You are on page 1of 156

 

Table of Contents 
Click on any of the titles to take you to the appropriate piece 

Features
When Is a Sandwich Not  Really a Sandwich? 16 
By Jill Nussinow, MS, RD 

Columns 
What’s Cooking?  4
Find out what’s up with the Vegan  Culinary Experience this month.   

  Gluten‐free wraps and tasty  sandwich fillings make for good  eating.   

The PB&J: America’s  Favorite Sandwich 20 
By Robin Robertson 
 

Vegan Cuisine & the Law:  What You Should Know  About How the  Pharmaceutical Industry Is  Poisoning Pigs, Poultry, and  People  41 
By Mindy Kursban, Esq. & Andy  Breslin 
 

Robin spins the classic peanut  butter and jelly sandwich with  delicious flare!   

Sandwich Activism 22 
By Madelyn Pryor 

  Madelyn shares some easy‐to‐ make Thai recipes that are soul‐ satisfying and fun to make.   

Read about the drug Ractopamine  and its insidious effect on both the  farm animal and human  populations with a healthy dose of  corruption on the side.   

From the Garden:  Tasty  Homemade Vegan Breads 44 
By Liz Lonetti 
 

The Reuben: An American  Melting Pot Sandwich 25 
By Tamasin Noyes 
 

Reubens are one of the most  famous American sandwiches int  eh world. Explore the intricacies  and history of this outstanding  sandwich and find out what’s up  with its cousin, the Rachel.    

Discover how to mill your own  wheat to flour and how to make  bread with just flour, water, yeast,  and salt.   

The Vegan Traveler:  Hudson  Valley, NY 46 
By Chef Jason Wyrick 

The Celestial Sandwich 28 
By Angela Elliott 

  A nut free raw foods sandwich  with ninja sauce? Awesome.         
July 2013

  Chef Jason spends a couple of days  in upstate New York eating his way  through the Hudson Valley.    see the following pages for  interviews and reviews…      

Sandwiches |1

 

Table of Contents 2  Features Contd. Columns Contd.
 

The Heart Healthy Greens of  Marketplace  9   Spring Sandwich 31 
By Mark Sutton 

                                   

  Mark shares his fabulously  detailed recipe for a unique and  tantalizing creation of his, a mint  sorrel hummus sandwich with  cinnamon and cumin scented  bread.   

Get connected and find out about  vegan friendly businesses and  organizations.   

Recipe Index  63 
 

A listing of all the recipes found in  this issue, compiled with links. 

 

Religion, Politics, and the  Third Rail: Sandwiches! 36 
By LaDiva Dietitian 

Interviews  
Cookbook Author Tamasin  Noyes 51 
 

  Think you know what exactly a  sandwich is? Think again!   

Sandwich Construction 39 
By Jason Wyrick 
 

With a heart as big as his arms,  Mike is winning the world over and  proving that vegans are  powerhouses of good. 

  Building the perfect sandwich isn’t   
just about flavor. Learn about the  five key principles to sandwich  construction.   
     

Reviews 
What We’re Eating: Food  Reviews 54 
By  Jason Wyrick 

      What We’re Reading: Book  Reviews 59 
By  Madelyn Pryor 

  Find out what we think of Beyond  Meat, Eppa Organic Sangria, Casa  Noble Organic Tequila, Daiya  Creamcheese, and Earth Balance  Cheese Puffs. Plus, recipes to go  along with the tequilas and  Beyond Meat!        

  Book reviews of Whole Grain  Vegan Baking, Vegan before 6,  Practically Raw Desserts, and  Vegan for Her.   

July 2013

Sandwiches |2

 

The Vegan Culinary Experience
                            Sandwiches     July 2013   
                          Publisher    Jason Wyrick                                  Editors     Eleanor Sampson,                                                   Madelyn Pryor             Nutrition Analyst     Eleanor Sampson                         Web Design    Jason Wyrick                            Graphics     Jason Wyrick                                   Reviewers    Madelyn Pryor                                                 Jason Wyrick        Contributing Authors    Jason Wyrick                                                 Madelyn Pryor                                                 Liz Lonetti                                                 Sharon Valencik                                                 Mark Sutton                                                 Jill Nussinow                                                 Marty Davey                                                 Robin Robertson                                                 Mindy Kursban                                                 Andy Breslin                                                 Dynise Balcavage                                                 Ani Phyo                                                 Tamasin Noyes                    Photography Credits  

What’s Cooking?
I have recently fallen in love with  sandwiches again. Why did I ever  break up with them in the first place?  It was probably that year I went gluten  free. While I don’t load up on gluten  anymore, I also don’t eschew it and  that’s left some space to welcome  back a favorite friend. I’m not sure  what it is about the sandwich that is so captivating. Maybe it’s all  the flavor melded into a single, manageable bite or the heartiness  of it all. It might be the versatility of the sandwich, able to serve as  a meal or a snack, as a portable lunch, and even better when  you’ve got leftovers of it. I think it must be all of those, and that’s  why I enjoyed putting this issue together so much.     The range of recipes in this issue run the gamut from quick, five  minute sandwiches all the way to some crazy culinary endeavors.  You’ll see some completely original sandwiches and a few fun spins  on favorite classics, and some not‐so‐well‐known sandwiches, as  well. Make what you feel comfortable making and try to find the  time to stretch your cooking chops a bit. The recipes in this issue  will reward you for doing so (and so will all your friends and family  waiting to eat your awesome sandwich)!    Eat healthy, eat compassionately, and eat well!         

                  Cover Page     Jason Wyrick    
                Recipe Images     Jason Wyrick                                                 Madelyn Pryor                                                 Milan Valencik of                                                  Milan Photography                                                 Jill Nussinow                                                 Mark Sutton                                                 Liz Lonetti                                                 Lori Maffei                                                 Dynise Balcavage                                                 Tamasin Noyes                                                 Angela Elliott                      Travel Photos   Jason Wyrick                                      Earl of Sandwich   Public Domain       Hudson Valley, Wheat   Creative Commons         Field, Wheatberries                     Tamasin Noyes  Courtesy of Tamasin Noyes                             Ani Phyo    Courtesy of Jeff Skeirik                                                           

July   2013

Sandwiches |3

Contributors
  Jason Wyrick ‐ Chef Jason Wyrick is the Executive Chef of Devil Spice, Arizona's vegan  catering company, and the publisher of The Vegan Culinary Experience. Chef Wyrick has  been regularly featured on major television networks and in the press.  He has done  demos with several doctors, including Dr. Neal Barnard of the PCRM, Dr. John  McDougall, and Dr. Gabriel Cousens.  Chef Wyrick was also a guest instructor in the Le  Cordon Bleu program.  He has catered for PETA, Farm Sanctuary, Frank Lloyd Wright,  and Google. He is also the NY Times best‐selling co‐author of 21 Day Weightloss  Kickstart Visit Chef Jason Wyrick at www.devilspice.com and  www.veganculinaryexperience.com.  

Madelyn Pryor ‐ Madelyn is a lover of dessert, which she celebrates on her blog,  http://badkittybakery.blogspot.com/. She has been making her own tasty desserts for  over 16 years, and eating dessert for longer than she cares to admit. When she isn’t in  the kitchen creating new wonders of sugary goodness, she is chasing after her bad  kitties, or reviewing products for various websites and publications. She can be  contacted at thebadkittybakery@gmail.com or madelyn@veganculinaryexperience.com.     Robin Robertson ‐ A longtime vegan, Robin Robertson has worked with food for more  than 25 years and is the author of twenty cookbooks, including Quick‐Fix Vegan, Vegan  Planet, 1,000 Vegan Recipes, Vegan Fire & Spice, and Vegan on the Cheap. A former  restaurant chef, Robin writes the Global Vegan food column for VegNews Magazine and  has written for Vegetarian Times, Cooking Light, and Natural Health, among others.  Robin lives in the beautiful Shenandoah Valley of Virginia. You may contact her through  her website: www.robinrobertson.com. 

  Mindy Kursban, Esq. ‐ Mindy Kursban is a practicing attorney who is passionate about  animals, food, and health. She gained her experience and knowledge about vegan  cuisine and the law while working for ten years as general counsel and then executive  director of the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine. Since leaving PCRM in  2007, Mindy has been writing and speaking to help others make the switch to a plant‐ based diet. Mindy welcomes feedback, comments, and questions at  mkursban@gmail.com.     Jill Nussinow, MS, RD, The Veggie Queen ‐ Jill is a Registered Dietitian and has a  Masters Degree in Dietetics and Nutrition from Florida International University. After  graduating, she migrated to California and began a private nutrition practice providing  individual consultations and workshops, specializing in nutrition for pregnancy, new  mothers, and children.  You can find out more about The Veggie Queen at  www.theveggiequeen.com.    

July 2013

Sandwiches |4

Contributors
    Liz Lonetti ‐ As a professional urban designer, Liz Lonetti is passionate about building  community, both physically and socially.  She graduated from the U of MN with a BA in  Architecture in 1998. She also serves as the Executive Director for the Phoenix  Permaculture Guild, a non‐profit organization whose mission is to inspire sustainable  living through education, community building and creative cooperation  (www.phoenixpermaculture.org).  A long time advocate for building greener and more  inter‐connected communities, Liz volunteers her time and talent for other local green  causes.  In her spare time, Liz enjoys cooking with the veggies from her gardens, sharing  great food with friends and neighbors, learning from and teaching others.  To contact  Liz, please visit her blog site www.phoenixpermaculture.org/profile/LizDan.    Sharon Valencik ‐ Sharon Valencik is the author of Sweet Utopia: Simply Stunning Vegan  Desserts. She is raising two vibrant young vegan sons and rescued animals, currently a  rabbit and a dog. She comes from a lineage of artistic chef matriarchs and has been  baking since age five. She is working on her next book, World Utopia: Delicious and  Healthy International Vegan Cuisine. Please visit www.sweetutopia.com for more  information, to ask questions, or to provide feedback.          Andrew Breslin ‐ Andrew Breslin is the author of Mother's Milk, the definitive account of  the vast global conspiracy orchestrated by the dairy industry, which secretly controls  humanity through mind‐controlling substances contained in cow milk. In all likelihood  this is a hilarious work of satyric fiction, but then again, you never know. He also authors  the blog Andy Rants, almost certainly the best blog that you have never read. He is an  avid book reviewer at Goodreads. He worked at Physicians Committee for Responsible  Medicine with Mindy Kursban, with whom he occasionally collaborates on projects  concerning legal issues associated with health and food. Andrew's fiction and nonfiction  have appeared in a wide variety of print and online venues, covering an even wider  variety of topics. He lives in Philadelphia with his girlfriend and cat, who are not the  same person.    Dynise Balcavage ‐ Dynise Balcavage’s newest cookbook Pies and Tarts with Heart:  Expert Pie‐Building Techniques for 60+ Sweet and Savory Vegan Pies hits the stores this  summer. Dynise blogs at urbanvegan.net and tweets at @theurbanvegan.               

July 2013

Sandwiches |5

Contributors
    Mark Sutton ‐ Mark Sutton has been the Visualizations Coordinator for two NASA Earth  Satellite Missions, an interactive multimedia consultant, organic farmer, and head  conference photographer.  He’s developed media published in several major magazines  and shown or broadcast internationally, produced DVDs and websites, edited/managed  a vegan cookbook (No More Bull! by Howard Lyman), worked with/for two Nobel Prize  winners (on Global Climate Change), and helped create UN Peace Medal Award‐winning  pre‐college curriculum.  A vegetarian for 20 years, then vegan the past 10, Mark’s the  editor of the Mad Cowboy e‐newsletter, an avid nature photographer, gardener, and  environmentalist.  Oil‐free for over 5 years and author of the 1st vegan pizza cookbook,  he can be reached at:  msutton@hearthealthypizza.com and  http://www.hearthealthypizza.com    Milan Valencik ‐ Milan Valencik is the food stylist and photographer of Sweet Utopia:  Simply Stunning Vegan Desserts. His company, Milan Photography, specializes in artistic  event photojournalism, weddings, and other types of photography. Milan is also a fine  artist and musician. Milan is originally from Czech Republic and now lives in NJ. For more  information about Milan, please visit www.milanphotography.com or  www.sweetutopia.com.        Angela Elliott ‐ Angela Elliott is the author of Alive in Five, Holiday Fare with Angela, The  Simple Gourmet, and more books on the way! Angela is the inventor of Five Minute  Gourmet Meals™, Raw Nut‐Free Cuisine™, Raw Vegan Dog Cuisine™, and The  Celestialwich™, and the owner and operator of Celestial Raw Goddess Tonics and  Teas. www.celestialrawgoddesstonicsandteas.com. Angela has contributed to various  publications, including Vegnews Magazine, Vegetarian Baby and Child Magazine, and  has taught gourmet classes, holistic classes, lectured, and on occasion toured with Lou  Corona, a nationally recognized proponent of living food.    LaDiva Dietitian! ‐ Marty Davey is not only LaDiva, Dietitian!, but a Registered Dietitian  with a Masters degree in Food and Nutrition. She became a vegetarian in 1980 when she  discovered that there were more chemicals in cattle then attendants at a Grateful Dead  concert. Her family is all vegan, except the dog who drew the line at vegetarian. She  conducts factual and hilarious presentations and food demos.  While her private practice  includes those transitioning to a plant‐based life, LaDiva's most popular private  consulting topic is "I'm too busy and I don't cook." Her website  is www.ladivadietitian.com.           

July 2013

Sandwiches |6

Contributors
Ani Phyo – Ani is the world’s leading author on detox, raw food, and wellness and has  written six award‐winning and best‐selling books, including Ani’s 15‐Day Fat Blast, Ani’s  Raw Food Essentials, and Ani’s Raw Food Kitchen, awarded “Best Vegetarian Cookbook  USA 2007″ by Gourmand International. She offers Mastery Raw Food and Detox  Certification Courses to help people learn how to make delicious, healthy food at home  and/or for business while providing guidance to students who wish to start their own  small business in the wellness and natural food categories. Please visit her at  www.AniPhyo.com.    Tamasin Noyes – Tamasin Noyes is the author of American Vegan Kitchen, Grills Gone  Vegan, and co‐author (with Celine Steen) of Vegan Sandwiches Save the Day! and  Whole Grain Vegan Baking. A committed  vegetarian since 1980 and vegan for the past  10 years, Tami loves to cook with big, bold flavors while exploring  food from different  cultures, as well as redefining American comfort food. Tami lives and blogs in Ohio,  with her best friend/husband, Jim, and three love kitties. Follow Tami’s blog,  www.veganappetite.com, and find her on facebook.     Eleanor Sampson – Eleanor is an editor and nutrition analyst for The Vegan Culinary  Experience, author, and an expert vegan baker with a specialty in delicious vegan  sweets (particularly cinnamon rolls!)  You can reach Eleanor at  Eleanor@veganculinaryexperience.com.              

July 2013

Sandwiches |7

About the VCE
The Vegan Culinary Experience is an educational vegan culinary  magazine designed by professional vegan chefs to help make  vegan cuisine more accessible.  Published by Chef Jason Wyrick,  the magazine utilizes the electronic format of the web to go  beyond the traditional content of a print magazine to offer  classes, podcasts, an interactive learning community, and links to  articles, recipes, and sites embedded throughout the magazine to  make retrieving information more convenient for the reader.     The VCE is also designed to bring vegan chefs, instructors,  medical professionals, authors, and businesses together with the  growing number of people interested in vegan cuisine.    Eat healthy, eat compassionately, and eat well. 

Become a Subscriber
Subscribing to the VCE is FREE!  Subscribers have access to our Learning Community, back issues, recipe  database, and extra educational materials.    Visit http://veganculinaryexperience.com/VCESubscribe.htm to subscribe.   
*PRIVACY POLICY ‐ Contact information is never, ever given or sold to another individual or company 

 

Not Just a Magazine
Meal Service 
The Vegan Culinary Experience also provides weekly meals that coincide with the recipes from the magazine.   Shipping is available across the United States.  Raw, gluten‐free, and low‐fat diabetic friendly options are  available.  Visit http://veganculinaryexperience.com/VCEMealService.htm for more information.   

Culinary Instruction 
Chef Jason Wyrick and many of the contributors to the magazine are available for private culinary instruction,  seminars, interviews, and other educational based activities.  For information and pricing, contact us at  http://veganculinaryexperience.com/VCEContact.htm.  
 

An Educational and Inspirational Journey of Taste, Health, and Compassion 
July 2013 Sandwiches |8

Marketplace
Welcome to the Marketplace, our new spot for finding  vegetarian friendly companies, chefs, authors, bloggers,  cookbooks, products, and more!  One of the goals of The Vegan  Culinary Experience is to connect our readers with organizations  that provide relevant products and services for vegans, so we  hope you enjoy this new feature!      Click on the Ads – Each ad is linked to the appropriate  organization’s website.  All you need to do is click on the ad to  take you there.    Become a Marketplace Member – Become connected by joining  the Vegan Culinary Experience Marketplace.  Membership is  available to those who financially support the magazine, to  those who promote the magazine, and to those who contribute  to the magazine.  Contact Chef Jason Wyrick at  chefjason@veganculinaryexperience.com for details!                               

Current Members 
Bad Kitty Creations       GoDairyFree.org    Robin Robertson  (www.badkittybakery.blogspot.com) (www.godairyfree.org)  (www.robinrobertson.com)  Dynise Balcavage      Sweet Utopia      Milan Photography      (www.sweetutopia.com)  (www.milanphotography.com)  (urbanvegan.net)   Jill Nussinow, MS, RD      Heart Healthy Pizza    LaDiva Dietitian  (www.theveggiequeen.com)    (www.hearthealthypizza.com) (www.ladivadietitian.com)   Ani Phyo        Tamasin Noyes    Celestial Raw Goddess Tonics & Teas  (www.aniphyo.com)       (www.veganappetite.com)   (www.celestialrawgoddesstonicsandteas.com)               Non‐profits              Vegan Outreach        Rational Animal      Farm Sanctuary  (www.veganoutreach.org)       (www.rational‐animal.org)     (www.farmsanctuary.com)    The Phoenix Permactulture Guild (www.phoneixpermaculture.org) 
July 2013 Sandwiches |9

Marketplace
                                                                                     

July 2013

Sandwiches |10

Marketplace
                                                                                         
July 2013 Sandwiches |11

Marketplace
                                                                               

July 2013

Sandwiches |12

Marketplace
                                                                             

July 2013

Sandwiches |13

Marketplace

                                     

July 2013

Sandwiches |14

Marketplace
 

                     

July 2013

Sandwiches |15

When Is a Sandwich Not Really a Sandwich?
Gluten-free Sandwiches: They’re a Wrap and More
By Jill Nussinow, MS, RD, aka The Veggie Queen™
When you’re eating gluten‐free, sandwiches become  more of a challenge when you haven’t yet found bread  that you love to eat. That would be me. I love the bread  at New Cascadia Bakery in Portland, Oregon but it’s a 2  hour plane ride from where I live so I just skip eating  traditional sandwiches, unless of course I’ve been to  Portland. Then I bring back a loaf of teff bread and a  loaf of seeded bread and slice them, wrap the pieces in  waxed paper and freeze them. I can assure you, though,  that this only happens about once a year, leaving me  generally bread‐free. (I have a local bakery: Grindstone  that has some gluten‐free breads that will suffice, yet I  only buy them once in a while but infrequently.)  Not one to give up on eating something sandwich‐like, I  generally have some kind of wrap. The wrapper also  poses a bit of a challenge but here I share with you  some of my favorite wrappers (aka sandwich filling  holders).  One of my favorite ways to wrap a sandwich filling is in  between 2 large leaves of lettuce. It’s often mighty  messy and not something that I am likely to do in front  of other people but it’s often easy because I generally  have lettuce on hand. I like to put any of my favorite  fillings, listed below, into the leaves with sprouts, onion,  avocado or whatever is on hand that day. I wrap the  lettuce leaf around the filling and eat.  A more civilized approach to wraps involves getting the  best wrappers that you can. My favorite wrap is the  large teff tortilla made by La Tortilla Factory. The  factory happens to be in Santa Rosa, California where I  live but I believe that they are also available elsewhere.  These wraps have oil added so if you want to go oil‐free  you might want to try the Engine 2 brown rice tortillas. I  have not had as much luck using them as they tend to  break, they contain nuts and they are a smaller size so I  find them a bit harder to wrap.  Udi’s just came out with 
July 2013

a gluten‐free tortilla but I haven’t yet tried it. (If you do,  let me know what you think, please.)  We all have to pick and choose what works for us. Look  around for your favorite wrapper and get to work  making the fillings.   My two favorite wrap fillings are Roasted Red Pepper  White Bean Spread and Asian Bean Dip or Spread. I like  to spread these on the tortilla, add shredded carrots,  thinly sliced red cabbage, onion, homegrown sprouts  and roll the whole thing up and cut it in half on a  diagonal for a pretty presentation. Or I might use  cooked ingredients, mentioned below. Fresh hergs  always add zip.  Or you can use something more substantial and make a  batch of Tempeh No‐Chicken Salad. Click here for the  recipe.  If you want something a bit more substantial, I like to  make “crepes”. The recipe Basic Buckwheat Crepes‐  Vegan and Gluten‐Free is not mine, it came from  Food.com. I was inspired to make these crepes after I  had a very tasty raw veggie burger from Lydia’s  Sunflower Café in Petaluma, California served with  buckwheat crepes as the bun (this is a don’t miss spot if  you find yourself in Sonoma County). While I have not  attempted making the raw burger, I like to use these  crepes to cradle my cooked burger, a version of which I  have included here.   Generally when making crepes you want them to be  very thin so that you can roll them. In this version, you  want them to be a bit thicker so that they can hold up  to a potentially messy burger.   The nice thing about making the crepes is that you can  make 16 to 20 at one time and freeze them with waxed  paper between the crepes and take them out of the 
Sandwiches |16

freezer as you need them. You can do the same with  the burgers. And you can freeze the spreads and dips,  too which, eliminates your saying, “There’s nothing to  eat.” Having a well‐stocked freezer makes it easy to say,  “It’s a wrap.” 

Asian Bean Spread or Dip for Wraps and Veggies
This tantalizing dip was created in front of a  McDougall diet class. Luckily, someone wrote down  the ingredients.  It was their favorite dip of the day.  You’ll notice that the beans aren’t Asian but I suspect  that it would work well with azuki, mung or soybeans,  too.    Makes about 2 cups    1   clove garlic   1‐2  tablespoons peanut butter  1   1‐inch piece of ginger, peeled  1 ½     cups cooked garbanzo or cannellini beans   1   teaspoon rice vinegar   1   tablespoon mellow white or any other miso  (my favorite is South River Miso)  3   tablespoons water or vegetable broth  1   tablespoon or more cilantro leaves  1  tablespoon agave, Sucanat or equivalent  sugar substitute, such as stevia  1   green onion, sliced    Put the garlic, peanut butter and ginger in a food  process and process until finely chopped. Add the  beans, vinegar, miso and water or broth and blend  until slightly chunky. Add the cilantro, sweetener and  green onion and process briefly until combined. Taste  and adjust the seasonings to your liking by adding  more vinegar, miso or sugar. Use as a filling for wraps  or as a dip for vegetables.   
©2013, Jill Nussinow, MS, RD, The Veggie Queen™ 

Roasted Red Pepper White Bean Spread or Dip
This spread or dip makes a wonderful base layer for  wraps of any kind. In the summer, you can layer in  roasted red peppers and grilled summer squash and  onions for a true taste treat. Put in fresh basil or  parsley to give it a fresh and lively flavor.    Serves 6 as an appetizer    2  cups cooked white beans  ½   cup roasted red peppers, drained  1  tablespoon olive oil (optional)  1  tablespoon lemon juice  1  tablespoon fresh sage, chopped  2  teaspoons fresh thyme  ½   teaspoon salt and ½ teaspoon ground black     pepper    Combine beans, olive oil, lemon juice, sage, thyme,  salt and pepper in food processor. Process until  smooth. Use as the base for wraps or for a vegetable  dip. 
©2013, Jill Nussinow, MS, RD, The Veggie Queen™ 

                     
July 2013

               

Sandwiches |17

Vegan and Gluten-free Buckwheat Crepe Buns from Food.com
Once you mix the batter, it will take about 30 minutes  to make the crepes. My favorite filling is a veggie  burger because these crepes stand in for the bun.  Use 2 to 3 tablespoons batter for each one. Make  them about the size of your burger.  I think that these can be made oil‐free but I haven’t  tried it yet.    Makes 16 to 20 bun sized crepes  ½   cup buckwheat flour   ½   cup rice flour (use a finely milled flour)   1   tablespoon coconut oil (can use other oil of     choice), [I used sesame oil]  1 ¼   cups soymilk (can use other milk if wished) [I     used unsweetened almond milk]  2   teaspoons arrowroot or 2 teaspoons tapioca     starch   1   pinch salt   ~  spray oil, for pan frying    Place the buckwheat flour, rice flour and a pinch of  salt in a bowl. Make a 'well' in the center of the flour.    Add oil and a little of the milk, beating well with a  wooden spoon.   Gradually beat in the remaining milk, drawing the  flour in from the sides to make a smooth batter.     Spray the oil in an 18 cm/7 inch non‐stick frying pan.  Pour in just enough batter to coat the base of the pan  thinly. [I only added about 2 to 3 tablespoons of  batter and made the crepes smaller.]Swirl the pan to  spread the mixture thinly across the base of the pan.   Cook until golden brown, flip and cook the other side.   [I did not need to respray the pan until I had made  about 12 crepes.]    Place cooked crepes onto a plate and using baking  paper between cooked crepes to stop them from  sticking together. You can freeze these, too. 
©2013, Jill Nussinow, MS, RD, The Veggie Queen™ 

                 

Lentil & Red Rice Burgers
I have been known to make burgers out of almost any  leftover bean or grain. Since lentils cook so quickly, I  often make extra and freeze them or you can make  them from scratch. Using a food processor for  blending helps a lot.    Makes 6‐8 burgers    2   cups cooked whole grain rice  2   cups cooked lentils  1   teaspoon grated or minced ginger  2   cloves garlic or 1 stalk green garlic, minced  ½   cup minced onion or leeks  1   tablespoon tamari or 1 teaspoon salt  ~  Seasoning of your choice, like curry, to taste  ¼   cup hemp or sunflower seeds  ~  Ground oats, for binding, if necessary    Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Combine the rice,  lentils and seasonings in a food processor. Blend until  sticky. When well blended, stir in the hemp seeds.  With wet hands, form into burgers. Place on a  parchment lined baking sheet, sprayed or lightly  rubbed with oil.    Bake the burgers for 15 minutes on one side. Remove  from oven, turn over and bake on the other side until  browned. Serve hot on crepes, a bun, or not, with  garnishes.     Note: precooked burgers can be frozen in wax paper in  plastic bags. To reheat, put in toaster, or regular, oven  until warmed through.   
©2013, Jill Nussinow, MS, RD, The Veggie Queen™ 
Sandwiches |18

 
July 2013

The Author    Jill Nussinow aka The Veggie  Queen™ makes sandwiches her way.  No matter what they are always  tasty, even if they are extremely  messy. You can read more about  what she does at  http://www.theveggiequeen.com     

July 2013

Sandwiches |19

The PB & J: America’s Favorite Sandwich
by Robin Robertson

  When you consider the fact that before the age of  eighteen, the average American child consumes  1,500 peanut butter and jelly sandwiches, it’s easy  to see why the iconic PB&J is America’s favorite  sandwich.     When I was a kid, the only PB&J choices were  smooth or crunchy peanut butter and maybe  swapping out strawberry jam for grape jelly. These  days, you can choose from over a dozen kinds of  nut butters, paired with an orchard full of jams,  jellies, preserves, and marmalades, and served on a  wide variety of breads.  You can get even more  creative by adding another flavor layer to your  sandwich with anything from dried or fresh fruits  to crushed nuts, chocolate, shredded carrots, or  even vegan bacon.    Variations on the PB&J are, in fact, infinitely  versatile when you consider that by combining  various nut butters with different jams, jellies, or  preserves, “add‐ons” and breads, you can enjoy  more than 32,130 different variations of America’s  favorite sandwich. (see chart on next page)      I love the creativity of putting a new spin on the  traditional PB&J.  You can even go savory by  combining lime marmalade, peanut butter, and  shredded carrot with a little cilantro and sriracha  sauce. Or create a sweet treat with a dessert panini  made with hazelnut butter, raspberry jam, and  chocolate.     Another favorite twist on the classic is this recipe  for Peach‐Almond Butter Quesadillas from my  cookbook, Nut Butter Universe: Easy Vegan Recipes  with Out‐Of‐This‐World Flavors.   

 

Peach-Almond Butter Quesadillas

Serves 2     Almond butter stands in for the peanut butter and  peach jam replaces the classic grape jelly in this new  spin on the classic PB & J. But that’s not all: tortillas  replace the bread to make delicious quesadillas.  Variations are endless so feel free to use different  combinations of nut butter and jam or other spread.  Sliced bananas or fried vegan bacon slices make  good additions. This recipe is easily doubled. For  gluten‐free, use gluten‐free tortillas. This recipe is  from Nut Butter Universe: Easy Vegan Recipes with  Out‐Of‐This‐World Flavors.    2 (8‐inch) flour tortillas  1/3 cup almond butter   1/3 cup peach jam    Spread one side of each of the tortillas evenly with  the almond butter and peach jam. Fold the tortillas  in half to enclose the spreads. Place both  quesadillas in a large non‐stick skillet and cook until  lightly browned on both sides, turning once. To  serve transfer the quesadillas to a cutting board and  cut them into wedges.    © 2013, used by permission Vegan Heritage Press                     

July 2013

Sandwiches |20

The Author 
  Robin Robertson is the author of  more than twenty cookbooks,  including Quick‐Fix Vegan, Fresh  from the Vegan Slow Cooker,  Vegan Planet, 1,000 Vegan  Recipes, Vegan Fire & Spice, and  Vegan on the Cheap. Her latest  book is entitled Nut Butter  Universe: Easy Vegan Recipes  with Worlds of Flavor.  A former restaurant chef,  Robin writes the Global Vegan food column for  VegNews Magazine and has written for Vegetarian  Times, Cooking Light, and Natural Health, among  others. She blogs regularly on her website:  www.robinrobertson.com.     

