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Program overview

18-Jan-2009 18:42 Year Organization Education 2008/2009 Elektrotechniek, Wiskunde en Informatica Master Electrical Engineering

Code Omschrijving Track Telecommunications EE 2008 Compulsory Courses (20 ECTS) Compulsory Courses TC(20 ECTS) EE 2008 EE 2008
ET4356 ET4357 ET4358 ET4359 Electromagnetics Observation Systems Wireless Communication Advances in Networking

ECTS

p1

p2

p3

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5 5 5 5

Specialization Courses (min. 37 ECTS) EE 2008


ET4010 ET4012 ET4014 ET4015 ET4016 ET4022 ET4030 ET4034 ET4036 ET4138 ET4147 ET4160 ET4162 ET4163 ET4167 ET4235 ET4240 ET4244 ET4266 ET4270 ET4275 ET4284 ET4285 ET4286 ET4287 ET4288 ET4290 ET4294 ET4367

Specialization Courses TC(min. 37 ECTS) EE 2008


Wavefields Imaging Electromagnetic Compatibility in Comm. Propagation of Radio Waves Antenna Systems Radar Radio Navigation Error Correcting Codes Telecom, Architectures & Business Models Transmission Systems Engineering Introduction to Avionics Signal Processing for Communications Acoustic and Elastodynamic Waves Computational Electromagnetics A Computational Electromagnetics B Wireless Security Digital Signal Processing Radar Earth Observation Avionics Lab Intro. to Ultra-Wideband Sys. and Anten. Statistical Signal Processing Advanced Topics in Digital Wireless Comm Ad-hoc Networks Measuring and Simulating the Internet Telecom. Case Studies from Industry Advanced Mobile and Wireless Networking Applied Electromagnetic Analysis in Wireless, Microwave and Radar Engineering Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS) Microwave Circuit Design Performance Analysis of Communications Networks and Systems 4 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 4 4 3 3 4 4 4 1 3 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 5 6

Specialisation Profiles TC EE Specialisation Profiles EE-TC 2008 2008 Suggested Profile Wireless & Mobile Communications TC-EE2008
ET4036 ET4167 ET4036 ET4367 ET4015 ET4016 ET4270 ET4162 ET4163 Transmission Systems Engineering Wireless Security Transmission Systems Engineering Performance Analysis of Communications Networks and Systems Antenna Systems Radar Statistical Signal Processing Computational Electromagnetics A Computational Electromagnetics B 4 4 4 6 4 4 4 3 3

Suggested Profile Network Architecture & Services TC-EE 2008 Suggested Profile Telecommunications & Remote Sensing Technology TC-EE 2008

Suggested Profile Electromagnetic ResearchTC-EE 2008 Free Electives TC(18 ECTS) EE Suggested Free Electives TC (18 ECTS) EE 2008 2008 Business Engineering & Management EE 2008
SPM9310 SPM9612 SPM9618 SPM9624 E-business Systems Engineering of Wireless Networks (R)evolution in ICT-infrastructures. Information Security 6 3 6 4

Homologation courses EE 2008


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ET2205 ET3505D1 ET8002A ET8002B

Electromagnetism and Signals Telecommucation Networking Telecommunications Techniques Telecommunication Networks Flight Dynamics I Airplane Performance and Operations for Avionics Radio Navigation Introduction to Avionics Avionics Lab Modelling & System Analysis

11 2 3 3 4 3 4 2 1 4

Profile Avionics EE 2008


AE3-302 AE4-220ET ET4022 ET4138 ET4244 SC4031

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1.

Year Organization Education

2008/2009 Elektrotechniek, Wiskunde en Informatica Master Electrical Engineering

Track Telecommunications EE 2008


MSc Coordinator Program Title ECTS Program Introduction 1 Dr.ir. G.J.M. Janssen Track Telecommunications 120 The MSc programme in Telecommunications is provided by the department of Telecommunications. The programme takes 24 months and is fully conducted in English. It offers challenging high-level education and research to talented students holding a BSc degree in technology or science. Telecommunication is an integral part of modern society: mobile telephony, the internet and e-mail have become everyday items. Within a reasonably short period of time, a wide range of new facilities has become available - today it is easy to exchange information by wired and wireless media, for anyone, any time, any place, and the associated distribution of services has followed in its footsteps. In addition, we have created a complex society with intensive economic activity, cultural diversity, ecological changes and risks and rewards far beyond anything our grandparents could have imagined. The management and government of such a society necessitate up-to-date information. In parallel to the telecommunications revolution, yet based on the same techniques, new observation technologies are being developed, be it observation from space, the air or the ground. Radar and remote sensing are used to collect up-to-date information required to prevent collisions between aircraft, forecast weather, and manage crop health. The MSc programme Telecommunications covers the full spectrum, with extended opportunities for specialisation. Within the MSc Telecommunications programme, two central themes are distinguished: 1. Exploitation of electromagnetic phenomena: * to transport information, * to collect and extrac data. 2. Networking * to distribute information, * to guarantee Quality-of-Service. These themes cover the fundamental principles of telecommunications such as: * electromagnetics: e.m. waves and antennas * transport of information: modulation, coding and detection techniques, * networking: protocols for wireless and fixed networks, * observation technology: radar and remote sensing techniques * aspects of system design, * service-oriented applications: positioning and navigation. Program Goals The fundamental goal of the MSc programme is to train students to become independently thinking and broadly developed professionals by offering thorough fundamental knowledge and by involving them in cutting-edge research programmes in a stimulating environment. Telecommunications is a very vivid field with research institutes closely cooperating with the industry. The laboratories which constitute the Telecommunications department are: * Wireless and Mobile Communications, * Network Architectures and Services, * Observation Technology, * Electromagnet Research. These laboratories are are related to many partners, be it commercial companies, research laboratories and other universities. This is also materialized in externally sponsored professors and other researchers at the laboratories. For students this implies that internships at companies during the two-years programme can easily be arranged. An individual study programme of the track Telecommunications consists of the following parts: 1.Compulsory courses worth 20 EC, 2.Courses chosen from the list of specialisation courses for the track worth at least 37 EC, 3.A free elective space worth at least 18 EC that the student must spend on study units like a research task, an international exchange programme, an internship, an interfaculty specialisation profile (art. 4) or courses offered by other universities or by the Delft University of Technology; in the latter case, preferably courses from another department, or social studies courses Alternatively, this space may be used for homologation courses. These are courses that students can take to acquire knowledge missing from their previous bachelor programme. 4.A thesis project worth 45 EC. The programme is offered by the following groups: * Electromagnetic Research (contact: dr.ir. M.D. Verweij) * Wireless and Mobile Communications (contact: dr.ir. J.H. Weber) * Network Architectures and Services (contact: dr.ir. F.A. Kuipers) * Telecommunications and Remote Sensing Technology (contact: dr.ir. H. Russchenberg), * Circuits & Systems signal processing related to Telecommunication, (contact: prof.dr.ir. A.J. van der Veen)

Program Structure 1

Academic Chair or Topics involved

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Year Organization Education

2008/2009 Elektrotechniek, Wiskunde en Informatica Master Electrical Engineering

Compulsory Courses (20 ECTS) EE 2008


Introduction 1 The courses in this part are compulsory for all students in the MSc Programme in Electrical Engineering, Track Telecommunications.

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ET4356
Responsible Instructor Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Required for Dr. N.V. Budko Dr.ir. M.D. Verweij 6/0/0/0

Electromagnetics

Expected prior knowledge

Course Contents

Study Goals

Education Method Literature and Study Materials Assessment Permitted Materials during Tests

1 1 1 English Computational Electromagnetics. Part 1: The Volume Integral Equation Method ET4162. Computational Electromagnetics. Part 2: Finite Difference Techniques ET4163. Wavefield Imaging ET4010. Propagation of Radio Waves ET4014. Electromagnetic Simulation for Wireless, Microwave and Radar Engineering ET4273. - Beweging, Krachten en Velden: ET1105-D1/D2/D3 *** (Electrostatics, dielectric electrostatics, microscopic theory of dielectrics, magnetism, induction, Maxwells equations). - Analyse 1,2,3: WI1705ET-D1/D2/D3 *** (Vector calculus, differentiation, integration, surface and volume integrals, Gauss and Stokes theorems). - Linear Algebra: WI1805ET- D1/D2/D3 ** (Matrix-vector multiplication, solution of linear algebraic equations, rank, nullspace). - Signaal Transformaties: ET2205-D2 *** (Fourier and Laplace transforms, transform of a derivative, convolution, delta-fuction, finite energy signals). - Elektromagnetische Golven: ET2205-D3 *** (Plane waves, reflection and transmission at an interface). This course consists of two parts. In the first part, three basic electromagnetic processes are considered, namely: radiation from arbitrary current-distributions; scattering of given incident fields by arbitrary inhomogeneous objects; imaging and inversion of objects using the scattered field data. We derive, and analyze in Matlab the full-vectorial three-dimensional electromagnetic radiation formulae in frequency and time domains. The following subjects are also discussed: numerical solution of the scattering problem, inverse source, and inverse scattering problems. The second part of the course is devoted to the guided waves, where the modal structure of the electromagnetic field in open and closed planar waveguides is analyzed. Understanding of the mathematical structure of the Maxwells equations, spatial and temporal structure of the electromagnetic field in open and closed configurations. Ability to manipulate with three-dimensional electromagnetic formulae in both frequency and time domains and to make controllable approximations. Knowledge of the basic principles of simulation of elementary radiators via evaluation of analytical expressions in Matlab. Understanding of the physical meaning of mathematical expressions and simulation results. Elementary knowledge about the discretization of an integral equation and the associated error. Understanding of the imaging principles and the ill-posed nature of inverse source and inverse scattering problems. Lectures, homework assignments Lecture Notes (available on blackboard): N.V. Budko, Electromagnetic Radiation, Scattering and Imaging. M.D. Verweij, Electromagnetic Waveguides Oral Exam Pen and/or pencil

ET4357
Responsible Instructor Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Required for Course Contents Dr.ir. H.W.J. Russchenberg C.M.H. Unal 4/0/0/0

Observation Systems

Course Contents Continuation Study Goals

1 1 1 2 English ET4016, ET4015, ET4014, ET4240, and ET4266. The observation, detection and classification of natural and man made objects are very important in modern society. A wellknown example is the radar and its applications in air traffic control, weather prediction, land mine detection and in warning systems for natural hazards. Various types of radar systems, the underlying principles, and their related applications are discussed. Special attention is given to scattering of electromagnetic waves and data interpretation. Signal processing methods to extract the required information from the scattered waves are demonstrated. Observation systems, radar, sensor synergy, antennas, signal processing, Doppler, polarization, remote sensing, applications The main goal of the course is to introduce the students to radar systems and their applications in environmental studies. It also gives the students the insight of methods how one can retrieve the information from scattered electromagnetic fields and measurements. Lectures Polarimetric Doppler Weather Radar, V. N. Bringi, V. Chandrasekar, Cambridge Press This book is available in a paperback edition as well as e-book. Lecture notes Physics of waves and fields, Signal Theory, Telecommunication Systems (BSc equivalent courses: ET1105, W11705, ET2205, ET3501) a closed-book written exam

Education Method Literature and Study Materials

Prerequisites Assessment

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ET4358
Responsible Instructor Instructor Instructor Instructor Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Course Contents

Wireless Communication
A.C.C. Lo Prof.dr.ir. I.G.M.M. Niemegeers Dr.ir. G.J.M. Janssen Dr.ir. J.H. Weber Prof.dr.ing. S.M. Heemstra de Groot 0/4/0/0 2 2 2 4 English The Wireless Communications course provides a broad overview of the essential aspects of generic wireless communications. Physical layer, Link layer (including MAC) and Network layer issues, as well as their interaction are treated. The course uses the IEEE standard P802.11 for Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN) for short-range high data-rate communications (also called WiFi) as a "red thread". The following aspects will be covered in the course (preliminary course contents): 1. Indoor radio propagation *review of radio propagation, link-budget model * introduction of multipath propagation - time domain : rms-delay spread, signal dispersion, inter-symbol interference - frequency domain: frequency selectivity, coherence bandwidth * wall/floor/coated window attenuation * path-loss model * channel models - stochastic modeling, - how to use a stochastic model * model parameters for some characteristic indoor environments 2. Modulation techniques applied in WLAN * Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum (DS-SS) * Frequency Hopping Spread Spectrum (FH-SS) * Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) * Higher order modulation schemes (review) that can be applied in combination with the schemes discussed above: BPSK, QPSK, M-QAM 3. Diversity to increase robustness against transmission anomalies * Frequency diversity * Space/location diversity - Antenna diversity: selection diversity, maximal ratio combining * Time diversity: interleaving 4. Coding * Characterization of error types * Basics of error control coding: - Automatic repeat requests (ARQ) - Forward error correction (FEC) - Hybrid methods * Code design: trade-off between efficiency, reliability, complexity/delay * Block & convolutional codes * Viterbi decoding * Puncturing * Interleaving 5. Medium Access Control (MAC) Layer * 802.11 Family of Standards * Network and Protocol Architecture * DCF MAC * PCF MAC 6. Mobility and Security * 802.11f - IAPP * 802.11 - Security Issues * 802.11i Security 7. WLAN Deployment * Deployment Issues and Development * System Considerations * WLAN MAC and PHY Deployment The student has obtained insight in the different relevant aspects of wireless mobile communications systems related to the Physical- , Link- and the Network layers (propagation, modulation, coding, diversity, MAC, security and WLAN deployment), and is able to explain the relations between the different issues and trade-offs that can be made. Basic design problems can be solved based on calculations. Lectures Goldsmith, A., "Wireless Communications", ISBN-13: 978-0-521-83716-3, Cambridge University Press, 2005 Schiller, J.H., "Mobile Communications", 2nd ed., ISBN 0-321-12381-6, Pearson Education Limited, 2003 Written (closed book). During the written exam it is allowed to use an electronic calculator. This course belongs to the compulsory part of the MSc. Program Telecommunications.

