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JULY/AUGUST 2013 ● FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE 5
Contents
Food Network Magazine
JULY/AUGUST 2013
Find your
favorite flavors
in this issue.
Country
PEACH Pie
page 153
Asian
WATERMELON
Salad
page 147
STRAWBERRY
Pretzel Trifles
page 141
Serious Iced
COFFEE
page 70
Raspberry
LEMONADE
page 169
BLUEBERRY
Buttermilk
Bundt Cake
page 192
CHOCOLATE
Zucchini Cake
page 143
T
H
I
S

P
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E
,

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O
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6 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
Contents
190
136
164
In the Know
39 Shock Value t One easy trick will make
your produce last longer.
46 Know It All: Self-Serve Fro-Yo t Get the
lowdown on America’s fro-yo obsession.
50 Which Is Healthier? t Compare candy-
shop sweets before your next sugar fix.
54 Road to a Restaurant t See how Michael
Chiarello’s new Spanish spot came to be.
56 Star Kitchen t Jamie Deen shows us
his family-friendly Savannah kitchen.
60 What’s Your Diner IQ? t Find out how
much you know about American diners.
70 Geek’s Guide: Iced Coffee t Coffee snobs
will approve of this cold-brewed version.
Fun Cooking
75 Fire and Ice t Put a new twist on
lemonade using grilled lemons.
76 He Made…She Made t Guy Fieri and
Melissa d’Arabian make their best steak.
81 Can You Grill It? t Some surprising foods
are great on the grill—like lettuce.
84 Make Your Own… t Try whipping up
mayo at home.
86 Copy That! t Grill your own rack of
Famous Dave’s barbecue ribs.
88 Kids’ Meal t The whole family will love
these tangy Hawaiian kebabs.
90 Wake-Up Call t Start your morning right
with a stack of fruit-topped crêpes.
93 BLT t Try five delicious takes on the
classic sandwich.
102 Try This at Home t Jeff Mauro shows us
how to make soft-shell crab sandwiches.
10 Recipe Index
16 To Your Health
24 Editor’s Letter
26 Calendars
31 Reader Letters
34 You Asked
41 Food News
219 Good Question
Cover photograph by Steve Giralt
Food styling: Jamie Kimm
pg. 180
Step up your
BLT sandwiches.
See page 96.
BONUS RECIPES
Limited 4G LTE availability in select markets. LTE is a trademark of ETSI. Claim based on a comparison of U.S. national carriers’ average 4G LTE download speeds for Android™ and Windows smartphones and iPhone 5.
4G speeds not available everywhere. Screen images simulated. ©2013 AT&T Intellectual Property. All other marks contained herein are the property of their respective owners.
1.866.MOBILITY – ATT.COM/NETWORK – VISIT A STORE
AT&T. The nation’s
fastest 4G LTE
network.
Faster is better.
8 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
Contents
147
83
Upgrade your
iced coffee!
See page 71.
176
Party Time
163 Totally Tubular t Make squeezable fruity
ice pops.
164 American Cookout t Ree Drummond
hosts the ultimate Fourth of July bash.
172 Summer Potatoes t Food Network
stars reinvent potato salad.
180 Fresh Corn 50 Ways t Find dozens of
recipes for summer corn.
184 Red, White &…Blueberry t Serve a
patriotic dessert for the Fourth.
On the Road
195 Capitol Chill t You won’t believe how
much ice cream Washington, D.C., eats.
197 50 States, 50 Ice Cream Treats
Find America’s best frozen desserts.

Contest
220 Name This Dish! t Enter this month’s
recipe-naming contest.
Weeknight Cooking
109 Weeknight Dinners t Make one of our
simple meals in no time.
128 Easy Sides t Round out your dinner with
some quick, healthful side dishes.
130 Hot Tips t Get smart cooking advice from
Food Network Kitchens.
Weekend Cooking
135 Weekend Dinners t Prepare a tasty
spread for a summer party.
146 Side by Side t Try a sweet or savory
take on watermelon salad.
151 Pretty as a Peach t Indulge in one of five
amazing peach desserts.
56
Room enough for all
your freshest ideas.
