Editorial

Frankfurt Academy Quarterly

Summer Edition 2013
Three is a Crowd

where is the next superman?

Or: How to learn from start-ups, rivals and emerging players.
Trending Topics

Imitation is one of the best ways to learn. Educational psychology holds that copying = learning = behavioural change. Applied to the publishing business, that could read: copying = learning = strategic change. In this issue, we therefore take a close look at start-ups, rivals and emerging players. Where will we find the next Superman of publishing?

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Three is a Crowd
Three insiders talk about how traditional publishers, rivals and tech start-ups can get along.

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Cloudary earns money with online literature. How does the internet giant from China manage that?

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A chance encounter with some start-ups that point the way to a possible future for publishing.

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Welcome!
Superman is a good example for the success of copycats in publishing. Ever since the Man of Steel became popular in the 1930s, a veritable armada of superheroes, such as Batman, Flash Gordon, Wonder Woman and Captain America, has followed in his footsteps. This underlines the fact that copying is one of the best ways of learning new things. In educational psychology they say copying = learning = behavioural change. Applied to the publishing business, that could read: copying = learning = strategic change. However, the willingness of the publishing industry to learn new concepts is not unlimited, as was shown by a recent survey conducted by the media platform StoryDrive. As soon the industry’s idea of its own role comes into question, its openness seems to diminish.

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Three is a Crowd

Holger Volland, © Ch. Schmidt

Holger Volland is VP Media Industries at the Frankfurt Book Fair, and head of the Frankfurt Academy

Social media and publishing is the subject of this isFor that reason, in this issue of the Frankfurt Academy sue’s Trending Topics. Learn from an emerging player Quarterly (FAQ) we take a close look at a number of start-ups, rival companies and emerging players. Where in China how to make money with literature online. Its business model has made Cloudary one of the 100 fastwill we find the next Superman of publishing? Who has est growing companies in the world. the capacity to imagine the future? Are there any new business models out there “It’s serendipity, stupid,” that could benefit others says communications extoo? Any new collaborations pert Miriam Meckel, as she that might surprise us, yet warns publishers against still make sense? Gary Hamel, Leading the revolution, 2000 doing too much planning. That’s also why our Serendipity column is based on In our Three is a crowd column we examine three chance encounters. In this issue we meet some startdifferent approaches to cooperation in the publishups pursuing new publishing models – the pioneers ing industry. Firstly, as a publisher, anyone trying to of the future of publishing perhaps. If you know some develop Storyworlds and multimedia products usually exciting start-ups too, please share the information needs strong partners in the development field. Using using our publically accessible list: Best of Publishing some current examples, including a digital adaptation Start-Ups! of The 39 Steps and the browser game Black Crown,

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“Companies fail to create the future not because they fail to predict it, but because they fail to imagine it”

Serendipity

we show how this kind of cooperation works and what we can learn from them. Secondly, there has to be a very good reason for it when competitors join forces. In The art of working with frenemies, we ask how rivals have become partners in order to establish a market for e-books in Europe collectively. And thirdly, as the Goodreads-Amazon deal has shown, there is a lot of money to be made with start-ups in publishing. However, investors, publishers and start-ups rarely speak the same language. In the article Start-ups in book publishing: Two worlds – two different languages, you can read about how they find each other nevertheless – and also what the most exciting start-ups in marketplace are at the moment.

Enjoy your read!

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Holger Volland Vice President, Media Industries
faq@book-fair.com P.S. Please let me introduce you to two colleagues of the Frankfurt Academy. You can read an interview with Britta and Kat in our “Serendipity” column.

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Britta Friedrich

Kat Meyer

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Calendar of events at the frankfurt academy
When
30 August

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Where
Rio de Janeiro Brazil

What

Whom to contact
Marifé Boix-Garcia boix@book-fair.com

Literacy & Media
A conference examining the importance of digital technologies and tools for imparting knowledge and media literacy.

Three is a Crowd

2–6 September & 6 – 11 October

St. Gallen/ Switzerland and Frankfurt

International Publishing Management Course
Providing the expertise and tools required to manage publishing and media companies successfully.

Frederik Fensch fensch@book-fair.com

8 October

Frankfurt, Marriot Hotel

CONTEC
A conference for stakeholders from across the publishing ecosystem, from STM and trade publishers to service providers and tech start-ups, bringing them together in one place to redefine and redesign the publishing experience.

Kat Meyer meyer@book-fair.com

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or
Britta Friedrich friedrich@book-fair.com

8 October

Frankfurt Book Fair

International Rights Directors Meeting
This year, the industry’s most prestigious meeting of international rights and licensing experts will focus on two topics: understanding new digital financial models, and licensing in the Arab World.

Iris Klose klose@book-fair.com

Serendipity

9 October

Frankfurt Book Fair

A digital Resumé:
Are there digital strategies out there that work?

Iris Klose klose@book-fair.com

Intensive training for an overview of how publishers develop their programmes and marketing.
11 August Frankfurt Book Fair

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storydrive conference
Under the motto “Fiction is real”, this year’s event is dedicated to a new generation of stories that cross the boundaries between fiction and reality.

Britta Friedrich friedrich@book-fair.com

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Three is a crowd
In our Three is a crowd column we examine three different approaches to cooperation in the publishing industry. Firstly, as a publisher, anyone trying to develop Storyworlds and multimedia products usually needs strong partners in the development field. We show how this kind of cooperation works. Secondly, in The art of working with frenemies, we ask how rivals have become partners in order to establish a market for e-books in Europe collectively. And thirdly, in Two worlds – two different languages, you can read about how start-ups, investors and publishers communicate – and also what the most exciting start-ups in marketplace are at the moment.

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Three is a Crowd

1 Storyworlds: Cooperation in Transmedia – how does it work?
By Nicole Stöcker

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Interactive “enhanced” books pose huge challenges for publishers, in terms of both production and marketing, and the publishers need competent partners in this area. That usually means working with startups in the games or software sectors, as very few publishers have the necessary competences in-house. FAQ has looked at some of the most prominent examples and asks, how well does the cooperation work?