Study Goals

Education Method Literature and Study Materials Assessment Permitted Materials during Tests Remarks

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ET4359
Responsible Instructor Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Expected prior knowledge Course Contents

Advances in Networking
Dr.ir. F.A. Kuipers Prof.dr.ir. P.F.A. Van Mieghem 0/4/0/0 in de eerste 4 weken, 0/2/0/0 in de resterende 3 weken

Study Goals

Education Method Literature and Study Materials Assessment

2 2 2 English Telecommunication Networks (ET3505-D1) The course treats important network concepts and functionalities in the communication protocol suites. Principles of the Internet (data/computer world) and of ATM (the telephony/B-ISDN world) are high-lighted. In brief, routing is superiorly handled in Internet, while ATM excels in traffic management and Quality of Service (QoS) aspects. These concepts and principles provide the foundation for understanding the current advances in networking (like QoS routing). Also other developments (like peer-topeer and ad hoc networking) are touched upon in order to give an idea of the rapid evolutions in the area of telecommunication. (See blackboard for more details). The learning objective of this course is twofold. First, the student should be able to explain each of the network functionalities or network concepts and should have a clear grasp of the differences. Each of the network concepts can be regarded as a building block to construct the networking as a whole. The second objective is to learn how these different network concepts interact both in a connnectionless architecture (as IP) and in a connection oriented architecture (as ATM). In that study, a large number of protocols appear. Lectures and a lab exercise in our router lab. Book: Data Communications Networking by P. Van Mieghem (ISBN: 90-8594-008-7) Written and closed book

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Year Organization Education

2008/2009 Elektrotechniek, Wiskunde en Informatica Master Electrical Engineering

Specialization Courses (min. 37 ECTS) EE 2008


Introduction 1 A selection of courses intended to extend knowledge on specific subjects can be chosen from the following list of specialisation courses. Select courses that are worth at least 37 EC. Your personal study programme needs the approval of the thesis advisor and the Board of Examiners. Specialisation profiles have been listed separately with courses that are strongly recommended by the research groups where you may want to do your thesis work.

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ET4010
Responsible Instructor Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Expected prior knowledge Course Contents Dr. N.V. Budko Dr.ir. R.F. Remis 0/0/2/0

Wavefields Imaging

Study Goals Education Method Literature and Study Materials Assessment

3 3 3 English A basic course on electromagnetics and or acoustics like ET4356. Linear algebra. Starting with the basic equations of electromagnetic and acoustic scattering, we introduce inverse source and inverse scattering problems. The ill posed nature of these types of problems is discussed. Popular regularization methods are described, and linear and nonlinear solution methods are presented. Up to date knowledge of inverse scattering and imaging methods and techniques. Understanding of the variety of linearizing approximations of the inverse scattering problem. Ability to analyze particular practical problems and apply suitable algorithms. Lectures H. Blok and M. Oristaglio, Wavefield Imaging and Inversion in Electromagnetics and Acoustics. The exam consists of two parts: homework assignments (30%) and a review of a recent research paper (70%)

ET4012
Responsible Instructor Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Expected prior knowledge Course Contents Study Goals Education Method Literature and Study Materials Assessment Remarks

Electromagnetic Compatibility in Comm.


Dr.ir. B.J. Kooij Dr.ir. M.D. Verweij By Appointment None (Self Study) 1 Exam by appointment English ET2205 EMI of Kirchhoff circuits, EMI of transmission-line systems, EM-field emission from radiating systems, susceptibility analysis of systems to disturbing EM-fields. To understand how the interaction of electromagnetic fields with transmissionlines takes place and to understand how these interactions can be translated into equivalent voltage and current sources. Self study using a reader To be announced Assignment paper Important for designing systems with respect to immunity and susceptibility of electromagnetic radiation By appointment

ET4014
Responsible Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Expected prior knowledge Course Contents Dr. H. Nikookar 0/0/3/0

Propagation of Radio Waves

Course Contents Continuation

Education Method Literature and Study Materials Books Prerequisites Assessment

3 3 3 English ET4015, ET4357 Radio communication relies on radiowaves for the transmission of information. The propagation medium can change the characteristics of the radiowaves, and affects the quality of the radio link. The emphasis of the course will be put on radio propagation, applied to wireless indoor/mobile communication. Material of this course is helpful for students to extend their theoretical knowledge of radio wave propagation and understanding of radio transmission. Special emphasis is given to the radio technologies and systems (RATS). The mobile/indoor radio propagation channel, path loss, fading, received signal characteristics, diversity, interference, as well as propagation aspect of spread spectrum networks will be studied. Lectures a.o. Propagation of Radiowaves, 2nd edition, L.Barclay, IEE London, UK a.o. Propagation of Radiowaves, 2nd edition, L.Barclay, IEE London, UK ET-4015, ET-4358 Written, closed book exam.

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ET4015
Responsible Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Required for Expected prior knowledge Course Contents M. Simeoni 0/5/0/0

Antenna Systems

Course Contents Continuation Study Goals

2 2 2 4 English ET4016, ET4014, ET4020, ET4266, ET4273, and ET4280 ET1105, W11705ET, ET2205, ET3505-D2 The aim of this course is to introduce the students to the Antenna Techniques that are instrumental for applications such as telecommunications, remote sensing and radar systems. After introducing basic antenna concepts such as the fundamental radiation mechanisms, the basic antenna parameters are defined. A detailed description of the antenna gain, directivity, polarization, radiation pattern, bandwidth, beamwidth, efficiency, temperature, effective length, effective area and input impedance is given. The radiation from an infinitesimal dipole is detailed. The integral equation formulation of the radiation from wire type antennas is introduced. The radiation from linear and planar array antennas is discussed in detail while stressing their importance in radar and remote sensing systems. Design techniques for array antennas are described. Aperture antennas are introduced and discussed with particular emphasis on open-ended waveguide and horn antennas. Microstrip radiators, reflector and broadband antennas are also introduced. Some basic concepts about antenna measurements techniques are introduced. The lectures are complemented with classroom exercises and a visit to the antenna measurement facilities available at TU Delft. The main goal of the course is to introduce the students to the design and analysis of the most common types of antennas for wireless, satellite, and radar systems. The students should become capable of selecting and designing a suitable type of antenna for a given application. Lectures, Instructions Balanis, C. A., Antenna Theory, Analysis and Design, 3rd edition, ISBN 0-471-66782-X, WILEY, 2005. Homework exercises (weekly) Written exam (closed book) Two A4 formula sheets Seminary talk given by an invited guest speaker: the purpose is to inform the students with the latest developments in the antenna technology for selected applications.

Education Method Literature and Study Materials Assessment Permitted Materials during Tests Remarks

ET4016
Responsible Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Expected prior knowledge Course Contents Prof.ir. P. van Genderen 0/0/3/0

Radar

Study Goals

Education Method Literature and Study Materials Assessment Remarks

3 3 3 English ET4020 The course is oriented towards the understanding and design of radar systems. Throughout the course the theory will be illustrated by examples and recordings of live radar in various applications. Methods and basics of detection of objects by radar will be discussed, so that the link between the scattering of the electromagnetic field by objects on the one hand and detection of objects and the estimation of their parameters on the other hand is shown. Important properties of the radarsystem and its components (receiver, transmitter, some antenna related aspects) will be treated to show their impact on the measurement of object properties. Signalprocessing methods to extract object features like radial motion, range and angle and the discrimination between various kinds of object echoes will be demonstrated. Fundamental limits to the accuracy of measurement of object parameters will be discussed. Also various types of radar, like pulse Doppler and FMCW will be presented and their system design will be highlighted. The course will be concluded with a detailed radar system design case study, uniting many of the various details discussed throughout the course. After the course the student should a) understand the link between physical effects like scattering and propagation, the technological alternatives and radar system performance b) be able to propose the first draft of a radar design compliant with a number of requirements Lectures M.I. Skolnik, "Introduction to radar systems", 3d ed., McGrawHill Book Co. and lecture notes. Oral, open book Optional: 1-day excursion.

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ET4022
Responsible Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Required for Course Contents Dr.ir. E. Theunissen 0/0/3/0

Radio Navigation

Study Goals

Education Method Literature and Study Materials Assessment

3 3 3 English AE4294 Air Traffic Management This course gives an introduction to the basics of radio navigation. It starts with the principles of range measurements and threats stemming from interference, multipath and poor propagation modelling, followed by a description of position determination, based on hyperbolic, rho-rho, pseudo rho-rho and angular systems. The course continues with high-level descriptions for a number of systems such as Loran-C, GPS, VOR/DME, ILS and MLS. Attention is given to reliability problems like accuracy, integrity, availability and continuity. An introduction is given on integrated and hybridised navigation and also on the principles of differential navigation techniques. The environmental effects of aviation, the methods to measure these effects and the navigation systems involved are discussed. The course ends with the description of two integrated systems: EUROFIX and MIAS. As the radio link is generally the limiting factor in the final performance, the radio navigation education is strongly embedded in the telecommunication program. Understanding of the principles of radio navigation: radio wave propagation, distance measurements, accuracy & ambiguity, determination of position, co-ordinate systems Understanding of the principles of: oLoran-C: signal, ground wave & sky wave, setup of chains, errors oGNSS: signals, multi-path & shadowing, system set up, errors oVOR/DME: signals, characteristics, errors Understanding of the principles of: oILS: signals, restrictions, errors oMLS: signals, restrictions, errors Understanding of the RNP parameters Understanding of the tunnel concept: influence on RNP Knowledge about augmentation systems: DGPS & RTK, SBAS, influence on RNP Knowledge about integration of systems: single point of failure, dissimilarity, voting, influence on RNP Lectures Lecture notes: Handouts Written, closed book

ET4030
Responsible Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Expected prior knowledge Course Contents Dr.ir. J.H. Weber 0/0/3/0

Error Correcting Codes

Study Goals

Education Method Literature and Study Materials Assessment Remarks

3 3 3 English A BSc. Programme in Electrical Engineering, Computer Science, or Mathematics Introduction into error-correcting codes; mathematical basics; block codes fundamentals; cyclic codes; co-operating codes; softdecision decoding; convolutional codes; iterative decoding (turbo codes, LDPC codes); applications (space and satellite communications; GSM; Compact Disc; football pool). The goal of this course is to provide a broad overview of error correction techniques. Such techniques are applied in order to protect information against errors which may occur during transmission or storage. The emphasis will be on the basic trade-offs between efficiency, reliability, and complexity. Most results are presented without proofs (the interested reader may consult books from the bibliography). Lectures Lecture notes Written (closed book), oral (closed book), essay, or computer program Actual course information available on Blackboard.

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ET4034
Responsible Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Expected prior knowledge Course Contents 0/0/3/0

Telecom, Architectures & Business Models


Prof.dr.ir. N.H.G. Baken

3 3 3 English Telecommunciation Networks Some 8 lectureres from other universities and industry will give an overview of relevant toppics in the ICT-sector: - new fixed/mobile developments - business networks - telecom laws - business cases - impact ICT on other sectors - Streetlight, a major programme for wireless access - the actors in the ICT-arena - financial modelling see also the website http://www.nas.its.tudelft.nl/education/courses/Et4-034/welcome.html Oversight Telecom Industry, services, infrastructures and finance Lectures Reader, sheets, blackboard Report (assigments, game)

Study Goals Education Method Literature and Study Materials Assessment

ET4036
Responsible Instructor Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Expected prior knowledge Course Contents Dr.ir. J.H. Weber Dr.ir. R. Hekmat 0/3/0/0

Transmission Systems Engineering

Study Goals

Education Method Literature and Study Materials Assessment Remarks

2 2 2 4 English Telecommunication Techniques (ET2505-D2/ET3505-D1 or ET8002a) Telecommunication Networks (ET3505-D2 or ET8002b) Systems engineering in telecommunications is introduced and then further explored via case studies. Topics to be discussed in the context of the case studies include channel models (indoor and outdoor), link budget, modulation, channel coding, multiple access, QoS MAC, QoS routing, WPAN (IEEE 802.15.3), network coding, ad-hoc networking, sensor networks, and cognitive radio. Case studies, that resemble real-life telecommunication problems of today, have a central place in this course. Theoretical topics mentioned above will all be treated in relation to a practical case study. The main goal of this course is to extend the analytical knowledge obtained in the basic courses to the synthetic skills of systems engineering and the design of means of digital transmission, used in modern public and business networks. Furthermore, the student becomes familiar with the basics and applicability of some of the latest telecommunication technologies. The obtained knowledge and skills have to be demonstrated in a written open book exam in the format of a system design problem. Lectures Slides, notes, and papers, to be provided by the instructors. The following book is recommended as background material: Digital and Analog Communication Systems", L.W. Couch II, Prentice Hall. Written (open book, system design problem) Actual course information available on Blackboard