The Whirlpool
®
refrigerator, with flexible storage solutions and
Accufresh
®
dual cooling technology, senses and adapts to set
ideal humidity levels, while giving you room to keep more food
fresher. Making your coolest creations simple.
whirlpool.com
®/™ ©2013 Whirlpool. All rights reserved.
10 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
SANDWICHES
BRUNCH
VEGETARIAN DINNERS
APPETIZERS AND CONDIMENTS
FISH AND SEAFOOD
MEAT AND POULTRY
Zucchini Parmesan
143
Squash Blossom
Frittata Squares
Grilled Beer and Butter
Shrimp with Potatoes
Pappardelle with
Lobster and Corn
Spicy Pasta with Tilapia Salmon with
Curried Lentils
Soft-Shell Crab
Sandwiches
Cheesy Chile Strata
Shaved Squash and
Tomato Pasta
Asian BLT Buns with
Chile Mayonnaise
Mexican BLTs with
Spicy Salsa
Beer Bratwursts
Vietnamese
Egg Sandwiches
Fresh Tomato Soup
with Grilled Cheese
Grilled Burgers Grilled Salmon BLT Clubs
Open-Faced
Roasted Tomato BLTs
Crêpe Cake with
Granola and Plums
Vegetarian Chef’s Salad
Homemade Mayonnaise
Four Ways
Sausage Toppings Burger Toppings
143 139
112
98 96
110
141
118
137
110
118
166
124
100
103 94
90
120
84 141 167
Recipe Index
Almost-Famous
Barbecue Spareribs
Poached Chicken with
Garlic-Herb Sauce
Bloody Mary Flank Steak
Pork Chops with
Pineapple Salsa
“Name This Dish!”
Fried Chicken
Pork Tacos with
Black Beans
Grilled Cheesy
Meatloaves
Sesame-Lemon Chicken
Grilled Steak
and Vegetables
Simple Sirloin Steak
with Chimichurri
Hawaiian Chicken Kebabs
Turkey and Quinoa Salad
86
116
76
126
220
116
120
124
112
77
88
126
Try 5 new
takes on the
classic BLT.
JULY/AUGUST 2013 ● FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE 11
Contents
VEGETABLES AND SIDES
DESSERTS
50
Bonus
Recipes!
Page 180
Arugula with
Grilled Plums
Blackberry Chip
Ice Cream
Buttery Beans with
Almonds
Peach Melba Tart
Spicy Pasta Salad with
Gouda and Tomatoes
White Chocolate Mousse
Asian Watermelon Salad
Blueberry Buttermilk
Bundt Cake
Coconut-Watermelon
Salad
Raspberry-Watermelon
Terrine
String Bean and
Potato Salad
Avocado-Radish Salad
Chocolate-Zucchini Cake
Creamy Potato and
Prosciutto Salad
Red Velvet–Blueberry
Ice Cream Pie
Bacon-and-Egg
Potato Salad
Country Peach Pie
Grilled Sweet Potato
and Scallion Salad
Roasted Peach Napoleon
Baked Potato Salad
Macaroni and Egg Salad
Hot Peaches and Cream
Star-Studded
Berry Tarts
BLT Bread Salad
Peach Cobbler
Ice Cream Cake
Spicy Green Tomato–
Avocado Salad
Strawberry-Pretzel
Trifles
129
128
168
170
156
137
147
146
178
192
187
129
173
143
188
176
174
153
158
175
128
190
154
95
139
152
141
Celebrate the Fourth
of July with these
patriotic desserts.
DRINKS
Serious Iced Coffee
Coffee Frappé Coffee Float
Sparkling Sangria
Grilled Lemonade Coffee-Stout Cocktail
Mango-Guava Batidos Raspberry Lemonade
70 137
75 71
139 169
71 71
16 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
Contents
To Your Health
Here’s what’s extra good for you in this month’s
DINNERS
UNDER 500 CALORIES
Try these light dishes from our
Weeknight Cooking section:
AT THEIR PEAK
Berries are loaded with
fiber and antioxidants,
and you’ll find plenty
in this issue:
Ι
Make tarts topped with blueberries
and raspberries (page 190).
Ι
Cool down with Ree Drummond’s
raspberry lemonade (page 169).
