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JULY 24-30, 2013
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INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Return customers
‘Repunch’ to be offered at
Princeton businesses. PAGE 2
It seemed like a normal
evening at the theater for
Richard Hannay, until a
chance meeting with a mys-
terious woman in the audi-
ence plunged him into the
world of international espi-
onage! From the novel by
John Buchan and the movie
by Alfred Hitchcock, Patrick
Barlow’s stage adaptation of
‘The 39 Steps’ is an eruption
of delicious noir spoofery
and physical comedy.
Director/Choreographer
Jeff Kuperman’s daring pro-
duction
stretches the
imagination
to the limits
as it cele-
brates the
versatility of
four fearless
actors per-
forming
more than
100 roles.
This side-splitting spy adven-
ture has something in it for
everyone, from plane crash-
es to love affairs.
Princeton Summer
Theater’s ‘The 39 Steps’ runs
July 25-28. Performances
are Thursday-Saturday at 8
p.m., and Saturday and
Sunday at 2 pm. Tickets are
$25, $20 for students.
SPOTLIGHT
‘The 39 Steps’
Group
pushes
to ‘Save
the
Dinky’
By KATIE MORGAN
The Princeton Sun
The Save the Dinky group, an
organization of Princeton citizens
who vehemently oppose Princeton
University’s plans to move the his-
toric Dinky train and station as
part of the Arts and Transit proj-
ect, have taken the fight to the na-
tion’s capital.
The university’s plan would
move the Dinky station approxi-
mately 460 feet south, and would
reroute the tracks. NJ Transit
owns and operates both the sta-
tion and rail line.
The group filed a petition this
month with the Surface Trans-
portation Board, a federal agency
KATIE MORGAN/The Princeton Sun
World-renowned conductor Mark Laycock leads the Philadelphia Orchestra in a performance of
Prokofiev’s “Symphony No. 1 (Classical)” during the Scheide Midsummer Celebration Concert at
Richardson Auditorium on July 17. For a full story, see page 16.
Scheide Midsummer Celebration Concert
please see GROUP, page 13
2 THE PRINCETON SUN — JULY 24-30, 2013
‘Repunch’ to encourage return shoppers
By KATIE MORGAN
The Princeton Sun
In the next few weeks, mem-
bers of the Princeton Merchants
Association will launch the first
uniform loyalty program for local
businesses.
Repunch is a smartphone ap-
plication created by local entre-
preneur Matt Tervooren.
According to a PMA release,
“Repunch provides retailers inno-
vative solutions for loyalty, mar-
keting, data analytics and com-
munication. For consumers, Re-
punch makes earning rewards
easy while also providing ways to
interact with their favorite mer-
chants around town.”
Mark Censits, PMA board
member and owner of CoolVines,
a specialty wine and spirits store
in Princeton, helped to develop
the partnership between the PMA
and Repunch.
“Matt’s mother is a good cus-
tomer of mine at CoolVines,”
Censits said. “She said her son
was starting a business and asked
if I’d listen to the idea and give
him some advice. He came back
to me six months later with a re-
tooled idea, and thought we could
come up with a mutually benefi-
cial relationship.”
CoolVines, along with other
local businesses, will act as a test
group for the Repunch applica-
tion.
Retailers can create a Repunch
account where they offer targeted
marketing through discounts and
promotions.
For customers, Repunch acts
like a traditional punch card loy-
alty program. When customers
make purchases at participating
retailers, they simply have to give
their five-digit loyalty number.
“If a customer comes to my
store using Repunch, I can con-
tact them with special deals and
incentives to shop more with me,”
Censits said.
“The ability to communicate
with your customers in a very
targeted way is very unique in
the market right now. It allows
the merchant to set up the pro-
gram they want.
“There’s a lot of flexibility in
receiving points and redeeming
points. Plus it’s great for the cus-
tomer, because you’re not carry-
ing another key fob around or dig-
ging for a loyalty card in your
wallet. It’s all right there on your
phone.”
Tervooren said discount and
promotion sites like LivingSocial
and Groupon inspired the idea for
Repunch.
“This was born as long as two
years ago, when I was graduating
from the University of Michi-
gan,” Tervooren said. “It was dur-
ing this craze over sites like
Groupon, who were getting bil-
lions of dollars and tons of retail-
ers signing up.
“But I noticed that while they
had a lot of people coming in, re-
peat patronage was only at 20 per-
cent.”
Repunch is designed to keep
shoppers coming back to earn re-
wards for their consumer loyalty.
In addition to discounts, the
app has social features that allow
users to send gifts of points or
punches to friends, and to post ac-
tivity to social networks such as
Facebook.
Tervooren said he is looking
forward to testing and improving
Repunch during its initial two-
year launch in local Princeton
stores.
“We’re still internally testing
and improving optimization in
anticipation of the launch,” Ter-
vooren said.
“When we do fully launch, we
expect to have around 15 local
merchants participating. This is
a close-knit business community.
We’ll be able to gain a lot of feed-
back before we scale it at a bigger
level.”
By KATIE MORGAN
The Princeton Sun
Council working to make
Princeton a sanctuary
for immigrants
The Princeton Council’s
Human Services Subcommittee is
drafting a resolution that would
bar police enforcement of federal
immigration laws.
The resolution would release
town police from any obligation
to conduct immigration checks
during traffic stops or participate
in immigration raids conducted
by federal agents.
Councilwoman Heather
Howard, the liaison to the sub-
committee, said the resolution
would be an important policy
statement to the town’s Hispanic
residents, who constitute 8.5 per-
cent of the population, according
to the most recent census data.
“You want the city to have faith
in its police department, and not
be worried about local police en-
forcing immigration law,”
Howard said. “We don’t want peo-
ple to be afraid to report crimes
or be witnesses because of their
immigration status.”
If a resolution is passed,
Princeton would join other local
communities, including Hight-
stown and Trenton, in declaring
itself a “sanctuary city.”
PHA considers hiring a
full-time executive
director
The Princeton Housing Au-
thority, which owns and manages
236 affordable housing units in
Princeton, will vote on whether to
renew its existing contract with
an outside agency in September.
