CITY OF CHARLOTTESVILLE

STRATEGIC INVESTMENT AREA COMMUNITY MEETING/WORKSHOP PRESENTATION: THREE SCENARIOS
May 16, 2013

Cunningham | Quill Architects
OCULUS Landscape Architects Kittelson & Associates, Inc Bolan Smart Associates, Inc
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Goals of the Strategic Investment Area Study
(From City of Charlottesville SIA Request for Proposals)

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To rebuild and preserve public and assisted housing as part of an integrated plan for revitalizing neighborhoods hallmarked by concentrated poverty. T catalyze To l coordinated di di investments i in neighborhood i hb h d revitalization, i li i including improvements in infrastructure, education and community assets that attracts businesses and industries. To build the foundations for economically viable neighborhoods of opportunity and choice within one of the city’s most distressed communities by promoting mixed income residential development without displacement and employment growth. To address interconnected challenges: g housing g decay, y, crime, , disinvestment, , health disparities, adult educational opportunities, transportation and economic opportunities for youth and adults. To create a healthy, viable neighborhood with urban amenities such as public parks parks, institutions like libraries and excellent food sources and safe, safe interconnected streets that promote walking, biking, and efficient public transit. To adhere to and comply with the Residents’ Bill of Rights for Redevelopment. Redevelopment
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Residents’ Bill of Rights for Redevelopment

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Key Entities
(Partial List of Groups)

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Overall Process

TONIGHT (5/16/13)

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PLAN AREA / CREATING PLACE:

DESIGN OPPORTUNITIES

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RESEARCH

- Diversity of SIA Character Areas

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RESEARCH -

Diversity of Walking Tours, Stakeholder & Community Meetings

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Extensive Community Engagement
Piedmont Housing Alliance National Housing Trust / Enterprise Preservation Corporation Local Developers (Private Sector & Non-Profit) Neighborhood Leaders Downtown Businesses Bicycle & Pedestrian Safety Committee Charlottesville Redevelopment Housing Authority Tech Businesses Real Estate / Market Conditions Meeting University of Virginia – School of Architecture, Planning & Landscape Architecture Place Design Task Force Environmental Staff, Public Works Staff & City Engineer City y Bike & Pedestrian Staff, , Trails Staff & City y Arborist Section 3 Coordinator Economic Development Staff City Traffic Engineer City Tax Assessor Owners of IX Property – The Kuttners Piedmont Council for the Arts Section 3 & Department of Social Services Client Focus Group Youth Group Community Leaders Church – Community Leaders African American Heritage Center / Jefferson School SIA Steering Committee Community Walking Tour (March 14, 14 2013) Steering Committee Walking Tour (February 24, 2013) Martha Jefferson Neighborhood Walking Tour (April 25, 2013) Community Open House # 1- (March 14, 2013) Community Workshop / Meeting # 1 - (March 14, 2013) Public Housing Residents & PHAR - (February 21, 2013 P bli H Public Housing i R Residents id t / C Crescent tH Halls ll (A (April il 23 23, 2013) - Community C it M Meeting ti #2 Public Housing Residents / 6th Street (April 24, 2013) - Community Meeting # 3 Community Open House & Community Workshop / Meeting # 4 (May 16, 2013)

Feb. 2013 - May 16, 2013

List of Stakeholder Meetings, Walking Tours & Community Meetings

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Community Workshop/Meetings (3/14/13, 4/23/13, 4/24/13)

TABLE DIAGRAMS & WORKSHOP PHOTOS
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WHAT WE HEARD

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Key Plan Components
While we are presenting three scenarios tonight, several key plan components have developed out of the input we have received from stakeholder groups. These components are found in each of the three scenarios which follow, and they will be part of the plan that is ultimately selected: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Existing i i Economic i Conditions C di i & Future Economic i C Concepts Connectivity & Transportation Landscape Strategies Sustainable Lifestyle Civic Open Spaces Housing Typologies: Mixed Income, Affordable, Market-Rate

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Plan Component:
Existing Economic Conditions
1. Central location / beside Mall 2. Attractive location for some jobs 3. Range of interest in local living 4. Mix of incomes and social groups already present present. 5. Land area can accommodate growth over time 6. Existing zoning can support future vision
IX Jeff School City Cntr SNL

Lexis Nexis I Inova

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Plan Component:
Future Economic Concepts
Near-Medium Term: 1. Circulation, water management, open spaces 2. Gradual commercial and residential development closest to Mall 3. Targeted 3 a ge ed moderate ode a e income co e employment growth 4. Planning framework for future Longer Term: 1. Continued mixed dev. near Mall 2. Preservation of existing neighborhoods g 3. Gradual updating of existing housing 4. Neighborhood serving retail 5. Capacity to grow 6 IX location as a mixed 6. mixed-use use anchor
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Plan Component:
Connectivity