Ι
Throw whole strawberries onto
the grill (page 82).
Ι
Mix mashed blueberries into
green tea (page 28).
s issue:
EAK
Poached
Chicken with
Herb Sauce
pg. 116
CALORIES: 443
Salmon with
Curried Lentils
pg. 124
CALORIES: 426
Grilled Cheesy
Meatloaves
pg. 120
CALORIES: 314
Steak and
Vegetables with
Lemon Butter
pg. 112
CALORIES: 326
Spicy Pasta
with Tilapia
pg. 118
CALORIES: 435
GOOD TO KNOW During a recent study, people who had eaten
ocados also tended to weigh less, eat fewer sugary foods and
ve a lower risk of heart disease, according to the Centers for
sease Control and Prevention. Become one of those people!
u’ll find two great avocado salads on pages 129 and 139.
GO
avo
hav
Dis
Yo
Clean Sweep
THE ENVIRONMENTAL WORKING GROUP RECENTLY
RELEASED ITS ANNUAL “CLEAN 15” LIST: FRUIT AND VEGETABLES
WITH THE LOWEST PESTICIDE LEVELS. LOOK FOR THESE
FIVE WINNERS IN THIS ISSUE:
Corn
Discover dozens of
new ways to serve it
on page 180.
Onions
Add sweet-and-sour
onions to a sausage or
hot dog. See page 141.
Pineapple
Try the pineapple
salsa on page 126
as a topping for
pork or chicken.
Mushrooms
The vegetarian chef’s
salad on page 120
calls for a pound of
mushrooms.
Sweet potatoes
Serve Bobby Flay’s grilled
sweet potato salad at your
next cookout. See page 174.
ISSUE:
Sweet po
C
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©
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TheBreakfastProject.com
SCARE UP SOME PROTEIN.
Monster days start with milk at breakfast.
Contents
18 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
Sunny Anderson
Cooking for Real;
Home Made in
America with
Sunny Anderson
pgs. 34, 173
Jeff Mauro
Sandwich King
pg. 103
Ron Ben-Israel
Sweet Genius
pg. 34
Kelsey Nixon
Kelsey’s Essentials;
The Perfect 3
(on Cooking Channel)
pg. 34
Anne Burrell
Chef Wanted
with Anne Burrell;
Worst Cooks in
America
pg. 178
Aarón Sánchez
Chopped;
Heat Seekers
pg. 34
Melissa d’Arabian
Ten Dollar Dinners;
Drop 5 lbs with
Good Housekeeping
(on Cooking Channel)
pg. 77
Jamie Deen
Home for Dinner
with Jamie Deen
pg. 56
Bobby Deen
Not My Mama’s Meals
(on Cooking Channel)
pg. 34
Ree Drummond
The Pioneer
Woman
pg. 164
Guy Fieri
Diners, Drive-ins and
Dives; Guy’s Big Bite;
Rachael vs. Guy:
Celebrity Cook-Off
pg. 76
Bobby Flay
Food Network Star; Iron Chef
America; Bobby Flay’s Barbecue
Addiction; Worst Cooks in
America; Brunch @ Bobby’s
(on Cooking Channel)
pg. 174
Alex
Guarnaschelli
Iron Chef
America; Chopped
pg. 175
Robert Irvine
Restaurant:
Impossible;
Dinner: Impossible
pg. 176
Star Search
Find your favorite Food Network celebs in this issue:
Recipes to go!
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I
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R
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.

K
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:

K
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Unlike other credit cards, the Citi Simplicity
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20 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
Different rooms call for different
moods. So let each room’s unique
personality shine by combining
different colors in the same
collection from HGTV
®
VV HOME by
Sherwin-Williams to create bold,
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DAVID BROMSTAD
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Learn more at a Sherwin-Williams store or
sherwin-williams.com/hgtvhome.
THE GLOBAL SPICE COLLECTION
Let each room in your
home make a statement.