The PHA had an executive di-
rector, Scott Parsons, until 2011,
when he resigned to take a job
with Lakewood Housing Authori-
ty. At that time, a contract was en-
acted that required Parsons to
provide a minimum of 10 hours
of service per week to Princeton
in exchange for $65,000 a year.
Members of the Princeton Bor-
ough Council questioned the con-
tract, which more than doubled
Parsons’ hourly pay for a quarter
of the work he used to do.
A subcommittee that includes
former Borough Councilmember
Barbara Trelstad will look into
the possibility of hiring a new
full-time executive director in
lieu of renewing the existing con-
tract. The subcommittee will
present their recommendation to
the PHA board in September.
Mercer Co. man charged
in dog’s death pleads
not guilty to cruelty
Michael G. Rosenberg, a for-
mer Princeton resident on trial
for killing a 3-year-old German
shepherd left in his care last Au-
gust, pled not guilty on July 12 in
separate charges of abusing his
own two dogs.
The Mercer County Prosecu-
tor’s office has charged Rosen-
berg with committing animal
cruelty between February and
August 2012, when he was living
in Princeton.
Rosenberg was posing as a dog
trainer when Mercer County resi-
dent Tracy Stanton left her dog,
named “Shyanne,” in Rosenberg’s
care on the recommendation of a
friend.
Two days later, Rosenberg con-
tacted Stanton to inform her
Shyanne needed to see a veteri-
narian for what he thought were
heartworms.
By the time Stanton’s
boyfriend arrived at Rosenberg’s
residence minutes later, Shyanne
was unresponsive.
A necropsy performed on the
dog showed that Shyanne died of
blunt force trauma that resulted
in a punctured lung and four bro-
ken ribs.
Rosenberg was charged with
third-degree animal cruelty in
Shyanne’s death, and two counts
of fourth-degree animal cruelty
in the abuse of his own two dogs.
Each charge carries a sentence of
up to 18 months in prison.
Rosenberg is due back in Tren-
ton Superior Court on Aug. 29.
In addition, Princeton Animal
Control Officer Mark Johnson
said Rosenberg has a July 22
court date in Princeton Munici-
pal Court, where the charges in-
volve another dog that Rosenberg
reportedly abused while posing
as a dog trainer.
PHS enrollment reaches
new heights, expected
to continue rising
Princeton High School’s enroll-
ment for next school year is cur-
rently at 1,475 students, the high-
est it has been in more than a
decade.
School officials said they are
exploring options for staffing and
classroom space to accommodate
a growing number of students,
but that the school would not
need to use classroom trailers, as
the school was forced to do in
2006.
The district will add a physical
education teacher and a math and
computer-programming teacher.
In addition, a chemistry position
will be converted from part-time
to full-time.
The changes will bring the
high school faculty to approxi-
mately 115.
Enrollment is expected to con-
tinue to rise, as the eighth-grade
class entering the school as fresh-
men in 2014 includes about 40 stu-
dents more than usual.
news BRIEFS
JULY 24-30, 2013 – THE PRINCETON SUN 3
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The following incidents were
taken from reports on file with
the Princeton Police Department:
On July 8 at 3:04 p.m., a caller
reported to police that, while
their vehicle was parked at
Princeton Shopping Center, an
unknown person or persons
scratched the vehicle with a
sharp object, causing damage to
the paint.
On July 8 at 11:39 a.m., during a
motor vehicle stop, a $175 traffic
warrant was discovered for a 57-
year-old man out of Bordentown.
The man was placed under ar-
rest, transported to police HQ and
later released after posting bail.
On July 8 at 6:12 p.m., a 2008
Honda driven by an 18-year-old
woman was westbound on Stock-
ton Street at Library Place when
it impacted with a 2010 Honda
driven by a 65-year-old man, who
was driving southbound on Li-
brary Place. As a result of the
crash, the man complained of
shoulder pain but declined trans-
port to the hospital. The woman
was issued a summons for disre-
gard of the traffic signal.
On July 9 at 6:47 p.m., police
were alerted by several callers ad-
vising that a black SUV was driv-
ing on North Harrison Street
spraying an unknown liquid on
pedestrians. Police located the ve-
hicle traveling on Valley Road
and upon being hailed to stop, the
driver of the vehicle, later identi-
fied as a 19-year-old man, fled
from police. The vehicle was posi-
tively identified and was located
minutes later parked on Cherry
Hill Road. The driver was
charged with eluding police and
multiple motor vehicle charges,
including driving while suspend-
ed. The two passengers in the ve-
hicle, an 18 and 19 year old, were
police reports
please see POLICE, page 11
4 THE PRINCETON SUN — JULY 24-30, 2013
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Resident coordinates
NEDA walk on Sept. 22
By KATIE MORGAN
The Princeton Sun
A Princeton resident is coordi-
nating the first ever Central Jer-
sey charity walk on Sept. 22 to
benefit the National Eating Disor-
der Association.
Lisa Roe said that while she
has never had an eating disorder,
she has always had a particular
interest in helping people who
suffer from disorders including
anorexia nervosa, bulimia ner-
vosa, binge eating disorder or an
unspecified eating disorder.
“I don’t have an eating disor-
der, and no one in my family has
an eating disorder,” Roe said.
“But for some reason, I’ve always
felt there’s tremendous pressure
on young men and women to look
a certain way and have a certain
body. That whole body image
issue, and the way it’s represent-
ed in the media – that leads to eat-
ing disorders. That’s something
I’ve always just cared about.”
Roe, who works as a librarian
at The College of New Jersey, said
she was inspired to take action
when she saw “Someday Melis-
please see WALK, page 17
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in our opinion
6 THE PRINCETON SUN — JULY 24-30, 2013
1330 Route 206, Suite 211
Skillman, NJ 08558
609-751-0245
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 1330 Route 206, Suite 211,
Skillman, NJ 08558. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08042 and 08540 ZIP
codes.
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For information, please call 609-751-0245.
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news@theprincetonsun.com. For advertis-
ing information, call (609) 751-0245 or
email advertising@theprincetonsun.com.