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What are they all talking about?
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Dan Franklin, digital publisher at Random House UK

Henry Volans, Head of Digital Publishing at Faber and Faber

Nick Eliopulos, Editor at Scholastic

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“An infectious new kind of narrative experience”

“A book in a game environment”

“A multi-platform property”

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The answer is: transmedial storytelling – something which is becoming increasingly important for the traditional publishing sector. The media platform StoryDrive and the Berlin-based agency newthinking communications recently conducted an international Market Climate Survey on the Future of the Content and Media World. More than half of the 1,400 media representatives questioned claimed that crossmedial and transmedial forms of storytelling and value addition are already part of their daily work. Only very few publishing houses have editors, games developers and designers sitting together under the same roof. One of those that does is Scholastic in the USA. “We have an in-house team devoted to gaming and web development for our multi-platform properties,” says Nick Eliopolus of Scholastic, who recently spoke in Beijing at the conference StoryDrive China. “They’re involved at every step in the process. So you could say that we’re an example of constant contact and collaboration between the book and gaming industries.” Eliopolus is editor of the company’s multiplatform Infinity Ring, a time-travel adventure for young adults consisting of seven books, as well as online games. Due to the lack of relevant in-house capacities, this kind of interdisciplinary work is more often performed in cooperation with experimental start-ups in the digital entertainment field – companies that are probing the limits of what is feasible. Dan Franklin, digital publisher with Random House UK, summarises the advantages and disadvantages of such cooperation: “A start-up’s slanted perspective on the industry introduces new thinking and encourages innovation as these companies are untainted by the esoteric nature of how the publishing industry works. Having said that, it’s also the source of frustration and misunderstanding. Especially when it comes to how rights are treated, a lot of start-ups are in the dark.”

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“A start-up’s slanted perspective on the industry introduces new thinking and encourages innovation as these companies are untainted by the esoteric nature of how the publishing industry works.”

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Sophie Rochester, founder of the „Literary Platform“, an online magazine and consultancy

Cooperation between publishers and start-ups is something Sophie Rochester knows a lot about. As the founder of the online magazine and consultancy The Literary Platform, part of her job is to bring publishers together with potential partners in other creative industries. On the subject of rights, Rochester observes that the sharing of intellectual property – who holds the rights to the texts, or to the games structure – is particularly difficult in such complex works. It becomes even harder when social media are introduced as an additional component to supplement the finished products. An important job for the future, she says, is to consider ways of protecting the rights of all the creative people involved.

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6 Black Crown

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Black Crown
Created by debut author Rob Sherman, Black Crown is a densely written, very literary, text-based game and narrative. The project is anchored on a single storytelling platform, though it refers its readers to external sources to investigate ‘miasma’ objects and read documentations. Random House has also published two related e-books to expand and deepen the experience, which are available for free through conventional retail channels. These are Lincoln’s bedsheet and Mour, mour, mour.

There is no fixed division of roles when developers and publishers collaborate.
Depending on the project, the roles in the cooperation can be distributed very differently. Depending on the project, the roles in the cooperation can be distributed very differently. Start-ups such as Failbetter Games and Popleaf can provide the development, design and platform for a product which is 100% financed by the publisher – as was the case with the close collaboration between Random House and author Rob Sherman for the free-to-play browser game Black Crown. The Story Mechanics based their product on John Buchan’s espionage thriller. They persuaded Faber and Faber (UK) to get involved as the publisher for the Mac App Store and Google Play Store platforms, while Avanquest is responsible for retail sales of the physical boxed product, and KISS for online PC/Mac distribution. As Rochester explains, “Games companies like The Story Mechanics are keen to partner with traditional publishers, such as Faber, on projects like The 39 Steps, as the book publishers still offer a better chance of getting publicity for them in the media.” Getting access to big author properties also makes the cooperation with publishers attractive. Faber and Faber has had positive experiences elsewhere with such cooperation arrangements. The iPad app for T.S. Elliot’s The Waste Land, produced in collaboration with developer Touch Press, covered its costs within just a few weeks of its release in 2011.

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The 39 Steps

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The 39 Steps
The Story Mechanics, the multi-platform and games division of the Scottish independent TV production company Tern, provides insights on its website into the production of The 39 steps, “an adventure story that comes with the imaginative pull of reading, the emotional resonance of cinema and the freedom of gaming.” As well as computer-animated interiors and scenery, it employs stop-motion-style sequences, accompanied in part by silent movie scores, for telling a character’s background story, and it uses newspaper cuttings to give an authentic note to historical events of the period around 1914. The 39 Steps has been shortlisted for the UK Develop Awards 2013, which will be announced in Brighton in July.

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An example of a cooperative project in which the publishing house and the start-up both act as publishers was the enhanced multimedia e-book Frankenstein, released in 2012. This was the work of independent British publisher Profile Books, in cooperation with the Cambridge-based creative design company, Inkle. While the app is based on Mary Shelley’s novel, the text was rewritten by Dave Morris as an “interactive gamebook”, which lets readers choose the storylines they want to pursue. This project is profitable, with 17,000 copies sold todate (May 2013). The source of income is from apps sold to users as well as from B2B licensing. “Selling apps is remarkably similar to selling print books,” says Michael Bhaskar, Digital Publishing Director at Profile Books. “What we’ve learned is that you have to market and publicise digital projects even more than print, because the app store is just a very narrow window, a tiny little window to the world.” Profits are smaller than for “traditional” publishing projects, because they need to be divided among a larger number of interested parties.

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The digital adaptation of Mary Shelley’s novel Frankenstein was produced jointly by the independent publisher, Profile Books, and the “creative design” company Inkle. Author Dave Morris completely reworked the original material.

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storydrive
StoryDrive is the international forum for trends and innovation in media and entertainment. Since 2010, this event has focused on new forms of storytelling and pioneering business models. Leaders from the publishing, film, TV, and games industries, from marketing, design and sociology, gather here to present their visionary narrative concepts and to offer new perspectives on the media world of tomorrow. Under the motto “Fiction is real”, this year’s Frankfurt StoryDrive is dedicated to a new generation of stories. They’re from the future. They’re more realistic than ever before. You can touch them, experience them with all your senses and actively influence them. When: 11 October 2013 Where: Frankfurt Book Fair, Room Europe Contact: Britta Friedrich, Director Conferences, at friedrich@book-fair.com

New cooperation arrangements often lead to new business models...
For the publishers, meanwhile, with the assistance of their partners, it is interesting not only to try out innovative products, but also to test new business models and their related sales channels. For instance, the browser-based game Black Crown is available free of charge. As Dan Franklin explains, users can make micropayments “if they want to, to buy story strands, to expedite the narrative, or acquire status in the story world.” It is just a few weeks since the launch of the project, so it is too early to say much about its profitability, especially as the calculation is more complex than for traditional book projects. “We have new-fangled, complex targets – we need to set key performance indices for a project like this around average revenue per user, audience churn and absolute revenue.” Black Crown is the first real foray by Random House into the world of free-to-play (F2P) games. In the other direction, several games companies are increasingly turning to literary plots in order to make their gameworlds more exciting. An example is Bigpoint, whose browser-based Game of Thrones draws on the book A Song of Ice and Fire by George R.R. Martin.