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ET4138
Responsible Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Course Contents Dr.ir. E. Theunissen 0/3/0/0

Introduction to Avionics

Study Goals

2 2 2 English - Navigation concepts, systems and displays (FANS, CNS, Control systems, RNP, EFIS, FMS, LNAV, VNAV). - Safety and accidents (CFIT, Midair collisions, Runway Incursions, Loss of Control). - Warning systems (TCAS, (E)GPWS). - Design (Requirements Analysis, Certification, Automation, Architectures, Vulnerability, Error reports). - Sensors (GPS, IRS, Air Data Computer). - New developments (EVS, SVS, SGS). Demonstrate basic knowledge of the typical Avionics systems, their implementation, the performance requirements and the sensors used to provide the required data Demonstrate the ability to choose an architecture based on reliability requirements and an identification of failure modes and effects Demonstrate basic knowledge about current developments, future systems and their anticipated potential Lectures Handouts used during the course written

Education Method Literature and Study Materials Assessment

ET4147
Responsible Instructor Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Expected prior knowledge Summary

Signal Processing for Communications


G.J.T. Leus Prof.dr.ir. A.J. van der Veen 0/0/0/3

Course Contents

Study Goals

Education Method Literature and Study Materials Assessment Remarks

4 4 4 English Linear algebra, signal processing, Fourier transform, Introduction to Communications We discuss techniques for signal separation and parameter estimation, using arrays of sensors, and applied to wireless communications. We start by deriving a signal processing model of the wireless channel. We then recall useful tools from linear algebra: QR, SVD, eigenvalue decompositions, projections. This gives us tools to discuss some more elementary receivers: the matched filter, the Wiener filter. Then we discuss important applications: estimation of angles and delays using ESPRIT, adaptive space-time filters, the constant modulus algorithm. Finally, we look at CDMA systems and see how the above techniques can be applied to this. Signal processing model of the wireless channel, elementary beamforming concepts (spatial filtering), tools from linear algebra: QR, SVD, eigenvalue decompositions, projections. Elementary beamformers/receivers: the matched filter, the Wiener filter. Estimation of angles and delays using ESPRIT, adaptive space-time filters and the LMS algorithm, the Constant-Modulus algorithm. Application to CDMA systems. - To be able to explain some key problems regarding data models, estimation and detection that occur in wireless communications. - To be able to explain the major signal processing tools required to solve these problems. - To be able to implement these signal processing techniques in Matlab. - To be able to apply these techniques to new communications problems. Lectures plus Matlab homeworks Reader "Signal processing for communications". Refs from lit: see http://ens.ewi.tudelft.nl/Education/courses/et4147 Oral assessment with take-home Matlab assignment Computer use: requires access to Matlab. Course requires 10 hours per week for a total studyload of 100 hours.

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ET4160
Responsible Instructor Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Expected prior knowledge Dr.ir. M.D. Verweij Dr.ir. B.J. Kooij x/x/x/x

Acoustic and Elastodynamic Waves

Course Contents

Education Method Literature and Study Materials Assessment Remarks

None (Self Study) 1 Exam by appointment English Calculus (WI1705ET or equivalent) Complex function theory (ET2205-D1 or equivalent) Fourier and Laplace transformations (ET2205-D2 or equivalent) Basic principles of radiation of (dilatational) acoustic waves are derived. Integral representations and integral equations for the scattered wavefields are discussed. The scattered wavefields are analysed, using the first Born approximation. The acoustic reciprocity theorem and its possible applications are briefly discussed. The basic principles of radiation of dilatational and shear elastodynamic waves are developed. Integral representations for the radiated wavefield of an arbitrary source are derived. The Rayleigh-Betti reciprocity theorem and its applications are briefly discussed. Lectures Lecture notes: A.T. de Hoop, Radiation and Scattering of Acoustic Waves in Fluids, Radiation and Scattering of Elastic Waves in Solids. Oral, open book Course is mainly self-study. Coordinator will be available for explanation of topics and answering of questions at his room (HB14.290). For the first appointment, contact the coordinator. Further appointments will be based on the students progress.

ET4162
Responsible Instructor Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Expected prior knowledge Course Contents Dr. N.V. Budko Dr.ir. R.F. Remis 0/0/3/0

Computational Electromagnetics A

Study Goals

Education Method Literature and Study Materials Assessment

3 3 3 English ET4004 Electromagnetic Radiation, Scattering and Imaging or a new variant ET4356 Electromagnetics The method of the volume integral equation is used to compute electromagnetic scattering on a large class of objects situated in free (unbounded) space. The following questions are studied: singularity of the Green tensor in 3-D; existence and uniqueness of the solution; spectrum of the scattering operator; iterative methods; discretization and numerical solution. The course is aimed at physicists and engineers and includes some practical numerical programming and simulation work. Knowledge of the mathematical structure of the fundamental integral equation describing the electromagnetic scattering process. Understanding of the basic principles of the numerical simulation of the electromagnetic field. Ability to estimate and control the simulation errors. Hands-on experience with the numerical simulation of electromagnetic scattering on arbitrary dielectric objects of finite extent. Lectures Notes provided. Each participant is given a separate computational problem to solve. She/he has to: modify the provided MATLAB code, perform numerical experiments, write a little illustrated summary. If needed, computing facilities and a place to work will be provided by the EM Lab.

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ET4163
Responsible Instructor Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Expected prior knowledge Course Contents Dr.ir. R.F. Remis Dr. N.V. Budko 0/0/3/0

Computational Electromagnetics B

Study Goals Education Method Literature and Study Materials Assessment

3 3 3 English A basic linear algebra and analysis course (such as WI1705ET and WI1805ET) and an introductory electromagnetics course (such as ET2205-D3 or ET4004). Being able to predict the electric behavior of a complex system is essential in many areas of electrical engineering and related fields such as microwave communications, high-speed microelectronics, chip design, radar, remote sensing, environmental sensing, electromagnetic compatibility, and bioengineering. To this end, Maxwells equations need to be solved, since it is the electromagnetic field that determines this electric behavior. Practical systems are often so complex that only numerical solution techniques can be applied to obtain approximate solutions of Maxwells equations. In this part of the computational electromagnetics series we discuss the essentials of a very popular numerical solution method, called the Finite-Difference TimeDomain method (FDTD method), which is used worldwide in industry and academia to solve all kinds of electromagnetic wave field problems. Computing the electromagnetic field scattered by an airplane, simulating fields in integrated circuits, field computations in the human body, and simulating a ground penetrating radar are just a few examples. In particular, what we discuss in this course is the spatial discretization of Maxwells equations using a so-called nonuniform Yee grid, how to include piecewise constant media, the leap-frog time discretization scheme, stability of FDTD, and we also discuss how to simulate electromagnetic wave propagation in domains of infinite spatial extent (using perfectly matched layers). Moreover, certain symmetry properties of Maxwells equations and their relation to energy conservation and reciprocity are discussed as well. After a successful completion of this course, the student understands the basic principles of the finite-difference time-domain method and knows how to solve practical electromagnetic wave field problems using this method. Lectures Lecture notes and a Matlab FDTD computer program will be provided during the course. The exam consists of two parts: 1. Homework problems (30%) 2. Programming assignment (70%)

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ET4167
Responsible Instructor Responsible Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Expected prior knowledge Course Contents

Wireless Security
Prof.dr.ing. S.M. Heemstra de Groot Dr.ir. R. Hekmat 0/0/3/0 3 3 3 4 English Wireless Communications Wireless security provides an overview of the most relevant security mechanisms and protocols that play a role in current and emerging wireless communications systems. The course covers security in infrastructure-based wireless systems as well as in multi-hop ad-hoc networks. The following topics will be covered in the course (preliminary contents): Security in wireless systems Why is security of concern in wireless? Vulnerabilities of wireless channels Security requirements: Authenticity, Access control, Integrity, Confidentiality, Non-repudiation, Replay detention, Privacy, Availability Review of basic principles of wireless systems (cellular, WLAN, WPAN) Infrastructure vs. ad-hoc systems Authentication and access control Elements of an authentication system Authentication tokens On-line authentication Public key and off-line authentication Certificates Private key security Smart cards Authentication protocols: 802.1x , EAP, Radius, SSL Authentication in infrastructure-based wireless systems Authentication in ad-hoc networks Integrity and confidentiality Cryptographic algorithms and protocols Message authentication code, Hash functions, Digital signature Key establishment protocols, Diffie-Hellman key exchange Key management in infrastructure and ad-hoc networks Security in cellular networks Introduction/review cellular networks Security in GSM Security in UMTS Security in IEEE802.11 Introduction/review IEEE802.11 WEP WPA 802.211i Security in WPAN Introduction to IEEE802.15.1/Bluetooth Security in Bluetooth Introduction to IEEE802.15.4/Zigbee Security in Zigbee Security in ad-hoc networks Specific problems and solutions Secure routing Special ad-hoc networks Vehicular networks Wireless mesh networks Sensor networks Cooperation Greedy behavior /selfish node Protocols for behavior enforcement (including game theory)

Study Goals

Education Method Literature and Study Materials

Assessment

The student has acquired a good understanding of the most relevant issues that play a role in securing wireless systems and has knowledge in the architectures and protocols that are used in the current commercial systems. In addition, the student has a good insight of the security problems and trade-offs that play a role in multi-hop ad-hoc networks. Lectures 1.Specific course slides with notes, 2.A selection of papers (to be announced per lecture), 3.Selective (optional) readings from the book: Levente Buttyn and Jean-Pierre Hubaux, Security and cooperation in Wireless networks, Cambridge University Press. Closed book written examination

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ET4235
Responsible Instructor Responsible Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Expected prior knowledge Summary

Digital Signal Processing


G.J.T. Leus Prof.dr.ir. A.J. van der Veen 0/3/0/0

2 2 2 4 English Signals and Systems, eg, Laplace, Fourier and z-transforms; random processes; linear algebra; experience with Matlab This is a basic course in signal processing at the level of professional engineering. It treats techniques in Signal Processing as they really occur in major applications, most notably in telecommunications and multimedia. Starting from well-chosen applications, we develop the theory needed to fulfill the demands of these applications. We will cover (1) modulation techniques for digital subscriber lines (DSL), in particular OFDM, (2) linear prediction and estimation of speech as used in the GSM speech coder, (3) detection and estimation of signals as they are transmitted over a telecommunication link and (4) selective filtering as is done in most radio receivers. This forms the motivation for discussing some fundamental methods in digital signal processing, to wit: 1. In the case of digital subscriber line coding methods, the Fast Fourier Transform plays a major role. We develop it in detail, and show how it is effective in spectral analysis and processing. 2. The GSM standard is based on another central algorithm of Signal Processing, called the Schur/Levinson algorithm. We study the main components of the GSM standard and how it is implemented by some of the most beautiful techniques in signal estimation. 3. Many modern telecommunication systems transmit coded bits over a channel. The detection and estimation of these bits at the receiver end require the design of estimation filters based on channel estimation. The basic methods to achieve this are covered in the course, together with a Matlab based take-home exercise to be done by all course participants. 4. Selective filtering is based on interesting mathematical methods in spectral approximation, for example the Chebychev approximation technique. The course treats: the discrete Fourier Transform (DFT), the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), their application in OFDM and DSL; elements of estimation theory and their application in communications; linear prediction, parametric methods, the Yule-Walker equations, the Levinson algorithm, the Schur algorithm; detection and estimation filters; non-parametric estimation; selective filtering, applications to beamforming. You will have acquired insight in how signal processing mathematics is really applied in concrete engineering examples. You will know how to do a time-frequency analysis, how to apply the FFT in Digital Subscriber Lines (DSL), how to estimate, separate and filter signals. Lectures Matlab (take-home exercise) Boaz Porat: A course in digital signal processing (Wiley, 1997), ISBN 0-471-14961-6. The book is intended as background, the lectures are documented by slides and explanatory notes Oral, with 2 parts: (1) explain one of the basic techniques treated in the course (15 mins.); (2) present the results of a take-home Matlab exercise on estimation filters as part of a Lab Experiment. The examen is open book. A preparation time of 45 mins. before the exam appointment is foreseen. The exam itself is an exercise in presentation as well as a test on the acquired knowledge and skills.

Course Contents

Study Goals

Education Method Computer Use Literature and Study Materials Assessment Permitted Materials during Tests

ET4240
Responsible Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Expected prior knowledge Course Contents Prof.ir. P. Hoogeboom 0/0/0/3

Radar Earth Observation

Study Goals

Education Method Literature and Study Materials Assessment Special Information Remarks

4 4 4 English Core curriculum, ET4020, ET4016 recommended Introduction to SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) based earth observation. A condensed overview in 12 hours is presented on the following topics: observation principles, SAR theory, airborne and spaceborne SAR instruments, SAR processing, polarimetry, interferometry, moving target indication, signal processing, radar signatures of land and sea, speckle, orbit correction and motion compensation, applications in remote sensing. See also www.irctr.tudelft.nl To obtain general knowledge of Radar remote sensing systems, in the broad area from radar design to the physics of the application. The basic understanding will enable successful autonomous study of specific topics whenever required. To gain more experience in writing articles and making a presentation on a topic that has been studied from available literature. Lectures and a student colloquium. Lecture sheets, literature list, example topics for your assignment. By means of a paper and presentation P. Hoogeboom, available Monday afternoon and Thursday lecture style: lectures: 12 hours (6 x 2 hours), student colloquium (1 x 4 hours) An assignment is given to prepare a paper and presentation (during a student symposium) on a selected topic in this field. Studyload 120 hours.