The Sun welcomes comments from readers –
including any information about errors that
may call for a correction to be printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers.
Brief and to the point is best, so we look for
letters that are 300 words or fewer. Include
your name, address and phone number. We
do not print anonymous letters. Send letters
to news@theprincetonsun.com, via fax at
609-751-0245, or via the mail. Of course,
you can drop them off at our office, too.
The Princeton Sun reserves the right to
reprint your letter in any medium – includ-
ing electronically.
PUBLISHER Steve Miller
EXECUTIVE EDITOR Tim Ronaldson
VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Joe Eisele
MANAGING EDITOR Mary L. Serkalow
PRODUCTION EDITOR Patricia Dove
COMMUNITY EDITOR Michael Redmond
PRINCETON EDITOR Katie Morgan
ART DIRECTOR Tom Engle
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Russell Cann
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Barry Rubens
VICE CHAIRMAN Michael LaCount, Ph.D.
ELAUWIT MEDIA GROUP
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Dan McDonough, Jr.
EDITOR EMERITUS Alan Bauer
T
he Internet is quite a powerful
tool, but, sometimes its power
can be used for bad instead of
good. Information as harmless as
facts, someone’s opinion or pictures of
people having fun can turn harmful in
a second.
Inappropriate comments on a photo;
attacking someone’s character, race,
religion or sexuality; cyber-bullying;
or straight mis-reporting facts all take
advantage of the Internet’s power to
do bad.
Social media sites such as Facebook,
Twitter and Instagram make it easier
to connect people all over the world,
and even easier to do so in a negative
fashion.
But, luckily, there is some good
going on in the digital world.
The state recently released its Uni-
form Crime Reporting rates, and local
police departments have attributed
significant drops in crime to the their
utilization of social media.
In Evesham Township, for example,
crime dropped 21.7 percent. In
Moorestown, crime dropped 36.9 per-
cent. Officials from both departments
say their presence on Facebook and
Twitter has helped tremendously.
Both of those departments use the
social media sites, as well as informa-
tion sharing service Nixle, to not only
notify residents of crimes, alerts and
issues, but also as communication
tools for residents to submit their own
issues and concerns directly to the de-
partment.
They’ve found that it’s much easier,
and more efficient, for residents to
submit information on the computer
than it is to call in or stop by their of-
fices.
It’s great to see that police depart-
ments at a local level are utilizing the
latest technology to make their jobs
easier and more efficient, and provid-
ing more avenues for residents to feel
safe and communicate with their local
police force.
Evesham and Moorestown aren’t
the only towns with police depart-
ments doing this; they are just exam-
ples.
To those departments that are doing
the same, bravo; keep it up. To those
that aren’t, it’s time to step up and go
out on a limb. It’s worth it.
Social media more than just pics
Police departments using Facebook, Twitter to help reduce crime
Your thoughts
Do you follow your local police
department on Twitter, Facebook or
other online sites? What is your police
department doing well? How can it
improve? Tell us your thoughts.
French Baroque music to be featured at July 24 concert
In its inaugural performance, Les Agre-
ments de musique will present a concert
featuring French Baroque music for
recorder and harpsichord on Wednesday,
July 24 at 7:30 p.m. in Bristol Chapel on the
campus of Westminster Choir College. The
concert is free and open to the public.
The performance will highlight the
music of French Baroque masters
Couperin, Hotteterre, Le Roux, Blavet,
Lully, Rameau and others.
Les Agrements de musique was founded
by Minju Lee and John Burkhalter to sur-
vey the grandeur and intimacy of the mu-
sical riches associated with the courts of
Louis XIII, his son and heir Louis XIV and
his great-grandson Louis XV. The ensem-
ble specializes exclusively in the field of
French Baroque music and performs
repertory on period instrument copies of
recorders and harpsichord at the Paris/
Versailles pitch of A392, a whole step lower
than today's more common A440.
Lee earned her bachelor’s degree in
music composition at Hanyang University
in Korea; her master's degree and Doctor of
musical arts in harpsichord performance
under Arthur Haas at the State University
of New York at Stony Brook; and artist
diploma at Oberlin Conservatory of Music
under Lisa Crawford. She has many years
of experience teaching harpsichord music,
theory and basso continuo at the Korea Na-
tional University of Art, Hanyang Univer-
sity and elsewhere. Lee has performed
widely in Korea and the U.S. Recent ap-
pearances have been with the early music
groups Zorzal, The Practitioners of Mu-
sick and La Fiocco.
Burkhalter studied the performance of
early music at the New England Conserva-
tory of Music in Boston under Daniel
Pinkham and the performance of Baroque
music at Harvard University under the
noted Dutch recorder virtuoso, scholar and
conductor Frans Bruggen. In addition, he
received valuable instruction from the dis-
tinguished Swiss Baroque oboist and
recorder player Michel Piguet. Artistic Di-
rector of The Practitioners of Musick,
Burkhalter also performs with Le Triom-
phe de l' amour, Brandywine Baroque and
the Princeton University early music
group Musica Alta. He regularly performs
in various English country dance bands,
most notably, with the Germantown Colo-
nial Assembly of Philadelphia and New
York's 92nd Street Y.
Westminster Choir College is located at
101 Walnut Lane in Princeton.
WEDNESDAY JULY 24
Champagne and Tapas at Mistral
restaurant. 7 p.m. $65 all-inclu-
sive.more info and signup at:
http://www.coolvines.com/events
Institutes of Theology and Wor-
ship, Princeton Theological Semi-
nary. Miller Chapel. 7 p.m. 'Sing-
ing of Wisdom,' a hymn sing led
by Mary Louise Bringle, professor
or philosophy and religious stud-
ies at Brevard College. Free.
Open Mic, Alchemist & Barrister,
28 Witherspoon St. Princeton,
(609) 924-5555. 10 p.m. 21 plus.
www.theaandb.com.
Contra Dance, Princeton Country
Dancers, Suzanne Patterson
Center, Monument Drive, Prince-
ton, (609) 924-6763. 7:30 p.m. to
10:30 p.m. Instruction followed by
dance. $8. www.princetoncoun-
trydancers.org.
