
(e) At least two occur.
(f) One and no more occurs.
(g) Two and no more occur.
(h) None occurs.
(i) Not more than two occur.
1.18. The union A∪B of two events can be expressed as the union of two mutually
exclusive events, thus: A∪B = A∪(B−AB). Express in a similar way the union of
three events A, B, C.
1.19. Using the result of problem 1.18 prove that
P¦A∪B∪C¦ = P¦A¦+P¦B¦+P¦C¦−P¦AB¦−P¦AC¦−P¦BC¦+P¦ABC¦
[This is a special case of IV, (1.5).]
2
Elements of Combinatorial Analysis
Note: Sections 2 and 3 contain problems of a diferent character and diverse comple-
ments to the text.
1. Exercises and Examples
Note: Assume in each case that all arrangements have the same probability.
2.1. How many initial sets of initials can be formed if every person has one surname
and (a) exactly two given names, (b) at most two given names, (c) at most three given
names?
2.2. Letters in the Morse code are formed by a succession of dashes and dots with
repetitions permited. How many letters is it possible to form with ten symbols or
less?
2.3. Each domino piece is marked by two numbers. The pieces are symmetrical so
that the number-pair is not ordered. How many different pieces can be made using
the numbers 1, 2, . . . , n?
2.4. The numbers 1, 2. . . , n are arranged in random order. Find the probability that
the digits (a) 1 and 2, (b) 1, 2, and 3, appear as neighbors in the order named.
2.5. A throws six dice and wins if he scores at least one ace. B throws twelve dice
and wins if he scores at least two aces. Who has the greater probability to win?
1
Hint: Calculate the probabilities to lose.
1
This paraphrase a question adressed in 1693 to I. Newton by the famous Samuel Pepys.
Newton answered that “an easy computation” shows A to be an advantage. On prodding
he later submitted the calculations, but he was unable to convince Pepys. For a short docu-
mented account see E. D. Schell, Samuel Pepys, Isaac Newton, and probability, The Amer.
Statician, vol. 14 (1960), pp. 27–30. There reference is made to Private correspondence
and miscellaneous papers of Samuel Pepys, London (G. Bell and Sons), 1926.
6 2 Elements of Combinatorial Analysis
2.6. (a) Find the probabilities that among three random digits there appear 1, 2, or 3
different ones. (b) Do the same for four random digits.
2.7. Find the probabilities p
r
that in a sample of r random digits no two are equal.
Estimate the numerical value of p
10
using Stirling’s formula.
2.8. What is the probability that among k random digits (a) 0 does not appear; (b) 1
does not appear; (c) neither 0 nor 1 appears; (d) at least one of the two digits 0 and
1 does not appear? Let A and B represent the events in (a) and (b). Expres the others
events in terms of A and B.
2.9. If n balls are placed at random in n cells, find the probability that exactly one
cell remains empty.
2.10. At a parking lot there are twelve places arranged in a row. A man observed
that there were eight cars parked, and that the four empty places places were adja-
cent to each other (formed one run). Given that there are four empty places, is this
arrangement surprising (indicative of non-randomness)?
2.11. A man is given n keys of which only one fits his door. He tries them succes-
sively (sampling without replacement). This procedure may require 1, 2, . . . , n trials.
Show that each of these n outcomes has probability n
−1
.
2.12. Suppose that each of n sticks is broken into one long and one short part. The 2n
parts are arranged into n pairs from which new sticks are formed. Find the probability
(a) that the parts will be joined in the original order, (b) that all long parts are paired
with short parts.
2
2.13. Testing a statistical hypothesis. A Cornell professor got a ticket twelve times
for illegal overnight parking. All twelve tickets were given either Tuesdays or Thurs-
days . Find the probability of this event. (Was his renting a garage only for Tuesdays
and Thursdays justified?)
2.14. Continuation. Of twelve police tickets none was given on Sunday. Is this evi-
dence that no tickets are given on Sundays?
2.15. A box contains ninety good and ten defective screws. If ten screws are used,
what is the probability that none is defective?
2.16. From the population of five symbols a, b, c, d e, a sample of size 25 is taken.
Find the probability that the sample will contain five symbols of each kind. Check
the result in tables of random numbers,
3
identifying the digits = and 1 with a, the
digits 2 and 3 with b, etc.
2
When cells are exposed to harmful radiation, some chromosomes break and play the
roles of our “sticks”. The “long” side is the one containing the so-called centromere. If
two “long” or two “short” parts unite, the cell dies. See D. G. Catcheside, The effect of
X-ray dosage upon the frequency of induced structural changes in the chromosomes of
Drosophila Melanogaster, Journal of Genetics, vol. 36 (1938), pp. 307–320.
3
They are occasionally miraculously obliging: see J. A. Greenwood and E. E. Stuart, Review
of Dr. Feller’s critique, Journal for Parapsycholoy, vol. 4 (1940), pp. 298–319, in particular
p. 306.
2 Elements of Combinatorial Analysis 7
2.17. If n men, among whom are A and B, stand in a row, what is the probability
that there will be exactly r men between A and B? If they stand in a ring instead
of in a row, show that the probability is independent of r and hence 1/(n −1). (In
the circular arrangement consider only the arc leading from A to B in the positive
direction.)
2.18. What is the probability that two throws with three dice each will show the same
configuration if (a) the dice are distinguihable, (b) they are not?
2.19. Show that is more probable to get at least one ace with four dice than at least
one double ace in 24 throws of two dice. The answer is known as de M´ er´ e’s paradox.
4
2.20. Froma population of n elements a sample of size r is taken. Find the probability
that none of N prescribed elements will be included in the sample, assuming the
sampling to be (a) without, (b) with replacement. Compare the numerical values for
the two methods when (i) n = 100, r = N = 3, and (ii) n = 100, r = N = 10.
2.21. Spread of rumors. In a town of n +1 inhabitants, a person tells a rumor to a
second person, who in turn repeats it to a third person, etc. At each step the recipient
of the rumor is chosen at random from the n people available. Find the probability
that the rumor will be told r times without: (a) returning to the originator, (b) being
repeated to any person. Do the same problem when at each step the rumor is told by
one person to a gathering of N randomly chosen people. (The first question is the
special case N = 1.)
2.22. Chain letters. In a population of n+1 people a man, “the progenitor,” send out
letters to two distinct persons, “the first generation.” These repeat the performance
and, generally, for each letter received the recipient sends out two letters to two per-
sons chosen at random without regard to the past development. Find the probability
that the generations number 1, 2, . . . , r will not include the progenitor. Find the me-
dian of the distribution, supposing n to be large.
2.23. A family problem. In a certain family four girls take turns at washing dishes.
Out of a total of four breakages, three were caused by the youngest girl, and she
was thereafter called clumsy. Was she justified in attributing the frequency of her
breakages to chance? Discuss the connection with random placements of balls.
2.24. What is the probability that (a) the birthdays of twelve people will fall in twelve
different calendar months (assume equal probalities for the twelve months), (b) the
birthdays of six people will fall in exactly two calendar months?
4
An often repeated story asserts that the problem arose at the gambling table and that in
1654 de M´ er´ e proposed it to Pascal. This incident is supposed to have greatly stimulated
the development of probability theory. The problem was in fact treated by Cardano (1501–
1576). See O. Ore, Pascal and the invention of probability theory, Amer. Math. Monthly,
vol. 67 (1960), pp. 409–419, and Cardano, the gambling scholar, Princeton (Princeton
Univ. Press), 1953.
8 2 Elements of Combinatorial Analysis
2.25. Given thirty people, find the probability that among the twelve months there
are six containing two birthdays and six containing three.
2.26. A closet contains n pairs of shoes. If 2r shoes are chosen at random (with
2r < n), what is the probability that there will be (a) no complete pair. (b) exactly
one complete pair, (c) exactly two complete pairs among them?
2.27. A car is parked among N cars in a row, not at either end. On his return the
owner finds that exactly r of the N places are still occupied. What is the probability
that both neighboring places are empty?
2.28. A group of 2N boys and 2N girls is divided into two equal groups. Find the
probability p that each group will be equally divided into boys and girls. Estimate p,
using Stirling’s formula.
2.29. In bridge, prove that the probability p of West’s receiving exactly k aces is the
same as the probability than an arbitrary hand of thirteen cards contains exactly k
aces. (This is intuitively clear. Note, however, that the two probabilities refer to two
different experiments, since in the second case thirteen cards are chosen at random
and in the first case all 52 are distributed.)
2.30. The probability that in a bridge game East receives m and South n spades is the
same as the probability that of two hands of thirteen cards each, drawn at random
from a deck of bridge cards, the first contains m and the second n spades.
2.31. What is the probability that the bridge hands of North and South together con-
tain exactly k aces, where k = 0, 1, 2, 3, 4?
2.32. Let a, b, c, d be four non-negative integers such that a +b +c +d = 13. Find
the probability p(a, b, c, d) that in a bridge game the players North, East, South, West
have a, b, c, d spades, respectively. Formulate a scheme of placing red and black balls
into cells that contains the problem as a special case.
2.33. Using the result of problem 32, find the probability that some player receives
a, another b, a third c, and the last d spades if (a) a = 5, b = 4, c = 3, d = 1; (b)
a = b = c = 4, d = 1; (c) a = b = 4, c = 3, d = 2.
Note that the three cases are essentially different.
2.34. Let a, b, c, d be integers with a + b + c + d = 13. Find the probability
q(a, b, c, d) that a hand at bridge will consist of a spades, b hearts, c diamonds, and
d clubs and show that the problem does not reduce to one of placing, at random,
thirteen balls into four cells. Why?
2.35. Distribution of aces among r bridge cards. Calculate the probabilities p
0
(r),
p
1
(r), ..., p
4
(r) that among r bridge cards drawn at random there are 0, 1, ..., 4 aces,
respectively. Verify that p
0
(r) = p
4
(52−r).
2 Elements of Combinatorial Analysis 9
2.36. Continuation: waiting times. If the cards are drawn one by one, find the prob-
abilities f
1
(r), . . . , f
4
(r) that the first,..., fourth ace turns up at the rth trial. Guess at
the medians of the waiting times for the first,..., fourth ace and then calculate them.
2.37. Find the probability that each of two hands contains exactly k aces if the two
hands are composed of r bridge cards each, and are drawn (a) fromthe same deck, (b)
from two decks. Show that when r = 13 the probability in part (a) is the probability
that two preasigned bridge players receive exactly k aces each.
2.38. Misprints. Each page of a book contains N symbols, possibly misprints. The
book contains n = 500 pages and r = 50 misprints. Show that (a) the probability that
pages number 1, 2, . . . , n contain, respectively, r
1
, r
2
, . . . , r
n
misprints equals
_
N
r
1
__
N
r
2
_

_
N
r
n
___
nN
r
_
;
(b) for large N this probability may be approximated by (5.3). Conclude that the r
misprints are distributed in the n pages approximately in accordance with a random
distribution of r balls in n cells. (Note. The distribution of the r misprints among the
N available places follows the Fermi-Dirac statistics. Our assertion may be restated
as a general limiting property of Fermi-Dirac statistics. Cf. section 5.a.)
Note: The following problems refer to the material of section 5.
2.39. If r
1
indistinguishable things of one kind and r
2
indistinguishable things of a
second kind are placed into n cells, find the number of distinguishable arrangements.
2.40. If r
1
dice and r
2
coins are thrown, how many results can be distinguished?
2.41. In how many different distinguishable ways can r
1
white, r
2
black, and r
3
red
balls be arranged?
2.42. Find the probability that in a random arrangement of 52 bridge cards no two
aces are adjacent.
2.43. Elevator. In the example (3.c) the elevator starts with seven passengers and
stops at ten floors. The various arrangements of discharge may be denoted by sym-
bols like (3, 2, 2), to be interpreted as the event that three passengers leave together at
a certain floor, two others passengers at another floor, and the last two at still another
floor. Find the probabilities of the fifteen possible arrangements ranging from (7) to
(1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1).
2.44. Birthdays. Find the probabilities for the various configurations of the birthdays
of 22 people.
2.45. Find the probability for a poker hand to be a (a) royal flush (ten, jack, queen,
king, ace in a single suit); (b) four of a kind (four cards of equal face values); (c)
full house (one pair and one triple of cards with equal face values); (d) straight (five
cards in sequence regardless of suit); (e) three of a kind (three equal face values plus
two extra cards); (f ) two pairs (two pairs of equal face values plus one other card);
(g) one pair (one pair of equal face values plus three differents cards).
10 2 Elements of Combinatorial Analysis
2. Problems and Complements of a Theoretical Character
2.46. A population of n elements includes np red ones and nq black ones (p+q =1).
A random sample of size r is taken with replacement. Show that the probability of
its including exactly k red elements is
_
r
k
_
p
k
q
r−k
. (2.1)
2.47. A limit theorem for the hypergeometric distribution. If n is large and n
1
/n = p,
then the probability q
k
given by (6.1) and (6.2) is close to (2.1). More precisely,
_
r
k
__
p−
k
n
_
k
_
q−
r −k
n
_
r−k
< q
k
<
_
r
k
_
p
k
q
r−k
_
1−
r
n
_
−r
. (2.2)
A comparison of this and the preceding problem shows: For large populations
there is practically no difference between sampling with and without replacement.
2.48. A random sample of size r without replacement is taken from a population of n
elements. The probability u
r
that N given elements will all be included in the sample
is
u
r
=
_
n−N
r−N
_
_
n
r
_ . (2.3)
[The corresponding formula for sampling with replacement is given by (2.10) and
cannot be derived by a direct argument. For an alternative form of (2.3) cf. problem
9 of IV,6.]
2.49. Limiting form. If n →∞ and r →∞ so that r/n →p, then u
r
→p
N
(cf. problem
58).
Note:
5
Problems 50–58 refer to the classical occupancy problem (Boltzmann-
Maxwell statistics): That is, r balls are distributed among n cells and each of the n
r
possible distributions has probability n
−r
.
2.50. The probability p
k
that a given cell contains exactly k balls is given by the
binomial distribution (4.5). The most probable number is the integer ν such that
(r −n +1)/n < ν ≤ (r +1)/n. (In other words, it is asserted that p
0
< p
1
< <
p
ν−1
≤ p
ν
> p
ν+1
> > P
r
; cf. problem 2.60.)
2.51. Limiting form. If n →∞ and r →∞ so that the average number λ =r/n of balls
per cell remains constant, then
p
k
→e
−λ
λ
k
/k!. (2.4)
(This is the Poisson distribution, discussed in chapter VI; for the corresponding limit
theorem for Bose-Einstein statistics see problem 2.61.)
5
Problems 50–64 play a role in quantum statistics, the theory of photographic plates, G-M
counters, etc. The formulas are frequently discussed and discovered in the physical liter-
ature, usually without realization of their classical and essentially elementary character.
Probably all the problems occur (although in modified form) in the book by Whitworth
quoted at the opening of this chapter.
2 Elements of Combinatorial Analysis 11
2.52. Let A(r, n) be the number of distributions leaving none of the n cells empty.
Show by a combinatorial argument that
A(r, n+1) =
r

k=1
_
r
k
_
A(r −k, n). (2.5)
Conclude that
A(r, n) =
n

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
n
ν
_
(n−ν)
r
. (2.6)
Hint: Use induction; assume (2.6) to hold and express A(r −k, n) in (2.5) ac-
cordingly. Change the order of summation and use the binomial formula to express
A(r, n+1) as the difference of two simple sums. Replace in the second sum ν +1 by
a new index of summation and use (8.6).
Note: Formula (2.6) provides a theoretical solution to an old problem but obvi-
ously it would be a thankless to use it for the calculation of the probability x, say, that
in a village of r = 1900 people every day of the year is a birthday. In IV,2 we shall
derive (2.6) by another method and shall obtain a simple approximation formula
(showing, e.g., that x = 0.135, approximately).
2.53. Show that the number of distributions leaving exactly m cells empty is
E
m
(r, n) =
_
n
m
_
A(r, n−m) =
_
n
m
_
n−m

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
n−m
ν
_
(n−m−)
ν
. (2.7)
2.54. Show without using the preceding results that the probability
p
m
(r, n) = n
−r
E
m
(r, n)
of finding m cells empty satisfies
p
m
(r +1, n) = p
m
(r, n)
n−m
n
+ p
m+1
(r, n)
m+1
n
. (2.8)
2.55. Using the results of problems 2.52 and 2.53, showby direct calculation that (2.8)
holds. Show that this method provides a new derivation (by induction on r) of (2.6).
2.56. From problem 2.53 conclude that the probability x
m
(r, n) of finding m or more
cells empty equals
_
n
m
_
n−m

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
n−m
ν
__
1−
m+ν
n
_
r
m
m+ν
. (2.9)
(For m ≥n this expression reduces to zero, as is proper.)
Hint: Show that x
m
(r, n) −p
m
(r, n) = x
m+1
(r, n).
12 2 Elements of Combinatorial Analysis
2.57. The probability that each of N given cells is occupied is
u(r, n) = n
−r
r

k=0
_
r
k
_
A(k, N)(n−N)
r−k
(2.10)
Conclude that
u(r, n) =
N

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
N
ν
_
_
1−
ν
n
_
r
. (2.11)
[Use the binomial theorem. For N = n we have u(r, n) = n
−r
A(r, n). Note that (2.11)
is the analogue of (2.3) for sampling with replacement.
6
For an alternative derivation
see problem 4.8 of IV,6.]
2.58. Limiting form. For the passage to the limit described in problem 2.49 one has
u(r, n) →(1−e
−p
)
N
.
Note: In problems 14–19, r and n have the same meaning as above, but we as-
sume that the balls are indistinguishable and that all distinguishable arrangements
have equal probabilities (Bose-Einstein statistics).
2.59. The probability that a given cell contains exactly k balls is
q
k
=
_
n+r −k −2
r −k
___
n+r −1
r
_
. (2.12)
2.60. Show that when n > 2 zero is the most probable number of balls in any speci-
fied cell, or more precisely, q
0
> q
1
> (cf. problem 5).
2.61. Limit theorem. Let n →∞ and r →∞, so that the average number of particles
per cell, r/n tends to λ. Then
q
k

λ
k
(1+λ)
k+1
. (2.13)
(The right side is known as the geometric distribution.)
2.62. The probability that exactly m cells remain empty is
ρ
m
=
_
n
m
__
r −1
n−m−1
___
n+r −1
r
_
. (2.14)
6
Note that u(r, n) may be interpreted as the probability that the waiting time up to the moment
when the Nth element joins the sample is less than r. The result may be applied to random
sampling digits: here u(r, 10) −u(r −1, 10) is the probability that a sequence of r elements
must be observed to include the complete set of all ten digits. This can be used as a test
of randomness. R. E. Greenwood [Coupon collector’s test for random digits, Mathematical
Tables and Other Aids to Computation, vol. 9 (1955), pp. 1–5] tabulated the distribution and
compared it to actual counts for the corresponding waiting times for the first 2035 decimals
of π and the first 2486 decimals of e. The median of the waiting time for a complete set of
all ten digits is 27. The probability that this waiting time exceeds 50 is greater than 0.05,
and the probability of the waiting time exceeding 75 is about 0.0037.
2 Elements of Combinatorial Analysis 13
2.63. The probability that group of m prescribed cells contains a total of exactly j
balls is
q
j
(m) =
_
m+ j −1
m−1
__
n−m+r − j −1
r − j
___
n+r −1
r
_
. (2.15)
2.64. Limiting form. For the passage to the limit of problem 4 we have
q
j
(m) →
_
m+ j −1
m−1
_
p
j
(1+ p)
m+j
. (2.16)
(The right side is a special case of the negative binomial distribution to be introduced
in VI, 8.)
Theorems on Runs. In problems 20–25 we consider arrangements of r
1
alphas
and r
2
betas and assume that all arrangements are equally probable [see example
(4.e)]. This group of problems refers to section 5b.
2.65. The probability that the arrangement contains exactly k runs of either kind is
P

= 2
_
r
1
−1
ν −1
__
r
2
−1
ν −1
___
r
1
+r
2
r
1
_
(2.17)
when k = 2ν is even, and
P
2ν+1
=
__
r
1
−1
ν
__
r
2
−1
ν −1
_
+
_
r
1
−1
ν −1
__
r
2
−1
ν
____
r
1
+r
2
r
1
_
(2.18)
when k = 2ν +1 is odd.
2.66. Continuation. Conclude that the most probable number of runs is an integer
k such that
2r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2
< k <
2r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2
+3. (Hint: Consider the ratios P
2ν+2
/P

and
P
2ν+1
/P
2ν−1
.)
2.67. The probability that the arrangement starts with an alpha run of length ν ≥ 0
is
_
r
1
_
ν
r
2
/
_
r
1
+r
2
_
ν+1
. (Hint: Choose the ν alphas and the beta which must follow
it.) What does the theorem imply for ν = 0?
2.68. The probability of having exactly k runs of alphas is
π
k
=
_
r
1
−1
k −1
__
r
2
+1
k
___
r
1
+r
2
r
1
_
. (2.19)
Hint: This follows easily from the second part of the lemma of section 5. Alter-
natively (??) may be derived from(??) and (??), but this procedure is more laborious.
2.69. The probability that the nth alpha is preceded by exactly m betas is
_
r
1
+r
2
−n−m
r
2
−m
__
m+n−1
m
___
r
1
+r
2
r
1
_
. (2.20)
14 2 Elements of Combinatorial Analysis
2.70. The probability for the alphas to be arranged in k runs of which k
1
are of
length 1, k
2
of length 2, ..., k
ν
of length ν (with k
1
+ +k
ν
= k) is
k!
k
1
!k
2
! k
ν
!
_
r
2
+1
k
___
r
1
+r
2
r
1
_
. (2.21)
3. Problems and Identities Involving Binomial Coefficients
2.71. For integral n ≥2
1−
_
n
1
_
+
_
n
2
_
−+ = 0 (2.22)
_
n
1
_
+2
_
n
2
_
+3
_
n
3
_
+ = n2
n−1
(2.23)
_
n
1
_
−2
_
n
2
_
+3
_
n
3
_
−+ = 0 (2.24)
2 1
_
n
2
_
+3 2
_
n
3
_
+4 3
_
n
4
_
+ = n(n−1)2
n−2
(2.25)
Hint: Use the binomial formula.
2.72. Prove that for positive integers n, k
_
n
0
__
n
k
_

_
n
1
__
n−1
k −1
_
+
_
n
2
__
n−2
k −2
_
±
_
n
k
__
n−k
0
_
= 0. (2.26)
More generally
7

_
n
ν
__
n−ν
k −ν
_
t
ν
=
_
n
k
_
(1+t)
k
. (2.27)
2.73. For any a > 0
_
−a
k
_
= (−1)
k
_
a+k −1
k
_
. (2.28)
If a is an integer, this can also be proved also by repeated differentiation of the
geometric series ∑x
k
= (1−x)
−1
.
2.74. Prove that
_
2n
n
_
2
−2n
= (−1)
n
_

1
2
n
_
, (2.29)
1
n
_
2n−2
n−1
_
2
−2n+1
= (−1)
n−1
_
1
2
n
_
. (2.30)
7
The reader is reminded of the convention (8.5); if ν runs through all integers, only finitely
many terms in the sum (2.27) are different from zero.
2 Elements of Combinatorial Analysis 15
2.75. For integral non-negative n and r and all real a
n

ν=0
_
a−ν
r
_
=
_
a+1
r +1
_

_
a−n
r +1
_
. (2.31)
Hint: Use (8.6). The special case n = a is frequently used.
2.76. For arbitrary a and integral n ≥0
n

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
a
ν
_
= (−1)
n
_
a−1
n
_
. (2.32)
Hint: Use (8.6).
2.77. For positive integers r, k
r

ν=0
_
ν +k −1
k −1
_
=
_
r +k
k
_
. (2.33)
(a) Prove this using (8.6). (b) Show that (2.33) is a special case of (2.32). (c) Show by
an inductive argument that (2.33) leads to a new proof of the first part of the lemma
of section 5. (d) Show that (2.33) is equivalent to
n

j=0
_
j
m
_
=
_
n+1
m+1
_
. (2.34)
2.78. In section 6 we remarked that the terms of the hypergeometric distribution
should add to unity. This amounts to saying that for any positive integers a , b , n ,
_
a
0
__
b
n
_
+
_
a
1
__
b
n−1
_
+ +
_
a
n
__
b
0
_
=
_
a+b
n
_
. (2.35)
Prove this by induction. Hint: Prove first that equation (2.35) holds for a = 1 and all
b .
2.79. Continuation. By a comparison of the coefficients of t
n
on both sides of
(1+t)
a
(1+t)
b
= (1+t)
a+b
(2.36)
prove more generally that (2.35) is true for arbitrary numbers a , b (and integral n ).
2.80. Using (2.35), prove that
_
n
0
_
2
+
_
n
1
_
2
+
_
n
2
_
2
+ +
_
n
n
_
2
=
_
2n
n
_
. (2.37)
2.81. Using (2.37), prove that
n

ν=0
(2n)!
(ν!)
2
((n−ν)!)
2
=
_
2n
n
_
2
. (2.38)
16 2 Elements of Combinatorial Analysis
2.82. Prove that for integers 0 < a < b
a

k=1
(−1)
a−k
_
a
k
__
b+k
b+1
_
=
_
b
a−1
_
. (2.39)
Hint: Using (2.28) show that (2.39) is a special case of (2.35). Alternatively,
compare the coefficients of t
a−1
in (1−t)
a
(1−t)
−b−2
= (1−t)
a−b−2
.
2.83. By specialization derive from (2.35) the identities
_
a
k
_

_
a
k −1
_
+− ∓
_
a
1
_
±1 =
_
a−1
k
_
(2.40)
and

ν
(−1)
ν
_
a
ν
__
n−ν
r
_
=
_
n−a
n−r
_
, (2.41)
valid if k , n , and r are positive integers. Hint: Use (2.28).
2.84. Using (2.35), prove that
8
for arbitrary a , b and integral k
k

j=0
_
a+k − j −1
k − j
__
b+ j −1
j
_
=
_
a+b+k −1
k
_
. (2.42)
Hint: Apply (2.28) back and forth. Alternatively, use (2.36) with changed signs of
the exponents.
Note the important special cases b = 1, 2 .
2.85. Referring to the problems of section 11, notice that (2.12), (2.14), (2.15),
and (2.16) define probabilities. In each the quantities should therefore add to unity.
Show that this is implied, respectively, by (2.33), (2.35), (2.42), and the binomial
theorem.
2.86. From the definition of A(r, n) in problem 7 of section 11 it follows that
A(r, n) = 0 if r < n and A(n, n) = n! . In other words
n

k=0
(−1)
n−k
_
n
k
_
k
r
=
_
0 if r < n
n! if r = n .
(2.43)
(a) Prove (2.43) directly by reduction from n to n −1 . (b) Next prove (2.43) by
considering the rth derivative of (1−e
t
)
n
at t =0 . (c) Generalize (2.43) by starting
from (2.11) instead of (2.6).
2.87. If 0 ≤N ≤n prove by induction that for each integer r ≥0
N