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Location of Key Destinations relative to SIA

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Connectivity
Issues
Critical Elements:

Barriers disconnect the area from activity centers: • downtown, U.Va, schools, employment and retail

Community gathering spaces and services including Region Ten, worship facilities, community and training centers

Limited d options without h a car • Belmont neighborhood lacks a continuous sidewalk network • Major streets difficult for pedestrian and bicycle • Monticello Ave • Elliott Avenue

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Connectivity
Opportunities
Critical Elements: • Transit service • Simplified routes structure • Increased frequency & reliability li bilit • Improve walk bike connections to bus stops • Pedestrian and bicycle networks • Connect “gaps” • Cross major barriers Martha Jefferson Neighborhood • Target busy intersections Belmont Neighborhood • Calm traffic with green streets • Sidewalks
5/16/13 Street Neighborhood Ridge • New development creates 17

Plan Component:
Existing and Planned Transit
Existing Planned (2013)

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Both maps from: http://www.charlottesville.org

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Plan Component:
Existing and Planned Transit
Existing Planned (2013)

Both maps from: http://www.charlottesville.org

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Plan Component:
Bicycle and Pedestrian Toolbox – Examples of Potential Improvements

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http://nacto.org/cities‐for‐cycling/design‐guide

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Plan Component:
Traffic Calming Toolbox - Examples of Potential Improvements -

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Plan Component:
Bicycle and Pedestrian Connectivity- Martha Jefferson Neighborhood
C iti l El Critical Elements: t
• Targeted intersection crossing improvements • 9th Street NE/Jefferson Street 9th Street NE/E High Street • • Roundabouts or other geometric improvements • Traffic calming measures Pedestrian P d t i and d bi bicycle l network t k improvements • Opportunities to fill in “gaps” in the bicycle and pedestrian network • Sidewalks on 9 ½ Street NE • Sharrows on 9th Street NE and E High Street • Dedicated bicycle space, • On steep inclines, eg. climbing lanes • At busy intersections 5/16/13 22

Plan Component:
Bicycle and Pedestrian Connectivity – Belmont Neighborhood
C iti l El Critical Elements: t • Traffic calming measures on streets and at problematic p intersections Use low-volume streets to provide connections in the bike network Provide sidewalks Provide rainwater retention/treatment

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Plan Component:
Connectivity – Ridge Street Neighborhood
Critical Elements:
• New development creates connections to downtown and within the neighborhood • New direct access to downtown • Connections across the creek • Links through the IX site Prioritize pedestrian access to community gathering facilities and services including Region Ten, worship facilities, community centers and training Target intersection and corridor impro ements to reduce improvements red ce barrier effect of major thru streets Provide dedicated space for bicyclists • Monticello Avenue • Elliot Avenue 5/16/13 Plan for shared parking, car-sharing, bike-sharing stations 24

Add rendering, site plan, photo, etc…

Plan Component:
Site Reading + Landscape Strategies SITE READING
• Landform of ridges and hills flanking a central t ll latent t t stream t valley; ll over 150-foot 150 f t change in elevation from Belmont to Moores Creek topography; major topographic modifications (cut and fill) pp reach of Pollocks over time within upper Branch Stream corridors are impaired and mitigation opportunities are limited by quantities of piped high velocities and q stormwater discharged into Pollocks Branch and Moores Creek Current overall built form (including mix of industrial uses and housing) within the core project area represents late 19th- and early 20th-century attitudes concerning the value of stream corridors Community identity within project area is challenged by pattern of fragmented land use and lack of pedestrian and bicycle 5/16/13 connectivity

LANDSCAPE STRATEGIES
• Topography • Green Infrastructure • Site Site-Specific Specific Place Making • Landscape Character & Identity

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Plan Component:
Landscape Strategies TOPOGRAPHY
• Reveal and respond to topographic features and conditions associated with a reestablished landform of ridges-stream ridges stream valley valley-hills hills
• • Reveal topographic change through built form Interpret p latent stream corridor of the upper reach of Pollocks Branch through built form

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Plan Component:
Landscape Strategies TOPOGRAPHY

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Plan Component:
Landscape Strategies GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE
• Rehabilitate the upper reach of Pollocks Branch and associated drainage systems to slow, divert, and cleanse storm water and to enable the restoration of the lower reach of Pollocks Branch
• • Manage upstream flows via best management practices Disconnect storm drains in the Belmont and Ridge Street neighborhoods from the Pollocks Branch main line and manage and treat stormwater within a water cleansing system piggybacked over the existing Pollocks Branch main line sewer pipe

