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Positive Behaviour Support Plan For S.C.

By Laura MacLellan EPSE 532 Dr. Brenda Fossett

Summary of Focus Person S.C. is a 15 year old male who has a Mild Intellectual Disability. He attends his neighbourhood school on a modified program. He was enrolled in all regular classes but had to be removed from his woodshop class due to his behaviour and was placed in a segregated class for that period. S.C. has been able to establish a good rapport with several adults (teachers, EAs and administrators) at the school starting in September. S.C. is eager to please and wants to do well. However, he is easily discouraged and very concerned about looking “stupid” in front of his peers and consequently he is very resistant to corrective feedback. S.C. has a histroy of failure in his school career and he is very reluctant to try work on his own, especially on tasks that challenge him. S.C. seems to respond well in situations where he is given choices. S.C. can communicate well verbally but has significant skill deficits in reading, writing, and math calculations. Description of Routines Working Independently This routine occurs in the second period after lunch when S.C. is in a “Self-Paced Class.” In this class all the students are working on various courses and the teacher and EA move around the room helping students in a one-on-one fashion. The expectation for S.C. is that he comes to class get his required materials out, sits at his desks, works on his assignment, asks if he has questions, and hands his completed work into the teacher. Corrective Feedback This routine occurs occurs across S.C.’s day when he is given corrective feedback, most often in relation to an academic task. The expectation is that when S.C. is given corrective feedback, he will listen respecfully and makes the requested changes to his work. Description of Problem Behaviours Noncompliance – not following directions, requests (oral or written) Inappropriate language – talking disrespectfully to teacher/EA (includes swearing) Leaving the room – leaving the classroom without premission and may or may not return

Competing Behaviour Pathways Diagram: Corrective Feedback
Listen appropriately to feedback and makes appropriate changes to work Praise Earn time to do preferred activity or Starbucks drink (selected from a menu of activities appropriate for the classroom) Maintaining Consequence Escape from the negative feedback

Desired Behaviour -history of unpleasant interactions regarding school work -skill deficits in writing, reading, calculations -lack of choice Setting Event(s)

Corrective feedback from adult (teacher/EA) related to task performance

1. Non-compliance with feedback 2. Inappropriate language 3. Leaving the room

Antecendent Trigger(s)

Problem Behaviour Use his Feedback Card to choose when and where he would be most comfortable receiving his corrective feedback Alternative Replacement Behaviour

Maintaining Consequence

Positive Behaviour Support Plan
Strategies that Make Problem Behaviours Irrelevant, Ineffective, and Inefficient Setting Event Strategies  Ensure positive interaction at the start of each class (ask about day, weekend etc.,)  Provide more enjoyable types of tasks  Structure tasks so that writing may be done on the computer. If pencil and paper task are required matching, fill in the blanks and multiple choice questions will be used  Provide access to a calculator for math tasks  Provide increased opportunity for choice in the classroom Preventative Strategies  Ensure tasks are at appropriate level (initially 100% success independently, slowly increasing the difficulty)  Review Visually Mediated Contingency Statements  Use precorrection to remind the student to fill out the feedback card  Use Feedback Card to give student time to prepare for “corrective feedback” Teaching Strategies  Teach why it is important to be able to repsond appropriately to corrective feedback (using social stories and role playing)  Teach how to respond appropriately to feedback (using role playing)  Teach how to use feedback card Consequence Strategies  Contingent upon S.C. listening appropriately and making appropriate changes to work he he earns praise and time to do a preferred activity/ drink from Starbucks, he will choose on Fridays  Contingent upon using his Feedback Card indicating where and when the feedback will be given, S.C.’s prefernces will be honoured  Contingent upon non compliance (minor problem behaviour) S.C. will be reminded to use the feedback card and consequence map  Contingent upon inappropriate language and/or leaving the classroom (major problem behaviour) S.C. will lose some of his earned free time and he will still be required to make corrections to work

Competing Behaviour Pathways Diagram: Working Independently
Work independently in class: 1. Get out materials for class 2. Sit at desk 3. Start and engage in work task 4. Ask for help if unsure 5. Hand in completed work Praise Earn time to do preferred activity or Starbucks drink (selected from a menu of activities appropriate for the classroom)

Desired Behaviour -history of failure at school -skill deficit in reading, writing and math -lack of choice Setting Event(s) Teacher requests S.C. to do a difficult and/or multi-step task independently Non-compliance Inappropriate language

Maintaining Consequence Escape from work

Antecendent Trigger(s)