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
N
ν
_
(n−ν)
r
=
_
n−N
r −N
_
r! . (2.44)
(Note that the right-hand member vanishes when r < N and when r > n .) Ver-
ify (2.44) by considering the rth derivative of t
n−N
(t −1)
N
at t = 1 .
8
For a more elegant proof see problem 15 of IX,9.
2 Elements of Combinatorial Analysis 17
2.88. Prove by induction (using the binomial theorem)
_
n
1
_
1
1

_
n
2
_
1
2
+ +(−1)
n−1
_
n
n
_
1
n
= 1+
1
2
+
1
3
+ +
1
n
. (2.45)
Verify (2.45) by integrating the identity ∑
n−1
ν=0
(1−t)
ν
=¦1−(1−t)
n
¦t
−1
.
3
Fluctuations in Coin Tossing and Random Walks
3.1. (a) If a > 0 and b > 0, the number of paths (s
1
, s
2
, . . . , s
n
) such that s
1
>
−b, . . . , s
n−1
>−b, s
n
= a equals N
n,a
−N
n,a+2b
.
(b) If b > a > 0 there are N
n,a
−N
n,2b−a
paths satisfying the conditions s
1
<
b, . . . , s
n−1
< b, s
n
= a.
3.2. Let a >c >0 and b >0. The number of paths which touch the line x =a and then
lead to (n, c) without having touched the line x = −b equals N
n,2a−c
−N
n,2a+2b+c
.
(Note that this includes paths touching the line x =−b before the line x = a.)
3.3. Repeated reflections. Let a and b positive, and −b < c < a. The number of paths
to the point (n, c) wich meet neither the line x =−b nor x = a is given by the series

(N
n,2k(a+b)+c
−N
n,2k(a+b)+2a−c
),
the series extending over all integers k from −∞ to ∞, but having only finitely many
non-zero terms.
Hint: Use and extend the method of the preceding problem.
Note. This is connected with the so-called ruin problem which arises in gambling
when the two players have initial capitals a and b so that the game terminates when
the accumulated gain reaches either a or −b. For the connection with statistical tests,
see example (1.c).
(The method of repeated reflections will be used again in problem 17 of XIV,9
and in connection with diffusion theory in volume 2; X,5.)
3.4. From lemma 3.1 conclude (without calculations) that
u
0
u
2n
+u
2
u
2n−2
+ +u
2n
u
0
= 1.
3.5. Show that
u
2n
= (−1)
n
_

1
2
n
_
f
2n
= (−1)
n−1
_
1
2
n
_
.
Derive the identity of the preceding problem as well as (2.6) from II, (12.9).
20 3 Fluctuations in Coin Tossing and Random Walks
3.6. Prove geometrically that there are exactly as many paths ending at (2n +2, 0)
and having all interior vertices strictly above the axis as there are paths ending at
(2n, 0) and having all vertices above or on the axis. Therefore
P¦S
1
≥0, . . . , S
2n−1
≥0, S
2n
= 0¦ = 2 f
2n+2
.
Hint: Refer to figure 1.
3.7. Prove lemma 3.1 geometrically by showing that the following construction es-
tablishes a one-to-one correspondence between the two classes of paths:
Given a path to (2n, 0) denote its leftmost minimum point by M(k, −m). Reflect
the section from the origin to M on the vertical line t = k and slide the reflected
section to the endpoint (2n, 0). If M is taken as origin of a new coordinate system the
new path leads from the origin to (2n, 2m) and has all vertices strictly above or on
the axis. (This construction is due to E. Nelson.)
3.8. Prove formula (3.5) directly by considering the paths that never meet the line
x =−1.
3.9. The probability that before epoch 2n there occur exactly r returns to the origin
equals the probability that a return takes place at epoch 2n and is preceded by at least
r returns. Hint: Use lemma 3.1.
3.10. Contimuation. Denote by z
r,2n
the probability that exactly r returns to the origin
occur up to and including epoch 2n. Using the preceding problem show that z
r,2n
=
ρ
r,2n

r+1,2n
+ where ρ
r,2n
is the probability that the rth return occurs at epoch
2n. Using theorem 7.4 conclude that
z
r,2n
=
1
2
2n−r

_
2n−r
n
_
.
3.11. Alternative derivation for the probabilities for the number of changes of sign.
Show that
ξ
r,2n−1
=
1
2
n−1

k=1
f
2k
_
ξ
r−1,2n−1−2k

r,2n−1−2k
¸
.
Assuming by induction that (5.1) holds for all epochs prior to 2n−1 show that this
reduces to
ξ
r,2n−1
= 2
n−1

1
f
2k
p
2n−2k,2r
which is twice the probability of reaching the point (2n, 2r) after a return to the
origin. Considering the first step and using the ballot theorem conclude that (5.1)
holds.
3.12. The probability that S
2n
= 0 and the maximum of S
1
, . . . , S
2n−1
equals k is the
same as P¦S
2n
= 2k¦−P¦S
2n
= 2k +2¦. Prove this by reflection.
3 Fluctuations in Coin Tossing and Random Walks 21
3.13. In the proof of section 9 it was shown that
n

r=1
1
4r(n−r +1)
u
2r−2
u
2n−2r
=
1
n+1
u
2n
.
Show that this relation is equivalent to (2.6). Hint: Decompose the fraction.
3.14. Consider a path of length 2n with S
2n
= 0. We order the sides in circular order
by identifying 0 and 2n with the result that the first and the last side become adja-
cent. Applying a circular permutation amounts to viewing the same closed path with
(k, S
k
) as origin. Show that this preserves maxima, but moves them k steps ahead.
Conclude that when all 2n cyclical permutations are applied the number of times
that a maximum occurs at r is independent of r.
Consider now a randomly chosen path with S
2n
= 0 and pick the place of the
maximum if the latter is unique; if there are several maxima, pick one at random.
This procedure leads to a number between 0 and 2n −1. Show that all possibilities
are equally probable.
4
Combination of Events
Note: Assume in each case that all possible arrangements have the same probability.
4.1. Ten pair of shoes are in a closet. Four shoes are selected at random. Find the
probability that there will be at least one pair among the four shoes selected.
4.2. Five dice are thrown. Find the probability that at least three of them show the
same face. (Verify by the metods of II,5.)
4.3. Find the probability that in five tossing a coin falls heads at least three times in
succession.
4.4. Solve problem 4.3 for a head-run of at least length five in ten tossings.
4.5. Solve problems 4.3 and 4.4 for ace runs when a die is used instead of a coin.
4.6. Two dice are thrown r times. Find the probability p
r
that each of the six combi-
nations (1, 1), . . . , (6, 6) appears at least one.
4.7. Quadruples in a bridge hand. By a quadruple we shall understand four cards of
the same face value, so that a bridge hand of thirteen cards may contain 0, 1, 2, or 3
quadruples. Calculate the corresponding probabilities.
4.8. Sampling with replacement. A sample of size r is taken from a population of n
people. Find the probability u
r
that N given people will all be included in the sample.
(This is problem 12 of II,11.)
1
4.9. Sampling without replacement. Answer problem 4.8 for this case and show that
u
r
→ p
N
. (This is problem 3 of II,11, but the present method leads to a formally
entirely different result. Prove their identity.)
1
Ante la dificultad para seguir las referencias cruzadas, os recomiendo que os hag´ ais con un
ejemplar del libro. En Amazon usa hay de todos los precios.
24 4 Combination of Events
4.10. In the general expansion of a determinant of order N the number of terms
containing one or more diagonal elements is N!P
1
defined by (1.7).
4.11. The number of ways in which 8 rooks can be placed on a chessboard so that
none can take another and that none stands on the white diagonal is 8!(1−P
1
), where
P
1
is defined by (1.7) with N = 8.
4.12. A sampling (coupon collector’s) problem. A pack of cards consist of s identical
series, each containing n cards numbered 1, 2, . . . , n. A random sample of r ≥ n
cards is drawn from the pack without replacement. Calculate the probability u
r
that
each number is represented in the sample. (Applied to a deck of bridge cards we get
for s = 4, n = 13 the probability that a hand of r cards contains all 13 values; and for
s = 13, n = 4 we get the probability that all four suits are represented.)
4.13. Continuation. Showthat as s →∞one has u
r
→p
0
(r, n) where the latter expres-
sion is defined in (2.3). This means that in the limit our sampling becomes random
sampling with replacement from the population of the numbers 1, 2, . . . , n.
4.14. Continuation. From the result of problem 4.12 conclude that
n

k=0
(−1)
k
_
n
k
_
(ns −ks)
r
= 0
if r < n and for r = n
n

k=0
(−1)
k
_
n
k
_
(ns −ks)
n
= s
n
n!.
Verify this by evaluating the rth derivative, at x = 0, of
1
(1−x)
ns−r+1
¦1−(1−x)
s
¦
n
.
4.15. In the sampling problem 4.12 find the probability that it will take exactly r
drawings to get a sample containing all numbers. Pass to the limit as s →∞.
4.16. A cell contains N chromosomes, between any two of which an interchange of
parts may occur. If r interchanges occur (which can happen in
_
N
2
_
r
distinct ways) ,
find the probability that exactly m chromosomes will be involved.
2
4.17. Find the probability that exactly k suits will be missing in a poker hand.
4.18. Find the probability that a hand of thirteen bridge cards contains the ace-king
pairs of exactly k suits.
2
For N = 6 see D. G. Catcheside, D. E. Lea, and J. M. Thoday, Types of chromosome struc-
tural change introduced by the irradiation of tradescantia microspores, Journal of Genetics,
vol. 47 (1945–46), pp. 113–149.
5
Conditional Probability. Stochastic Independence
5.1. Three dice are rolled. If no two show the same face, what is the probability that
one is an ace?
5.2. Given that a throwwith ten dice produced at least one ace, what is the probability
p of two or more aces?
5.3. Bridge. In a bridge party West has no ace. What probability should he attribute
to the event of his partner having (a) no ace, (b) two or more aces? Verify the result
by a direct argument.
5.4. Bridge. North and South have ten trumps between them (trumps being cards of
a specified suit). (a) Find the probability that all three remaining trumps are in the
same hand (that is, either East or West has no trumps). (b) If it is known that the king
of trumps is included among the three, what is the probability that he is “unguarded”
(that is, one player has the king, the other the remaining two trumps)?
5.5. Discuss the key problem in example II, (7.b) in terms of conditional probabilities
following the pattern of example (2.a).
5.6. In a bolt factory machines A, B, C manufacture, respectively, 25, 35 and 40 per
cent of the total. Of their output 5, 4, and 2 per cent are defective bolts. A bolt is
drawn at random from the produce and is found defective. What are the probabilities
that in was manufactured by machines A, B, C?
5.7. Suppose that 5 men out of 100 and 25 women out of 10,000 are colorblind. A
colorblind person is chosen at random. What is the probability of his being male?
(Assume males and females to be in equal numbers.)
5.8. Seven balls are distributed randomly in seven cells. If exactly two cells are
empty, show that the (conditional) probability of a triple occupancy of some cells
equals
1
4
. Verify this numerically using table 1 of II,5.
26 5 Conditional Probability. Stochastic Independence
5.9. A die is thrown as long as necessary for an ace to turn up. Assuming that the
ace does not turn up at the first thrown, what is the probability that more than three
throws will be necessary?
5.10. Continuation. Suppose that the number, n, of throws is even. What is the prob-
ability that n = 2?
5.11. Let
1
the probability that a family has exactly n children be αp
n
when n ≥1, and
p
0
= 1−αp(1+ p+ p
2
+ ). Suppose that all sex distributions of n children have
the same probability. Show that for k ≥ 1 the probability that a family has exactly k
boys is 2αp
k
/(2−p)
k+1
.
5.12. Continuation. Given that a family includes at least one boy, what is the proba-
bility that there are two or more?
1
According to J. A. Lotka, American family statistics satisfies our hypotesis with p =
0,7358. See Th´ eorie analytique des associations biologiques II, Actualit´ es scientifiques
et industrielles, no. 780, Paris, 1939.
Solutions
Problems of Chapter 1
1.1 (a)
3
5
; (b)
3
5
; (c)
3
10
.
1.2
S
1
=¦10−−15, 22−−27¦ P¦S
1
¦ =
12
27
S
2
=¦4−−6, 19−−27¦ P¦S
2
¦ =
12
27
S
1
∪S
2
=¦4−−6, 10−−15, 19−−27¦ P¦S
1
∪S
2
¦ =
18
27
S
1
S
2
=¦22−−27¦ P¦S
1
S
2
¦ =
6
27
Tenemos
18
27
=
12
27
+
12
27

6
27
Por tanto, se cumple (7.4).
1.3 Consideremos A
1
y A
2
, tenemos
A
1
=¦1234, 1243, 1324, 1342, 1423, 1432¦
A
2
=¦1234, 1243, 3214, 3241, 4213, 4231¦
A
1
A
2
=¦1234, 1243¦
A
1
∪A
2
=¦1234, 1243, 1324, 1342, 1423, 1432, 3214, 3241, 4213, 4231¦
con probabilidades respectivas P¦A
1
¦ =
6
24
, P¦A
2
¦ =
6
24
, P¦A
1
A
2
=
2
24
y P¦A
1

A
2
¦ =
10
24
. Se tiene
10
24
=
6
24
+
6
24

2
24
se cumple (7.4).
28 Solutions
1.4 El espacio muestral es discreto pero infinito, consta de los siguientes elementos
“finitos”
HH, HTT, HTHH, HTHTT, HTHTHH, HTHTHTT, HTHTHTHH,
TT, THH, THTT, THTHH, THTHTT, THTHTHH, THTHTHTT,
y de los dos siguientes elementos “infinitos”
HTHTHTHTHTHT , THTHTHTHTHTH
(a) 2
_
1
4
+
1
8
+
1
16
+
1
32
_
=
15
16
, (b) 2
_
1
2
2
+
1
2
4
+
_
=
2
3
.
1.5 (a)
2


k=2
1
2
k
= 2
_
1
2
2
+
1
2
3
+
1
2
4
+
_
= 1
(b) Que gane a
_
1
2
2
+
1
2
5
+
_
+
_
1
2
4
+
1
2
7
+
_
=
1
4

1
1−
1
8
+
1
16

1
1−
1
8
=
2
7
+
1
14
=
5
14
Que gane c
2
_
1
2
3
+
1
2
6
+
_
=
1
4

1
1−
1
8
=
2
7
(c)
1−2
_
1
2
2
+
1
2
3
+ +
1
2
k
_
= 1−
1
2

1−
1
2
k−2

1
2
1−
1
2
=
1
2
k−1
.
1.6 Si t se refiere a empate, n al n´ umero de letras de una palabra y P
n
al n´ umero de
palabras de n letras, tenemos para n = 7 lo siguiente:
acbacbb
. ¸¸ .
7
bcabcaa
. ¸¸ .
7
2 palabras de 7 letras
t
. ¸¸ .
6
P
6
palabras de 7 letras
at
. ¸¸ .
5
bt
. ¸¸ .
5
2 P
5
palabras de 7 letras
act
. ¸¸ .
4
bct
. ¸¸ .
4
2 P4 palabras de 7 letras
acbt
. ¸¸ .
3
bcat
. ¸¸ .
3
2 P
3
palabras de 7 letras
acbat
.¸¸.
2
bcabt
.¸¸.
2
2 P
2
palabras de 7 letras
Si P
7
es el n´ umero de palabras de 7 letras, tenemos
Solutions 29
P
7
= 2+P
6
+2 (P
5
+P
4
+P
3
+P
2
)
genral, tenemos la siguiente relaci´ on de recurrencia
• P
2
= 2
• P
n
= 2+P
n−1
+2 (P
n−2
+P
n−3
+ +P
2
) n > 2
Si asociamos la probabilidad α
n
a cada palabra de n letras tenemos que


n=2
P
n
α
n
= 1
utilizando la relaci´ on de recurrencia
P
n
α
n
=2α
n
+P
n−1
α
n−1
α +2 (P
n−2
α
n−2
α
2
+P
n−3
α
n−3
α
3
+ +P
2
α
2
α
n−2
)
consecuentemente


n=2
P
n
α
n
=2


n=2
α
n



n=2
P
n
α
n
+2


n=2

2
n
α
n

3
P
n−1
α
n−1
+ +α
n
P
2
α
2
)
cuyos valores son
• ∑

n=2
P
n
α
n
= 1
• ∑

n=2
α
n
=
α
2
1−α
(serie geom´ etrica)
• ∑

n=2

2
P
n
α
n

3
P
n−1
α
n−1
+ +α
n
P
2
α
2
)
= (∑

n=2
α
n
) (∑

n=2
P
n
α
n
) =
α
2
1−α
(producto de Cauchy)
con lo que tenemos la ecuaci ´ on
1 =

2
1−α
+α +

2
1−α
0 < α < 1
cuya soluci ´ on es α =
1
3
, como cab´ıa esperar.
1.7
A
1
A
2
A
3
=¦1234¦ ⊂A
4
, A
1
A
2
A
/
3
=¦1243¦ ⊂A
/
4
.
1.8 (a) S
1
S
2
D
3
no contiene ning´ un punto muestral de la tabla 1 de I,2, por tanto,
se trata del suceso vac´ıo; (b) S
1
D
2
consta de los puntos 10–12 contenidos en E
3
; (c)
E
3
−D
2
S
1
consta de los puntos 1, 2, 4–6 y S
2
D
1
de los puntos 4–6, de donde se sigue
el enunciado.
1.9
El suceso A es la suma de sus caras es impar.
A =¦12, 14, 16, 21, 23, 25, 32, 34, 36, 41, 43, 45,
52, 54, 56, 61, 63, 65¦ P¦A¦ = 18/36
30 Solutions
El suceso B es sale al menos un as.
B =¦11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 21, 31, 41, 51, 61¦ P¦B¦ = 11/36
El suceso AB es sale as y la suma de sus caras es impar.
AB =¦12, 14, 16, 21, 41, 61¦ P¦AB¦ = 6/36
El suceso A∪B es sale al menos un as o la suma de sus caras es impar.
A∪B =¦11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 21, 23, 25, 31, 32, 34,
36, 41, 43, 45, 51, 52, 54, 56, 61, 63, 65¦ P¦AB¦ = 23/36
El suceso AB
/
la suma es impar y no sale ning´ un as.
AB
/
=¦23, 25, 32, 34, 36, 43, 45, 52, 54, 56, 63, 65¦ P¦AB¦ = 12/36
1.10 (a) El marido es mayor que la mujer y esta tiene m´ as de 40 a˜ nos. (b) El marido
tiene m´ as de 40 a˜ nos y la mujer, como m´ınimo, tiene la edad del marido. (c) El
marido tiene m´ as de 40 a˜ nos y a lo sumo la edad de la mujer.
1.11 El marido tiene m´ as de 40 a˜ nos y la mujer a lo sumo 40 (suceso AC
/
), lo que
implica que el marido es mayor que la mujer (suceso B).
1.12 (a) x = 0, (b) x = 0, (c) x = 4, (d) x = 2, (e) x = 1, (f) x = 1, (g) x = 0.
1.13 (a) Si Sur tiene al menos tres ases, al menos tiene dos. (b) No puede haber
al menos cinco ases. (c) Idem. (d) Si Norte y Sur tienen al menos dos ases cada
uno, Oeste no puede tener ninguno. (e) No puede haber al menos cinco ases. (f) El
que Oeste tenga cuatro ases implica que ni Norte, ni Sur ni Este tengan alg´ un as y
rec´ıprocamente.
1.14 (a) x ∈ (A∪B)
/
⇐⇒ x / ∈ A∪B ⇐⇒ x / ∈ A, x / ∈ B ⇐⇒ x ∈ A
/
, x ∈ B
/
⇐⇒ x ∈
A
/
B
/
. Esta es una de las leyes de De Morgan.
(b) x ∈ (A∪B) −B ⇐⇒ x ∈ A∪B, x / ∈ B ⇐⇒ (x ∈ A o x ∈ B), x / ∈ B ⇐⇒ (x ∈
A, x / ∈B) o (x ∈B, x / ∈B) ⇐⇒ (x ∈A, x ∈B
/
) o (x ∈B, x ∈B
/
) ⇐⇒ (x ∈AB
/
) o (x ∈
BB
/
) ⇐⇒ (x ∈ AB
/
)o (x ∈ O) ⇐⇒ x ∈ AB
/
∪O ⇐⇒ x ∈ AB
/
.
Por otra parte x ∈ A−AB ⇐⇒ x ∈ A, x / ∈ AB ⇐⇒ x ∈ A, x ∈ (AB)
/
⇐⇒ x ∈ A, x ∈
A
/
∪B
/
por el apartado (f) ⇐⇒ x ∈ A, (x ∈ A
/
o x ∈ B
/
) ⇐⇒ (x ∈ A, x ∈ A
/
) o (x ∈
A, x ∈ B
/
) ⇐⇒ x ∈ AA
/
o x ∈ AB
/
⇐⇒ x ∈ O∪AB
/
⇐⇒ x ∈ AB
/
.
(c) x ∈ AA ⇐⇒ x ∈ A, x ∈ A ⇐⇒ x ∈ A, por otra parte x ∈ A∪A ⇐⇒ x ∈ A o x ∈
A ⇐⇒ x ∈ A.
(d) (A−AB) ∪B = (AB
/
) ∪B (por (b)) = (A∪B)(B
/
∪B) = (A∪B)G= A∪B.
(e) x ∈ (A∪B) −AB ⇐⇒ x ∈ A∪B, x / ∈ AB ⇐⇒ x ∈ A∪B, x ∈ (AB)
/
⇐⇒ x ∈
A∪B, x ∈ A
/
∪B
/
por (f) ⇐⇒ (x ∈ A o x ∈ B), (x ∈ A
/
o x ∈ B
/
) ⇐⇒ (x ∈ A, x ∈
A
/
) o (x ∈ A, x ∈ B
/
) o (x ∈ B, x ∈ A
/
) o (x ∈ B, x ∈ B
/
) ⇐⇒ x ∈ O∪AB
/
∪A
/
B ∪
O ⇐⇒ x ∈ AB
/
∪A
/
B.
Solutions 31
(f) A
/
∪B
/
= ((A
/
∪B
/
)
/
)
/
= ((A
/
)
/
(B
/
)
/
)
/
por (a) = (AB)
/
.
(g) x ∈ (A∪B)C ⇐⇒ x ∈ A∪B, x ∈C ⇐⇒ (x ∈ A o x ∈ B), x ∈C ⇐⇒ (x ∈ A, x ∈
C) o (x ∈ B, x ∈C) ⇐⇒ x ∈ AC o x ∈ BC ⇐⇒ x ∈ AC∪BC.
1.15 (a) (A∪B)(A∪B
/
) = (A(A∪B
/
)) ∪(B(A∪B
/
)) = (AA∪AB
/
) ∪(BA∪BB
/
) =
A∪AB
/
∪AB∪O = A∪(A(B
/
∪B)) = A∪AG= A∪A = A.
(b) (A∪B)(A
/
∪B)(A∪B
/
) = B(A∪B
/
) por (a) = AB∪BB
/
= AB∪O = AB.
(c) (A∪B)(B∪C) = (A(B∪C)) ∪(B(B∪C)) = AB∪AC∪BB∪BC = B∪AC.
1.16 (a) Incorrecto. (A∪B) −C = (A∪B)C
/
= AC
/
∪BC
/
⊂A∪BC
/
= A∪(B−C).
(b) Incorrecto. AB(C∪B) = ABC∪ABB = ABC∪AB = AB ⊃ABC.
(c) Correcto. A ∪(B −AB) ∪(C −AC) = A ∪B(AB)
/
∪C(AC)
/
= A ∪B(A
/
∪B
/
) ∪
C(A
/
∪C
/
) = A∪A
/
B∪BB
/
∪A
/
C∪CC
/
= A∪A
/
B∪A
/
C = A∪B∪C.
(d) Correcto. (A−AB)∪B=A(AB)
/
∪B=A(A
/
∪B
/
)∪B=AA
/
∪AB
/
∪B=AB
/
∪B=
A∪B.
(e) Correcto. AB∪BC∪CA ⊃AB ⊃ABC.
(f) Correcto. AB ⊂A, BC ⊂B y CA ⊂C, con lo que AB∪BC∪CA ⊂A∪B∪C.
(g) Incorrecto. (A∪B) −A = (A∪B)A
/
= AA
/
∪BA
/
= BA
/
⊂B.
(h) Correcto. AB
/
C ⊂A ⊂A∪B.
(i) Correcto. Por el problema 14 (a), (A∪B∪C)
/
= ((A∪B) ∪C)
/
= (A∪B)
/
C
/
=
A
/
B
/
C
/
.
(j) Incorrecto. (A∪B)
/
C = A
/
B
/
C ⊂A
/
C ⊂A
/
C∪B
/
C.
(k) Correcto. Por el problema 14 (a).
(l) Correcto. C−C(A∪B) =C(C(A∪B))
/
=C(C
/
∪(A∪B)
/
) =CC
/
∪C(A∪B)
/
=
O∪(A∪B)
/
C = (A∪B)
/
C.
1.17 (a) AB
/
C
/
. (b) ABC
/
. (c) ABC. (d) A∪B∪C. (e) AB∪AC ∪BC. (f) AB
/
C
/