                             

Sandwiches Unlimited
If you choose one ingredient from column A, one from column B, add one from column C, and then  put them all on one of the choices from column D, you could potentially enjoy more than 30,000 different  variations of America’s favorite sandwich.      
A. Nut Butter  Peanut butter  Almond butter  Cashew butter  Macadamia butter  Walnut butter  Pecan butter  Pistachio butter  Brazil nut butter  Hazelnut butter  Chestnut Butter  Soy nut butter  Sesame butter  Sunflower seed butter  Pumpkin seed butter    B. Sweet Spread  Grape jelly  Peach jam  Strawberry preserves  Lime marmalade  Orange marmalade  Apricot preserves  Cherry jam  Blackberry jam  Apple jelly  Fig jam  Raspberry jam  Blueberry preserves  Pineapple jam  Mango jam  Guava jam  Red pepper jelly  Quince Jelly    C. Optional Add‐Ons  Raisins  Dried cranberries  Dried blueberries  Sliced bananas  Grated chocolate  Crushed nuts  Minced celery  Shredded carrot  Thinly‐sliced cucumber  Cooked vegan bacon  Sliced apple  Sliced pear  Sliced peach  Ground flaxseeds  Vegan cream cheese    D. Bread of Choice  Whole‐grain bread  Gluten‐free bread  Tortilla  Pita  Bagel  Lavash  Baguette  English muffin  Bagel 

     

July 2013

Sandwiches |21

Sandwich Activism
By Chef Madelyn Pryor

There is pressure from every side in modern  American life. There is pressure to get things done,  pressure to look a certain way, pressure to be there  for everyone (including yourself). Those are just a  few of the external pressures we face every day. I  also face internal pressure, not the least of which is  a desire to eat delicious, healthy vegan food. There  are several reasons this is a huge driving force. One  is that I am a hobbit trapped in a human woman’s  body. I love food. LOVE LOVE LOVE. But I also love  using something as simple as my lunch as a way to  get other people thinking.     It has happened to us all – lunch envy. Especially at  work or school you see what someone else has and  instantly you start thinking about what you  brought. When I was a college student, I brought  my own lunch and snacks. I have a habit of wanting  to munch when I am reading and concentrating so I  would cut up bell peppers (at least two colors) and  throw those into a container along with baby  carrots and grape tomatoes. As I munched my way  through lecture I was getting my veggies in for the  day and getting my classmates minds moving.  Always by the end of the semester there were  fewer bags of chips around me and more fruit cups  and veggie bags.     This is especially effective with a great vegan  sandwich. Most animal products have a sharp,  unpleasant odor. In the confines of a lunch room,  this can be really harsh. When I opened my lunch  bag I would produce delicious easy sandwiches that  were beautiful, full of great nutrition, and colorful.  Usually that would open up a dialogue with a  classmate or co‐worker that heard I was vegan and  wanted to see what I was eating. I talked to them  not about the ethics, but about flavor profiles and  health benefits. Often they would ask for my  recipes. It was the start of their vegan journey.   I teach cooking classes now, so no more lunch  rooms for me. I still take vegan sandwiches  wherever I go – the mall, the game store, travel.  Recently I had two days of travel. I brought fresh  fruit and veggies in baggies, and three vegan  sandwiches. The first two I knew I would eat  (breakfast and lunch) and the third was there in  case of a delay. I was full, comfortable and happy  for my flight. While the people around me ate  ‘food’ I would never partake of, I felt refreshed and  replenished. Vegan sandwiches saved the day once  again!!     So now you might be asking, well, what does make  a great vegan sandwich? If you are then flip  through the magazine. I wish I had this collection of  recipes years ago! But I try for a few things every  time. These are Madelyn’s laws of making a great  sandwich.     1. You need a great bread. Find something  that works with the rest of your sandwich. A  whole wheat is a fine bread for a traditional  PB&J, but cinnamon raisin bread makes it  amazing. The same is true with a roasted  vegetable sandwich. Regular bread makes  that sandwich ok, but a true sourdough  makes a roasted vegetable salad sing!   2. Twist one tradition – Much like choosing a  more complex bread, if you take a  traditional sandwich and change one  element, it is much more exciting! I loved  making BLTs into BATs, vegan bacon,  avocado and tomato. By making that one  change, it was suddenly more exciting.  Again, look at the classic PB&J sandwich.  What about using peach jam and adding  some chili flakes? That will wake up your  taste buds and beat away the lunch time  sleepies.  

July 2013

Sandwiches |22

3. Always include one ‘pop’ of flavor – In  savory sandwiches I almost always use a  little white balsamic vinegar if I have a  hearty bread, or mustard and sprinkle of a  spice blend if my bread is softer. This makes  the sandwich much more interesting to the  pallet. In sweet sandwiches, I add some  spice, or sometimes some acid such as lime  juice. The tartness of the lime helps to  balance the sweetness of a jam and gives  your taste buds a refreshing burst.     Those are my basic essentials. You can use those  rules to make a thousand, no a million, different  sandwiches. However, in case you’re feeling some  of those time pressures I talked about, I have  included some of my favorite simple sandwiches.  Hugs and happy eatings from my corner of the  shire to yours.     The Author 
  Madelyn is a lover of  dessert, which she  celebrates on her blog,  http://madelynpryor.blogsp ot.com/. She has been  making her own tasty  desserts for over 16 years,  and eating dessert for longer than she cares to admit.  When she isn’t in the kitchen creating new wonders of  sugary goodness, she is chasing after her bad kitties, or  reviewing products for various websites and  publications. She can be contacted at  thebadkittybakery@gmail.com or  madelyn@veganculinaryexperience.com.  

 

                                                                                                 

Madelyn’s Miso Dijonaise
Makes about ¾ cup    ¼ cup white miso   ¼ cup white balsamic vinegar   2 tbsp yellow mustard (organic  preferred)   2 tbsp maple syrup (grade B  preferred)   ½ teaspoon – 1 teaspoon of black  poppy seeds     Combine and whisk until smooth.   Store in the refrigerator after  creation.  

Chopped Miso Chickpea Sandwich
Makes 4 sandwiches    4 whole wheat hamburger buns   1 cup of cooked chickpeas   ¼ cup of Madelyn’s Miso Dijonaise   2 tablespoons of capers   ¼ cup of celery, chopped fine   2 tablespoons of finely minced red  onion     Mash the chickpeas using a potato  masher until they have texture, but  are slightly creamy.   Add the miso dijonaise, capers,  celery, and onion.   Mix together and place about 1/3  cup of the mixture on a whole  wheat hamburger bun or other  bread and enjoy.  

July 2013

Sandwiches |23

                                       

Thousand Island Dressing
Makes about 1 cup    ½ cup vegenaise or other vegan  mayonnaise   2 tablespoons ketchup   1 tablespoon white balsamic vinegar   1 tablespoon agave   2 tablespoons sweet pickle relish   1 tablespoon white onion  ¼ teaspoon freshly ground pepper   1‐2 pinches of salt     Combine all ingredients in a bowl  and whisk until smooth.  Pour into an airtight container and  it to sit in the refrigerator for at  least 6 hours.  Stir and serve.  

Deconstructed “Dee” Burger
Makes 4 sandwiches    1 package of beefless seitan strips, about 8 oz    1 medium onion, sliced   1 medium green bell pepper, sliced  1 vegan bouillon cube  1 teaspoon ancho powder   1 teaspoon smoked paprika   ¼ cup water   4 soft oblong sandwich rolls   1 cup shredded cabbage  1 recipe of Thousand Island Dressing     Cut the onion and bell pepper into fajita  strips.  Heat a wok over medium heat and add the  onion, bell pepper, and seitan.   Cook over medium about 8‐10 minutes, until  the onions are slightly browned.  Heat the water with the vegan bouillon cube,  ancho powder and smoked paprika until the  bouillon is dissolved.   Add to the peppers and onions and cook for  an extra 10 minutes until the liquid is  absorbed.   Stuff one of the rolls with some of the seitan  mixture, dress with the Thousand Island  Dressing, and top with cabbage.  

this is my version of a childhood favorite burger I  had at dee’s restaurant 

July 2013

Sandwiches |24

The Reuben: An American Melting Pot Sandwich
By Tamasin Noyes
    The Reuben sandwich has a long and contested  history. There are at least three different  contenders who claim its creation. The earliest  mention of the sandwich dates to 1914 when a  “reuben special” was a featured at Reuben’s Deli in  New York City. The deli was owned by Arnold  Reuben, giving the sandwich its name. The next  claim on the sandwich comes from Nebraska and a  man named (you guessed the first part) Reuben  Kulakofsky, circa 1930. Kulalofsky, a Lithuanian  immigrant, held a weekly poker game at the  Blackstone Hotel in Omaha. Legend has it that the  poker players combined their ideas to come up  with the combination. The last version of the story  takes us back Reuben’s Deli. In this story, the  sandwich was created by Arnold Reuben’s chef, for  the son of his German‐born boss.    Now that we’ve talked about the somewhat  checkered history of the reuben's creation, let’s  talk about creating one for ourselves. Like all good  sandwiches, the choice of bread is important. In  some sandwiches, the bread takes a back seat to  the filling in the sandwich. Not so with reubens.  They breads are known for the distinctive flavor of  either rye or pumpernickel, which are flavorful  enough to share the stage with the boldly flavored  main element. Instead of the traditional corned  beef, vegan reubens often feature tofu, tempeh, or  seitan which are all well‐seasoned with the  expected reuben flavors found when marinated  with pickling spices and mustard. Less commonly,  the mighty portobello mushroom has been known  to stand in for the "meat" of the sandwich. Next  up: the salad layer. Traditionally, sauerkraut has  filled this spot, but recently I’ve seen other versions  using cabbage slaw and even kimchi! For dressing,  either Russian dressing or Thousand Island is the  most frequently used. When I say “Russian  dressing”, I am speaking of the Americanized  version which is made with vegan mayonnaise,  ketchup, and horseradish. In Russia, Russian  dressing contains caviar. Pickle relish replaces the  horseradish to create 1000 Island dressing, and  other minced ingredients such as onion may be  added. The “dressing”, which is really more of a  sauce or spread, is an easy way to make the  sandwich your own. Try adding minced pickled  jalapeno peppers, minced sun‐dried tomatoes, or  some minced fresh dill. The sandwich is often  finished with a slice of Swiss cheese, which  sometimes adds a subtle accent, and at other times  can be lost in the mix. Although vegan Swiss cheese  has recently become available, a few slices of fresh  avocado also bring a creamy roundness to the  flavor of a reuben.     Closely related to the reuben, is the Rachel. The  Rachel is made with coleslaw rather than  sauerkraut and usually pastrami rather than corned  beef. In Vegan Sandwiches Save the Day, we’ve got  a recipe for the Rachel, as well as for the One  World Reuben, my melting pot version of the  sandwich.  After all, with the origins of the  sandwich decidedly European and carried to the  United States via immigrants, it’s only natural to  embrace global flavors. Try sneaking some  unexpected flavors into your version of a reuben  for a tasty surprise!    No matter which history you choose to believe,  there is just something about the wholesome  almost sweetness of the bread, the creamy  dressing (try it with a little heat as written below!), 

July 2013

Sandwiches |25

the crisp, salty sauerkraut, and the bold, low‐note  flavors of the protein of choice that make reubens  my very favorite sandwich. I couldn’t resist trying a  portobello burger variation, and hope you enjoy it,  too.    

While rising, preheat the oven to 375 degrees F.  Bake the buns for 15 to 18 minutes, until the  bottom sounds hollow when tapped with your  knuckles. Cool on a wire rack until serving.    Yield: 6 buns   

thousand island sauce 
This is a basic version, because the burger flavor is  bold. Think of it as a blueprint, and customize it to  suit your own tastes for any reuben.     ½ cup vegan mayonnaise  2 tablespoons ketchup  2 tablespoons minced red onion  2 tablespoons minced dill pickle  1 teaspoon hot sauce, more to taste  ½ teaspoon grated horseradish, more to taste  Generous pinch ground black pepper    Yield: 1 cup    

light rye burger buns 
  180 g (1 ½ cups) dark rye flour  180 g (1 ½ cups) bread flour  2 tablespoons dry minced onion   2 teaspoons caraway seeds  2 teaspoons instant dry yeast  1 teaspoon fine sea salt  1 cup lukewarm water  2 tablespoons neutral oil  1 tablespoon molasses  Nonstick cooking spray    Put the flours, onion, caraway seeds, yeast, and salt  in the mixing bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a  dough hook. Mix to combine. Add the water, oil and  molasses. Knead the dough 5 to 7 minutes, until  smooth and elastic. Add an additional tablespoon of  flour (15 g) or water, if needed to form the dough.  Lightly spray a medium bowl with cooking spray.  Shape the dough into a ball. Put the dough in the  bowl, turning to coat so the oiled side is up. Cover  with plastic wrap and let rise in a warm place until  doubled, 1 to 1 ½ hours.     On a lightly floured surface, divide the dough into  six even portions. Lightly spray a baking sheet with  cooking spray. Shape each portion into a bun shape,  slightly flattening with your hands. The buns should  be between 3 and 4 inches across. Cover with a  towel and let rise in a warm place until nicely  puffed, about 40 minutes.  
July 2013

portobello reuben burgers 

The burger buns may be toasted, if desired. Spread  the top and bottom of the buns lightly with the  Thousand Island Sauce, and top with a burger, then  the sauerkraut, and the bun top. We use a generous  ½ cup of sauerkraut for each burger, but you may  prefer less.     ¼ cup vegetable broth  ¼ cup dill pickle juice (drained from a jar)  2 tablespoons dry red wine (or additional broth)  1 teaspoon Dijon mustard  2 teaspoons coriander  2 teaspoons ground cumin 

Sandwiches |26

2 teaspoons onion powder  1 teaspoon paprika  1 teaspoon smoked salt  ½ teaspoon dried dill   ¼ teaspoon ground black pepper  6 portobello mushroom caps, stems and gills  removed  Neutral oil, for cooking  Heated sauerkraut, for serving  Thousand Island Sauce    Combine the broth, pickle juice, wine, Dijon,  coriander, cumin, onion powder, paprika, salt, dill,  and black pepper in a 9 X 13 inch pan. Put the  mushroom caps in the marinade with the cup side  up. Spoon the marinade into the caps and let  marinate 30 minutes.     Pour a thin layer of oil in large skillet and heat over  medium high heat. Cook the mushrooms, cap side  up, for 4 to 5 minutes, until the outside of the cap is  lightly browned. Baste the inside of the mushrooms  with the remaining marinade as they cook. Turn  over to cook the second side, about 4 minutes,  continuing to baste. The centers of the mushrooms  should be tender, when pressed.     Yield: 6 burgers                                           
July 2013

The Author    Tamasin Noyes is the  author of American  Vegan Kitchen, Grills  Gone Vegan, and co‐ author (with Celine  Steen) of Vegan  Sandwiches Save the  Day! and Whole Grain Vegan Baking. A committed   vegetarian since 1980 and vegan for the past 10  years, Tami loves to cook with big, bold flavors  while exploring  food from different cultures, as  well as redefining American comfort food. Tami  lives and blogs in Ohio, with her best  friend/husband, Jim, and three love kitties. Follow  Tami’s blog, www.veganappetite.com, and find her  on facebook.         

Sandwiches |27

Angela’s Famous Celestial Sandwich
By Angela Elliott
    This is the most amazing  sandwich on the planet!  First we start with our  delicious olive focaccia  bread, then we add our  Ninja Sauce, Presto Pesto,  Marinated Onions, "Sautéed  Mushrooms", Avocado,  Tomatoes, Marinated Sun‐ dried Tomatoes, BBQ  "Meatballs" and Bio‐ dynamic Greens.    At a time when the only raw bread out there consisted  of cracker type, practically break your teeth on it, I was  determined to create something wonderful you could  truly sink your teeth into that resembled bread. After  lots of experimenting, I successfully created the first  raw bread. That alone would have been a great  discovery considering what raw foodists had been  eating for some time, but to create what came next was  even better than anything I could have ever imagined.  The end result was this Dagwood style sandwich that  not only let your teeth sink into it, but also held  together. I knew right then that I had a goldmine on my  hands and mentioned it to my best friend, Caneman  and we decided to market it and sell it at every raw  event. Oh, did I mention it is ALSO NUT FREE? That was  the huge seller right there, because raw foodists were  tired of the usual nut fare and this tasty sandwich was  free of the heaviness of nuts and tasted so much like a  regular sandwich, everyone had to have one. No other  sandwich has been written up more times than this one.  I created this fabulous sandwich back in the late 90's  and it has been selling out ever since. Here's your  chance to not only taste it, but also make it at home.  This is the first time this TOP SECRET RECIPE has ever  been shared. This sandwich sold for $22 and sold out at 
July 2013

every raw event we've been at since 2000 in under two  hours. Fans of this sandwich include, David Wolfe,  Stephen Arlin (Thor), Chef Ito of Au Lac, Rawsheed, Pear  Magazine, Owner and creator of Ocean Grown, Lou  Corona, and many more.    

focaccia bread 
4 cups golden flax, ground  2 cups almonds, soaked  2 cups apples, grated  2 tomatoes, chopped  4 tablespoons olive oil  4 tablespoons fresh basil, finely chopped  1 tablespoon Himalayan salt  Sliced olives of choice    Place the four cups of ground golden flax flour in a bowl  and set aside. Place the almonds, grated apples,  chopped tomatoes, olive oil, fresh basil, and salt in a  food processor and process until you achieve a light  fluffy texture. Scrape out the contents of the processor  into the bowl with the flax flour and stir until well  incorporated.  Divide the mixture in two and place on  Teflex lined dehydrator trays. Use an offset spatula to  spread the mixture evenly to all 4 corners of the Teflex  sheet. Score each tray into 9 squares and place 4 olive  halves into each square. Dehydrate for 4 hours, remove  the Teflex sheets by placing another dehydrator tray  (mesh on top) and invert so that your original sheet of  bread is upside down. Peel the Teflex sheet off and  dehydrate for another 7 hours. Your bread should be  soft and pliable.           

Sandwiches |28

ninja sauce 
2 ½ teaspoons mellow red or white miso  2 teaspoons tahini  Squeeze of fresh lemon  1 clove of fresh garlic  Himalayan salt and black pepper to taste    Place all the above ingredients in a food processor and  process until smooth.   

marinated onions 
1 onion sliced into rings  Juice of one lime  Cayenne, black pepper, and Himalayan salt to taste  1/4 cup olive oil  Drizzle a small amount of agave    Let marinate overnight.   

"sautéed" mushrooms 
2 packages sliced cremini mushrooms  ¼ cup olive oil  Juice of one lemon  4 cloves garlic  Himalayan salt and pepper to taste  ¼ teaspoon tarragon     Let marinate overnight.   

angelina's sassy bbq sauce 
6 sun‐dried tomatoes, (presoaked or the ones packed  in olive oil)  3 tablespoons miso  1 tablespoon molasses  2 tablespoons agave  ½ teaspoon maple syrup  2 red chiles (like jalapeno or fresno)    Place all the above ingredients in a food processor and  process until smooth.   

burger paradise! 
1 cup ground sunflower seeds  3 tablespoons tamari  1 cup sun‐dried tomatoes (packed in oil)  1 cup chopped kale  ¼ cup ground flax  1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice  ¼ teaspoon dried oregano, basil, and thyme  1/8 teaspoon dried rosemary  1 ½ tablespoons mustard    Place sunflower seeds in a food processor and process  until ground. Add remaining ingredients except for  ground flax (you can buy flax meal or grind your flax  seeds into a meal with a coffee grinder ahead of time).  Transfer to a bowl, add flax meal and mix by hand.  Shape into individual burger patties and place them on  a teflex sheet. Dehydrate at 105 degrees F for 6 hours,  flip and dehydrate for another 6.   

presto pesto 
1 large bunch of fresh basil  2 cups sunflower seeds  4 cloves of fresh garlic  1 teaspoon black pepper  Juice of half of one lemon  1 teaspoon Himalayan salt  ¼ cup olive oil  Pinch of cayenne    Place all the above ingredients in a food processor and  process until smooth.   

marinated sun‐dried tomatoes 
8 oz bag of sun‐dried tomatoes  ½ cup olive oil  Fresh Thai basil  ¼ teaspoon each of dried oregano, basil, and thyme  1/8 teaspoon dried rosemary  Himalayan salt and black pepper to taste    Let marinate overnight.   

gettin’ it ready 
Now that you have everything ready, you can assemble  the CelestialWich. First place two slices of Focaccia  bread on a plate, on one side of the bread spread on the  ninja sauce, on the other slice, spread on presto pesto.  Add marinated onions and mushrooms. Next, place the 

July 2013

Sandwiches |29

burgers in a bowl and pour BBQ sauce over them, add  the BBQ burgers to one slice of the focaccia bread. Add  sliced tomatoes, marinated sun‐dried tomatoes, slices  of avocado, and lettuce. Now, place the other slice on  top and VOILA! You have the greatest raw sandwich of  all time.     The Author    Angela Elliott ‐ Angela Elliott is  the author of Alive in  Five, Holiday Fare with  Angela, The Simple Gourmet, and  more books on the way! Angela is  the inventor of Five Minute  Gourmet Meals™, Raw Nut‐Free  Cuisine™, Raw Vegan Dog Cuisine™, and The  Celestialwich™, and the owner and operator of Celestial  Raw Goddess Tonics and  Teas. www.celestialrawgoddesstonicsandteas.com.  Angela has contributed to various publications,  including Vegnews Magazine, Vegetarian  Baby and Child Magazine, and has taught gourmet  classes, holistic classes, lectured, and on occasion toured  with Lou Corona, a nationally recognized proponent of  living food.   

July 2013

Sandwiches |30

A Heart Healthy “Greens of Spring” Sandwich
by Mark Sutton
One of the earliest signs of Spring in our communal  garden is the visual "jolt of green" that arrives  every year from the perennial Sorrel and Mint  plants.  This wonderful reminder that the Plant  Kingdom is re‐awakening and anxious to re‐assert  itself, helps to shake out Winter lethargies and  provide new inspiration and initiative to get things  ready for the plantings to come.  Common Sorrel, being the rare green leafy  vegetable to be a hardy perennial, is not well  known in the United States, but quite popular in  Europe.  Native to both Europe and Asia, it has  been cultivated for centuries, most commonly  pureed in soups, added to salads, or mixed with  vinegar and sugar to become the infamous English  "green sauce" most often served over decidedly  non‐vegan food. 
"Sorrel sharpens the appetite,  assuages heat, cools the liver and  strengthens the heart..."   ‐ 1720, John Evelyn (English writer  and gardener)  "Woe unto you, scribes and  Pharisees, hypocrites! for ye pay  tithe of mint and anise and cumin,  and have omitted the weightier  matters of the law, judgment,  mercy, and faith: these ought ye to  have done, and not to leave the  other undone.    ‐ Matthew xxiii, 23 (King James  Version) 

To take full advantage of this gracious bounty from  the garden, we'll use the natural lemony tang of  sorrel leaves and combine them with the bouquet  of fresh mint, blending the results with early garlic,  roasted sesame seeds, and chickpeas ‐‐‐ creating a  flavorful "Sorrel & Mint Chickpea Hummus."  This bright green hummus is the foundation for a  heart healthy plant‐based sandwich, and since it is  reminiscent of Middle Eastern fare, cinnamon and  cumin will "scent" a whole wheat and millet seed  bread for sandwich slices, with various vegetables  and sprouts  layered in  between to  complete the  tasteful  edifice.  Packed with  fiber and  serious  nutritional  qualities, this  unique 

Mint, like sorrel, is very easy to grow, but unlike  sorrel, it is incredibly aggressive in the ability to  spread throughout a garden.  As a testimony to its  invasiveness, mint pretty much grows everywhere  in the world where the ground doesn't freeze 365  days a year!  Originating in Asia and the  Mediterranean region, mint is so old historically,  that it's mentioned in early mythology and even  the Bible: 

July 2013

Sandwiches |31

sandwich provides a myriad of colors, fragrances,  and textures that will intrigue and delight your eyes,  nose, and palette, while pairing marvelously with a  cool glass of your favorite white wine or light beer,  as you propose toasts of "good riddance" to Winter  and "how nice to see you again" to Spring...  ...with hearty thanks to Mother Earth for a Vegan  Culinary Experience worth celebrating! 

  THE 'GREENS OF SPRING' SPECIAL  SANDWICH 
  Cinnamon/Cumin Scented Wheat & Millet Grain  Bread (recipe follows)  Sorrel & Mint Chickpea Hummus (recipe follows)  Balsamic vinegar‐broiled eggplant slices (see  Method below)  Tomatoes (sliced)  Cucumbers (sliced)  Alfalfa sprouts (or sprouts of choice)  Plain mustard    Method  Lightly brush balsamic vinegar on top of ¼" slices of  eggplant, broil until starting to darken, turn over,  brush again with balsamic vinegar, broil until slightly 

brown on top.   Spread desired amount  of hummus on 1st slice  of non‐toasted bread.  Place  eggplant  slices  on  hummus.  Add  tomato  slices.  Add sliced cucumbers. Add sprouts. Spread second  slice of bread with mustard. Place on top of sprouts    Notes   ¼" sliced eggplant works best, as thinner  pieces won't broil as well for a good  "mouth" texture.   Lightly broiled (& similarly basted) sliced  potatoes and/or summer squash could be  used in place of eggplant.   Cucumbers don't need to be peeled.   Lettuce could be used instead of sprouts.   Plain mustard is preferable over flavored, as  there's so much taste complexity happening  with the intense sorrel, the garlic, balsamic  vinegar, etc.    

   

SORREL & MINT CHICKPEA HUMMUS 
 
A  "greens  and  beans"  powerhouse  of  nutrition,  this  spread's  sorrel  is  an  excellent  source  of  Vitamin  C  (1/2 

July 2013

Sandwiches |32

cup provides over 50% of your daily requirements). Both  the sorrel and mint are good sources of Vitamin A, iron (1  cup of mint provides just about all the daily need!), and  magnesium.  The  strong  lemony  flavor  of  sorrel  comes  from  oxalic  acid,  a  potential  problem  for  those  people  with  kidney  stone  issues.    The  added  chickpeas  are  a  superb  source  of  dietary  fiber  (helping  to  lower  blood  cholesterol),  protein,  copper,  zinc,  and  especially  iron.  They  contain  10  different  vitamins,  including  folate  (essential  to  red  blood  cell  development)  and  provide  more dietary phosphorous than an equivalent amount of  whole milk. 

sheet occasionally), but it's easier to  purchase them at an Asian Grocery store.  Fresh spinach should work as a substitute  for sorrel, and if using, add another  tablespoon (to taste) of lemon juice and  decrease water slightly to compensate for  the very lemony sorrel taste. 

  2 cups cooked chickpeas  3‐4 cloves "chunked" garlic (to taste)  1 ½ to 2 T. roasted sesame seeds  1 t. salt (optional)  2 cups chopped fresh sorrel leaves  ¼ cup chopped fresh mint leaves  ¾ cup water  1 T. lemon juice    Method  Put drained chickpeas into a blender or food  processor. Add garlic pieces, salt, sorrel, and mint  leaves. Add lemon juice. Add water in small  increments, blend, stopping to push or scrape  mixture down the sides of your blender or food  processor with a non‐metal spoon or rubber spatula.  Continue blending until desired texture is obtained,  adding additional water if necessary, and stopping  to taste a few times for adjusting as desired.    Notes   A 15 oz. can of chickpeas is slightly less than  2 cups. If used, drain, rinse, and use a little  less water when blending hummus to  compensate.   Sesame seeds can be roasted under a broiler  on a non‐stick baking sheet (shaking the 

  The hummus also goes well with raw vegetables as  a dip, using such as: carrots, celery, peppers, cherry  tomatoes, summer squash, and jicama.    This recipe makes just over 3 cups, and will keep 5  days or more in the refrigerator in a sealed  container.     

 

 

July 2013

Sandwiches |33

  CINNAMON & CUMIN‐SCENTED WHEAT &  MILLET SEED BREAD 
 
The  addition  of  whole  seed  millet  to  this  bread  gives  a  nice  crunch  to  its  overall  texture.  Cultivated  for  over  10,000  years,  aside  from  many  vitamins  (especially  niacin,  B6  and  folic  acid),  millet  provides  a  significant  amount of phyotochemicals, including phytic acid, which  is believed to help lower cholesterol. 

 
Notes 

 Has not been tested with other non‐dairy  milks, results will vary.   For extra flavor, roast cumin seeds, then  powderize in a spice grinder.   Use non‐rapid acting yeast.   If not using a bread machine, proof yeast in 
¼ cup warm water until it bubbles, then add. 

 
¾ cup soy milk  1/3 cup warm water  2 T. oil (optional)  ½ t. salt  2 T. brown sugar  1 ½ cups bread flour  1 ½ cups whole wheat flour  1/3 cup raw millet seeds  1 t. onion powder  ½ t. cinnamon powder  ½ t. ground cumin  2 t. yeast   

 Molasses should work as a brown sugar  substitute. 
 Makes one 2 lb. loaf of bread. 