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ET4244
Responsible Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Expected prior knowledge Course Contents Dr.ir. E. Theunissen By Appointment

Avionics Lab

Study Goals

Education Method Literature and Study Materials Assessment Remarks

None (Self Study) 1 Exam by appointment English ET4022, ET4138. During the Avionics exercise the students will be introduced to the Electronic Flight Instrument System. In a number of scenarios, lateral navigation, vertical navigation, collision avoidance and ground proximity warning systems will be demonstrated. At certain points during a scenario, aspects of the system will be discussed with the students to test their knowledge. Data that is recorded during these scenarios is provided to the student for an assignment that will be evaluated during the de-briefing. Ability to apply the RNP concept Ability to identify failures and probable cause Ability to explain how the relevant Avionics systems operate Ability to explain how the data is obtained and what the potential errors and its sources are Ability to explain how errors can be detected and isolated Lab. course Briefing Assignments By appointment The exercise takes place in the DELPHINS flightsimulator facility, located at the 20th floor of the Faculty EEMCS. To participate, students need to make an appointment with Dr. Theunissen or Ir. Koeners. The exercise consists of three parts: briefing, simulator flights and de-briefing.

ET4266
Responsible Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Course Contents

Intro. to Ultra-Wideband Sys. and Anten.


Prof.dr. O. Yarovyi 0/0/0/2 college, 0/0/0/4 laboratories

4 4 4 English Understanding Ultra-wideband (UWB) technology is becoming of greater importance as the pressure for signal bandwidth increases. This course introduces students to foundations of UWB technology and discusses UWB system design implementation of the key facets of modern UWB systems in both the frequency (FD) and time (TD) domains. General discussion of the systemlevel trade offs of such UWB systems is complemented by a detailed analysis of practical systems designed and implemented at TU Delft. Furthermore, the course gives an overview of different modern applications of UWB technology. Through the use of laboratory work, students will receive a hand-on experience with measurements, processing of UWB signals and characterization of devices by means of UWB signals. The course consists of three major parts. In Part 1 the ultra-wideband technology is introduced and presented in its historical development. Need for UWB technology in different applications is discussed in details. A general approach to the technological realization of any UWB system is presented. In Part 2 an overview of time-domain and frequency domain realizations of UWB technology is presented on the level of blockdiagrams. Performance of main functional blocks, physical phenomena behind their operation, main specifications and technological limitations are discussed. Part 3 is dedicated to discussion of main applications of UWB technology nowadays: telecommunications, radar and positioning. The course finishes with a discussion on spectrum sharing and emission regulations for UWB systems. Introduce students to Ultra Wideband (UWB) technology as it is used (or will be used) in communications, radar and navigation systems, to give detailed attention to the system aspects in both frequency (FD) and time (TD) domains and to discuss major applications of UWB technology in more details. Lectures, laboratory classes and a final assignment Lecture handouts; M. Ghavami, L.B. Michael, R. Kohmo, "Ultra Wideband signals and systems in communication engineering, 2004; J.D. Taylor (ed.), Introduction to ultra-wideband radar systems, 1995 Reports on laboratory works and final assignment (essay plus presentation at the closing symposium)

Study Goals

Education Method Literature and Study Materials Assessment

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ET4270
Responsible Instructor Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Expected prior knowledge Course Contents Prof.dr.ir. J. Biemond Dr. A. Hanjalic 2/0/0/0

Statistical Signal Processing

Study Goals

Education Method Literature and Study Materials Assessment

1 1 1 2 English Stochastic Processes (ET2505-D1) Digital Signal Coding Role of random signals, correlation and power spectral density in statistical signal processing; modeling, detection and estimation of parameters and signals in the presence of noise; linear filtering theory: Wiener and Kalman filters; adaptive noise cancelling; estimation of autocorrelation and power spectral density; applications in the area of signal processing and telecommunications. To gain sufficient basic knowledge to be able to read, understand and apply the modern statistical signal processing literature in signal and image processing, telecommunication, and media and knowledge engineering applications. Further, to be able to solve simple detection and estimation problems, to reflect on the approach taken and to simulate signal and noise processes and the corresponding estimation and detection algorithms in for example MatLab. Lectures R.L. Lagendijk and J. Biemond. Statistische Signaalverwerking. DUM, 1999. ISBN: 90-6562-145-8. Reader (in English) Closed book exam.

ET4275
Responsible Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Expected prior knowledge Course Contents 0/0/0/2

Advanced Topics in Digital Wireless Comm


Dr. H. Nikookar

Study Goals

4 4 4 English ET4036 and ET4358 This course is designed for students to expand their knowledge on modern mobile communications. The aim of this course is to provide advanced material to the students that would like to pursue research in this area or would like to work in this field after their graduation. The objectives of this course are to: -Provide a comprehensive understanding of wireless radio channels (including MIMO and UWB channels), -Explain thoroughly the WCDMA and OFDM technologies, -Elucidate the ongoing standardization activities of third generation wireless communications. Lectures Lecture notes and articles. Written exam (open book) and accomplishment of a case study.

Education Method Literature and Study Materials Assessment

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ET4284
Responsible Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Course Contents Dr.ir. R. Hekmat 3/0/0/0

Ad-hoc Networks

1 1 1 2 English Ad-hoc networks are formed in situations where mobile computing devices require networking applications while a fixed network infrastructure is not available or not preferred to be used. In these cases mobile devices could setup a possibly shortlived network for the communication needs of the moment, in other words, an ad-hoc network. Ad-hoc networks are decentralized self-organizing networks and are capable of forming a communication network without relying on any fixed infrastructure. Ad-hoc networks form a relatively new field of research. During this lecture, next to general introduction to ad-hoc networks and their applications, we will focus on state of the art methods and technologies for forming an ad-hoc network and maintaining its stability despite the dynamics of the network. The contents of the course are as follows: Positioning and applications (1 hour) oDefinition of ad-hoc networks oComparison with cellular systems oTypical application environments oAdvantages oChallenges Radio technologies for ad-hoc networks (1 hour) oIEEE families (Wi-Fi, Zigbee, maybe WiMax) oBlueTooth oUWB Modelling ad-hoc networks (3 hours) oTopology models based on graph theory oPropagation models oDegree and hopcount Connectivity (2 hour) oConnectivity theorems oRobustness MAC protocols for ad-hoc networks (2 hours) oClasses of MAC protocols oEnergy efficiency in MAC protocols Interference and capacity (3 hours) oSingle channel oMulti channel oMesh networks Mobility and dynamics of the system (2 hours) oMobility models oEffects of mobility on connectivity and capacity oEffect of nodes coming and leaving the network Self organisation (2 hours) oNode discovery, neighbour discovery oRoute establishment oTopology maintenance, localisation Routing (3 hours) oActive, pro-active, hybrid oTypical protocols oEnergy efficiency in routing Security (2 hours) oAuthorization and authentication oMisbehaving nodes oTrust By the end of this course students should be capable of: - Assessing the suitability of ad-hoc networks for different communication needs and scenarios. - Applying graph theory fundamentals to analyse topological properties of ad-hoc networks. - Describing the working principles of Medium Access Control protocols for ad-hoc and sensor networks. - Describing the working principles, advantages and disadvantages of different classes of routing protocols for ad-hoc and sensor networks. - Calculating the expected level of interference and the capacity of ad-hoc and sensor networks. - Providing an overview of security threats and methods to resolve security issues in ad-hoc networks. The course will be taught in lecture form. The presence of students at all lectures is required for optimum result. There are slide handouts as well as reference books for this course. - Lecture notes consisting of slides used for the course - Book: "Ad-hoc Networks: Fundamental Properties and Network Topologies", R. Hekmat, Springer 2006. There will be written examination for this course. Page 20 of 54

Study Goals

Education Method Literature and Study Materials Assessment

ET4285
Responsible Instructor Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Expected prior knowledge Course Contents

Measuring and Simulating the Internet


Dr.ir. F.A. Kuipers Dr. S.P.W.G. Uhlig 0/0/2/0

Study Goals

Education Method Literature and Study Materials Assessment

3 3 3 English Advances in Networking (ET4359) The Internet is a complex network without a fixed structure. Hence, measuring the Internet is crucial to acquire knowledge about the Internet infrastructure (topology), traffic, and performance (e.g., loss, delay, bandwidth, etc.). This course will discuss the design requirements and challenges in measuring and simulating the Internet, and the existing measurement methodologies (how/where/when to measure). Knowledge of how to conduct and evaluate Internet measurements enables the design and enhancement of a large set of applications, including: peer-to-peer systems, capacity planning and traffic engineering, network management and trouble-shooting, detecting network abuse and intrusions, etc. (See blackboard for more details) The goal of this course is to introduce the students to basic Internet measurement tools, as well as the state-of-the-art in Internet measurements research. The students will learn several Internet measurement techniques (e.g., active vs. passive measurements), and different software tools. Through a measurement assignment, the students will learn how to define/formulate a research problem, choose a specific approach, and complete a measurements-related research project. Project Papers Groups of students will be assigned a project that requires the students to put the theory on measuring and simulating the Internet into practice. The students have approximately 1 month to complete their assignment. The final assessment is based on the presentation (via report and demonstration) of the project assignment results.

ET4286
Responsible Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Course Contents Dr.ir. R.E. Kooij 0/0/0/2

Telecom. Case Studies from Industry

Study Goals Education Method Literature and Study Materials Assessment

4 4 4 English In this course seven guestspeakers will discuss case studies from the telecommunication industry. In particular the following case studies will be presented - Performance aspects for networked applications - Service development in an international environment - Integrating wireless networks with a fixed infrastructure - Routing in ad hoc networks - UMTS and beyond Obtain insight in several aspects within the current telecommunication industry Lectures Sheets, blackboard Written and closed book

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ET4287
Responsible Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Required for Course Contents A.C.C. Lo 3/0/0/0

Advanced Mobile and Wireless Networking

1 1 1 2 English Telecommunications Networks (ET3505-D1) Telecommunicatietechniek II (ET3505-D2) This course covers advanced mobile and wireless technologies and protocols. It concentrates on the protocols above Data Link layer. The following topics will be covered: - Short range networks: Bluetooth - 3G cellular networks: UMTS, CDMA 2000 - IP-based cellular networks: IEEE 802.16 (WiMax) - Network layer or Internet mobility: Mobile IP Wireless Transport protocol This advanced course aims at providing insight and knowledge about architectures and protocols for mobile and wireless communication systems. After completing the course, the students should be able to - have deep insight into the functional operation of advanced mobile and wireless technologies and protocols. - understanding the design of the architectures and protocols for mobile and wireless networks. Lectures "Mobile Communications" by Jochen H. Schiller, 2nd edition, Addison-Wesley, 2003, ISBN 0-321-12381-6 Lecture slides available on Blackboard Written examination This course is suitable for Electrical Engineering, Computer engineering and Computer Science students.

Study Goals

Education Method Literature and Study Materials Assessment Remarks

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ET4288
Responsible Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Required for Expected prior knowledge Summary