A
/
BC
/
∪A
/
B
/
C. (g) ABC
/
∪AB
/
C ∪A
/
BC. (h) A
/
B
/
C
/
. (i) A
/
B
/
C
/
∪A
/
B
/
C ∪A
/
BC
/

AB
/
C
/
∪A
/
BC∪AB
/
C∪ABC
/
= B
/
∪A
/
B∪ABC
/
= A
/
∪B
/
∪C
/
= (ABC)
/
.
1.18 A∪B∪C = A∪(B−AB) ∪(C−(A∪B)C) = A∪BA
/
∪CA
/
B
/
.
1.19 Por el problema anterior
P¦A∪B∪C¦ = P¦A¦+P¦BA
/
¦+P¦CA
/
B
/
¦.
Por otra parte
B = BA
/
∪BA, BA
/
BA = O
implica
P¦BA
/
¦ = P¦B¦−P¦AB¦,
similarmente
C =CA
/
∪CA, CA
/
CA = O
implica
P¦CA
/
¦ = P¦C¦−P¦AC¦,
CB =CA
/
B∪CAB, CA
/
BCAB = O
implica
32 Solutions
P¦CA
/
B¦ = P¦BC¦−P¦ABC¦
CA
/
=CA
/
B
/
∪CA
/
B, CA
/
B
/
CA
/
B = O
implica
P¦CA
/
¦ = P¦CA
/
B
/
¦+P¦CA
/

con las sustituciones convenientes
P¦C¦−P¦AC¦ = P¦CA
/
B
/
¦+P¦BC¦−P¦ABC¦
de donde
P¦CA
/
B
/
¦ = P¦C¦−P¦AC¦−P¦BC¦+P¦ABC¦.
Sustituyendo arriba
P¦A∪B∪C¦ = P¦A¦+P¦BA
/
¦+P¦CA
/
B
/
¦
= P¦A¦+P¦B¦+P¦C¦−P¦AB¦−P¦AC¦−P¦BC¦+P¦ABC¦
Problems of Chapter 2
2.1 (a) 26
3
= 17576; (b) 26
3
+26
2
= 18252; (c) 26
4
+26
3
+26
2
= 475228.
2.2 2+2
2
+ +2
10
= 2
11
−2 = 2046.
2.3
_
n+1
2
_
=
n(n+1)
2
.
2.4 (a)
(n−1)(n−2)!
n!
=
1
n
(b)
(n−2)(n−3)!
n!
=
1
n(n−1)
2.5
P¦A
/
¦ =
5
6
6
6
−→P¦A¦ = 1−
5
6
6
6
≈0,6651
P¦B
/
¦ =
5
12
6
12
+
12 5
11
6
12
−→P¦B¦ = 1−
17 5
11
6
12
≈0,6187
2.6 (a) p
1
=
10
10
3
= 0,001; p
2
=
(
3
2
)(10)
2
10
3
= 0,027; p
3
=
(10)
3
10
3
= 0,072. (b) p
1
=
10
10
4
=
0,001; p
2
=
(
4
2
)(
10
2
)
10
4
= 0,027
2
; p
3
=
(
4
2
)(10)
3
10
4
= 0,432; p
4
=
(10)
4
10
4
= 0,504.
2.7 p
r
=
(10)
r
10
r
; p
10
=
10!
10
10


2π10
10+
1
2 e
−10
10
10
=

20π
e
10
≈0,0003599. Su verdadero valor
es ≈0,0003629
2.8 (a) P¦A¦ =
_
9
10
_
k
; (b) P¦B¦ =
_
9
10
_
k
; (c) P¦AB¦ =
_
8
10
_
k
; (d) P¦A ∪B¦ =
P¦A¦+P¦B¦−P¦AB¦ = 2
_
9
10
_
k

_
8
10
_
k
.
2
El autor da 0,063 para esta probabilidad.
Solutions 33
2.9 Tendremos una celda vac´ıa que se puede elegir de
_
n
1
_
= n maneras, una celda
doblemente ocupada que se puede elegir de
_
n−1
1
_
= n −1 maneras, por tanto, la
celda vac´ıa y la doblemente ocupada se pueden elegir de n(n −1) maneras siendo
todas las dem´ as simplemente ocupadas. Podemos elegir
_
n
2
_
pares distintos de bolas
para la celda doblemente ocupada, n −2 bolas para la primera celda simplemente
ocupada, n −3 para la segunda celda simplemente ocupada y una sola bola para
la ´ ultima celda simplemente ocupada. Como el n´ umero de casos posibles es n
n
, la
probabilidad pedida es
n(n−1)
_
n
2
_
(n−2)(n−3) 1
n
n
=
_
n
2
_
n!
n
n
.
2.10 La probabilidad pedida es
9
(
12
8
)
=
9
495
≈ 0,0182. Para saber si esta probabili-
dad es indicativa de no aleatoriedad, compar´ emosla con la probabilidad de las otras
posibles disposiciones
• 3 plazas vac´ıas adyacentes y 1 separada (3+1). La probabilidad es
72
495

0,1455.
• 2 pares de plazas adyacentes en cada par y separados los pares (2+2).
36
495

0,0727.
• 2 plazas adyacentes y 2 plazas separadas (2+1+1).
252
495
≈0,5091.
• 4 plazas separadas (1+1+1+1).
126
495
≈0,2545.
A falta de mejor criterio, cabe suponer que la disposici´ on cuya probabilidad pregunta
el problema no es casual.
2.11 El espacio muestral consta de n-tuplas ordenadas sin que se repita ninguna de
sus componentes, su n´ umero es n!. Sea A
k
donde k = 1, 2,. . . , n el suceso de que la
llave abre al k-´ esimo intento. La probabilidad es
ninguna de estas llaves abre
¸ .. ¸
(n−1) (n−1−(k −1) +1)
esta es la que abre
¸..¸
1
las dem´ as llaves
¸ .. ¸
(n−k) 1
n!
=
(n−1)!
n!
=
1
n
2.12 Consideraremos el espacio muestral formado por n-uplas donde cada compo-
nente es a su vez un par, lo que equivale a una 2n-upla.
El n´ umero de casos posibles es
[2n(2n−1)][(2n−2)(2n−3)] [2 1] = (2n)!
(a) Suponemos que cada trozo (largo o corto) debe unirse con el trozo al que origi-
nalmente estaba unido, el n´ umero de casos favorables es
[2n 1][(2n−2) 1] [2 1] = 2
n
n!
con lo que la probabilidad es
2
n
n!
(2n)!
.
34 Solutions
(b) El n´ umero de casos favorables es
[2n n][(2n−2) (n−1)] [2 1] = 2
n
(n!)
2
y la probabilidad
2
n
(n!)
2
(2n)!
.
2.13 El n´ umero de casos posibles es de distribuir 12 bolas (multas) en 7 cajas (d´ıas),
i. e. 7
12
. El n´ umero de casos favorables el de distribuir 12 bolas en dos cajas, i. e.
2
12
. Por tanto, la probabilidad es
_
2
7
_
12
≈3,010
−7
. Lo que justifica el alquiler para
martes o jueves.
2.14 Similar al anterior. El n´ umero de casos favorables es ahora 6
12
y la probabilidad
_
6
7
_
12
≈0,1573. Suficiente grande para extraer conclusiones.
2.15
_
90
10
_
_
100
10
_ ≈0,3305
2.16
1
5
25

25!
5!5!5!5!5!
=
25!
5
25
(5!)
5
≈0,0021
2.17
Puede ser . . . A. . . B. . . o . . . B. . . A. . .
ambas con el mismo n´ umero de distribuciones. Fij´ emonos en el primer tipo. Adem´ as
tenemos n−r −1 maneras de situar a A y B, a saber:
A
r
¸ .. ¸
. . . B. . . , A
r
¸ .. ¸
. . . B. . . , . . . ,
n−r−2
¸ .. ¸
. . . A
r
¸ .. ¸
. . . B.
Una de ellas proporciona (n −2)
r
maneras de elegir ordenadamente los r hombres
entre A y B y ordenar fuera de esa posici´ on a los restantes de (n −2 −r)! maneras.
La probabilidad es:
2(n−r −1)(n−2)
r
(n−2−r)!
n!
=
2(n−r −1)(n−2)!
n!
=
2(n−r −1)
n(n−1)
Cuando est´ an en un anillo, situamos a A en la parte horizontal derecha y distribuimos
en sentido antihorario, con lo que queda fijado B (ver Fig. 5.1) La probabilidad es
(n−2)
r
(n−r −2)!
(n−1)!
=
(n−2)!
(n−1)!
=
1
n−1
.
Independiente de r.
2.18 El n´ umero de casos posibles es el mismo para ambos 6
6
.
Solutions 35
A
B
n −r −2
r
Fig. 5.1.
1. Los casos favorables son 6
3
y la probabilidad
6
3
6
6
=
1
216
.
2. • Con las tres caras iguales hay 6 1.
• con dos caras iguales y la otra distinta hay 3 6 5 3.
• Con las tres caras distintas hay 6 5 4 3 2.
La probabilidad es
61+3653+65432
6
6
=
996
46656
=
83
3888
.
2.19 Las probabilidades son 1−
5
4
6
4
≈0,5177 y 1−
35
24
36
24
≈0,4914.
2.20 (a)
(n−N)
r
(n)
r
. (i)
(100−3)
3
(100)
3
=≈ 0,9118, (ii)
(100−10)
10
(100)
10
=≈ 0,3305. (b)
(n−N)
r
n
r
=
_
1−
N
n
_
r
. (i)
_
1−
3
100
_
3
≈0,9127, (ii)
_
1−
10
100
_
10
≈0,3487.
2.21 Los casos posibles son:
_
n
N
_
N
_
n
N
_
N
_
n
N
_
N
_
n
N
_
= N
r−1
_
n
N
_
r
(a) Los casos favorables son:
_
n
N
_
N
_
n−1
N
_
N
_
n−1
N
_
N
_
n−1
N
_
=
_
n
N
_
N
r−1
_
n−1
N
_
r−1
,
la probabilidad es:
_
n
N
_
N
r−1
_
n−1
N
_
r−1
N
r−1
_
n
N
_
r
=
_
_
n−1
N
_
_
n
N
_
_
r−1
=
_
(n−1)
N
(n)
N
_
r−1
=
_
n−N
n
_
r−1
=
_
1−
N
n
_
r−1
(b) Los casos favorables son:
_
n
N
_
N
_
n−N
N
_
N
_
n−2N
N
_
N
_
n−(r −1)N
N
_
=
N
r−1
(N!)
r
(n)
rN
,
la probabilidad es:
N
r−1
(N!)
r
(n)
rN
N
r−1
_
n
N
_
r
=
(n)
rN
((n)
N
)
r
36 Solutions
2.22 Existe una diferencia fundamental entre el anterior problema y este, a saber:
en el anterior problema aunque a una persona se la “avise” varias veces al mismo
tiempo, ella solo “avisa” una vez a un subconjunto de N personas. En cambio en este
problema, recibir varios “avisos” (cartas) al mismo tiempo, obliga a “avisar” (enviar
cartas) a un subconjunto de N (N = 2, en este problema) tantas veces como “avisos”
simult´ aneos tiene. Por tanto, el n´ umero de casos posibles es:
2
1−1
¸..¸
_
n
2
_

2
2−1
¸ .. ¸
_
n
2
__
n
2
_

2
3−1
¸ .. ¸
_
n
2
__
n
2
__
n
2
__
n
2
_

2
r−1
¸ .. ¸
_
n
2
__
n
2
_

_
n
2
_
=
_
n
2
_

_
n
2
_
2

_
n
2
_
4

_
n
2
_
2
r−1
=
_
n
2
_
1+2+4++2
r−1
.
Por otra parte el n´ umero de los casos favorables es:
_
n
2
_

_
n−1
2
_
2

_
n−1
2
_
4

_
n−1
2
_
2
r−1
=
_
n
2
__
n−1
2
_
2+4++2
r−1
.
La probabilidad es:
_
n
2
__
n−1
2
_
2+4++2
r−1
_
n
2
_
1+2+4++2
r−1
=
_
n−2
n
_
2+4++2
r−1
=
_
1−
2
n
_
2
r
−2
Para la mediana, r, tenemos:
_
1−
2
n
_
2
r
−2
=
1
2
,
tomando logaritmos y considerando que ln(1−x) ≈−x para x peque˜ no:
(2
r
−2)ln
_
1−
2
n
_
=−ln2,
obtenemos:
(2
r
−2)
2
n
= ln2 ⇐⇒
2
r+1
n

4
n
= ln2,
como n es grande, despreciamos el segundo t´ ermino del primer miembro, con lo que:
2
r+1
= nln2
2.23 Hay 4 bolas (platos) y 4 cajas (chicas), el n´ umero total de distibuciones es de
4
4
=256. Si la primera caja corresponde a la chica m´ as joven, podemos distribuir tres
platos en ella y otro en las dem´ as de
_
4
3
_
3 = 12 maneras lo que da una probabilidad
Solutions 37
de
12
256
=
3
64
. Y hay
_
4
3
_
4 3 = 48 de distribuir tres platos en una caja y el otro en
otra, lo que da una probabilidad de
48
256
=
3
16
.
2.24 (a) Es la distribuci´ on de 12 bolas (cumplea˜ nos) en 12 cajas (meses). La proba-
bilidad es
12!
12
12
≈0,000053723.
(b) La probabilidad es
(
12
2
)∑
5
k=1
(
6
k
)
12
6
=
(
12
2
)(2
6
−2)
12
6
≈0,001370.
2.25
_
12
6
_

_
30
2
__
28
2
_

_
20
2
__
18
3
__
15
3
_

_
3
3
_
12
30
=
30!
_
12
6
_
12
30
(2!3!)
6
= 0,0003457. . .
2.26 (a)
2
2r
(
n
2r
)
(
2n
2r
)
, (b)
(
n
1
)2
2r−2
(
n−1
2r−2
)
(
2n
2r
)
, (c)
(
n
2
)2
2r−4
(
n−2
2r−4
)
(
2n
2r
)
.
2.27
(
N−3
r−1
)
(
N−1
r−1
)
.
2.28 p =
(
2N
N
)
2
(
4N
2N
)
=
_

2π(2N)
2N+
1
2 e
−2N
_
4
_

2πN
N+
1
2 e
−N
_
4

2π(4N)
4N+
1
2 e
−4N
=
_
2
πN
.
2.29 p =
(
4
k
)(
48
13−k
)(
39
13
)(
26
13
)(
13
13
)
(
52
13
)(
39
13
)(
26
13
)(
13
13
)
=
(
4
k
)(
48
13−k
)
(
52
13
)
.
2.30
(
13
m
)(
39
13−m
)(
13−m
n
)(
26+m
13−n
)(
26
13
)(
13
13
)
(
52
13
)(
39
13
)(
26
13
)(
13
13
)
=
(
13
m
)(
39
13−m
)(
13−m
n
)(
26+m
13−n
)
(
52
13
)(
39
13
)
.
2.31
p
k
=

k
i=0
_
4
i
__
4−i
k−i
__
48
13−i
__
35+i
13−k+i
_
_
52
13
__
39
13
_ =
_
4
k
__
48
26−k
_
_
52
26
_ .
Donde hemos usado la identidad:
k

i=0
_
13
i
__
13
k −i
_
=
_
26
k
_
.
2.32 Supongamos que tenemos n cajas y que la caja i contiene a
i
bolas rojas y b
i
bolas negras donde:
a
1
+a
2
+ +a
n
= a, b
1
+b
2
+ +b
n
= b.
La probabilidad de esta distribuci ´ on es:
38 Solutions
p(a
1
, b
1
; a
2
, b
2
; . . . ; a
n
, b
n
)
=
_
a
a
1
__
b
b
1
_

_
a−a
1
a
2
__
b−b
1
b
2
_

_
a−a
1
−a
2
−−a
n−1
a
n
__
b−b
1
−b
2
−−b
n−1
b
n
_
_
a+b
a
1
+b
1
_

_
a−a
1
+b−b
1
a
2
+b
2
_

_
a−a
1
−a
2
−−a
n−1
+b−b
1
−b
2
−−b
n−1
a
n
+b
n
_
=
_
a
1
+b
1
a
1
__
a
2
+b
2
a
2
_

_
a
n
+b
n
a
n
_
_
a+b
a
_
Para este problema, esto se traduce en la f´ ormula:
P(a, b, c, d) =
_
13
a
__
13
b
__
13
c
__
13
d
_
_
52
13
_
.
2.33 (a) p(5, 4, 3, 1) =
(
13
5
)(
13
4
)(
13
3
)(
13
1
)
(
52
13
)
=0,0053877. . .; (b) p(4, 4, 4, 1) =
(
13
4
)(
13
4
)(
13
4
)(
13
1
)
(
52
13
)
=
0,0074830. . .; (c) p(4, 4, 3, 2) =
(
13
4
)(
13
4
)(
13
3
)(
13
2
)
(
52
13
)
= 0,017959. . ..
2.34 q(a, b, c, d) =
(
13
a
)(
13
b
)(
13
c
)(
13
d
)
(
52
13
)
, no se reduce al problema de distribuir trece bolas
en cuatro cajas pues si a = b = c = 1, d = 10, tenemos q(1, 1, 1, 10) =
131313(
13
10
)
(
52
13
)

9,89 10
−7
y para la distribuci ´ on de las trece bolas en cuatro cajas de manera que
en la primera, segunda y tercera tenga una sola bola y la cuarta tenga diez, la proba-
bilidad ser´ıa
131211
4
13
≈2,5610
−5
.
2.35 p
k
(r) =
(
4
k
)(
48
r−k
)
(
52
r
)
. Por otra parte,
p
4
(52−r) =
_
4
4
__
48
48−r
_
_
52
52−r
_ =
_
4
0
__
48
r
_
_
52
r
_ = p
0
(r),
donde se ha hecho uso de la identidad
_
n
n−j
_
=
_
n
j
_
.
Podr´ıamos demostrarlo por un argumento combinatorio. Ambas probabilidades
son iguales pues por cada caso favorable para p
0
(r), i. e, subconjunto de la baraja de
r elementos sin ning´ un as, podemos considerar su complementario, i. e, subconjunto
de la baraja con 52 −r con los cuatro ases y reciprocamente, es decir, hay tantos
casos favorables para una probabilidad como para la otra, lo que prueba su igualdad.
2.36 Si k = 1, . . . , 4 y r = 1, . . . , 52, tenemos:
f
k
(r) =
_
r−1
k−1
__
4
_
k
_
48
_
r−k
_
52
_
r
=
_
r−1
k−1
__
52−r
4−k
_
_
52
4
_ .
Concretando:
Solutions 39
f
1
(r) =
1
_
52
4
_
(52−r)(51−r)(50−r)
6
,
f
2
(r) =
1
_
52
4
_
(52−r)(51−r)(r −1)
4
,
f
3
(r) =
1
_
52
4
_
(52−r)(r −1)(r −2)
4
,
f
4
(r) =
1
_
52
4
_
(r −1)(r −2)(r −3)
6
.
Multiplicando los factores de la segunda fracci´ on, podemos expresarlo:
f
k
(r) =
1
_
52
4
_ ¦A
k
r
3
+B
k
r
2
+C
k
r +D
k
¦,
los coeficientes del segundo factor estan tabulados en la Tab. 5.1.
k A
k
B
k
C
k
D
k
1 −
1
6
51
2

3901
3
22100
2
1
2
−52
2755
2
−1326
3 −
1
2
55
2
−79 52
4
1
6
−1
11
6
−1
Table 5.1. Coeficientes de f
k
(r).
Para sumar probabilidades usar las siguientes identidades:
r

i=1
1 = r
r

i=1
i
2
=
r(r +1)(2r +1)
6
r

i=1
i =
r(r +1)
2
r

i=1
i
3
=
r
2
(r +1)
2
4
Sumemos las probabilidades:
r

i=1
f
k
(i) =
1
_
52
4
_
_
A
k
r
2
(r +1)
2
4
+B
k
r(r +1)(2r +1)
6
+C
k
r(r +1)
2
+D
k
r
_
=
r
_
52
4
_
_
α
k
r
3

k
r
2

k
r +δ
k
_
.
Podemos tabular los valores de las α’s, β’s, γ’s y δ’s, en la Tab. 5.2.
40 Solutions
k α
k
β
k
γ
k
δ
k
1 −
1
24
101
12

15299
24
257449
12
2
1
8

205
12
5303
8

7751
12
3 −
1
8
107
12

487
8
205
12
4
1
24

1
4
11
24

1
4
Table 5.2. ∑
r
i=1
f
k
(i) =
r
(
52
4
)
_
α
k
r
3

k
r
2

k
r +δ
k
_
.
Podemos conjeturar que las medianas se hallan igualmente espaciadas alrededor
de los valores 10, 20, 30 y 40 para k igual a 1, 2, 3 y 4 respectivamente. La ´ ultima
f´ ormula es de gran ayuda para calcularlas pues evita c´ alculos largos y tediosos. Por
ejemplo, para k = 2, tenemos:
20

i=1
f
2
(i) =
2
_
52
4
_
_
1
8
20
3

205
12
20
2
+
5303
8
20−
7751
12
_
≈0.5007,
pero
19

i=1
f
2
(i) =
2
_
52
4
_
_
1
8
19
3

205
12
19
2
+
5303
8
19−
7751
12
_
≈0.4659.
La mediana es 20, nuestra conjetura es correcta. Para los otros valores de k se procede
de manera similar.
No obstante, podemos escribir un programa en C que nos permita tabular los
sumatorios de f
k
. Este programa es:
#include <stdio.h>
#include <conio.h>
int main(void)
¦
double sum 1 = 0.0;
double sum 2 = 0.0;
double sum 3 = 0.0;
double sum 4 = 0.0;
int r;
printf("\n\t r\t sum f 1\t sum f 2\t sum f 3\t sum f 4");
for(r = 1; r < 53; r++)
¦
sum 1 += (52-r)
*
(51-r)
*
(50-r)/1624350.0;
sum 2 += (52-r)
*
(51-r)
*
(r-1)/541450.0;
Solutions 41
sum 3 += (52-r)
*
(r-1)
*
(r-2)/541450.0;
sum 4 += (r-1)
*
(r-2)
*
(r-3)/1624350.0;
printf("\n\t %d\t %lf\t %lf\t %lf\t %lf", r, sum 1, sum 2,
sum 3, sum 4);
¦
getch();
return 0;
¦
La salida de este programa es:
r sum f 1 sum f 2 sum f 3 sum f 4
1 0.076923 0.000000 0.000000 0.000000
2 0.149321 0.004525 0.000000 0.000000
3 0.217376 0.013213 0.000181 0.000000
4 0.281263 0.025712 0.000713 0.000004
5 0.341158 0.041684 0.001755 0.000018
6 0.397230 0.060800 0.003454 0.000055
7 0.449644 0.082741 0.005947 0.000129
8 0.498565 0.107201 0.009360 0.000259
9 0.544150 0.133885 0.013807 0.000465
10 0.586555 0.162508 0.019392 0.000776
11 0.625930 0.192797 0.026207 0.001219
12 0.662425 0.224490 0.034334 0.001828
13 0.696182 0.257335 0.043842 0.002641
14 0.727343 0.291092 0.054790 0.003697
15 0.756044 0.325533 0.067227 0.005042
16 0.782418 0.360440 0.081189 0.006723
17 0.806593 0.395604 0.096703 0.008791
18 0.828697 0.430832 0.113783 0.011303
19 0.848850 0.465938 0.132433 0.014317
20 0.867171 0.500748 0.152646 0.017896
21 0.883775 0.535100 0.174402 0.022107
22 0.898772 0.568843 0.197673 0.027020
23 0.912269 0.601836 0.222418 0.032708
24 0.924370 0.633950 0.248584 0.039250
25 0.935174 0.665066 0.276110 0.046726
26 0.944778 0.695078 0.304922 0.055222
27 0.953274 0.723890 0.334934 0.064826
28 0.960750 0.751416 0.366050 0.075630
29 0.967292 0.777582 0.398164 0.087731
30 0.972980 0.802327 0.431157 0.101228
31 0.977893 0.825598 0.464900 0.116225
42 Solutions
32 0.982104 0.847354 0.499252 0.132829
33 0.985683 0.867567 0.534062 0.151150
34 0.988697 0.886217 0.569168 0.171303
35 0.991209 0.903297 0.604396 0.193407
36 0.993277 0.918811 0.639560 0.217582
37 0.994958 0.932773 0.674467 0.243956
38 0.996303 0.945210 0.708908 0.272657
39 0.997359 0.956158 0.742665 0.303818
40 0.998172 0.965666 0.775510 0.337575
41 0.998781 0.973793 0.807203 0.374070
42 0.999224 0.980608 0.837492 0.413445
43 0.999535 0.986193 0.866115 0.455850
44 0.999741 0.990640 0.892799 0.501435
45 0.999871 0.994053 0.917259 0.550356
46 0.999945 0.996546 0.939200 0.602770
47 0.999982 0.998245 0.958316 0.658842
48 0.999996 0.999287 0.974288 0.718737
49 1.000000 0.999819 0.986787 0.782624
50 1.000000 1.000000 0.995475 0.850679
51 1.000000 1.000000 1.000000 0.923077
52 1.000000 1.000000 1.000000 1.000000
Inspeccionando esta tabla, las medianas son 9 para k = 1, 20 para k = 2, 33 para
k = 3 y 44 para k = 4.
2.37 (a)
(
4
k
)(
48
r−k
)(
4−k
k
)(
48−r+k
r−k
)
(
52
r
)(
52−r
r
)
=
(
52−2r
4−2k
)(
r
k
)
2
(
52
4
)
, k ≤ 2. (b)
_
(
4
k
)(
48
r−k
)
(
52
r
)
_
2
, k ≤ 4. Es
evidente.
2.38 (a) Es evidente. (b)
Solutions 43
lim
N→∞
_
N
r
1
__
N
r
2
_

_
N
r
n
_
_
nN
r
_ = lim
N→∞
N!
r
1
!(N−r
1
)!

N!
r
2
!(N−r
2
)!

N!
r
n
!(N−r
n
)!
(nN)!
r!(nN−r)!
=
r!
r
1
!r
2
! r
n
!

lim
N→∞
N(N−1) (N−r
1
+1) N(N−1) (N−r
2
+1) N(N−1) (N−r
n
+1)
nN(nN−1) (nN−r +1)
=
r!
r
1
!r
2
! r
n
!

lim
N→∞
N
r
1
_
1−
1
N
_

_
1−
r
1
−1
N
_
N
r
2
_
1−
1
N
_

_
1−
r
2
−1
N
_
N
r
n
_
1−
1
N
_

_
1−
r
n
−1
N
_
N
r
n
_
n−
1
N
_

_
n−
r−1
N
_
=
r!
r
1
!r
2
! r
n
!