Problem Behaviour Ask for a break

Maintaining Consequence

Alternative Replacement Behaviour

Positive Behaviour Support Plan
Strategies that Make Problem Behaviours Irrelevant, Ineffective, and Inefficient Setting Event Strategies  Structure tasks so that writing may be done on the computer. If pencil and paper task are required matching, fill in the blanks and multiple choice questions will be used  Provide access to a calculator for math tasks  Increase the opportunity for choice Preventative Strategies  Provide a weekly list of tasks that need to be accomlished and give S.C. the choice of which tasks he would like to complete each day  Use precorrections to remind S.C. to ask for a break  Review Visually Mediated Contingency Statements with S.C. at the start of each class.  Initially ensure tasks are independently 100% achieveable by S.C. and only very slowly increase the difficulty and complexity. Teaching Strategies  Teach S.C. to ask for a break  Teach S.C. to self monitor behaviour  Teach S.C. to use the weekly and daily list of tasks to select his work for the day  Teach S.C. how he will earn free time Consequence Strategies  Contingent upon S.C. working independently in class he earns praise and time to do a preferred activity/ drink from Starbucks, he will choose on Fridays  Contingent upon S.C. asking for a break he is able to take a 3 minute break, upon return he will resume task  Contingent upon S.C. noncomplying when presented with a difficult/multi-step task (minor problem behaviour) he is reminded to ask for a break if he needs ones  Contingent upon S.C. using inappropriate language (moderate) he will have time deducted from earned free time and still will be required to complete task

Behaviour Support Plan: Working Independently Setting Event Strategies 1. Structure tasks so that writing may be done on the computer. However, if pencil and paper task are required then tasks will be designed so that questions are matching, fill-in-the-blanks or multiple choice. 2. Math tasks will be done on the computer or via paper and pencil but calculators will be allowed. 3. S.C. will be allowed to select the work he wants to complete for the day from a weekly list of required activities. Antecedent/Preventitive Strategies 1. S.C. will be provided a list of tasks that need to be completed for the week. They will be grouped according to subject (Math, English, Science). This list will be shown to S.C. at the start of each class and he will choose tasks from the weekly list to complete. S.C. will be able to put a check mark beside each tasks once they have been handed in, when the assignment is returned and deemed appropriately completed by the teacher S.C. will be able to scratch out the task from the list of tasks. 2. Precorrections will be used by the teacher and EA in the classroom to remind him to ask for a break or help if he needs it. As S.C. is concerned about looking “different” in front of his classmates, this precorrection will be given to the entire class. For example, “Remember everybody, if you are getting tired or are stuck remember to ask for a break or for some help.” 3. S.C.’s Visually Mediated Contingency Statements will be reviewed initially at the start of every class to remind him about the consequences of his behaviours. For example, “S.C. when you are required to work independently and you do so you will earn free time for Friday. However, when you are asked to work independently and you refuse and use inappropriate languge you will lose free time. (See Appendix for the Visually Mediated Contingency Statements.) 4. Initially, assigned tasks will be at an appropriate level for S.C. so that he can independently answer 100% of the questions correctly. The difficulty of these tasks will be increased very gradually after two weeks of the program. This means by the second week, one or two slightly more difficult questions will be added to a math assignment or point form answers will be required on one question as instead of all matching, fill-in-the-blank or multiple choice questions. For the next two weeks, S.C. will be required to do three or four more difficult questions or be expected to write one or two sentence answers on his English or Science tasks. The gradual increase will continue with the teacher being mindful if that problem behaviours reemerge that this could be a sign that the work became too difficult too quickly. If this happens, return the difficultly of the questions back to before problem behaviours began to recur. Teaching Strategies 1. S.C. will be taught to ask for a break. 2. S.C. will be taught to self monitor his behaviour. S.C. will be taught to self monitor by tracking his behaviour periodically in class. This will be done using the Self Monitoring Chart in his binder. The chart will list the following steps: a. Do I have all the stuff I need? i. Worksheet ii. Pencil or pen

b. c. d. e.

iii. Computer iv. headphones Am I sitting at my desk or computer? Am I paying attention to my work and trying my best to complete it? Am I asking for help if I need it? If I am finished, did I hand it in to the teacher and choose a new task?

(see Appendix for example of Self Monitoring Chart) S.C. will be shown how to complete this chart and for the first 3 classes he will earn preferred activity time by completing the chart honestly. During this time the teacher will also fill out a chart on S.C.’s behaviour. Honesty will be determined by an agreement with the teachers chart. After 3 classes S.C. will be told that free time will be earned by a combination honesty score and independent work score. His independent work score will be determined by what his answers indicate regarding the how well he is working independently. The honesty score will still be determined by agreement with the teachers chart. S.C. will be taught to fill out the chart every 10 minutes. A timer program on the computer will be used to let S.C. know that it is time to fill out his chart. This time will move to every 15 minutes after 3 more days and then once 3 consecutive days S.C. has earned high honesty scores and independent work scores the time will be moved to 20 minutes. The time interval will remain at 20 minutes for 2 weeks followed by 25 for 2 more weeks and then to 30 minutes.