Applied Electromagnetic Analysis in Wireless, Microwave and Radar Engineering


Prof.dr. O. Yarovyi 0/0/2/0 college, 0/0/4/0 laboratories

Course Contents

3 3 3 English Computational Electromagnetics A (ET4162) Computational Electromagnetics B (ET4163) ET2205-D3 EM simulation methods offer powerful tools for solving complex electromagnetic coupling, radiation and scattering problems, as encountered in the field of telecommunications, microwave and radar engineering. Within the course on examples of different typical problems like transmission lines, microwave filters, antennas and Radar Cross Section of targets all basics physical phenomena of EM wave interaction with objects will be analyzed and characterized. Analysis will be done in frequency as well as in time domain. Advantages and disadvantages of time-domain and frequency domain methods will be compared. The course will finish with overview of basic recommendation regarding choice of appropriate computational method for different problems of wireless, microwave and radar engineering. At the supervised laboratory work commercial simulation tools are used for simulation of five practical problems of wireless, microwave and radar engineering. The course contents consists of three major parts. In Part 1 the applied electormagnetics as a subject will be introduced, scope of the problems and typical approaches will be considered. Role of applied electromagnetics in wireless, microwave and radar engineering will be discussed. A general approach to solution of applied electromagnetics problems is presented and discussed in details. Part 2 of the course is dedicated to frequency domain simulations. Based on a simple problem of electromagnetic wave interaction with a thin wire all basics radiation phenomena will be analyzed and characterized. The problem will be treated via the method of moments. All essential features of the method of moments will be discussed in details. Students will write their own MATLAB code to appreciate the fundamentals of the method. (Again, this is a simple task, typically 2030 lines of code). Simulation results will be verified against experimental ones. Following this, students will be introduced to the commercial program FEKO. Various structures will be modelled using FEKO, including simple 2D structures (microstrip filters and patch antennas) as well as more complex 3D scatteres (sphere). Specific issues for EM wave interaction with 2D and 3D structures will de discussed. Finally, computational limitations of frequency domain methods will be discussed. Advantages and disadvantages of time-domain and frequency domain methods will be compared. Alternatives to the purely numerical methods will be introduced. In part 3 wideband (time domain) simulations will be discussed. On the example of one-dimensional transmission line basic time domain phenomena (such as dispersion, matching, stability) will be analyzed. Time-domain simulation will be performed using Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method. For a very simple lossless transmission line students will write their own FDTD MATLAB code for this. (This can be done in 2030 lines of MATLAB, this is not by any means a large programming task). The aim of this is to develop a basic appreciation of the FDTD method, as well as reinforce concepts of transforming between time and frequency domains. The use of time-domain simulation for ultra-wideband systems will be emphasized throughout. Finally, computational aspects of FDTD such as numerical dispersion, absorbing boundary conditions and numerical complexity will be discussed. The course will finish with overview of basic recommendation regarding choice of appropriate computational method for different problems of wireless, microwave and radar engineering. The lectures are supported by supervised laboratory work at which commercial simulation tools are used for simulation of five practical problems of wireless, microwave and radar engineering. The aim of this course is twofold: to introduce M.Sc. students to electromagnetic problems encountered in microwave, telecommunications and radar engineering; and to teach students how to use available EM simulators for the analysis and design of microwave circuits, wireless and radar systems. Students will learn basic properties and limitations of different computational methods realized in different EM simulators. The course consists of lectures and computer simulations on commercial simulators. Additionally, students will have to complete assignments (home tasks and final assignment) for this 4 credit point course. The final assignment is a case study on applied problem from microwave, wireless or radar engineering (an essay plus a presentation at the closing symposium). In the course supervised computer simulations will be performed using commercially available EM solvers and simple MATLAB codes. This course supports the following courses: Observation Technology (ET4020), Propagation of radio waves (ET4014), Antenna systems (ET4015), Introduction to ultra-wideband systems and antennas (ET4266). D.B.Davidson Computational Electromagnetics for RF and microwave engineering, Cambridge University Press, 2005; lecture handouts Reports on supervised computer simulations and final assignment (an essay plus a presentation at the closing symposium). The final assignment is a case study on applied problem from microwave, wireless or radar engineering.

Study Goals

Education Method

Computer Use Course Relations Literature and Study Materials Assessment

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ET4290
Responsible Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Required for 0/0/0/2

Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS)


A.C.C. Lo

Course Contents

Study Goals

Education Method Books Assessment Remarks

4 4 4 5 English Telecommunicatietechniek II (ET3505-D2) Wireless Communications (ET4358) Transmission Systems Engineering (ET4036) The course covers the following topics: -cellular mobile radio networks -standardization and spectrum -UMTS System Architecture -The protocol stack of the radio interface -Data transmission at UMTS radio interface -The physical layer at the radio interface -Physical channels and procedures at the radio interface -Service architecture and services in UMTS This course aims at providing insight into basic building blocks of UMTS network. The course includes the fundamental principles of mobile networks, standardization, system architecture, radio interface protocol stack, network planning, service architectures and services in UMTS. Lectures "UMTS: The Fundamentals, B. Walke, Chichester Wiley, 2003, ISBN 0-470-84557-0 Written examination This course is suitable for Electrical Engineering, Computer engineering and Computer Science students.

ET4294
Responsible Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Required for Expected prior knowledge Course Contents Dr.ing. L.C.N. de Vreede 0/3/0/0

Microwave Circuit Design

Study Goals Education Method Literature and Study Materials Assessment Remarks

2 2 2 English RF Integrated Circuit Design (ET4254) Passive Microwave Components (ET4280) The optimization of technology, devices and circuits for microwave applications requires fundamental knowledge of RF design and high frequency device characterization. This is caused by the fact that surrounding circuitry and wiring parasitics will strongly affect the achievable performance of active devices. For this reason we will discuss in detail active device matching for optimum gain, noise, linearity and efficiency. Since realistic commercial LNAs, PAs, mixers, etc. compete on all of the requirements above; focus will be placed on how the best overall performance can be achieved without trading-in other specifications. The outline of the course is as follows; we start with a short fresh up of the required network theory. Followed by a discussion of basic design techniques for matching networks using lumped (inductors, capacitors) and distributed elements (transmission lines). We proceed with the utilization of this knowledge in design of conventional (hybrid) microwave amplifiers under various constrains. Next we make the step to Integrated Circuits and discuss optimum device scaling and the changes in design philosophy when going from hybrid to on-chip RF / microwave design. During the lectures the use of CAD and Microwave measurement instruments are demonstrated. The lectures are accompanied by real-life wireless design problems (labs) which have to be solved using professional simulation tools like Agilent's Advanced Design System (ADS). Course goals: Learn to understand, analyze, design, simulated and optimize the small-signal, noise and large signal performance of microwave circuits. Lectures + homeworks Hand-outs + recommended books Homeworks + written exam More details are available on Blackboard, to participate this course, please enroll using Blackboard

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ET4367
Responsible Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Course Contents

Performance Analysis of Communications Networks and Systems


Prof.dr.ir. P.F.A. Van Mieghem 0/0/0/2

4 4 4 English This course applies probability theory and the theory of stochastic processes to the design and performance evaluation of telecommunication and computer systems. The computation with random variables is reviewed. Markov processes and queuing theory will be introduced to the current important concept of "Quality of Service (QoS)" provisioning and to the computation of the blocking probabilities in telephony (both fixed as mobile). Applications to the Internet shortest path routing are also included. More details are found on blackboard. We follow the book by P. Van Mieghem, Performance Analysis of Communications Networks and Systems, Cambridge University Press, 2006. (see e.g.: http://www.nas.its.tudelft.nl/people/Piet/bookPA.html) Other course material, such as a formularium, is provided in Blackboard. The course intends to provide students with mathematical techniques, in particular probabilistic methods and graph theory, to compare the performance of different network designs and protocols and of QoS measures for end-to-end communication. Lectures Written and closed book

Study Goals Education Method Assessment

Page 25 of 54

Year Organization Education

2008/2009 Elektrotechniek, Wiskunde en Informatica Master Electrical Engineering

Specialisation Profiles TC EE 2008

Page 26 of 54

Year Organization Education

2008/2009 Elektrotechniek, Wiskunde en Informatica Master Electrical Engineering

Suggested Profile Wireless & Mobile Communications TC-EE2008

Page 27 of 54

ET4036
Responsible Instructor Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Expected prior knowledge Course Contents Dr.ir. J.H. Weber Dr.ir. R. Hekmat 0/3/0/0

Transmission Systems Engineering

Study Goals

Education Method Literature and Study Materials Assessment Remarks

2 2 2 4 English Telecommunication Techniques (ET2505-D2/ET3505-D1 or ET8002a) Telecommunication Networks (ET3505-D2 or ET8002b) Systems engineering in telecommunications is introduced and then further explored via case studies. Topics to be discussed in the context of the case studies include channel models (indoor and outdoor), link budget, modulation, channel coding, multiple access, QoS MAC, QoS routing, WPAN (IEEE 802.15.3), network coding, ad-hoc networking, sensor networks, and cognitive radio. Case studies, that resemble real-life telecommunication problems of today, have a central place in this course. Theoretical topics mentioned above will all be treated in relation to a practical case study. The main goal of this course is to extend the analytical knowledge obtained in the basic courses to the synthetic skills of systems engineering and the design of means of digital transmission, used in modern public and business networks. Furthermore, the student becomes familiar with the basics and applicability of some of the latest telecommunication technologies. The obtained knowledge and skills have to be demonstrated in a written open book exam in the format of a system design problem. Lectures Slides, notes, and papers, to be provided by the instructors. The following book is recommended as background material: Digital and Analog Communication Systems", L.W. Couch II, Prentice Hall. Written (open book, system design problem) Actual course information available on Blackboard

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ET4167
Responsible Instructor Responsible Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Expected prior knowledge Course Contents

Wireless Security
Prof.dr.ing. S.M. Heemstra de Groot Dr.ir. R. Hekmat 0/0/3/0 3 3 3 4 English Wireless Communications Wireless security provides an overview of the most relevant security mechanisms and protocols that play a role in current and emerging wireless communications systems. The course covers security in infrastructure-based wireless systems as well as in multi-hop ad-hoc networks. The following topics will be covered in the course (preliminary contents): Security in wireless systems Why is security of concern in wireless? Vulnerabilities of wireless channels Security requirements: Authenticity, Access control, Integrity, Confidentiality, Non-repudiation, Replay detention, Privacy, Availability Review of basic principles of wireless systems (cellular, WLAN, WPAN) Infrastructure vs. ad-hoc systems Authentication and access control Elements of an authentication system Authentication tokens On-line authentication Public key and off-line authentication Certificates Private key security Smart cards Authentication protocols: 802.1x , EAP, Radius, SSL Authentication in infrastructure-based wireless systems Authentication in ad-hoc networks Integrity and confidentiality Cryptographic algorithms and protocols Message authentication code, Hash functions, Digital signature Key establishment protocols, Diffie-Hellman key exchange Key management in infrastructure and ad-hoc networks Security in cellular networks Introduction/review cellular networks Security in GSM Security in UMTS Security in IEEE802.11 Introduction/review IEEE802.11 WEP WPA 802.211i Security in WPAN Introduction to IEEE802.15.1/Bluetooth Security in Bluetooth Introduction to IEEE802.15.4/Zigbee Security in Zigbee Security in ad-hoc networks Specific problems and solutions Secure routing Special ad-hoc networks Vehicular networks Wireless mesh networks Sensor networks Cooperation Greedy behavior /selfish node Protocols for behavior enforcement (including game theory)

Study Goals

Education Method Literature and Study Materials

Assessment

The student has acquired a good understanding of the most relevant issues that play a role in securing wireless systems and has knowledge in the architectures and protocols that are used in the current commercial systems. In addition, the student has a good insight of the security problems and trade-offs that play a role in multi-hop ad-hoc networks. Lectures 1.Specific course slides with notes, 2.A selection of papers (to be announced per lecture), 3.Selective (optional) readings from the book: Levente Buttyn and Jean-Pierre Hubaux, Security and cooperation in Wireless networks, Cambridge University Press. Closed book written examination

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Year Organization Education

2008/2009 Elektrotechniek, Wiskunde en Informatica Master Electrical Engineering

Suggested Profile Network Architecture & Services TC-EE 2008

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ET4036
Responsible Instructor Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Expected prior knowledge Course Contents Dr.ir. J.H. Weber Dr.ir. R. Hekmat 0/3/0/0

Transmission Systems Engineering

Study Goals

Education Method Literature and Study Materials Assessment Remarks

2 2 2 4 English Telecommunication Techniques (ET2505-D2/ET3505-D1 or ET8002a) Telecommunication Networks (ET3505-D2 or ET8002b) Systems engineering in telecommunications is introduced and then further explored via case studies. Topics to be discussed in the context of the case studies include channel models (indoor and outdoor), link budget, modulation, channel coding, multiple access, QoS MAC, QoS routing, WPAN (IEEE 802.15.3), network coding, ad-hoc networking, sensor networks, and cognitive radio. Case studies, that resemble real-life telecommunication problems of today, have a central place in this course. Theoretical topics mentioned above will all be treated in relation to a practical case study. The main goal of this course is to extend the analytical knowledge obtained in the basic courses to the synthetic skills of systems engineering and the design of means of digital transmission, used in modern public and business networks. Furthermore, the student becomes familiar with the basics and applicability of some of the latest telecommunication technologies. The obtained knowledge and skills have to be demonstrated in a written open book exam in the format of a system design problem. Lectures Slides, notes, and papers, to be provided by the instructors. The following book is recommended as background material: Digital and Analog Communication Systems", L.W. Couch II, Prentice Hall. Written (open book, system design problem) Actual course information available on Blackboard

ET4367
Responsible Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Course Contents

Performance Analysis of Communications Networks and Systems


Prof.dr.ir. P.F.A. Van Mieghem 0/0/0/2

4 4 4 English This course applies probability theory and the theory of stochastic processes to the design and performance evaluation of telecommunication and computer systems. The computation with random variables is reviewed. Markov processes and queuing theory will be introduced to the current important concept of "Quality of Service (QoS)" provisioning and to the computation of the blocking probabilities in telephony (both fixed as mobile). Applications to the Internet shortest path routing are also included. More details are found on blackboard. We follow the book by P. Van Mieghem, Performance Analysis of Communications Networks and Systems, Cambridge University Press, 2006. (see e.g.: http://www.nas.its.tudelft.nl/people/Piet/bookPA.html) Other course material, such as a formularium, is provided in Blackboard. The course intends to provide students with mathematical techniques, in particular probabilistic methods and graph theory, to compare the performance of different network designs and protocols and of QoS measures for end-to-end communication. Lectures Written and closed book

Study Goals Education Method Assessment

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Year Organization Education

2008/2009 Elektrotechniek, Wiskunde en Informatica Master Electrical Engineering

Suggested Profile Telecommunications & Remote Sensing Technology TC-EE 2008

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ET4015
Responsible Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Required for Expected prior knowledge Course Contents M. Simeoni 0/5/0/0

Antenna Systems

Course Contents Continuation Study Goals

2 2 2 4 English ET4016, ET4014, ET4020, ET4266, ET4273, and ET4280 ET1105, W11705ET, ET2205, ET3505-D2 The aim of this course is to introduce the students to the Antenna Techniques that are instrumental for applications such as telecommunications, remote sensing and radar systems. After introducing basic antenna concepts such as the fundamental radiation mechanisms, the basic antenna parameters are defined. A detailed description of the antenna gain, directivity, polarization, radiation pattern, bandwidth, beamwidth, efficiency, temperature, effective length, effective area and input impedance is given. The radiation from an infinitesimal dipole is detailed. The integral equation formulation of the radiation from wire type antennas is introduced. The radiation from linear and planar array antennas is discussed in detail while stressing their importance in radar and remote sensing systems. Design techniques for array antennas are described. Aperture antennas are introduced and discussed with particular emphasis on open-ended waveguide and horn antennas. Microstrip radiators, reflector and broadband antennas are also introduced. Some basic concepts about antenna measurements techniques are introduced. The lectures are complemented with classroom exercises and a visit to the antenna measurement facilities available at TU Delft. The main goal of the course is to introduce the students to the design and analysis of the most common types of antennas for wireless, satellite, and radar systems. The students should become capable of selecting and designing a suitable type of antenna for a given application. Lectures, Instructions Balanis, C. A., Antenna Theory, Analysis and Design, 3rd edition, ISBN 0-471-66782-X, WILEY, 2005. Homework exercises (weekly) Written exam (closed book) Two A4 formula sheets Seminary talk given by an invited guest speaker: the purpose is to inform the students with the latest developments in the antenna technology for selected applications.