Cornerstone Community Kitchen,
Princeton United Methodist
Church, Nassau at Vandeventer
Street, Princeton, (609) 924-
2613. 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Hot
meals served, prepared by TASK.
Free. www.princetonumc.org.
Guided Tour, Drumthwacket Foun-
dation. 354 Stockton St., Prince-
ton, (609) 683-0057. 1 p.m. New
Jersey governor's official resi-
dence. Group tours are available.
Register. $5 donation.
www.drumthwacket.org.
Tour and Tea, Morven Museum, 55
Stockton St., Princeton, (609)
924-8144. 1 p.m. Tour the
restored mansion, galleries, and
gardens before or after tea. Reg-
ister. $20. www.morven.org.
Animal Sleepover, Princeton Pub-
lic Library. 65 Witherspoon St.,
(609) 924-8822. 7 p.m. Children
are invited to bring a stuffed ani-
mal to an evening storytime and
leave their animal overnight. Ani-
mals, along with photographs
showing what kind of fun they
had, may be picked up the next
morning. For families with chil-
dren ages three and older.
www.princetonlibrary.org
Beat the Heat Movie Series,
Princeton Senior Resource Cen-
ter, Suzanne Patterson Building,
45 Stockton St., (609) 924-7108
1 p.m. Popcorn and screening of
'Sound of Music: Sing-along.'
Register. Free. www.princetonse-
nior.org
THURSDAY JULY 25
Summer Courtyard Concert
Series, Arts Council of Princeton,
Princeton Shopping Center, 301
North Harrison St., Princeton,
(609) 924-8777. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Animus performs traditional Lat-
in, Eastern Mediterranean, and
Middle Eastern music. Bring a
lawn chair. Free. www.artscoun-
cilofprinceton.org
The 39 Steps, Princeton Summer
Theater, Hamilton Murray The-
ater, Princeton University, (609)
258-7062. 8 p.m. Hitchcock
spoof. $25. www.princetonsum-
mertheater.org
How Thumbelina Found Her Wings,
Princeton Summer Theater,
Hamilton Murray Theater, Prince-
ton University, (609) 258-7062. 11
a.m. Autograph session for kids
to meet their favorite characters
follows the show. $9. www.prince-
tonsummertheater.org
Homegoings, Princeton Public
Library, 65 Witherspoon St.,
Princeton, (609) 924-9529. 7
p.m. Documentary focusing on
African American funerals. Free.
www.princetonlibrary.org
Argentine Tango, Viva Tango,
Suzanne Patterson Center, 45
Stockton St., Princeton, (609)
948-4448. 8 p.m. Lesson and
practice session. Performance by
Vittoria and Guillermo. $10
includes refreshments. vivatan-
go.org.
Princeton Farmers' Market, Hinds
Plaza, Witherspoon Street,
Princeton, (609) 655-8095. 11
a.m. to 4 p.m. Produce, cheese,
breads, baked goods, flowers,
chef cooking demonstrations,
books for sale, family activities,
workshops, music and more. Rain
or shine. www.princetonfarmers-
market.com.
Hiring Event, McCarter Theater, 91
University Place, (609) 258-2787.
6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Recruitment
event for part-time positions in
the front of house department.
Register and send resume to
tbitetto@mcccarter.org.
www.mccarter.org.
BNI Growth by Referral (Mont-
gomery), Princeton Elks Club,
354 Route 518, Skillman, (908)
359-4787. 7 a.m. Weekly network-
ing, free. Call Dave Saltzman,
(609) 430-9740, or Lorette Pru-
den, (908) 359-4787.
CALENDAR PAGE 8 JULY 24-30, 2013
The Golf Club for Young Professionals
Hopewell Valley Golf Club Associate Junior Golf Membership
This Membership is focused on creating an affordable Membership
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on our 1927 Thomas Winton design golf course. Here at Hopewell Valley
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individuals who are under 36 years of age.
Hopewell Valley Golf Club will accept 12 Associate Junior Golf
Memberships from each category: 20-27 years old, 28-35 years old.
After which a wait list will be created.
The Dues for an Associate Junior Golf Membership is determined by adding
two zeros to your age. For example:
25 year old = $2,500 / $208.33 per month + tax ($50 Monthly Food Minimum)
34 year old = $3,400 / $283.33 per month + tax ($50 Monthly Food Minimum)
HOPEWELL VALLEY GOLF CLUB
114 Hopewell Pennington Rd., Hopewell, NJ 08525
Please Contact our General Manager Bill Shaw
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FRIDAY JULY 26
An Evening of Dance, American
Repertory Ballet, Berlind Theater,
McCarter Theater Center, 61 Uni-
versity Place, Princeton, (609)
921-7758. 6:30 p.m. Culminating
performance for Princeton Ballet
School's summer intensive pro-
gram. $25. www.arballet.org.
The 39 Steps, Princeton Summer
Theater, Hamilton Murray The-
ater, Princeton University, (609)
258-7062. 8 p.m. Hitchcock
spoof. $25. www.princetonsum-
mertheater.org.
How Thumbelina Found Her Wings,
Princeton Summer Theater,
Hamilton Murray Theater, Prince-
ton University, (609) 258-7062. 11
a.m. Autograph session for kids
to meet their favorite characters
follows the show. $9. www.prince-
tonsummertheater.org.
Outdoor Dancing, Central Jersey
Dance Society, Hinds Plaza, With-
erspoon Street, Princeton, (609)
945-1883. 7:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m.
All styles. No partner needed.
Free.
www.centraljerseydance.org.
Divorce Recovery Program, Prince-
ton Church of Christ, 33 River
Road, Princeton, (609) 581-3889.
7:30 p.m. Non-denominational
support group for men and
women. Free. www.prince-
tonchurchofchrist.com.
Professional Service Group,
Princeton Public Library, (609)
292-7535. 10 a.m. weekly career
meeting, support and networking
for unemployed professionals,
free.
www.psgofmercercounty.blogspo
t.com.
Ragtime Relics, Halo Pub, 5 Hulfish
St., Princeton, (609) 921-1710 6
p.m. to 9 p.m. American roots
music.