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Faber and Faber has already made a profit with The 39 Steps, Henry Volans informs us. At the same time he also points out that, if nothing else, the marketing of such new products is not without its problems. “People are not sure where The 39 Steps fits, and they have different expectations depending on whether they come from a books or a gaming background. The product has had a fair bit of criticism, as well as lots of praise, but the vast majority of commentators do see it as a step towards a hugely exciting new product category.” And after all, The 39 Steps has been nominated for the UK games industry’s Develop Award, in the “Use of narrative” category. Most of the partnerships discussed so far have been located in the world of games and (digital) books. Meanwhile, in the field of transmedia publishing some really ambitious projects are being pursued by Kristian Costa-Zahn, Head of Creation with UFA Lab, which has offices in Berlin and Cologne. The UFA Film & TV Produktion’s multimedia production unit, which views itself as a “content laboratory for new media”, has already implemented a range of marketing campaigns for German publishers, using transmedia elements. As a first for Germany, it is now working on a story that uses inter-linked platforms: book, TV-film, the internet, and physical events. This will be presented in an “advanced state” at the Frankfurt StoryDrive conference in October. According to Costa-Zahn – who, with representatives of different industries, co-authored the Transmedia Manifesto at the Book Fair in 2011 – the most important prerequisites for cooperation between the various creative industries are openness and flexibility. “You have to be able to question existing processes.” This is not least a plea to the authors as the originators of stories; for not every author is prepared to take part in this kind of collaborative work.

“People are not sure where The 39 Steps fits, and they have different expectations depending on whether they come from a books or a gaming background”

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Three is a Crowd

The 39 Steps book cover

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Kristian Costa-Zahn, Head of Creation UFA Lab, who spoke at this year‘s StoryDrive China conference in Beijing.

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Meet kristian costa-zahn
You can meet Kristian, UFA Lab and other experts from the world of transmedia publishing at the StoryDrive Conference (11 October).

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Download the survey: The future of Publishing

Join the conversation on the Frankfurt Academy Blog:
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2 The art of working with frenemies: competitors united!
Collaboration among competitors in the publishing industry is certainly not a new phenomenon. To improve their chances of landing shelf space in bricks-and-mortar bookstores, publishers with smaller lists and lower turnover have always had to find creative ways to combine forces – and they’re not the only ones. Now, with the rise of online sales – of both print and e-books – and the emergence and expansion of retail giants like Amazon, publishers face a different set of challenges. But when does it make sense for traditional competitors to join forces? And what do they hope to gain?

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Prof. Robert Picard

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Professor Robert Picard is Director of Research at the Department of Politics and International Relations of the Reuters Institute, and a member of the faculty of the Publishing Management Course at the University of St. Gallen, Switzerland.

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By Siobhan O‘Leary

Managing risk and achieving economies of scale
“Collaboration is useful to firms when the complexity of the environment and the risks of operating individually are high,” says Professor Robert Picard of the Reuters Institute, and a faculty member of the Publishing Management Course at the University of St. Gallen, Switzerland. “Working with others reduces complexity and risk and the amount of money one might have to invest,” he adds. For example, distribution requires substantial investment and a single publisher may not achieve the necessary economies of scale. According to Picard, “Collective distribution collaborations can ameliorate that problem and have the potential for turning distribution activities into a profit, rather than cost generating activity”.

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“Working with others reduces complexity and risk and the amount of money one might have to invest”

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In early 2009, several of Spain’s largest publishers – Planeta, Random House and Santillana – sat down together to explore the idea of a collective investment in e-book logistics. Taking their cue from the US, where today’s technological revolution in publishing first began, and from efficient logistics projects for printed books that already existed in the Netherlands and South Korea, these publishers joined forces to form Libranda. Four years later, Libranda is now co-owned by Planeta, Random House and Santillana (each holding 26.67%), with Wolters Kluwer, SM, Grup 62 and Roca (5% each). It offers booksellers a catalogue of over 15,000 e-books, and is growing at a rate of around 500 titles a month. But compared to what some other big e-retailers offer, Libranda still has a long way to go. As Jesús Badenes, Managing Director of the Books Group for Planeta, points out, “In today’s content world, with competitors much larger in size and in investment capability, publishers need to be very strict when planning investments. It does not make any sense to replicate the same project two, three or four times within a single market.” The benefits stem not only from cost savings, but also from new capacities related to critical mass. Such partnerships don’t remove the competition (the publishers determine their own prices, for example), but Libranda does provide an efficient interface with big e-retailers (Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Kobo, Apple, Google, Casa del Libro, FNAC, etc.). As such, according to Badenes, it allows “a whole industry to march at the same technological pace, regardless of specific technology resources deployed in medium and small publishing houses.” Libranda also offers existing players a chance to evolve, and to access new business models without having to build vast new in-house structures.

Jesús Badenes

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Jesús Badenes, Managing Director of the Books Group for Planeta, and a member of the faculty of the Publishing Management Course at the University of St. Gallen, Switzerland.

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Pursuing projects that improve efficiency without diminishing competition allows small and medium-sized publishers to play in the “big league” with the new breed of players – from e-retailers like Amazon and device makers like Apple, to advertising-fuelled search engines such as Google and new content packagers like Spotify. “We have to recognise that yesterday’s battlefield has been replaced by a much larger and more complex scenario,” says Badenes. “Any example of ‘colpetition’ (collaboration-competition) is not a goal in itself – it is a way to be more efficient and save ammunition for the real battles.”

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“Publishers need to be very strict when planning investments. It does not make any sense to replicate the same project two, three or four times within a single market.”
Libranda website

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An open door policy
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The founding members of Libranda wanted a common project with no restrictions to entry, for shareholders and business partners alike. According to Badenes, they saw this as the best way to prepare and adapt the industry as a whole for the technical challenges that lie ahead. The same approach has been embraced by the Copyright Clearance Center (CCC) ever since it was founded in 1978 to simplify the access to and licensing of content, at a time when the photocopier was the disruptive technology of the day. The CCC represents more than 12,000 publishers from the US, Europe, Latin America and Asia. “If the approach is ‘if you play by our rules, anyone can qualify,’ that’s going to be successful,” says Chris Kenneally, Director of Business Development for the CCC, and adds that “Limiting these kinds of operations only to the established players is probably shortsighted.” The CCC catalogue includes hundreds of millions of titles, and it serves as a global rights broker for in- and out-of-print books, journals, newspapers, magazines, movies, television shows, images, blogs and e-books. It is a clearing house that enables rights holders to approach the market together and sell re-publication rights and other rights that might not achieve an economically viable scale if handled individually. “When we talk about publishers working together now, the definition of publisher is so different from what it was in the early 1980s,” says Kenneally. In other words, as content is reused, copied and distributed on the internet, the same forces are at work, regardless of whether you are an independent blog writer or a major global publisher. According to Kenneally, the definition of who the competitors are is also changing and expanding to include content and service providers from other industries and other countries. “The difference between content and rights is beginning to blur [and] merge – it’s all part of one continuum.”