1
n
r
2.39 Es tanto como preguntar por el n´ umero de soluciones enteras no negativas del
sistema:
a
1
+a
2
+ +a
n
= r
1
b
1
+b
2
+ +b
n
= r
2
_
que es A
r
1
,n
A
r
2
,n
=
_
r
1
+n−1
r
1
__
r
2
+n−1
r
2
_
.
2.40 Estanto como preguntar por el n´ umero de soluciones del sistema:
a
1
+a
2
+ +a
6
= r
1
b
1
+b
2
= r
2
_
i.e. A
r1,6
A
r
2
,2
=
_
r
1
+6−1
r
1
__
r
2
+2−1
r
2
_
=
_
r
1
+5
5
__
r
2
+1
1
_
= (r
2
+1)
_
r
1
+5
5
_
.
2.41
_
r
1
+r
2
+r
3
r
1
__
r
2
+r
3
r
2
__
r
3
r
3
_
=
(r
1
+r
2
+r
3
)!
r
1
!r
2
!r
3
!
.
2.42 Hay en esencia cuatro configuraciones distintas, si ♠representa un as cualquiera:

a
1
¸ .. ¸

a
2
¸ .. ¸

a
3
¸ .. ¸


b
1
¸ .. ¸

b
2
¸ .. ¸

b
3
¸ .. ¸

b
4
¸ .. ¸

b
1
¸ .. ¸

b
2
¸ .. ¸

b
3
¸ .. ¸

b
4
¸ .. ¸

c
1
¸ .. ¸

c
2
¸ .. ¸

c
3
¸ .. ¸

c
4
¸ .. ¸

c
5
¸ .. ¸

El n´ umero de configuraciones distintas es igual al n´ umero de soluciones positivas
de las ecuaciones:
44 Solutions
a
1
+a
2
+a
3
= 48
b
1
+b
2
+b
3
+b
4
= 48 (esta por partida doble)
c
1
+c
2
+c
3
+c
4
+c
5
= 48
que es igual a:
_
47
2
_
+2
_
47
3
_
+
_
47
4
_
=
_
_
47
2
_
+
_
47
3
_
_
+
_
_
47
3
_
+
_
47
4
_
_
=
_
48
3
_
+
_
48
4
_
=
_
49
4
_
.
El n´ umero de casos favorables es, por tanto,
_
49
4
_
4!48! y la probabilidad:
_
49
4
_
4!48!
52
=
_
49
_
4
_
52
_
4
≈0.7826
2.43 En la elecci ´ on de los pisos distinguimos entre septuplemente, sextuplemente,
quintuplemente, cuadruplemente, triplemente, doblemente , simplemente ocupados
y vac´ıos. Por ejemplo la probabilidad correspondiente a (3, 2, 2), tendr´ıamos
_
10
1
_
maneras de elegir uno triplemente ocupado por
_
9
2
_
maneras de elegir dos pisos
doblemente ocupados por
_
7
7
_
de elegir siete pisos vac´ıos, i.e.
_
10
1
__
9
2
__
7
7
_
=
10!
1!2!7!
.
En cuanto a las personas
_
7
3
_
maneras de elegir tres personas que vayan al piso triple-
mente ocupado por
_
4
2
_
maneras de elegir a otras dos personas que vayan al primer
piso doblemente ocupado por
_
2
2
_
maneras de elegir a otras dos personas que vayan
al segundo piso doblemente ocupado, i.e.
_
7
3
__
4
2
__
2
2
_
=
7!
3!2!2!
. En total,
10!
1!2!7!

7!
3!2!2!
.
Hay 10
−7
distribuciones de siete bolas (pasajeros) en diez celdas (pisos). La dis-
tribuci ´ on de probabilidades es:
Solutions 45
p
(7)
=
10!
1!9!

7!
7!
10
−7
= 0.000001
p
(6,1)
=
10!
1!1!8!

7!
6!1!
10
−7
= 0.000063
p
(5,2)
=
10!
1!1!8!

7!
5!2!
10
−7
= 0.000189
p
(5,1,1)
=
10!
1!2!7!

7!
5!1!1!
10
−7
= 0.001512
p
(4,3)
=
10!
1!1!8!

7!
4!3!
10
−7
= 0.000315
p
(4,2,1)
=
10!
1!1!1!7!

7!
4!2!1!
10
−7
= 0.00756
p
(4,1,1,1)
=
10!
1!3!6!

7!
4!1!1!1!
10
−7
= 0.01764
p
(3,3,1)
=
10!
2!1!7!

7!
3!3!1!
10
−7
= 0.00504
p
(3,2,2)
=
10!
1!2!7!

7!
3!2!2!
10
−7
= 0.00756
p
(3,2,1,1)
=
10!
1!1!2!6!

7!
3!2!1!1!
10
−7
= 0.10584
p
(3,1,1,1,1)
=
10!
1!4!5!

7!
3!1!1!1!1!
10
−7
= 0.10584
p
(2,2,2,1)
=
10!
3!1!6!

7!
2!2!2!1!
10
−7
= 0.05292
p
(2,2,1,1,1)
=
10!
2!3!5!

7!
2!2!1!1!1!
10
−7
= 0.31752
p
(2,1,1,1,1,1)
=
10!
1!5!4!

7!
2!1!1!1!1!1!
10
−7
= 0.31752
p
(1,1,1,1,1,1,1)
=
10!
7!3!

7!
1!1!1!1!1!1!1!
10
−7
= 0.06048
2.44 Consideremos el problema de los n´ umeros de ocupaci ´ on de r bolas en n celdas:
(
α
0
¸ .. ¸
0, . . . , 0,
α
1
¸ .. ¸
1, . . . , 1,
α
2
¸ .. ¸
2, . . . , 2, . . . ,
α
r
¸ .. ¸
r, . . . , r),
donde α
i
indica el n´ umero de celdas con i bolas, i = 0, 1, 2, . . . , r. Tenemos las si-
guientes relaciones:
α
0

1

2

3
+ +α
r
= n

1
+2α
2
+3α
3
+ +rα
r
= r
_
La probabilidad correspondiente es:
46 Solutions
P
_
(
α
0
¸ .. ¸
0, . . . , 0,
α
1
¸ .. ¸
1, . . . , 1,
α
2
¸ .. ¸
2, . . . , 2, . . . ,
α
r
¸ .. ¸
r, . . . , r)
_
=
1
n
r

n!
α
0

1

2

3
! α
r
!

r!
(1!)
α
1
(2!)
α
2
(3!)
α
3
(r!)
α
r
.
Por ejemplo, 18 cumplea˜ nos simples y 2 cumplea˜ nos dobles, n = 365 y r = 22:
P
_
(
345
¸ .. ¸
0, . . . , 0,
18
¸ .. ¸
1, . . . , 1, 2, 2)
_
=
1
365
22

365!
345!18!2!

22!
(1!)
18
(2!)
2
≈0.09695
2.45
(a)
_
4
1
_
_
52
5
_ = 0.000001539 (e)
_
13
1
__
4
3
__
12
2
__
4
1
__
4
1
_
_
52
5
_ = 0.02113
(b)
_
13
1
__
4
4
__
12
1
__
4
1
_
_
52
5
_ = 0.0002401 (f )
_
13
2
__
4
2
__
4
2
__
11
1
__
4
1
_
_
52
5
_ = 0.04754
(c)
_
13
1
__
4
2
__
12
1
__
4
3
_
_
52
5
_ = 0.001441 (g)
_
13
1
__
4
2
__
12
3
__
4
1
__
4
1
__
4
1
_
_
52
5
_ = 0.4226
(d)
9
_
4
1
__
4
1
__
4
1
__
4
1
__
4
1
_
_
52
5
_ = 0.003546
2.46
_
r
k
_
(np)
k
(nq)
r−k
n
r
=
_
r
k
_
p
k
q
r−k
.
2.47 Partimos de (6.2)
q
k
=
_
r
k
_
_
n−r
n
1
−k
_
_
n
n
1
_
=
_
r
k
_

(n−r)!
(n
1
−k)!(n−n
1
−r +k)!

n
1
!(n−n
1
)!
n!
=
_
r
k
_
(n−r)!(np)!(n−np)!
n!(np−k)!(n−np−r +k)!
=
_
r
k
_
(n−r)!(np)!(nq)!
n!(np−k)!(nq−(r −k))!
=
_
r
k
_
np(np−1) (np−k +1) nq(nq−1)(nq−(r −k) +1)
n(n−1) (n−r +1)
=
_
r
k
_
n
k
p
_
p−
1
n
_

_
p−
k−1
n
_
n
r−k
q
_
q−
1
n
_

_
q−
(r−k)−1
n
_
n
r
_
1−
1
n
__
1−
2
n
_

_
1−
r−1
n
_
=
_
r
k
_
p
_
p−
1
n
_

_
p−
k−1
n
_
q
_
q−
1
n
_

_
q−
(r−k)−1
n
_
_
1−
1
n
__
1−
2
n
_

_
1−
r−1
n
_
Solutions 47
Como
_
1−
1
n
__
1−
2
n
_

_
1−
r−1
n
_
< 1, tenemos
q
k
>
_
r
k
_
p
_
p−
1
n
_

_
p−
k −1
n
_
q
_
q−
1
n
_

_
q−
(r −k) −1
n
_
teniendo en cuenta que
i
n
<
k
n
i = 0, 1, . . . , k −1,
j
n
<
r −k
n
j = 0, 1, . . . , r −k −1,
tenemos
p−
i
n
> p−
k
n
, q−
j
n
> q−
r −k
n
.
de donde
p
_
p−
1
n
_

_
p−
k −1
n
_
>
_
p−
k
n
_
k
,
q
_
q−
1
n
_

_
1−
r −k −1
n
_
>
_
q−
r −k
n
_
r−k
.
lo que conduce a la primera parte de la desigualdad a probar
q
k
>
_
r
k
__
p−
k
n
_
k
_
q−
r −k
n
_
r−k
.
Para probar la segunda parte de la desigualdad, partimos de
q
k
=
_
r
k
_
p
k
_
1−
1
pn
__
1−
2
pn
_

_
1−
k−1
pn
_
1
_
1−
1
n
__
1−
2
n
_

_
1−
k−1
n
_

q
r−k
_
1−
1
qn
__
1−
2
qn
_

_
1−
r−k−1
qn
_
_
1−
k
n
__
1−
k+1
n
__
1−
k+2
n
_

_
1−
r−1
n
_
de donde
q
k
<
_
r
k
_
p
k
q
r−k

1
_
1−
1
n
__
1−
2
n
_

_
1−
r−1
n
_.
Si i <r, tenemos 1−i/n >1−r/n, por lo que
_
1−
k
n
__
1−
k+1
n
__
1−
k+2
n
_

_
1−
r−1
n
_
>
_
1−
r
n
_
r−1
>
_
1−
r
n
_
r
, con lo que el segundo factor
1
_
1−
1
n
__
1−
2
n
_

_
1−
r−1
n
_ <
_
1−
r
n
_
−r
,
y demostramos la segunda parte
48 Solutions
q
k
<
_
r
k
_
p
k
q
r−k
_
1−
r
n
_
−r
.
2.48 Trivial.
2.49
u
r
=
_
n−N
r−N
_
_
n
r
_ =
(n−N)(n−N−1)(n−r+1)
(r−N)!
n(n−1)(n−r+1)
r!
=
r(r −1) (r −N+1)
n(n−1) (n−N+1)
=
_
1−
1
r
_

_
1−
N−1
r
_
_
1−
1
n
_

_
1−
N−1
n
_
_
r
n
_
N
→p
N
2.50 El entero ν tal que 0 ≤ν ≤r buscado debe cumplir
p
ν−1
p
ν
≤1
p
ν
p
ν+1
> 1
_
¸
_
¸
_
⇐⇒
_
r
ν−1
_
1
n
ν−1
_
1−
1
n
_
r−ν+1
_
r
ν
_
1
n
ν
_
1−
1
n
_
r−ν
≤1
_
r
ν
_
1
n
ν
_
1−
1
n
_
r−ν
_
r
ν+1
_
1
n
ν+1
_
1−
1
n
_
r−ν−1
> 1
_
¸
¸
¸
¸
¸
_
¸
¸
¸
¸
¸
_
⇐⇒
νn
r −ν +1
_
1−
1
n
_
≤1
(ν +1)n
r −ν
_
1−
1
n
_
> 1
_
¸
¸
_
¸
¸
_
⇐⇒
ν
r −ν +1
(n−1) ≤1
ν +1
r −ν
(n−1) > 1
_
¸
_
¸
_
⇐⇒
ν(n−1) ≤r −ν +1
(ν +1)(n−1) > r −ν
_
⇐⇒
nν ≤r +1
nν > r −n+1
_
⇐⇒
r −n+1
n
< ν ≤
r +1
n
2.51
p
k
=
_
r
k
_
1
n
k
_
1−
1
n
_
r−k
=
1
k!
r (r −1) . . . (r −k +1)
n n . . . n
_
_
1+
1
−n
_
−n
_

r−k
n
=
1
k!
λn
n

λn−1
n
. . .
λn−k +1
n
_
_
1+
1
−n
_
−n
_

λn−k
n

1
k!
λ
k
e
−λ
=
e
−λ
λ
k
k!
2.52 Pasemos a demostrar la f´ ormula (2.6) por inducci ´ on sobre n.
Solutions 49
. . .
. . .
. . .
. . . . . . . . .
1 2 n n + 1

r
1

A(r −1, n)

r
2

A(r −2, n)

r
k

A(r −k, n)
. . .
Fig. 5.2. La n+1-´ esima celda puede tomar k, k ≥1, bolas de entre r de
_
r
k
_
maneras, dejando
las r −k restantes para repartir, sin que haya ninguna celda vac´ıa, entre las n celdas restantes,
lo cual supone A(r −k, n) maneras distintas, siendo el total
_
r
k
_
A(r −k, n), sumando desde
k = 1 hasta r. Debe entenderse A(r −k, n) = 0 si r −k < n.
• Para n = 1, tenemos
A(r, 1) =
1

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
1
ν
_
(1−ν)
ν
= (−1)
0
_
1
0
_
(1−0)
0
+(−1)
1
_
1
1
_
(1−1)
1
= 1+0 = 1
lo que es cierto.
• Supongamos que se cumple para n−1 y demostr´ emoslo para n
3
.
A(r, n) =
r

k=1
_
r
k
_
A(r −k, n−1)
por la f´ ormula (2.5),
=
r

k=1
_
r
k
_
n−1

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
n−1
ν
_
(n−1−ν)
r−k
hip´ otesis de inducci ´ on,
=
n−1

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
n−1
ν
_
r

k=1
_
r
k
_
(n−1−ν)
r−k
1
k
cambio de orden de sumaci ´ on, f´ ormula del binomio,
3
En la ayuda se supone para n y debemos demostrarlo para n +1, pero en esencia, es lo
mismo.
50 Solutions
=
n−1

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
n−1
ν
_
¦(n−ν)
r
−(n−1−ν)
r
¦
=
n−1

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
n−1
ν
_
(n−ν)
r

n−1

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
n−1
ν
_
(n−(ν +1))
r
efectuemos el cambio de ´ındice µ = ν +1
=
n−1

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
n−1
ν
_
(n−ν)
r

n

µ=1
(−1)
µ−1
_
n−1
µ −1
_
(n−µ)
r
como los ´ındices ν y µ son mudos, los podemos cambiar por la misma letra, por
ejemplo, ν, con lo que obtenemos
=
n−1

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
n−1
ν
_
(n−ν)
r
+
n

ν=1
(−1)
ν
_
n−1
ν −1
_
(n−ν)
r
agrupando convenientemente
= (−1)
0
_
n−1
0
_
n
r
+
n−1

ν=1
(−1)
ν
__
n−1
ν
_
+
_
n−1
ν −1
__
(n−ν)
r
+(−1)
n
_
n−1
n−1
_
0
r
aplicando la f´ ormula (8.6), tenemos
= (−1)
0
_
n
0
_
(n−0)
r
+
n−1

ν=1
_
n
ν
_
(n−ν)
r
+(−1)
n
_
n
n
_
(n−n)
r
=
n

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
n
ν
_
(n−ν)
r
2.53 Las m celdas vac´ıas se pueden elegir de
_
n
m
_
maneras. Las dem´ as celdas n−m
no son vac´ıas y su n´ umero de distribuciones es A(r, n −m), de donde se sigue el
resultado.
2.54 A la vista de la figura 5.3, el n´ umero de distribucines de r +1 bolas en n celdas
de manera que m de ellas resulten vac´ıas es
E
m
(r +1, n) = (n−m)E
m
(r, n) +(m+1)E
m+1
(r, n),
dividiendo por n
−(r+1)
, resulta
E
m
(r +1, n)
n
r+1
=
n−m
n
E
m
(r, n)
n
r
+
m+1
n
E
m+1
(r, n)
n
r
,
i.e.
Solutions 51
. . . . . .
. . . . . .
1 2 m 1 2
1 2
m m+ 1 1 n −m−1
(a)
(b)
n −m
Fig. 5.3. (a) Representa una distribuci´ on con r bolas (negras) y m celdas vac´ıas y una bola
(blanca) que se puede disponer en las celdas no vac´ıas de n−m maneras para dar lugar a una
distribuci´ on de r +1 bolas con m celdas vac´ıas. (b) Representa una distribuci ´ on de r bolas
(negras) y m+1 celdas vac´ıas, la bola blanca se puede disponer en las celdas vac´ıas de m+1
maneras, dando lugar a una distribuci´ o de r +1 bolas con m celdas vac´ıas.
p
m
(r +1, n) =
n−m
n
p
m
(r, n) +
m+1
n
p
m+1
(r, n).
2.55
n−m
n
p
m
(r, n) +
m+1
n
p
m+1
(r, n)
=
n−m
n

1
n
r
_
n
m
_
n−m

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
n−m
ν
_
(n−m−ν)
r
+
m+1
n

1
n
r
_
n
m+1
_
n−m−1

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
n−m−1
ν
_
(n−m−1−ν)
r
=
1
n
r+1

n!
m!(n−m−1)!
_
n−m

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
n−m
ν
_
(n−m−ν)
r
+
n−m−1

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
n−m−1
ν
_
(n−m−1−ν)
r
_
=
1
n
r+1

n!
m!(n−m−1)!
_
n−m

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
n−m
ν
_
(n−m−ν)
r
+
n−m

ν=1
(−1)
ν−1
_
n−m−1
ν −1
_
(n−m−ν)
r
_
=
1
n
r+1
_
n
m
_
(n−m)
n−m

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
n−m−1
ν
_
(n−m−ν)
r
=
1
n
r+1
_
n
m
_
n−m

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
n−m
ν
_
(n−m−ν)
r+1
= p
m
(r +1, n).
Impl´ıcitamente se ha efectuado un cambio de ´ındice, µ = ν +1, se ha utilizado el
hecho de que los ´ındices son mudos y se ha manipulado los coeficientes binomiales.
52 Solutions
Adem´ as, como p
m
(r +1, n) =
1
n
r+1
_
n
m
_
A(r +1, n−m), tenemos que
A(r +1, n−m) =
n−m

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
n−m
ν
_
(n−m−ν)
r+1
,
que se ha obtenido a partir de A(r, n −m) y de A(r, n −m−1), pues son factores
de p
m
(r, n) y de p
m+1
(r, n) respectivamente, usando la f´ ormula (2.7) que, a su vez,
deriva de (2.6). En rigor, habr´ıa que probar la f´ ormula para r = 1, i.e.
A(1, n) =
n

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
n
ν
_
(n−ν)
1
= n
n

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
n−1
ν
_
=
_
1 si n = 1
0 si n ≥2
lo que es cierto. Recordar que
_
n
0
_

_
n
1
_
+ +(−1)
n
_
n
n
_
= 0 si n ≥1.
2.56 Por inducci ´ on sobre m.
• Si m = 1, tenemos
x
1
(r, n) = 1−p
0
(r, n) = 1−
1
n
r
_
n
0
_
n

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
n
ν
_
(n−ν)
r
= 1−
_
n
0
_
n

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
n
ν
_
_
1−
ν
n
_
r
=−
_
n
0
_
n

ν=1
(−1)
ν
_
n
ν
_
_
1−
ν
n
_
r
=
n

ν=1
(−1)
ν−1
_
n
ν
_
_
1−
ν
n
_
r
=
n

ν=1
(−1)
ν−1
n
ν
_
n−1
ν −1
_
_
1−
ν
n
_
r
=
_
n
1
_
n

ν=1
(−1)
ν−1
_
n−1
ν −1
_
_
1−
ν
n
_
r
1
ν
cambio de ´ındice µ = ν −1
=
_
n
1
_
n−1

µ=0
(−1)
µ
_
n−1
µ
__
1−
1+µ
n
_
r
1
1+µ
.
que coincide con (2.9) con m = 1.
• Supongamos que es cierto para m, prob´ emoslo para m+1.
Solutions 53
x
m+1
(r, n) = x
m
(r, n) −p
m
(r, n)
=
_
n
m
_
n−m

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
n−m
ν
__
1−
m+ν
n
_
r
m
m+ν

_
n
m
_
n−m

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
n−m
ν
__
1−
m+ν
n
_
r
=
_
n
m
_
n−m

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
n−m
ν
__
1−
m+ν
n
_
r
_
m
m+ν
−1
_
=
_
n
m
_
n−m

ν=1
(−1)
ν
_
n−m
ν
__
1−
m+ν
n
_
r
−ν
m+ν
=
_
n
m+1
_
m+1
$
$
$
n−m
n−m

ν=1
(−1)
ν−1
_
n−m−1
ν −1
_
($
$
$
n−m)
_
1−
m+ν
n
_
r
1
m+ν
=
_
n
m+1
_
n−m

ν=1
(−1)
ν−1
_
n−(m+1)
ν −1
__
1−
m+ν
n
_
r
m+1
m+ν
cambio de ´ındice µ = ν −1
=
_
n
m+1
_
n−(m+1)

µ=0
(−1)
µ
_
n−(m+1)
µ
__
1−
m+1+µ
n
_
r
m+1
m+1+µ
que coincide con la f´ ormula (2.9) para m+1, con lo que queda demostrada.
2.57 El n´ umero de distribuciones con las N celdas dadas ocupadas es A(k, N), donde
las k bolas se pueden elegir de
_
r
k
_
maneras, las n −N celdas restantes se pueden
ocupar de (n −N)
r−k
maneras. El total de casos favorables es ∑
r
k=0
_
r
k
_
A(k, N)(n −
N)
r−k
y el de casos posibles n
r
. Si denotamos por u(r, n) a la probabilidad pedida,
tenemos
u(r, n) =

r
k=0
_
r
k
_
A(k, N)(n−N)
r−k
n
r
,
teniendo en cuenta la f´ ormula (2.6), en nuestro caso
A(k, N) =
N

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
N
ν
_
(N−ν)
k
.
Combinando ambas expresiones
u(r, n) =
1
n
r
r

k=0
_
r
k
_
N

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
N
ν
_
(N−ν)
k
(n−N)
r−k
transponiendo el orden de sumaci´ on
54 Solutions
=
1
n
r
N

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
N
ν
_
r

k=0
_
r
k
_
(N−ν)
k
(n−N)
r−k
aplicando el teorema del binomio
=
1
n
r
N

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
N
ν
_
(n−ν)
r
=
N

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
N
ν
_
_
1−
ν
n
_
r
2.58 Del problema anterior, podemos expresar
u(r, n) =
N

ν=0
_
N
ν
_
_
_
1+
1

n
ν
_

n
ν
_

ν
n
r

N

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
N
ν
_
e
−ν p
=
N

ν=0
_
N
ν
_
_
−e
−p
_
ν
1
N−ν
=
_
1−e
−p
_
N
donde se ha aplicado el teorema del binomio en el ´ ultimo paso.
2.59 El n´ umero de casos posibles son las combinaciones con repetici ´ on de n ele-
mentos tomados de r en r, i.e.
_
r+n−1
r
_
. Y los casos favorables, una vez tomadas k
bolas en una determinada caja, son las combinaciones con repetici ´ on de n −1 ele-
mentos tomados de r −k en r −k, i.e.
_
r−k+n−1−1
r−k
_
=
_
n+r−k−2
r−k
_
. Y la probabilidad
q
k
=
(
n+r−k−2
r−k
)
(
n+r−1
r
)
.
2.60
q
k+1
q
k
=
(
n+r−k−3
r−k−1
)
(
n+r−k−2
r−k
)
=
r−k
n+r−k−2
. La condici ´ on
q
k+1
q
k
< 1, implica n > 2 para
cualquiera que sea k siempre que n > 2, i.e. q
0
> q
1
> .
2.61
q
k
=
_
n+r−k−2
r−k
_
_
n+r−1
r
_ =
(n−1)
k
¸ .. ¸
r(r −1). . . (r −k +1)
(n+r −1)(n+r −2) (n+r −k)
. ¸¸ .
k
(n+r −k −1)
=
n−1
n+r −1

r
n+r −1

r −1
n+r −2
. . .
r −k +1
n+r −k

1
1+λ

λ
1+λ

λ
1+λ

λ
1+λ
=
λ
k
(1+λ)
k+1
.
2.62 Podemos elegir las m cajas que permanecer´ an vac´ıas de
_
n
m
_
maneras. Las
n−m cajas restantes se pueden configurar de
_
r−1
n−m−1
_
maneras pues su n´ umero es
el mismo que el de soluciones enteras positivas de la ecuaci´ on
Solutions 55
a
1
+a
2
+ +a
n−m
= r (consultar el texto, p´ ag. 38)
2.63 Las j bolas (indistinguibles) se pueden distribuir en las m cajas de
_
m+j−1
j
_
=
_
m+j−1
m−1
_
, maneras; y las r− j bolas restantes en las otras n−m cajas de
_
n−m+r−j−1
r−j
_
maneras. El total de casos favorables (y equiprobables seg´ un la estad´ıstica de Bose-
Einstein) es
_
m+j−1
m−1
__
n−m+r−j−1
r−j
_
. Los casos posibles (y equiprobables seg´ un la es-
tad´ıstica de Bose-Einstein) son
_
n+r−1
r
_
. La probabilidad es
q
j
(m) =
_
m+j−1
m−1
__
n−m+r−j−1
r−j
_
_
n+r−1
r
_ .
2.64
q
j
(m) =
_
m+ j −1
m−1
_
j
¸ .. ¸
r(r −1) (r − j +1)
m
¸ .. ¸
(n−1)(n−2) (n−m)
(n+r −1)(n+r −2) (n+r −(m+ j))
. ¸¸ .
m+j

_
m+ j −1
m−1
_
p
j
(1+ p)
m+j
.
2.65
• k = 2ν. Equivale a repartir r
i
bolas (indistinguibles) en ν cajas, ninguna vac´ıa,
que puede realizarse de
_
r
i
−1
ν−1
_
maneras. Como puede empezar por las alphas o
por las betas, de ah´ı el factor 2.
• k = 2ν +1. Si empieza por las alphas, habr´ an ν +1 runs de alphas y ν runs de
betas y rec´ıprocamente.
2.66
• Se consideran runs pares.
P
2ν+2
P

=
_
r
1
−1
ν
__
r
2
−1
ν
_
_
r
1
−1
ν−1
__
r
2
−1
ν−1
_ =
(r
1
−ν)(r
2
−ν)
νν
_
r
1
−1
ν−1
__
r
2
−1
ν−1
_
_
r
1
−1
ν−1
__
r
2
−1
ν−1
_ =
(r
1
−ν)(r
2
−ν)
ν
2
P
2ν+2
P