Editor in Chief
Maile Carpenter
Creative Director Deirdre Koribanick
Executive Editor Joanna Saltz
Managing Editor Maria Baugh
Editorial
Food Director Liz Sgroi
Food Editor Erica Clark
Features Editor Yaran Noti
Senior Editors Lisa Cericola, Lisa Freedman
Recipe Editor Ruth Kaplan
Senior Associate Editor Allison Baker
Editorial Assistants Ellery Badcock,
Hannah Kay Hunt
Online Coordinator Victoria Phillips
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Art
Art Director Ian Doherty
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Photography
Photo Director Alice Albert
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Copy
Copy Chief Joy Sanchez
Research Editor Linda Fiorella
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Food Network Kitchens
Senior Vice President,
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Size up your
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D
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FEATURED: THE GLOBAL SPICE COLLECTION Join us on
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.
Only at Sherwin-Williams
22 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
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Editor’s Letter
24 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
I
wonder
if a bunch of food-industry
analysts are sitting around a table
somewhere trying to figure out why
Americans have become obsessed with self-
serve frozen yogurt. I don’t pretend to know
what makes one dessert become a trend
(cupcakes) and another one not. (Been to a
rice pudding store lately?) But I know that
pump-your-own yogurt chains have been opening
hundreds of new stores every year (see page 46 for our
trend report), and I can offer one possible explanation: It’s really
fun to pump your own soft serve. I tried it for the first time when
I worked the counter at McDonald’s in the ‘80s, and it was the best
part of my job—maybe because it was one of the only tasks that I actually
controlled. Most of my duties were preprogrammed, including soda
dispensing, but the McDonald’s Corporation left two things in my
not-so-capable hands: salting the fries and pumping the soft serve.
(I’m fascinated to this day that McDonald’s allows human employees to
salt the fries freehand. All it takes is one guy with an overzealous
shake of the canister to wreck a whole batch…but I digress.)
Once I realized that I could pump the soft serve as I wished, I
set out to master the art of swirling. And the more I practiced, the
bigger the cones got, until suddenly kids were lining up at my cash register
because I was pumping the tallest cones they’d ever seen. The fun lasted for a
week or so, until a manager saw me do it and disciplined me on the spot. I had half
a mind to oversalt some fries in protest, but instead I went back to making short,
forgettable cones according to company regulations. I returned to glory in college, when I
worked at the Yogurt Oasis in Chapel Hill and mastered not just the fro-yo swirl but also the
art of adding toppings so they wouldn’t fall all over the place. I put my skills to good use a few
years later when my brother-in-law found an industrial soft-serve machine on the street in
New York City, fixed it and threw the best party ever: a pump-your-own ice cream social.
People couldn’t help themselves—they went insane at the pump, gorging on soft serve
until they were physically ill. I should have looked at the sheer joy on their faces
and seen the future of self-serve fro-yo. But I was too busy making a sundae.
Maile Carpenter
Editor in Chief
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Photo by Jade Albert
Learn more at
autismspeaks.org/signs
Some signs to look for:
No big smiles or other joyful
expressions by 6 months
No babbling by
12 months
No words by
16 months
© 2012 Autism Speaks Inc. "Autism Speaks" and "It's time to listen" & design are trademarks owned by Autism Speaks Inc. All rights reserved. The person depicted is a model and is used for illustrative purposes only.
26 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
Calendar
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27
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9 11
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19
29 31
18
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WED SUN THU MON SAT TUE
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Make maple
mustard
in honor of
Canada Day:
Mix ½ cup dijon
mustard with
¼ cup maple
syrup; serve on
hot dogs.
Happy Birthday,
Sandra Lee!
Celebrate
with her piña
colada pie:
foodnetwork
.com/coladapie.
Serve patriotic
ice cream cones
today: Dip the
tops of cones
in melted white
chocolate; roll in
red, white and
blue sprinkles.
Plums are prime!
Use them in
mimosas: Puree
4 plums with
3 tablespoons
each sugar and
water; strain. Add
to prosecco.
Try Iron Chef
Jose Garces’
chicken-
chorizo paella
for dinner in
honor of his
birthday. Go to
foodnetwork
.com/paella.
Celebrate Bastille
Day with French
onion burgers:
Serve patties
on brioche buns
with gruyère,
caramelized
onions and dijon
mustard.
Serve smoky nuts
for the MLB
All-Star Game:
Toast cashews in
a skillet with olive
oil, chili powder
and smoked
paprika, 5 minutes.