Chelsea Dewitt, Brian Flynn, James Moore, UVA School of Architecture

Restore the lower reach of Pollocks Branch corridor after development of upper reach improvements 5/16/13 •

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Plan Component:
Landscape Strategies
+ HP 504’

GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE

+ HP 500’

+ HP 488’

+ LP 382’

+ HP 500’
CLARK SCHOOL

BELMONT PARK

JORDAN PARK

+ LP 340’

QUARRY PARK

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Plan Component:
Landscape Strategies SITE-SPECIFIC PLACE MAKING
• Orient development to a rehabilitated and restored Pollocks Branch and incorporate views of Carters Mountain to create an authentic sense of place
• Use Pollocks Branch to define a “Central Park” and to [re]structure new development d l Transform the riverBACK condition to a riverFRONT condition with development oriented to Pollocks B Branch h Create views to Pollocks Branch from developed areas and circulation systems
JORDAN PARK

OAKWOOD CEMETERY

CLARK SCHOOL

BELMONT PARK

Retain and showcase views of Carters Mountain 5/16/13 •

QUARRY PARK

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Plan Component:
Landscape Strategies SITE-SPECIFIC PLACE MAKING

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Plan Component:
Landscape Strategies LANDSCAPE CHARACTER & IDENTITY
• Strengthen neighborhood identity; retain important existing landscape character; establish landscape character through renovated and new parks, streetscapes, and trail corridors
• St e gt e neighborhood Strengthen e g bo ood identity de t ty through temporary and permanent landscape interventions and public art reveal a rehabilitated and restored Pollocks Branch to establish neighborhood identity Retain Belmont and Ridge Street neighborhood character
JORDAN PARK Pollocks Branch Gateway

OAKWOOD CEMETERY Pollocks Branch Gateway / Central Civic Space

Pollocks Branch Gateway

Pollocks Branch Gateway

CLARK SCHOOL

Pollocks Branch Gateway

BELMONT PARK

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Use l U landscape d t to k knit it t together th th the landscapes within the Warehouse District, the housing areas, and Ix 5/16/13 development

QUARRY PARK

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Plan Component:
Landscape Strategies LANDSCAPE CHARACTER & IDENTITY

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Plan Component:
Sustainable Lifestyle
1. 2. 3. 4. Local Food Sourcing Urban Agriculture “Green” Green Infrastructure Reduced Automobile Transportation Needs through Connectivity and Localizing Services 5. Reduced Energy Requirements & Energy Production 6. Sustainable Building g Design g for All Housing g Types yp & Commercial Buildings 1. Compact development 2. Green roofs 3. Energy gy & Water efficiencies 4. Alternative heating & cooling practices

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Plan Component:
Sustainable Lifestyle – A Green City
Implement and Showcase Existing City Programs: 1. Stormwater management 2. Water resource protection 3. Green buildings 4 Stream Restorations and Raingardens 4. 5. Incentives for alternative fuel cars 6. Trails network 7. Energy Efficiency Incentives 8. Recycling and Conservation Efforts

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Plan Component:
Sustainable Lifestyle – Urban Agriculture
Environmental • Locally sourced food • Storm St water t mitigation iti ti • Reduces heat-island effect • Re-use of vacant land • Restore urban ecosystems y Economic • Job creation • Skill development • Entrepreneurial opportunity Social • Community / after school educational programs • Opportunities for communal participation
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Plan Component:
Sustainable Lifestyle – Urban Agriculture Vertical Integration

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Plan Component:
Sustainable Lifestyle - Compact Development & Sustainable Buildings

74 Units/Acre

44 Units/Acre

22 Units/Acre

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Plan Component:
Civic Open Spaces

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Plan Component:
Civic Open Spaces – Intimate Neighborhood Spaces

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Plan Component:
Civic Open Spaces – Inter-neighborhood Spaces

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Plan Component:
Civic Open Spaces – Grand Urban Spaces

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Plan Component:
Housing Typologies : Townhouse, Small Multi-Family, Mid-Rise Multi-Family Aff d bl Mixed Affordable, Mi d Income, I M Market k t R Rate t

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Plan Component:
Housing Typologies - Affordable Housing / Small Multi-Family Precedent DAVIS PLACE – Arlington, VA
• Density – 10 units aimed at first time homebuyers
(at or below 80% HUD-defined Median Family Income)