Education Method Literature and Study Materials Assessment Permitted Materials during Tests Remarks

ET4016
Responsible Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Expected prior knowledge Course Contents Prof.ir. P. van Genderen 0/0/3/0

Radar

Study Goals

Education Method Literature and Study Materials Assessment Remarks

3 3 3 English ET4020 The course is oriented towards the understanding and design of radar systems. Throughout the course the theory will be illustrated by examples and recordings of live radar in various applications. Methods and basics of detection of objects by radar will be discussed, so that the link between the scattering of the electromagnetic field by objects on the one hand and detection of objects and the estimation of their parameters on the other hand is shown. Important properties of the radarsystem and its components (receiver, transmitter, some antenna related aspects) will be treated to show their impact on the measurement of object properties. Signalprocessing methods to extract object features like radial motion, range and angle and the discrimination between various kinds of object echoes will be demonstrated. Fundamental limits to the accuracy of measurement of object parameters will be discussed. Also various types of radar, like pulse Doppler and FMCW will be presented and their system design will be highlighted. The course will be concluded with a detailed radar system design case study, uniting many of the various details discussed throughout the course. After the course the student should a) understand the link between physical effects like scattering and propagation, the technological alternatives and radar system performance b) be able to propose the first draft of a radar design compliant with a number of requirements Lectures M.I. Skolnik, "Introduction to radar systems", 3d ed., McGrawHill Book Co. and lecture notes. Oral, open book Optional: 1-day excursion.

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ET4270
Responsible Instructor Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Expected prior knowledge Course Contents Prof.dr.ir. J. Biemond Dr. A. Hanjalic 2/0/0/0

Statistical Signal Processing

Study Goals

Education Method Literature and Study Materials Assessment

1 1 1 2 English Stochastic Processes (ET2505-D1) Digital Signal Coding Role of random signals, correlation and power spectral density in statistical signal processing; modeling, detection and estimation of parameters and signals in the presence of noise; linear filtering theory: Wiener and Kalman filters; adaptive noise cancelling; estimation of autocorrelation and power spectral density; applications in the area of signal processing and telecommunications. To gain sufficient basic knowledge to be able to read, understand and apply the modern statistical signal processing literature in signal and image processing, telecommunication, and media and knowledge engineering applications. Further, to be able to solve simple detection and estimation problems, to reflect on the approach taken and to simulate signal and noise processes and the corresponding estimation and detection algorithms in for example MatLab. Lectures R.L. Lagendijk and J. Biemond. Statistische Signaalverwerking. DUM, 1999. ISBN: 90-6562-145-8. Reader (in English) Closed book exam.

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Year Organization Education

2008/2009 Elektrotechniek, Wiskunde en Informatica Master Electrical Engineering

Suggested Profile Electromagnetic ResearchTC-EE 2008

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ET4162
Responsible Instructor Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Expected prior knowledge Course Contents Dr. N.V. Budko Dr.ir. R.F. Remis 0/0/3/0

Computational Electromagnetics A

Study Goals

Education Method Literature and Study Materials Assessment

3 3 3 English ET4004 Electromagnetic Radiation, Scattering and Imaging or a new variant ET4356 Electromagnetics The method of the volume integral equation is used to compute electromagnetic scattering on a large class of objects situated in free (unbounded) space. The following questions are studied: singularity of the Green tensor in 3-D; existence and uniqueness of the solution; spectrum of the scattering operator; iterative methods; discretization and numerical solution. The course is aimed at physicists and engineers and includes some practical numerical programming and simulation work. Knowledge of the mathematical structure of the fundamental integral equation describing the electromagnetic scattering process. Understanding of the basic principles of the numerical simulation of the electromagnetic field. Ability to estimate and control the simulation errors. Hands-on experience with the numerical simulation of electromagnetic scattering on arbitrary dielectric objects of finite extent. Lectures Notes provided. Each participant is given a separate computational problem to solve. She/he has to: modify the provided MATLAB code, perform numerical experiments, write a little illustrated summary. If needed, computing facilities and a place to work will be provided by the EM Lab.

ET4163
Responsible Instructor Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Expected prior knowledge Course Contents Dr.ir. R.F. Remis Dr. N.V. Budko 0/0/3/0

Computational Electromagnetics B

Study Goals Education Method Literature and Study Materials Assessment

3 3 3 English A basic linear algebra and analysis course (such as WI1705ET and WI1805ET) and an introductory electromagnetics course (such as ET2205-D3 or ET4004). Being able to predict the electric behavior of a complex system is essential in many areas of electrical engineering and related fields such as microwave communications, high-speed microelectronics, chip design, radar, remote sensing, environmental sensing, electromagnetic compatibility, and bioengineering. To this end, Maxwells equations need to be solved, since it is the electromagnetic field that determines this electric behavior. Practical systems are often so complex that only numerical solution techniques can be applied to obtain approximate solutions of Maxwells equations. In this part of the computational electromagnetics series we discuss the essentials of a very popular numerical solution method, called the Finite-Difference TimeDomain method (FDTD method), which is used worldwide in industry and academia to solve all kinds of electromagnetic wave field problems. Computing the electromagnetic field scattered by an airplane, simulating fields in integrated circuits, field computations in the human body, and simulating a ground penetrating radar are just a few examples. In particular, what we discuss in this course is the spatial discretization of Maxwells equations using a so-called nonuniform Yee grid, how to include piecewise constant media, the leap-frog time discretization scheme, stability of FDTD, and we also discuss how to simulate electromagnetic wave propagation in domains of infinite spatial extent (using perfectly matched layers). Moreover, certain symmetry properties of Maxwells equations and their relation to energy conservation and reciprocity are discussed as well. After a successful completion of this course, the student understands the basic principles of the finite-difference time-domain method and knows how to solve practical electromagnetic wave field problems using this method. Lectures Lecture notes and a Matlab FDTD computer program will be provided during the course. The exam consists of two parts: 1. Homework problems (30%) 2. Programming assignment (70%)

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Year Organization Education

2008/2009 Elektrotechniek, Wiskunde en Informatica Master Electrical Engineering

Free Electives TC(18 ECTS) EE 2008


Introduction 1 You can use the free elective space for study units like a research task, an international exchange programme, an internship, an interfaculty specialisation profile or courses offered by other universities or by the Delft University of Technology; in the latter case, preferably choose courses from another department, or social studies courses. Alternatively, this space may be used for homologation courses. These are courses that students can take to acquire knowledge missing from their previous BSc degree programme. It is not allowed to include: - courses that are part of the compulsory part of the BSc programmes of either Electrical Engineering, or courses that are very similar in content; - more than 6 EC of language courses and skills; - more than 12 EC of the list of homologation courses.

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Year Organization Education

2008/2009 Elektrotechniek, Wiskunde en Informatica Master Electrical Engineering

Business Engineering & Management EE 2008

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SPM9310
Module Manager Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Expected prior knowledge Dr. W.A.G.A. Bouwman 4/4/0/0 1 2 1 none English Basic knowledge about:

E-business

Summary

Information and communication technology, including tele- and data communication, middleware and applications; Business models and business modeling; Strategy, management and organization theory. An elective course for students in the final stages of their Master study that provides knowledge in e/m-business developments. It deals with theory and practice At the end of the course students -have a sound understanding of e/m-business (including eGovernment) applications and foster their ability to define e/mbusiness strategies, making use of these applications, -are able to analyze business models, -are able to describe best practices and recognize ways of using e/m-business applications to improve organizational processes, -are able to analyze the impact of e-business on key sector of the economy, on collaboration between organizations, on individual organizational strategies and processes, and assess implications for individual and collaborating organizations -have knowledge on generic and specific technologies that support e/m-business. The course will advance your understanding of strategic and technical issues business as well as IT managers will face in reality; you will not write code, design websites or develop databases.

Course Contents

Study Goals

Education Method

Literature and Study Materials

The course is organized in two blocks General introduction on E-business, business strategy and business models: market and technology drivers, B2B and B2C, front- and back-office applications, and E-business technology and Ecommerce support services, such as content management, security and privacy enhancing technologies, payment systems, mobile applications To familiarize students with management issues and technological developments in the e/m-business (and e-government) domain. The focus is on individual companies and organizations, as well as on value chains; on front-offices (CRM and CMS) as well as back office (ERP, SCM, application integration). Generic technologies like security, privacy, and e-payment, as well as innovations in (mobile, wireless and Internet) networks, systems, web services and applications level will be covered. Students should particularly understand the relation between strategic and technological opportunities. There are (guest) lectures, tutorials and possibly field trips. The lectures and tutorials take 2 hours. The students discuss business and technical cases in the tutorials. These case have to be analyzed by the students before class and handed over on paper to the tutor before the case is discussed. Papazoglou, M. & P. Ribbers, P. (2006), EBusiness, Organizational and Technical Foundations. Chichester: John Willey Publishers. ISBN0-470-84376-4 Bouwman, H., H. de Vos & H. Bouwman (2008). Mobile service innovation and business models. Heidelberg: Springer. ISBN 978-3-540-79237-6 and additional reading as mentioned in course schedule, and provided via Blackboard. It is expected that students attend class, participate and contribute to discussions. Class participation is key to the success of the course (an assessment of your participation by the module manager accounts for 10% of your grade). You are expected to take part of the responsibility for your own learning in this course. The world of ebusiness is changing fast and frequently, and knows many fashions and hypes. The lectures will give you a sound basis for critical analysis, but in order to stay on top of on-going trends you are expected to be up to date with trade press. Students are expected to read and familiarize themselves with course material prior to the class session. Furthermore every student has to deliver 4 Case write ups (the training case is excluded but obligatory) (40%) and have to pass a final exam (50%). The final exam will be based on a presentation by students, discussing relevant service, technological, organizational and financial aspects of an ebusiness case.

Assessment

Enrolment / Application

The course will only be taught even a sufficient number of students enroll (>15)

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SPM9612
Module Manager Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Expected prior knowledge Course Contents 2/0/0/0

Systems Engineering of Wireless Networks


Dr. W.A.G.A. Bouwman

Study Goals

Education Method Literature and Study Materials

1 1 none English Basic knowledge of telecommunication networks and wireless technology. - Introduction to wireless networks, market trends, value webs and standardization and regulatory issues. - Systems Engineering principles in Telecommunications. - Wireless networks: compromises in system design; design considerations; cellular networks - GSM network: design objectives and practical aspects; security; system management aspects; services; developments (GPRS), Next generation mobile UMTS - Disruptive technologies: Bluetooth, WLAN, WiMAx and UWB. Beyond 3G: always best connected - Mobile services design - Economics of wireless access. Economic models for analyzing access plant decisions; simplified models of wireless access cost - Mobile technology and services in practice An overview will be given of developments in the design of wireless networks for telecommunication The emphasis is on making explicit what the systems engineering aspects are in the design process. In this course we will study the process of getting to a satisfactory design, while often having to conside different options and to make compromises. Technical considerations play an important role, but they have to be matched with user requirements, economical aspects and standardisation Classroom presentations, discussions and self study. Bouwman, H., H. de Vos & T. Haaker (2008). Mobile Service Innovation and Business Models. Heidelebrg: Springer Verlag. ISBN 978-3-540-79237-6 On the Blackboard site there is a reader available in English with recent articles from relevant journals. Also the classroom presentations will be published there. Written Assignment based on original work

Assessment

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SPM9618
Module Manager Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Required for Summary Drs. J. Ubacht 0/0/2/2

(R)evolution in ICT-infrastructures.