Cut your
kids’ sandwiches
into moon
shapes in
honor of Neil
Armstrong:
He set foot on
the moon on this
day in 1969.
Start the week
with a healthful
breakfast to
go: Scramble
egg whites with
baby spinach;
tuck into pita
bread with sliced
tomatoes.
It’s Jeff Mauro’s
birthday. Tweet
the Sandwich
King a
greeting at
@JeffMauro.
Toast the end of
the week with
a glass of white
wine and keep
it cold with a
few frozen
grapes.
Prep ice cream
sandwiches for
the week: Layer
strawberry ice
cream and jam
between sugar
cookies;
freeze.
Try Alton Brown’s
chicken wings
tonight: It’s
his birthday!
Go to
foodnetwork
.com/buffalowings
for the recipe.
Try
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FAMI LY ST YL E
A L F R E S C O
From serveware to drinkware to linens that go everywhere,
create the perfect summer spread perfect for your budget.
Shop the Food Network

collection only at Kohl’s and
Kohls.com/foodnetwork.
10
24
7
21 20
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28 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
Calendar
27
AUGUST 2013
August
Start the month
with a cool
treat: Mix
broken
chocolate-
covered
pretzels into
dulce de leche
ice cream.
Figs are in season!
Pick up a pint,
then stem, halve
and tuck into
corn muffins
before baking.
Splurge this
morning: Fill a
halved croissant
with chocolate
chips and sliced
strawberries.
Grill in a panini
press.
Replace your
morning coffee
with a fresh
antioxidant fix:
Mash blueberries
in a glass, add
ice and top with
chilled green tea.
For an easy app
tonight, blister
shishito peppers
in olive oil. Warn
guests: One in 10
of these Japanese
peppers
is super
spicy!
Watch the PGA
Championship
and make Arnold
Palmer slushes:
Mix equal parts
lemonade and iced
tea; freeze until
slushy, stirring
occasionally.
Switch up your
lunch and make
a summery
sandwich of
sliced peaches,
fresh mozzarella
and pesto on
multigrain bread.
In honor of
Aarti Sequeira’s
birthday, make
her coconut-
lime granita
tonight: Go to
foodnetwork
.com/granita.
It’s Giada
De Laurentiis’
birthday! Try
her bruschetta:
Top grilled
ciabatta
with ricotta
and orange
marmalade.
Happy Birthday,
Rachael Ray!
Tweet her a
greeting at
@rachael_ray.
Serve BLT
hot dogs tonight:
Top with mayo,
bacon, shredded
lettuce and
diced tomatoes.
Flip to page 93
for more BLT
ideas.
Make sorbet
pie for the long
weekend: Scoop
assorted sorbets
into a graham
crust. Cover with
plastic wrap,
press to fill the
gaps and freeze.
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2 Tier Radial™ cyclones
Why two tiers are
better than one.
The new DC50 has 2 Tier Radial™
cyclones that exert over 135,000 G
of centrifugal force to capture micro-
scopic dust particles. Its cleanerhead
has nylon bristles for deep cleaning
on carpets and anti-static carbon
fiber filaments to remove fine dust
from hard floors.
To get the full story,
visit dyson.com/DC50.
Two tiers of cyclones capture more
microscopic dust than any other.
JULY/AUGUST 2013 ● FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE 31
Melissa’s
SECRET
BEACH
Ina’s
FAVORITE
CHEESE SHOP
Bobby’s
GO-TO
LOBSTER ROLL
THE STARS’ GUIDE TO
The Hamptons
Summer Trips
35 spots for food lovers
FUN
Take our saltwater taffy quiz (page 20)
PLUS
b Cool travel bags
b Best boardwalk bites
b And more!
We Hear You...
A few thoughts from our readers this month.
Keep the letters coming!
Reader Letters
The Derby Tartlets [Weekend Cooking]
in the May 2013 issue are simply
irresistible—our family could not stop
eating them. I even made a second
batch with a peanut butter and
chocolate filling sprinkled with sea
salt and toasted coconut. They were
tartlets of heaven!