SATURDAY JULY 27
Larry Tritel, Thomas Sweet Ice
Cream, 183 Nassau St., Princeton,
(609) 683-8720. 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Guitar and vocals. www.thomass-
weet.com.
Summer Music Series, Palmer
Square, On the Green, (609) 921-
2333. 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. The Kootz
performs. Free. www.palmer-
square.com.
The 39 Steps, Princeton Summer
Theater, Hamilton Murray The-
ater, Princeton University, (609)
258-7062. 8 p.m. Hitchcock
spoof. $25. www.princetonsum-
mertheater.org.
How Thumbelina Found Her Wings,
Princeton Summer Theater,
Hamilton Murray Theater, Prince-
ton University, (609) 258-7062. 11
a.m. Autograph session for kids
to meet their favorite characters
follows the show. $9. www.prince-
tonsummertheater.org.
Wreck-It Ralph, Princeton Public
Library, 65 Witherspoon St.,
Princeton, (609) 924-9529. 3
p.m. Free.
www.princetonlibrary.org.
Contra Dance, Princeton Country
Dancers, Suzanne Patterson Cen-
ter, Monument Drive, Princeton,
(609) 924-6763. 7:30 p.m.
Instruction followed by dance.
$10. www.princetoncountry-
dancers.org.
Meeting, Bhakti Vedanta Institute,
20 Nassau St., Princeton, (732)
604-4135. 2 p.m. Discussion,
meditation, and Indian vegetari-
an luncheon. Register by E-mail
to princeton@bviscs.org.
http://bviscs.org.
Yoga for Athletes, Princeton Center
for Yoga & Health, Orchard Hill
Center, 88 Orchard Road Skill-
man, (609) 924-7294. 2 p.m.
Challenge your power and bal-
ance with Jay Karlinski. Register.
$35. www.princetonyoga.com.
Kids Day Out, Tiger Hall Play Zone,
53 State Road, Princeton, (609)
356-0018. 1 p.m. Story time, tum-
ble time, games, snack, and
crafts. $12 per hour with two hour
minimum. Optional dinner for $3.
Extended care to 10 p.m. avail-
able. www.tigerhallkids.com.
Princeton Canal Walkers, Turning
Basin Park, Alexander Road,
Princeton, (609) 638-6552. 10
a.m. Three-mile walk on the tow-
path. Bad weather cancels. Free.
Ghost Tour, Princeton Tour Compa-
ny, Witherspoon and Nassau
streets, (609)-902-3637. 8 p.m.
$20. www.princetontourcompa-
ny.com.
Hiring Event, McCarter Theater, 91
University Place, (609) 258-2787
1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Recruitment
event for part-time positions in
the front of house department.
Register and send resume to
tbitetto@mcccarter.org.
www.mccarter.org.
SUNDAY JULY 28
Highlight Tour, Princeton University
Art Museum, Princeton campus,
(609) 258-3788. 2 p.m. Free. art-
museum.princeton.edu.
The 39 Steps, Princeton Summer
Theater, Hamilton Murray The-
ater, Princeton University, (609)
258-7062. 2 p.m. Hitchcock
spoof. $25. www.princetonsum-
mertheater.org.
Walking Tour, Historical Society of
Princeton, Bainbridge House, 158
Nassau St., Princeton, (609) 921-
6748. 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Two-hour
walking tour of downtown Prince-
ton and Princeton University
includes stories about the early
history of Princeton, the founding
of the university, and the Ameri-
can Revolution. $7; $4 for ages 6
10 THE PRINCETON SUN — JULY 24-30, 2013
SUMMER
FAIR
Sun., 8/11
11to 4
$25 off
Any Party
Not valid with any other offer. Discount only
applies to base party price and does not
apply to any packages or extras added.
Code: PS026 · Expires 12/31/2013.
www.jumpzoneparty.com
Open!Play Special
Buy one admission
at regular price,
get one FREE!
Not valid with any other offer.
Code: PS026 · Expires 12/31/2013.
www.jumpzoneparty.com
calendar
CALENDAR
Continued from page 8
please see CALENDAR, page 14
charged with harassment as they
had sprayed what was deter-
mined to be water on the pedestri-
ans. All were released with a
pending court date.
On July 9 at 2:20 p.m., a vehicle
became disabled on Route 206. A
routine check of the driver re-
vealed warrants totaling $775 out
of several towns. The driver was
placed under arrest, transported
to police HQ and later released on
his own recognizance by the issu-
ing towns.
On July 9 at 11:45 a.m., the
manager at a store in the 100
block of Nassau Street called po-
lice to report that someone had
just left the store and had stolen a
cowboy hat. The caller was able to
give patrols a detailed description
of the actor. Minutes later patrols
located a 30-year-old man who
matched the description given by
the caller, a short distance from
the store in possession of the hat.
The man was placed under ar-
rest, transported to police HQ,
processed and later released.
On July 11 at 1:19 a.m., during a
motor vehicle stop, it was discov-
ered that the 57-year-old driver
had consumed alcoholic bever-
ages and then operated his vehi-
cle. The man was placed under ar-
rest, transported to police head-
quarters and processed. He was
later released to a friend with a
pending court date.
On July 12 at 9:50 p.m., police
were alerted that a 20-year-old
woman had presented a falsified
drivers license in an attempt to
enter a bar on Nassau Street. The
woman was placed under arrest,
transported to police HQ and
later released after being issued a
complaint summons with an up-
coming court date.
On July 13 at 3:30 p.m., patrols
responded to a report of a motor
vehicle crash without injuries in
the 300 block of Jefferson Rd.
Upon investigation of the crash,
it was discovered that the 56-year-
old driver had consumed alco-
holic beverages prior to operating
her vehicle. The driver was
placed under arrest, transported
to police HQ, and processed. She
was later released to a relative.
On July 13 at 3:33 a.m., a 21-
year-old man was placed under
arrest by State Police and turned
over to Princeton Police on a
Princeton Municipal Court war-
rant. He was released after post-
ing the $114 bail.