 
Method  Add ingredients into a bread machine in the order  indicated. Use "whole wheat bread" setting.    The Author  Mark Sutton has been the  Visualizations Coordinator  for two NASA Earth  Satellite Missions, an  interactive multimedia  consultant,  organic  farmer,  and head conference  photographer.  He’s developed media published in  several major magazines and shown or broadcast  internationally, produced DVDs and websites,  edited/managed a vegan cookbook (No More Bull! 

 

 
Monitor the initial dough mixing and add additional  water in 1 T. increments, if need be, to get right  consistency of dough. 

 
The "dough/pasta" setting on a bread machine  could also be used, and as with mixing dough by  hand, after 1st rise (near double in size), put dough  into a non‐stick bread loaf pan, cover, let rise again  30 minutes to an hour, then bake in a pre‐heated  350 degree F. oven for around 30 minutes.  Let cool  before removing. 

July 2013

Sandwiches |34

by Howard Lyman), worked with/for two Nobel  Prize winners (on Global Climate Change), and  helped create UN Peace Medal Award‐winning pre‐ college curriculum.  A vegetarian for 20 years, then  vegan the past 10, Mark’s the editor of the Mad  Cowboy e‐newsletter, an avid nature photographer,  gardener, and environmentalist.  Oil‐free for over 5  years and author of the 1st vegan pizza cookbook,  he can be reached at:   msutton@hearthealthypizza.com and  http://www.hearthealthypizza.com        

July 2013

Sandwiches |35

Religion, Politics, & the Third Rail: Sandwiches!
By LaDiva Dietitian!, MS, RD, LDN

What is a sandwich? Wait before you answer that. If  you are going to start with a PBJ, you may be surprised  to find yourself quickly embroiled into a discussion  about Greek philosophers and Debbie Does Dallas.  Here’s how that happens.    When writing about a subject a good place to start is  the dictionary. Previous online searches about  “sandwich” returned a history including the 4th Earl of  Sandwich and his famous gambling obsession. He asked  for a food which would be easily eaten with one hand to  allow playing cards with the other. Although, he is  claimed to be the inventor of the sandwich, he probably  got the idea from his travels to Greece and Turkey  where gyros or strips of spiced lamb are enclosed,  partially, in bread. Of course, there is NO reference to  the chef who put the Earl’s edible package together.  Here are some of the definitions from an online search  of the word, sandwich:    The Free Dictionary:  1. Two or more slices of bread with a filling such as  meat or cheese placed between  them.  2. A partly split long or round roll containing a filling.  3. One slice of bread covered with a filling.    Merriam‐Webster:  1. Two or more slices of bread or a split roll having a  filling in between  2. One slice of bread covered with food  3. Something resembling a sandwich; especially:  composite structural material consisting of layers often  of high‐strength facings bonded to a low strength  central core       
July 2013

  th   john montagu, 4  earl of sandwich   The Oxford Dictionary:  1. An item of food consisting of two pieces of bread  with meat, cheese, or other filling between them, eaten  as a light meal: a ham sandwich  2. Something that is constructed like or has the form of  a sandwich.    What is interesting about this one is that history shows  that the English had beef mostly between the bread and  Americans had ham. Since the idea of the sandwich hit  the American shore shortly before the American 

Sandwiches |36

Revolution it is thought that having ham instead of beef  was another defining themselves as not English.  Someone should inform Oxford.    But does that really define a sandwich? What about  those Greek street vendor things? Should a  Croissan’wich really be called a Cross’yro? And what  about Panera Bread? Panera Bread sued Qdoba in 2006  for opening a store on the same block. Supposedly,  Panera had a wrap [all puns intended] on the zoning of  sandwich shops in this area. However, Qdoba sells  burritos. So when is a burrito a sandwich? According to  the judge it’s not. The judge agreed with Merriam‐ Webster, that a sandwich needs two pieces of bread  and not one tortilla.   

vs
  But what about the other sandwich criteria? One main  component of a sandwich is its ability to be eaten with  the hands. In fact, the Earl himself required that it be  able to be eaten with one hand, which would have not  only changed the judge’s ruling, but made H.D. Renner  have a more favorable review when he gave his treatise  on the sandwich in 1944. Mr. Renner stated that a  sandwich had positive traits due to its ability to be “put  in a man’s pocket” when going to work. A sandwich of  two pieces of bread keeps the “fingers from being  smeared” and “avoid the necessity of carrying cooking  utensils about.” One the other hand, H.D. thinks that  the science of nutrition is ill served by denying the  “psychological” pleasure of seeing food by hiding what  is inside with the second bread slice. He calls it, “the  coffin‐lid which spells death to the flavour."    How do you explain the “Open‐Faced Sandwich”? This is  where the true intelligentsia enter the foray.  In 2011, Adrienne Crezo asked, ‘What Exactly is a  Sandwich’ on the website, Neatorama.com. Below is a  summation of this intricate and deep thinking for this  new question of the ages. Adrienne gives us the basics  on the conservative and liberal camps. On the  conservative side is the “It must be between bread”  group which adhere to not only to the Earl’s 
July 2013

description, but intent of usage. These people accept  burgers as a sandwich even though they use a bun,  because it is bread. These purists always use two pieces  of bread and are so stringent in their sandwich  philosophies, they may feel they are straying from the  truth by using rye for a PB&J. Definitely, a PB&J is never  toasted and not referred to as PBJ. Quesadillas cross the  red line. They are between two tortillas, but cannot be  eaten with one hand. Also, they need a plate.    The liberal camp starts with those who accept hot dogs  due to the bun, but also accepts wraps and burritos  because they adhere to the intent in that they can be  eaten by one hand. Ice cream sandwiches were  mentioned and created no negative response.  Apparently, dessert is something everyone agreed on.  They accept quesadillas because they are between two  pieces of bread. Well, some do. Then there are the  more heavy weight items. If a sandwich is a filling  between two pieces of bread where does that leave  pop tarts and other toaster pastries? The response to  this was mixed, but had one good answer: They are an  “encasement” of the filling. Hiding it, enclosing it.    So the ball is back in the burrito corner. Aren’t burritos  an encasement? And what about tacos? You can still  see the filling, but they are not bread. And even if you  accept that a tortilla is bread, hard shelled tacos are an  entirely different mouth feel. If you allow hard shell  tacos don’t you open up the slippery slope of egg rolls  and samosas. It appeared that the definition of a  sandwich, whether made of bread or tortilla, whether it  encased or allowed for peeks of the filling must lie in a  missionary position. Additionally, the top and bottom  “bread” aspects were rendered gender neutral. Of the  many discussions researched for this article one phrase  was repeated: Just like porn, I can’t define it, but I know  it when I see it.    The Author    Marty Davey, RD, MS is not only  LaDiva, Dietitian!, but a Registered  Dietitian with a Masters degree in  Food and Nutrition. She became a  vegetarian in 1980 when she 

Sandwiches |37

discovered that there were more chemicals in cattle  then attendants at a Grateful Dead concert. Her family  is all vegan, except the dog who drew the line at  vegetarian. She conducts factual and hilarious  presentations and food demos. While her private  practice includes those transitioning to a plant‐based  life, LaDiva's most popular private consulting topic is  "I'm too busy and I don't cook." Her website is  www.ladivadietitian.com.    

July 2013

Sandwiches |38

Sandwich Construction
Building the Perfect Sandwich
By Chef Jason Wyrick
 

There is more to a sandwich than just taste and  texture. Sandwiches are designed to be picked up,  have big bites taken out of them, carried around,  packaged up for hours, and not fall apart. It’s one  of the few foods we talk about where we use the  term construction and building. It’s a monument to  taste destined to be lovingly demolished in our  mouths and not before, or at least it’s supposed to  be if it is built well. Before I go any farther, I have  to say that I don’t want you to make your food  fussy. Fussy food drives me crazy and sucks the joy  out of eating. If it comes down to either having a  messy sandwich, or having a well‐built sandwich  that takes you thirty minutes to construct and a  whole lot of stress, get a napkin. With a few tips,  though, you should be well on your way to putting  together the perfect sandwich.    When I think about building a sandwich, I primarily  consider five aspects of the sandwich. Bread  integrity, keeping the sandwich together, when the  flavors hit the tongue, mouth feel, and evenness.  Most importantly is how long the sandwich needs  to keep before I get around to eating it. If I am  preparing it and eating it right afterwards, I have a  little more leeway with the ingredients and I don’t  need to protect the bread from getting soggy. If I  am making it, but not eating it for a couple hours  (or sometimes even half a day if I am traveling),  then I need to do something to protect the bread  from getting too wet. That usually means putting  the driest ingredients against the bread and putting  the wettest ingredients in the middle. Lightly  toasting the bread also helps here since it gives the  bread a little more structure to handle excess 

moisture. Think about little touches like patting  lettuce dry before adding it to the sandwich. Dry  lettuce makes a barrier between the bread and the  wet ingredients. Vegan deli slices do the same as  does some melted vegan cheese. Wet roasted red  peppers or a slab of roasted eggplant, maybe not  so much. Building your sandwich this way will keep  the integrity of your bread intact. I like to cut the  bottom of the bread a little thicker than the top  since the bottom is really the support mechanism  for the sandwich.    Next, I consider how to keep all the ingredients  within the sandwich. Some ingredients are just  slippery against each other and they want to  explode out the side of the sandwich. Think about  placing ingredients that have some traction against  the more slippery ingredients and don’t stuff your  sandwich so much that everything wants to jump  out the side. A neat trick you can do is to scoop out  just a little from the bottom of the bread and some  from the top, creating a shallow boat in which your  ingredients can rest. This is perfect for ingredients  like sautéed mushrooms, seitan strips, and other  small cut items. You need to make sure your bread  is not too tough either, because a tough bread puts  pressure on the ingredients when you bite into it  and that forces them out the side. I don’t mind a  chewy bread when I make a sandwich, but I don’t  want to have to struggle to chomp down on it!    After that, I think about how the flavors of the  sandwich are going to be experienced. For  example, the same amount of vinegar on the  bottom slice of bread of a sandwich will be more 

July 2013

Sandwiches |39

intense than if it was on the top of the sandwich,  simply because there is more going on in the bite  once your tongue gets all the way to the top  ingredients. If you have an intense ingredient that  you want to mingle with the other flavors more,  then put it towards the top. If you want a shot of  saltiness as one of the first tastes of the sandwich,  put olives or other salty ingredients towards the  bottom. If you want a jolt of hot sauce to happen a  moment after you bite into the sandwich, put it  towards the top.    Mouth feel is also important. I love bread, but  when I eat a sandwich, I don’t want to scratch the  top of my mouth up with rough, super‐crusty bread  and I don’t want to have to struggle with a tough,  chewy bread. That’s why I underbake my ciabatta  bread when I make a sandwich. Some people like  to cut the crust off their bread to achieve a gentle  mouth feel, but I don’t go that far and I think you  lose some interesting flavors and textures when  you do that. Just make sure to get a bread that you  can bite down on without having to wrestle with it  and one that won’t tear your mouth up! That  means don’t overtoast it.  Speaking of toasting, I  learned a neat tip from Tom Colicchio. He toasts  the interior cut of the bread, but not the exterior. It  means when you bite down into a sandwich, your  palate gets the soft exterior part of the bread  before getting the nice toasty part on the inside.     Finally, an ideal sandwich has an even spread of  ingredients. All that means is that you don’t want  one bite to be heavily of one flavor and the next to  be completely different. Take some care to spread  your ingredients out across the whole sandwich as  best you can. All those ingredients in the sandwich  are meant to go together in one bite and not be  jumbled across the entire sandwich in a haphazard  manner.     

The Author  
  Jason Wyrick is the  executive chef and  publisher of The  Vegan Culinary  Experience, an  educational vegan  culinary magazine  with a readership of  about 30,000.  In  2001, Chef Jason reversed his diabetes by switching to a  low‐fat, vegan diet and subsequently left his position as  the Director of Marketing for an IT company to become  a chef and instructor to help others.   Since then, he has  been featured by the NY Times, has been a NY Times  contributor, and has been featured in Edible Phoenix,  and the Arizona Republic, and has had numerous local  television appearances.  He has catered for companies  such as Google, Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, and  Farm Sanctuary, has been featured in the Scottsdale  Culinary Festival’s premier catering event, and has been  a guest instructor and the first vegan instructor in the Le  Cordon Bleu program at Scottsdale Culinary Institute.   Recently, Chef Jason wrote a national best‐selling book  with Dr. Neal Barnard entitled 21‐Day Weight Loss  Kickstart.  You can find out more about Chef Jason  Wyrick at www.veganculinaryexperience.com. 

 
   

July 2013

Sandwiches |40

What You Shold Know about How the Pharmaceutical Industry is Poisoning Pigs, Poultry, and People
By Mindy Kursban, Esq. & Andy Breslin
Jumping on what is misperceived as a fast‐food health  trend, Burger King is offering its customers a turkey  burger, following in the footsteps of Carl’s Jr. and  Hardee’s. Burger King now presents itself as a retailer of  life‐supporting fast food‐health food, guaranteeing a  secure position in the word “oxymoron” for “moron.”    The proud purveyors of the Triple Whopper with  Cheese are now serving up 530 calories, 1,210 mg of  sodium and 26 fat grams worth of hot, steaming irony.  It doesn’t come with a special sauce. But every one of  those hundreds of calories might be laced with a secret  ingredient: Ractopamine.    Russian Roulette?  Earlier this year, Russia banned all U.S. beef, pork, and  turkey imports because of concerns that the meat  contains residues of Ractopamine, a drug added to  animal feed as a “productivity enhancer.” Russia has the  fourth‐highest per capita consumption of both alcohol  and tobacco, and a life expectancy nearly 10 years  shorter than the average throughout the European  Union. One Russian was brave enough to be shot into  space on the tip of a rocket built by 1950s Soviet  bureaucracy and held together with little more than  duct‐tape and ideology. And these people are afraid to  eat American meat because they think it’s too  dangerous.    In December 2012, the Animal Legal Defense Fund,  along with the Center for Food Safety, petitioned the  FDA to stop the use in food production of this  controversial substance, shining “a light into the  shadowy overlap between human health and animal  welfare threats in food production.”    Why should you care, not only for the millions of cows,  pigs, and turkeys killed as food in this country, but for  your own health? If you’re going to be playing Russian  roulette, it pays to have an idea how many bullets are in  the gun.     What is Ractopamine?  Part of a class of drugs called beta‐adrenergic agonists,  racotopamine is the active ingredient in the turkey‐feed  additive Topmax. It’s administered during the final two  weeks of their lives, in a last‐ditch effort to fatten them  up, and never withdrawn before slaughter.  Ractopamine is also similarly used as a feed additive for  cows (Optaflexx) and pigs (Paylean), increasing the rate  at which animals convert feed to muscle, growing faster  and leaner without any additional food or time.     Pigs fed ractopamine produce an average of 10 percent  more meat than ractopamine‐free animals given the  same amount of food. That raises profits by $2 per  animal, according to Elanco Animal Health, the division  of Eli Lilly that manufactures all three products.   

Vegan Cuisine and the Law:

 
a ractopamine molecule

  Mystery Meat  An estimated 60 to 80 percent of pigs and 30 percent of  cows in the United States are pumped full of this drug in  the days leading up to their slaughter. Numbers for 
Sandwiches |41

July 2013

turkeys have proven far more elusive. We decided to go  straight to the horse’s mouth and called Elanco to ask  them directly. It turns out the horse’s mouth was  surprisingly tight‐lipped on the subject of horses or any  other animal. They wouldn’t confirm the widely  reported statistics on cows and pigs, and they  absolutely would not talk turkey.     We also asked Burger King and Hardees/Carl’s, Jr.  whether the turkeys in their burgers are getting high (or  at least wide) on this drug. None responded.     The Food and Drug Administration approved  ractopamine use for pigs in 1999, for cattle in 2003, and  for turkeys in 2008. They’re in a rather small club that  believes that it’s safe. In addition to the U.S., only 25  other nations allow the use of ractopamine.     In addition to Russia, the 27 European Union countries,  China, Taiwan and 130 other countries have banned its  use. In the U.S., Chipotle restaurants and Whole Foods  Markets avoid ractopamine‐laced meat. The U.S. even  has a certified‐ractopamine‐free program in place  specifically for marketing pork to the EU. The guiding  principle seems to be that they’ll forego using this drug  if that’s the only way to sell meat to foreigners who  appear to be more opposed to suffering a heart attack,  but they are perfectly willing to let Americans play  Russian roulette.     Human Side Effects  Ractopamine’s label says: “Individuals with  cardiovascular disease should exercise special caution  to avoid exposure. Not for use in humans. When mixing  and handling [Ractopamine], use protective clothing,  impervious gloves, protective eye wear, and a NIOSH‐ approved dust mask.”    Only one human study has attempted to investigate the  human health effects of ractopamine exposure. This  study, conducted by Elanco, involved six healthy male  volunteers. One of them was removed because his  heart began racing and pounding abnormally, according  to a detailed evaluation of the study by European food  safety officials. What do you call a drug that almost  causes a heart attack in 17% of the otherwise healthy  men who take it? Perfectly safe, apparently.        Animal Side Effects  Ractopamine has triggered more reports of adverse  effects in pigs than any other animal drug on the US  market. It’s been linked to cardiovascular stress,  tremors, increased aggression, broken limbs, lameness, 

hyperactivity, trembling, collapse, depression, diarrhea,  spasms, vomiting, and death in pigs.     NBC News reported that USDA meat inspectors found  that ractopamine has increased the number of downer  pigs, pigs who are too lame to stand or walk on their  own to their death onto the slaughterhouse kill floor. So  they are dragged, beaten, pushed with forklifts, or  shocked with electric prods to get them to move, or  they die where they are after hours or days without  food, water or veterinary care.   

    As a result, the FDA required Elanco to put a warning  label on Paylean to warn of increased risk of downer pig  syndrome. It reads:       “Pigs fed Paylean® 20 may be at an increased  risk for exhibiting the fatigued/downer pig  syndrome particularly when marketed at high  body weights. Pig handling methods to reduce  the incidence of fatigued/downer pigs should  be thoroughly evaluated prior to initiating the  use of Paylean® 20.”    Pig farmers across the nation immediately stopped  using it of course, now that they had read about how  much agony it would cause their precious, precious  pigs, whom they then clutched lovingly while flushing  their remaining stocks of now‐reviled Paylean down the  toilet. This did not, it should be pointed out, actually  happen, but it’s difficult not to take some solace in  therapeutic sarcasm. The FDA took no action to  regulate the use of ractopamine. All it did was require  that pig farmers be aware of how much suffering it  might cause pigs. As far as demographics who have  voiced serious ethical objections to modern pig  production, pig farmers rank close to the bottom.       Rac‐ket‐opamine  An article unashamedly titled Lilly hopes Elanco unit  becomes a cash cow, reports that “[Eli] Lilly is counting  on rapid growth from its hitherto sleepy Elanco unit to  help offset some of the $10 billion in current revenue it 
Sandwiches |42

July 2013

stands to lose over the next five years as patents on its  best‐selling drugs expire.”    So while Elanco calls itself “A World Leader in Animal  Health Products and Services,” animal health is not one  of its goals. In fact it’s largely the opposite.  Ractopamine has no therapeutic applications at all. Its  sole intended purpose is to make animals bigger. Its  unintended effect is to make them sicker.     Our government regulatory agencies are supposed to  protect our health, not the health of Eli Lilly and Burger  King stock portfolios. Yet they routinely approve  rampant and reckless use of drugs in animal agriculture,  even as the rest of the world turns away in amazement  and disgust. It’s just so upside‐down that we’re tempted  to implement a Russian solution, and by that we mean,  “where’s the vodka?”                                                           

The Authors  
  Mindy Kursban is a  practicing attorney who is  passionate about animals,  food, and health. She gained  her experience and  knowledge about vegan  cuisine and the law while  working for ten years as  general counsel and then  executive director of the Physicians Committee for  Responsible Medicine. Since leaving PCRM in 2007,  Mindy has been writing and speaking to help others  make the switch to a plant‐based diet. Mindy welcomes  feedback, comments, and questions at  mkursban@gmail.com.     Andrew Breslin is the author  of Mother's Milk, the  definitive account of the vast  global conspiracy  orchestrated by the dairy  industry, which secretly  controls humanity through  mind‐controlling substances contained in cow milk. In all  likelihood this is a hilarious work of satyric fiction, but  then again, you never know. He also authors the blog  Andy Rants, almost certainly the best blog that you have  never read. He is an avid book reviewer at Goodreads.  He worked at Physicians Committee for Responsible  Medicine with Mindy Kursban, with whom he  occasionally collaborates on projects concerning legal  issues associated with health and food. Andrew's fiction  and nonfiction have appeared in a wide variety of print  and online venues, covering an even wider variety of  topics. He lives in Philadelphia with his girlfriend and  cat, who are not the same person.   

 
July 2013 Sandwiches |43

Tasty Homemade Vegan Breads!
by Liz Lonnetti
Can vegan bread be quick and simple, support local  economies and be a truly transformative moment in  your relationship to your food?  And can it all be fun?   You bet!    Until I came across the 5 Minute a Day technique from  Jeff Hertzberg, M.D., and Zoë François, I hadn’t really  tried to make my own bread.  I knew how to make  bread, but never really had the time.  Despite being  skeptical about this “5 minute” claim, requiring no  kneading or complicated proofing, I tried it and found it  really was as easy and fast as they make it look.  The  ingredients are very simple: flour, water, yeast and salt.   If you want to use whole wheat flour for a healthier loaf,  plan on sourcing another ingredient called vital wheat  gluten.  It provides the bread with a lighter texture if  you plan on storing your dough for up to two weeks in  the fridge.  You can find vital wheat gluten at many  healthy grocery stores. Click here for a video of their  Original recipe and here for their whole wheat version.   If you have never made your own bread before, then  this is the time and the recipe to start.  It is fast, easy  and affordable by any measure, plus if you don’t use all  the dough you can freeze it for later.    The only downside to the “5 Minute” bread, in my  opinion, is the space used in your fridge.  Whole wheat  flour is best kept in the freezer and, coupled with a 6  quart container in the fridge, that is a lot of space  dedicated to bread.  Many people purchase wheat  berries for significant savings and longer storage life  than whole wheat flour, but then what?  How are those  whole grains ground into flour?  If you are lucky enough  to own a Vitamix blender, you also have a flour mill that  can easily and quickly turn hard grain seed into fresh  healthy flour.  Vitamix manufactures a special dry  ingredient blade just for grinding grains, but you can  also use your wet blade with good enough results.  The easiest recipe to begin your own flour grinding  journey is to make pita bread.  Jane at Blend It and  Mend It has a wonderful video sure to inspire you to try  it at home (and probably start saving up to buy a  Vitamix if you don’t already have one)!  Keeping your  wheat berries in the freezer certainly extends their  freshness, but it also helps keep the temperature lower  as they are  ground to  flour.  It’s as  easy as taking  1 ¾ cups  wheat  berries,  grind for 1 ½  minutes.  Add  1 cup water  and optional 1  tsp salt.  Alternatively pulse on High for a second or two  and scrape sides until the dough forms into a rough ball  on top of the blades.  Dump it all out, knead and shape  the dough into a ball form and pinch off small handfuls  about the size of a golf ball.  Flatten them out with your  hands and a rolling pin and bake on a bare oven rack at  475 degrees F for 3 minutes.  That’s it, and from  personal experience these are tasty!  Oh, and you don’t  need a pizza type stone for these, I’ve found they puff  up even better just on the bare oven rack as long as you  try to get the ends as close as possible to a wire support  without big overhangs.    What happens when you take your bread making to the  next level?  These quick and easy breads using wheat  purchased at your grocery store are a fantastic starting  point, but what about learning more about where your  flour was grown?  I was lucky enough to hear Jeff  Zimmerman, of Hayden Flour Mills, speak at an Arizona  Herb Association meeting.  He spoke about the history  of producing wheat here in the desert, the recent 

July 2013

Sandwiches |44

The Author 
As a professional urban designer, Liz  Lonetti is passionate about building  community, both physically and  socially.  She graduated from the U  of MN with a BA in Architecture in  1998. She also serves as the  Executive Director for the Phoenix  Permaculture Guild, a non‐profit  organization whose mission is to  inspire sustainable living through education, community  building and creative cooperation  (www.phoenixpermaculture.org).  A long time advocate  for building greener and more inter‐connected  communities, Liz volunteers her time and talent for  other local green causes.  In her spare time, Liz enjoys  cooking with the veggies from her gardens, sharing  great food with friends and neighbors, learning from  and teaching others.  To contact Liz, please visit her blog  site www.phoenixpermaculture.org/profile/LizDan.  

efforts to revive heritage grains, and bringing back to  market Arizona Rose and Hayden Mills flour.  The  efforts of the Zimmerman family, local farmers such as  Steve Sossaman of Queen Creek and local business like  Pizzeria Bianco, have recreated a local food economy  and revived old wheat strains like White Sonoran and  Red Fife.  Chef Chris Bianco uses this wheat in his  nationally known pizzas and breads.  As if superior taste,  texture and support of local economies were not  enough, these grains are better for the environment.   The heritage wheat varieties being grown are so well  adapted to our desert that they requires about half as  much water compared to conventional wheat, no  fertilizer and no chemicals to grow!    Hopefully you are inspired to take the plunge into bread  making, please do watch the video links, they are what  inspired me and I’m happy to share them with you.   Happy baking!                                 

  Resources 
www.phoenixpermaculture.org   

July 2013

Sandwiches |45

The Vegan Traveler: Hudson Valley, NY
By Chef Jason Wyrick
 

  I love traveling, especially when I get to go to a  place I have never been to, Hudson Valley. I  frequently travel around the US teaching vegan  cooking classes and my latest one brought me to  Rhinebeck, NY, a town I had never heard of before.  Seeing new places is one of my favorite things  about teaching and if you like antique stores and  boutique shops, Rhinebeck is a great town to visit.  I, however, am not a fan. Put me in a used  bookstore or a tabletop game store and I’ll spend  hours of my day there looking for cool treasures.  Put me in an antique, or worse, something that  looks like a country arts and crafts shop, and I will  flee for sanity’s sake. Of course, that just means I  have more time to drive around and try as many  vegan and vegan‐friendly restaurants I could find!  Plus, the area was beautiful, so I had little to  complain about. I happen to live in a desert, so  getting to cruise down winding roads through a  lush forest with the windows rolled down in 

summer (not something I usually get to experience)  is a real treat.    I will start out by saying that the Hudson Valley, at  least north of Newburgh, did not feel like a mecca  of vegan cuisine. There were no iconic vegan  restaurants, or must‐eat‐at dining spots (with one  exception,) but it did end up being one of the most  vegan‐friendly areas I have been to. In just about  every restaurant, there were a number of  prominent vegan items. Because I was a bit  worried when I didn’t see a lot of vegan options on  the typical review sites, I was quite relieved when I  actually got to the area and started talking to the  locals about what was available. No shopping at  some random grocery store and eating even more  random food in a hotel room for me!   

tito santana 

My first stop was at the taqueria Tito Santana. This  cool restaurant, located in Beacon, NY, serves tacos  (if you couldn’t guess from the fact that it’s a  taqueria) and burritos and has vegan desserts. 

July 2013

Sandwiches |46

While itself not a vegetarian restaurant, their tacos  and burritos can be made with tofu or portabellas.  The portabella tacos were a little skimpy on the  mushrooms and left me feeling hungry, but the  tofu ones were quite satisfying. They were also  both pretty delicious and they were done in a style  that was more reminiscent of real Mexican street  tacos than the mundane fare often seen in the  states. The tacos were served with pickled red  onions, shredded cabbage, and a habanero  pineapple salsa. The tacos were small and the  portions a bit skimpy, so plan on ordering three  tacos when you head into the taqueria. They also  had vegan fudge cake! I wanted to get another one  after I finished the first, but self‐control won out.  Damn you self control! All in all, Tito Santana  wasn’t mind‐blowing, but it was a cool, fun place to  stop in and get a bite to eat and well‐worth the  time.   

love this place. It was by no means vegan, but if  you bring a smartphone with you, you can hop on  Barnivore and check out what’s good. I promise  you will find a horde of good‐quality vegan beers  there. A horde. Now that was a fun find.   

 
karma road café  

 

    After Tito, I headed to my hotel room the first night  in Poughkeepsie. There were a couple vegetarian  and one vegan restaurant there, though they didn’t  look too note‐worthy when I drove by (I have eaten  at so many Asian mock‐meat restaurants that all  seem the same) and I was already full by this time. I  did come across a massive beer store, though,  claiming that they had the largest selection of beer  in the world. Later that night, after I couldn’t sleep,  I decided to see if their claim was true. I’m not sure  if it was, but it was pretty close! It was all beer and  they had hundreds of beers from around the world  available. If you are a beer connoisseur, you will 
July 2013

The next day I headed farther north. Driving  around this part of Hudson Valley was a completely  different experience than what I was used to. It  was like the area was one big scattered village with  pockets of shops and restaurants dotted  throughout. These pockets were ostensibly the  townships like Rhinebeck and Woodstock, but it  often felt like the villages just kind of merged one  into the other. My first stop was in New Paltz,  where I visited the Karma Road Organic Café.  Karma Road is located just past the main  thoroughfare of shops and was super busy when I  was there. Immediately upon walking in, it felt like  a throwback to the vegan restaurants that were  around twenty years ago. Lots of wraps, sprouts,  and sandwiches on the  menu. Typically, those  places turn me off, but  Karma Road had a  vibrancy to it that totally  made it work and made  me want to stay and eat  there rather than get my  food to go. I ended up  getting a tempeh, lettuce, 
Sandwiches |47

and tomato sandwich (this is the type of food you  can expect to find there) and while it wasn’t  anything other than what you would expect, and  maybe a bit expensive for what it was, it was still  satisfying and a fun place to eat. I also got there  blackened tofu, which was really good and  definitely worth the price. They used some  blackening spices and a touch of tahini on it, which  made all the difference. If I was traveling that way  again, I would go out of my way to stop in for a  bite.     After that, I drove over to Woodstock after hearing  from a few people that I should walk around the  town and check out some of the food places there.  The first place I went to was a tea shop called The  Tea Shop. I know, not the most creative name, but  it did its job and got me to step in. The Tea Shop  has a good selection of loose leaf tea and tea  brewing accessories, but more importantly, they  had some really good quality ice tea on tap and it  was getting pretty hot that day. Actually, I wouldn’t  say it was super hot, but the humidity kills me  (desert, remember) and ice tea was exactly what I  needed. They offered soy, vanilla soy, and almond  milk with their teas at no extra charge and I usually  don’t get those three offered to me, let alone for  free. Thanks The Tea Shop! Having secured my tea,  I walked over to my real target, the Garden Café on  the Green.    