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Copyright Clearance Center (CCC) website

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With so many players working together at so many levels, does it mean that a single European book market could one day emerge? While the CCC is more closely involved in secondary markets, such as rights licensing, Victoriano Colodron, Senior Director of Global Relations, is still monitoring policy developments on that front carefully. “The European Commission wants to make it easier for content users,” he says. “That includes companies that use content or want to put all their content in the marketplace. The EC wants to remove barriers.” This is in line with Colodron’s wishes. “If there are barriers that can be removed – legal barriers – we are in favour of that,” he adds. Partnerships with local publishers and organisations that add to the CCC’s services (for example, cooperation with the German collecting society VG Wort) are a crucial part of this effort, as are multi-territorial or pan-European licenses. The arrangement between the CCC and VG Wort involves the reciprocal licensing of their digital repertoires. Jesús Badenes also thinks a single book market – one that makes the existing books available to all readers – is a realistic expectation. “It is a perfectly viable project and, in my opinion, a very important one, since it will bring, at the end, an increase of human capital and competitiveness to European countries.” This goal will depend on increasing discoverability, making content portable across devices, and limiting private data usage.

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“When we talk about publishers working together now, the definition of publisher is so different from what it was in the early 1980s”

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Bookish website

The new priorities: Customer contact and discoverability
According to Professor Picard, the real goal and the biggest advantage of collaboration is that it can bring publishers directly into contact with their customers. This allows them to establish direct relationships and to understand their interests better. In short, it ensures “that you are an important player in the market with enough market share to have an impact on marketing and customer relationships.” Kenneally of the CCC also points out that the most dramatic thing happening in US publishing is the shift is from the trading space to direct-to-consumer models. This was one of the reasons why the Hachette Book Group, Penguin Group USA (now part of Penguin Random House) and Simon & Schuster teamed up more than three years ago in the joint venture Bookish – a platform that provides a book-centric experience, with the goal of helping readers find their next book. Bookish finally went online in February this year, and now boasts 35 participating publishers. These include the other two giants, HarperCollins and Macmillan, as well as Scholastic and Houghton Mifflin. The membership is still growing. The platform claims to be editorially independent; it contains reviews, articles, essential book lists, and more. Users can purchase these directly from Bookish or from other locations, including independent booksellers. At the heart of the venture is the site’s search technology. This does not only rely on customers’ purchase history or reviews (like Amazon): It mines the books themselves for data (like the Book Genome Project). Thus it promises users a more neutral and possibly more satisfying search and recommendation process. “Our ultimate goal is to increase discoverability and expand the overall marketplace for books,” says Diane Martins, Director of Marketing for Bookish. She also observes that a recent national survey showed that fewer than 50% of US-Americans read books or long-form journalism. “We believe there is a tremendous opportunity for Bookish to introduce books to new readers through our original content and unique recommendation tool, while also helping regular readers find their next book. Both of these outcomes are good for the industry and for the reading public,” she says. It is telling that the deal between Goodreads and Amazon coincided with the Bookish launch. The publishing industry is trying to catch up with a league of bigger competitors who so often seem to be one step ahead.

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The International Publishing Management Course in St. Gallen
…has been specially designed for future publishing executives and senior professionals. Learn from international publishing leaders and eminent professors from the universities of St. Gallen (CH), Fordham (US), Oxford (GB) and Jönköping (SE), as well as the EDHEC Business School (F). The course is organised by the Frankfurt Academy and the Institute for Media and Communications Management, University of St. Gallen, one of the world’s leading teaching and research facilities in its field. When: 2 – 6 September 2013 (on-campus programme), 7 – 30 September (self-study period), 9 – 10 October (recap, certificates) Where: St. Gallen University, Institute for Media and Communications Management, Switzerland (2 – 6 September), Frankfurt Book Fair (9 – 10 October)

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Included in the course is a free ticket for access to all the conferences of the Frankfurt Academy during the Frankfurt Book Fair (9 – 13 October).

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Meet JESÚS BADENES and Prof. robert picard
You can meet Jesús Badenes and Prof. Robert Picard at the Publishing Management Course in St. Gallen.

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3 Start-ups in book publishing: Two worlds, two different languages
After 2012 was celebrated as the “year of the start-up” in book publishing, it seems that the start-up trend has only continued to gain steam in 2013. And according to industry expert Javier Celaya, the Goodreads / Amazon deal shows that you can even earn a decent amount of money with start-ups. We’ll introduce some of the most exciting start-ups in publishing and ask: How does the collaboration among investors, publishers and start-ups actually work? Do they even speak the same language? And are start-ups in Europe really lagging far behind their US counterparts?

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Javier Celaya

Javier Celaya is vice president of the Spanish Digital Magazines Association (ARDE), a member of the executive board of the Digital Economy Association of Spain and CEO and founder of Dosdoce.com, an online portal that analyses the use of new technologies in the cultural sector and publishes annual studies related to trends in the cultural sector.

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By Alva Gehrmann Would you invest in a hands-free umbrella? The inventor of the device took it to the US television show “Shark Tank”, where start-ups and entrepreneurs are given a chance to present their new products. The panel always consists of five “sharks”, i.e. potential investors, who need some convincing. For his Nubrella, which looks like a mix of giant space helmet and bubble, the young entrepreneur actually received 200,000 US dollars. In return, the investor acquired a 25 per cent share of the company. “Shark Tank” is, of course, a show meant to entertain, but it’s still interesting to watch how the start-ups make their pitches to investors, and to take note of some of the tough questions that are thrown at them.