On July 13 at 4:44 p.m., both a
2000 Honda driven by a 33-year-
old and a 2010 Honda driven by a
42-year-old were southbound on
State Road at the intersection of
Mountain Avenue. As both vehi-
cles stopped in traffic at the inter-
section, the vehicle driven by the
33-year-old was struck from be-
hind by the vehicle driven by the
42-year-old. The 33-year-old com-
plained of neck pain but refused
treatment at the scene; the 42-
year-old was issued a summons
for careless driving.
On July 14 at 11:25 p.m., during
a motor vehicle stop, a warrant
for $336 was located out of Prince-
ton Municipal Court for the 40-
year-old driver. She was placed
under arrest and transported to
police HQ where she was later re-
leased on her own recognizance.
On July 14 at 2:14 p.m., a 2006
Toyota driven by a 74-year-old
was eastbound on Valley Road
when it was struck by a 2002 Ford
driven by a 52-year-old, which
was southbound on Ewing Street.
The impact occurred in the inter-
section of Valley Road and Ewing
Street. As a result of the crash in-
vestigation, the 52-year-old was is-
sued a summons for disregarding
the stop sign at the intersection.
The 74-year-old complained of
neck pain as a result of the crash
and was transported to Universi-
ty Medical Center Princeton-
Plainsboro by Princeton First Aid
Rescue Squad for treatment of
her injuries.
On July 15 at 2:45 a.m., while
patrolling the American Water
Co. property on Mt. Lucas Road,
patrols discovered graffiti had
been painted on the water tower.
The cost to remove the damage
was unknown.
JULY 24-30, 2013 – THE PRINCETON SUN 11
Valid at Princeton Location Only.
Police Reports
POLICE
Continued from page 3
Send us your Princeton news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos?
Shoot an interesting video?
Drop us an email at news@theprincetonsun.com.
Fax us at 856-427-0934. Call the editor at 609-751-0245.
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West Windsor
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HILLSBOROUGH
that governs interstate freight
rail lines, asking that they declare
jurisdiction over the Dinky line.
The petition is a joinder to a pe-
tition jointly filed on June 24 by
the New Jersey Association of
Rail Passengers and the National
Association of Rail Passengers.
In the petition, the NJ-ARP and
NARP “request that the [Surface
Transportation] Board exercise
its discretion to remove uncer-
tainty, and declare that the
Princeton Branch is a line of rail-
road subject to the jurisdiction of
the board and that any abandon-
ment of all or part of the line, in-
cluding the railroad station build-
ings located thereon, must be ap-
proved by the board.”
The STB has jurisdiction over
any freight rail lines that are part
of an interstate rail network, and
once jurisdiction is declared, the
STB has that jurisdiction in per-
petuity, even if the line is no
longer used for freight transport.
“For passenger rail our juris-
diction is a little more murky,” an
STB spokesman said. “Generally,
we do not have jurisdiction on a
passenger rail between two points
in the same state.”
Philip Craig, director of the
NJ-ARP, said the petition argues
that the Dinky line should qualify
as interstate commerce.
“There are shuttle trains that
run between Princeton and
Princeton Junction, and NJ Tran-
sit is trying to pass this off as a
local transit function,” Craig
said. “But most of the passengers
are destined for Philadelphia or
New York. There are also Amtrak
trains that stop at Princeton
Junction. This is truly an inter-
state commerce, and therefore
falls under the jurisdiction of
STB.”
If the STB ruled that it has ju-
risdiction over the Princeton
Branch, NJ Transit would have to
apply for abandonment authority
before the line could be suspend-
ed or rerouted.
Bruce Afran, a lawyer for the
Save the Dinky group, said the
permission from STB to abandon
a line is dependent on whether
the public convenience and neces-
sity require abandonment of the
track.
“In this case, the only conven-
ience and necessity is that they
want to run a ramp from the
parking garage across where the
train tracks currently are,” Afran
said. “Obviously, there is no ne-
cessity. It makes it much harder
to use the train, and in addition,
people will have to cross that new
ramp to get to the station. Right
now, if you are walking down the
sidewalk to the station, you never
have contact with a vehicle. Clear-
Group tries to ‘Save the Dinky’
GROUP
Continued from page 1
Visit us on the Web at www.theprincetonsun.com
please see DECISION, page 17
to 12. www.princetonhistory.org.
Leadership Academy, At the Well,
Friend Center, 58 Prospect Ave.,
Princeton, (646) 592-1488. 10
a.m. First day of a two-week pro-
gram of lessons for teen girls
ages 13 to 16 from the tri-state
area. Registration includes an
application, recommendation let-
ter, essay, interview, and a 3.0
GPA. Scholarships available.
www.atthewellconferences.org.
MONDAY JULY 29
Rehearsal, Jersey Harmony Chorus,
1065 Canal Road, Princeton,
(732) 469-3983. 7:15 p.m. New
members are welcome. www.har-
monize.com/jerseyharmony.
Brokeback Mountain, Princeton
Public Library, 65 Witherspoon
St., Princeton, (609) 924-9529.
6:30 p.m. Free. www.princetonli-
brary.org.
TUESDAY JULY 30
CoOperative Opera, Westminster
Choir College, Bristol Chapel,
Princeton, (609) 924-7416. 7:30
p.m. Community sing presented
by Tom Shelton, a faculty mem-
ber of the Westminster Choir Col-
lege. Bring your own score or
borrow one. www.rider.edu.
International Folk Dance, Princeton
Folk Dance, Suzanne Patterson
Center, 45 Stockton St., Prince-
ton, (609) 921-9340. 7:30 p.m. to
9:30 p.m. Ethnic dances with
original music. Beginners wel-
come. Lesson followed by dance.
Lines and circles. No partner
needed. $3. www.princetonfolk-
dance.org.
Vacation Bible School, Princeton
United Methodist Church, Nassau
at Vandeventer Street, (609)
924-2613. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. 'Mis-
sion Madness' includes family
meals, fellowship, Bible stories,
and opportunities to serve in
ministry locally, regionally, and
beyond. Children from pre-school
to fifth grade are invited to
attend. Teen and adult volunteers
are welcome. Parents and fami-
lies may attend for supper and
programming. Register. Dona-
tions of towels, washcloths and
canned food are encouraged. E-
mail cathie@princetonumc.org
for registration forms.
www.princetonumc.org.