This small vegan restaurant was well‐reviewed and  it seemed like the premiere vegan place in the  area. I lucked out and managed to get there right  between lunch and dinner service, so I was one of  the only few people there. Looking over the menu,  it looks like they might live up to the reputation. I  saw some creative items on the menu, but it was  the daily special that caught my eye. A potpie bowl  made with corn bread and tempeh and greens on  the side (and I was really craving some greens at  this point). Perfect for an early dinner and it  sounded satisfying. However, just across the road  was a street vendor selling what he called  vegeterranean cuisine that caught my eye. Was he  vegan? I better save some room, just in case, I  thought. Or, I’ll just be a bit of a glutton, order the  full bowl at the Garden Café, and walk over to the  street vendor afterwards, and that is just what I  did.   

    The bowl arrived, eventually (like I said, I caught  them between services), and I dug in. Ok, I have to  say that the “bowl” stretched the boundary of  what I consider a bowl. It was a very small ramekin  with the pot pie in it, with a few slices of spiced  tempeh on the side and a heeping pile of sautéed  greens…all served in a bowl. I was hoping for more  of a pot pie, but since it was the greens I was really  craving, I wasn’t too sad. The tempeh had a  weightiness to it, like it was dressed with a nut or  seed butter and the pot pie needed a bit of salt,  but that corn bread was super soft with just a light  crust on the outside and the veggie medley inside 
Sandwiches |48

   
garden café on the green 

July 2013

was delicious. The greens were cooked perfectly,  right to the point where they are soft, but not so  much that they just collapse down onto the plate,  or the bowl as it may be. It was definitely good,  soul satisfying food, just maybe not quite what I  expected. I will also say that you should seat a  patron at the bar when there are plenty of tables  available, and then have a dinner service staff  meeting at said bar. By this time, I was full, but  there was one more place I needed to check out.  It’s a trial, yes, but I do have to do a good job of  reporting my food journey for you, don’t I?   

 
green palate – sadly, this is the best picture I had

  Across the street I went to the pavilion and grill  setup that was The Green Palate. The sign said  vegan friendly, so I was hoping it was a vegan  place, but I wasn’t sure. Usually, vegan friendly  means a restaurant that is something other than  strictly vegan. Hmm. I wondered if I should just hop  in my car and head back to the hotel room, but the  grill and the vegeterranean advertisement kept  pulling me back. I’m glad I did! This was easily the  best food I had on the trip. It turns out the food  stand was indeed vegan and they were doing  grilled vegan pizzas and panini. Not only that, the  ingredients I saw on the pizzas were ingredients  and flavor combinations I had seen on pizzas in  Southern Italy, like broccoli rabe and grilled onions.  Plus, it just smelled right. I had to have some, but I  almost missed out. Turns out, The Green Palate 
July 2013

only takes cash and I had neither cash nor a debit  card on me to get some. Sad, I asked if I could at  least get a picture of some of their food and that’s  when Giovanni, the owner of The Green Palate,  stepped out from behind his grill and offered to  make me a pizza for free, and what a pizza. It was a  personal sized pizza with broccoli rabe, caramelized  onions, a light tomato sauce, and a drizzle of olive  oil. Sounds simple, but simple foods are the easiest  ones to screw up. This pizza had a perfectly crisped  crust and the balance of flavors was sublime. I am  getting hungry just thinking about that pizza, the  combination of lush sweetness from the onions  and sauce, the crispy nuttiness from the whole  grain crust, the smokiness from the grill, and the  mellowed out bitterness from the broccoli rabe. I  expected to get it, take a picture, and eat it on the  way back to my car, but I just stood there and  devoured the whole thing. On top of that, I got to  chat with Giovanni while he made the pizza and  learned that he used to own a pizza restaurant, but  no one knew it was vegan, and that he distributed  several of his dishes to the restaurants around the  area. His grandfather was a Sicilian restaurateur  and I think Giovanni must have gotten the cooking  gene from him. An all around nice guy and great  food, and I didn’t even get to the espresso or  panini! While he only has his pavilion open on the  weekends, if I am back in the area, I will go quite a  bit out of my way to visit The Green Palate again.   

   

Sandwiches |49

My one regret during my food journey through the  Hudson Valley was that I did not get over to Sweet  Maresa’s Upstate Cupcakes or Lagusta’s Luscious, a  chocolatier and sometimes restaurant. I have heard  both are quite excellent and I am curious to know if  I will have to revise my opinion of there being no  iconic places in the Hudson Valley. Hopefully I will  get to travel back there soon!    Contact Info  Tito Santana – www.tacosantana.com   Karma Road Café – www.karmaroad.net   Garden Café – www.gardencafewoodstock.com   Green Palate –  www.facebook.com/thegreenpalategrill   Lagusta’s Luscious – www.lagustasluscious.com   Sweet Maresa’s Upstate Cupcake ‐  www.facebook.com/SweetMaresa   Hudson Valley – www.hudsonvalley.org                                             
 

The Author  
  Jason Wyrick is the  executive chef and  publisher of The  Vegan Culinary  Experience, an  educational vegan  culinary magazine  with a readership of  about 30,000.  In  2001, Chef Jason reversed his diabetes by switching to a  low‐fat, vegan diet and subsequently left his position as  the Director of Marketing for an IT company to become  a chef and instructor to help others.   Since then, he has  been featured by the NY Times, has been a NY Times  contributor, and has been featured in Edible Phoenix,  and the Arizona Republic, and has had numerous local  television appearances.  He has catered for companies  such as Google, Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, and  Farm Sanctuary, has been featured in the Scottsdale  Culinary Festival’s premier catering event, and has been  a guest instructor and the first vegan instructor in the Le  Cordon Bleu program at Scottsdale Culinary Institute.   Recently, Chef Jason wrote a national best‐selling book  with Dr. Neal Barnard entitled 21‐Day Weight Loss  Kickstart.  You can find out more about Chef Jason  Wyrick at www.veganculinaryexperience.com. 

     

July 2013

Sandwiches |50

An Interview with Cookbook Author Tamisin Noyes
     

Please tell us about yourself!    My husband, Jim, and I live in Northeast Ohio with  our 3 wonder kitties. I grew up in a meat and  potatoes family. I hated vegetables as a kid, but I  liked to bake. I cooked some, but didn’t really get  into it until going vegetarian in the early 80s.  If I’m  not cooking, I’m quilting! I dream of having a vegan  bed and breakfast with a huge garlic garden (we  have a small one now) and a cool old barn where  my husband can host music events. With lots of  quilts around, of course.     What led you to become vegan and why did you  make the leap to writing vegan cookbooks?    While I was in college, I started learning about  world hunger and happened upon Diet for a Small  Planet. The amount of grain needed to feed a cow  to produce a pound of beef compared to how  many people that same grain would feed was  mind‐melting.  I got it on an intellectual level, but  not an emotional one yet. Shortly after reading the  book, I had a chicken sandwich at a local  restaurant. I realized I was eating skin! I  determined then and there that I never wanted an  animal to suffer to feed me.  From there, as a  vegetarian, I went through many phases of being  an on‐and‐off vegan, but I say I didn’t become a  committed vegan until 2004. A light bulb clicked on  and I made a more personal connection to the 
July 2013

dairy link. Eggs were never an issue, as I’m not a  fan and never used them.     At that time in 2004, I immediately jumped into  recipe testing for some of the best vegan cookbook  authors and began blogging a little later. It was the  earlier days of vegan blogging, and my blog got  noticed by Jon Robertson, husband of Robin  Robertson. I was testing for Robin and Jon was  starting Vegan Heritage Press. He approached me  about writing a book, and I was off and running.     What did you do before you became a vegan  cookbook author?    What didn’t I do? I’ve worked in a prison, a  hospital, restaurants, bookstores, and libraries. I  also started a nonprofit group which sent  handmade cards to children with life threatening  illnesses. Most recently before writing, I made  handmade soap. That business lasted about 10  years before I was ready to move on.     What is the biggest challenge you have faced  writing your books and how did you overcome it?    Good question! I get knocked sometimes for having  ingredient lists that people think are too long,  especially in my first book.  Those long lists are  mostly herbs and spices and I’m convinced that  they really do add layers of flavor. I love big, bold 
Sandwiches |51

flavors and I think I’ve become known for that.  But  I get that they are intimidating to people, so I’m  trying to focus more on techniques for flavor, and  using fewer ingredients. One of the best things  about cooking is that it is a never‐ending learning  process, so I view it as more of an opportunity than  a real difficulty.     Where do you find inspiration for your choice of  topics?    All over the place! I keep a file of book ideas. Some  are keepers that I hope to write one day, while  others get on the list as a whim and end up being  dropped.     Your book, Vegan  Sandwiches Save  the Day, is one of  my favorite vegan  cookbooks. What is  the most fun  sandwich you  created for that  book and how did  you come up with  it?    Wow, thanks. I’d have to say the Jimwich. Jim and I  were riding in the car (no doubt on a trip from  grocery shopping) and I asked him what his dream  sandwich would be. He threw out the idea of fried  pickles and seitan, then I set about creating the  sandwich in an even bigger way than he imagined.  With all the bold flavors in that sandwich, it’s a  good example of how I cook.     You’ve also got two more books coming out  within just a couple months of each other. Please  tell us about them and how did you find time to  write so many books so quickly?   

I know it seems  like those two  were written at  the same time,  but they really  weren’t. Grills  Gone Vegan  was written a  couple of years  ago and just  didn’t hit the  publication schedule until now. That one is with  Book Pub Co. The recipes are for every course and  they can be made inside on a grill pan or ‘griddler’,  or outside on the grill. I love grilling because it’s so  casual, and the results are always so flavorful.  Grilling is a super fun, social way to cook, and  probably my favorite way to spend time with  friends.     Whole Grain Vegan  Baking is co‐written  with Celine Steen of  Have Cake, Will Travel.  Fair Winds Press is the  publisher. We’ve  focused only on whole  grain flours,  “healthier”  sweeteners, and  haven’t used any  margarine, but crammed it full of incredible  recipes. This one was written in a relatively short  time, but both Celine and I tend to be very goal‐ oriented, and we both spurred each other on with  recipe ideas. Writing with a partner gives you an  instant sounding board, too, which makes the  process even more fun.        

July 2013

Sandwiches |52

If you had one essential piece of advice you could  give to home cooks, what would it be?     The best piece of advice I ever got was from Mike  Crooker from What the Hell Does a Vegan Eat  Anyway?.  He said to just cook, cook all the time.   Living in the middle of nowhere with very few  vegan options, if I’m not cooking, we’re usually not  eating. Mike’s wisdom worked well for me, so that  is what I’d tell others.     What is your favorite recipe that you like to cook  at home?    Tofu scrambles. They can be as gourmet and  planned as anything or else, or as random as “clean  out the fridge.” With a well‐stocked herb and spice  cabinet, you can go in any direction.  I always make  tofu scrambles on the weekends, and have a  couple of my favorite scramble recipes in AVK.     Where do you see the vegan food scene headed in  the next couple of years?    Exploding! The American population is growing  more and more interested.  It is such an exciting  time to be vegan. Just look at the rapid growth in  the vegan cheese industry. That’s a big one  because so many people say cheese is their hurdle.    What advice can you give aspiring vegan  cookbook authors?    Theme, theme, theme! If you’ve got a terrific  concept, be patient and you’ll find the right  publisher.     What projects do you have coming up?    Celine and I are working on a new book. The theme  is vegan finger foods. We’ve got mostly appetizers, 

snacks, and small plates, but we also have some  desserts. How could we not?     Thanks Tami!    Contact Info    You can see what Tami is up to at  www.veganappetite.com.    Bio    Tamasin Noyes – Tamasin Noyes is the author of  American Vegan Kitchen, Grills Gone Vegan, and  co‐author (with Celine Steen) of Vegan Sandwiches  Save the Day! and Whole Grain Vegan Baking. A  committed  vegetarian since 1980 and vegan for  the past 10 years, Tami loves to cook with big, bold  flavors while exploring  food from different  cultures, as well as redefining American comfort  food. Tami lives and blogs in Ohio, with her best  friend/husband, Jim, and three love kitties. Follow  Tami’s blog, www.veganappetite.com, and find her  on facebook.     

July 2013

Sandwiches |53

What We’re Eating
Food Reviews and Recipes

house, it lasts a couple of days. Eppa lasted about an  hour. If you are looking for an organic, vegan wine  perfect for a summer patio party, Eppa makes a great  buy, especially at about $12 a bottle. Look for Eppa at  Whole Foods and check out www.eppasangria.com for  more details about this anti‐oxidant rich, super tasty  wine.                       

Eppa Organic Sangria 
  My experience with sangria has been a bit chaotic, so to  speak. I’ve had super sweet sangria, sangria that tasted  like it had fruit concentrate added to it, sangria that was  too tannic, and some sangrias that were just right.  Sweet without being cloying, refreshing, full‐bodied,  and easy to drink. Eppa organic sangria is all those  things, but with some added bonuses. First, it’s organic  and it reflects in the taste. Second, Eppa uses  a few  extra fruit juices not found in traditional sangria, namely  blood orange (often orange can be found, but usually  not blood orange), blueberry, and acai, and they don’t  skimp on the pomegranate. I loved the fruit and berry  mix used for this wine. Not only does it up the  antioxidant count for this wine, it ups the taste!  Normally when a bottle of wine gets opened in my 

Casa Noble Organic Tequilas 
  First off, these are sipping tequilas. They are way too  high quality and have too much complexity and body to  be otherwise. Unlike most tequilas, which are distilled  twice, Casa Noble goes through one more distilling.  They are also pure 100% blue agave and completely  organic. Ok, that doesn’t always necessarily mean a  tequila is going to be good, but Casa Noble completely  exceeded what I was expecting. You see, I am not much  of a tequila drinker. Most tequilas are single‐note  entities with a harsh burn. All three of the tequilas I  tasted, the Crystal, the Reposado, and the Anejo were  anything but. The Crystal had the purest, brightest taste  out of the three tequilas. The Reposado had a little  extra body to it with a flavor profile that reminded me  of almonds. The Anejo, the aged tequila, took this a step  beyond the Reposado, with hints of oak and vanilla that 

July 2013

Sandwiches |54

played around the tongue and lasted for several  minutes. The Anejo was my favorite, but I still loved the  other two. They had a bite to them, but not a  harshness, and they all tasted clean. Each of these really  captured the essence of the blue agave plant and what  a tequila should be. Bottles of Casa Noble are around  $40 ‐ $50 and are well worth the expense. This is truly a  tequila to drink for taste and it makes a classy after‐ dinner drink, ideal for a relaxed summer evening with  friends.    For more information about Casa Noble, check out  www.casanoble.com, where you can learn more details  about the product, about the estate where the tequila  is produced, and about the tequila distilling process.       

 
Sangrita
Sangrita is a sipping palate cleanser served between  tastes of high‐end tequilas blancos, like Casa Noble  Crystal. It is basically the collected juices of a  traditional northern Mexico fruit salad with some hot  sauce added to it.    1 cup of fresh orange juice  ¼ cup of fresh pomegranate juice  Juice of 1 lime  2 tbsp. of Cholula hot sauce    Combine all the ingredients and let them sit for about  5 minutes before serving. 

  
 

Beyond Meat 
  Beyond Meat is the new star on the vegan block. With a  sleek look to the packaging and an exclusive debut at  the Whole Foods deli, it made a quick splash, but does it  hold up to its reputation? Emphatically, yes!    Beyond Meat currently comes in three flavors, Grilled,  Southwest, and Lightly Seasoned. The texture of each is  the same, fairly dense, but not homogenous, with a  meaty chew. It’s close enough to meat that I wouldn’t  hesitate to use it as a meat‐substitute for a non‐ vegetarian and they wouldn’t hesitate to eat it. Out of  the three, my favorite was the Grilled flavor. It has a  nice mesquite taste to it (my favorite type of grilling 
July 2013

wood) and a mélange of spices to give it an extra flavor  boost. It’s a nice way to get a taste of the grill without  having to light up the coals. However, keep in mind that  you don’t have as much control of the flavor with the  Grilled or Southwest versions. If you want total control,  go with the Lightly Seasoned, which is what I typically  do if I am not going for a superfast meal, or if I want to  grill it myself. Also, Beyond Meat is not a product that  will cover all your needs. It is not the product of choice I  would use if I wanted something that was very tender  or one that shreds. The strips also dried out very quickly  on the grill, so the second time through, I soaked them  in water for about 30 minutes to keep them tender  while on a hot grill. That being said, it is the perfect  meat substitute for recipes where you want a dense,  hearty product, like in a “chicken” salad, with particular  types of tacos, satays, or with enchiladas. If you need  that texture for your recipe, Beyond Meat is at the top  of the pack.    For more information about Beyond Meat, head to  www.beyondmeat.com. You can find Beyond Meat in  the freezer section of Whole Foods and at Tropical  Smoothie Cafes.          
Sandwiches |55

   


Lime Kissed Beyond Meat Tacos
These tacos are incredibly easy to make and pack a  powerhouse of flavor. With smoky Beyond Meat strips  and bright limes, they are sure to satisfy vegans and  non‐vegans alike.    1 package of Beyond Meat grilled strips  1 tbsp. of mojo de ajo or garlic oil  1 tsp. of ancho powder  ¼ tsp. of salt  Juice of 2 limes  1 cup of shredded cabbage  1 radish, sliced thin  1 avocado, chopped  Hot sauce to taste  4 thick corn tortillas    Get your coals or mesquite wood lit and fairly hot.  While the coals are heating up, soak the Beyond Meat  strips in water (this will allow the strips to absorb  water and stay moist on the grill). Once the coals are  ready, pat them dry. Toss the Beyond Meat strips in  the mojo de ajo or garlic oil, then toss them in the  ancho powder and salt. Transfer them to a perforated  grill pan. Grill the strips, slowly stirring them, for  about 5 minutes, until they develop a slight char.  Transfer them back to your mixing bowl and  immediately dress them with lime juice. Shred the  cabbage, slice the radish, and chop the avocado.  Warm the tortillas and fill them with the Beyond Meat  strips, then the cabbage, then the radish, then the  avocado, and finish off with hot sauce to taste. 

 

Earth Balance Vegan Aged White Cheddar  Flavor Popcorn 
  Decadent ‘Cheesy’ Popcorn for All!!     I have always loved ‘cheesy’ popcorn.  The year after I  first became vegan this was one of the items I was  tempted by the most. I went to the movies almost every  week, and the smell of the cheesy popcorn would make  me slightly insane. If only this had been around back  then, all my problems would have been solved. Better  late than never, Earth Balance has produced a  wonderfully delicious product. This already perfectly  popped popcorn is coated with the same delicious  topping as their new puffs. The result is a product that  is airy, ‘cheesy’, and intensely satisfying.     Imagine a bright pop of popcorn that brings with it a  touch of aged cheddar joy. That fantasy is reality with  this wonderful new product. It comes in a big bag  (about 16‐17 cups) and you will want all of that and  more. Each and every kernel is a little bit of perfection. I  must confess that I like this product a bit more than  their ‘puffs’ because they have more coating and it 


adheres better. That causes this product to be well  worth the price of admission.     So instead of reading this, grab yourself a bag. If you do  not have a retailer near you, some of the vegan grocery  stores have it. Best of all, once you have a bag and a big  purse, you can bring this into the movies and have the  same joy of snacking away while you watch the next big  blockbuster, or host a movie night inside.     Highest Recommendations.  
Sandwiches |56

July 2013

Earth Balance Vegan Aged White Cheddar  Flavor Puffs 
  When I an omnivore and in the process of eating  anything I wanted, I loved Cheezy Poofs. Call them  Cheetos, call them the devil, I sought them out and  relished in my neon orange tinged fingers. I didn’t like  the crispy ones, I liked the little puffs of air that  disappeared in my mouth, leaving nothing behind but a  taste of cheese and chemicals.     Flash forward to now. I no longer see those things as  food, let alone something I would consume. I have been  happily vegan for 6 years and counting. I love the way  that being vegan makes me feel and look. And you  know what? Sometimes I miss cheesy poofs. I miss them  on road trips, or sometimes I just miss them out of the  blue.     Earth Balance has given us the best of both worlds. They  made a ‘cheese’ puff that is vegan, based on navy  beans, that tastes great. Bright, clean, with a slight  ‘cheesy’ flavor, these disappear in your mouth in a  cloud of not‐so‐guilty pleasure. Each bag contains four  servings of 120 calories each, and these come with a  little fiber and protein for your snacking pleasure.    

Now, if you’re looking strictly for the neon orange thrills  of yesteryear, these will not work. They are white, with  no artificial coloring. For me, the lack of artificial color is  a huge plus, since it can trigger a headache. These are  an all natural, more healthy than conventional treat.     The only downside to these little wonders is they do not  have a ton of the coating. This is sad because that  coating is pure gold and you enjoy every single bite –  no, every single molecule. A lot of the coating falls to  the bottom of the bag, and this is why I make sure that I  have a bag for both my husband and I. That way, we  don’t have to fight over the coating crumbs. However, if  Earth Balance could include more coating and find a  way to make it stick to the puffs they would have a  product that would bankrupt me buying it all. As it  stands, it is a tasty treat that leaves you feeling clean  and bright after you eat it – something that not all snack  food can say.     Highly recommended.     For more information about Earth Balance puffs, go to  www.earthbalancenatural.com.    

 

Daiya Cream Cheese 
  Daiya quickly became the big vegan cheese on the  market and within just a couple of years, they have  expanded to blocks of havarti, slices of provolone,  cheddar, and Swiss, and now cream cheese. In fact, I am  surprised it has taken this long. The question is, was it  worth the wait? And the answer is, yes. If you were ever  a fan of that thick cream cheese found in the dairy  section of most grocery stores, then Daiya totally nails 

July 2013

Sandwiches |57

it. If you are, or were, a fan of high quality artisan cream  cheeses, this product is not for you since it is almost a  direct analogue of the standard commercial cream  cheese. Like other Daiya products, their cream cheese is  soy free and it has a particular undertaste to it. On its  own, that undertaste may be a little too prevalent, but  as soon as it is mixed with other ingredients, it gets lost.  I will say, it actually works to complement the chive and  onion cream cheese that they make and not so much  the plain. Speaking of the chive and onion version, the  texture of this was a little flakier (as far as cream  cheeses go), not quite as dense as the plain. It threw me  at first, but I ended up really enjoying this one and used  it for several quick wraps. All in all, a very good vegan  cream cheese.   

Madelyn is a lover of dessert, which she celebrates on  her blog, http://madelynpryor.blogspot.com/. She has  been making her own tasty desserts for over 16 years,  and eating dessert for longer than she cares to admit.  When she isn’t in the kitchen creating new wonders of  sugary goodness, she is chasing after her bad kitties, or  reviewing products for various websites and  publications. She can be contacted at  thebadkittybakery@gmail.com or  madelyn@veganculinaryexperience.com.    

The Reviewers   
Jason Wyrick is the  executive chef and  publisher of The  Vegan Culinary  Experience, an  educational vegan  culinary magazine  with a readership of  about 30,000.  In  2001, Chef Jason reversed his diabetes by switching to a  low‐fat, vegan diet and subsequently left his position as  the Director of Marketing for an IT company to become  a chef and instructor to help others.   Since then, he has  been featured by the NY Times, has been a NY Times  contributor, and has been featured in Edible Phoenix,  and the Arizona Republic, and has had numerous local  television appearances.  He has catered for companies  such as Google, Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, and  Farm Sanctuary, has been featured in the Scottsdale  Culinary Festival’s premier catering event, and has been  a guest instructor and the first vegan instructor in the Le  Cordon Bleu program at Scottsdale Culinary Institute.   Recently, Chef Jason wrote a national best‐selling book  with Dr. Neal Barnard entitled 21‐Day Weight Loss  Kickstart.  You can find out more about Chef Jason  Wyrick at www.veganculinaryexperience.com.   

July 2013

Sandwiches |58

What We’re Reading
Book Reviews

 

 
 

Authors: Tamasin Noyes and Celine Steen  Publisher: Fair Winds Press  Cost: $19.99  ISBN: 9781592335459    This is not your typical baking book. Thankfully!  Nowhere in this book will you find white flour,  refined sugar, vegan butter, or any other highly  processed product. What you will find are delicious  whole‐grain recipes with plenty of fun surprises.  Check out the recipes for Peanut Butter Surprise  Cookies that have sriracha and Chinese five spice or  the Tapenade and White Bean buns if you have any  doubts. You will also find plenty of tips for using  flours that go beyond the standard whole wheat  variety, like teff, millet, amaranth, barley, and a  whole lot more. Whole Grain Vegan Baking isn’t  just about breads and flours, though. It’s filled with  tasty desserts, breakfast dishes, breads, muffins,  snacks, and cupcakes. All told, it has over one  hundred morsels of deliciousness. Whole Grain  Vegan Baking is all taste with none of the guilt.   
July 2013

  Author: Mark Bittman  Publisher: Clarkson Potter Publishers  Cost: $26.00  ISBN: 9780385344746    When I heard that Mark Bittman was writing a  vegan friendly book, I was pretty excited. I have his  massive opus of vegetarian recipes and I thought  this would be a fun addition. When VB6 arrived I  read it and re‐read it. I just didn’t know how I felt  about it, and I still don’t. This is why.     Mark Bittman is advocating a vegan diet (yay!) only  before 6 o’clock (boo!). His justification is that by  eating two vegan meals a day you are improving  your health and then you can eat what you want  once a day. By doing this, you’ll take in far more  good food and some animal products are ok.  Specifically, he has six principals for this way of life.   1. Eat fruit and vegetables in abundance.  
Sandwiches |59

2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Eat fewer animal products.   Eat almost no junk food.   Cook at home as much as possible.   Consider quality over quantity.  See your weight as one component to good  health.  

  I agree with five of these principals with all my  heart. Principal #2 I just cannot get past. Mr.  Bittman spends so much of this book putting out  great information about how bad the typical  American diet is, and how bad for your body. He  says so many things right, but how much poison is  ok? We know that in addition to the suffering of  food animals that animal products are loaded with  carcinogens, insulin‐like growth factors, and other  pathogens.     I also take great exception to the quote from page  2 “Yet, the idea of becoming a full‐time vegan was  neither realistic nor appealing to someone  accustomed to eating as widely or as well as I do.”  Excuse me, Mr. Bittman. What have you been  eating? I eat widely and well from foods across the  globe. So many delicious wats from Ethiopia (shiro  is my favorite), curries from India, and don’t even  get me started on all the amazing foods of Mexico  that are also vegan. Because Mr. Bittman is used to  ‘eating well’ he is unwilling to make a full  conversion to this beneficial way or unwilling to ask  others to do so?     Therein is the quandary. While I agree many of the  book’s messages, I do not agree with all of them. I  also found the vegan recipes to be quite pedestrian  and the meat recipes to be insulting in their  presence.     I cannot in good conscience recommend this book.          

    Authors: Virginia Messina, MPH, RD and JL Fields  Publisher: DeCapo Lifelong  Cost: $16.99  ISBN: 9780738216713    Wow.     The second I heard about Vegan for Her I started a  countdown to the second I could get it in my  hands. This book is my most eagerly anticipated  vegan book of the year. There are several reasons.  One is I am vegan, and the other is I am a woman.  Of course, it’s not JUST that. My mother has high  blood pressure. My maternal aunt has diabetes  type 2 as does my mother in law. I tell them to eat  vegan, a shot gun approach, but I knew this would  give me the ability to hone my advice.     Messina and Fields did not disappoint. Vegan for  Her takes a woman through every phase of her life,  which is wonderful. It also addresses female  centered issues, such as fertility, and being happy  beyond the scale. There are chapters on breast  cancer, heart health, controlling diabetes and  managing stress and depression. I loved the  chapters on managing stress and depression and  weight from a female centered view since both  men and women’s bodies and needs are slightly  different. There is even advice on cruelty free  beauty!    

July 2013

Sandwiches |60

I have now read this book twice, and friends and  family members now have copies. But I would like  to recommend this book to men, too. Reading  through this book will give you an idea of how you  can support the female vegans in your life and  assist them with their journeys. Frankly, I don’t  know why you are still reading this review. Go get a  copy of Vegan for Her and start reading that  instead.     Highest Recommendations.      

the way. On top of that, she has tips for making the  recipes easy and plenty of little hints and tricks  peppered throughout the book. There are also  plenty of recipes for making basics like nut butters,  nut milks, and other necessaries for making great  raw desserts. Coupled with lots of pictures, this  book is a must have for anyone looking to add  delicious, no‐hassle raw desserts to their  repertoire. Below is one of my favorite recipes  from the book, published with permission by Vegan  Heritage Press.   