≥1
P
2ν+2
P

≤1
(r
1
−ν)(r
2
−ν)
ν
2
≥1
(r
1
−ν)(r
2
−ν)
ν
2
≤1
ν ≤
r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2
ν ≥
r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2
de donde
P
2
≤P
4
≤ ≤P
2
_
r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2
_
≤P
2
_
r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2
_
+2
≥P
2
_
r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2
_
+4
≥ ≥P
2min¦r
1
,r
2
¦
.
56 Solutions
El valor de k para el que la probabilidad es m´ axima es k = 2
_
r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2
_
+2 i.e.
_
r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2
_
=
k−2
2
. De la desigualdad
_
r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2
_

r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2
<
_
r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2
_
+1 .
de la primera desigualdad
k −2
2

r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2
⇐⇒ k ≤
2r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2
+2 <
2r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2
+3
y de la segunda
r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2
<
k −2
2
+1 ⇐⇒
2r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2
< k ,
reuniendo ambos resultados
2r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2
< k <
2r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2
+3 .
• Consideremos runs impares.
P
2ν+1
P
2ν−1
=
_
r
1
−1
ν
__
r
2
−1
ν−1
_
+
_
r
1
−1
ν−1
__
r
2
−1
ν
_
_
r
1
−1
ν−1
__
r
2
−1
ν−2
_
+
_
r
1
−1
ν−2
__
r
2
−1
ν−1
_
=
r
1
ν
_
r
1
−1
ν−1
__
r
2
−1
ν−1
_
+
r
2
−ν
ν
_
r
1
−1
ν−1
__
r
2
−1
ν−1
_
ν−1
r
2
−ν+1
_
r
1
−1
ν−1
__
r
2
−1
ν−2
_
+
ν−1
r
1
−ν+1
_
r
1
−1
ν−2
__
r
2
−1
ν−1
_
=
(r
1
+r
2
−2ν)(r
1
−ν +1)(r
2
−ν +1)
ν(ν −1)(r
1
+r
2
−2ν +2)
Si
P
2ν+1
P
2ν−1
≥1, tenemos
(r
1
+r
2
−2ν)(r
1
−ν +1)(r
2
−ν +1)
ν(ν −1)(r
1
+r
2
−2ν +2)
≥1
despu´ es de algunos c´ alculos, obtenemos
ν
2

_
r
1
+r
2
2
+
3
2
+
r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2
_
ν +
_
r
1
r
2
2
+
r
1
+r
2
2
+
1
2
_
≥0 .
Cuya soluci ´ on es
ν ≤
1
2
_
_
r
1
+r
2
2
+
3
2
+
r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2

¸
_
r
1
+r
2
2

r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2

1
2
_
2
+
2r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2
_
_
,
o
Solutions 57
ν ≥
1
2
_
_
r
1
+r
2
2
+
3
2
+
r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2
+
¸
_
r
1
+r
2
2

r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2

1
2
_
2
+
2r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2
_
_
.
Si
P
2ν+1
P
2ν−1
≤1, tenemos
1
2
_
_
r
1
+r
2
2
+
3
2
+
r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2

¸
_
r
1
+r
2
2

r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2

1
2
_
2
+
2r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2
_
_
≤ν

1
2
_
_
r
1
+r
2
2
+
3
2
+
r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2
+
¸
_
r
1
+r
2
2

r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2

1
2
_
2
+
2r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2
_
_
Como
1
2
_
_
r
1
+r
2
2
+
3
2
+
r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2
+
¸
_
r
1
+r
2
2

r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2

1
2
_
2
+
2r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2
_
_
>
1
2
_
r
1
+r
2
2
+
3
2
+
r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2
+
¸
¸
¸
¸
r
1
+r
2
2

r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2

1
2
¸
¸
¸
¸
_
=
r
1
+r
2
2
+
1
2
> min¦r
1
, r
2
¦ ,
no nos puede proporcionar ning´ un valor de ν pues este no puede superar el
m´ınimo de los valores r
1
y r
2
. As´ı pues. el valor alrededor del ν correspondi-
ente al valor de k que hace m´ axima la probabilidad es
1
2
_
_
r
1
+r
2
2
+
3
2
+
r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2

¸
_
r
1
+r
2
2

r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2

1
2
_
2
+
2r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2
_
_
.
Adem´ as el discriminante lo tomaremos como
∆ =
_
r
1
+r
2
2

r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2

1
2
_
2
+
2r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2
para acotar superiormente a la susodicha ν. Y para acotarla inferiormente
∆ =
_
r
1
+r
2
2

r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2
+
1
2
_
2
−2
_
r
1
+r
2
2

2r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2
_
pues ambos valores de ∆ son id´ enticos.
ν ≤
1
2
_
_
r
1
+r
2
2
+
3
2
+
r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2

¸
_
r
1
+r
2
2

r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2

1
2
_
2
+
2r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2
_
_
<
1
2
_
r
1
+r
2
2
+
3
2
+
r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2

¸
¸
¸
¸
r
1
+r
2
2

r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2

1
2
¸
¸
¸
¸
_
=
r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2
+1
58 Solutions
por otra parte
ν ≥
1
2
_
_
r
1
+r
2
2
+
3
2
+
r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2

¸
_
r
1
+r
2
2

r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2
+
1
2
_
2
−2
_
r
1
+r
2
2

2r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2
_
_
_

1
2
_
r
1
+r
2
2
+
3
2
+
r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2

¸
¸
¸
¸
r
1
+r
2
2

r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2
+
1
2
¸
¸
¸
¸
_
=
r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2
+
1
2
Como k = 2ν +1 de
r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2
+
1
2
≤ν <
r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2
+1
es decir
2r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2
+2 ≤k <
2r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2
+3 .
Por tanto
2r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2
< k <
2r
1
r
2
r
1
+r
2
+3 .
2.67 Debemos escoger el run como indica la figura
ν
¸ .. ¸
α . . . α
1
¸..¸
β
r
1
+r
2
−ν−1
¸ .. ¸
. . .
Por tanto:
• Casos favorables.
– Las ν primeras alphas las podemos escoger y ordenar de
_
r
1
ν
_
ν! maneras.
– La beta que sigue la podemos escoger de entre las r
2
betas que hay.
– De entre las r
1
+r
2
−ν −1 casillas restantes podemos escoger y ordenar las
r
1
−ν alphas y r
2
−1 betas que quedan de
_
r
1
+r
2
−ν−1
r
2
−1
_
(r
1
−ν)!(r
2
−1)!
maneras posibles.
• Casos posibles. Podemos escoger y ordenar los r
1
+r
2
lugares para las alfas y
las betas de
_
r
1
+r
2
r
1
_
r
1
!r
2
! maneras.
La probabilidad es
_
r
1
ν
_
ν! r
2

_
r
1
+r
2
−ν−1
r
2
−1
_
(r
1
−ν)!(r
2
−1)!
_
r
1
+r
2
r
1
_
r
1
!r
2
!
=
_
r
1
_
ν
ν!
ν!r
2
(r
1
+r
2
−ν−1)!
(r
2
−1)!(r
1
−ν)!
(r
1
−ν)!(r
2
−1)!
(r
1
+r
2
)!
r
1
!r
2
!
r
1
!r
2
!
=
_
r
1
_
ν
r
2
_
r
1
+r
2
_
ν+1
.
Si ν = 0 el suceso se reduce a que los runs empiecen por beta.
2.68 Para cada elecci ´ on de k runs para las alphas podemos elegir:
Solutions 59
• k −1 runs para las betas que podemos elegir de
_
r
2
−1
k−2
_
maneras.
• k runs para las betas que podemos elegir de 2
_
r
2
−1
k−1
_
, maneras pues puede em-
pezar por un run de alfas y terminar con otro run de betas o viceversa.
• k +1 runs de betas que podemos elegir de
_
r
2
−1
k
_
, maneras.
La probabilidad es
π
k
=
_
r
1
−1
k−1
_
_
_
r
2
−1
k−2
_
+
_
r
2
−1
k−1
_
+
_
r
2
−1
k−1
_
+
_
r
2
−1
k
_
_
_
r
1
+r
2
r
1
_
=
_
r
1
−1
k−1
___
r
2
k−1
_
+
_
r
2
k
__
_
r
1
+r
2
r
1
_ =
_
r
1
−1
k−1
__
r
2
+1
k
_
_
r
1
+r
2
r
1
_ .
2.69 La n-´ esima alpha debe estar precedida de n−1 alphas y m betas cuyos lugares
se pueden elegir de
_
m+n−1
m
_
maneras. A la n-´ esima alpha las siguen r
1
−r
2
−n−m
cuyos lugares podemos elegir de otras
_
r
1
−r
2
−n−m
r
1
−n
_
formas. La probabilidad es
_
m+n−1
m
__
r
1
−r
2
−n−m
r
1
−n
_
_
r
1
+r
2
r
1
_ .
2.70 Los K
1
runs simplemente ocupados, los k
2
doblemente ocupados,..., y los k
ν
ν-mente ocupados se pueden ordenar de
k!
k
1
!k
2
!k
ν
!
maneras. Para cada uno de los k
runs de alphas se pueden elegir runs de betas de longitud k −1 o k o bien k +1
en el sentido del ejercicio 2.68 cuyo n´ umero es
_
r
2
+1
k
_
. Por tanto la probabilidad
buscada es
k!
k
1
!k
2
! k
ν
!
_
r
2
+1
k
_
_
r
1
+r
2
r
1
_ .
2.71 (a) 1 −
_
n
1
_
+
_
n
2
_
−+ =
_
n
0
_
1
n
+
_
n
1
_
1
n−1
(−1) +
_
n
2
_
1
n−2
(−1)
2
+ = (1 +
(−1))
n
= 0
n
= 0.
(b)
_
n
0
_
+
_
n
1
_
x+
_
n
2
_
x
2
+
_
n
3
_
x
3
+ = (1+x)
n
, derivando
_
n
1
_
+2
_
n
2
_
x+3
_
n
3
_
x
2
+
= n(1+x)
n−1
tomando x = 1, resulta
_
n
1
_
+2
_
n
2
_
+3
_
n
3
_
+ = n2
n−1
.
(c)
_
n
0
_

_
n
1
_
x+
_
n
2
_
x
2

_
n
3
_
x
3
+ = (1−x)
n
, derivando −
_
n
1
_
+2
_
n
2
_
x−3
_
n
3
_
x
2
+
− = n(1−x)
n−1
tomando x = 1, resulta −
_
n
1
_
+2
_
n
2
_
−3
_
n
3
_
+ =−n0
n−1
= 0,
i.e.
_
n
1
_
−2
_
n
2
_
+3
_
n
3
_
−+ = 0.
(d) Derivando dos veces
_
n
0
_
+
_
n
1
_
x +
_
n
2
_
x
2
+
_
n
3
_
x
3
+ = (1+x)
n
, tenemos
2 1
_
n
2
_
+3 2
_
n
3
_
x +4 3
_
n
4
_
x
2
+ = n(n −1)(1 +x)
n−2
, tomando x = 1, tenemos
2 1
_
n
2
_
+3 2
_
n
3
_
+4 3
_
n
4
_
+ = n(n−1)2
n−2
.
2.72 Se usa el teorema del binomio en el miembro derecho de (2.27)
_
n
k
_
(1+t)
k
=
_
n
k
_
k

ν=0
_
k
ν
_
t
ν
=
k

ν=0
_
n
k
__
k
ν
_
t
ν
=
k

ν=0
n!

k!(n−k)!

k!
ν!(k −ν)!
t
ν
=
k

ν=0
n!
ν!(n−ν)!

(n−ν)!
(k −ν)!(n−k)!
t
ν
=
k

ν=0
_
n
ν
__
n−ν
k −ν
_
t
ν
.
60 Solutions
Tomando t =−1, obtenemos (2.26).
2.73 Directamente
_
−a
k
_
=
−a(−a−1) (−a−k +1)
k!
= (−1)
k
a(a+1) (a+k −1)
k!
= (−1)
k
(a+k −1) (a+1)a
k!
= (−1)
k
_
a+k −1
k
_
.
Si a es entero, diferenciemos a −1 veces la serie geom´ etrica ∑x
n
= (1 −x)
−1
y
apliquemos el teorema del binomio generalizado

n(n−1) (n−a+2)x
n−a+1
= (a−1)!(1−x)
−a
= (a−1)!

_
−a
k
_
(−1)
k
x
k
igualando coeficientes para lo que n−a+1 = k →n = a+k −1, tenemos
(a+k −1)(a+k −2) (k +1) = (a−1)!
_
−a
k
_
(−1)
k
(a+k −1)
a−1
= (a−1)!
_
−a
k
_
(−1)
k
despejando
_
−a
k
_
= (−1)
k
(a+k −1)
a−1
(a−1)!
= (−1)
k
_
a+k −1
a−1
_
= (−1)
k
_
a+k −1
k
_
.
2.74
(−1)
n
_

1
2
n
_
= (−1)
n

1
2
_

1
2
−1
__

1
2
−2
_

_

1
2
−n+2
__

1
2
−n+1
_
n!
= (−1)
n
−1(−1−2)(−1−4) (−1−2n+4)(−1−2n+2)
n!

1
2
n
= (−1)
n
(−1)
n
−1 3 5 (2n−3)(2n−1)
n!

1
2
n
=
1 2 3 4 5 (2n−3)(2n−2)(2n−1)2n
n!2 4 (2n−2)2n

1
2
n
=
(2n)!
n!n!2
n

1
2
n
=
_
2n
n
_
2
−2n
,
Solutions 61
(−1)
n−1
_
1
2
n
_
= (−1)
n−1
1
2
_
1
2
−1
__
1
2
−2
__
1
2
−3
_

_
1
2
−n+2
__
1
2
−n+1
_
n!
= (−1)
n−1
1(−1)(−3)(−5) (−2n+5)(−2n+3)
n!

1
2
n
= (−1)
n−1
(−1)
n−1
1 1 3 5 (2n−5)(2n−3)
n!

1
2
n
=
1 2 3 4 5 (2n−5)(2n−4)(2n−3)(2n−2)
n!2 4 (2n−4)(2n−2)

1
2
n
=
1
n

(2n−2)!
(n−1)!(n−1)!

1
2
n−1
1
2
n
=
1
n
_
2n−2
n−1
_
2
−2n+1
.
2.75
_
a
r
_
+
¨
¨
¨
_
a
r+1
_
=
_
a+1
r+1
_
_
a−1
r
_
+
&
&
&
_
a−1
r+1
_
=
¨
¨
¨
_
a
r+1
_

_
a−n
r
_
+
_
a−n
r+1
_
=
¨
¨
¨
¨
_
a−n+1
r+1
_
_
a
r
_
+
_
a−1
r
_
+ +
_
a−n
r
_
+
_
a−n
r+1
_
=
_
a+1
r+1
_
de donde se sigue el resultado.
2.76
_
a
0
_
=
¨
¨
¨
_
a−1
0
_

_
a
1
_
= −
¨
¨
¨
_
a−1
0
_

¨
¨
¨
_
a−1
1
_
_
a
2
_
=
¨
¨
¨
_
a−1
1
_
+
¨
¨
¨
_
a−1
2
_

(−1)
n−1
_
a
n−1
_
=
$
$
$
$
$
$
(−1)
n−1
_
a−1
n−2
_
+
$
$
$
$
$
$
(−1)
n−1
_
a−1
n−1
_
(−1)
n
_
a
n
_
=
$
$
$
$
$
(−1)
n
_
a−1
n−1
_
+
$
$
$
$
$
(−1)
n
_
a−1
n
_
_
a
0
_

_
a
1
_
+
_
a
2
_
− +(−1)
n−1
_
a
n−1
_
+(−1)
n
_
a
n
_
= (−1)
n
_
a−1
n
_
2.77 (a)
_
k−1
k−1
_
=

_
k
k
_
_
k
k−1
_
=
¨
¨
¨
_
k+1
k
_

_
k
k
_
_
k+1
k−1
_
=
¨
¨
¨
_
k+2
k
_

¨
¨
¨
_
k+1
k
_

_
k+r−2
k−1
_
=
¨
¨
¨
¨
_
k+r−1
k
_

¨
¨
¨
¨
_
k+r−2
k
_
_
k+r−1
k−1
_
=
_
k+r
k
_

¨
¨
¨
¨
_
k+r−1
k
_
_
k−1
k−1
_
+
_
k
k−1
_
+
_
k+1
k−1
_
+ +
_
k+r−2
k−1
_
+
_
k+r−1
k−1
_
=
_
k+r
k
_
(b)
62 Solutions
r

nu=0
_
ν +k −1
k −1
_
=
r

ν=0
_
ν +k −1
ν
_
=
r

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
−k
ν
_
(por la identidad (2.28))
= (−1)
r
_
−k −1
r
_
(por (2.32))
= (−1)
r
(−1)
r
_
k +1+r −1
r
_
(por la identidad 2.28)
=
_
r +k
k
_
(c) Se trata de probar por inducci´ on sobre n que el n´ umero de soluciones (combina-
toriamente, n´ umero de distribuciones de r bolas indistinguibles en n celdas distin-
guibles) de la ecuaci ´ on
r
1
+r
2
+ +r
n
= r, r
k
≥0
es
A
r,n
=
_
n+r −1
r
_
=
_
n+r −1
n−1
_
.
El n´ umero de soluciones es la suma de los n´ umeros de soluciones de las ecuaciones
r
1
+r
2
+ +r
n−1
= r,
r
1
+r
2
+ +r
n−1
= r −1,
r
1
+r
2
+ +r
n−1
= r −2,
= ,
r
1
+r
2
+ +r
n−1
= 1,
r
1
+r
2
+ +r
n−1
= 0.
Por la hip´ otesis de inducci ´ on es
A
r,n−1
+A
r−1,n−1
+A
r−2,n−1
+ +A
1,n−1
+A
0,n−1
=
_
n+r −2
n−2
_
+
_
n+r −3
n−2
_
+
_
n+r −4
n−2
_
+ +
_
n−1
n−2
_
+
_
n−2
n−2
_
=
r

ν=0
_
ν +n−2
n−2
_
=
_
r +n−1
n−1
_
si n ≥2
por la identidad (2.33). Para n = 1 es trivial.
(d)
n

j=0
_
j
m
_
=
n

j=0
_
n− j
m
_
=
_
n+1
m+1
_

_
n−n
m+1
_
=
_
n+1
m+1
_
Solutions 63
Por (2.31), el segundo t´ ermino se anula
=
_
n−m+m+1
m+1
_
=
n−m

ν=0
_
ν +m
m
_
que resulta ser la ecuaci ´ on (2.33) con k = m+1 y r = n−m.
2.78
• a = 1 , tenemos
_
1
0
__
b
n
_
+
_
1
1
__
b
n−1
_
=
_
b
n
_
+
_
b
n−1
_
=
_
1+b
n
_
.
• Supongamos que se cumple para a . Prob´ emoslo para a+1
_
a+1
0
__
b
n
_
+
_
a+1
1
__
b
n−1
_
+ +
_
a+1
n
__
b
0
_
=
_
a
0
__
b
n
_
+
__
a
0
_
+
_
a
1
___
b
n−1
_
+ +
__
a
n−1
_
+
_
a
n
___
b
0
_
=
_
a
0
__
b
n
_
+
_
a
1
__
b
n−1
_
+ +
_
a
n
__
b
0
_
+
_
a
0
__
b
n−1
_
+ +
_
a
n−1
__
b
0
_
=
_
a+b
n
_
+
_
a+b
n−1
_
=
_
a+1+b
n
_
.
2.79 Por la f´ ormula del binomio de Newton, tenemos:

i
_
a
i
_
t
i


j
_
b
j
_
t
j
=

k
_
a+b
k
_
t
k
,
tomando k = n e igualando los coeficientes de t
n
, tenemos

i+j=n
_
a
i
__
b
j
_
=
_
a+b
n
_
.
2.80 Se toma a =b =n y teniendo en cuenta que
_
n
n−k
_
=
_
n
k
_
se sigue el resultado.
2.81
n

ν=0
(2n)!
(ν!)
2
((n−ν)!)
2
=
_
2n
n
_
n

ν=0
n!n!
(ν!)
2
((n−ν)!)
2
=
_
2n
n
_
n

ν=0
_
n
ν
_
2
=
_
2n
n
__
2n
n
_
=
_
2n
n
_
2
2.82
64 Solutions
a

k=1
(−1)
a−k
_
a
k
__
b+k
k −1
_
=
a−1

l=0
(−1)
a−1−l
_
a
l +1
__
b+1+l
l
_
( l = k −1 )
=
a−1

l=0
(−1)
a−1
_
a
l +1
__
−b−2
l
_
(por (2.28))
= (−1)
a−1
a−1

l=0
_
a
a−1−l
__
−b−2
l
_
= (−1)
a−1
_
a−b−2
a−1
_
(por (2.35))
= (−1)
a−1
(−1)
a−1
_
−a+b+2+a−1−1
a−1
_
(por (2.28))
=
_
b
a−1
_
Alternativamente
(1−t)
a
(1−t)
−b−2
= (1−t)
a−b−2

i≥0
(−1)
i
_
a
i
_
t
i


j≥0
(−1)
j
_
−b−2
j
_
t
j
=

k≥0
(−1)
k
_
a−b−2
k
_
t
k

i+j≥0
(−1)
i+j
_
a
i
__
−b−2
j
_
t
i+j
=

k≥0
_
a−b−2
k
_
t
k
a

i=0
(−1)
a−1
_
a
i
__
−b−2
a−1−i
_
= (−1)
a−1
_
a−b−2
a−1
_
igualando los coeficientes de t
a−1
a

i=0
(−1)
a−1
_
a
i
_
(−1)
a−1−i
_
b+2+a−1−i −1
a−1−i
_
= (−1)
a−1
(−1)
a−1
_
−a+b+2+a−1−1
a−1
_
por (2.28)
a

i=0
(−1)
i
_
a
i
__
a+b−i
a−1−i
_
=
_
b
a−1
_
a

i=0
_
a
a−i
__
a+b−i
b+1
_
=
_
b
a−1
_
a

k=0
(−1)
a−k
_
a
k
__
b+k
b+1
_
=
_
b
a−1
_
se ha efectuado el cambio a−i = k
a

k=1
(−1)
a−k
_
a
k
__
b+k
b+1
_
=
_
b
a−1
_
Solutions 65
pues
_
b
b+1
_
= 0
2.83 De (2.28) tenemos que
_
−1
k
_
= (−1)
k
_
k
k
_
= (−1)
k
, por tanto
_
a
k
_

_
a
k −1
_
+− ∓
_
a
1
_
±
_
a
0
_
=
_
a
k
__
−1
0
_
+
_
a
k −1
__
−1
1
_
+ +
_
a
1
__
−1
k −1
_
+
_
a
0
__
−1
k
_
=
_
a−1
k
_
.
Por otra parte, efectuando el cambio k =n−r −ν y haciendo uso de (2.28) y (2.35),
tenemos
n−r

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
a
ν
__
n−ν
r
_
=
n−r

k=0
(−1)
n−r−k
_
a
n−r −k
__
r +k
k
_
= (−1)
n−r
n−r

k=0
_
a
n−r −k
_
(−1)
k
_
r +1+k −1
k
_
= (−1)
n−r
n−r

k=0
_
a
n−r −k
__
−r −1
k
_
= (−1)
n−r
_
a−r −1
n−r
_
= (−1)
n−r
_
a−n+n−r −1
n−r
_
=
_
n−a
n−r
_
Alternativamente se puede probar por inducci´ on,
• Si n = 1 se reduce a probar
0

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
a
ν
__
1−ν
1
_
=
_
1−a
0
_
es decir
(−1)
0
_
a
0
__
1
1
_
=
_
1−a
0
_
= 1
lo que es cierto.
• Supuesto que se cumple para n , prob´ emoslo para n+1
66 Solutions
n+1−r

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
a
ν
__
n+1−ν
r
_
=
n−(r−1)

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
a
ν
___
n−ν
r −1
_
+
_
n−ν
r
__
=
_
n−a
n−r +1
_
+
n−r+1

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
a
ν
__
n−ν
r
_
=
_
n−a
n−r +1
_
+
n−r

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
a
ν
__
n−ν
r
_
+(−1)
n−r+1
_
a
n−r +1
__
r −1
r
_
=
_
n−a
n−r +1
_
+
_
n−a
n−r
_
=
_
n+1−a
n+1−r
_
2.84
k

j=0
_
a+k − j −1
k − j
__
b+ j −1
j
_
=
k

j=0
(−1)
k−j
_
−a
k − j
_
(−1)
j
_
−b
j
_
= (−1)
k
_
−a−b
k
_
=
_
a+b+k −1
k
_
.
2.85
• Para (2.12)
r

k=0
q
k
=
1
_
n+r−1
r
_
r

k=0
_
n+r −k −2
r −k
_
=
1
_
n+r−1
r
_
r

k=0
_
n+r −k −2
n−2
_
=
1
_
n+r−1
r
_
r

ν=0
_
ν +n−2
n−2
_
(cambio ν = r −k )
=
1
_
n+r−1
r
_
_
r +n−1
n−1
_
(se aplica (2.33))
= 1
• Para (2.14)
n−1

m=0
ρ
m
=
1
_
n+r−1
r
_
n−1

m=0
_
n
m
__
r −1
n−m−1
_
=
1
_
n+r−1
r
_
_
n+r −1
n−1
_
(se aplica (2.35))
= 1
• Para (2.15)
Solutions 67
r

j=0
q
j
(m) =
1
_
n+r−1
r
_
r

j=0
_
m+ j −1
m−1
__
n−m+r − j −1
r − j
_
=
1
_
n+r−1
r
_
r

j=0
_
n−m+r − j −1
r − j
__
m+ j −1
j
_
=
1
_
n+r−1
r
_
_
n−m+m+r −1
r
_
(aplicando (2.42))
= 1
• Para (2.16)
r

j=0
q
j
(m) →


j=0
_
m+ j −1
m−1
_
p
j
(1+ p)
m+j
=
1
(1+ p)
m


j=0
(−1)
j
_
m+ j −1
j
__

p
1+ p
_
j
=
1
(1+ p)
m


j=0
_
−m
j
__

p
1+ p
_
j
(aplicando (2.28))
=
1
(1+ p)
m
_
1−
p
1+ p
_
−m
(por el teorema del binomio)
= 1
2.86 Empecemos realizando algunos ajustes
A(r, n) =
n

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
n
ν
_
(n−ν)
r
(por (2.6))
=
n

k=0
(−1)
n−k
_
n
k
_
k
r
(cambio k = n−ν )
(a) Lo que en realidad pide es una prueba por inducci´ on, suponemos n ≥1 .
• Si n = 1 tenemos