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It’s tough to say whether Goodreads would also have prevailed on the TV show. Otis Chandler and his wife launched the online platform seven years ago from their living room – initially without the help of any investors. The idea is simple. “We set out to create a better way for people to find and share books they love,” is how Chandler describes it on Goodreads. In the second year, however, angel investors supported the US startup to the tune of around 750,000 US dollars. The website now boasts over 16 million registered readers and, in the biggest startup success story in book publishing to date, the company was purchased by Amazon in March for an undisclosed sum. Javier Celaya of the Spanish consulting firm Dosdoce. com finds the concept of the US show “Shark Tank” interesting. The show, by the way, originated in Japan and now has spin-offs in more than 20 countries (including Saudi Arabia, Nigeria and Finland). It’s a way for young entrepreneurs to learn first-hand what’s important to investors. That’s because it brings two worlds face to face – two worlds that first have to learn to speak the same language with each other. And it’s well worth the effort, as each side ultimately benefits from the other. Traditional book publishing is faced with the big challenge of having to keep up with the demands and trends of the 21st century in order to stay alive. Start-ups on the other hand provide the technical solutions and innovative ideas that make this possible. “Without angel investors, Goodreads also couldn’t have made it,” says Javier Celaya with certainty. His consulting firm Dosdoce recently published a study entitled “How to collaborate with start-ups”. The goal was to create a paper to discuss and reflect on ways to improve the relationship between technology start-ups and companies in the book world. For the study, Celaya interviewed around 170 international publishers and start-ups from Great Britain, Germany, Spain, Argentina, Chile, the USA and other countries. As positive examples of successful collaborations, Celaya cites not only the Berlin-based social reading community ReadMill, but also the novel business idea from SmallDemons (USA), the Spanish-language portal 24Symbols, which has been praised as “Spotify for e-books” – and, of course, Goodreads. How significant is the Goodreads deal with Amazon? “It provided an initial spark and demonstrated that it’s also possible to earn a lot of money with start-ups in book publishing,” says Celaya, who also teaches at the University of Madrid as a professor in the digital publishing master’s programme.

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“How significant is the deal with Amazon? “It provided an initial spark and demonstrated that it’s also possible to earn a lot of money with startups in book publishing”

Three is a Crowd

In the USA, it seems to be much easier to launch a startup. There’s ultimately a much-touted “can-do” attitude here, and cultural patronage is traditionally more pronounced here given the lack of government funding for culture. If you have a new idea, you simply throw yourself into an adventure – and if it doesn’t work out, at least you’ve tried and learned an important lesson to keep in mind for your next project. For example, the AngelList, which brings together investors and start-ups, has a dedicated category for start-ups in publishing. In Europe, on the other hand, quite a few innovative projects are thwarted early on, or their creators are, at the very least, bombarded with countless sceptical questions: Are you sure you want to invest time in this idea? How much potential does your project have and would you ever earn enough money with it? Wouldn’t it be better to do something more sensible instead? So if the US seems such an easier place for start-ups, shouldn’t you just get on the next plane to Silicon Valley and launch your new projects there? “In theory this is certainly a good idea,” says Celaya. “But in reality, the competition is much greater in Silicon Valley and in the USA in general. They’re two or three years ahead of us there.” In addition, the European market should not be underestimated. There’s a new generation with a different mindset. This is also reflected in our list of notable start-ups (see box), which features just as many start-ups from Europe as from the USA.

Trending Topics Serendipity
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“The European market should not be underestimated. There’s a new generation with a different mindset.”

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CONTEC
CONTEC is a new, highly engaging event created by the Frankfurt Academy to address the complex needs of today’s publishing business. It gathers stakeholders from across the publishing ecosystem – from STM and trade publishers to service providers and tech start-ups – in one arena to redefine and redesign the experience of publishing. CONTEC will feature the first edition of the CONTEC International Publishing Start-Up Showcase. We‘re working with Ziggeo.com to provide a unique online showcase for publishing start-ups from around the world – three of which will be invited to present themselves at CONTEC Frankfurt on 8 October. Interested startups can make their elevator pitch at Ziggeo.com until 1 September. When: 8 October 2013 Where: Frankfurt Marriott Hotel, Hamburger Allee 2, Frankfurt am Main Contact: For questions about programming and proposal submissions for CONTEC, please contact Britta Friedrich friedrich@book-fair.com or Kat Meyer meyer@book-fair.com

Book publishers and start-ups: What happens when they meet?
Editorial
In the study “How to collaborate with start-ups”, Celaya discovered that both sides begin their conversations with a degree of self-assuredness, each convinced that they know better. It’s not uncommon for both sides to come to a meeting with different expectations. While the startup is focused on potentially making a deal, many book publishers just want to listen to their ideas first and gain inspiration from them. This, in turn, causes some concern among start-ups that the publisher might just steal their ideas. It is also interesting to look at what technologies are on offer – and which of them are in demand. Most of the start-ups that took part in the survey stated that their technologies offer publishers services for adding value to book sales – for example, electronic commerce for paper books and e-books. A high percentage also offered technologies intended to improve the visibility and discoverability of books on the internet. Only four per cent of the start-ups focused on other areas, such as copyright management or internal manuscript publications. “One of the most interesting facts revealed by this international survey is that there is an excessive concentration of start-ups with extremely similar technological approaches and solutions,” says Celaya. However, publishers are looking for technological solutions not yet covered by existing start-ups, for example in the field of distribution and for optimising internal processes, such as those involved in receiving and managing manuscripts. “These needs are not being met with current technology and may become business opportunities for new entrepreneurs,” Celaya claims.

Three is a Crowd Trending Topics Serendipity

“Publishers are looking for technological solutions not yet covered by existing startups”

Start-ups and publishers sometimes sound a bit like an old married couple talking past each other. To get beyond this, Celaya suggests that a consultant would be the ideal solution for bringing start-ups and publishers together. The study suggests incorporating a kind of in-house “mentor”, who should “support the most innovative projects with a view to implementing them to create a new, more open, fresh and creative corporate culture without sacrificing the publisher’s identity.” Javier Celaya is also an angel investor himself. And he invests exclusively in cultural projects, including www. entrelectores.com, a Spanish version of Goodreads. In his experience, only one out of every ten start-ups

makes it, as is the case in all fields of business. Some are lacking in entrepreneurial spirit or staying power; others are perhaps ahead of their time because the technology required to realise the idea on a grand scale doesn’t yet exist. The recipe for creating a successful startup involves not only an innovative concept, but also a mix of entrepreneurial spirit and courage, perseverance and luck in terms of meeting the right people at the right time. When Celaya speaks with start-ups, he also asks them: “What’s your next idea?” This idea might even be of much more interest to him, even if it’s not yet fully developed. With start-ups, unlike publishers, investors are paying for the vision, not for the actual business...

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some of The most promising startups in book publishing:
24Symbols: http://www.24symbols.com/ ABC Tales: http://www.abctales.com/ Bibliocrunch: http://bibliocrunch.com/ Blinkist: http://www.blinkist.com/en/ Bookigee: http://www.bookigee.com/ Epubli: http://www.epubli.co.uk/ Ether: http://www.etherbooks.com/ Hyperink: http://www.hyperink.com/ Inkle: http://www.inklestudios.com/ Jottify: http://jottify.com/ Kraut-publishers: http://www.kraut-publishers.de/ Neobooks: http://www.neobooks.com/ Offbeat Guides: http://www.offbeatguides.com/ On Demand Books: http://www.ondemandbooks.com/ Paperight: http://www.paperight.com/ Paper C: www.paperc.com ReadMill: https://readmill.com/ Skoobe: https://www.skoobe.de/ Small Demons: https://www.smalldemons.com/ Smashwords: http://www.smashwords.com/ Unbound: http://unbound.co.uk/ Unglue It: https://unglue.it/ ValoBox: http://www.valobox.com/

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If you know some exciting start-ups too, please share the information using our publically accessible list: Best of Publishing Start-Ups!