Tuxedo Cheesecake Brownies   
Yield: 16 servings    These black‐and‐white bars contain a layer of silken  cheesecake filling sandwiched inside a rich, sticky  brownie. When frozen, they can be picked up and  eaten out of hand, while at room temperature,  they’re decadently gooey. You will hardly believe  these are sugar‐free!    (From Practically Raw  Desserts by Amber Shea Crawley © 2013. Used by  permission of Vegan Heritage Press.)    Brownie Layers:  1 cup dry pecans  1 cup dry walnuts  1/3 cup cacao powder  1/8 teaspoon sea salt  ¾ cup pitted dates    Cheesecake Layer:  1 cup cashews, soaked for 2 to 4 hours and drained  ¼ cup water or nondairy milk of choice   2 tablespoons melted coconut oil  2 tablespoons lemon juice  ½ teaspoon vanilla extract  1/8 teaspoon sea salt  30 drops liquid stevia (or equivalent sweetener of  choice), or to taste   

    Author: Amber Shea Crawley  Publisher: Vegan Heritage Press  Cost: $19.95  ISBN: 97800980013184    Amber Shea Crawley has become one of my  favorite raw foods chefs. Not only does she make  great food, she has a no‐guilt, inviting manner  about her writing that sets her above a lot of other  food writers. I have thought for a long time that  recipes and food advice don’t matter if said advice  makes food a chore. Both  Practically Raw (her  previous book) and  Practically Raw Desserts  give readers the  emotional leeway to go as  raw as they want to with  cooked variations on the  recipes for those that  don’t want to go quite all 
July 2013

Sandwiches |61

Brownie Layers: In a food processor, combine the  pecans, walnuts, cacao powder, and salt and pulse  until finely ground (be careful not to overprocess).  Add the dates, 2 to 3 at a time, pulsing between  additions until each date is well‐incorporated and  the mixture is sticky. Taste for sweetness, and add  another date or some stevia if desired.     Press half of the mixture (about 1 heaping cup)  firmly and evenly into an 8‐inch square baking pan  (lined with plastic wrap for easy removal, if  desired). Place the pan in the freezer to chill. Set  the other half of the mixture aside while you make  the cheesecake layer.     Cheesecake Layer: In a high‐speed blender,  combine the cashews, water, coconut oil, lemon  juice, vanilla, salt, and stevia and blend until  smooth. You can add more water, a teaspoon at a  time, as needed to help the mixture blend. Taste  for sweetness and add more stevia if desired.     Remove the pan from the freezer and transfer the  cheesecake mixture onto the brownie layer,  spreading it evenly with a spoon or spatula. Place  the pan back in the freezer for 1 to 2 hours to allow  the cheesecake layer to firm up. Once frozen,  remove the pan from the freezer again, and evenly  scatter the remaining half of the brownie mixture  on top of the cheesecake layer. Gently but firmly  press the brownie bits into the cheesecake. You  may still be able to see the cheesecake layer  underneath; that’s ok. Place in the refrigerator for  at least 2 hours before cutting and serving.     Store the brownies in an airtight container in the  refrigerator for up to a week or in the freezer for  up to a month. Though best served cold, straight  from the fridge, you can bring them to room  temperature before serving if you prefer; you just  may need to eat them with a fork instead of your  hands!  

Nutrition: Per serving: 189 calories, 15.6g fat (3g  sat), 12.5g carbs, 3g fiber, 4g protein    The Reviewers   
Jason Wyrick is the  executive chef and  publisher of The  Vegan Culinary  Experience, an  educational vegan  culinary magazine  with a readership of  about 30,000.  In  2001, Chef Jason reversed his diabetes by switching to a  low‐fat, vegan diet and subsequently left his position as  the Director of Marketing for an IT company to become  a chef and instructor to help others.   Since then, he has  been featured by the NY Times, has been a NY Times  contributor, and has been featured in Edible Phoenix,  and the Arizona Republic, and has had numerous local  television appearances.  He has catered for companies  such as Google, Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, and  Farm Sanctuary, has been featured in the Scottsdale  Culinary Festival’s premier catering event, and has been  a guest instructor and the first vegan instructor in the Le  Cordon Bleu program at Scottsdale Culinary Institute.   Recently, Chef Jason wrote a national best‐selling book  with Dr. Neal Barnard entitled 21‐Day Weight Loss  Kickstart.  You can find out more about Chef Jason  Wyrick at www.veganculinaryexperience.com.    Madelyn is a lover of  dessert, which she  celebrates on her blog,  http://madelynpryor.blogsp ot.com/. She has been  making her own tasty  desserts for over 16 years,  and eating dessert for longer than she cares to admit.  When she isn’t in the kitchen creating new wonders of  sugary goodness, she is chasing after her bad kitties, or  reviewing products for various websites and  publications. She can be contacted at  thebadkittybakery@gmail.com or  madelyn@veganculinaryexperience.com.  
Sandwiches |62

July 2013

    
=

 

Recipe Index 

Click on any of the recipes in the index to take you to the relevant recipe.  Some recipes will  have large white sections after the instructional portion of them.  This is so you need only print  out the ingredient and instructional sections for ease of kitchen use.   
 

Recipe 
Quick Sandwiches  Avocado Sandwich  Ciabatta Club with Smoky Mayo  Mushroom Pesto Bagel Sandwich  Seared Zucchini Sandwich  Truffled Philly Cheese Steak    Complex Sandwiches  Black Bean Mushroom Torta  BLT Club (Raw)  Carnitas Sandwich   French Toast Sandwich  Chipotle Seitan Sandwich  Citrus Muffaletta  El Cubano  French Dip  Lavash Pesto Sandwich  Pan Bagnat  Po’boy  Roasted Red Pepper Sub  Tartine d’Aubergine  Tempeh Morel Meatball Subs  Tofu Steak Sandwich  Chopped Miso Chickpea Sandwich  Deconstructed “Dee” Burger  Celestial Sandwich (Raw)  Lentil and Red Rice Burgers  Greens of Spring Sandwich  Peach Almond‐butter Quesadillas  Portobella Reuben Burgers    Dessert Sandwiches  Apple Pie Panini  Chocolate Marzipan Mini‐cookie  Sandwiches  Tuxedo Cheesecake Brownie  Sandwich (Raw)         

Page
  65  68  72  75  78      80  83   85  88  90  93  96  100  103  106  109  113  116  119  122  23  24  29  18  32  20  26      125  129    61 

   

Recipe 
Condiments and Base Ingredients  Arugula Pesto  Coconut Bacon  Roasted Garlic Sauce  Ketchup     Basic Ketchup     Quick Ketchup     Roasted Tomato Ketchup     Curry Ketchup     Sundried Tomato Ketchup     Salty and Spicy Ketchup     Green Tomato Ketchup  Mayo and Aioli     Basic Mayo     Basic Healthier Mayo     Aioli     Nut‐based Mayo (Raw)     Chipotle Mayo     Salted Lime Mayo     Lemon Tarragon Mayo     Roasted Garlic Mayo  Mustard     Classic Yellow Mustard     Brown Mustard     Dijon Mustard     Chinese Hot Mustard     Spicy Beer Mustard     Agave Mustard     Whiskey Mustard     Smokey Pub Mustard     Creole Mustard      Miso Dijonaise  Bean Spreads for Sandwiches     Hummus          

Page
  131  134  135    138  138  138  139  139  139  139    141  141  141  141  142  142  142  142    143  143  144  144  144  144  145  145  145  23    146 

 

     

 

Recipe Index 

Click on any of the recipes in the index to take you to the relevant recipe.  Some recipes will  have large white sections after the instructional portion of them.  This is so you need only print  out the ingredient and instructional sections for ease of kitchen use.   
 

Recipe 
Breads  Ciabatta   French Bread  Cuban Bread  Hoagie Rolls  Bolillo Rolls  Tuscan Loaf Sliced Sandwich Bread  San Francisco Style Sourdough   Focaccia with Sage  Round Country Bread  Sunflower Bread (Raw)  Freshly Milled Wheatberry Bread  Gluten‐free Buckwheat Crepe Buns  Cinnamon and Cumin‐scented           Wheat and Millet Seed Bread  Light Rye Burger Buns  Focaccia Bread (Raw)    Miscellaneous  Sangrita  Lime‐kissed Beyond Meat Tacos         

Page
  148  148  149  149  150  151  151  152  152  152  44  18   34    26  28      55  56   

   

Recipe 
Condiments & Base Ingredients  Contd.      White Bean Spread       Mexican Black Bean Sauce       Sorrel & Mint Hummus     Roasted Red Pepper White Bean      Spread     Asian Bean Spread  Thousand Island Dressing  Thousand Island Reuben Sauce  Ninja Sauce (Raw)  Angelina’s Sassy BBQ Sauce (Raw)  Presto Pesto   Marinated Sundried Tomatoes   Marinated Onions  Sautéed Mushrooms (Raw)         

Page
    146  146  32  17    17  24  26  29  29  29  29  29  29   

July   2013

Sandwiches |64

Avocado Sandwich
Serves: 1        Time to Prepare: 5 minutes    Ingredients  2 slices of sourdough bread, toasted  ½ of an avocado, sliced  ¼ cup of shredded purple cabbage   Pinch of salt  ¾ cup of sprouts  2 tbsp. of hot sauce    Instructions  Toast the bread for about 1 minute, until it is just crispy, but not brown.  Slice the avocado and shred the cabbage or slice it very thin.  Place the sprouts on the sandwich, then the avocado, then the pinch of salt, and then the cabbage.  Spread the hot sauce on the top piece of bread, close the sandwich, and serve.                                     

                   
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |65

Kitchen Equipment  Knife  Cutting Board  Measuring Cup  Measuring Spoon  Knife or Small Spatula to spread the hot sauce  Toaster or Oven    Presentation    Cut the sandwich along the diagonal, but hold the bread  gently when you do it so you don’t smash the avocado.    Time Management    Serve right away so the avocado doesn’t brown.     Complementary Food and Drinks    A side of garlicky black beans would be perfect for this sandwich.    Where to Shop    These ingredients can be purchased anywhere, but because there are so few of them, the quality of  this sandwich is highly dependent on the quality of the ingredients. Try to get the bread as fresh as  possible and the avocado should be firm with just a touch of give. If it feels soft, it may be too mushy  for the sandwich. My preferred hot sauce for this sandwich is Cholula.     How It Works    It’s pretty simple. Creaminess and heartiness from the avocado, crunch from the cabbage, earthy  base notes from the sprouts, and acidity from the hot sauce and a bit from the sourdough. The bread  is toasted since the meaty part of the sandwich, the avocado, is soft. That way you don’t have soft on  soft.    Chef’s Notes     As much as I write fancier recipes, the five to ten minute ones are just what I need when I don’t feel  like being in the kitchen or I am simply running short of time. That doesn’t mean I want to trade  convenience for flavor, it just means I need something quick and satisfying and this sandwich fits the  bill.       
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |66

Nutrition Facts (per serving) 
  Calories 381       Calories from Fat 117  Fat 13 g  Total Carbohydrates 55 g  Dietary Fiber 9 g  Sugars 2 g  Protein 11 g  Salt 450 mg    Interesting Facts    Cholula hot sauce was originally produced as a component of sangrita, a fruit and chile palate  cleansing drink sipped between shots of tequila blanco.    

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |67

Ciabatta Club Sandwich with Smoky Mayonnaise
Serves: 1    Time to Prepare: 20 minutes    Ingredients  Meat Substitute Version  1 Gardein “chicken” breast, sliced thin or 8‐10 strips of Beyond Meat, sliced thin  ¼ tsp. of black pepper  1 package of tempeh bacon  All Veggie Version  2 zucchini, sliced as thin as possible  ¼ cup of lemon juice  2 tbsp. of olive oil  2 tbsp. of water  ½ tsp. of salt  ¼ tsp. of black pepper  1 cup of chopped oyster mushrooms  2 tsp. of olive oil  ¼ tsp. of salt  The Bread  2 ciabatta rolls, cut in half and toasted  Sprinkle of red wine vinegar  The Fixings  ¼ cup of vegan mayonnaise  1/3 tsp. of mesquite smoked salt (you can substitute regular sea salt)  1 heirloom tomato, sliced  4 pieces of crispy lettuce, torn    Instructions  The Meat Substitute Version  Gardein: Slice (if you have a thick Gardein breast) this thin (about 1/8” pieces) working your  way from the top to the bottom, or smash (if you have a thin Gardein breast) it flat with your  hand and then cut the smashed breast in half. Toss it in the pepper. Spread it on a baking  sheet and bake it at 350 F for 10 minutes.  Beyond Meat: Slice the strips along the length into thin 1/8” thick pieces and toss them in the  pepper.  Cut the tempeh bacon strips in half.  The Veggie Version  Cut the ends off the zucchini.  Slice the zucchini along the length as thin as you can get it (using a mandolin helps  immensely).  Combine the lemon juice, oil, water, and salt and marinate the zucchini in this mix for about 4  hours (skip this and omit the marinade if you want the sandwich right away).  Remove the zucchini from the marinade and toss it with the pepper. 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |68

Over a high heat, sear the oyster mushrooms in the oil and salt until they are heavily browned  and slightly crisp (this can takes about 10‐12 minutes).  Assembling the Sandwich  Cut the bread in half and toast it.  Sprinkle red wine vinegar and the bread.  Combine the vegan mayonnaise with the smoked salt  Slice the tomato.  Place the meat substitute or zucchini on the bottom half of the bun, then the tempeh bacon  or seared oyster mushrooms, then the vegan mayonnaise, then the tomato, and then the  lettuce, close, and serve!                                       

                               
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |69

Low‐fat Version 
  Omit the vegan mayonnaise and use the meat  substitute version. I would add an extra sprinkle of  red wine vinegar to the bread to make up for the  loss of moisture from omitting the vegan mayo.  Also, toss the meat sub in the smoked salt since it  won’t be in the mayo.    Kitchen Equipment    Knife  Cutting Board  Measuring Cup  Measuring Spoon  Mixing Bowl  Small Whisk  Oven and Baking Dish or Sauté Pan    Presentation    For the true club sandwich experience, cut the  sandwich into quarters and hold each one closed  with long toothpicks.    Time Management    If I am doing the meat sub version, I make the mayo and get everything cut while the meat substitute  is in the oven. If I am doing the veggie version, I sear the oyster mushrooms just before I am about to  serve the sandwich so they will still be warm.     Complementary Food and Drinks    Pickles and potato chips. I’m not a fan of dill pickles, so I serve this with sweet crispy ones.    Where to Shop    Whole Foods is pretty much the only place to get the Gardein or Beyond Meat products and you  usually have to go to the deli area to get the Gardein breasts (you can get some flavored ones in the  refrigerated section, but that flavor interferes with the other flavors of the sandwich). When  purchasing the tomato, make sure it is firm. Many heirloom tomatoes are soft and these do not slice  as well as the firmer ones. I either make my ciabatta rolls or get them at Trader Joe’s. For the  mesquite smoked salt, head to the spice section of any high end store and you should be able to find  it. It’s also available for order online, as well. It’s tasty enough that I usually order a big batch of it and  then I have it on hand for at least a year. Approximate cost per serving is $4.00. 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |70

How It Works    A classic club sandwich is really just an upscale blt. It’s got turkey, bacon, tomato, lettuce, and mayo.  Using the meat substitutes creates a similar experience. Gardein needs a little heat applied to it to  tighten it up, which is why it goes in the oven. Beyond Meat doesn’t have that problem, but they only  have the strips available, so you can’t slice it into larger deli‐sized slices. For the veggie version, the  zucchini marinades to keep its fresh flavor while still softening it and infusing it with some richness.  The lemon juice brightens it and also ensures that it softens. Don’t be scared off by using so much oil  in the marinade. Most of it stays in the bowl. My preferred “bacon” is actually the oyster mushroom  version. I find they develop a nice browning, almost sweet, deep bacon flavor when they are heavily  seared, but they need to be cooked to the point where they start to crisp for this to happen.    Chef’s Notes     My favorite version of this sandwich is a combination of the two methods, with sliced Beyond Meat  strips and oyster mushroom “bacon.” It’s hearty and tasty and reminds me very strongly of the club  sandwiches I used to eat when visiting my grandfather (probably because he was a member of a golf  club!).    Nutrition Facts (per serving, meat sub version)    Calories 637       Calories from Fat 225  Fat 25 g  Total Carbohydrates 67 g  Dietary Fiber 6 g  Sugars 3 g  Protein 36 g  Salt 858 mg    Interesting Facts    Although popular at many golf clubs, the sandwich is actually purported to have been developed at a  gambling club in upstate New York in 1899.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |71

Mushroom Pesto Bagel Sandwich
Serves: 1      Time to Prepare: 10 minutes    Ingredients  1 bagel (an onion bagel works best), cut in half  5‐6 cremini mushrooms, sliced  1 tsp. of olive oil  1/8 tsp. of salt  ¼ tsp. of black pepper  1 cup of basil leaves  1 clove of garlic  1 tbsp. of olive oil  2 tbsp. of pine nuts  Pinch of salt  Pinch of crushed red pepper flakes    Instructions  Cut the bagel in half and toast it.  Slice the mushrooms.  Sauté the mushrooms in the oil and salt over a medium high heat until they are browned (this will  take about 5 minutes).  Sprinkle the pepper on them immediately after you take them off the heat.  Puree the basil, garlic, olive oil, pine nuts, and salt.  Spread the pesto over both halves of the bagel, add the mushrooms and crushed red pepper, and  serve.                                     

   
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |72

Low‐fat Version 
  Sauté the mushrooms in a dry pan until they are browned. Omit  all the olive oil in the recipe and substitute ¼ cup of white beans  for the pine nuts.    Kitchen Equipment    Sauté Pan  Stirring Spoon  Blender  Measuring Cup  Measuring Spoon  Knife  Cutting Board  Toaster    Presentation    Give the sandwich a press before you serve it. It helps keep the mushrooms from sliding out from the  bagel.    Time Management    You can toast the bagel while the mushrooms are cooking to save a few minutes of time. You might  even be able to get the pesto made.     Complementary Food and Drinks    Serve this with a side of chopped roasted red peppers, chickpeas, roasted garlic, and a drizzle of  balsamic vinegar.    Where to Shop    You should be able to get all the ingredients for this at just about any market. Approximate cost per  serving is $3.00.    How It Works    I like to heavily brown the mushrooms. It develops their flavor, but it also cooks a lot of the water out  of them, condensing them and making a heartier sandwich. This works best on a medium high or high  heat. The pesto slightly moistens the bagel and gives the sandwich a rich feel while the crushed red  pepper gives the sandwich some pop.     
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |73

Chef’s Notes 
   This sandwich was inspired by a mushroom melt I used to eat as a child, but I decided to use pesto  instead of vegan cheese to keep it made out of whole ingredients.    Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 500       Calories from Fat 180  Fat 20 g  Total Carbohydrates 65 g  Dietary Fiber 4 g  Sugars 1 g  Protein 15 g  Salt 565 mg    Interesting Facts    Bagels are Polish in origin and go back to at least the 1500s. They were brought to the US by Polish  Jewish immigrants.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |74

Seared Zucchini Sandwich
Serves: 1      Time to Prepare: 8‐10 minutes    Ingredients  1 zucchini, sliced   1 tsp. of olive oil  Pinch of salt  1 tbsp. of balsamic vinegar  3 tbsp. of chopped sundried tomatoes  Olive oil to sprinkle on the bread  ¼ tsp. of freshly ground black pepper  2 slices of sourdough bread (sourdough with roasted garlic is even better)    Instructions  Slice the ends off the zucchini, then slice it along the length into ½” thick pieces.  Bring the oil to a medium high heat in a sauté pan, then add the zucchini and salt.  Sear the zucchini for about 3 minutes, then flip it and repeat (it should develop several heavily  browned areas).  Turn off the heat and immediately add in the balsamic vinegar and quickly toss the zucchini in the  pan for about 30 seconds (until the balsamic coats and condenses on the zucchini).  Chop sundried tomatoes until you have about 3 tbsp. of them.  Sprinkle some olive oil on both slices of the bread.  Add the zucchini, then the tomatoes, dress with black pepper, close the sandwich, and serve.                                     

     
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |75

Low‐fat Version 
  You can sear the zucchini without oil, but it works a little better if it  is cut into rounds instead of long strips. Make sure to do this  without any liquid in the pan and keep a spatula nearby in case it  sticks. Once it starts to stick, add a splash of water to the pan and  quickly stir the zucchini until the water evaporates. Turn off the  heat and add the balsamic. Do not sprinkle the bread with oil.    Kitchen Equipment    Sauté Pan  Spatula  Knife  Cutting Board  Measuring Spoon    Presentation    Close the sandwich up, cut it in half diagonally using a serrated knife, and serve it. It’s a quick  sandwich meant to be eaten just as quickly!    Time Management    The key to this sandwich is making sure the balsamic vinegar doesn’t burn, which is why you should  add it until the heat is off. You only have a few seconds to add it, though, because you still want the  pan hot enough to caramelize the vinegar onto the zucchini.     Complementary Food and Drinks    Serve this with a white bean dip and toasted flatbread dressed with sesame seeds.    Where to Shop    All of these ingredients are very easy to find. Approximate cost per serving is $2.00.    How It Works    It’s a simple sandwich. Basically, you sear the zucchini, which should be done around a medium high  heat. This gets a nice sear on the zucchini without putting it on the heat too long (which would  happen if the heat was lower), but it’s not so hot that the zucchini burns. The heat should then be  turned off, leaving just enough heat in the pan to caramelize the balsamic vinegar onto the zucchini,  but not burn it. Make sure you keep stirring until the pan is no longer super hot. The sundried  tomatoes add a second sweet, tangy flavor, and the oil on the bread helps mellow out all the acidity  in the sandwich. 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |76

Chef’s Notes 
   This is one of my favorite snack sandwiches. It only takes a few minutes to make and it’s not too  heavy on the calories.    Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 261       Calories from Fat 45  Fat 5 g  Total Carbohydrates 44 g  Dietary Fiber 5 g  Sugars 12 g  Protein 10 g  Salt 466 mg    Interesting Facts    Although zucchini is a staple vegetable, it wasn’t developed into the modern version until the late  1800s in Italy.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |77

Truffled Philly Cheesesteak
Serves: 4 large sandwiches        Time to Prepare: 10 minutes    Ingredients  1 long French baguette, sliced into 4 sections  6 garlic cloves, minced   4 cups mixed exotic mushrooms (eg., shiitake, maitake, oyster, cremini, chanterelles), chopped    1 ½ tablespoons olive oil   Salt and pepper, to taste   About 1 tablespoon white truffle oil  8 slices vegan cheddar and/or provolone cheese [I recommend Daiya slices]    Instructions  Slice baguette lengthwise and remove most of the soft middle to form concave pockets (save the  middle for bread crumbs, bread pudding or stuffing. You can freeze it in an airtight bag).   Slice baguette into 4 sections and set aside.    Prep the garlic and mushrooms.  Heat olive oil in a large saucepan over medium‐low.   Add garlic and cook until it softens, about 2 minutes, taking care not to burn it.   Add mushrooms and cook until they are very soft and tender.   Remove from heat and stir in truffle oil and season with salt and pepper.    Place vegan cheese slices into prepared bread.   Divide hot mushroom mixture amongst the 4 bread sections – heat will melt the cheese – and serve  immediately.                                   

   
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Dynise Balcavage * urbanvegan.net

July 2013

Sandwiches |78

Chef’s Notes 
   Philadelphia, my home city, is famous for its meat‐ laden, calorie‐busting cheese steaks. It’s also famous  for its tough edge, ruthless sports fans and no BS  attitude. This is my attempt at trying to infuse my city’s  reputation with a little more refinement – and a lot  more kindness.    Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 386       Calories from Fat 126  Fat 14 g  Total Carbohydrates 51 g  Dietary Fiber 8 g  Sugars 5 g  Protein 14 g  Salt 770 mg    Interesting Facts    Pat’s King of Steaks is the restaurant started by the inventor of the cheesesteak sandwich, which  ironically was first served without cheese.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Dynise Balcavage * urbanvegan.net

July 2013

Sandwiches |79

Black Bean Mushroom Tortas
Type:   Sandwich    Serves: 2 or 4 as a half sandwich  Time to Prepare: 20 minutes    Ingredients  The Bean Sauce                   1‐2 chipotles in adobo, chopped   1 ½ cups of cooked black beans with about 3‐4 tbs. of liquid  1 tbsp. of mojo de ajo*   ¼ tsp. of salt  The Filling                 2 cups of oyster mushrooms, chopped into large pieces   6 fresh shiitake mushrooms, sliced         2 tbsp. of mojo de ajo                                      1/8 tsp. of salt  The Bread                             3 tbsp. of pepitas, toasted      2 bolillo rolls, toasted and cut in half (and sandwich roll will work here)                1 cup of baby arugula        * mojo de ajo is olive oil baked with garlic, salt, and lime juice. You can substitute 1 tbsp. of olive oil, 1  clove of minced garlic, and the juice of ½ of a lime for this.    Instructions  Making the Bean Sauce  Chop the chipotles.   Add the chipotles, beans, liquid, mojo de ajo, and salt to a pan and gently simmer while you  prepare the filling.  Making the Filling  Turn the pan to a medium heat, add the pepitas, and gently stir them until they are lightly  browned.   Remove them from the pan and set them aside.   Chop the oyster mushrooms into large pieces and slice the shiitakes into about 4 slices.   Bring a sauté pan to a medium high heat and add the mojo de ajo.   Wait a moment, then add the oyster mushrooms, shiitakes, and salt and sear cook until the  mushrooms are lightly browned.  Making the Bread  Cut the bread in half for a sandwich and toast it.   Puree the beans and add just enough water to get a semi‐thick sauce.  Assembling the Torta  Spread this on both sides of the bread.   Add the mushrooms, arugula, and pepitas and serve.     
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |80

Low‐fat Version 
  Omit the mojo de ajo in the recipe. Add the juice of ½ of a lime to the bean sauce and sauté the  mushrooms in a dry pan. Do not sauté them in any liquid or they will not properly brown.    Kitchen Equipment    Small Pot  Masher  Sauté Pan  2 Stirring Spoons  Small Mixing Bowl to set the pepitas aside  Measuring Spoon  Measuring Cup    Presentation    Serve this open‐faced. The bean sauce and filling look so  good, it’s a shame to hide them with the top part of the  bread.    Time Management    Make sure you start the bean sauce first. The longer it  simmers, the better it gets.     Complementary Food and Drinks    Serve this with a side salad of diced chayote and fresh corn.    Where to Shop    All of these ingredients are relatively easy to find, except for the mojo de ajo. I suggest using the  cheat I outlined in the recipe, unless you want to make it yourself. You can find the recipe for it in our  La Cucina Mexicana issue of The Vegan Culinary Experience at  www.veganculinaryexperience.com/VCEAug10.pdf. Pepitas are green pumpkin seeds. I usually  purchase them from a bulk bin since they are fairly inexpensive that way. Bolillo rolls are simply a  type of Mexican sandwich roll, usually available in most bakeries. If you can’t find them, you can  substitute any sandwich roll for them. I often use the Panini rolls from Trader Joe’s. Chipotles in  adobo are smoked dried jalapenos that are then canned with a marinade. You can find them in the  Mexican section of most markets. Approximate cost per serving is $3.00.    How It Works    The beans simmer so that the heat and smokiness from the chipotles and the lime and garlic from the 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |81

mojo de ajo can infuse the sauce. They are smashed so that they retain some texture. Oyster  mushrooms, when they are seared, take on a flavor reminiscent of bacon while the shiitakes lend an  earthy depth to the sandwich. The peppery arugula is the high note in the recipe.    Chef’s Notes     This recipe was inspired by a torta recipe I saw at one of Rick Bayless’ restaurants. I took the idea of a  bean sauce and mushrooms as the backbone of the recipe and created my own sandwich out of it  and it has turned out to be one of my favorite sandwiches I’ve created.    Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 688       Calories from Fat 252  Fat 28 g  Total Carbohydrates 85 g  Dietary Fiber 21 g  Sugars 6 g  Protein 24 g   Salt 572 mg    Interesting Facts    Tortas are a type of Mexican sandwich that always includes beans or a bean sauce.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |82

BLT Club
Serves: 4        Time to Prepare: 5 minutes plus time to make the components    Ingredients  12 slices of Sunflower Bread (see recipe on page 152)  1 batch of Nut‐based Aioli (see recipe on page 141)  8 leaves of iceberg lettuce  1 tomato, seeded and sliced  1 ripe avocado, pitted and sliced  1 batch of Coconut Bacon (see recipe on page 134)  Option: Use Eggplant Bacon if you don’t have any Thai Baby Coconuts for Coconut Bacon.    Instructions  Place a slice of bread on each of four serving dishes and spread with a couple of tablespoons of Nut‐ based Aioli.   Top each portion with a lettuce leaf, then a slice of tomato, some avocado, and then another slice of  bread.   Spread that slice with additional Nut‐based Aioli, and top with slices of Coconut Bacon, lettuce, and  tomato.   Spread a couple more tablespoons of Nut‐based Aioli on one side of the remaining slices of bread,  and place Nut‐based Aioli‐side down atop your sandwiches.                                      

       
Recipe by Ani Phyo * www.aniphyo.com * recipe used by permission of Da Capo Lifelong, a member of the Perseus Books Group, from Ani’s Raw Food Essentials

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com

July 2013

Sandwiches |83

  Chef’s Notes 
   This sandwich keeps for several hours, making it a great sandwich  for the road when traveling or on a hike or picnic.    Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 690       Calories from Fat 522  Fat 58 g  Total Carbohydrates 28 g  Dietary Fiber 22 g  Sugars 4 g  Protein 14 g  Salt 403 mg    Interesting Facts    The BLT is the second most popular sandwich in the United States.   