3 4 3 none English ICT-profile ICT-infrastructures and -services Due to technical innovations the range of options for innovation in large ICT-infrastructures has increased enormously. Also the number of ICT-infrastructures has increased, parallel ICT-networks are now available to the masses. This poses questions for choices to be made during the design and implementation phase of these infrastructures. Which are the aspects that play a role in the transition of technology into an infrastructure? In this module students are provided with theoretical backgrounds in the (r)evolution of large ICT-infrastructures. They are challenged to translate theoretical notions into an analytical framework which will be used to study a case in innovation in ICTinfrastructures. The final assignment is to write a paper in which the analytical framework is once more tested by means of a case study of an innovation in ICT-infrastructures. The paper will be peer reviewed by team members and will be graded by the coaches according to scientific guidelines. The final product can be composed of a communal part, produced by the entire team and an individual part. In the first part of the module(week 1-7) the theoretical concepts that accompany evolutions in ICT-infrastructures will be explored by means of interactive class meetings (students must prepare material before attending) and online discussions. Guest lectures will be organised for a linking pin between theory and practice. At the end of the first period the students will have developed an initial analytical framework on the basis of the theoretical notions for the analysis of an empirical case study (Grounded Theory approach). In the second period the students work towards writing a paper in which they apply the analytical framework to a transition moment in ICT-infrastructures or in which they test (parts of) the framework. Examples are the introduction of digital television standards, the launch of Galileo, a new Internet Protocol (IPv6), RFID, peer-to peer networks or Ultra Wide Band (UWB), Personal Area Networks (PAN) etc. The choice of a case study is up to the student. Some attention will also be paid to failures in the introduction of (innovation in) infrastructures, such as the Iridium case. Coaching sessions on the final product will be organised. We also organise a 'come back' meeting to look back and forward. To understand the complexity of innovation and evolution in large ICT-infrastructures from a theoretical point of view. To design an analytical framework for the analysis of cases in which the evolution in ICT-infrastructures is the locus in order to apply theoretical concepts to empirical case studies. To be able to report on the results of the analysis of the case study based on an analytical framework in a scientific manner. Interactive lectures Guest lectures Case study assignment Students are expected to prepare before class meetings.The participants are the project leader of the assignment and function as a team. In class a pro-active attitude in discussing the scientific module material is required and students will act as peer reviewers of each others' final product and participation as a team member. An excursion can be part of the module. Use of a digital course environment (possibly a Wiki). Optional: digital mindmapping and decision support tools. This course is part of the ICT profile ICT-infrastructures and services. The course aims at the design of an analytical framework for innovation in ICT-infrastructures. The other profile course is SPM9310 E-business in which the design of business models for electronic services is taught. The course SPM4340 Design of innovative ICT-infrastructures and services focuses on the technical design of ICT-systems. The three courses thus represent theoretical, business/organization and systems design in the field of ICT-infrastructures and services. Material will be provided via the electronic learning environment; incl. case study material. Prior technical knowledge of ICT-infrastructures is an advantage. Curiosity, willingness to work in a team on a minimally predefined assignment, commitment, and academic attitude are prerequisite! Prerequisite for obtaining a grade is a positive evaluation of participation during the module, this is assessed in a peer review. Individual paper(100 %). No pre-enlistment is required, please attend first class All further information can be requested from the module manager mrs. Jolien Ubacht, Assistant Professor Section ICT, e-mail: j.ubacht@tudelft.nl Note that you will be working as a team and that we require full commitment, a willingness to share your knowledge and a proactive attitude. Students in their fourth or fifth year of study (SEPAM, MoT, EPA, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Industrial Design,.....) Contact the module manager if you want to match your interests with this course. Working as a team member, active searching for additional course material, brainstorm techniques, presentation techniques, scientific writing and reporting in English, theoretic design and representation, peer reviewing, critical reflection.

Course Contents

Study Goals

Education Method

Computer Use Course Relations

Literature and Study Materials Prerequisites Assessment Enrolment / Application Special Information Remarks Targetgroup Extra Skills Trained

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SPM9624
Module Manager Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Course Contents Dr.ir. S. Daskapan 0/0/0/4

Information Security

Study Goals

4 4 4 5 English The course can be divided into a theoretical and practical part. In the first part algorithms, protocols and other existing technologies including their legal and moral constraints are explained. In the second part more practical and business oriented topics are discussed. 1. Cryptography; 2. Network security; 3. Emerging security technologies; 4. Trust, identity /privacy technologies; 5. Identity /privacy legal issues; 6. Business continuity; 7. Operational Risk management 8. ITIL security To understand security technologies in ICT-infrastructures and organisations. To develop an analytical framework for the analysis of security architectures. To be able to perform an analysis in organisations or ICT infrastrcutures and to report on the results of the analysis in a scientific manner. At the end of the course the student: has knowledge about cryptographic essentials; has knowledge about common network security protocols; has knowledge about the different trust models; is able to distinguish the different privacy technologies; is able to distinguish the legal issues concerning privacy; is able to perform an operational risk analysis; is able to set up a business continuity plan; is able to understand how security matures in an organisation; Weekly class room lectures and assignment(s). Basic skills with computers, networks and programming. A first year bachelor course on those topics must be completed. Reader / set of papers Successful completion of a 1st year course on computer science/networks and programming, like spm1410. Written exam and/or assignment(s)

Education Method Computer Use Literature and Study Materials Prerequisites Assessment

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Year Organization Education

2008/2009 Elektrotechniek, Wiskunde en Informatica Master Electrical Engineering

Homologation courses EE 2008


Introduction 1 Homologation courses are courses that students can take to acquire knowledge missing from their previous BSc degree programme.

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ET2205
Responsible Instructor Instructor Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language

Electromagnetism and Signals


Dr.ir. R.F. Remis Dr.ir. B.J. Kooij Drs. A.J.T. van den Berg 8/6/0/0 1 2 1 1 2 Dutch

11

ET3505D1
Responsible Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Course Contents Study Goals 0/0/2/0

Telecommucation Networking
Prof.dr.ir. P.F.A. Van Mieghem

Education Method Literature and Study Materials Assessment

3 3 3 English Telecommunication Networks provides an introduction to telecommunications networks such as local area networks, the Internet and traditional telephony networks. The basic goal is to provide an understanding of what functionality is required for an end-to-end communication and to obtain an insight in the many different concepts that are needed to design a data communication network. The students are expected to be able to explain network concepts, to relate these concepts in the network architecture and to understand their interaction. Lectures: 14 hours (7x2 hours) Router lab (2 hours and the labo needs to be prepared at home) P. Van Mieghem, Data Communications Networking, Techne Press, Amsterdam, 2006, Chapter 1-6, ISBN-10: 90-8594-008-7 T. Kleiberg and P. Van Mieghem, Data Communications Networking laboratory exercise, available as pdf on blackboard. Written exam (closed book)

ET8002A
Responsible Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Expected prior knowledge Summary Dr.ir. G.J.M. Janssen 2/0/0/0

Telecommunications Techniques

Course Contents

Study Goals Education Method Literature and Study Materials Assessment Permitted Materials during Tests Special Information

1 1 1 2 English Mathematics in general, Signal Transformations (especially linear systems and signals, Fourier analysis), Stochastic Processes. Transmission and distribution of information by means of telecommunication techniques form the backbone of our modern society. The course Telecommunications Techniques provides mathematical methods to describe and analyse communication systems for the transmission of digital signals. In this course, mathematical methods are given to describe and evaluate communication systems for the transmission of digital signals: distortion and loss in signal transmission, description of physical transmission media, received signal power, noise and signal-to-noise ratio, system noise calculations, signal sampling and pulse modulation, digital transmission in baseband, bandpass signals: modulation and demodulation, generic transmitter and receiver concepts, digital modulation techniques, detection of digital signals: bit error probability. The student has gained insight in the basic concepts of signal processing for telecommunications, especially those related to the transmission of digital signals, and is able to apply this knowledge by solving related problems by means of calculations. Lectures, homework excerises Couch, L.W., Digital and Analog Communication Systems, 7th edition, ISBN 0-13-142492-0, Prentice Hall, 2007. Written exam with open book. During the exam, the student is allowed to use an electronic calculator and the book "Digital and Analog Communication Systems" of L.W. Couch. For international MSc. students in the Program Telecommunications, this course can be taken in the first quarter as a refresher course to bring the knowledge of telecommunication techniques on the required level (as part of the Free Elective space).

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ET8002B
Responsible Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Course Contents Study Goals 2/0/0/0

Telecommunication Networks
Prof.dr.ir. P.F.A. Van Mieghem

Education Method Literature and Study Materials Assessment Remarks

1 1 1 English The course focuses on network concepts and treats local area networks, error control and retransmission protocols, the architectural principles of the Internet, flow control in the Internet (TCP) and routing algorithms. The basic goal is to provide an understanding of what functionality is required for an end-to-end communication and to obtain an insight in the many different concepts that are needed to design a data communication network. The students are expected to be able to explain network concepts, to relate these concepts in the network architecture and to understand their interaction. Lectures: 14 hours (7x2 hours) Router lab (2 hours and the lab needs to be prepared at home) P. Van Mieghem, Data Communications Networking, Techne Press, Amsterdam (2006), ISBN-10: 90-8594-008-7, ISBN-13: 978-90-8594-008-1, (Chapter 1-6) T. Kleiberg and P. Van Mieghem, Data Communications Networking laboratory exercise, available as pdf on blackboard. Written. PLEASE NOTE: Exceptionnally this course will not be taught this study year (2008-2009). As an alternative, you may take ET3505-D1 in the third quarter.

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Year Organization Education

2008/2009 Elektrotechniek, Wiskunde en Informatica Master Electrical Engineering

Profile Avionics EE 2008

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AE3-302
Responsible Instructor Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Required for Prof.dr.ir. J.A. Mulder Ir. A.C. in 't Veld 0/0/6/0

Flight Dynamics I

Expected prior knowledge Course Contents

Study Goals

Education Method Literature and Study Materials Assessment

3 3 3 5 English Follow up courses AE4-301 AE4-303 AE4-304 AE4-305 ae2-115 is recommended. 1. Introduction to flight dynamics, flying qualities, static and dynamic stability. 2. Definitions, reference frames, Euler angles, quarternions, transformations. 3. Nonlinear equations of motion of rigid aircraft and spacecraft, effect of rotors, flat and spherical earth. 4. Linearized equations of motion for small excursions from nominal flight conditions, dimensionless and dimensional forms of the linearized equations of motions. Decomposition in longitudinal and lateral-directional equations, definition of stability and control derivatives. 5. Analysis of longitudinal aerodynamic forces and moments in symmetrical flight, contributions of wing, fuselage, tailplanes and engines, aerodynamic centre, down wash and control hinge moments. Moment equilibrium, the normal force on the horizontal tail to trim. 6. Estimation of longitudinal stability and control derivatives. 7. The concept of static stability in symmetrical steady flight conditions, the neutral point with stick fixed and stick free, stability margins. Elevator control force and displacement curves, relation with stability margins. Stick force and displacement stability. The manoeuvrepoint with stick fixed and stick free. Stick force and stick displacement per g. Artificial stability augmentation through springs and bobweights or artificial stability through Fly by Wire flight control systems. 8. Estimation of lateral stability and control derivatives. 9. Lateral stability and control in steady asymmetrical straight flight conditions and during turns. Control and equilibrium of one engine out flight, minimum control speed air. 10. Symmetrical characteristic motions, effect of nominal flight condition, altitude and speed. Simple approximations of short period and phugod characteristic motions. 11. Asymmetrical characteristic motions, effect of nominal flight condition, altitude and speed. Simple approximations of Dutch Roll, spiral mode and roll mode characteristic motions. The lateral stability diagram for the Dutch Roll and spiral modes. Thorough introduction to aircraft flight dynamics, stability and control. Nonlinear and linearized equations of motion. The concept of and conditions for static stability and static control characteristics. Mechanical and electronic control augmentation. Egine out flight conditions. Symmetrical and asymmetrical characteristic motions. Handling qualities requirements. Lecture J.A. Mulder, W.H.J.J. van Staveren, J.C. van der Vaart, E. de Weerdt, Flight Dynamics, Lecture-Notes AE3-302 Written

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AE4-220ET
Responsible Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Course Contents 0/0/0/3

Airplane Performance and Operations for Avionics


Ir. T.J. Mulder

4 4 4 English Elements of Airplane Performance and Operation. This course will comprise the basic concepts of translational and rotational motion of a point mass and centre of gravity. Coordinate systems: Earth axis system (also moving), Body axis system and Air path systemand their relation and angles. The airplane mission, parts, configuration, control surfaces, flight phases and forces on the airplane The Atmosphere with variation of pressure with altitude, International Standard Atmosphere Aerodynamic coefficients with wing geometry and airfoils, Lift drag polar and derivatives Air data instruments such as Altimeter, Vertical speed indicator, Airspeed indicator, Mach meter and Thermometer Different types of airplane propulsion systems, piston engine and jet engine. Definition of thrust for Jet propulsion and calculating an ideal turbojet cycle. Also Propeller performance, thrust and efficiency. The airplane in symmetric flight (powered and gliding, climb and descent) and performance calculations, Basic relations, Equations of motion, Drag and Power required, thrust and power available and performance diagram. Effect of altitude on Drag and Power required. Cruise Performance, Range and Endurance. Airfield performance, take off and landing parameters and calulations The accompanying practical is a real flight in a general aviation Single Engine Piston aircraft such as a Cessna 172. Teaching the elements of performance analysis. To apply mechanics, aerodynamics and thermodynamics to practical problems, including modeling, methods of solution, interpretation, design and operational procedures. Experiencing the practical and operational aspects of flying in a general aviation aircraft, control, operational procedures, use of checklists etc. Lectures + Demoflight -G.J.J. Ruijgrok, Elements of airplane performance, Delft University Press, Delft, 1996 -Th.J.Mulder, A.Kraeger, Introduction to the first year flight practical AE1-005DEMO written and open book and test before the flight -G.J.J. Ruijgrok, Elements of airplane performance, Delft University Press, Delft, 1996 Additional information and exercises can be found on Blackboard.