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Three is a Crowd
Another good source on start-ups in publishing is a list compiled by Michael Bhaskar, Digital Publishing Director at Profile Books : Digital Publishing Start-Ups

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Meet javier celaya
You can meet Javier, CEO of Dosdoce. com, at the Frankfurt Book Fair (9–13 October 2013), where he will be speaking at the new Frankfurt Academy event CONTEC (8 October 2013). Or contact him by email at
jcelaya@dosdoce.com

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or on Twitter at
http://www.twitter.com/javiercelaya

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Frankfurt Frankfurt is is the the biggest Biggest venue Venue for literary Literaryagents. Agents.
More than agents and a unique atmosphere: The Literary Agents & Scouts Centre (LitAg) brings together publishing professionals from all over the world.
Contact:
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Trending topics
Social media and publishing is the subject of this issue’s Trending Topics. Learn from an emerging player in China how to make money with literature online. Its business model has made Cloudary one of the 100 fastest growing companies in the world.

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Cloudary: A Chinese online literature platform is using cooperation to conquer the market
By Maja Linnemann The same question is being asked all around the world: how can you earn money online with literature? FAQ spoke on this subject with Hua Lin, Vice President of Cloudary, who is responsible for selling the rights to literary works for adaption into TV series and movies.

Trending Topics Serendipity

FAQ: What makes Cloudary so successful?
Hua Lin: In the first place, it was the vision of our CEO Hou Xiaoqiang who bought the literary online portal Qidian in 2008, and has continuously developed the business since then. Now we have six online literary websites and a market share of 72%, but we made a profit only in 2012. 1.6 million authors write on our websites, and 80 million Chinese characters are uploaded every day. We have now accumulated a “library” of 60 million titles. Of course, we’ve also developed successful business models.

Hua Lin at StoryDrive China

FAQ: Could you explain your business model?
Hua Lin: The basic business model can be summed up as follows: Online users generate original content in the form of series, adding content on a regular basis. They receive micro-payments based on the downloads and

Hua Lin, Vice President of Cloudary Corporation, joined the company in August 2010. As the head of copyright acquisitions and sales, and of business cooperation, he is responsible for TV, film and game adaptations of original works of literature, and is now a leading expert in his field. From 2000 to 2009 he worked as the sales director for the SAP Software System Co. Lin holds a bachelor’s degree in engineering from Xi’an Jiaotong University and an MBA from a joint programme of the Shanghai Finance University and Webster University in the USA.

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subscriptions of customers. Cloudary’s own editors scan the platform regularly for writers who show good potential – and they may offer online authors a contract. In general there are no restrictions on the authors with respect to what or how they write, as long as they do not break any laws of the PRC. Some of the content is free, some is not. If the clickrates for a particular piece of literature rise to a certain level, then the piece is moved to the VIP section and readers have to pay to continue reading. Our standard payment right now is from 0.05 to 0.08 yuan [roughly equivalent to one US-cent] per 1,000 characters. Apart from this, our revenues come from sales of printed books and e-books, from copyright licensing and from online advertising.

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“Now we have six online literary websites and a market share of 72%, but we made a profit only in 2012. 1.6 million authors write on our websites, and 80 million Chinese characters are uploaded every day.

Three is a Crowd

We have now accumulated a ‘library’ of 60 million titles.”

FAQ: What is the advantage of your business model?
Hua Lin: There are two main areas of focus. We offer an all-round service to the writers, and we provide more content and a number of different platforms for the readers. Since our system is a website, we can immediately see from the click-rates which pieces are the most successful. Due to objective technology, we know what is successful. Our editors are different from traditional editors, because they analyse the successful works and give advice to other authors, accordingly.

It is also very interactive, since the readers can and do comment immediately. We are always very close to the market and we know what topics and stories touch the nerve of society. For example, The Era of Naked Marriage, which is about newlyweds with no assets and the problems they face, started as a piece of online literature, and has since been published as a paper book and made into a popular TV series. Now that population group is starting to have children, so the new literary trend is about the highs and lows of raising a young child.

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Qidian website

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Three is a Crowd

Yuncheng online e-book store

“Online literature definitely plays a role in the production of TV series – for example, in 2011, four out of ten popular TV series were related to online literature.”
We also offer reading content for all kinds of platform: PCs and smartphones, or our own e-reader, the 6-inch Bambook, which is connected to the Yuncheng platform [an online e-book store belonging to Shanda, the parent company of Cloudary] and provides access to several million books. Each website has its own Apps. We provide also content for more than 330 partners. We have understood that smartphone users are extremely important for us. For example, practically all the participants at events have mobile phones, and we can use this fact to interact with them. [which had the title Human Flesh Search Engine and was about cyber-bullying]. A number of Cloudary titles have also been turned into games – MMORGP, browser games and mobile games. We’re now looking into the possibility of setting up a scriptwriting company. So far, there is none in China, which means there is a void in the market waiting to be filled. On the other hand, the fact that nobody has yet occupied this market niche also means that it wont be an easy thing to do. Still, we would like to be able to deliver more tailor-made products to TV companies, not just the raw material. We want to create more value for Cloudary. We have therefore invited scriptwriting consultants from the US to hold workshops here.

Trending Topics Serendipity

FAQ: What kind of services do you perform in-house and what do you outsource?
Hua Lin: Right now, our focus is on creating content for our six websites and providing services for authors. When it comes to getting the content onto other media platforms and reaching more audiences, that’s something we like to do with partners. In this respect we cooperate with Shanda Games – another subsidiary of our parent company, Shanda Corporation. We sell them copyrights, but we also cooperate with other companies. There is no special cooperation agreement or relationship. Online literature definitely plays a role in the production of TV series – for example, in 2011, four out of ten popular TV series were related to online literature. Chen Kaige directed Caught in the Web, for example, which came out in 2012 and was based on a Cloudary piece

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Chinese star director Chen Kaige’s latest film, Caught in the Web, was based on a piece of online literature originally published by Cloudary. Photo: copyright: douban.com

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FAQ: What other kinds of start-up company are you watching, nationally or internationally?
Editorial
Hua Lin: We are very interested in megadata analysis. We have huge amounts of data that can be analysed: reading habits, user habits, different kinds of text. If we can analyse what literary works are successful then we can focus on promoting similar products. Of course we have always analysed our data, but we would like to take it to another level. This kind of data will also help us to sell stories and scripts more effectively. The more data we have, the better we can explain to a TV production company, for example, why they should buy which script, which target group they will reach, and so on.