Recipe by Ani Phyo * www.aniphyo.com * recipe used by permission of Da Capo Lifelong, a member of the Perseus Books Group, from Ani’s Raw Food Essentials

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com

July 2013

Sandwiches |84

Carnitas Sandwich with Roasted Garlic Chile Pequin Sauce
Serves: 2      Time to Prepare: 10‐12 minutes    Ingredients  2 cups of beefless seitan strips (the ones from Trader Joe’s are ideal for this recipe)  1 tbsp. of olive oil  1 tsp. of dried Mexican oregano  ¼ tsp. of salt  Water  1 avocado, sliced  ½ cup of Roasted Garlic Chile Pequin Sauce (see recipe on page 135), or a vinegary hot sauce  2 torpedo shaped rolls (bolillo rolls work well), sliced to form pockets    Instructions  Over a medium high heat, sauté the seitan strips in the olive oil until they brown (about 6‐8 minutes)  – some of the seitan will probably stick to the pan, which is ok.  Add the oregano and salt and give everything a few quick stirs.  Add about ¼” of water to the pan and let it cook out (make sure to keep stirring while the water  evaporates), then immediately remove the pan from the heat.  Cut the rolls open.  Slice the avocado.  Add the seitan, then the avocado, and then liberally spread the sauce over the sandwich.                                     

       
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |85

Low‐fat Version 
  Toss the seitan with the oregano and salt, wrap it in  foil, and bake it at 450 F for 20 minutes. This  replaces the sautéing step.    Kitchen Equipment    Sauté Pan  Stirring Spoon  Measuring Cup  Measuring Spoon  Knife  Cutting Board    Presentation    I spread some of the sauce along the bread and then drizzle some on the seitan.    Time Management    If you don’t have the sauce handy, you can roast the garlic for it while you sauté the seitan.    Complementary Food and Drinks    This goes very well with some salted watermelon.    Where to Shop    Trader Joe’s Beefless Strips are perfect for this recipe. They crisp well in the oil and then turn very  tender and flaky once the water is added. You will have to make the sauce to go with this recipe, but  if you don’t feel like it, you can substitute your favorite vinegary hot sauce. Approximate cost per  serving is $3.50.    How It Works    The seitan crisps in the oil (best done at a medium high heat to get a good sear without burning it),  developing its flavor and leaving a nicely browned, crunchy “skin” that holds even when the water is  added. Water is added to make the interior of the seitan tender, so you have a nice pulled texture.  The sauce pairs well with the crisped seitan, complementing it with the roasted garlic flavor and  providing a bold shot of heat and acidity from the vinegar and hot chiles pequin.    Chef’s Notes     This sandwich was created because I had some of this sauce left over from a class I taught and I was 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |86

really in the mood for crispy seitan. Put it in some bread, add some avocado, and the magic  happened.    Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 459       Calories from Fat 135  Fat 15 g  Total Carbohydrates 55 g  Dietary Fiber 4 g  Sugars 1 g  Protein 27 g  Salt 609 mg    Interesting Facts    Chiles pequin are tiny, usually about ½” long when dried, and are about 20 times hotter than a  jalapeno.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |87

French Toast Breakfast Sandwich
Serves:  4        Time to Prepare: 15 minutes    Ingredients  8 slices of whole grain bread              ½ cup peanut or almond butter   6 oz. of firm silken tofu               ½ cup of vegan milk   ½ teaspoon of turmeric                 1 teaspoon cinnamon   ½ teaspoon vanilla extract  Pinch of black or regular salt                  2 bananas   ½ to 1 cup of cubed mango or strawberries           1 teaspoon oil or vegan butter  4 teaspoons of cinnamon sugar    Instructions  In a blender, blend the tofu and vegan milk with the turmeric, salt, cinnamon and vanilla.   Place in a shallow dish, and set to the side.   If it is too thick, thin out with a little additional almond milk.   Take the eight slices of bread and spread each one with a tablespoon of peanut butter or almond  butter.   Slice the bananas.   Add slices of banana to one half of the slices.   Take the mango or strawberries and slice or mash as needed.   Place on the half of the bread that does not have bananas.   Put the slices together, and dip them in the tofu mixture.   Heat a skillet over medium to medium high heat.   Place the vegan butter or oil in the skillet and once it is sizzling, add the sandwich.   Cook for about 3‐5 minutes on each side, until lightly brown.   Cook the other side.   Remove from heat and sprinkle with 1 teaspoon of the cinnamon sugar.   Serve with additional strawberries and fruit if so desired.                      
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

July 2013

Sandwiches |88

Low‐fat Version 
  Eliminate the peanut butter.     Kitchen Equipment    Blender, knife, cutting board, measuring cups and spoons,  skillet, spatula  

  Complementary Food and Drinks 
  A cold glass of almond or soy milk is almost a necessity to pair with this, or a warm cup of tea or  coffee. As stated in the recipe, I also like to serve this with additional fruit. If you are feeling very  decadent, you can also serve this with warm maple syrup.     Where to Shop    These ingredients should be available at any supermarket. If possible, get fresh organic fruit to make  this sandwich pop.     How It Works    The heat melts the nut butter and lightly cooks the fruit, giving this a perfect texture.     Chef’s Notes     Make sure the outside is browned, lightly. It will take a small amount of oil, but is totally worth it. I  also like using a cast iron skillet because of the heat it conducts and the nonstick nature.     Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 496       Calories from Fat 144  Fat 16 g  Total Carbohydrates 72 g  Dietary Fiber 7 g  Sugars 24 g  Protein 16 g  Salt 506 mg    Interesting Facts    The earliest mention of French toast dates back to the 4th century and is by Apicius, a Roman  cookbook author.    
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

July 2013

Sandwiches |89

Chipotle Seitan Sandwich with Lime Aioli and Potato Chips
Serves: 2      Time to Prepare: 15 minutes    Ingredients  The Seitan  1 ½ cups of seitan strips  2 tsp. of olive oil  ½ tsp. of chipotle powder  ½ tsp. of ancho powder  ½ tsp. of dried oregano  ¼ tsp. of salt  The Aioli  4 cloves of garlic  1/3 cup of vegan mayonnaise   ¼ tsp. of salt  Zest of 2 limes  Juice of 2 limes  The Chips and Apple  ½ cup of shredded green apple (toss this in lime or lemon juice if you do not serve it right  away)  10‐12 potato chips (preferably salt and pepper potato chips)  The Bread  2 ciabatta rolls, cut in half and toasted    Instructions  Over a medium heat, sauté the seitan strips in the oil until they are browned (about 6‐7 minutes).  Dress them with the chipotle powder, ancho powder, oregano, and salt while they are in the pan,  quickly tossing everything together, then immediately remove the pan from the heat.  Zest and juice the limes.  Puree all the ingredients for the aioli.  Cut the ciabatta rolls and toast them for about 1 minute.  Shred the green apple with a grater.  Spread about 1 tbsp. of the aioli on the bottom slices of bread, then add the seitan, followed by the  potato chips, and then the apple.   Spread the rest of the aioli on the top portion of the roll, close the sandwich, and serve.                     
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |90

Low‐fat Version 
  Spritz the seitan with water and then toss it with the herbs  and spices. Wrap it in parchment paper and bake it at 400  degrees F for 20 minutes. Instead of using vegan  mayonnaise in the aioli, use light silken tofu instead.    Kitchen Equipment    Sauté Pan  Stirring Spoon  Measuring Cup  Measuring Spoon  Blender  Spatula  Zester  Grater  Oven to toast the bread    Presentation    Don’t press down on the sandwich. You may crush the potato chips! Also, if you don’t plan on serving  this right away, dress the grated apple in some lime juice so it doesn’t brown.    Time Management    While you are sautéing the seitan, make the aioli and grate the apple. That way, everything can get  plated as soon as you are done with the seitan. Also, make sure you zest the limes before you juice  them. It’s a pain to do it the other way around.    Complementary Food and Drinks    This goes great with a berry tea and a creamy tomatillo soup.    Where to Shop    I usually just get the Beefless Strips from Trader Joe’s for my seitan, but you can use any of your  favorite mock meat strips for this recipe. If I don’t make my own ciabatta rolls, I either get those at  Wildflower Bakery, Whole Foods, or Trader Joe’s for convenience. Some conventional grocery stores  also have them. For potato chips, I typically get the Kettle brand salt and pepper chips. They have a  nice kick to them that augments the chipotle powder from the recipe and they are thick and crunchy.  Approximate cost per serving is $4.00.       
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |91

How It Works    This sandwich has several components that all provide something unique to the sandwich. First is the  spicy seitan itself, which gives the sandwich heartiness and a smoky heat from the chipotle powder.  Ancho powder is also used to add chile flavor without adding more heat and to lend a sort of caramel  flavor to the sandwich. Next up is the aioli. Not only does it add creaminess to the sandwich, which  binds together all the components, it adds a bright pop by using lime juice and lime zest. The  shredded green apple adds a little crunch, but more importantly tartness and sweetness, both of  which play well with the lime and chile flavors. Finally, potato chips are added for lots of delicious  crunch.     Chef’s Notes     This is a fun sandwich to make and even more fun to eat! Not only are there several layers of flavor  within the sandwich, there are also several layers of texture.    Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 737       Calories from Fat 297  Fat 33 g  Total Carbohydrates 82 g  Dietary Fiber 3 g  Sugars 5 g  Protein 28 g  Salt 850 mg    Interesting Facts    In the late 1800s, potato chips were the province of chefs and restaurants, but by 1916, they had  become a mass market snack.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |92

Citrus Muffaletta on Focaccia
Serves: 3      Time to Prepare: 10 minutes + 2 hours to sit    Ingredients  Zest of 2 oranges  ¼ stalk of celery, sliced chopped  ½ of a carrot, peeled and chopped   1 pepperoncini, chopped  1 yellow, red, or orange pepper, chopped  ¼ cup of pickled cauliflower, drained   1 cup of green olives stuffed with garlic   ¾ cup of pitted kalamata olives  1 cipollini onion  1 tsp. of capers, drained   1 tsp. of celery seeds   1 tbsp. of fresh oregano  1 tbsp. of sliced basil  1 tsp. of freshly ground pepper   3 5” x 5” squares of focaccia, sliced in half  2 tbsp. of olive oil and 2 tbsp. of red wine vinegar  12 slices of Tofurky smoked hickory deli slices  Option: 6 slices of vegan provolone    Instructions  Chop the celery, carrot, pepperoncini, and pepper.  Zest the orange.  Chop the celery, carrot, pepperoncini, bell pepper, and cipollini onion.  Combine all of the ingredients together except for the bread, oil, and deli slices.  Pulse them in a food processor until they are all roughly diced and mixed together.  Cut the focaccia in half.  Drizzle a bit of olive oil over and red wine vinegar over each piece of bread.  Spread the veggie olive mix on both sides of bread, then place 2 slices of the deli slices on each piece  of bread, then the optional vegan provolone over one side, and close it up. (this should form a  sandwich with olive veggie mix on top and below, with deli slices surrounding the vegan provolone)  Wrap the sandwich in plastic and let it sit for about 2 hours in the refrigerator.                 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |93

Low‐fat Version    
This isn’t truly a low‐fat version since the olives  contain a lot of fat, but you can lower the fat  calories by omitting the olive oil from the  recipe.      Kitchen Equipment    Measuring Cup  Measuring Spoon  Food Processor  Serrated Knife   Knife  Cutting Board    Presentation    Serve it in a basket lined with paper and give the  sandwich a press to impress the olive veggie mix  into the bread, making it easier to eat.    Time Management    This is a sandwich that really improves while it sits,  allowing the flavors to meld and work their way  into the bread, so don’t skimp on the wait time.     Complementary Food and Drinks    Serve this with a roasted garlic dip and some fresh veggies or sourdough bread.     Where to Shop    I typically get the olives and Tofurky slices from Trader Joe’s, where I can get a good price on them.  For the provolone, I shop at Whole Foods where I can find Daiya provolone. The pickled veggies come  from a jar of giardiniera, which is that jar of pickled veggies usually found in the condiment aisle of  most grocery stores. If you can’t find vegan focaccia, you can use large slices of Italian bread instead.  Approximate cost per serving is $2.50.    How It Works    The salad is a very salty, tangy mix of olives intensified by the capers and vinegar soaked cauliflower.   The carrot adds some sweetness to the olive salad while oregano, celery, and celery seeds give depth  to it.  The basil and zest brighten the sandwich and give it some sweetness. Focaccia is a spongy bread 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |94

that absorbs the flavors of the olive salad incredibly well and also has a nice, robust flavor. Wrapping  the sandwich is important because it gives the flavors time to meld and seep into the bread without  drying the exterior of the sandwich.    Chef’s Notes     A muffaletta looks intimidating because of the large amount of ingredients, but it’s really just a  matter of chopping a bunch of stuff together in a food processor, placing it on bread, and waiting.    Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)    Calories 385       Calories from Fat 153  Fat 17 g  Total Carbohydrates 47 g  Dietary Fiber 5 g  Sugars 4 g  Protein 11 g  Salt 858 mg    Interesting Facts    The olives in this sandwich clearly showcase the muffaletta’s Spanish influence, which is one of the  other major influences for New Orleans cuisine. 

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |95

El Cubano Two Ways
Serves: 1          Time to Prepare: 15 minutes    Ingredients for the Seitan Cubano  7” loaf of Cuban bread, cut in half to make a sandwich (see recipe on page 149)  4 slices of sweet pickle  3‐4 slices of vegan Swiss “cheese”  3‐4 tbsp. of yellow mustard  Olive oil (or melted vegan margarine) to brush the bread  Option 1  ½ cup of smoked pulled “pork” (see below)  4‐6 slices of vegan cured “ham” (see below)  Option 2  1” thick slab of eggplant, brushed with olive oil  ¼ cup of dried shiitake mushrooms, rehydrated and sliced  1/8 tsp. of salt    The Simple Way: Use Gardein BBQ Pulled Shreds or the ones from Trader Joe’s and rinse off the BBQ  sauce, then toss the shreds in about ¾ tsp. of smoked paprika, ¼ tsp. of garlic powder, and ½ tsp. of  Liquid Smoke. Alternatively, you can rinse off the shreds and simmer them with ¼ cup of water, ½ tsp.  of liquid smoke, ¼ tsp. of salt, and 1 tsp. of agave, simmering until the water evaporates. Use Tofurky  ham slices. Use Daiya Swiss cheese slices. If you can’t find Cuban bread, substitute French bread.    Instructions  Slice the bread in half.   Brush each half, both on outside of the crust and the inside with the soft middle, with olive oil or  melted margarine.   Option 1 (seitan)  Place a layer of vegan “ham” slices, then a layer of pulled “pork,”, then the pickles, and then  the “cheese.”  Option 2 (eggplant)  Cut the eggplant into a 1” slab.  Brush it with oil and toss with salt.  Grill the eggplant until it is soft on both sides, flipping it once it has developed nice grill lines  and softened on one side.  Rehydrate the mushrooms in warm water and slice them.  Place the “ham” or shiitakes on the bread, then the pulled “pork” or grilled eggplant.  Next, place the pickles followed by the Swiss “cheese.”  Spread the mustard along the top slice of bread and close the sandwich.  Heat up a sandwich press to just below a medium heat.  Press the sandwich down until it is about half the size it was originally and keep it in the press until it  develops nice black lines across the top from the sandwich press, but don’t leave it in so long that the  entire top turns black! (it should be a crispy golden color with black lines)   
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |96

 

Make Your Own Ingredients 
This is a lot of work for one sandwich, but the extra effort will create a far superior meal. Feel free to  make any or all of the ingredients! If I were to make them this way, I would make large batches of  them and store them in my refrigerator so that I had them to use in other recipes.    Smoked Pulled “Pork”  Take the BBQ shreds, wrap them in foil, and pierce the foil with a fork. If you have a smoker, smoke  these with mesquite wood for a full day. You can also do this on the grill by lighting a small fire and  adding mesquite chips soaked in water for at least an hour. Place the foil packet away from the fire,  close the lid, and let the BBQ shreds smoke for at least one hour. Once the smoking is done, toss with  ¾ tsp. of paprika and ¼ tsp. of garlic powder.    Cured Vegan “Ham”  Purchase your favorite vegan ham (you can use deli slices from Tofurky), make your own seitan, or  head to an Asian market to get a mock ham. Slice it thin, toss it liberally in salt (don’t worry, you’ll  brush it off when done) and about ½ tsp. of granulated turbinado sugar, and set it in your oven on the  lowest setting possible and let it “cure” for about 2 hours. Brush the salt and sugar off when you are  done.     

             

   
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |97

  Low‐fat Version 
  Simply omit the Swiss cheese and don’t brush  the bread with oil and you will have a tasty,  no‐oil added sandwich!    Kitchen Equipment    Sandwich Press  Knife  Cutting Board  Measuring Spoon  Mixing Bowl  A Brush to spread the oil on the bread    Presentation    Pressed, with nice black marks across the top is the way to go. Make sure you don’t overload the  sandwich so that the fillings don’t spill out when you press it.    Time Management    Don’t let this sit around! Serve it hot off the sandwich press, made to order. Yum! If you want a quick  sandwich, go with The Simple Way.      Complementary Food and Drinks    Serve this with a side of hot sauce and an ice cold beer.    Where to Shop    I typically get the pulled BBQ shreds from Trader Joe’s, but you can also get the Gardein ones from  Whole Foods and even some conventional grocery stores. So far, the Daiya Swiss is most commonly  found at Whole Foods. Don’t worry about seeking out Cuban bread. It’s usually made with lard, so  you’ll have to make your own or substitute a hoagie roll or sandwich‐sized loaf of French bread.  Approximate cost per sandwich is $5.00.    How It Works    The sandwich is basically a mix of hearty, succulent fillings with a nice smoky undertone that has  some sourness from the pickles and the pop of the mustard. None of those flavors should overwhelm  the sandwich and they are all mellowed by the Swiss cheese, which also serves to hold all those  ingredients together (they will want to slip out of the sandwich!). That is also why the sandwich is  pressed. Without pressing it, the ingredients tend to explode out the sides of the bread. 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |98

 

Chef’s Notes 
   I used to make a sandwich very similar to this one when I was a kid without knowing that I was  making a Cuban sandwich. The hearty seitan and melty cheeses leaves me satisfied and reminds me  of my childhood.    Nutrition Facts (per serving, eggplant version)    Calories 552       Calories from Fat 180  Fat 20 g  Total Carbohydrates 80 g  Dietary Fiber 3 g  Sugars 3 g  Protein 13 g  Salt 730 mg    Interesting Facts    The Cuban sandwich is an old recipe, for a sandwich, having been around since at least the 1860s.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |99

French Dip Sandwich with Wild Mushroom Rosemary Jus
Serves: 2          Time to Prepare: 10‐15 minutes    Ingredients  The Jus  4 large shallots, sliced thin  2 tsp. of olive oil  1 cup of water  1 sprig of fresh rosemary  ¼ cup of dried wild mushrooms  ¼ tsp. of salt  Option: 1 tsp. of “beef” bouillon  The Sandwich  2 portabella mushrooms, sliced into ¼” thick pieces  2 tsp. of olive oil  ¼ tsp. of salt  ¾ tsp. of ground black pepper  2 French rolls, sliced open  Option: Instead of portabellas, you can use sliced seitan for a meatier texture    Instructions  Slice the shallots thin.  Over a medium heat in a small pot, sauté the shallots with the oil until the shallots are heavily  browned.  Add the water, rosemary, mushrooms, salt, and optional “beef” bouillon and bring it to a simmer.  Reduce the heat until it is just simmering and let it sit on the heat while you finish the sandwich.  Slice the portabellas into ¼” thick pieces.  Over a medium‐high heat, sauté them with the oil and salt until the mushrooms show brown sear  marks (about 5 minutes).  Remove the pan from the heat and immediately stir in the black pepper.  Slice the rolls open, creating a pocket, and stuff the rolls with the portabellas.  Pour the wild mushroom broth over the sandwiches (remove the rosemary sprig!) or serve it on the  side.                   

   
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |100

Low‐fat Version 
  Omit the olive oil in both sections of the recipe and sauté  in a dry pan.    Kitchen Equipment    Small Pot  Sauté Pan  Stirring Spoon  Measuring Cup  Measuring Spoon  Knife  Cutting Board    Presentation    The original way this sandwich was served is drowned in the sauce, which is how I prefer it. If you do  it that way, it is definitely a knife and fork sandwich. The more modern version is served with the  sauce on the side as a dipping sauce.    Time Management    The longer the dipping sauce (aka the jus) simmers, the better it gets, but you will need to replace  some of the water if you let it simmer for more than ten minutes.    Complementary Food and Drinks    Fries are the traditional accompaniment to this dish. Try some thyme and garlic fries for an elevated  side. The sandwich is also served with mustard at Phillipe The Original, one of the two restaurants  that claims to have invented the sandwich.    Where to Shop    All of these ingredients are fairly common. If you can get the dried mushrooms from a bulk bin, you  can save a decent amount of money. Approximate cost per serving is $3.00.    How It Works    It’s a fairly simple recipe. The portabellas serve as the “meat” of the sandwich, replacing the  traditional roast beef. I like to sear them to give them a heavier, deeper flavor. The broth gets its  flavor from shallots, which, like the mushrooms, are browned to deepen the flavor of the broth. The  rosemary creates a heady herbal aroma which naturally complements the mushrooms and dried  mushrooms are used to round out the broth. Plus, the rehydrated mushrooms are quite tasty when  added to the sandwich. 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |101

Chef’s Notes 
   Want to try a version that is out of this world? Use dried porcini instead of the dried wild mushroom  mix. You will never look back.    Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 244       Calories from Fat 72  Fat 9 g  Total Carbohydrates 35 g  Dietary Fiber 3 g  Sugars 3 g  Protein 8 g  Salt 781 mg    Interesting Facts    The French Dip sandwich was created in the early 1900s, most likely in 1908 at a Los Angeles  restaurant named Cole’s. Phillipe the Original also claims to have created the sandwich, but at a later  date in 1918.    

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |102

Lavash Pesto Sandwich
Type:   Sandwich      Serves: 2  Time to Prepare: 40 minutes     Ingredients  1 whole wheat flatbread (lavash bread)   ¼ cup of arugula pesto   7‐8 spears of lightly blanched asparagus   ¼ cup of Daiya mozzarella or other vegan cheese   6 pitted kalamata olives, sliced in half lengthwise   4‐6 heirloom cherry tomatoes, sliced into quarters     Instructions  Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.   Blanch the asparagus.   Spread the arugula pesto over the entire flatbread.    Place the asparagus with the spear tips sticking out over the bottom edge all in a row, so that every   bite will have some asparagus.   Quarter the heirloom cherry tomatoes and half the pitted kalamata olives and sprinkle them around  the bottom half of the sandwich where the asparagus is.   Sprinkle the bottom half of the sandwich with the vegan cheese.   Fold in half.   Place on a cookie sheet or baking stone and bake for 20 minutes.   Remove and cut in half.                                      

   
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

July 2013

Sandwiches |103

Low‐fat Version 
  The fat in this comes from the pesto. To reduce the fat content  in the pesto use water instead of oil to ease the blending.    

Raw Version 
  Use raw flatbread, and a raw vegan cheese. Do not bake, but  instead dehydrate on 105 for 2‐3 hours until slightly firmer.     Kitchen Equipment    Knife, cutting board, cookie sheet, pan for blanching the  asparagus    Time Management    While the oven is warming, blanch the asparagus and make the  pesto. When the oven has come to temperature, assemble the  sandwich.     Complementary Food and Drinks    A light side salad of arugula and a few more quartered heirloom tomatoes dressed in balsamic  vinegar and spicy olive oil, with salt and pepper would be simple and wonderful.     Where to Shop    I found premade vegan whole wheat lavash bread at Trader Joes. Make sure the asparagus has a full  body and looks crisp. Approximate cost per serving is $2.00.    How It Works    The mild flavor of the asparagus provides a wonderful contrast to the slight spiciness of the pesto and  the saltiness of the olives. The Daiya has some depth to it and its texture helps loosely bind the  ingredients in the sandwich. Thin lavash bread keeps the sandwich feeling light and fun.    Chef’s Notes     I made this sandwich after being inspired and furstated by an experience at a restaurant. My vegan  meal was horrible, while my mother‐in‐laws flatbread pizza looked wonderful. I feel that many main  stream restaurants really shortchange the vegan dishes. Instead of staying angry I just came up with  an even better version of my mother‐in‐laws pizza and made it for the family. It was a big hit!    
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

July 2013

Sandwiches |104

Nutrition Facts (per serving) 
  Calories 391       Calories from Fat 243  Fat 27 g  Total Carbohydrates 27 g  Dietary Fiber 5 g  Sugars 3 g  Protein 10 g  Salt 405 mg    Interesting Facts    Asparagus shows the age of the plant. Thick stems of comes from older plants, while young tender  stalks come from younger plants.     

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

July 2013

Sandwiches |105

Pan Bagnat with Chopped Chickpeas
Serves: 2      Time to Prepare: 10 minutes + 2 hours to sit    Ingredients  Salted Tomatoes  1 Roma tomato, deseeded and thinly sliced  ½ tsp. of salt (this will get brushed off the tomatoes)  Sliced Veggies  2 green onions, sliced  ½ of a small red bell pepper, sliced into thin strips  ¼ of a small bulb of fennel, sliced into thin strips  ½ of a small cucumber, thinly sliced  Chopped Chickpeas  1 ½ cups of cooked, rinsed chickpeas  1 tbsp. of nori seaweed, crushed into flakes  ¼ tsp. of salt  Tofu Scramble  4 oz. of firm tofu, scrambled  1/8 tsp. of salt, preferably Indian black salt  ¼ tsp. of turmeric  Dressing  ¼ cup of olive oil  1 tbsp. of Dijon mustard  Finishing Ingredients  8‐10 Nicoise black olives, pitted and cut in half (use whatever small black olives are on hand)  1 ½ tbsp. of capers  ½ tsp. of freshly ground black pepper  2 tbsp. of red wine vinegar  Bread  2 small rounds of country bread    Instructions  Cut the tomatoes in half, deseed them, and slice them into thin strips.  Toss them in the salt and place them in a colander for 30 minutes.  Brush the salt off of them and set them to the side.  Slice the green onions, bell pepper, fennel, and cucumber and set aside.  Chop the chickpeas and combine them with the seaweed and salt and set this aside.  Crumble the tofu with either your hand, combine it with the salt and turmeric, and set it aside.  Whisk together the olive oil and Dijon mustard.  Cut the bread in half and scoop out a shallow indentation in each half.  Place the tomatoes on the bread, then the fennel and cucumber, then the scramble, then the  chopped chickpeas, then the bell pepper, green onions, olives, capers, and black pepper, and pour  the dressing and vinegar on top.  Wrap each sandwich in plastic wrap, refrigerate, and let them sit for 2 hours. 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |106

Low‐fat Version 
  Omit the olive oil and add an extra tbsp. of  mustard.    Kitchen Equipment    Knife  Cutting Board  3 Small Mixing Bowls  Measuring Spoon  Measuring Cup  Whisk  Colander  Plastic Wrap    Presentation    This looks particularly nice on a piece of slate or a  dark plate. Also, give the sandwich a light smash so  that the ingredients get pressed together. It makes  it much easier to eat.    Time Management    Start with the tomato and while it is hanging out in  the colander, prep all the other ingredients. The sandwich will  come together quickly that way. I sometimes make these as  picnic sandwiches because they can sit while I am traveling to  the picnic site.     Complementary Food and Drinks    Serve this with a glass of sparkling water and finish it with a  lemon sorbet.        Where to Shop  You can pretty much find any of these ingredients at most  grocery stores, except for the bread and olives. Any sort of oil  cured black olive will do for this recipe and if you can’t find  any of those, go with some kalamatas. For the bread, you just  need a rustic loaf of round bread. Usually, a bakery will have  this and if they don’t, you can use any crusty, rustic bread you  can get your hands on. Don’t worry if it is not round. If it’s a long loaf, just cut it into about a 7” long  piece. Approximate cost per serving is $3.00.   
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |107

How It Works    This is basically a Nicoise salad in a sandwich. It’s got fennel for  brightness, cucumber to cool the salad, red pepper for  sweetness and a full mouth feel, and salted tomatoes. Salting  the tomatoes pulls out some of the water in them, condensing  their flavor. The traditional sandwich has tuna, anchovies, and  hardboiled eggs, so in our version, we use chopped chickpeas,  seaweed, and salt for the tuna, a tofu scramble for the  hardboiled eggs, and capers for the anchovies. The sandwich is  finished off with a liberal amount of dressing, which will soak  into the bread as it sits.    Chef’s Notes     This sandwich takes a bit of effort to make, but it’s all chopping  and slicing, and it is totally worth it. It feels refreshing and  satisfying at the same time, with shots of saltiness from the  capers and olives, sweetness from the tomatoes and bell  pepper, aromatic qualities from the fennel, acidity from the  mustard and vinegar, and lushness from the scramble, olive oil,  and soaked bread. Make an extra sandwich and have another  the next day!    Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 795       Calories from Fat 315  Fat 35 g  Total Carbohydrates 94 g  Dietary Fiber 17 g  Sugars 13 g  Protein 26 g  Salt 675 mg    Interesting Facts    Pan bagnat is a Provencal term for bathed bread.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |108

Po’ Boy
Serves: 2      Time to Prepare: 10 minutes    Ingredients  The Seitan            2 cups of seitan, sliced (if you don’t want to use seitan, you can use 2 large sliced portabellas)    Optional Bake and Simmer Method  Enough water to cover the seitan in a small baking dish  ¼ of an onion, chopped  1 stalk of celery, sliced  ½ of a green bell pepper, chopped  6 cloves of garlic  ½ tsp. of salt  ½ tsp. of black pepper  ½ tsp. of cayenne  ½ tsp. of dry mustard  The Gravy  ½ of a yellow onion, sliced            1 tsp. of vegan margarine or olive oil  1 tbsp. of flour  Water (about 1 cup) or the leftover flavoring liquid from the Bake and Simmer Method  ¼ tsp. of salt              ½ tsp. of freshly ground black pepper  1 tsp. of fresh thyme leaves                    Option:  2 tbsp. of red wine with the water or 1 tbsp. of “beef” bouillon   The Dressing and Fixings            1 cup of shredded lettuce  1 large tomato, sliced  Creole mustard (see Creole Mustard recipe on page 145)  Option:  ¼ cup of vegan mayo      The Bread  12” to 14” long loaf of French bread    Instructions  You can use the seitan as is or you can bake it to create a more authentic flavor using the following  instructions.  Combine all the ingredients from the Bake and Simmer Method in a small baking dish, along  with the seitan and enough water to cover it.  Give everything a stir, cover the dish, and bake it at 350 F for about 1 hour.  Remove the seitan from the liquid and veggies (save these for use in another recipe).  Slice a yellow onion as thin as you can get it.  Over a medium high heat, sauté the onion in the margarine until it heavily caramelizes.  Reduce the heat to medium and add the flour, stirring and cooking for about 2 minutes.  Add the water and stir until the flour thickens the water. 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |109

Add the salt, pepper, thyme, and optional ingredients, reduce the heat to medium low, and cook this  for about 5 minutes.  Shred the lettuce and slice the tomato.  Cut the French bread in half to make two sandwiches.  Cut it open enough to fold the bread open without slicing all the way through it.  Fill it with the seitan, vegan mayo, Creole mustard, and gravy, and top with the lettuce and tomato.  French fries are a popular addition to this sandwich.                                                                               
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |110

Kitchen Equipment    Cutting Board  Knife  Serrated Knife  Saute Pan  Measuring Cup  Measuring Spoon    Presentation    Serve this sandwich right away or else you will  end up with sandwich mush.    Time Management    If you just use straight seitan without baking it, this sandwich will come together quickly. Watch the  flour to make sure it doesn’t burn, but while the onions are cooking and the gravy is simmering, you  can get together all the other components.    If you don’t feel like making Creole mustard, feel free to substitute Dijon mustard.    Complementary Food and Drinks    Garlic and parsley French fries dressed with a touch of cayenne would be perfect for this sandwich.  Sometimes, French fries are even served inside the sandwich in some po’boy shops.    Where to Shop    Trader Joe’s Beefless Strips are perfect for this if you want to use store‐bought seitan. If you don’t  have access to that, any hearty seitan will do, especially if you can get it sliced thin. The crustier the  French bread, the better it will work for this sandwich. Approximate cost per serving is $3.50.    How It Works    A traditional po’boy uses a roast beef that is baked with all the ingredients from the Bake and Simmer  Method part of this recipe, so the seitan is almost a direct translation from the original. It infuses the  seitan with pungency, sweetness, and heat, creating an explosion of flavor in the sandwich. The gravy  is an easy onion gravy darkened by the heavy caramelization of the onion, which is where the gravy  gets most of its flavor. Flour is added after the onion cooks in order to toast. This flour in turn  thickens the liquid into a lightly viscous gravy. That lets it cling to the sandwich instead of just run all  over and soak the bread.        
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |111

 

Chef’s Notes 
   I always use the bake and simmer method for this sandwich. Even without it, the sandwich is good,  but with it, it’s spectacular.    Nutritional Facts (individual servings)    Calories 560       Calories from Fat 108  Fat 12 g  Total Carbohydrates 55 g  Dietary Fiber 6 g  Sugars 1 g  Protein 58 g  Salt 774 mg 

  Interesting Facts 
  A variation on the po’boy is the Vietnamese po’boy, created by New Orleans’ Vietnamese population. 