Consequences Strategies Strategies For Increasing Desired Behaviour Contingent upon S.C. working independently in class he earns praise and time to do a preferred activity or drink from Starbucks. He will make his selection on Friday morning when he comes for a check in. (See Appendix for S.C.’s Time Earned Recording Chart where he and the teacher will keep track of his time earned and Free Time Menu for S.C.’s choices of activities). Initially, S.C. will be able to earn up to 10 minutes of free time for use on Fridays each day for working independently. The teacher can make the judgement about how much of the ten minutes he earns based on his scores on his self monitoring charts. For example, 10 minutes would be earned for high honesty scores and independent work scores on all checks. 5 minutes would be earned for high honesty scores and on most of his checks high independent work scores. No time will be earned for low honesty score or low independent work scores. 30 minutes of earned time will be required to earn a tall Starbucks drink. Strategies For Increasing Alternative Behaviour Contingent upon S.C. asking for a break he is able to take a break (no longer than 3 minutes), upon return he will resume task. S.C. can tell time and will be told by what time he is required to start working again. S.C. may go fill up his mug with water, go to the bathroom, walk a “lap” of the school or remain at his desk during his break. Strategies For Deceasing Problem Behaviour (minor) Contingent upon S.C. non-complying, he will be given a warning, (“Remember to ask for a break if you need a break but otherwise you need to start/continue working.”). If minor problem behaviour continues refer to moderate/high strategies below. Strategies For Deceasing Problem Behaviour (moderate) Contingent upon S.C. using inappropriate language or continous to non-comply after warning has been given S.C. will have free time deducted from his total earned. If total free time earned is zero S.C. will be

required to make up the time after school. If a moderate problem behaviour occurs 5 minutes of free time will be deducted. If the moderate problem behaviour continues S.C. will lose an additonal 5 minutes of free time and then if the behaviour continues he will lose all his earned free time for the week. Crisis Management Procedures Not required.

Monitoring and Evaluation S.C. progress will be monitored by the teacher as she is keeping track of time earned. If S.C. is able to redeem free time/ Starbucks regularly each week the program will continue. If S.C. is unable to earn free time or if the amount of free time deducted regularly means no free time remains come Friday the program will be reviewed. The teacher will keep a copy of S.C. self monitoring behaviour chart along with the one that he/she fills out. This will be used to monitor how well S.C. is able to self monitor, by comparing it to the teacher’s and how well he is learning to work independently. The teacher/ EA will also keep track of problem behaviours using a scatter plot. (See Appendix for Scatter Plot)

Behaviour Support Plan: Corrective Feedback Setting Event Strategies 1. Begin each class with a positive interaction with S.C. (ask him about his day/weekend, what he did at lunch, how was P.E. etc.) This brief chat can end with having S.C. select what tasks he will work to complete that day. 2. Design tasks around topics he is interested in (skateboarding, being a teenager) and using interative website and videos. 3. Tasks will be structured so that they may be completed on the computer as writing is difficult for S.C.. S.C. has difficulty reading so instructions for tasks should be given orally with an example of what he required to do. If possible tasks will include a video or interactive website as these are things that S.C. enjoys. Pencil and paper tasks will mostly rely on matching, multiple choice or fill in the blank type questions. Some “short answer” type questions can be used but will be done sparingly or they will be done orally. 4. For tasks that require calculations, a calculator will be provided. 5. Allow S.C. more choice, by allowing him to select from a list of weekly tasks the ones he wishes to work on and in which order he would like to work on those. Antecedent/Preventitive Strategies 1. Initially, assigned tasks will be at an appropriate level for S.C. so that he can independently answer 100% of the questions correctly. The difficulty of these tasks will be increased very gradually after two weeks of the program. This means by the second week, one or two slightly more difficult questions will be added to a math assignment or point form answers will be required on one question as instead of all matching, fill-in-the-blank or multiple choice questions. For the next two weeks, S.C. will be required to do three or four more difficult questions or be expected to write one or two sentence answers on his English or Science tasks. The gradual increase will continue with the teacher being mindful if that problem behaviours reemerge that this could be a sign that the work became too difficult too quickly. If this happens, return the difficultly of the questions back to before problem behaviours began to recur. 2. S.C. will be given a Visually Mediated Contingency Statement, illustrating the what happens if he responds appropriately or inappropriately to corrective feedback (see Appendix for Visual Mediated Contingency Statements). This will be reviewed orally with him when he is given the Feedback Card. A week after using the Feedback Card the reviewing of the Visually Mediated Contingency Statement will be reduced to every other day and then a week later to once a week. Reviewing the visually mediated consequence statements involves reading over the statements for both desired behaviour and problem behaviour. For example, “So remember S.C., when you are get feedback from me and you respond by listening appropriately and making the corrections you will earn free time to be used on Fridays. But if you are given feedback and you respond by not following directions, by using bad language or by leaving the room you will be lose free time on Fridays and you will still have to make the corrections.” 3. S.C. will be given a Feedback Card instead of work that needs correcting. The Feedback Card will let S.C. know what he has work that needs to corrected. On the Feedback Card he will be able to select one of several times, that the teacher has chosen, to receive the feedback. The teacher will also give S.C. several options of places where the feedback can happen, eg., at his desk, at the