what is cloudary?
Three is a Crowd
Cloudary is one of the biggest so-called private publishing houses in mainland China. It is one of only two companies in the Chinese digital publishing industry that have received an official business licence for e-book publishing, the other one being Chinese All. This demonstrates how carefully the Chinese government is dealing with the new media in a book market that, even in the private sector, is still subject to censorship. Online literature websites in China need a licence to operate and only a few such licences have been granted so far. They are supervised by the General Administration of Press and Publications, which applies similar restrictions also for printed publications. When China was Guest of Honour at the Frankfurt Book Fair in 2009, Cloudary was already attracting attention from the industry as one of the first publishing houses to explore the benefits of crowdsourcing and online literature. Fortune already listed the company – which back then went under the name of Shanda – as one of the world’s fastest growing. Today, the company is preparing for its stock market floatation. Alongside other companies, such as internet service provider Tencent and the search engine Baidu, it counts as one of China’s internet giants. Judging by the general market figures, further growth seems inevitable. In China in 2009 there were 690 million cell phone owners, 32 million bloggers and 340 million internet users; in 2013, the last figure is expected to exceed 600 million. Some 203 million Chinese internet users now produce and/or consume online literature. This means the market importance of online literature currently surpasses that of e-books. A study by the German Book Office Beijing on the Chinese publishing market is available to download here.

FAQ: How do you expect your work to change in the next five years?
Hua Lin: Now, I can still count the number of works we’ve sold to be made into films or TV serials. In five years time, I hope that the quantity has multiplied, and that I’ll need to give you a report. I also hope that we’ll have developed more links with the film production business.

Trending Topics

FAQ: What kind of international projects are you interested in?
Hua Lin: On the one hand, we are looking to the US, because they are far ahead of everybody in the film business. On the other hand, there may be potential for cooperation in Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore or Korea, because we are culturally close to one another. Everything else must be discussed on a case by case basis.

Serendipity
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storydrive china
StoryDrive China is the first all-media platform in Asia dedicated to exploring new forms of collaboration and business models across media boundaries. Leading minds from all over the world illuminate the future of media and entertainment. They share their knowledge and provide the tools you need to make the most of your business and to discover successful crossmedia and transmedia approaches.

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23 BIZ Peking Team

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Three is a Crowd Trending Topics

german book office beijing
A study by the German Book Office Beijing on the Chinese publishing market is available to download here. If you have any questions about how the Chinese market works, ask our colleagues at the German Book Office Beijing (BIZ Beijing)! Contact: Yingxin Gong gong@biz-beijing.org

Serendipity

Meet hua lin
You can meet Hua Lin, Vice President of Cloudary, at the Frankfurt Book Fair (9–13 October) or Contact him via LinkedIn

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Hua Lin was a speaker at the recent StoryDrive China conference (28 May – 1 June 2013)

Join the conversation on the Frankfurt Academy Blog:
http://blog.book-fair.com/ category/academy/

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Here you can find more articles about StoryDrive China.

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Serendipity
“It’s serendipity, stupid,” says communications expert Miriam Meckel, when she warns publishers against the dangers of too much planning. That’s also why we base our Serendipity column on chance encounters. To match the theme of this issue, we’ve taken a sideways look at a few publishing start-ups that are using new business models. Are these the pioneers of the publishing future? For the choices, we turned to the Frankfurt Academy’s very own trend scouts, Britta Friedrich and Kat Meyer, who’ve been discussing their personal favourites for our benefit.
What start-up would you take to a desert island? For example to Angaga Island in the Maldives? © by Neville Wootton

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Three is a Crowd Trending Topics Serendipity

Start-ups for a desert island
In a not entirely frivolous interview – inspired perhaps by Proust, perhaps by the BBC’s Desert Island Discs – we asked two of the Frankfurt Academy’s favourite trend scouts, Britta Friedrich and Kat Meyer, what they think are the hottest start-ups of this publishing summer.

By Nina Klein The so-called Proust Questionnaire (read here how the great man responded in a friend’s “confession album” in 1890) has been used in diverse contexts, from papers and magazines, like German weekly Die Zeit and US magazine Vanity Fair, to internet blogs and radio broadcasts. It has been adapted many times to glean different information, emotions and insights. We thought we’d use it too, to trigger some snap responses from our own resident experts about the hottest startups this publishing summer.

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FAQ: This FAQ issue is all about learning from others. So, tell us: do you have any role models?
Britta: I don’t have a role model, and I won’t have one – ever. At least not this summer. Kat: My bookish-techy role models are Sam Missingham of Futurebook and Sophie Rochester of the Liter-

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ary Platform. They lead by example – putting together vibrant, interesting and info-packed publishing events, and always staying ahead of the game when it comes to learning who is doing what that is changing the face of our industry. To top it off, they do it all with class and style, and their personalities really shine through in their work.

Editorial

Britta Friedrich

Britta Friedrich is director of events & programmes at the Frankfurt Book Fair and the brain behind cross-industry events such as StoryDrive. She is not a traditional “book person” – even if she’s always used every free minute she has for reading. She started her career in communication and strategy consultancy in Hamburg, before moving to the Frankfurt Book Fair about six years ago. Here, she first worked in the PR and marketing fields, but then devoted herself full time to the development of new products, services and topics, which has now become an abiding passion.

FAQ: In the world of traditional publishing there are fewer and fewer women in leading positions. What start-ups founded by women do you think are worth watching?
Kat: Check out Citia, led by Linda Holliday, or Susan Danziger of Ziggeo and Jenny 8 Lee of Plympton, the publisher of serialized original fiction. Another of my favourites is Bookigee, headed by Kristen McLean. Bookigee provides tools and technology to help authors take control of their careers. Kristen is a publishing veteran, yes, but she has the energy of a handful of Silicon Valley nerds... Britta: At StoryDrive, we have a rule that we call “NPMP”: no pure-male podiums. It’s a hard rule to stick to at times, and I must admit we have broken it in the past. So one thing I’d wish for in the future would be to see more women speakers at our conferences. For example Anna Lewis of ValoBooks, or Ina Fuchshuber of Droemer Knaur’s self-publishing and crowdsourcing platform, Neobooks.