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |112

White Bean5RDVWHG5HG3HSSHUSub
Serves:       3 sandwiches    Time to Prepare: 45 minutes if making the bean balls from  scratch, or about 15 minutes if they are premade    Ingredients  White Bean Balls   One 15 oz. can of white beans, drained and rinsed           One 3 oz. package of sundried tomatoes   3‐4 green onions, finely minced               1 ½ teaspoons smoked paprika   1 ½ cup of old fashioned oatmeal, pulsed in a food processor       One 3 to 4 inch piece of rosemary, stem removed   8‐10 basil leaves                 Salt and pepper to taste  Red Pepper Sandwich Spread   2 large roasted red peppers               15 kalamata olives   10 green olives stuffed with garlic           2 tablespoons lemon juice   2 tablespoons cup white balsamic vinegar               3 tablespoons tomato paste  ½ cup chopped fire roasted tomatoes  1 small jar of capers, drained    1 tablespoon olive oil                2 cloves of garlic   ½ teaspoon pepper   Other Ingredients and Final Assembly            1 large tomato, cut into slices   1 cup of lettuce, cut into ribbons, or 1 cup of arugula            ¼ a small red onion, cut into slices   One batch of the White Bean Balls, divided 3 ways              One batch of the Red Pepper Sandwich Spread, divided 3 ways  1 baguette about 18” long, sliced open almost all the way through    Instructions  Making the White Bean Balls   In a food processor, quickly pulse the old fashioned oatmeal.   Add the drained rinsed white beans.   If not already done, finely chop the sundried tomatoes.   Remove the stem from the rosemary and mince the leaves.   Cut the basil leaves into ribbons.   Slice them all thinly, and add them to the bowl with a little salt and pepper.   Use your hands to mash everything together, adding ½ cup of the oatmeal at a time until you   get a tight patty that sticks to itself and not you.  
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

July 2013

Sandwiches |113

Taking small handfuls, shape into balls that are the size of walnuts.   Preheat your oven to 350 degrees.   Line a baking sheet and place the bean balls on the sheet, then bake for about 20‐30 minutes   until set.  Red Pepper Sandwich Spread   Place all ingredients in a blender and blend.   Final Assembly   Cut the baguette into half, length wise.    Hollow out a small amount of the bread.   Slice the tomatoes, ribbon the lettuce, and slice the red onion.   Prepare the white bean ball recipe and the red pepper spread recipe.   Place a row of the bean balls in the sub, then the other ingredients.   Pour at least 4 tablespoons of the red pepper spread over the sandwich.   Cut into 3 pieces and serve.     

                                                     
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

July 2013

Sandwiches |114

Low‐fat Version 
  Reduce the amount of olives by half and eliminate the  olive oil.     Kitchen Equipment    Blender, cookie sheet, oven, knife, cutting board,  measuring cups and spoons 

  Management 
  While the bean balls are baking, prepare the other ingredients.     Complementary Food and Drinks    Drinks that pair well with this sandwich are a cool glass of lemonade with mint and basil, or a nice red  wine.     Where to Shop    These ingredients should be available in any major supermarket.     Chef’s Notes     This is a nice, gourmet version of the classic vegan meatball sub that are often seen. This is quick and  appeals to the whole family.     Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories        Calories from Fat   Fat 9 g  Total Carbohydrates 101 g  Dietary Fiber 19 g  Sugars 17 g  Protein 27 g  Salt 733 mg    Interesting Facts    The bell pepper is a true member of the pepper family, and the only one to contain no trace of  capsicum, the compound that makes other peppers hot.    
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

July 2013

Sandwiches |115

Tartine d’Aubergine
Serves: 4    Time to Prepare: 45 minutes plus time to marinade the eggplant    Ingredients  1 medium sized eggplant, sliced and marinated (see marinade below)    ¼ cup of olive oil    ¼ cup of lemon juice    ¼ tsp. of salt    1 tbsp. of lavender  ¼ tsp. of freshly ground pepper    4 cloves of garlic, smashed  4 large slices of French bread  ½ tsp. of saffron  Olive oil for brushing the bread  4 thin slices of fennel  1 large heirloom tomato, sliced  ¼ cup of pitted Nicoise olives or almond stuffed green olives    Instructions  Slice the eggplant into 1” slabs.  Combine the olive oil, lemon juice, salt, lavender, pepper, and garlic.  Marinate the sliced eggplant in this mix for at least 6 hours, but preferably over night.  Slice the fennel and tomato thinly.  Grill the eggplant until it has black grill lines on both sides (this should only take a couple minutes per  side as the eggplant will already be soft form the marinade).  Option: Bake the eggplant on 425 degrees F for 30 minutes instead of grilling it.  Slice the French bread into thick slices just a bit longer and wider than the eggplant slices.  Brush it with the saffron and olive oil.  Toast this bread in the oven while the eggplant is baking until it is golden brown.  Top the bread with a slice of eggplant, slice of fennel, slice of tomato, and a few olives.  Option:  You can grill the eggplant and bread instead of baking them.                             
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |116

Low‐fat Version 
  Omit the olive oil from the marinade and use a  high quality white wine vinegar instead.    Kitchen Equipment    Bowl for the marinade  Measuring Cup  Measuring Spoon  Large Knife for the eggplant  Serrated Knife for the bread  Cutting Board  Grill or Oven  Metal Spatula or Baking Dish 

  Time Management 
  Set up the eggplant and marinade the night before you do this sandwich so it has plenty of time to  marinate.  If you don’t plan ahead for it that much, but still want to do it, bake the eggplant for  fifteen minutes in the marinade.    Complementary Food and Drinks    Serve this with a small salad dressed with the same type of olives you used for the sandwich, a few  sundried tomatoes, and a light touch of olive oil.    Where to Shop    When purchasing the eggplant, make sure the skin is firm, not wrinkled.  The fennel should have a  bright color to it and no browning at the base.  The lavender can be found at World Market, Sprouts,  at your local spice store, and occasionally in the spice section of your local market.  For the olives, go  to a store with an olive bar for the best price.  Price per serving is approximately $1.50.    How It Works    Marinating the eggplant softens it and infuses it with all of the marinade flavors.  The olive oil makes  it rich, the lemon juice adds tartness and the acidity of it helps the marinade flavors penetrate the  eggplant, the lavender gives a bright floral aroma to the eggplant, and the salt brings out all the  flavors.  The eggplant is finished off on the grill for a subtle smoky effect. Fennel is added for a strong  aromatic flavor and is sliced thinly so it does not texturally interfere with the eggplant.  The tomato  lends a slightly sweet, acidic flavor while the olives balance everything with a shot of saltiness.  The  bread is brushed with oil and saffron so it toasts properly and takes on a light saffron color.   
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |117

Chef’s Notes 
   I was incredibly surprised at how well the lavender worked with sandwich and how much the  marinade softened the eggplant.  It was so soft, I even considered not cooking it.    Nutritional Facts (per serving)    Calories 221       Calories from Fat 81  Fat 9 g  Total Carbohydrates 30 g  Dietary Fiber 6 g  Sugars 5 g  Protein 5 g  Salt 373 mg    Interesting Facts    A tartine is an open faced sandwich. 

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |118

Tempeh Morel Meatball Sub in Sundried Tomato Sauce
Serves: 2 big sandwiches    Time to Prepare: 1 hour (includes time to bake the meatballs)    Ingredients  The Meatballs  12 oz. of tempeh, ground  ¼ cup of dried morels, rehydrated (save the rehydrating liquid)  6 cloves of garlic, minced  1 tbsp. of minced fresh flat leaf parsley  1 cup of cubed bread  ½ tsp. of salt  2 tsp. of olive oil  The Sauce  ½ of a yellow onion, diced  4 Roma tomatoes, chopped  2 Roma tomatoes and ¼ cup of sundried tomatoes, pureed  2 tsp. of olive oil  ¼ tsp. of salt  1 tbsp. of capers  The Bread and Toppings    2 long sandwich rolls, cut open to create a pocket    2 tbsp. of smashed pine nuts  Option: 3 tbsp. of vegan pesto spread on the bread    Instructions  Rehydrate the morels in warm water.  Pulse the tempeh in a food processor until it falls apart into small pieces.  Add the morels and pulse a few more times.  Transfer this to a mixing bowl.  Mince the garlic and parsley and transfer these to the mixing bowl.  Cube the bread and place it in a separate mixing bowl.  Moisten it with the morel‐infused rehydrating water and smash the bread.  Add the bread, salt, and olive oil to the tempeh bowl and mix everything by hand.  Form into meatballs.  Lightly oil a cupcake or muffin tin and place one meatball in each.  Bake them at 350 degrees F for 30 minutes.  Dice the onion and chop the tomatoes.  Puree the 2 Romas with the sundried tomatoes.  Over a medium heat, sauté the onion in the oil until it browns.  Add the chopped tomatoes and salt and continue sautéing until the tomatoes are soft.  Add the sundried tomato sauce and capers and stir.  Immediately add the tempeh morel meatballs and cook one more minute.  Open the sandwich rolls.  Smash the pine nuts and fill each roll with the meatball tomato mix and top with smashed pine nuts. 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |119

Low‐fat Version 
  Omit the oil from the meatballs and sauté the onion in a  dry pan instead of using the oil.    Kitchen Equipment    2 Mixing Bowls  Muffin or Cupcake Tin  Food Processor  Knife  Cutting Board  Sauté Pan  Stirring Spoon  Measuring Cup  Measuring Spoon    Presentation    It may be fancy, elevated version of a meatball sub, but I serve this just like bar food in a basket!    Time Management    Start the meatballs, then make the sauce while they are baking. The meatballs freeze very well, so  feel free to make a double or triple batch of them.     Complementary Food and Drinks    Serve this with a shaved fennel and olive salad.    Where to Shop    You may need to head to a gourmet store or a place like Whole Foods to get dried morels. If you can’t  find them, try chopped shiitakes instead. All of the other ingredients are fairly common. Approximate  cost per serving is $4.00.    How It Works    Tempeh, when pulsed, breaks up into crumbles that are the perfect size for meatballs. The morels  give the meatballs a very earthy, hearty taste. The bread is moistened with the rehydrating water to  impart even more of a morel taste and it is smashed and mixed with the crumbles to act as a binding  agent. Oil is used to give them a smooth mouth feel and they are baked to tighten them up. I like the  muffin tins because it keeps the meatballs separate and helps them retain their shape.   
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |120

The sauce is a standard tomato sauce, except that it has a sundried tomato puree added to it. I blend  the sundried tomatoes with Romas because the Romas have enough natural moisture to allow the  sundried tomatoes to turn into a puree. Otherwise, you would have to use water, which would dilute  some of the flavor.    Finally, the pine nuts are smashed so that they can serve as a tasty substitute for parmesan cheese.    Chef’s Notes     I’m a sucker for a meatball sub. I usually end up making a double batch of the meatballs for this  recipe, so I can have a second sandwich later, but to be honest, I usually end up eating all the  meatballs right away.    Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 955       Calories from Fat 351  Fat 39 g  Total Carbohydrates 106 g  Dietary Fiber 21 g  Sugars 10 g  Protein 45 g  Salt 983 mg    Interesting Facts    Because morels vary greatly in appearance, the type of morel can be hard to identify in the wild.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |121

Tofu Steak Sandwich
Serves: 2      Time to Prepare: 10 minutes + 6 hours to marinate the tofu    Ingredients  8 oz. of super firm tofu, sliced into ½” slabs  2 parts soy sauce  1 part rice vinegar  ½ of a yellow onion, sliced into thin strips  4 Roma tomatoes, chopped  2 tsp. of olive oil  Water  1/8 tsp. of salt  2 panini rolls  Sriracha to taste    Instructions  Slice the tofu into ½” slabs.  Marinate them in 2 parts soy sauce and 1 part rice vinegar, using just enough liquid to cover the tofu  slabs (this will vary based on the shape of the bowl in which you marinate them, which is why no  precise measurements are given for the marinade) for at least 2 hours, but preferably 6.  When they are done marinating, pat them dry, but don’t press them.  Slice the onion and chop the tomatoes.  Over a medium high heat, sauté the onion in the oil until they are heavily browned.  Add a splash of water to the pan, stir quickly, and let the water evaporate.  Add the tomatoes and salt to the pan and sauté everything for about 3 minutes.  Remove all this from the pan and set it aside, then return the pan to the burner.  Over a medium high heat, in the same pan in which you just sautéed the veggies, add the tofu slabs.  Sauté each side of the tofu slab for about 2 minutes, gently flipping it over with a spatula.  Remove them and set them aside.  Cut the panini rolls in half and toast the cut sides in the same sauté pan for about 30 seconds.  Spread sriracha on the bottom halves of the rolls, then add the tofu, and then the tomato and onion  mixture, top it with the other half of the roll, and serve.                          
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |122

Low‐fat Version 
  Omit the oil when sautéing the onions, sautéing in a dry pan  instead. Everything else works the same, though I would  reduce the heat to medium when cooking the tofu.    Kitchen Equipment    Bowl for marinating the tofu  Knife  Cutting Board  Sauté Pan  Spatula  Stirring Spoon  Plate to hold ingredients when you set them aside    Presentation    You can finish the sandwich off in a panini press if you want to create a denser bread and nice black  lines on it, but I usually just want to dig into the sandwich.    Time Management    Be vigilant once you get the tofu into the pan. There will be some residual tomato bits on the pan and  they may burn if you let them sit too long, which in turn will burn them onto your tofu. If you see  them start to blacken, add a splash of water to the pan.     If you are not in the mood to wait to marinate the tofu, you can easily make this sandwich without  the marinating process. Add in 2 tbsp. of soy sauce when you add in your splash of water on the  onions. It won’t be quite as good, but you also don’t have to wait six hours for the marinade to work.    Complementary Food and Drinks    This goes incredibly well with an avocado mango salad.    Where to Shop    Super firm tofu is an incredibly dense tofu, much more so than extra firm. That’s why it makes such a  good sandwich ingredient. I typically get mine at Trader Joe’s, along with the panini rolls (which are  really just a fluffy torpedo‐shaped bread), but you can get the tofu at places like Sprouts and Whole  Foods, as well. If you can’t find a panini roll, don’t worry. You can substitute just about any long  sandwich roll for it. Approximate cost per serving is $3.25.     
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |123

 

How It Works 
  The marinade uses soy sauce for a salty dark flavor, giving the tofu a meatier taste while the rice  vinegar not only gives a pop to the flavor of the tofu, but uses its acidity to help the marinade works  its way into the dense patty. The onions are sautéed over a medium high heat so that they quickly  caramelize and then a splash of water is added to pick up all the caramelization from the pan, turn it  into a sauce, which then recoats the onions before the water evaporates. The tofu is sautéed in the  same pan so that it can pick up the residual flavor from the onion and tomatoes.    Chef’s Notes     This sandwich is based on one of the first vegan sandwiches I ever had at a place in Tempe, AZ called  Plaid Eatery. It’s simple, filling, and all the flavors work together to make it an extremely satisfying  meal.    Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 413       Calories from Fat 117  Fat 13 g  Total Carbohydrates 54 g  Dietary Fiber 6 g  Sugars 6 g  Protein 20 g  Salt 505 mg    Interesting Facts    The most widely accepted origin story of tofu was that it was first created in 146 BCE by Liu An of the  Han Dynasty.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |124

Apple Pie Panini
Serves: 4     Time to Prepare: About 30 minutes for all elements    Ingredients  Ginger Pecan Butter    4 oz. of pecans, unsalted and roasted    1 ½ tbsp. of oil    2 tbsp. of minced fresh ginger    ½ tsp. of salt    3 tbsp. of candied ginger  Apple Pie Filling   2 large granny smith sliced and cored   1/3 cup of granulated sugar   2 tablespoons of cornstarch   ¼ teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg   ¼ teaspoon allspice   ¼ teaspoon cinnamon   1/8 teaspoon salt   1 ¼ cups water   The Final Sandwich   4 panini wheat rolls   1 recipe of Ginger Pecan Butter  ¼ cup of Apple Pie Filling  1 medium apple, cored and sliced thin     Instructions  Making the Ginger Pecan Butter   Method 1: Place all ingredients in a food processor and process on a low setting for 5‐10  minutes, until the mixture comes together in a ball.   Method 2: If you have a powerful blender, process slowly using your tamper if available for 5‐ 10 minutes until the mixture is smooth.   Making the Apple Pie Filling   Add all ingredients to a pot and stir so thoroughly combined.   Place over medium heat and bring to a simmer.   Reduce heat to medium low and simmer for an additional 10 minutes, until the apples are  slightly tender.  Remove from heat, and use for the sandwiches.   Any excess allow to cool, and place in an airtight container.   Finishing the Sandwich   Cut the roll in half.   Spread both sides with the ginger pecan butter.   Add ¼ cup of the apple pie filling.   Top with the fresh apple.   Heat a skillet over medium heat.  
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

July 2013

Sandwiches |125

Using a sandwich press, press your sandwich and cook it approximately 5‐8 minutes on each  side until the bread is toasted.   Remove from heat and allow it to cool slightly before cutting.                                                                                       
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

July 2013

Sandwiches |126

Low‐fat Version 
  Add just a little bit of water instead of the oil to the pecan  butter. You will need to use this nut butter immediately.  

  Kitchen Equipment 
  Blender or food processor, knife, cutting board, measuring  cups and spoons, Panini press, pot, and spatula 

  Time Management 
  Start the apples cooking, then make your nut butter. By the time they are both done, start the Panini  press heating while you split the sandwich bread.      Complementary Food and Drinks    I think my favorite drink with this is a cool almond milk latte, because the slight bitterness of the  coffee and nuttiness of the almond milk pair well.     Where to Shop    These ingredients should be at most major grocery stores and the panini rolls are at Trader Joes.    How It Works    By slowly grinding the nuts you release their natural oils which creates the creaminess of the nut  butter. The hot Panini press melts everything together, and toasts the bread for extra depth of flavor.     Chef’s Notes     For the ginger pecan butter what you need for this recipe is patience. If you don’t have it, you can  burn out your appliance. It has happened to friends. Also, understand this will not produce the  smooth, creamy, processed nut butter from the store, but that is a good thing!    Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 468       Calories from Fat 144  Fat 16 g  Total Carbohydrates 74 g  Dietary Fiber 7 g  Sugars 36 g  Protein 7 g  Salt 607 mg 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

July 2013

Sandwiches |127

Interesting Facts 
  We think apple pie is American, but the recipe dates back to the 14th century!  

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

July 2013

Sandwiches |128

Chocolate Marzipan Mini-cookie Sandwiches
Serves: about 50 mini‐cookie sandwiches    Time to Prepare: 30 minutes + time for the cookie  sandwiches to cool    Ingredients  Cookies  1 cup semisweet vegan chocolate chips  ¾ cup non‐hydrogenated vegan butter  2/3 cup sugar  2 tablespoons nondairy milk  2 cups all purpose flour  ¾ teaspoon baking soda  Filling  ¼ cup almond paste  ¼ cup non‐hydrogenated vegan butter  ¼ cup powdered sugar    Instructions  Preheat oven to 350 degrees F and oil cookie sheets, using insulated sheets if possible or lining  standard sheets with parchment before oiling  Melt the chocolate and butter together.  Stir in the sugar and milk.  Combine the flour, sugar and baking soda in a large bowl.  Add the chocolate mixture to the flour mixture.  Use a teaspoon measuring spoon as a scoop.  Scoop out teaspoons of the mixture and place flat side down on the baking sheet.  Bake for 7‐8 minutes (cookies will not be firm, but will puff up while baking and settle after cooling).  Let the cookies cool on the baking sheets.  To make the filling, beat together all the ingredients.  Keep the filling refrigerated until ready to use.  Fill the cookies, using the tops as the outsides of the sandwiches.  Filled cookies are best kept in a sealed container in the refrigerator.   

                 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe Sharon Valencik * www.sweetutopia.com

July 2013

Sandwiches |129

 

Chef’s Notes 
   These simple cookies are chewy and chocolaty, and the filling  gives them a sophisticated almond flair.     Nutrition Facts (per cookie)    Calories 93       Calories from Fat 45  Fat 5 g  Total Carbohydrates 11 g  Dietary Fiber 1 g  Sugars 6 g  Protein 1 g  Salt 37 mg         

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe Sharon Valencik * www.sweetutopia.com

July 2013

Sandwiches |130

Arugula Pesto
Type:   Sauce      Serves: Makes 2 cups  Time to Prepare: 5‐10 minutes     Ingredients  3‐4 cloves of garlic  1 bag of arugula, about 6‐8 oz or 6‐8 loose cups of arugula   4 oz. or 3‐4 loosely packed cups of basil  1 cup of walnuts   2‐4 tablespoons of olive oil   ½ cup fresh lemon juice   1 teaspoon salt   1 teaspoon freshly ground pepper  More water as needed to blend     Instructions  Place all ingredients in blender, process until smooth, adding more water as needed.                                       

                 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

July 2013

Sandwiches |131

Low‐fat Version 
  The fat in this comes from the olive oil and walnuts. To reduce the fat content replace the olive oil  with water.     Kitchen Equipment    Measuring Cup  Measuring Spoon  Blender    Presentation    Not applicable.    Complementary Food and Drinks    This is lovely on spaghetti squash, in sandwiches, or on other pasta. I love to pair it with fresh  tomatoes and olives.     Where to Shop    You should be able to find these ingredients at any major grocery store, but I often get these  ingredients at Trader Joes since they have the best prices on these items in my area.     How It Works    The oil and water emulsify creating a lovely creaminess to the pesto. This also helps smooth out some  of the bitterness from the arugula. Baby arugula works best because it is light on the bitterness.    Chef’s Notes     This was a happy accident recipe. I wanted something special about the pesto for my latest sandwich  and then I spotted the arugula. Pairing it with the basil gives the sandwich a wonderful flavor!      Nutrition Facts (per half‐cup)    Calories 455       Calories from Fat 387  Fat 43 g  Total Carbohydrates 10 g  Dietary Fiber 4 g  Sugars 2 g  Protein 7 g  Salt 581 mg 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

July 2013

Sandwiches |132

 

Interesting Facts 
  Arugula cultivation dates back to Rome, and people of this area believed it was an aphrodisiac.    

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

July 2013

Sandwiches |133

Coconut Bacon
Serves: 4        Time to Prepare: 8 hours    Ingredients  2 cups coconut meat (from 3 to 4 Thai baby coconuts)  3 tablespoons nama shoyu or Bragg Liquid Aminos  2 tablespoons olive oil  A few drops of liquid smoke flavoring (optional)    Instructions  When scraping the meat out of your coconuts, try to keep pieces as large as possible.   Clean the meat by running your fingers over its surface, picking off any pieces of hard husk.   Rinse with filtered water as a last step, and drain well.  Place the coconut meat in a mixing bowl and add the remaining ingredients.   Toss to mix well.   Lay the meat in a single layer on two 14‐inch square Excalibur Dehydrator trays.  Dehydrate for 6 to 8 hours at 104°F.   The length of time will depend on how thick your coconut meat is.   Check it and dry it to your liking.   Don’t overdehydrate, because the more you dry it, the more it will shrink, and you’ll be left with only  a small amount of bacon.  Options: Replace the smoke flavor with herbs and spices to make different flavors. Try chipotle  powder, garlic, dill, or oregano.    Chef’s Notes     Thai baby coconut is a favorite raw food for its electrolyte‐rich living water. Plus, the inside of each  coconut is lined with the coconut meat used to make this recipe. The thickness of each coconut’s  meat varies from thinner, more translucent in color, and gelatinous in consistency to harder, whiter,  and thicker—sometimes up to ¼‐inch thick. The thicker meats make for better bacon, only because it  shrinks a lot during dehydration. Adding a few drops of liquid smoke will give your bacon a barbecue  flavor.    Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 307       Calories from Fat 279  Fat 31 g  Total Carbohydrates 6 g  Dietary Fiber 4 g  Sugars 3 g  Protein 1 g  Salt 433 mg   
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Ani Phyo * www.aniphyo.com

July 2013

Sandwiches |134

Roasted Garlic Sauce
Serves: Makes ½ cup      Time to Prepare: 15 minute    Ingredients  20 cloves of garlic, pan roasted  ½ tsp. of salt  ½ cup of white vinegar  1 tsp. of olive oil    To make this into a hot sauce, add 10‐12 chiles tepin or 15 chiles de arbol.  To make this into a creamy garlic sauce, add ¼ cup of vegan mayo or silken tofu.    Instructions  Bring a dry pan (preferably a cast iron skillet) to a medium heat.  Add 20 whole garlic cloves (ideally with the paper still on them).  Keep them on the heat, flipping them every couple of minutes, until the paper on the outer curve  blackens.  If you are using already peeled garlic, let it go a dark brown, but not completely black.  Let them garlic cool and peel it.  Puree all the ingredients.                                     

           
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |135

Low‐fat Version 
  Omit the oil.   