teachers desk. This is to ensure that S.C. feels that he is in a comfortable place when this corrective feedback is given. (see Appendix for an example of the Feedback Card). Teaching Strategies 1. S.C. will be taught why it is important to be able to listen to corrective feedback. This will be done outside of his regular class on Friday mornings or with his councellor. This will be done by reading “Mistakes Happen on the Way to Learning” and “That’s Great” social stories (see Appendix for these stories). These stories discusses that making mistakes is a part of learning for everyone and that is okay to make mistakes. The teacher will discuss with S.C. about corrective feedback. She will explain that it is meant to help S.C. with his learning. They will also discuss that people are constantly learning over their lifetime and corrective feedback helps us in that process. They will discuss appropriate reactions for accepting academic feedback but also corrective feedback from prinicipals, police officers and other adults in the community. 2. S.C. will be taught using role play the appropriate ways to respond to feedback. This will be done on Friday mornings when S.C. has extra time in the resource block. This will be done with video modelling of appropriate responses to feedback, taken from T.V. shows. These skill will also be practices with role playing. 3. S.C. will be taught how to use his Feedback Card to allow him to choose when and where the feedback will take place. It will be explained that the Feedback Card will be given to him when the teacher has some work that requires some correcting/completing. S.C. will be given an example of the Feedback Card and asked to fill it out as practice. Then the teacher and S.C. will role play having the teacher pick up the Feedback Card from S.C.’s desk and will the meet at the chosen location and time. Consequence Strategies Strategies For Increasing Desired Behaviour Contingent upon S.C. listening appropriately and making appropriate changes to his work, he will be prasied and earn time for “preferred activities” selected from a menu of choices. (See Appendix for Free Time Menu) S.C.’s list of preferred activities includes listening to music on the computer, watching videos on the computer, completing “jobs” for the teacher (like using the photocopier, finding information online, and organizing and setting up the classroom) and having a Starbucks drink. Everyday S.C. will have the opportunity to earn time to be used for a preferred activity on Friday afternoons. Initially, if S.C. listens appropirately to feedback and makes the appropriate chages to his work he will be able to earn 5 min worth of free time each day. This amount of time will be reduced very very slowly (minute by minute) only after a week or two of regularly earning time for the desired behaviour. This amount of time earned should also go back up to 5 minutes with any new teachers at the start of the new semester as the relationship development is essential for this student. Strategies For Increasing Alternative Behaviour Contingent upon using his Feedback Card indicating where and when the feedback will be given, S.C.’s prefernces will be honoured. When S.C. beings to show comfort using the Feedback Card and receiving the feedback fewer options will be given on when the feedback can take place. S.C. will still be given the ability to choose where the feedback will take place but the Feedback Card direct the time it will take place. Strategies For Deceasing Problem Behaviour (minor)

Contingent upon non-compliance S.C. will be reminded of the consequence map and to use the Feedback Card. Strategies For Deceasing Problem Behaviour (moderate) Contingent upon inappropriate language and/or leaving the classroom S.C. will lose some of his earned free time and he will still be required to make corrections to work. If total free time earned is zero, S.C. will be required to make the time up at lunch or after school. Crisis Management Plan Not required. Monitoring and Evaluation S.C. progress will be monitored by the teacher as she is keeping track of time earned. If S.C. is able to redeem free time/ Starbucks regularly each week the program will continue. If S.C. is unable to earn free time or if the amount of free time deducted means no free time remains come Friday, the program will be reviewed. The teacher will continue to monitor problem behaviour around corrective feedback by filling out a scatter plot (See Appendix for Scatter Plot), indicating the time when a problem behaviour occurs. The teacher will also have a rating scale (1-5) on the the back on the Feedback Card where he/she will rate S.C.’s behaviour during the “feedback” meeting. The feedback cards will be collected in an evelope and reviewed to determine if the program is helping S.C. with his problem behaviours around corrective feedback.

Free Time Menu pick what you would like to do!

Feedback Card Front

Hi ___________________________ I need to talk to you about ________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ Please check the time you when you will feel ready Right now _________ _________ Please check where you would feel comfortable talking about this At your desk __________ Thanks! __________

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