Three is a Crowd Trending Topics

FAQ: If you were stuck on a desert island, writing your memoirs, and you were allowed online access to only one start-up to help you with this: which one would you choose?
Kat Meyer

Serendipity

Kat Meyer is programme & community manager for the Frankfurt Academy, with special focus on the Contec Conference. She is a veteran of the book publishing industry, and her background includes some 20-odd years (“it’s all a blur”) focused on community management, event curation, and editorial, marketing and social media projects for a diverse array of publishers and media companies. Kat comes to the Frankfurt Academy from O’Reilly Media, where she was Conference Chair and Community Manager for the internationally-acclaimed Tools of Change conference series.

Britta: Waking App from Israel, which specialises in augmented reality. Why that? Because it blurs the boundaries between fiction and reality.... And that could be handy sitting on a hot, lonesome island. Kat: Can I assume this desert island is equipped with WIFI? If so, there are two Canadian start-ups I would have trouble choosing between. One is PressBooks – I love it because it’s a super-easy-to-use content management and export system for books. The other is Leanpub, which I love because I like the idea of publishing works in progress. It is a bit like a tech solution based on Heinrich von Kleist’s advice in his essay, On the Gradual Construction of Thoughts while Speaking: “If there is something you want to know and cannot discover by meditation then, my dear ingenious friend, I advise you to discuss it with the first acquaintance

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whom you happen to meet. He need not have a sharp intellect, nor do I mean that you should question him on the subject. No! Rather you yourself should begin by telling it all to him....” As there’s nobody else besides me on a desert island, I would need Leanpub as a confidante...

storydrive
StoryDrive is the international forum for trends and innovation in media and entertainment. Since 2010, this event has focused on new forms of storytelling and pioneering business models. Leaders from the publishing, film, TV, and games industries, from marketing, design and sociology, gather here to present their visionary narrative concepts and to offer new perspectives on the media world of tomorrow. Under the motto “Fiction is real”, this year’s Frankfurt StoryDrive is dedicated to a new generation of stories. They’re from the future. They’re more realistic than ever before. You can touch them, experience them with all your senses and actively influence them. When: 11 October 2013 Where: Frankfurt Book Fair, Room Europe

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FAQ: Which start-ups in the self-publishing field would you choose to publish your memoirs?
Britta: Smashwords – because I like their motto: “The Right to Publish”. I think the founder, Mark Coker, hit the nail on the head with this. Everyone does have the right to publish! The second question then follows automatically: does everyone also have a right to be read? For that side of things, I’d try it with a social reading platform such as Wattpad or Jottify. Kat: Neobooks if I were German, Cloudary if I were Chinese, and Popo if I were Taiwanese. That’s because I like the crowdsourcing aspect of these online literature platforms – the most popular titles get the chance of professional support and marketing. This seems to me to be the ideal connection between self-publishing and professional publishing. In the English-speaking world we have Pubslush and BookCountry – two platforms that have been playing with the idea of crowdfunding and crowdsourcing for a while. They have some interesting features.

Three is a Crowd Trending Topics

Contact: Britta Friedrich, Director Conferences, at friedrich@book-fair.com

Start-up founders and women to watch out for!
Serendipity

Linda Holliday, Citia

Susan Danziger, Ziggeo

Jenny 8 Lee, Plympton

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Kristen McLean, Bookigee

Anna Lewis, Valobox

Ina Fuchshuber, Neobooks

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FAQ: And where would you get the money to keep you going for two years, while you’re writing your memoirs?
Britta: Unbound (UK). Naturally, I’d first have to convince the founders Justin Pollard, John Mitchinson and Dan Kieran – all of them successful writers themselves – that I’m worth featuring on their crowdfunding platform. But if Kate Moss can manage that, I’m sure I can too ;-) Kat: There’s always Las Vegas or the lottery. But failing those, I would try the Kickstarter thing, and if worse comes to worst, keep my day job!

CONTEC
CONTEC is a new, highly engaging event created by the Frankfurt Academy to address the complex needs of today’s publishing business. It gathers stakeholders from across the publishing ecosystem – from STM and trade publishers to service providers and tech start-ups – in one arena to redefine and redesign the experience of publishing. When: 8 October 2013 Where: Frankfurt Marriott Hotel Contact: Britta Friedrich friedrich@book-fair.com or Kat Meyer meyer@book-fair.com

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Three is a Crowd

Meet britta and kat
You can meet Britta and Kat at the Frankfurt Book Fair (9 – 13 October) – in particular at the conferences StoryDrive (11 October) and CONTEC (8 October), which will feature the premiere edition of the CONTEC International Publishing Start-Up Showcase. You can also get in touch with Britta or Kat: Britta Friedrich: friedrich@book-fair.com, t: +49 (0) 69 2102145 Kat Meyer: meyer@book-fair.com, t: +49 (0) 69 2102 166

Trending Topics

links to the start-ups britta and kat have mentioned:
Bookigee: http://www.bookigee.com/ BookCountry: http://www.bookcountry.com/ Citia: http://citia.com/about.html Cloudary: http://www.cloudary.com.cn/ Kickstarter: http://www.kickstarter.com/ Leanpub: http://www.kickstarter.com/ Neobooks: http://www.neobooks.com/ Plympton: http://plympton.com/ PressBooks: http://pressbooks.com/ Pubslush: http://www.pubslush.com/ Smashwords: http://www.smashwords.com/ Unbound: http://unbound.co.uk/ Waking App: http://www.wakingapp.com/ Wattpad: http://www.wattpad.com/hot Ziggeo: https://ziggeo.com/

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Meet even more start-ups at the Hot Spots, an exhibition format at the Frankfurt Book Fair (9 – 13 October), tailored to service providers and publishing innovators.

share
If you know some exciting start-ups too, please share the information using our publically accessible list: Best of Publishing Start-Ups! or contact us at faq@book-fair.com

Join the conversation on the Frankfurt Academy Blog:
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The Frankfurt Academy informs, inspires, and supports you in all facets of the content business, presenting innovative ideas, visionary concepts, promising markets, new business partners and forward looking solutions. From 8–13 October 2013, the Frankfurt Book Fair will be the meeting place for the industries’ leading minds. See you in Frankfurt! CONTEC Frankfurt (8 October 2013) Publishers Launch Frankfurt (8 October 2013) International Rights Directors Meeting RDM (8 October 2013) LitCam Fit for the Future: International Perspectives on Education (9 October 2013) Frankfurt StoryDrive (10 – 12 October 2013) Frankfurt Academy Seminars & Trainings (9 –12 October 2013)

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Frankfurt Academy Quarterly / Frankfurt Book Fair Publisher Holger Volland, Frankfurt Book Fair Chief editor Nina Klein Contributors Siobhan O’Leary, Nicole Stöcker, Alva Gehrmann, Nina Klein Translation: Siobhan O’Leary, Alastair Penny Design & Art Direction Dipl. des. Manuel Rauch www.manuelrauch.com contact@manuelrauch.com

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