Study Goals

Education Method Literature and Study Materials Assessment Permitted Materials during Tests Remarks

ET4022
Responsible Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Required for Course Contents Dr.ir. E. Theunissen 0/0/3/0

Radio Navigation

Study Goals

Education Method Literature and Study Materials Assessment

3 3 3 English AE4294 Air Traffic Management This course gives an introduction to the basics of radio navigation. It starts with the principles of range measurements and threats stemming from interference, multipath and poor propagation modelling, followed by a description of position determination, based on hyperbolic, rho-rho, pseudo rho-rho and angular systems. The course continues with high-level descriptions for a number of systems such as Loran-C, GPS, VOR/DME, ILS and MLS. Attention is given to reliability problems like accuracy, integrity, availability and continuity. An introduction is given on integrated and hybridised navigation and also on the principles of differential navigation techniques. The environmental effects of aviation, the methods to measure these effects and the navigation systems involved are discussed. The course ends with the description of two integrated systems: EUROFIX and MIAS. As the radio link is generally the limiting factor in the final performance, the radio navigation education is strongly embedded in the telecommunication program. Understanding of the principles of radio navigation: radio wave propagation, distance measurements, accuracy & ambiguity, determination of position, co-ordinate systems Understanding of the principles of: oLoran-C: signal, ground wave & sky wave, setup of chains, errors oGNSS: signals, multi-path & shadowing, system set up, errors oVOR/DME: signals, characteristics, errors Understanding of the principles of: oILS: signals, restrictions, errors oMLS: signals, restrictions, errors Understanding of the RNP parameters Understanding of the tunnel concept: influence on RNP Knowledge about augmentation systems: DGPS & RTK, SBAS, influence on RNP Knowledge about integration of systems: single point of failure, dissimilarity, voting, influence on RNP Lectures Lecture notes: Handouts Written, closed book

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ET4138
Responsible Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Course Contents Dr.ir. E. Theunissen 0/3/0/0

Introduction to Avionics

Study Goals

2 2 2 English - Navigation concepts, systems and displays (FANS, CNS, Control systems, RNP, EFIS, FMS, LNAV, VNAV). - Safety and accidents (CFIT, Midair collisions, Runway Incursions, Loss of Control). - Warning systems (TCAS, (E)GPWS). - Design (Requirements Analysis, Certification, Automation, Architectures, Vulnerability, Error reports). - Sensors (GPS, IRS, Air Data Computer). - New developments (EVS, SVS, SGS). Demonstrate basic knowledge of the typical Avionics systems, their implementation, the performance requirements and the sensors used to provide the required data Demonstrate the ability to choose an architecture based on reliability requirements and an identification of failure modes and effects Demonstrate basic knowledge about current developments, future systems and their anticipated potential Lectures Handouts used during the course written

Education Method Literature and Study Materials Assessment

ET4244
Responsible Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Expected prior knowledge Course Contents Dr.ir. E. Theunissen By Appointment

Avionics Lab

Study Goals

Education Method Literature and Study Materials Assessment Remarks

None (Self Study) 1 Exam by appointment English ET4022, ET4138. During the Avionics exercise the students will be introduced to the Electronic Flight Instrument System. In a number of scenarios, lateral navigation, vertical navigation, collision avoidance and ground proximity warning systems will be demonstrated. At certain points during a scenario, aspects of the system will be discussed with the students to test their knowledge. Data that is recorded during these scenarios is provided to the student for an assignment that will be evaluated during the de-briefing. Ability to apply the RNP concept Ability to identify failures and probable cause Ability to explain how the relevant Avionics systems operate Ability to explain how the data is obtained and what the potential errors and its sources are Ability to explain how errors can be detected and isolated Lab. course Briefing Assignments By appointment The exercise takes place in the DELPHINS flightsimulator facility, located at the 20th floor of the Faculty EEMCS. To participate, students need to make an appointment with Dr. Theunissen or Ir. Koeners. The exercise consists of three parts: briefing, simulator flights and de-briefing.

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SC4031
Responsible Instructor Responsible Instructor Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start Education Exam Period Course Language Course Contents Ir. A.E.M. Huesman Dr.ing. D. Jeltsema 0/4/0/0

Modelling & System Analysis

Study Goals

2 2 2 English Brief introduction into modeling of dynamical systems with help of differential and algebraic equations. Emphasis will be on dynamical systems where energy storage and dissipation play an important role. Linear versus nonlinear. Global vs local. Linearization. Periodic solutions and limit cycles. Stability analysis for nonlinear systems. Dissipativity and passivity of nonlinear systems. Modeling and analysis of systems from the process industry. You are able to make models of electro-mechanical systems from the knowledge of physics, with an emphasize on the internal energy of the system. You are able to write models of systems described by differential and algebraic equations in a control systems form. You are able to distinguish between linear and nonlinear systems properties, and you know when to apply the linear and when to apply the nonlinear theory. You are able to consider minimality and related issues for nonlinear systems. You can determine several stability properties for nonlinear systems. You are able to use passivity properties of physical systems. You are able to formulate and analyse process dynamics. The examples are mainly from electro-mechanical systems and the process industry. Lectures 0/4/0/0 Course notes Written exam and homework Matlab/Simulink exercises. 3mE Department Delft Center for Systems and Control

Education Method Literature and Study Materials Assessment Department

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Prof.dr.ir. N.H.G. Baken


Unit Department E-mail Telephone Room Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform. BE Netw. Architect. & Services N.H.G.Baken@tudelft.nl +31 (0)15 27 87374 HB 19.300

Drs. A.J.T. van den Berg


Unit Department E-mail Telephone Room Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform. LS Toegep. Waarsch.rekening A.J.T.vandenBerg@tudelft.nl +31 (0)15 27 83442 HB 06.290

Prof.dr.ir. J. Biemond
Unit Department E-mail Telephone Room Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform. LS Theorie van de Inf. & Comm. J.Biemond@tudelft.nl +31 (0)15 27 84695 HB 11.270

Dr. W.A.G.A. Bouwman


Unit Department E-mail Telephone Room Techniek, Bestuur & Management Sectie Informatie & Communicat W.A.G.A.Bouwman@tudelft.nl +31 (0)15 27 87168 b2.260

Dr. N.V. Budko


Unit Department E-mail Telephone Room Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform. LS Elektromagnetisme N.V.Budko@tudelft.nl +31 (0)15 27 86050 HB 14.040

Dr.ir. S. Daskapan
Unit Department E-mail Telephone Room Techniek, Bestuur & Management Sectie Informatie & Communicat S.Daskapan@tudelft.nl +31 (0)15 27 85700 b2.330

Prof.ir. P. van Genderen


Unit Department E-mail Telephone Room Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform. LS Microgolftr &Tele-obs.techn P.vanGenderen@tudelft.nl +31 (0)15 27 85055 HB 21.090

Dr. A. Hanjalic
Unit Department E-mail Telephone Room Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform. LS Theorie van de Inf. & Comm. A.Hanjalic@tudelft.nl +31 (0)15 27 83084 HB 11.310

Prof.dr.ing. S.M. Heemstra de Groot


Unit Department Telephone Room Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform. LS Wireless Communications +31 (0)15 27 87374 HB 19.300

Dr.ir. R. Hekmat
Unit Department Telephone Room Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform. BE Wireless & Mobile Commun. +31 (0)15 27 86272 HB 19.320

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Prof.ir. P. Hoogeboom
Unit Department E-mail Telephone Room Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform. LS Microgolftr &Tele-obs.techn P.Hoogeboom@tudelft.nl +31 (0)15 27 87794 HB 20.250

Ir. A.E.M. Huesman


Unit Department E-mail Telephone Room Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng Delft Cent for Systems & Contr A.E.M.Huesman@tudelft.nl +31 (0)15 27 88131 8C-2-18

Dr.ir. G.J.M. Janssen


Unit Department E-mail Telephone Room Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform. LS Wireless Communications G.J.M.Janssen@tudelft.nl +31 (0)15 27 86736 HB 19.290

Dr.ing. D. Jeltsema
Unit Department E-mail Telephone Room Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform. LS Wiskundige Systeemtheorie D.Jeltsema@tudelft.nl +31 (0)15 27 89277 HB 04.140

Dr.ir. B.J. Kooij


Unit Department E-mail Telephone Room Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform. LS Elektromagnetisme B.J.Kooij@tudelft.nl +31 (0)15 27 81745 HB 14.270

Dr.ir. R.E. Kooij


Unit Department E-mail Telephone Room Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform. IRCTR R.E.Kooij@tudelft.nl +31 (0)15 27 85393 HB 19.260

Dr.ir. F.A. Kuipers


Unit Department E-mail Telephone Room Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform. BE Netw. Architect. & Services F.A.Kuipers@tudelft.nl +31 (0)15 27 81347 HB 19.250

G.J.T. Leus
Unit Department E-mail Telephone Room Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform. LS Netwerktheorie G.Leus@tudelft.nl +31 (0)15 27 84327 HB 17.280

A.C.C. Lo
Unit Department E-mail Telephone Room Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform. LS Wireless Communications A.C.C.Lo@tudelft.nl +31 (0)15 27 81752 HB 19.080

Prof.dr.ir. J.A. Mulder


Unit Department Telephone Room Luchtvaart- & Ruimtevaarttechn Control and Simulation +31 (0)15 27 85378 flexplek Page 52 of 54

Ir. T.J. Mulder


Unit Department E-mail Telephone Room Luchtvaart- & Ruimtevaarttechn Design of Air- and Rotorcraft T.J.Mulder@tudelft.nl +31 (0)15 27 85368 11.22

Prof.dr.ir. I.G.M.M. Niemegeers


Unit Department E-mail Telephone Room Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform. LS Wireless Communications I.G.M.M.Niemegeers@tudelft.nl +31 (0)15 27 87372 HB 19.310

Dr. H. Nikookar
Unit Department E-mail Telephone Room Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform. LS Microgolftr &Tele-obs.techn H.Nikookar@tudelft.nl +31 (0)15 27 81389 HB 21.060

Dr.ir. R.F. Remis


Unit Department E-mail Telephone Room Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform. LS Elektromagnetisme R.F.Remis@tudelft.nl +31 (0)15 27 86050 HB 14.040

Dr.ir. H.W.J. Russchenberg


Unit Department E-mail Telephone Room Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform. LS Microgolftr &Tele-obs.techn H.W.J.Russchenberg@tudelft.nl +31 (0)15 27 86292 HB 20.250

M. Simeoni
Unit Department E-mail Telephone Room Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform. IRCTR M.Simeoni@tudelft.nl +31 (0)15 27 81023 HB 21.080

Dr.ir. E. Theunissen
Unit Department E-mail Telephone Room Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform. LS Microgolftr &Tele-obs.techn E.Theunissen@tudelft.nl +31 (0)15 27 81792 HB 20.080

Drs. J. Ubacht
Unit Department E-mail Telephone Room Techniek, Bestuur & Management Sectie Informatie & Communicat J.Ubacht@tudelft.nl +31 (0)15 27 82791 b2.230

Dr. S.P.W.G. Uhlig C.M.H. Unal


Unit Department E-mail Telephone Room Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform. LS Microgolftr &Tele-obs.techn C.M.H.Unal@tudelft.nl +31 (0)15 27 86257 HB 20.270

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Prof.dr.ir. P.F.A. Van Mieghem


Unit Department E-mail Telephone Room Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform. LS Telecomm.netten & diensten P.F.A.VanMieghem@tudelft.nl +31 (0)15 27 82397 HB 19.270

Prof.dr.ir. A.J. van der Veen


Unit Department E-mail Telephone Room Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform. LS Netwerktheorie A.J.vanderVeen@tudelft.nl +31 (0)15 27 86240 HB 17.040

Ir. A.C. in 't Veld


Unit Department E-mail Telephone Room Luchtvaart- & Ruimtevaarttechn Control and Simulation A.C.intVeld@tudelft.nl +31 (0)15 27 82594 LB 0.23

Dr.ir. M.D. Verweij


Unit Department E-mail Telephone Room Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform. LS Elektromagnetisme M.D.Verweij@tudelft.nl +31 (0)15 27 81761 HB 14.290

Dr.ing. L.C.N. de Vreede


Unit Department E-mail Telephone Room Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform. LS Ontw. van Elektron. Circ. L.C.N.deVreede@tudelft.nl +31 (0)15 27 86187 LB 01.420

Dr.ir. J.H. Weber


Unit Department E-mail Telephone Room Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform. LS Wireless Communications J.H.Weber@tudelft.nl +31 (0)15 27 81698 HB 19.280

Ir. E. De Weerdt
Unit Department E-mail Telephone Room Luchtvaart- & Ruimtevaarttechn Control and Simulation E.DeWeerdt@tudelft.nl +31 (0)15 27 85336 02.34

Prof.dr. O. Yarovyi
Unit Department E-mail Telephone Room Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform. LS Microgolftr &Tele-obs.techn O.Yarovyi@tudelft.nl +31 (0)15 27 82496 HB 21.050

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