A(0, 1) =
1

k=0
(−1)
1−k
_
1
k
_
0
=−1+1 = 0

A(1, 1) =
1

k=0
(−1)
1−k
_
1
k
_
k
1
= 0+1 = 1 = 1!
• Si n > 1 tenemos
– Si r = 0 tenemos
A(0, n) =
n

k=0
(−1)
n−k
_
n
k
_
k
0
=
n

k=0
(−1)
n−k
_
n
k
_
= 0
por el teorema del binomio.
68 Solutions
– Si r > 0 tenemos
A(r, n) =
n

k=0
(−1)
n−k
_
n
k
_
k
r
= (−1)
n
_
n
0
_
0
r
+
n−1

k=1
(−1)
n−k
_
n
k
_
k
r
+n
r
=
n−1

k=1
(−1)
n−k
__
n−1
k −1
_
+
_
n−1
k
__
k
r
+n
r
=
n−1

k=1
(−1)
n−k
_
n−1
k −1
_
k
r
+
n−1

k=1
(−1)
n−k
_
n−1
k
_
k
r
+n
r
=
n−1

k=1
(−1)
n−1−(k−1)
_
n−1
k −1
_
(k −1+1)
r

n−1

k=1
(−1)
n−1−k
_
n−1
k
_
k
r
+n
r
cambio k −1 ↔k
=
n−2

k=0
(−1)
n−1−k
_
n−1
k
_
(1+k)
r
+(−1)
n−1−(n−1)
_
n−1
n−1
_
_
1+(n−1)
_
r

n−1

k=0
(−1)
n−1−k
_
n−1
k
_
k
r
=
n−1

k=0
(−1)
n−1−k
_
n−1
k
_
(1+k)
r
−A(r, n−1)
=
n−1

k=0
(−1)
n−1−k
_
n−1
k
_
_
r

i=0
_
r
i
_
k
i
_
−A(r, n−1)
=
r

i=0
_
r
i
_
A(i, n−1) −A(r, n−1)
=
r−1

i=0
_
r
i
_
A(i, n−1)
Por tanto
Si r < n equivale a i ≤ r −1 < n−1 y todos los t´ erminos de la anterior
suma se anulan por hip´ otesis de inducci ´ on.
Si r = n equivale a r −1 = n−1 y s´ olo sobrevive el ´ ultimo t´ ermino por
la hip´ otesis de inducci ´ on, i. e.
_
r
r −1
_
A(r −1, n−1) = r(n−1)! = n(n−1)! = n!
(b) Tenemos que
(1−e
t
)
n
=
n

k=0
(−1)
k
_
n
k
_
e
kt
donde se ha aplicado el teorema del binomio. Derivando r veces, tenemos
Solutions 69
n

k=0
(−1)
k
_
n
k
_
k
r
e
kt
=n
r
(1−e
t
)
n

1
(n)(1−e
t
)
n−1

2
(n)(1−e
t
)
n−2
+ +(−1)
r
n(n−1)(n−2) (n−r+1)(1−e
t
)
n−r
Por lo que tomando t = 0
– Si r < n
n

k=0
(−1)
k
_
n
k
_
k
r
= 0
i. e.
n

k=0
(−1)
n−k
_
n
k
_
k
r
= 0
– Si r = n
n

k=0
(−1)
k
_
n
k
_
k
n
= (−1)
n
n!
i. e.
n

k=0
(−1)
n−k
_
n
k
_
k
n
= n!
(c)
u(r, n) =
N

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
N
ν
_
_
1−
ν
n
_
r
=
1
n
r
N

k=0
(−1)
N−k
_
N
k
_
(n−N+k)
r
(cambio k = N−ν )
=
1
n
r
N

k=0
(−1)
N−k
_
N
k
_
_
r

i=0
_
r
i
_
(n−N)
r−i
k
i
_
=
1
n
r
r

i=0
_
r
i
_
(n−N)
r−i
_
N

k=0
(−1)
N−k
_
N
k
_
k
i
_
– Si r <N como i ≤r se anula el sumatorio entre llaves, anul´ andose cada uno
de los t´ erminos del primer sumatorio.
– Si r = N s´ olo sobrevive el t´ ermino con i = r = N con lo que queda
N!
n
N
.
Esto es
N

k=0
(−1)
N−k
_
N
k
_
(n−N+k)
r
=
_
0 si r < N
N! si r = N .
2.87 Por inducci ´ on
• Si n = 0 , hemos de probar
(0)
r
=
_
0
r
_
r!
en efecto
70 Solutions
(0)
r
=
_
1 si r = 0
0 si r > 0
_
0
r
_
r! =
_
1 si r = 0
0 si r > 0
Supong´ amoslo cierto para n , prob´ emoslo para n+1 ,
N

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
N
ν
_
(n+1−ν)
r
=
N

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
N
ν
__
n+1−ν
r
_
r!
= r!
N

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
N
ν
___
n−ν
r
_
+
_
n−ν
r −1
__
=
_
n−N
r −N
_
r! +r!
N

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
N
ν
__
n−ν
r −1
_
=
_
n−N
r −N
_
r! +r
N

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
N
ν
_
(n−ν)
r−1
=
_
n−N
r −N
_
r! +r
_
n−N
r −1−N
_
(r −1)!
=
_
n+1−N
r −N
_
r!
Tambi´ en se puede demostrar como consecuencia de la f´ ormula del ejercicio 2.83.
N

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
N
ν
_
(n−ν)
r
=
N

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
N
ν
__
n−ν
r
_
r! =
_
n−N
n−r
_
r!
Una tercera demostraci´ on es la que sugiere el libro y aplicando el teorema del
binomio
t
n−N
(t −1)
N
=t
n−N
N

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
N
ν
_
t
N−ν
=
N

ν=0
_
N
ν
_
t
n−ν
Llamando f (t) =∑
N
ν=0
_
N
ν
_
t
n−ν
, g
1
(t) =t
n−N
y g
2
(t) = (t −1)
N
, tenemos
f (t) = g
1
(t)g
2
(t)
Las tres funciones son polin´ omicas y, por tanto, infinitamente derivables. Derivando
al orden r-´ esimo y aplicando la f´ ormula de Leibniz
f
(r)
(t) =
r

µ=0
_
r
µ
_
g
(r−µ)
1
(t)g
(µ)
2
(t).
Como
Solutions 71
– f
(r)
(t) =∑
N
ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
N
ν
_
(n−ν)
r
t
n−ν−r
, de donde f
(r)
(1) =∑
N
ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
N
ν
_
(n−
ν)
r
.
– g
(r−µ)
1
(t) = (n−N)
r−µ
t
n−N−r+µ
, de donde g
(r−µ)
1
(1) = (n−N)
r−µ
.
– g
(µ)
2
(t) = (N)
µ
(t −1)
N−µ
de donde
g
(µ)
2
(1) =
_
(N)
N
si µ = N
0 si µ ,= N
Con lo que para t = 1 obtenemos
N

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
N
ν
_
(n−ν)
r
=
_
r
N
_
(n−N)
r−N
(N)
N
=
r!
N!(r −N)!
(n−N)!
(n−r)!
N! =
_
n−N
r −N
_
r!
2.88 Llamemos
f
n
(t) =
n

ν=1
(−1)
ν−1
_
n
ν
_
t
ν
ν
,
probemos que
f
n
(1) = 1+
1
2
+
1
3
+ +
1
n
.
Procedamos por inducci ´ on
• f
1
(1) = 1
• Supongamos que f
n−1
(1) = 1+
1
2
+
1
3
+ +
1
n−1
, tenemos que
f
/
n
(t) =
n

ν=1
(−1)
ν−1
_
n
ν
_
t
ν−1
=
n

ν=1
(−1)
ν−1
__
n−1
ν −1
_
+
_
n−1
ν
__
t
ν−1
= (1−t)
n−1
+
n

ν=1
(−1)
ν−1
_
n−1
ν
_
t
ν−1
,
integrando
f
n
(1) =
_
1
0
f
/
n
(t)dt
=
_
1
0
(1−t)
n−1
dt +
n

ν=1
(−1)
ν−1
_
n−1
ν
_
_
1
0
t
ν−1
dt
=−
(1−t)
n
n
¸
¸
¸
¸
¸
1
0
+
n

ν=1
(−1)
ν−1
_
n−1
ν
_
t
ν
ν
¸
¸
¸
¸
¸
1
0
=
1
n
+
n−1

ν=1
(−1)
ν−1
_
n−1
ν
_
1
ν
72 Solutions
aplicando la hip´ otesis de inducci ´ on
= 1+
1
2
+
1
3
+ +
1
n−1
+
1
n
.
Alternativamente, a partir de la igualdad
n−1

ν=0
(1−t)
ν
=
1−(1−t)
n
t
=
1
t

1
t
n

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
n
ν
_
t
ν
=−
n

ν=1
(−1)
ν
_
n
ν
_
t
ν−1
integrando el primer y ´ ultimo miembro
n−1

ν=0
_
1
0
(1−t)
ν
dt =
n

ν=1
(−1)
ν−1
_
n
ν
_
_
1
0
t
ν−1
dt

n−1

ν=0
(1−t)
ν+1
ν +1
¸
¸
¸
¸
¸
1
0
=
n

ν=1
(−1)
ν−1
_
n
ν
_
t
ν
ν
¸
¸
¸
¸
¸
1
0
n−1

ν=0
1
ν +1
=
n

ν=1
(−1)
ν−1
_
n
ν
_
1
ν
.
Problems of Chapter 3
3.1 (a) Se aplica el principio de reflexi´ on.
O
−b
−2b
T
(n, a)
(0, −2b)
Fig. 5.4. Al n´ umero total de caminos, N
n,a
, se le
resta el n´ umero de caminos que “tocan” la recta x =
−b, este n´ umero se obtiene reflejando una de tales
rectas respecto de x = −b, el origen (0, 0) pasa a
ser (0, −2b) invariablemente. Tomando este punto
como nuevo origen, el n´ umero de tales caminos es
N
n,a+2b
. El n´ umero total es N
n,a
−N
n,a+2b
.
(b) Por el mismo procedimiento. En este caso no necesitamos cambiar el origen.
3.2 El n´ umero de caminos que parten del origen, tocan la recta x =a y llegan a (n, c)
es el mismo, tomando la reflexi´ on respecto de la recta x = a, que los que parten del
punto (0, 2a) y llegan al punto (n, c). De estos, hay que sustraer los que tocan la recta
Solutions 73
O
T
(n, a)
(n, 2b −a)
b
Fig. 5.5. Al n´ umero total le sustraemos el de
caminos que “tocan” la recta x = b. Por un pro-
cedimiento similar al anterior tenemos que hay
N
n,a
−N
n,2b−a
de tales caminos.
(0, 2a)
(0, 0)
x = a
(n, c)
x = −b
(n, −2b −c)
Fig. 5.6. El n´ umero de caminos que parten del origen, tocan la recta x = a y llegan al punto
(n, c) es el mismo que los que parten de (0, 2a) y llegan a (n, c), i.e. N
n,2a−c
. De estos, sus-
traemos los que parten de (0, 2a) y llegan a (n, −2b−c), i.e. N
n,2a+2b+c
. Por tanto, el n´ umero
total es N
n,2a−c
−N
n,2a+2b+c
.
x =−b despu´ es de haber tocado la recta x = a, para ello se toma la simetr´ıa respecto
de la recta x =−b, el punto (n, c) pasa a ser (n, −2b−c). Ver Fig. 5.6.
3.3 Usaremos el principio de inclusi ´ on-exclusi ´ on de una manera peculiar.
Hay N
n,c
caminos desde el origen hasta el punto (n, c) de los que debemos sus-
traer los caminos que tocan la recta x = a o la recta x =−b.
• Sea A
1
el conjunto de los caminos desde el origen hasta el punto (n, c) que tocan
la recta x = a .
• Sea B
1
el conjunto de los caminos desde el origen hasta el punto (n, c) que tocan
la recta x =−b
con lo que
[A
1
∪B
1
[ =[A
1
[ +[B
1
[ −[A
1
∩B
1
[
= N
n,2a−c
+N
n,2b+c
−[A
1
∩B
1
[
A su vez podemos expresar
A
1
∩B
1
=A
2
∪B
2
74 Solutions
(0, 0)
(n, c)
x = a
x = −b
F(0, 2a)
(a) [A
1
[ = N
n,2a−c
(n, c) (0, 0)
x = −b
x = a
F(0, −2b)
(b) [B
1
[ = N
n,2b+c
Fig. 5.7. Las simetr´ıas se˜ naladas en cada figura, nos proporciona el cardinal de cada conjunto.
donde
• A
2
es el conjunto de los caminos con S
i
= a y S
j
= b para alg´ un 1 ≤i < j ≤n.
• B
2
es el conjunto de los caminos con S
i
= b y S
j
= a para alg´ un 1 ≤i < j ≤n.
con lo que
[A
2
∪B
2
[ =[A
2
[ +[B
2
[ −[A
2
∩B
2
[
= N
n,2a+2b+c
+N
n,2a+2b−c
−[A
2
∩B
2
[
(0, 0)
(n, c)
x = a
x = −b
F(0, −2a −2b)
(a) [A
2
[ = N
n,2a+2b+c
(0, 0) (n, c)
x = a
x = −b
F(0, 2a + 2b)
(b) [B
2
[ = N
n,2a+2b−c
Fig. 5.8. Cardinales de A
2
y B
2
.
Solutions 75
A su vez podemos expresar
A
2
∩B
2
=A
3
∪B
3
donde
• A
3
es el conjunto de los caminos con S
i
= a, S
j
= b y S
k
= a para alg´ un 1 ≤i <
j < k ≤n.
• B
3
es el conjunto de los caminos con S
i
= b, S
j
= a y S
k
= b para alg´ un 1 ≤i <
j < k ≤n.
con lo que
[A
3
∪B
3
[ =[A
3
[ +[B
3
[ −[A
3
∩B
3
[
= N
n,4a+2b−c
+N
n,2a+4b+c
−[A
3
∩B
3
[
(0, 0)
x = a
(n, c)
x = −b
F(0, 4a + 2b)
(a) [A
3
[ = N
n,4a+2b−c
(0, 0)
x = a
(n, c)
x = −b
F(0, −2a −4b)
(b) [B
3
[ = N
n,2a+4b+c
Fig. 5.9. Cardinales de A
3
y B
3
.
Para ver cuales son las coordenadas del punto F se˜ nalado en las gr´ aficas debemos
distinguir si proviene de los conjuntos de caminos A’s o B’s y tener en cuenta sus
paridades.
• Los caminos son del conjunto A
n
. Para encontrar F tienen lugar n simetr´ıas res-
pecto de las rectas x = a y x =−b en orden alterno y empezando por la simetr´ıa
respecto de x = a aplicada al origen. Adem´ as:
76 Solutions
– Si n = 2k, entonces F(0, −2ka −2kb) y su n´ umero de caminos asociado es
N
n,2ka+2kb+c
= N
n,2k(a+b)+c
(suma).
– Si n = 2k +1, entonces F(0, (2k +2)a+2kb) y su n´ umero de caminos asocia-
do es N
n,(2k+2)a+2kb−c
= N
n,2k(a+b)2a−c
(resta).
• Los caminos son del conjunto B
n
. Para encontrar F tienen lugar n simetr´ıas
respecto de x =−b y x = a en orden alterno empezando por la simetr´ıa respecto
de x =−b aplicada al origen. Adem´ as:
– Si n = 2k, entonces F(0, 2ka +2kb) y su n´ umero de caminos asociado es
N
n,2ka+2kb−c
= N
n,2(−k)(a+b)+c
(suma).
– Si n = 2k +1, entonces F(0, −2ka−(2k +2)b) y su n´ umero de caminos aso-
ciado es N
n,−2ka−(2k+2)b−c
= N
n,2(−k−1)(a+b)+2a−c
(resta).
En resumen, el n´ umero de caminos desde el origen hasta (n, c) estrictamente entre
x =−b y x = a es
N
n,c
−[A
1
∪B
1
[ = N
n,c
−N
n,2a−c
−N
n,2b+c
+[A
1
∩B
1
[
= N
n,20(a+b)+c
−N
n,20(a+b)+2a−c
−N
n,2(−1)(a+b)+2a−c
+[A
2
∪B
2
[
= N
n,20(a+b)+c
−N
n,20(a+b)+2a−c
−N
n,2(−1)(a+b)+2a−c
+N
n,2a+2b+c
+N
n,2a+2b−c
−[A
2
∩B
2
[
= N
n,20(a+b)+c
−N
n,20(a+b)+2a−c
−N
n,2(−1)(a+b)+2a−c
+N
n,21(a+b)+c
+N
n,2(−1)(a+b)+c
−[A
3
∪B
3
[
= N
n,20(a+b)+c
−N
n,20(a+b)+2a−c
−N
n,2(−1)(a+b)+2a−c
+N
n,21(a+b)+c
+N
n,2(−1)(a+b)+c
−N
n,4a+2b−c
−N
n,2a+4b+c
+[A
3
∩B
3
[
= N
n,20(a+b)+c
−N
n,20(a+b)+2a−c
−N
n,2(−1)(a+b)+2a−c
+N
n,21(a+b)+c
+N
n,2(−1)(a+b)+c
−N
n,21(a+b)+2a−c
−N
n,2(−2)(a+b)+2a−c
+[A
4
∪B
4
[

= N
n,20(a+b)+c
−N
n,20(a+b)+2a−c
−N
n,2(−1)(a+b)+2a−c
+N
n,21(a+b)+c
+N
n,2(−1)(a+b)+c
−N
n,21(a+b)+2a−c
−N
n,2(−2)(a+b)+2a−c
+
+N
n,2k(a+b)+c
+N
n,2(−k)(a+b)+c
−N
n,2k(a+b)+2a−c
−N
n,2(−k−1)(a+b)+2a−c
+
=

k∈Z
(N
n,2k(a+b)+c
−N
n,2k(a+b)+2a−c
)
siempre en n´ umero finito.
Solutions 77
3.4 Sean los sucesos A
k
, k = 0, 1, . . . , n donde A
k
es el conjunto de los caminos cuyo
´ ultimo retorno al origen ocurre en el instante 2k, entonces
P¦A
k
¦ = P¦S
2k
= 0, S
2k+1
,= 0, . . . , S
2n
,= 0¦ = u
2k
u
2n−2k
Pues el n´ umero de caminos es
2
2n
P¦A
k
¦ = 2
2n
P¦S
2k
= 0, S
2k+1
,= 0, . . . , S
2n
,= 0¦
= 2
2k
P¦S
2k
= 0¦ 2
2n−2k
P¦S
2k+1
,= 0, . . . , S
2n
,= 0¦
donde
2
2k
P¦S
2k
= 0¦ = 2
2k
u
2k
(por la definici ´ on de u
2k
)
2
2n−2k
P¦S
2k+1
,= 0, . . . , S
2n
,= 0¦ = 2
2n−2k
u
2n−2k
(por el lema 3.1)
de lo que se desprende la primera igualdad.
Por ser sucesos mutuamente excluyentes y ser su uni ´ on el suceso cierto, tenemos
1 = P¦A
0
∪A
2
∪ ∪A
n
¦
= P¦A
0
¦+P¦A
2
¦+ +P¦A
n
¦
= u
0
u
2n
+u
2
u
2n−2
+ +u
2n
u
0
donde hemos tenido en cuenta que u
0
= 1.
3.5 Vamos a demostrar que u
2n
y f
2n
son iguales a las expresiones enunciadas.
(−1)
n
_

1
2
n
_
(−1)
n−1
_
1
2
n
_
= (−1)
n

1
2

_

3
2
_

_

2n−1
2
_
n!
= (−1)
n−1

1
2

_

1
2
_

_

3
2
_

_

2n−3
2
_
n!
= (−1)
n
(−1)
n
1
2
n

1 3 (2n−1)
n!
= (−1)
n−1
(−1)
n−1

1 1 (2n−3)
n!2
n
=
1
2
n

1 2 3 4 (2n−1) 2n
2 4 2n n!
=
1 1 2 3 4 (2n−3) (2n−2) (2n−1) 2n
n!2
n
2 4 (2n−2) (2n−1) 2n
=
1
2
n
(2n)!
2
n
n!n!
=
1
2n−1

(2n)!
2
2n
n!n!
=
_
2n
n
_
2
−2n
= u
2n
, =
1
2n−1
_
2n
n
_
2
−2n
= f
2n
.
Probaremos ahora las dos igualdades.
78 Solutions
u
0
u
2n
+u
2
u
2n−2
+ +u
2n
u
0
=
(−1)
0
_

1
2
0
_
(−1)
n
_

1
2
n
_
+(−1)
1
_

1
2
1
_
(−1)
n−1
_

1
2
n−1
_
+ +(−1)
n
_

1
2
n
_
(−1)
0
_

1
2
0
_
= (−1)
n
__

1
2
0
__

1
2
n
_
+
_

1
2
1
__

1
2
n−1
_
+ +
_

1
2
n
__

1
2
0
__
= (−1)
n
_
−1
n
_
= (−1)
n
−1 (−2) (−n)
n!
= (−1)
n
(−1)
n
n!
n!
= 1,
f
2
u
2n−2
+ f
4
u
2n−4
+ + f
2n
u
0
=
(−1)
0
_
1
2
1
_
(−1)
n−1
_

1
2
n−1
_
+(−1)
1
_
1
2
2
_
(−1)
n−2
_

1
2
n−2
_
+ +(−1)
n−1
_
1
2
n
_
(−1)
0
_

1
2
0
_
= (−1)
n−1
__
1
2
1
__

1
2
n−1
_
+
_
1
2
2
__

1
2
n−2
_
+ +
_
1
2
n
__

1
2
0
__
= (−1)
n−1
__
0
n
_

_
1
2
0
__

1
2
n
__
= (−1)
n−1
_
0−1
_

1
2
n
__
= (−1)
n
_

1
2
n
_
=u
2n
n ≥1.
3.6
(0, 0)
(1, 1)
(2n + 1, 1)
(2n + 2, 0)
Fig. 5.10. A cada camino desde
(0, 0) a (2n + 2, 0) y v´ ertices interi-
ores estrictamente por encima del eje
le corresponde un ´ unico camino de
(1, 1) a (2n +1, 1) y rec´ıprocamente.
Tomando a (1, 1) como nuevo origen
se sigue el resultado.
El camino de longitud 2n+2 indicado pasa necesariamente por los puntos (1, 1)
y (2n +1, 1), tomando el primero como nuevo origen de coordenadas se sigue el
enunciado, ver Fig 5.10, i.e.
2
2n
P¦S
1
≥0, . . . .S
2n−1
≥0, S
2n
= 0¦ = 2
2n+2
P¦S
1
> 0, . . . .S
2n+1
> 0, S
2n+2
= 0¦
adem´ as
P¦S
1
,= 0, . . . .S
2n+1
,= 0, S
2n+2
= 0¦ = f
2n+2
y por simetr´ıa
P¦S
1
> 0, . . . .S
2n+1
> 0, S
2n+2
= 0¦ =P¦S
1
< 0, . . . .S
2n+1
< 0, S
2n+2
= 0¦ =
1
2
f
2n+2
El n´ umero de caminos es, por tanto,
1
2
2
2n+2
f
2n+2
= 2
2n+1
f
2n+2
, de lo que se
desprende
Solutions 79
P¦S
1
≥0, . . . , S
2n−1
≥0, S
2n
= 0¦ =
1
2
2n
2
2n+1
f
2n+2
= 2f
2n+2
3.7
• Sea A el conjunto de los caminos de longitud 2n tales que S
2n
= 0.
• Sea B el conjunto de los caminos de longitud 2n tales que S
k
≥ 0 con k =
1, 2, . . . , 2n
La transformaci ´ on propuesta empieza por una simetr´ıa de manera que la secci ´ on
reflejada tiene sus S
i
> −m, i = 1, . . . , k −1 por la elecci ´ on de M y sigue con una
translaci´ on de vector
−−→
MN con N(2n, 0), la secci ´ on reflejada queda por encima del
eje (por la elecci´ on de M), finalmente, el tomar como nuevo origen M asegura que
el camino resultante queda por encima, o sobre, el eje (otra vez, por la elecci ´ on de
M). Obs´ ervese que, en el nuevo sistema de coordenadas, N es el ´ ultimo punto con
segunda coordenada m. El antiguo origen se transforma en el punto (2n, 2m) en el
nuevo sistema de referencia. Gr´ aficamente:
O(0, 0)
M(k, −m)
N(2n, 0)
M(0, 0)
N(2n −k, m)
O

(2n, 2m)
Fig. 5.11. Transformaci ´ on de un camino del conjunto Aen otro del conjunto B.
Dado un camino de B desde el origen O(0, 0) hasta el punto A(2n, 2m), la trans-
formaci ´ on inversa consiste en localizar el punto N que es el punto m´ as a la derecha
con segunda coordenada m. Se aplica la translaci ´ on de vector
−→
NO a la secci ´ on del
camino comprendida entre N y A y despu´ es una simetr´ıa respecto del eje de or-
denadas. Tomando como origen A
/
, transformado de A, obtenemos un camino del
conjunto A. Gr´ aficamente:
O(0, 0)
N(l, m)
A(2n, 2m)
A

O
N
Fig. 5.12. Transformaci ´ on de un camino del conjunto Ben otro del conjunto A.
Al tratarse de una composici´ on de movimientos (simetr´ıa axial y traslaci´ on) para
una secci ´ on del camino y la transformaci ´ on identidad para el resto del camino dando
lugar a un nuevo camino, se trata de una biyecci´ on con las funciones directa e inversa
tal como se han descrito. Esto concluye la demostraci´ on.
80 Solutions
3.8 Tenemos que S
2n−1
= 2r −1, r = 1, . . . , n el camino pasa necesariamente por
el punto (1, 1), que tomamos como nuevo origen. Vamos a sustraer los caminos que
tocan la recta x =−1. Para ello, tomamos el camino sim´ etrico respecto de x =−1 de
cualquier camino que toca a la recta x =−1, el punto (1, 1) se transforma en (1, −3),
por lo que
n

r=1
_
N
2n−2,2r−2
−N
2n−2,2r+2
_
=N
2n−2,0
+N
2n−2,2
=
_
2n−2
n−1
_
+
_
2n−2
n
_
=
_
2n−1
n
_
con lo que
1
2
P¦S
1
≥0, . . . , S
2n−1
≥0¦ =
1
2