Raw Version 
  You can make a raw version using raw apple cider vinegar. Let this sit for at least a day for the vinegar  to meld with the garlic.    Kitchen Equipment    Cast Iron Skillet  Tongs  Measuring Cup  Measuring Spoon  Blender    Time Management    Pay particular attention to the garlic after about 5 minutes to make sure that the garlic doesn’t burn.  It is ok for the paper to blacken, but if the garlic starts to harden, get it out of the pan immediately.     Complementary Food and Drinks    This is meant to be used with Mexican sandwiches.    Where to Shop    All of these ingredients are fairly common, but keep in mind that the vinegar is a huge part of the  recipe and the quality of it will directly impact the sauce’s flavor.    How It Works    The garlic is pan roasted because that creates a flavor profile with elements of both oven‐roasted  garlic and sautéed garlic. White vinegar is used for its pure taste and because the sauce is meant to  lend acidity to a sandwich. A touch of oil helps smooth out the flavor.s    Chef’s Notes     I originally created the hot sauce version of this for a taco, but it was so good, I realized I could turn  this into a straight garlic sauce to use on sandwiches.    Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 132 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |136

     Calories from Fat 36  Fat 4 g  Total Carbohydrates 20 g  Dietary Fiber 1 g  Sugars 1 g  Protein 4 g  Salt 1165 mg    Interesting Facts    Many white vinegars are produced from a base ingredient other than grapes, even though the word  vinegar is derived from the word for wine (“vin”).   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |137

Ketchup
There are several ketchups you can make at  some variations you can play with to use for  home. Considering that many commercial  your sandwiches and burgers. The basic one is  ketchups use corn syrup or a host of  an upscale, healthier version of Heinz while  preservatives, making your own ketchup is a  the other ones each have a taste of ketchup as  great way to make a clean product. Plus, you  the base, but with a bunch of other flavors  that transform them into their own unique  can do some interesting things with it and it  tastes great! Below is a basic ketchup and  version.     Basic Ketchup  2 pounds of sweet tomatoes, like cherry tomatoes, chopped  ¼ cup of white vinegar  1 onion, minced  4 cloves of garlic, minced  ¼ cup of brown sugar  1 tsp. of salt  Pinch of allspice (about 1/8 tsp.)    Chop the tomatoes and mince the onion and garlic. Over a medium heat, sauté the onion in a dry pan  until it softens, but not to the point where it browns. Add the garlic and sauté 2 more minutes. Add  the remainder of the ingredients and turn the heat to medium‐low. Cook this for about 4 hours,  letting it reduce until you have about 1 ½ to 2 cups of condensed tomatoes. Let this cool and puree it.    Quick Ketchup  1 cup of tomato paste  ¼ cup of water  3 tbsp. of apple cider vinegar  1 ½ tbsp. of agave  ½ tsp. of salt  ½ tsp. of onion powder  ¼ tsp. of garlic powder    Combine all the ingredients until smooth.    Roasted Tomato Ketchup  8‐10 large tomatoes, roasted  3 lemons, roasted  1 whole onion, roasted  8 whole cloves of garlic, roasted  2 tbsp. of olive oil  ¼ cup of tomato paste  2 tbsp. of molasses 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipes by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |138

1 tsp. of salt    Toss the tomatoes, lemons, onion, and garlic in the oil. Make sure to keep all of these ingredients  whole. Place them in a baking dish and cover it with foil. Roast the veggies on 450 F for 25 minutes,  removing the garlic after about 20 minutes. Juice the roasted lemons. Puree the roasted lemon juice  with all the other ingredients.   

Curry Ketchup 
1 cup of the Quick Ketchup  2 tbsp. of yellow curry powder  Option: 2 tsp. of cumin seeds, toasted    Combine the ketchup with the curry powder and let it sit for about 20 minutes before serving it to let  all the flavors meld. If you want a deeper flavor, toast the cumin seeds and then grind them, adding  the toasted cumin powder when you add the curry powder.   

Sundried Tomato Ketchup 
3 Roma tomatoes, chopped   1 ½ cups of sundried tomatoes  2 cloves of garlic  ¼ cup of balsamic vinegar  ½ tsp. of salt  ¾ tsp. of black pepper    Chop the tomatoes. Cook them down in a pot over a medium heat, until they are completely soft.  Puree all the ingredients.    Salty and Spicy Ketchup  ½ cup of tomato paste  2 tbsp. of maple syrup  3 tbsp. of soy sauce  2 tbsp. of Louisiana hot sauce    Combine all the ingredients. This is ready to serve right away.    

Green Tomato Ketchup 
2 pounds of green tomatoes, chopped  1 onion, minced  3 tbsp. of agave syrup  ¼ cup of apple cider vinegar  1 tsp. of salt  2 tbsp. of coriander seeds, toasted  1 tsp. of brown mustard seeds, toasted   
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipes by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |139

Chop the tomatoes and mince the onion. Over a medium heat, cook the tomatoes and onion  together in a pot until they are completely soft, then keep cooking them until the tomatoes reduced  to about half their original volume. Toast the coriander seeds in a dry pan over a medium heat until  they pop. Repeat this with the mustard seeds (this will happen very quickly). Grind the coriander and  mustard into a powder. Puree all the ingredients for the ketchup until you have a smooth sauce.              

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipes by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |140

Mayo, Aioli, and More
  Making your own mayo is easy, even coming  close to duplicating the best commercial  brands. If you want convenience, by all means  use a commercial vegan brand of mayo, but if  you want more control of the ingredients for    health reasons, or you simply want to have an  interesting homemade may, the following  recipes are perfect for you. Refrigerated and  jarred, most of these mayos should last about  a month.

Basic Mayo 
1 cup of plain unsweetened soymilk  2 ¼ cups of canola or peanut oil (use olive oil for an Italian version of Mayo)  Juice of 1 lemon  ½ tsp. of apple cider vinegar  ½ tsp. of agave   1 tsp. of salt  ¼ tsp. of mustard powder    Blend this at a high speed until everything emulsifies. Jar it and store in your refrigerator for up to a  month.   

Basic Healthier Mayo 
8 oz. package of firm silken tofu  1 tsp. of apple cider vinegar  1 tsp. of agave  ¼ tsp. of salt  ¼ tsp. of mustard powder    Puree until smooth.    Aioli  Juice of 2 lemons  3 cloves of garlic  ¾ cup of vegan mayo  ¾ tsp. of salt    Juice the lemons. Puree all the ingredients, making sure that you put the garlic in the blender first.  Option: Instead of pureeing everything, bash the garlic with a mortar and pestle and mix by hand for  a more complex layer of flavor.    Raw Nut‐based Aioli – recipe by Ani Phyo  This creamy, rich, smooth mayonnaise with a garlic kick can be used in sandwiches, burgers, and  wraps—you won’t even miss the version full of animal products!   
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipes by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |141

1 cup macadamia, cashew, and/or pine nuts  ¾ cup filtered water, or as needed  1 teaspoon minced garlic, or to taste  ½ teaspoon sea salt    Blend all the ingredients into a smooth mayonnaise, adding more water as needed to produce your  desired consistency.Store for 4 to 5 days in a tightly lidded glass jar in the fridge.   

Chipotle Mayo 
¾ cup of mayo  1 chipotle in adobo   1 tsp. of the adobo sauce  ¼ tsp. of salt  Option: ½ tsp. of agave for a hot and sweet effect    Puree all the ingredients.   

Salted Lime Mayo 
Zest of 2 limes  Juice of 1 lime  ¾ cup of mayo  ½ tsp. of large grain flakey sea salt    Zest the limes and juice one of them. By hand, thoroughly combine all the ingredients. This should be  done by hand and not in the blender to keep the sea salt grains intact.   

Lemon Tarragon Mayo 
Zest of 1 large lemon  Juice of 1 large lemon  1 tbsp. of minced fresh tarragon  1 ½ tsp. of poppy seeds    Combine all the ingredients by hand.   

Roasted Garlic Mayo 
8 cloves of roasted garlic  ¾ cup of mayo  ¼ tsp. of salt    Either toss the cloves in olive oil and a pinch of salt and roast them in a covered dish at 400 F for 20  minutes or roast the cloves in a dry pan over a medium heat until they paper blackens, then peel  them. Puree the garlic, mayo, and salt.        
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipes by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |142

Mustards
In England, which was famous for its mustard  during the Medieval period, mustard seed  would be ground and mixed with flour, salt,  and cinnamon. It would then be slightly  moistened, formed into balls, and stored for  later use. Mix the mustard ball with water and  you had mustard sauce. Fortunately, mustard  making has come a long way!    Mustards get better as they sit. It lets the  acidity in the mustard pull all the flavors  together and creates more complexity in the    sauce. Because all of these are very acidic, they  will keep for at least six months if you jar them  and refrigerate them. Also, mustard seeds are  bitter when first ground, but will mellow out  over the course of several days.    You can easily buy some of these mustards in a  store, but I think they are fun and easy to  make and you can create some interesting  flavors by playing around with the ingredients  in your homemade version.   

Classic Yellow Mustard 
½ cup of yellow mustard seeds  1 tsp. of flour  ½ tsp. of salt  ¼ cup of water  3 tbsp. of white vinegar    Grind the mustard seeds in a blender or spice grinder until you have ¼ cup of mustard powder.  Combine the mustard powder, flour, and salt together. Whisk in the water and vinegar until the  mixture is smooth. Over a medium heat in a small pot, bring the mustard to a simmer. Once it is  simmering, simmer it for 5 minutes. Remove it from the heat, let it stop simmering, then cover the  pot with a lid until the mustard completely cools. Option: If you want this to turn a very yellow color,  add in about 1/8 tsp. of turmeric.   

Brown Mustard 
½ cup + 2 tbsp. of brown mustard seeds  ¼ tsp. of ground cinnamon  ¼ tsp. of ground nutmeg  ½ tsp. of salt  Just under ½ cup of apple cider vinegar  2 tbsp. of agave    Over a medium heat, toast the seeds until they start to pop. Remove them from the heat and reserve  2 tbsp. of seeds. Grind the remaining seeds into mustard powder. Combine this with the cinnamon,  nutmeg, and salt. Combine this with the vinegar and agave. Jar this and let it sit in the refrigerator at  least one day, but preferably two before using. This is because the brown mustard seeds are a bit  bitter and this gives them time to mellow out.     
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipes by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |143

Dijon Mustard 
½ of a white onion, chopped  2 cloves of garlic, sliced (not minced)  1 cup of dry white wine  1 cup of yellow mustard seeds  1 ½ tbsp. of agave  2 tsp. of olive oil  ¾ tsp. of salt    Chop the onion and slice the garlic. Bring the wine to a simmer and add the onion and garlic. Simmer  these for 5‐7 minutes until they are soft. Place a fine mesh colander over a cup to catch the liquid and  pour this through the colander into the cup. Discard the onion and garlic. Grind the seeds into  powder. Combine the onion and garlic flavored wine, agave, oil, and salt with the mustard powder.  Jar this and refrigerate it. It needs to age for about four weeks before it is ready to use.   

Chinese Hot Mustard 
½ cup of yellow mustard seeds  1 tsp. of wasabi or horseradish powder  ½ tsp. of salt  ¼ cup of boiling water  1 tbsp. of peanut oil    Grind the mustard seeds until you have a powder and place it in a small mixing bowl along with the  wasabi or horseradish powder and salt. Bring the water to a boil and pour it over the mustard  powder. Quickly add the oil and whisk until smooth.   

Spicy Beer Mustard 
1 cup of stout beer  ¼ cup of brown sugar  ¼ cup of yellow mustard seeds  ¼ cup +1 tbsp. of brown mustard seeds  ½ cup of apple cider vinegar  1 tsp. of salt  Pinch of allspice    Bring the beer and sugar to a low simmer and stir until the sugar is melted. Combine all the  ingredients in a jar and refrigerate them for at least 12 hours. Once this is done, puree all the  ingredients into a smooth sauce.   

Agave Mustard 
2 tbsp. of brown mustard  2 tbsp. of Dijon mustard  2 tbsp. of agave syrup  ¼ tsp. of salt  Option: 1 tbsp. of vegan mayo if you want sweet creamy mustard 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipes by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |144

  Combine all the ingredients.   

Whiskey Mustard 
¼ cup of brown mustard  2 tsp. of whiskey  ¼ tsp. of salt    Whisk all the ingredients together and save some whiskey on the side for yourself.   

Smokey Pub Mustard 
1 clove of garlic, minced  ¼ cup of Classic Yellow Mustard  2 tbsp. of nutbrown ale  ½ tsp. of hickory smoked salt    Mince the garlic. Combine all the ingredients and let them sit for about 5 minutes before serving.    Creole Mustard  1 cup of dry white wine            1 clove of garlic, minced  1 tsp. of celery seeds            1 tsp. of allspice or allspice berries  ½ tsp. of salt               ¼ tsp. of cloves or 3 whole cloves  1/8 tsp. of freshly grated nutmeg        1 cup of yellow mustard seeds  4 tbsp. of vinegar (malt vinegar preferred)    Grind the celery seeds and any whole cloves and allspice.  In the wine, simmer the garlic, celery  seeds, allspice, salt, and cloves for about 10 minutes.  Remove from the heat and allow it to sit for at  least 30 minutes, but preferably 2 hours. While it is sitting, toast the mustard seeds over a medium  heat until they pop.  Grind these.  Add this mix to the wine reduction along with the vinegar. 

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipes by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |145

Bean Spreads
Bean spreads are perfect for sandwiches,  especially ones that need a protein boost. My  go to spread is hummus, but if I’m making an  Italian sandwich, I usually use the White Bean    Spread and the Mexican Black Bean sauce will  go with just about any torta you feel like  making. 

Hummus 
2 cloves of garlic, peeled  1 ½ cups of cooked rinsed chickpeas  Juice of 1 lemon  2 tbsp. of tahini  ½ tsp. of salt  Water as needed    Puree all the ingredients. Once you have them pureed, slowly add water 1 tbsp. at a time and blend  until you get the texture you desire. You may need to do this when you first start pureeing the  ingredients if you don’t have a powerful blender.   

White Bean Spread 
3 cloves of garlic, peeled  1 ½ cups of cooked rinsed cannellini beans  Juice of 1 lemon  3‐4 tbsp. of olive oil  ½ tsp. of salt  1 tsp. of fresh thyme  ½ tsp. of black pepper    Puree all the ingredients.   

Mexican Black Bean Sauce 
3 cloves of garlic, minced  1 chipotle in adobo, diced  1 tbsp. of adobo sauce  1 ½ cups of black beans with liquid  ½ tsp. of salt  1 tsp. of ground cumin  1 tsp. of Mexican oregano    Mince the garlic and dice the chipotle. Add all the ingredients to a pan and simmer for about 6‐7  minutes. Using a potato masher, smash the beans until you have a rough textured sauce.       
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |146

Breads
What’s a sandwich without bread? Gluten‐ free, probably! A sandwich bread should be  soft enough that the sandwich is easy to bite  down upon without pressing out the  ingredients. It should have a light crust and big  enough to hold all the ingredients in the  sandwich without turning the sandwich into a  big ball of bread. Each bread has its own  purpose, though if I don’t have the perfect  bread, I don’t let that stop me. Sourdoughs are  good when you have strong, bold ingredients.  Torpedo‐shaped rolls are good when you need  to close in big saucy ingredients, like  “meatballs.” Ciabatta bread is great when you  want a bit of chew to the sandwich to make it  hearty and French and Italian rolls are great for  subs and travel sandwiches. To be fair, I  purchase my bread most of the time, although  I do try to get the freshest bread possible and  avoid breads with a bunch of ingredients and  conditioners. I would rather eat something  else than a heavily doctored bread designed to  last on a store shelf more than being designed  to taste good. Sometimes, however, I get the  urge to make my own bread, whether that’s in  my indoor oven or my outdoor woodfire oven,  and when I do, I almost always save some to  the side to make a sandwich with it. The depth  it gives to the sandwich is indescribable.     Instead of writing a host of different recipes, I  have combined all of our bread recipes into  one section. Partly, this is for easy reference.  The other part is that it would be redundant to  give each one its own recipe since they work                  so similarly to each other. Most of these  recipes make two loaves. It is usually a little  easier to work with the ingredients if there are  enough of them to make two loaves as  opposed to one. It simply creates an easier‐to‐ handle volume. Note that when baking these,  they work best on a pizza stone.    Tips: Make sure to lightly flour your working  surface when you knead dough. If you want to  use an electric mixer to knead the dough, you  will generally want to let it run at the lower  end of the kneading time, so if a recipe says 8‐ 10 minutes, set your mixer to knead for 8  minutes. If you want to develop a crispy crust,  place a bowl of water in the bottom of your  oven. The steam will make a thin, glossy, crispy  crust on the outside of the bread. If you want  to make whole wheat versions of the bread (I  usually do), try to find the finest grain of whole  wheat flour. When letting your bread rise, you  may want to lightly oil it and make sure the  covering towel is damp. This will keep the  exterior of the dough from drying out. Before  kneading dough, let it rest for a couple  minutes so the flour and water can meld  better. This will make the dough easier to work  with. Finally, I suggest not adjusting the salt in  the recipe. Salt does more than flavor the  bread. Chlorine ions from salt bond with  gluten molecules and make the gluten firmer,  stronger, and more compact. If you use less  salt, the knead time and rise times will need to  be lowered and the bread won’t be as strong  when you are done baking it.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipes by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |147

 

Ciabatta Bread 
Ciabatta bread is a chewy, spongy Italian bread. This recipe is underbaked compared to a traditional  ciabatta loaf so that it is relatively soft, perfect for a sandwich. I shape these into long rolls for my  “meatball” subs and rounds for other types of sandwiches.    The Starter  1/8 tsp. of yeast  7 tbsp. of warm water  1 cup of bread flour  Additional Ingredients  ½ tsp. of yeast  2/3 cup of water  1 tbsp. of 1 tsp. of olive oil  2 cups of bread flour  1 ½ tsp. of salt    For the starter, combine the yeast with the water and wait a few minutes for it to foam. Once it does,  stir in the bread flour. Cover the bowl and let it sit for about 1 day in a slightly warm place to turn  sour. Once it has sat for a day, you can make the bread. Combine the yeast, water, and oil together.  Combine the flour and salt. Combine all the ingredients together, including the starter, and mix them  until evenly combined. Knead this for about 7‐8 minutes. The dough will still be a bit sticky. Cut it in  half and then form it into the shapes you desire. You will want to make these about half the size of  what you expect the bread to end up since the dough will expand quite a bit in the oven. Use your  fingers to make little dimples in the top of the dough. Lightly flour both sides of the dough and cover  it with a towel. Let this rise for about 1 ½ hours. Heat your oven to 425 F. Transfer your dough to the  oven and bake for 15 minutes (20 minutes for a non‐sandwich loaf).   

French Bread 
French bread is great for those sandwiches were you want a crispy, thin crust and a nice soft bread. I  like using it for muffalettas and melts.    1 1/8 tsp. of yeast  ¾ cup of warm water  1 ¾ cup of bread flour  1 1/8 tsp. of salt    Combine the yeast with the water and wait a few minutes for it to foam. Combine the flour with the  salt. Combine this with the water and mix until thoroughly combined. This works best if you add  about 1 cup of flour to the water and stir it until evenly combined, then add the remaining flour. It  tends to make a more even dough. Knead the dough for about 5 minutes. Place it in a bowl, cover it,  and let it rise in a warm place for about 3 hours. Punch the dough down, give it a couple of kneads,  then cover it and let it rise 1 ½ more hours. Form the dough into 6” long rolls. Cover them one more  time and let them rise 1 ½ more hours. Slice the dough about ¼” deep diagonally a couple of times  across each loaf. Heat your oven to 450 F and bake the loaves for about 20 minutes. Let them cool for  about an hour before using. 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipes by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |148

 

Cuban Bread 
Cuban bread is a slightly sweet, thick, sourdough bread and is the traditional bread for a Cuban  sandwich. It holds its shape well in a sandwich press and has a robust enough flavor that it doesn’t get  overwhelmed by the boldness of the Cuban sandwich.    The Starter  ¼ tsp. of dry yeast  2 tbsp. of flour  2 tbsp. of water  The Dough  2/3 cups of flour  1 tsp. of dry yeast  ¾ tsp. of sugar  2/3 tsp. of salt  The starter (from above)  ¼ cup of water  2 tbsp. of vegan shortening, softened  1 tbsp. of water to brush on the bread before baking    Combine the ingredients for the starter in a small bowl, cover it, and let it sit in the refrigerator for 24  hours. Combine all the dry ingredients. Soften the shortening over a medium low heat, then combine  the starter, shortening, and water with the dry ingredients and mix thoroughly. Knead the dough  until it is no longer sticky. Place it in a bowl, cover it with a towel, and let it rise one hour. Using your  hands, roll the dough out into a 7” long tube. Cover it with a damp cloth and let it rise one more hour.  Bake the bread at 350 F for 30 minutes, until the bread looks golden on top and sounds hollow when  you tap it. Option: Lay a damp string on top of the loaf before it goes into the oven to create the  traditional seam in the bread.   

Hoagie Rolls 
Hoagie rolls are great for long, messy sandwiches. The bread is firm without being chewy and perfect  for holding in lots of otherwise messy ingredients. While quintessential for a Philly “cheesesteak,” they  can also be used for French dip sandwiches and other drowned bites.     Note: This makes four rolls    1 tsp. of yeast  2/3 cup of warm water  1 ½ tsp. of sugar  1 tbsp. of oil  Just under 2 cups of bread flour  2/3 tsp. of salt    Combine the yeast, water, and sugar and wait a few minutes for the yeast to foam. Add in the oil.  Combine the flour and salt. Add one cup of flour to the wet mix and stir until evenly combined. Add  the other cup of flour and stir that it in until evenly combined. Knead the dough for about 7‐8 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipes by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |149

minutes. Divide the dough into 4 pieces and roll them into ovals about 4‐5” long. Cut a ¼” deep  groove across the top of each dough. Cover the dough and let it rise for about 20 minutes. Heat your  oven to 400 F. Bake the bread for 16 minutes. Let it cool for about an hour before using.    Calories 236.9     Calories from Fat 32  Total Fat 3.6 g  Saturated Fat 0.4 g  Cholesterol 0.0 mg  Sodium 390.2 mg  Total Carbohydrate 44.1 g  Dietary Fiber 1.7 g  Sugars 1.5 g  Protein 6.0 g   

Bolillo Roll 
Bolillos are soft and slightly airy with a light crust. They’re great for biting into a sandwich with a  bread that melts away. Excellent for tortas or other sandwiches with soft ingredients. The bread also  absorbs sauces very well, so you can dress them with a bean sauce or a dash of vinegar and the  dressing will go a long way. The key to this recipe is steam.    Note: This makes four rolls    1 1/8 tsp. of yeast  Just under ¾ cup of warm water  2 tsp. of agave  2 tsp. of vegetable shortening  1 ¾ cups of all purpose flour  ¾ tsp. of salt    Combine the yeast, water, and agave and wait a few minutes for it to foam. Work the shortening into  the water as best you can. Combine the flour and salt. Add half the flour into the wet mix and stir  until it is evenly combined. Add the other half of the flour and evenly combine it. Knead the dough  for about 12 minutes until it is very elastic. Place the dough in a bowl, cover it, and let it rise for about  an hour. Give the dough a couple of kneads. Divide it into four pieces and shape it into 5 ½” long  oval‐shaped rolls. Cover them and let them rise one more hour. After they rise, slash a ¼” deep  groove in each roll from end to end. Heat your oven to 375 F. Place a bowl of water on the bottom  rack of your oven to create steam. This will give the rolls a crispy crust. Bake for 30 minutes. The rolls  should sound hollow when tapped.    Calories 169.1  Calories from Fat 15  Total Fat 1.7 g  Saturated Fat 0.5 g  Cholesterol 1.2 mg 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipes by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |150

Sodium 351.2 mg  Total Carbohydrate 33.2 g  Dietary Fiber 1.3 g  Sugars 1.8 g  Protein 4.4 g   

Tuscan Loaf  
This is a saltless bread, making it very tender and allowing the sandwich ingredients to shine. That  makes it ideal as a traditional sandwich loaf with square pieces sliced thin. It does have a slight  sourdough aspect to it, making up for the fact that it is completely salt free.    The Starter  1/8 tsp. of yeast  1/3 cup of warm water  ½ cup plus 2 tbsp. of all purpose flour  Additional Ingredients  1 1/8 tsp. of yeast  Just under ¾ cup of warm water  1 ¾ cups + 2 tbsp. of all purpose flour    Combine the starter ingredients. Cover this, set it in a warm place, and let it sit for about 12 hours.  Combine the remaining ingredients and mix the starter into this, making sure everything is evenly  combined. Knead the dough for about 10 minutes until you have an elastic dough. Place it in a bowl,  cover it, and let it rise for 1 hour. Punch it down, give it a couple of kneads, cover it, and let it rise one  more hour. Divide it into 2 oval shaped loaves or spread it into 2 loaf pans (you will need the loaf  pans if you want rectangular bread). Slash the top in a checker pattern. Heat your oven to 450 F.  Spritz the dough with water and bake it for 15 minutes, opening the oven to spritz it again at 5  minutes and 10 minutes. Reduce the heat to 400 F and bake for 20 more minutes. Let it sit for at least  1 hour before slicing.   

SF‐style Sourdough Bread 
I call this San Francisco style because starters made in different regions have different flavors, so  unless you live in SF, yours will taste slightly different. This style is also made with an egg wash, which  makes the bread very glossy, but that is just as easy to do with a slurry of cornstarch.    The Starter  ½ tsp. of yeast  ½ cup of water  ½ cup of bread flour  Additional Ingredients  1 ¼ tsp. of yeast  1 ½ tbsp. of sugar  ½ cup of soymilk  1 tbsp. of olive oil  2 ¼ cups plus 2 tbsp. of bread flour  1 ¼ tsp. of salt 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipes by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |151

The Wash  1 tsp. of cornstarch  ¼ cup of cold water    To make the starter, combine all the starter ingredients together. Cover this and leave it out for 4‐7  days. This works best if you put it in a tall glass because the starter will bubble and rise and may flow  over the glass. Once the sour smell is pleasant, it is ready to use. If it has any discoloration at all,  throw it out and start over. Combine the yeast, sugar, and soy milk together and wait a few minutes  for it to froth. Stir the oil into it. Combine the flour and salt. Mix this into the wet mix, along with  your sourdough starter (save a couple tablespoons to the side and combine it with a new starter to  keep your starter going). Make sure everything is evenly combined. Knead the dough for about 8‐10  minutes. Place it in a bowl, cover it, and let it rise for 1 hour. Punch it down and knead it a couple  more times. Let it rest for about 15 minutes. Form it into the shape that you want (about a 9” long  oval or a 5” diameter round). Cover this and let it rise one more hour. Heat your oven to 375 F. Put  the cornstarch in a small bowl and then slowly stir the water into it until you have a thin slurry (the  water needs to be cold so the cornstarch does not congeal). Brush this onto the bread. Bake the  bread at 375 F for 30 minutes. Let it sit for about 15 minutes before slicing it.      Focaccia with Sage  This bread is wonderful if you are looking for a hearty sandwich with a bread that is soft and lush with  a crispy top and bottom. Make sure you don’t flatten it too much because once you are done with it,  you are going to cut it into squares and cut those squares in half horizontally. You need to make sure  there is enough bread on the top and bottom to hold the sandwich together.    1 tsp. of minced sage leaves  ½ tsp. of yeast  ½ tsp. of sugar  1 tbsp. of warm water  ¼ cup of olive oil  1 cup of bread flour   ½ tsp. of salt  ½ cup of water  1 tbsp. of water    Mince the sage leaves. Combine the warm water, sugar, and yeast together. Combine the flour and  salt together. Add the water and olive oil to the water, sugar, and yeast mixture. Stir the wet mix into  the dry mix (you should end up with a very soft dough.) Add the sage leaves to the dough mix, but  don’t worry about having it thoroughly mixed into the dough. Knead the dough with the sage leaves  until it no longer sticks to your hands. Roll the dough into a ball. Lightly oil the dough and place it in a  bowl. Cover the bowl. Allow the dough to rise in a warm place for 1 ½ hours. Fold the dough in on  itself and form it into the shape you wish (usually a rectangle.) Spread the dough onto a baking stone  or into a baking dish until it is about ¾” thick. Lightly oil the dough again. Cover the dough. Allow the  dough to rise for another 30 minutes. Take a small amount of water and sprinkle it on the top and  sides of the dough, gently smearing the dough with the water (it’s ok if depressions in the dough form  and collect excess water.) Bake the bread for 25 minutes on 400 F. Remove the bread from the oven 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipes by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |152

and allow it to rest for at least 10 minutes.    Calories 676       Calories from Fat 216  Fat 24 g  Total Carbohydrates 102 g  Dietary Fiber 3 g  Sugars 3 g  Protein 13 g  Salt 570 mg   

Round Country Bread 
This bread is ideal for making sandwiches that are filling with a very deeply‐flavored bread designed  to hold together lots of ingredients. It has a thick chew and an almost caramel taste to the crust. Cut  these in half horizontally and scoop out a little of the interior of the bread to make a nice pocket for  your sandwich ingredients.    The Starter  ¼ tsp. of yeast  ½ cup of warm water  ¾ cup of flour (half all purpose and half whole wheat)  Additional Ingredients  ½ tsp. of yeast  1 ½ tbsp. of sugar  ½ cup of warm water  2 cups of flour (half all purpose and half whole wheat)  ¾ tsp. of salt  A little extra flour    Combine all the ingredients for the starter and let it sit for about 8 hours. Combine the yeast, sugar,  and warm water under Additional Ingredients and wait a few minutes for it to froth. Combine the  flour and salt. Stir half the flour into the wet mix and evenly combine this with the starter. Evenly  combine this with the remainder of the flour. Knead this for about 10‐12 minutes. Place the dough in  a bowl, cover it, and let it rise for about 2 hours. Gently press the dough down (don’t punch it, you  don’t want to knock out all the air). Form it into two to three rounds about 4” in diameter. Cover  these and let them rise one more hour. Heat your oven to 475 F. Slash a ¼” deep X in the top of each  round and spritz them with water. Once the bread goes in, reduce the heat to 425 F and bake this for  25 minutes. Spritz it with water at the 5 minute and 10 minute marks. Let them rest for about 30  minutes. Slice them in half horizontally to make your sandwich rolls.   

Sunflower Bread ‐ recipe by Ani Phyo 
Makes 9 servings    This hearty yet soft bread is made with sunflower seeds, flax meal, and celery.     1½ cups chopped celery 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipes by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |153

3 tablespoons sunflower seeds  1½ cups flax meal  1 to 1¼ cups water, as needed    Place the celery in a food processor and process into small pieces. Add the sunflower seeds and  process into small pieces. Add the flax meal and water, and mix well, using only enough water to  make a spreadable batter.    Spread the batter evenly on one 14‐inch‐square lined Excalibur Dehydrator tray. Dehydrate for 4  hours at 104°F degrees. Flip and peel off the Paraflexx, then place back on the liner and score into  nine slices with a butter knife. Be careful not to cut through the mesh. Dehydrate for another 2 to 4  hours, or to desired consistency.   

   
   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipes by Chef Jason Wyrick

July 2013

Sandwiches |154