Guided Tour, Princeton Airport, 41
Airpark Road, Montgomery,
(609) 921-3100. 10:30 a.m. Tour
includes information about the
airport, the present, and the
future. View experimental, aero-
batic and homebuilt aircraft;
watch arrivals of planes; visit the
maintenance shop; and sit in a
plane to understand how the con-
trols work. Rain cancels. Free.
www.princetonairport.com.
Downton Abbey Tea Time, Prince-
ton Public Library, 65 Wither-
spoon St., Princeton, (609) 924-
9529. 3 p.m. Screening of two
episodes of 'Downton Abbey' and
tea. www.princetonlibrary.org.
Capital Networking Group, Prince-
ton United Methodist Church, 7
Vandeventer Avenue, Princeton,
(609) 635-1411. 7 a.m. weekly net-
working, free.
14 THE PRINCETON SUN — JULY 24-30, 2013
Heating, Plumbing,
Cooling and Fuel
SINCE 1925
Licensed On-Staff
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calendar
CALENDAR
Continued from page 10
McCarter to host
two hiring events
McCarter Theatre will hold
two hiring events for its Front of
House Department on Thursday,
July 25 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., and
on Saturday, July 27 from 1 p.m. to
4 p.m. Interested applicants will
be scheduled for one interview
during this two-day event.
McCarter is only recruiting for
the following part-time positions
in the Front of House Depart-
ment: assistant house manager,
food and beverage supervisor,
café staff, security and parking at-
tendant.
To schedule an appointment,
please contact Tricia Bitetto,
house services manager, at tbitet-
to@mccarter.org. Please include
the following in your email: a
copy of your resume, the posi-
tion(s) you are applying for, and
the date that you would like to at-
tend. Dress for success and please
bring at least one copy of your re-
sume with you. Walk-in appli-
cants are permitted, but are sub-
ject to rescheduling. McCarter
Theatre is an equal opportunity
employer. No phone calls please.
For more information, visit
www.mccarter.org. McCarter
Theatre is located at 91 University
Place in Princeton.
WE'VE G0T Y0U
C0VERED
Sun Newspapers
IN PRINT:
Æ0NTG0ÆERY
The South Jersey Sun
HTTP:]]SJ.SUNNE.WS
The Central Jersey Sun
HTTP:]]CJ.SUNNE.WS
&ND 0NLINE:
PRINCET0N
WEST WINDS0R
L&WRENCE
H0PEWELL
Æ00REST0WN
ÆT. L&UREL
ÆEDP0RD
T&BERN&CLE
SH&Æ0NG
Æ&RLT0N
V00RHEES
CHERRY HILL
H&DD0NPIELD
108 Kings Highway East
Haddonfield, NJ 08033
856.427.0933
elauwit.com
By KATIE MORGAN
The Princeton Sun
The Philadelphia Orchestra re-
turned to Princeton for the first
time in more than 50 years on
July 17 to play the sixth annual
Midsummer Celebration Concert
hosted by the Scheide Fund.
The fund is a philanthropic or-
ganization that helps finance
charitable projects that benefit
Princeton residents. Bill Scheide
and his wife Judy, the president of
the Scheide Fund, are lifelong
supporters of classical and cham-
ber music, and frequently con-
tribute first editions of renowned
musical compositions to Prince-
ton University’s Scheide Library.
Judy said this year’s Midsum-
mer Celebration was bigger and
better than previous years, large-
ly due to the return of the
Philadelphia Orchestra.
“The Philadelphia Orchestra
reached out to us through mutual
friends to ask if they could do the
concert,” Judy said. “Since they
haven’t done it before, we’ve
worked together to make it hap-
pen. It’s a bigger situation than in
previous years, simply because
it’s a bigger orchestra. That
makes it more complicated, and
we want it to be perfect. It’s im-
portant for it to be a premier
event, so the planning has been
very rigorous and we’ve left no
stone unturned.”
Mark Laycock, the favorite con-
ductor of, and a personal friend to
Bill Scheide, conducted the con-
cert in the Richardson Auditori-
um at Princeton University.
“We began flying Mark in to
conduct our concerts after he
moved to Germany,” Judy said.
“Bill said he could not bear the
thought of never seeing another
concert with Mark as the conduc-
tor. We just love having him here.
We wouldn’t have any other con-
ductor.”
The orchestra worked with
Laycock to choose pieces from
their repertoire that embodied
what Judy called “the Philadel-
phia sound.”
The orchestra performed
Prokofiev’s “Symphony No. 1,”
Weber’s “Overture to Oberon,”
Brahms’ “Variations of a Theme
of Haydn” and Schumann’s
“Symphony No. 1 (Spring).”
“These are all masterworks
and orchestral pieces from the
very heart of the symphonic
repertoire,” Laycock said. “They
showcase the brilliance and
trademark sound of the Philadel-
phia Orchestra.”
Judy said the unique sound of
the more than 60-piece orchestra
comes from the balance between
the instruments.
“It’s a very lush sound,” she
said. “It comes from a combina-
tion of the strings and the wood-
winds. I’ve never heard another
orchestra sound quite like this,
and we were so glad they chose
pieces that would specifically em-
phasize that sound.”
The Scheide Fund’s next con-
cert will mark Bill’s 100th birth-
day, and will be performed by the
Vienna Chamber Orchestra on
Jan. 25, 2014.
16 THE PRINCETON SUN — JULY 24-30, 2013
• Save money and make money • Very simple
• Huge demand • Residual revenue
• Save money and make money • Very simple
• Huge demand • Residual revenue
Send news and photos to
The Princeton Sun via email
to news@theprincetonsun.com.
Tell us your news.
We’ll tell
everyone else.
* Getting married?
* Engaged?
* Expecting?
* Need to thank someone?