1
2
2n−1
_
2n−1
n
_
=
1
2
n

n
2n
_
2n
n
_
=
1
2
u
2n
que es lo que quer´ıamos probar si damos por conocida la igualdad (3.2).
3.9 Si A
k
denota el suceso de que el r-´ esimo retormo al origen ocurre en el instante k,
la probabilidad pedida es, suponiendo que ocurren exactamente r retornos al origen:
P¦A
2r
∪A
2r+2
∪ ∪A
2n−2
¦ = P¦A
2r
¦+P¦A
2r+2
¦+ +P¦A
2n−2
¦
pues son sucesos mutuamente excluyentes. Por otra parte, el lema 3.1 afirma que:
P¦S
k+1
,= 0, . . . , S
2n
,= 0¦ = u
2n−k
con lo que:
P¦A
2r
¦ = ρ
r,2r
u
2n−2r
P¦A
2r+2
¦ = ρ
r,2r+2
u
2n−2r−2
=
P¦A
2n−2
¦ = ρ
r,2n−2
u
2
donde ρ
r,2k
es la probabilidad del r-´ esimo retorno en el instante 2k.
Teniendo en cuenta que u
2k
= P¦S
2k
= 0¦, resulta que:
ρ
r,2r
u
2n−2r
= P¦. . . , S
2r
= 0, . . . , S
2n
= 0¦ (*)
ρ
r,2r+2
u
2n−2r−2
= P¦. . . , S
2r+2
= 0, . . . , S
2n
= 0¦
=
ρ
r,2n−2
u
2
= P¦. . . , S
2n−2
= 0, S
2n
= 0¦
donde en cada l´ınea hay al menos r +1 retornos. Concretando m´ as, si llamamos B
2k
s
a
la probabilidad de que haya s retornos en el instante 2n habiendo sucedido r retornos
en el instante 2k, podemos reescribir lo anterior como:
Solutions 81
P¦. . . , S
2r
= 0, . . . , S
2n
= 0¦ = P¦B
2r
r+1
∪B
2r
r+2
∪ ∪B
2r
n−1
∪B
2r
n
¦
P¦. . . , S
2r+2
= 0, . . . , S
2n
= 0¦ = P¦B
2r+2
r+1
∪B
2r+2
r+2
∪ ∪B
2r+2
n−1
¦
=
P¦. . . , S
2n−2
= 0, S
2n
= 0¦ = P¦B
2n−2
r+1
¦
los sucesos B
2k
s
son mutuamente excluyentes, con lo que:
P¦B
2r
r+1
∪B
2r
r+2
∪ ∪B
2r
n
¦ = P¦B
2r
r+1
¦+P¦B
2r
r+2
¦+ +P¦B
2r
n−1
¦+P¦B
2r
n
¦
P¦B
2r+2
r+1
∪B
2r+2
r+2
∪ ∪B
2r+2
n−1
¦ = P¦B
2r+2
r+1
¦+P¦B
2r+2
r+2
¦+ +P¦B
2r+2
n−1
¦
=
P¦B
2n−2
r+1
¦ = P¦B
2n−2
r+1
¦
Igualando la suma de los miembros izquierdos de (*) con la suma derechos de
las ´ ultimas igualdades y teniendo en cuenta que:
P¦B
2r
r+1
¦+P¦B
2r+2
r+1
¦+ +P¦B
2n−4
r+1
¦+P¦B
2n−2
r+1
¦ = ρ
r+1,2n
P¦B
2r
r+2
¦+P¦B
2r+2
r+2
¦+ +P¦B
2n−4
r+2
¦ = ρ
r+2,2n
=
P¦B
2r
n
¦ = ρ
n,2n
obtenemos la igualdad buscada:
ρ
r,2r
u
2n−2r

r,2r+2
u
2n−2r−2
+ +ρ
r,2n−2
u
2
= ρ
r+1,2n

r+2,2n
+ +ρ
n,2n
3.10 Por el problema anterior, se trata de encontrar la probabilidad:
ρ
r,2r
u
2n−2r

r,2r+2
u
2n−2r−2
+ +ρ
r,2n−2
u
2

r,2n

r,2n

r+1,2n

r+2,2n
+ +ρ
n,2n
donde se han a˜ nadido los t´ erminos que faltan. Usando sumatorios:
82 Solutions
n

i=r
ρ
i,2n
=
n

i=r
ϕ
i,2n−i
(por el teorema 7.4)
=
n

r
i
2n−i
_
2n−i
n
_
1
2
2n−i
=
1
2
n
n

r
i
n+(n−i)
_
n+(n−i)
n
_
1
2
n−i
=
1
2
n
n−r

k=0
n−k
n+k
_
n+k
k
_
1
2
k
(cambio de ´ındice k = n−i)
=
1
2
n
n−r

k=0
n+k −2k
n+k
_
n+k
k
_
1
2
k
=
1
2
n
n−r

k=0
_
1−
2k
n+k
__
n+k
k
_
1
2
k
=
1
2
n
n−r

k=0
__
n+k
k
_
1
2
k

_
n+k −1
k −1
_
1
2
k−1
_
(por definici ´ on
_
n−1
−1
_
= 0)
=
1
2
n
_
n+n−r
n−r
_
1
2
n−r
(por la propiedad telesc´ opica)
=
1
2
2n−r
_
2n−r
n
_
como quer´ıamos probar.
Adem´ as, junto con el ejercicio anterior, hemos probado por un argumento com-
binatorio la siguiente identidad:
n

k=r
r
2k −r
_
2k −r
k
__
2n−2k
n−k
_
=
_
2n−r
n
_
, 1 ≤r ≤n
3.11
Sean
• Γ
2n
el conjunto de todos los caminos de longitud 2n que retornan por primera
vez al origen en el instante 2n.
• Ξ
r,2n−1
el conjunto de los caminos de longitud 2n−1 con r cambios de signo.
Todo camino de longitud 2n −1 con r cambios de signo se puede separar en
una secci ´ on inicial (desde el origen hasta el primer retorno al origen) perteneciente
al conjunto Γ
2k
con k = 1, 2, . . . , n −1 y una secci ´ on final (desde el primer retorno
al origen hasta el punto extremo de la derecha) perteneciente a Ξ
r−1,2n−1−2k
o a
Ξ
r,2n−1−2k
dependiendo de si S
2k−1
y S
2k+1
son de signo opuesto o del mismo signo
respectivamente.
A su vez dado un elemento de Ξ
r−1,2n−1−2k
y dos caminos sim´ etricos respecto
del eje de abscisas de Γ
2k
, formando dos nuevos caminos con secci ´ on inicial cada
uno de los caminos sim´ etricos, se obtiene que uno de ellos no cambia el n´ umero
Solutions 83
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
Γ
6
×Ξ
3,17
Γ
6
×Ξ
3,17
Γ
6
×Ξ
4,17
Γ
6
×Ξ
4,17
Fig. 5.13. (a) (b) Un mismo elemento de Ξ
3,17
(poligonal s´ olida) y dos elementos sim´ etricos
de Γ
6
(poligonal punteada) se combinan. En (a) el n´ umero de cambios de signo se incrementa
en una unidad proporcionando un elemento de Ξ
4,23
mientras que en (b) se mantiene el mismo
n´ umero de cambios de signo.
(c) (d) Un mismo elemento de Ξ
4,17
se combina con dos elementos sim´ etricos de Γ
6
. En (c)
El n´ umero de cambios de signo es el mismo y en (d) se incrementa en una unidad.
total de cambios de signo mientras que el otro lo aumenta en una unidad obteniendo
un camino del conjunto Ξ
r,2n−1
. Un razonamiento an´ alogo podemos hacer con un
camino de Ξ
r,2n−1−2k
y dos elementos sim´ etricos de Γ
2k
. Esto justifica el factor 1/2
en la f´ ormula. V´ ease Fig. 5.13.
Como 1 ≤k ≤n−1 entonces 1 ≤2n−1−2k ≤2n−3 todos instantes anteriores
a 2n−1 podemos asumir
4
ξ
r−1,2n−1−2k
= 2p
2n−1−2k,2r−1
ξ
r,2n−1−2k
= 2p
2n−1−2k,2r+1
con lo que
4
En rigor, habr´ıa que demostrar que (5.1) es cierto para el instante 1, i.e.
ξ
r,1
= 2p
1,2r+1
= 2
_
1
r +1
_
1
2
=
_
1, si r = 0;
0, si ,= 0.
como es obvio.
84 Solutions
ξ
r−1,2n−1−2k

r,2n−1−2k
= 2(p
2n−1−2k,2r−1
+ p
2n−1−2k,2r+1
)
= 2
__
2n−1−2k
n+r −k −1
_
+
_
2n−1−2k
n+r −k
__

1
2
2n−1−2k
= 2
_
2n−2k
n+r −k
_
1
2
2n−1−2k
= 4p
2n−2k,2r
por tanto
ξ
r,2n−1
=
1
2
n−1

k=1
f
2k
4p
2n−2k,2r
= 2
n−1

k=1
f
2k
p
2n−2k,2r
que es el doble de la probabilidad de alcanzar el punto (2n, 2r) retornando al menos
una vez al origen.
Para demostrar (5.1), calculemos la probabilidad de alcanzar el punto (2n, 2r)
retornando al menos una vez al origen, i.e. ∑ f
2k
p
2n−2k,2r
. Para ello, al n´ umero de
todos los caminos que conducen a (2n, 2r) le restaremos aquellos que no tocan el eje
usando el ballot theorem, i.e.
2
2n
p
2n,2r
. ¸¸ .
N´ umero total de caminos

2r
2n
N
2n,2r
. ¸¸ .
Ballot theorem
concretando
2
2n
p
2n,2r

2r
2n
N
2n,2r
=
_
2n
n+r
_

r
n
_
2n
n+r
_
=
n−r
n
_
2n
n+r
_
= 2
_
2n−1
n+r
_
La probabilidad mencionada es
n−1

k=1
f
2k
p
2n−2k,2r
=
1
2
2n
2
_
2n−1
n+r
_
=
_
2n−1
n+r
_
1
2
2n−1
= p
2n−1,2r+1
Y por ser ξ
r,2n−1
el doble del sumatorio, obtenemos finalmente
ξ
r,2n−1
= 2p
2n−1,2r+1
.
3.12 Ver el pie de la Fig. 5.14.
3.13 La igualdad del enunciado la podemos escribir
u
2n
=
n

r=1
n+1
4r(n−r +1)
u
2r−2
u
2n−2r
Solutions 85
x = k + 1
x = k
(2n, 0)
(2n, 2k)
(2n, 2k + 2)
(2n, 0)
x = k
Fig. 5.14. El n´ umero de caminos que tocan x = k con S
2n
= 0 es el mismo que el de caminos
desde el origen hasta (2n, 2k) como se ve por reflexi ´ on (figura de la izquierda) a los que habr´ a
que sustraer el n´ umero de los que alcanzan la recta x = k +1 y que por reflexi ´ on es el mismo
que el n´ umero de caminos desde el origen hasta el punto (2n, 2k +2) (figura de la derecha).
Por tanto, los que quedan son los que tocan x = k pero no x = k +1, es decir aquellos cuyo
m´ aximo es k. La f´ ormula se deduce f´ acilmente de estos hechos
1
2
2n
_
N
2n,2k
−N
2n,2k+2
_
=
P¦S
2n
= 2k¦−P¦S
2n
= 2k +2¦.
Descompongamos la fracci ´ on
n+1
4x(n−x +1)
=
A
4x
+
B
n−x +1
que conduce al sistema
−A+B = 0
(n+1)A = n+1
_
cuya soluci ´ on es A = 1, B = 1/4. Por lo que
u
2n
=
n

r=1
_
1
4r
+
1
4(n−r +1)
_
u
2r−2
u
2n−r
=
n

r=1
1
4r
u
2r−2
u
2n−r
+
n

r=1
1
4(n−r +1)
u
2r−2
u
2n−r
= I +J
usaremos la siguiente igualdad
u
2k−2
=
2k
2k −1
u
2k
= 2k f
2k
(*)
Procedamos por cada t´ ermino del sumatorio
86 Solutions
I =
n

r=1
1
4r
u
2r−2
u
2n−2r
J =
n

r=1
1
4(n−r +1)
u
2r−2
u
2n−2r
=
n

r=1
1
4r
2r f
2r
u
2n−2r
=
n−1

s=0
1
4(n−s)
u
2s
u
2n−2s−2
=
1
2
n

r=1
f
2r
u
2n−2r
=
n−1

s=0
1
4(n−s)
2
2s
(2n−2s) f
2n−2s
=
1
2
n−1

s=0
f
2n−2s
u
2s
Tenemos que J = I con sus t´ erminos en orden reverso donde hemos usado (*) y
el cambio de ´ındice s = r −1. Por tanto
u
2n
= I +J =
n

r=1
f
2r
u
2n−2r
= f
2
u
2n−2
+ f
4
u
2n−4
+ + f
2n
u
0
n ≥1.
que es la expresi ´ on (2.6) del texto.
3.14 En realidad lo que establece la primera parte del problema es una relaci ´ on de
equivalencia en el conjunto de los caminos de longitud 2n con S
2n
= 0 estableciendo
un camino circular cerrado transformado por el grupo de las rotaciones de centro el
centro de la circunferencia y ´ angulos (360

/2n) k k = 0, 1, . . . , 2n−1, que repre-
sentaremos por R360

2n
k
, de manera que al “deshacer” el camino cerrado transformado
vamos obteniendo los diversos caminos de la clase de equivalencia (en n´ umero de
2n como m´ aximo), Si queremos desplazar su m´ aximo de r a s hay que aplicar una
rotaci ´ on con k tal que r −k ≡s (mod 2n) lo que equivale tomar origen en (k, S
k
).
Ilustremos lo anterior con un ejemplo
Por tanto, el n´ umero de veces que un m´ aximo ocurre en el punto de abscisa r no
depende de r pues podemos elegir su abscisa arbitrariamente, ver Fig 5.15.
Por lo expuesto en la primera parte del problema, el n´ umero de veces que se pre-
senta el m´ aximo no depende de su abscisa. Supongamos que el m´ aximo se encuentra
en el punto (m, r) m = 0, 1, . . . , 2n −1 r = 0, 1, . . . , n, el n´ umero total de caminos
es N
2n,0
y el n´ umero de caminos cuyo m´ aximo es (m, r) es
5
5
Si m = 0, el n´ umero de caminos es
N
2n,0
−N
2n,2
=
_
2n
n
_

_
2n
n+1
_
=
1
n+1
_
2n
n
_
que concuerda con lo expuesto m´ as arriba.
Solutions 87
Fig. 5.15. Clase de equivalencia de los caminos de longitud 6 con S
6
= 0. Dado un represen-
tante, los dem´ as se obtienen por rotaciones respecto del centro de la circunferencia de ´ angulos
0

, 60

, 120

, 180

, 240

y 300

respectivamente. Se trata del mismo camino cerrado en cada
caso por tanto no se modifica su m´ aximo y podemos elegir la abscisa en que ocurre tomando
la rotaci ´ on pertinente.
n

r=0
(N
m,r
−N
m,r+2
) (N
2n−m,r
−N
2n−m,r+2
)
=
n

r=0
__
m
m+r
2
_

_
m
m+r
2
+1
____
2n−m
n−
m−r
2
_

_
2n−m
n+1−
m−r
2
__
= A(n)
El primer factor del sumatorio es el n´ umero de secciones desde (0, 0) hasta (m, r)
que no tocan la recta x = r +1, por reflexi´ on se obtiene dicho n´ umero. El segundo
factor es el n´ umero de secciones desde (m, r) hasta (2n, 0) que no tocan la recta
x = r +1, aplicando a dichas secciones una simetr´ıa respecto de la recta t = 2n y
tomando como origen el punto (2n, 0), ese n´ umero es el mismo que el de secciones
desde (0, 0) hasta (2n −m, r) que no tocan la recta x = r +1 que se obtiene por
reflexi ´ on respecto de la recta x = r.
88 Solutions
El n´ umero A(n) expresa que el n´ umero de caminos no depende de m por lo ante-
riormente expuesto pero s´ı de n, para calcularlo, podemos tomar cualquier m si m=0
este n´ umero es (ver la nota al pie de p´ agina)
A(n) =
1
n+1
_
2n
n
_
Si llamamos p(n) a la probabilidad pedida
p(n) =

n
r=0
(N
m,r
−N
m,r+2
) (N
2n−m,r
−N
2n−m,r+2
)
N
2n,0
=
1
n+1
En particular, por un argumento combinatorio, tenemos la siguiente identidad
n

r=0
__
m
m+r
2
_

_
m
m+r
2
+1
____
2n−m
n−
m−r
2
_

_
2n−m
n+1−
m−r
2
__
=
1
n+1
_
2n
n
_
m = 0, 1, . . . , 2n−1 r = 0, 1, . . . , n
Para afianzar lo expuesto, calculemos la anterior identidad para algunos valores de
m, pero antes hagamos algunas transformaciones
n

r=0
__
m
m+r
2
_

_
m
m+r
2
+1
____
2n−m
n−
m−r
2
_

_
2n−m
n+1−
m−r
2
__
=
n

r=0
_
1−
m−r
2
m+r
2
+1
__
m
m+r
2
_

_
1−
n−
m+r
2
n+1−
m−r
2
__
2n−m
n−
m−r
2
_
=
n

r=0
r +1
m+r
2
+1
_
m
m+r
2
_

1+r
n+1−
m−r
2
_
2n−m
n−
m−r
2
_
=
n

r=0
(1+r)
2
_
1+
m+r
2
__
n+1−
m−r
2
_
_
m
m+r
2
__
2n−m
n−
m−r
2
_
• m = 0
n

r=0
(1+r)
2
_
1+
r
2
__
n+1+
r
2
_
_
0
r
2
__
2n
n+
r
2
_
=
1
n+1
_
2n
n
_
• m = 1
n

r=0
(1+r)
2
_
1+
1+r
2
__
n+1−
1−r
2
_
_
1
1+r
2
__
2n−1
n−
1−r
2
_
=
2
2
2(n+1)
_
1
1
__
2n−1
n
_
=
2
n+1
_
2n−1
n
_
=
2
n+1

n
2n
_
2n
n
_
=
1
n+1
_
2n
n
_
Solutions 89
• m = 2
n

r=0
(1+r)
2
_
2+
r
2
__
n+
r
2
_
_
2
1+
r
2
__
2n−2
n−1+
r
2
_
=
1
2n
_
2
1
__
2n−2
n−1
_
+
9
3(n+1)
_
2
2
__
2n−2
n
_
=
1
n
_
2n−2
n−1
_
+
3
n+1
_
2n−2
n
_
=
1
n

n n
2n(2n−1)
_
2n
n
_
+
3
n+1

n(n−1)
2n(2n−1)
_
2n
n
_
=
_
1
2(2n−1)
+
3(n−1)
2(n+1)(2n−1)
__
2n
n
_
=
4n−2
2(n+1)(2n−1)
_
2n
n
_
=
1
n+1
_
2n
n
_
• m = 3
n

r=0
(1+r)
2
_
1+
3+r
2
__
n+1−
3−r
2
_
_
3
3+r
2
__
2n−3
n−
3−r
2
_
=
4
3n
_
3
2
__
2n−3
n−1
_
+
16
4(n+1)
_
3
3
__
2n−3
n
_
=
4
n
_
2n−3
n−1
_
+
4
n+1
_
2n−3
n
_
=
4
n

n n (n−1)
2n(2n−1)(2n−2)
_
2n
n
_
+
4
n+1

n(n−1)(n−2)
2n(2n−1)(2n−2)
_
2n
n
_
=
1
2n−1
_
2n
n
_
+
n−2
(n+1)(2n−1)
_
2n
n
_
=
2n−1
(n+1)(2n−1)
_
2n
n
_
=
1
n+1
_
2n
n
_
Problems of Chapter 4
4.1 Es m´ as f´ acil calcular la probabilidad del suceso opuesto. De las 20 19 18
17 muestras posibles, para que ning´ un zapato coincida con su par, el primero lo
podemos elegir de entre los 20 que hay, el segundo entre 18, el tercero entre 16 y el
cuarto entre 14, dando 20 18 16 14 muestras posible. La probabilidad pedida es
1−20 19 18 17/20 18 16 14 = 99/323 ≈0,3065.
4.2 Etiquetemos las caras del 1 al 6 y designemos al suceso al menos tres dados
muestran la cara i por C
i
donde i = 1, . . . , 6. Como el n´ umero de dados es 5, est´ a
90 Solutions
claro que se trata de sucesos mutuamente excluyentes
6
adem´ as, por simetr´ıa, las
probabilidades de los sucesos C
i
son iguales. La probabilidad que pide el problema
es el s´ extuple de la probabilidad que se cumpla, por ejemplo, C
1
. Calcul´ emosla.
Etiquetemos los dados del 1 al 5. Sean los sucesos A
1
, . . . , A
5
, donde A
1
significa
el dado 1 muestra la cara 1, A
1
A
2
los dados 1 y 2 muestran la cara 1, es decir, la
misma cara, etc. Si queremos que al menos tres de ellos muestren la misma cara,
deben de cumplirse al menos 3 de los sucesos A
1
, . . . , A
5
. Apliquemos (5.2), con-
siderando a las seis caras como celdas y los cinco dados como bolas, el n´ umero total
de distribuciones es 6
5
y las distintas probabilidades
p
i
1
...i
k
=
6
5−k
6
5
=
1
6
k
k = 1, . . . , 5.
calculemos S
k
S
k
=

1≤i
1
<<i≤5
p
i
1
...i
5
=
_
5
k
_
1
6
k
Apliquemos (5.2)
P
3
=
5

k=3
(−1)
k−3
_
k −1
2
_
S
k
=
5

k=3
(−1)
k−3
_
k −1
2
__
5
k
_
1
6
k
= 10
1
6
3
−15
1
6
4
+6
1
6
5
≈,035494.
La probabilidad pedida es
6P
3
≈ 0,212963 .
Calcul´ emosla por los n´ umeros de ocupaci ´ on de II,5. El n´ umero de ocupaci ´ on
3, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0 significa 3 dados (bolas) con la misma cara (en la misma caja), 1 dado
(otra bola) con otra cara (en otra caja), 1 dado (otra bola distinta de las anteriores)
con otra cara (en otra caja distinta de las anteriores). Resum´ amoslo en la tabla 5.3.
La suma de las probabilidades (sucesos mutuamente excluyentes) es 0,154321+
0,038580+0,019290+0,000772 ≈ 0,212963 .
4.3 Si representa los valores que puede tomar la moneda, tenemos la tabla 5.4. La
probabilidad es
2
2
+2 2
2
5
=
8
32
=
1
4
4.4 Observar la tabla 5.5 La probabilidad es
2
5
+5 2
4
2
10
=
2+5
2
6
=
7
2
6
6
Si el n´ umero de dados fuera mayor no ser´ıa verdad, pues podr´ıan haber dos tr´ıos de dados
que mostraran cada tr´ıo la misma cara pero distintas entre s´ı y tendr´ıamos que aplicar el
principio inclusi ´ on-exclusi ´ on.
Solutions 91
Table 5.3. Distribuci´ on de 5 bolas en 6 cajas, al menos tres de ellas en la misma caja.
N´ umeros de
ocupaci ´ on
N´ umero de distribu-
ciones igual a 6! 5!
dividido por
Probabilidad
(N´ umero de
distribuciones
dividido por
6
5
)
3, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0 1!2!3! 3!1!1! 0,154321
3, 2, 0, 0, 0, 0 1!1!4! 3!2! 0,038580
4, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0 1!1!4! 4!1! 0,019290
5, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0 1!5! 5! 0,000772
Table 5.4. Problema 4.3.
Configuraci ´ on Casos posibles
HHH 2
2
THHH 2
THHH 2
Table 5.5. Problema 4.4.
Configuraci ´ on Casos posibles
HHHHH 2
5
THHHHH 2
4
THHHHH 2
4
THHHHH 2
4
THHHHH 2
4
THHHHH 2
4
4.5 Si representa cualquiera de los seis valores que puede tomar el dado y ´cinco
valores exceptuando el as, tenemos las tablas 5.6 y 5.7. La probabilidad es
6
2
+2 5 6
6
5
=
6+2 5
6
4
=
1
81
La probabilidad es
6
5
+5 5 6
4
6
10
=
6+25
6
6
=
31
6
6
4.6 Sea A
i
el suceso, “(i, i) aparece entre los r lanzamientos de los dos dados”.
Por tanto, p
r
= P¦A
1
A
2
A
6
¦. Calcularemos la probabilidad del suceso contrario
92 Solutions
Table 5.6. Problema 4.5, primera parte.
Configuraci ´ on Casos posibles
AAA 6
2
´AAA 56
´AAA 65
Table 5.7. Problema 4.5, segunda parte.
Configuraci ´ on Casos posibles
AAAAA 6
5
´AAAAA 56
4
´AAAAA 56
4
´AAAAA 56
4
´AAAAA 56
4
´AAAAA 56
4
usando el principio de inclusi´ on-exclusi ´ on aplicado a A
/
i
, pues
A
1
A
2
A
6
=
_
A
/
1

/
2
∪ ∪A
/
6
_
/
, (ley de De Morgan).
Adem´ as
p
i
1
...i
k
= P¦A
/
i
1
A
/
i
k
¦ k = 1, . . . , 6 1 ≤i
1
< i
k
≤6,
de donde
p
i
1
...i
6
=
_
36−k
36
_
r
.
Aplicando el principio de inclusi´ on-exclusi ´ on (1.5), donde
S
k
=
_
6
k
_
p
i
1
...i
k
,
queda
p
r
= 1−P¦A
/
1

/
2
∪ ∪A
/
6
¦ =
6

k=0
(−1)
k
_
6
k
__
36−k
36
_
r
= 1−6
_
35
36
_
r
+15
_
34
36
_
r
−20
_
33
36
_
r
+15
_
32
36
_
r
−6
_
31
36
_
r
+
_
30
36
_
r
4.7 Sean los sucesos A
1
, . . . , A
13
, donde A
i
significa “la mano contiene cuatro cartas
con el valor i”. Lo que se pide es calcular P
[m]
, m = 0, 1, 2, 3, para lo que usaremos
la f´ ormula (3.1). Tenemos que
Solutions 93
p
i
1
...i
k
=
_
52−4k
13−4k
_
_
52
13
_ k =1, 2, 3 para los dem´ as valores se anula 1 ≤i
1
< <i
k
≤13
de donde
S
k
=
_
13
k
__
52−4k
13−4k
_
_
52
13
_ .
Aplicando (3.1) y tomando S
0
= 1
P
[0]
=
3

k=0
(−1)
k
_
k
0
_
S
k
=
_
0
0
_
S
0

_
1
0
_
S
1
+
_
2
0
_
S
2

_
3
0
_
S
3
= 1−
_
13
1
__
48
9
_
_
52
13
_ +
_
13
2
__
44
5
_
_
52
13
_ −
_
13
3
__
40
1
_
_
52
13
_ ≈0,9658
P
[1]
=
3

k=1
(−1)
k−1
_
k
1
_
S
k
=
_
1
1
_
S
1

_
2
1
_
S
2
+
_
3
1
_
S
3
=
_
1
1
__
13
1
__
48
9
_
_
52
13
_ −
_
2
1
__
13
2
__
44
5
_
_
52
13
_ +
_
3
1
__
13
3
__
40
1
_
_
52
13
_ ≈0,0341
P
[2]
=
3

k=2
(−1)
k−2
_
k
2
_
S
k
=
_
2
2
_
S
2

_
3
2
_
S
3
=
_
2
2
__
13
2
__
44
5
_
_
52
13
_ −
_
3
2
__
13
3
__
40
1
_
_
52
13
_ ≈1,333810
−4
P
[3]
=
3

k=3
(−1)
k−3
_
k
3
_
S
k
=
_
3
3
_
S
3
=
_
3
3
__
13
3
__
40
1
_
_
52
13
_ ≈1,801510
−8
4.8 Sean los sucesos A
1
, . . . , A
N
, donde A
i
la persona i aparece en la muestra. Ob-
viamente, queremos calcular u
r
= P¦A
1
A
N
¦. Para ello usaremos las leyes de De
Morgan y la probabilidad del suceso contrario, i.e.
A
1
A
N
=
_
A
/
1
∪ ∪A
/
N
_
/
(ley de De Morgan)
y la propiedad de la probabilidad del suceso contrario
P¦A
1
A
N
¦ = 1−P¦A
/
1
∪ ∪A
/
N
¦ = 1−
N

k=1
(−1)
k−1
S
k
.
aplicando el principio de inclusi ´ on-exclusi ´ on, para ello calculemos
p
i
1
...i
k
= P¦A
/
i
1
A
/
i
k
¦ =
(n−k)
r
n
r
=
_
1−
k
n
_
r
94 Solutions
de donde
S
k
=
_
N
k
_
p
i
1
...i
k
=
_
N
k
__
1−
k
n
_
r
.
La probabilidad pedida es
u
r
= P¦A
1
A
N
¦ = 1−
N

k=1
(−1)
k−1
_
N
k
__
1−
k
n
_
r
=
N

k=0
(−1)
k
_
N
k
__
1−
k
n
_
r
.
En concordancia con el problema 12 de II,11.
4.9 Lo sucesos A
1
, . . . , A
N
, tienen el mismo significado que en el problema anterior.
El procedimiento es el mismo. Lo ´ unico que cambia es la asignaci´ on de probabili-
dades p
i
1
...i
k
, que en esta caso son
p
i
1
...i
k
= P¦A
/
i
1
A
/
i
k
¦ =
_
n−k
r
_
_
n
r
_ , S
k
=
_
N
k
__
n−k
r
_
_
n
r
_ ,
de donde
u
r
=
N

k=0
(−1)
k
_
N
k
__
n−k
r
_
_
n
r
_ . (*)
Si n →∞, r →∞ y r/n →p, veamos a que tiende u
r
u
r
=
N

k=0
(−1)
k
_
N
k
_
(n−k)(n−k −1) (n−k −r +1)
n(n−1) (n−r +1)
Cancelando factores comunes en numerador y denominador, estos se reducen a k de
ellos
=
N

k=0
(−1)
k
_
N
k
_
(n−r)(n−r −1) (n−r −(k −1))
n(n−1) (n−(k −1))
=
N

k=0
(−1)
k
_
N
k
_
_
1−
r
n
_
_
1−
r
n−1
_

_
1−
r
n−(k −1)
_

N

k=0
_
N
k
_
(−1)
k
(1−p)
k
= (1−(1−p))
N
= p
N
Para probar la identidad de (*) con el resultado del problema 3 de II,11, aplicamos
el resultado (12,15) del cap´ıtulo II, a saber
N

k=0
(−1)
k
_
N
k
__
n−k
r
_
=
_
n−N
n−r
_
=
_
n−N
r −N
_
,
Solutions 95
de donde se sigue la identidad de las dos expresiones.
4.10 Sabemos que
¸
¸
¸
¸
¸
¸
¸
¸
a
11
. . . a
1N
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
a
N1
. . . a
NN
¸
¸
¸
¸
¸
¸
¸
¸
=