Strong sense of community Intimate t ate social soc a spaces Design quality and materials
Third Floor: 2 & 3 Bedroom Units West Elevation

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Front Elevation

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Site Plan

Plan Component:
Housing Typologies -- Mixed Income Housing Precedent: J James Bl Bland d Homes H – Alexandria, Al d i Virginia Vi i i

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Plan Component:
Housing Typologies -- Mixed Income Housing Precedent: J James Bl Bland d Homes H – Alexandria, Al d i Virginia Vi i i

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Plan Component:
Housing Typologies - Mixed Income Housing Precedent: C it l Q Capitol Quarter t – Navy N Y Yard dN Neighborhood, i hb h d W Washington, hi t DC

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SCENARIOS: Three Organizational Concepts that could provide a Physical Framework for the New Plan

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Scenario 1: Word Cloud of Community Comments

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SCENARIO 1:
Linear Park & Greenway
Critical Elements: • The historic location of Pollocks Branch is recognized through aboveground stormwater management incorporated into a public greenway. Residential and Mixed Mixed-Use Use Buildings are oriented toward the new parks. 2nd Street St t di directly tl li linked k dt to Downtown Mall

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Scenario 1: Linear Park & Greenway - Precedent:

Stormwater management happens at the level of the neighborhood through the greenway filtration system; at the level of the block through “green” green sidewalks; and at the level of the building.
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Scenario 1: Linear Park & Greenway - Precedent:

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Scenario 1: Green Infrastructure - Precedent:

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Scenario 2: Word Cloud of Community Comments

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SCENARIO 2:
Neighborhood Nodes Critical Elements: • A series of neighborhood “nodes” (open spaces, neighborhood retail centers civic buildings) centers, structures the blocks within the neighborhood. Mixed-Income Housing is provided in some areas; Affordable Housing and Market-rate Housing in others. 2nd Street St t directly di tl linked li k d to Downtown Mall
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Scenario 2: Neighborhood Nodes -Precedent
Parkside - Washington, DC: Integrated Services and New Housing

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Scenario 2: Neighborhood Nodes - Precedent
Parkside - Washington, DC: Integrated Services and New Housing

• Child Care/Pre-School Care/Pre School • Health Services • Affordable Housing & Affordable Senior Housing
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Scenario 2: Neighborhood Nodes - Precedent

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Public Housing and Market Rate Housing look identical. Examples 58 illustrate parks located centrally in housing communities.

Scenario 2: Neighborhood Nodes - Precedent
PSU Recreation Center & Urban Plaza – Portland, Oregon Charles Houston Recreation Center – Alexandria, Virginia Herndon Senior Center – Herndon, Virginia

Examples of Community Services & Facilities located in Neighborhoods

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Scenario 3: Word Cloud of Community Comments

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SCENARIO 3:
2nd Street Corridor and Central Piazza
Critical Elements: •
d Street directly linked to 2nd Downtown Mall

2nd Street develops into a vibrant commercial corridor Centrally located pedestrianf focused d piazza i at t IX property Higher g density y housing, g, commercial office, and retail around central piazza Surgical reconfiguration of Friendship Courts – 2nd St.
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Urbanized water feature

Scenario 3: Central Piazza- Precedent:
Director’s Park - Portland, Oregon E Example l of f Large L Civic/Community Ci i /C it Space S

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Scenario 3: Central Piazza- Precedent:
Piazza at Schmidt’s - Philadelphia, Pennsylvania E Example l of f Large L Civic/Community Ci i /C it Space S

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Scenario 3: Central Piazza- Precedent:
Piazza at Schmidt’s - Philadelphia, Pennsylvania E Example l of f Large L Civic/Community Ci i /C it Space S

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Scenario 3: Central Piazza- Precedent:
Incorporating Pollocks Branch as a Character Defining Element

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Scenario 3: 2nd Street Commercial Corridor Precedent:
Arts District Hyattsville, Maryland

Images illustrate scale and potential look of a commercial corridor
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2nd Street Commercial Corridor - Precedent:
Arts District Hyattsville, Maryland

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Scenario 3: 2nd Street Commercial Corridor Precedent:
Del Ray, Alexandria, Virginia

Image illustrates concept of potential two-story commercial/retail and neighborhood services building along 2nd Street
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Scenario 3: 2nd Street Commercial Corridor Precedent:
Del Ray, Alexandria, Virginia

Images illustrate narrow retail spaces ~ 30-40 feet deep.
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Di Discussion i

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Next Steps:

Refinement of Scenarios into a Composite Plan with Implementation Strategies
Next Presentation:

July 16 16, 2013
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