Philadelphia Orchestra features
‘lush’ sound at Scheide concert
KATIE MORGAN/The Princeton Sun
Allison Vulgamore, president and CEO of the Philadelphia Orchestra,
addresses the audience of the Scheide Midsummer Celebration Con-
cert at Richardson Auditorium on July 17 while Judy Scheide looks
on.
ly, this is actually a public incon-
venience.”
STB officials, however, said the
decision to issue abandonment
authority is actually based on an
economic analysis. The STB in-
vestigates whether the costs of
the rail line exceed the revenue,
and if they find it to be unprof-
itable, in most cases they will
issue the abandonment authority.
Now that the petitions have
been filed, and the STB says it has
received a reply from NJ Transit,
the board can either make a deci-
sion regarding jurisdiction based
on the information provided, or it
can begin proceedings and re-
quest more information from the
involved parties for a hearing.
The university has already
begun construction on the first
phases of the Arts and Transit
project, and plans to begin the
Dinky station move in September.
“The university wants to
change the train service in Sep-
tember, so we either need a
prompt hearing or an injunc-
tion,” Afran said.
STB said that if the board has-
n’t issued a decision by the time
construction is slated to begin,
the NJ-ARP and NARP and the
Save the Dinky group can file
with the federal district court for
an injunction asking it to hold
that construction cannot move
forward until the STB rules.
Martin Mbugua, director of
media relations at Princeton Uni-
versity, said the school was aware
of the filings with the STB.
“We were not surprised by
their intervention,” Mbugua said
in an email. “We don’t believe this
will have any impact on the proj-
ect or the timetable.”
STB officials said there is no
deadline for the board to decide
whether to issue a decision or
move into proceedings. If a deci-
sion to claim jurisdiction is made
after track removal begins, the
university would be forced to re-
verse any action.
“Well,” an STB official said, “I
guess they’d have to go ahead and
put it back in.”
Afran is also representing the
Save the Dinky group in two sepa-
rate Superior Court cases involv-
ing the Arts and Transit project.
The first, in the Chancery Divi-
sion court of Superior Court
Judge Hon. Paul Innes, argues
that the language of a 1984 con-
tract between the university and
NJ Transit does not permit the
university to move the Dinky to
the planned location.
“In 1984, when NJ Transit sold
the land the Dinky sits on to the
university, the contract had a pro-
vision that says the university
may move the service from the
North building, where the station
is currently, to the South build-
ing,” Afran said. “That’s a dis-
tance of about 60 feet. The con-
tract is designed to allow that
change, but in no way does it
allow the removal of the service
to that particular location.”
The university filed a motion
to have the case dismissed, but
Innes ruled this month that the
trial would go ahead.
The other lawsuit brought by
the group represented by Afran is
an action challenging the ordi-
nances approved by the munici-
pality that allow the university to
build the entire Arts and Transit
project.
“Without the ordinances that
now exist, the university couldn’t
build anything,” Afran said.
“This project would require hun-
dreds of variances from the Zon-
ing Board.
“The ordinances that are allow-
ing them to build this are a spe-
cial grant of power to one
landowner only. The Arts Zoning
ordinances give the university
the privilege to depart from the
ordinances that covered those
areas. This is what is called spot
zoning. Generally, such zoning is
illegal.”
That trial, in the court of Supe-
rior Count Judge Hon. Douglas
Hurd, is scheduled to begin on
Sept. 23.
sa,” a documentary made by Judy
Avrin after her daughter’s death
from bulimia.
“I went to library school with
Judy,” Roe said. “The documen-
tary really made an impact on
me. On the ‘Someday Melissa’
website, there are links to re-
sources, and that’s how I came
across NEDA. I saw that they
were holding walks all over the
country, and I thought it would be
a perfect way to involve the com-
munity.”
According the NEDA website,
20 million women and 10 million
men in the United States suffer
from a significant eating disorder
at some time in their life, and
anorexia has the highest mortali-
ty rate of any mental illness.
In addition, four out of 10 peo-
ple reported in a national survey
that they either suffered, or knew
someone who suffered, from an
eating disorder.
Roe feels that while occur-
rences of eating disorders are
alarmingly common, there is not
enough national discussion about
the diseases.
“Almost everyone knows some-
one whose life has been touched
by an eating disorder,” Roe said.
“But I think that in our communi-
ty, and in many communities, eat-
ing disorders have become a real-
ly taboo topic. I think that in the
schools and at home, it’s some-
times a difficult thing to talk
about. I think people don’t under-
stand it, and there’s a lot of stig-
ma attached.”
Roe also said she feels young
people are particularly at risk of
developing eating disorders be-
cause of a culture that is becom-
ing more and more picture-based.
“I feel like our culture, espe-
cially with young people, is be-
coming very visual,” Roe said.
“There are things like Snapchat
and Instagram, where kids are
constantly posting pictures of
themselves. In a way you could
say, ‘hey, so this means maybe
more normal-weight people are
taking pictures of themselves.’
But at the same time I think it
just means there’s more pressure
to look a certain way in these pic-
tures.”
Roe said the goal of the Central
Jersey NEDA walk is to educate
the community about the issue of
eating disorders, and to start a
conversation about the issues sur-
rounding them.
“I think the walk will really ed-
ucate this community,” Roe said.
“It’s about getting the word out
that help is available, and making
people understand that it’s OK to
talk about it, and it’s OK to ask for
help. The earlier eating disorders
are treated, or treatment is
sought, the better the outcome. If
people become more aware of the
signs, and what to look for, it
might help individuals recover
more quickly.”
The one-mile walk will be held
Sept. 22 at Montgomery Park in
Belle Mead. Participant check-in
will begin at 9 a.m. and the race
will begin at 10 a.m.
Registration is $15 for students
and $25 for adults, and is available
online by visiting www.na-
tionaleatingdisorders.org/find-
event and selecting the Central
NJ walk.
All participants will receive a
free walk t-shirt, and will be invit-
ed to listen to guest speaker Judy
Avrin and a musical performance
from local singer-songwriter Na-
talie Acciani.
JULY 24-30, 2013 – THE PRINCETON SUN 17
Walk to be held at
Montgomery Park
WALK
Continued from page 4
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DECISION
Continued from page 13
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