σ∈S
N
a
1σ(1)
a
Nσ(N)
1 ≤i, j ≤N
donde S
N
es el grupo sim´ etrico de orden N que en total tiene N! permutaciones, por
tanto, este es tambi´ en el n´ umero de t´ erminos del determinante.
Sean A
1
, . . . , A
N
, los sucesos donde A
i
se refiere a aquellas permutaciones con
σ(i) = i y, por tanto, se refiere a aquellos t´ erminos del determinante con alg´ un
elemento de la diagonal principal. Calculemos la probabilidad de que un t´ ermino
elegido al azar contenga alg´ un factor elemento de la diagonal principal de la matriz,
i.e.
P¦A
1
∪ ∪A
N
¦ =
N

k=1
(−1)
k−1
S
k
,
calculemos S
k
p
i
1
...i
k
=
(N−k)!
N!
de donde S
k
=
_
N
k
_
(N−k)!
N!
=
1
k!
.
Por tanto
P¦A
1
∪ ∪A
N
¦ =
N

k=1
(−1)
k−1
1
k!
= P
1
,
el n´ umero de t´ erminos pedido es N!P
1
.
4.11 El n´ umero de maneras de disponer 8 torres en un tablero de ajedrez sin que se
“coman” es igual al n´ umero de t´ erminos de un determinante de orden 8, pues estos
son de la forma a
1σ(1)
a
2σ(2)
a
8σ(8)
. Si asociamos la posici´ on de cada torre con
cada uno de los factores (elementos de la matriz) que intervienen, vemos que las
torres est´ an en filas distintas (primer sub´ındice distinto para cada una) y en columnas
distintas pues σ(1), σ(2), . . . , σ(8) no es m´ as que una permutaci´ on de 1, 2, . . . , 8.
As´ı no pueden encontrarse. Por tanto el n´ umero de maneras de disponer las 8 torres
sin que puedan interceptarse es 8! (n´ umero de t´ erminos del determinante). Si adem´ as
no queremos que ninguna torre est´ e sobre la diagonal principal, tenemos que restarle
el n´ umero de maneras con alguna torre sobre ella, esto se corresponde con el n´ umero
de t´ erminos del determinante con alg´ un elemento sobre la diagonal principal, seg´ un
el problema 4.10, estos son 8!P
1
. En total
8! −8!P
1
= 8!(1−P
1
).
4.12 Sean los sucesos A
1
, . . . , A
n
, donde A
i
representa ‘la carta de n´ umero i aparece
en la muestra’. Por las leyes de De Morgan, la probabilidad del suceso contrario y el
principio de inclusi´ on-exclusi ´ on tenemos
96 Solutions
A
1
A
n
=
_
A
/
1
∪ ∪A
/
n
_
/
P¦A
1
A
n
¦ = 1−P¦A
/
1
∪ ∪A
/
n
¦ = 1−
n

k=1
(−1)
k−1
S
k
.
calculemos p
i
1
...i
k
y S
k
.
p
i
1
...i
k
=
(sn−sk)
r
(sn)
r
S
k
=
_
n
k
_
(sn−sk)
r
(sn)
r
y la probabilidad pedida es
u
r
= P¦A
1
A
n
¦ =
n

k=0
(−1)
k
_
n
k
_
(sn−sk)
r
(sn)
r
.
4.13
u
r
=
n

k=0
(−1)
k
_
n
k
_
(sn−sk)
r
(sn)
r
=
n

k=0
(−1)
k
_
n
k
_
(sn−sk)(sn−sk −1) (sn−sk −r +1)
sn(sn−1) (sn−r +1)
=
n

k=0
(−1)
k
_
n
k
__
1−
k
n
__
1−
sk
sn−1
_

_
1−
sk
sn−r +1
_

n

k=0
(−1)
k
_
n
k
__
1−
k
n
_
r
= p
0
(r, n)
4.14 Por el problema 4.12
• Si r < n, el n´ umero de cartas extra´ıdas es menor que el n´ umero de n´ umeros. Por
tanto, su probabilidad es nula.
• Si r =n, cada extracci ´ on debe corresponder a un n´ umero distinto (complet´ andolos
todos) habiendo n! ordenaciones y como cada n´ umero se puede obtener de s
maneras la probabilidad es
u
n
=
s
n
n!
(sn)
n
,
igualando con la soluci ´ on del problema 4.12, se sigue el enunciado.
Llamemos
H(x) =
1
(1−x)
ns−r+1
¦1−(1−x)
s
¦
n
= f (x)g(x)
donde
f (x) =
1
(1−x)
ns−r+1
g(x) =¦1−(1−x)
s
¦
n
Por una parte
Solutions 97
H(x) =
1
(1−x)
ns−r+1
¦1−(1−x)
s
¦
n
por la f´ ormula del binomio
= H(x) =
1
(1−x)
ns−r+1
_
n

k=0
_
n
k
_
(−1)
k
(1−x)
sk
_
=
n

k=0
_
n
k
_
(−1)
k
(1−x)
−(ns−sk−r+1)
Calculemos algunas derivadas
H
/
(x) =
n

k=0
_
n
k
_
(−1)
k
(ns −sk −r +1)(1−x)
−(ns−sk−r+2)
H
//
(x) =
n

k=0
_
n
k
_
(−1)
k
(ns −sk −r +1)(ns −sk −r +2)(1−x)
−(ns−sk−r+3)
en particular, la derivada r-´ esima es
H
(r)
(x) =
n

k=0
_
n
k
_
(−1)
k
(ns −sk −r +1)(ns −sk −r +2) (ns −sk)(1−x)
−(ns−sk+1)
para x = 0, tenemos el miembro izquierdo de la igualdad a demostrar
H
(r)
(0) =
n

k=0
_
n
k
_
(−1)
k
(ns −sk −r +1)(ns −sk −r +2) (ns −sk)
=
n

k=0
_
n
k
_
(−1)
k
(ns −ks)
r
(*)
Para encontrar su valor, derivemos H(x) como un producto, aplicando la f´ ormula de
Leibniz
H
(r)
(0) =
r

k=0
_
r
k
_
f
(k)
(0)g
(r−k)
(0).
Despu´ es de algunos c´ alculos comprobamos que
f
(i)
(x) = (ns −r +i)
i
(1−x)
−(ns−r+i+1)
si 0 ≤i
g
( j)
(x) = (n)
j
¦1−(1−x)
s
¦
n−j
s
j
(1−x)
j(s−1)
si 0 ≤ j
+ p
1
(1−x)¦1−(1−x)
s
¦
n−j+1
+ p
2
(1−x)¦1−(1−x)
s
¦
n−j+2
+ + p
j−1
(1−x)¦1−(1−x)
s
¦
n−1
98 Solutions
Las p’s son polinomios en 1 −x .De donde para los ´ ordenes de derivadas que nos
interesan
f
(i)
(0) = (ns −r +i)
i
0 ≤i ≤r (recordar que (ns −r)
0
= 1)
g
( j)
(0) =
_
0 si 0 ≤ j ≤r < n
n!s
n
si j = r = n
por la f´ ormula de Leibniz, tenemos
H
(r)
(0) =
_
0 si r < n
n!s
n
si r = n
Por comparaci ´ on con (*) se siguen los resultados que quer´ıamos demostrar.
4.15 Lo que el problema pide es encontrar la probabilidad de que aparezcan los
n n´ umeros en la extracci´ on r-´ esima pero que no est´ en todos (falte uno de los n
n´ umeros) en la extracci´ on r −1-´ esima. Para ello, usando la soluci´ on del prob-
lema 4.12, calcularemos los casos favorables que conducen a la probabilidad u
r
y
le sustraeremos aquellos donde se han obtenido los n n´ umeros en a lo m´ as la r −1-
´ esima extracci´ on, usaremos la probabilidad u
r−1
. Hay (sn)
r
casos posibles, los casos
favorables para la probabilidad pedida son
(sn)
r
u
r
−(sn−r +1)(sn)
r−1
u
r−1
= (sn)
r
(u
r
−u
r−1
).
La probabilidad pedida es
u
r
−u
r−1
=
n

k=0
(−1)
k
_
n
k
__
(sn−sk)
r
(sn)
r

(sn−sk)
r−1
(sn)
r−1
_
=
n

k=0
(−1)
k
_
n
k
__

sk
sn
(sn−sk)
r−1
(sn)
r−1
_
=
n

k=0
(−1)
k−1
_
n
k
_
k
n
(sn−sk)
r−1
(sn)
r−1
=
n

k=1
(−1)
k−1
_
n−1
k −1
_
(sn−sk)
r−1
(sn)
r−1
Para el c´ alculo del l´ımite hagamos el cambio de ´ındice ν = k −1, con lo que la
probailidad es
u
r
−u
r−1
=
n−1

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
n−1
ν
_
(sn−sν −s)
ν
(sn)
r−1
=
n−1

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
n−1
ν
__
1−
sν +s −1
sn−1
_

_
1−
sν +s −1
sn−r +1
_

n−1

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
n−1
ν
__
1−
ν +1
n
_
r−1
Solutions 99
4.16 Sean los sucesos A
1
, . . . , A
N
, donde el suceso A
i
significa “el i-´ esimo cromo-
soma interviene en el intercambio de partes”.
P
[m]
=
N

k=m
(−1)
k−m
_
k
m
_
S
k
.
Tenemos que
S
k
=

1≤i
1
<<i
k
≤N
P¦A
i
1
A
i
k
¦,
es m´ as f´ acil calcular la probabilidad del suceso contrario
P¦A
i
1
A
i
k
¦ = 1−P¦
_
A
i
1
A
i
k
_
/
¦
por una de las leyes de De Morgan
= 1−P¦A
/
i
1
∪ ∪A
/
i
k
¦
aplicando el principio de inclusi ´ on-exclusi ´ on
=
k

l=0
(−1)
l
_
n−l
2
_
r
_
n
2
_
r
.
Con lo que la probabilidad pedida es
P
[m]
=
N

k=m
(−1)
k−m
_
k
m
__
N
k
_
k

l=0
(−1)
l
_
n−l
2
_
r
_
n
2
_
r
=
_
N
2
_
−r
_
N
m
_
N

k=m
(−1)
k−m
_
N−m
k −m
_
k

l=0
(−1)
l
_
k
l
__
N−l
2
_
r
.
A primera vista, parece que no concuerda con la soluci ´ on que ofrece el autor, mucho
m´ as sencilla formal y conceptualmente. Veamos, sin embargo, que son equivalentes.
Tenemos que
P
[m]
=
_
N
2
_
−r
_
N
m
_
N

k=m
(−1)
k−m
_
N−m
k −m
_
k

l=0
(−1)
l
_
k
l
__
N−l
2
_
r
en el segundo sumatorio podemos ampliar los valores que toma l, pues
_
k
l
_
= 0 si
l > k, por lo que podemos expresar
=
_
N
2
_
−r
_
N
m
_
N

k=m
(−1)
k−m
_
N−m
k −m
_
N

l=0
(−1)
l
_
k
l
__
N−l
2
_
r
intercambiemos el orden de sumaci´ on
100 Solutions
=
_
N
2
_
−r
_
N
m
_
N

l=0
(−1)
l
_
n

k=m
(−1)
k−m
_
N−m
k −m
__
k
l
_
_
_
N−l
2
_
r
cambio de ´ındice ν = N−k
=
_
N
2
_
−r
_
N
m
_
N

l=0
(−1)
l
_
N−m

ν=0
(−1)
N−m−ν
_
N−m
N−m−ν
__
N−ν
l
_
_
_
N−l
2
_
r
=
_
N
2
_
−r
_
N
m
_
N

l=0
(−1)
l+N−m
_
N−m

ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
N−m
ν
__
N−ν
l
_
_
_
N−l
2
_
r
aplicando la identidad (12.8) del cap´ıtulo II del texto original, la expresi ´ on entre
llaves se transforma, i.e ∑
N−m
ν=0
(−1)
ν
_
N−m
ν
__
N−ν
l
_
=
_
N−(N−m)
l−(N−m)
_
=
_
m
m−(N−l)
_
, con lo
que tenemos
=
_
N
2
_
−r
_
N
m
_
N

l=0
(−1)
N−m+l
_
m
m−(N−l)
__
N−l
2
_
r
otro cambio de ´ındice µ = N−l y teniendo en cuenta que
_
m
m−µ
_
=
_
m
µ
_
, queda
=
_
N
2
_
−r
_
N
m
_
N

µ=0
(−1)
m−µ
_
m
µ
__
µ
2
_
r
=
_
N
2
_
−r
_
N
m
_
m

µ=2
(−1)
m−µ
_
m
µ
__
µ
2
_
r
Que es la soluci ´ on del autor, se interpreta de la siguiente manera, podemos elegir m
de los sucesos de
_
N
m
_
maneras, el c´ alculo de la probabilidad se realiza como hemos
expuesto al principio, i.e. probabilidad del suceso contrario, leyes de De Morgan y
principio de inclusi´ on-exclusi ´ on.
Vemos, pues, que ambas soluciones s´ on id´ enticas.
4.17 Sean A
1
, . . . , A
4
los sucesos donde A
i
significa la mano no contiene el palo i.
De (3.1), tenemos
P
[k]
=
4

i=k
(−1)
i−k
_
i
k
_
S
i
donde
S
i
=
_
4
i
_
_
52−13i
5
_
_
52
5
_ ,
la respuesta es
P
[0]
≈0,2637; P
[1]
≈0,5884; P
[2]
≈0,1459; P
[3]
≈0,0020.
Solutions 101
4.18 Se aplica (3.1) tomando
S
k
=
_
4
k
_
_
52−2k
13−2k
_
_
52
13
_ ,
la respuesta es
P
[0]
=0,7808; P
[1]
=0,2046; P
[2]
=0,0148; P
[3]
=0,0003; P
[4]
=1,710210
−6
.
Problems of Chapter 5
5.1 La hip´ otesis H (todas las caras son distintas), tiene probabilidad P¦H¦ =
(6)
3
/6
3
. Si A es el suceso sale un as, tenemos P¦AH¦ = 3 5 4/6
3
, por tanto
P¦A [ H¦ = 3 5 4/(6 5 4) = 1/2.
5.2 La hip´ otesis H es el suceso sale al menos un as. Hallemos la probabilidad del
suceso contrario, el n´ umero de casos posibles es 6
10
y el de favorables 5
10
(no sale
ning´ un as). Por tanto, P¦H¦ = 1 −P¦H
/
¦ = 1 −5
10
/6
10
. Sea A el suceso salen, al
menos, dos ases. Calculemos la probabilidad condicional del suceso contrario A
/
,
con lo que
7
P¦A [ H¦ = 1−P¦A
/
[ H¦ = 1−
P¦A
/

P¦H¦
= 1−
10 5
9
1−
5
10
6
10
= 1−
10 5
9
6
10
−5
10
≈ 0,6148
5.3 La probabilidad de la hip´ otesis H West no tiene as, es P¦H¦ =
_
48
13
_
/
_
52
13
_
.
(a) Si A es el suceso West no tiene as. La probabilidad condicional es
P¦A [ H¦ =
P¦AH¦
P¦H¦
=
_
48
13
__
35
13
_
_
52
13
__
39
13
_ =
_
35
13
_
_
39
13
_ ≈0,1818
(b) Si B es el suceso West tiene dos o m´ as ases.
P¦B [ H¦ =
P¦BH¦
P¦H¦
=
_
48
13
_
_
_
4
2
__
35
11
_
+
_
4
3
__
35
10
_
+
_
4
4
__
35
9
_
_
_
52
13
__
39
13
_
=
_
4
2
__
35
11
_
+
_
4
3
__
35
10
_
+
_
4
4
__
35
9
_
_
39
13
_ ≈0,4073
5.4 Sea H el suceso Norte y Sur tienen 10 trumps
P¦H¦ =

10
k=0
_
13
k
__
39
13−k
__
13−k
10−k
__
26+k
3+k
_
_
52
13
__
39
13
_ =
_
26
3
__
26
10
_
_
52
13
_
7
A
/
H es el suceso sale un ´ unico as, al que le corresponden 10 5
9
casos favorables.
102 Solutions
Donde hemos usado
10

k=0
_
13
k
__
39
13−k
__
13−k
10−k
__
26+k
3+k
_
=
10

k=0
13!
k!
$
$
$
$
(13−k)!

39!
(13−k)!
$
$
$
$
(26+k)!

$
$
$
$
(13−k)!
(10−k)!3!

$
$
$
$
(26+k)!
(3+k)!23!
=
_
39
13
__
26
3
_
10

k=0
_
13
k
__
13
10−k
_
=
_
39
13
__
26
3
__
13
10
_
(a) Si A
1
es el suceso Este no tiene trumps y A
2
Oeste no tiene trumps. Tenemos
P¦A
1
∪A
2
[ H¦ = 2 P¦A
1
[ H¦ = 2
P¦A
1

P¦H¦
= 2
(
23
13
)(
3
3
)(
10
10
)∑
10
k=0
(
13
k
)(
39
13−k
)(
13−k
10−k
)(
26+k
3+k
)
(
52
13
)(
39
13
)(
26
13
)(
13
13
)

10
k=0
(
13
k
)(
39
13−k
)(
13−k
10−k
)(
26+k
3+k
)
(
52
13
)(
39
13
)
=
2
_
23
13
_
_
26
13
_ ≈ 0,2200
(b) Si B
1
es el suceso Este tiene el rey de trumps y B
2
Oeste tiene el rey de trumps,
tenemos
P¦B
1
∪B
2
[ H¦ = 2 P¦B
1
[ H¦ = 2
P¦B
1

P¦H¦
= 2
(
23
12(
11
11
)
)∑
10
k=0
(
13
k
)(
39
13−k
)(
13−k
10−k
)(
26+k
3+k
)
(
52
13
)(
39
13
)(
26
13
)(
13
13
)

10
k=0
(
13
k
)(
39
13−k
)(
13−k
10−k
)(
26+k
3+k
)
(
52
13
)(
39
13
)
=
2
_
23
12
_
_
26
13
_ = 0,26
5.5 Sea A
r
el suceso la llave abre al r-´ esimo intento. Hallemos su probabilidad
P¦A
1
¦ =
1
n
P¦A
2
¦ = P¦A
2
A
/
1
¦ = P¦A
2
[ A
/
1
¦P¦A
/
1
¦ =
1
n

_
1−
1
n
_
P¦A
3
¦ = P¦A
3
A
/
2
A
/
1
¦ = P¦A
3
[ A
/
2
A
/
1
¦P¦A
/
2
[ A
/
1
¦P¦A
/
1
¦ =
1
n
_
1−
1
n
_
2

P¦A
r
¦ = P¦A
r
A
/
r−1
A
/
1
¦ = P¦A
r
[ A
/
r−1
A
/
1
¦P¦A
/
r−1
[ A
/
1
¦ P¦A
/
1
¦
=
1
n
_
1−
1
n
_
r−1
La suma de las probabilidades es
Solutions 103


r=1
1
n
_
1−
1
n
_
r−1
=
1
n

1
1−
_
1−
1
n
_ =
1
n

1
1
n
= 1
5.6 Se aplica la regla de Bayes en cada caso:
P¦A [ D¦ =
P¦D [ A¦P¦A¦
P¦D [ A¦P¦A¦+P¦D [ B¦P¦B¦+P¦D [ C¦P¦C¦
=
0,05 0,25
0,05 0,25+0,04 0,35+0,02 0,40
≈ 0,3623
P¦B [ D¦ =
0,04 0,35
0,05 0,25+0,04 0,35+0,02 0,40
≈ 0,4058
P¦C [ D¦ =
0,02 0,40
0,05 0,25+0,04 0,35+0,02 0,40
≈ 0,2319
5.7 Los datos son
P¦M¦ = 0,5 P¦C [ M¦ =0,05
P¦F¦ = 0,5 P¦C [ F¦ =0,0025
Por la regla de Bayes, tenemos
P¦M [ C¦ =
P¦C [ M¦P¦M¦
P¦C [ M¦P¦M¦+P¦C [ F¦P¦F¦
=
0,05 0,5
0,05 0,5+0,0025 0,5
≈ 0,9524
5.8 El suceso hip´ otesis, H, significa que exactamente dos celdas est´ an ocupadas y
el suceso A significa que hay al menos una celda triplemente ocupada. El suceso
AH se corresponde con el n´ umero de ocupaci´ on 3, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0. El n´ umero de dis-
tribuciones que le corresponde es
7!
2!4!1!

7!
1!1!1!1!3!
, el primer factor es el n´ umero de
maneras de elegir 2 celdas vac´ıas, 4 simplemente ocupadas y 1 triplemente ocupada;
el segundo factor es, fijada una distribuci ´ on de celdas, el n´ umero de maneras de ele-
gir una bola para una celda determinada (en total cuatro celdas fijadas contienen una
bola cada una) y tres bolas para la celda triplemente ocupada. El n´ umero total de
deistribuciones es 7
7
. Por tanto
P¦AH¦ =
7!
2!4!1!

7!
1!1!1!1!3!
7
7
Por otra pare, usando la f´ ormula (3.1) de IV,3
P¦H¦ =
7

k=2
(−1)
k−2
_
k
2
_
S
k
=
7

k=2
(−1)
k−2
_
k
2
__
7
k
_
(7−k)
7
7
7
=
7!
2!7
7
_
5
7
5!

4
7
4!
+
3
7
2!3!

2
7
3!2!
+
1
4!
_
104 Solutions
En consecuencia
P¦A [ H¦ =
P¦AH¦
P¦H¦
=
7!7!
2!4!3!7
7

2!7
7
5!
7!

1
5
7
−5 4
7
+10 3
7
−10 2
7
+5
=
1
4
Por ´ ultimo, comprobemos num´ ericamente el resultado usando la tabla 1 de II,5. El
suceso AH se corresponde con el n´ umero de ocupaci´ on 3, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0 cuya proba-
bilidad p(3, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0) ≈ 0,107098 y el suceso H con los n´ umeros de ocupaci´ on
3, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0 y 2, 2, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, la probabilidad de este ´ ultimo es p(2, 2, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0) ≈
0,321295 con lo que la probabilidad condicional es aproximadamente
0,107098
0,107098+0,321295
≈0, 249999 ≈
1
4
.
5.9 Si A
k
representa el suceso sale as en la k-´ esima tirada, calculemos la probabili-
dad del suceso contrario
P¦A
2
∪A
3
A
/
2
[ A
/
1
¦ = P¦A
2
[ A
/
1
¦+P¦A
3
A
/
2
[ A
/
1
¦
= P¦A
2
[ A
/
1
¦+P¦A
3
[ A
/
2
A
/
1
¦P¦A
/
2
[ A
/
1
¦
=
1
6
+
1
6

5
6
=
11
36
La probabilidad pedida es 1−
11
36
=
25
36
.
5.10 Calculemos la probabilidad
8
del suceso contrario P¦A
/
2
A
/
1
¦ =P¦A
/
2
[ A
/
1
¦P¦A
/
1
¦ =
5
6

5
6
=
_
5
6
_
2
, por tanto la probabilidad del suceso pedido (suponemos que es que
salga as en a lo sumo dos tiradas es 1−
_
5
6
_
2
.
5.11 Sea p(k), k ≥1 la probabilidad buscada. Es f´ acil ver que
p(k) =


k=1
_
n
k
_
2
n
αp
n
=
αP
k
k!


k=1
n(n−1) (n−k +1)
_
p
2
_
n−k
1
2
k
=
αp
k
k!


k=1
d
k
dp
k
__
p
2
_
n
_
=
αp
k
k!
d
k
dp
k
_


k=1
_
p
2
_
n
_
=
αp
k
k!
d
k
dp
k
_
p
2
1
1−
p
2
_
=
αp
k
k!
d
k
dp
k
_
−1+2(2−p)
−1
_
=
αp
k
k!
2k!(2−p)
−(k+1)
=
2αp
k
(2−p)
k+1
5.12 Sea A
k
la probabilidad de que una familia tiene al menos k hijos la probabilidad
pedida es
8
El enunciado me parece ambiguo, he respetado la soluci´ on que da el autor.
Solutions 105
P¦A
2
[ A
1
¦ =
P¦A
2
∩A
1
¦
P¦A
1
¦
=
P¦A
2
¦
P¦A
1
¦
=


k=2
p(k)


k=1
p(k)
=


k=2
2αp
k
(2−p)
k+1


k=1
2αp
k
(2−p)
k+1
=
p
2
(2−p)
3


k=2
p
k−2
(2−p)
k−2
p
(2−p)
2


k=1
p
k−1
(2−p)
k−1
=
p
2−p