Lori Sensenig
Lancaster, PA
The recipe for Soppressata Pizzas
[Weekend Cooking, May 2013] calls
for the garlic to be discarded after
cooking the sauce. To someone who
grew up in an Italian-American
household, throwing away the garlic is
tantamount to throwing away the best
part of the recipe. Instead, you could
have chopped two of the cloves and
served them in the sauce.
Anne Forcella Skalitza
Spring Lake, NJ
I loved “Can You
Put an Egg on It?”
in the May 2013
issue. I recently lost
35 pounds, and one
of the changes I made
was to put a fried egg
on sautéed spinach
instead of toast. Now
you have given me so
many new options.
Sharon Leatherman
Orange, CA
I flipped straight to the Recipe Index for
healthy-meal inspiration when I received
my May 2013 issue. Breakfast food is my
favorite, so I was excited to see so many
options. Ted Allen’s Brunch Tart with
Spinach, Olives and Leeks [“Real Men
Make Quiche”] was the perfect meal with
a nice glass of sauvignon blanc.
Leslie Moyar
Holly Springs, NC
Is the spelling of “macaroons” incorrect
in the May 2013 issue’s “Try This at
Home” story? A macaroon is a coconut
cookie, but the cookie pictured is a
French macaron.
Jana Hagan
Birmingham, AL
Editor’s Note: Actually, both spellings are
correct. Macaron is the original French term
for these sandwich cookies and “macaroon”
is the English translation. We chose to go
with the English spelling.
I laughed when I saw the fresh salsa
recipes [“50 Salsas and Guacamoles”]
right after reading that jarred salsa is
better for you in “Which Is Healthier?”
The irony was funny.
Gina Hodges
Indianapolis
We’re building a new
house, and I wanted
to bake some goodies
as a thank-you to the
construction crew, so I
made Paula Deen’s Lemon
Bars and Jamie Deen’s
Chewy Toffee Bars [“He
Made…She Made,” May
2013]. Both were huge hits
with the builders!
Lindsay Tobin
Mentor, OH
I was thrilled that Ocean City, NJ, was featured in your
“Walk the Walk” boardwalks article [Travel Supplement,
May 2013]. I have been vacationing in O.C. since 1970,
and my family has reunions there every three years. I’m
surprised you did not mention the amazing hoagies at
Voltaco’s—I plan every meal around them.
Margery Whiteside
Fort Myers, FL
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Reader Letters
32 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
Your Basic Sweet-Roll Dough
[“Good Morning,” May 2013]
was truly heaven-sent. It’s
the best I have ever tried.
My whole family loved the
Classic Cinnamon Rolls and
Mexican Chocolate Loaf. The
only thing I changed was
that I drizzled cream cheese
frosting on the cooled rolls
and omitted the cayenne
pepper on the loaf for my kids. Can’t wait to make the
Cappuccino Knots and Sticky Monkey Bread.
Rose Mayer
Bad Soden am Taunus, Germany
Thank you for the behind-the-scenes
look at Chopped [“Shooting Baskets,”
May 2013]. I loved reading about what
Ted Allen and the judges are like while
filming—I had always wondered what it
takes to make an episode and how
Food Network comes up with those
bizarre baskets.
Kelly Shealer
Myersville, MD
I’ve always made pancakes from a box,
but for Mother’s Day I decided to try your
Perfect Pancakes from the May 2013
issue. My 2-year-old helped me add
chocolate and peanut butter chips at the
griddle while the grandparents kept the
triplets busy. The pancakes were a hit and
helped start off my wife’s first Mother’s
Day as a mother of four the right way.
Adam Fienman
Bloomfield Hills, MI
I absolutely love the
cinnamon roll recipe
[“Good Morning,” May
2013] and have already
made it twice. It’s taken
the place of my go-to
cinnamon roll recipe.
This will be the one that gets passed down
through generations.
Joann Kelley
Racine, WI
I was reading “The Rhubarb Handbook”
in the May 2013 issue, and I just wanted
to say that you can totally eat it raw!
I have lived in an area that grows rhubarb
my whole life, and we just pick it and
dip it in sugar (like strawberries). It can
be sour, but it’s way better than eating
sour candies!
Desiree Roberts
New Haven, VT
I was excited to read in the May 2013
issue that Ina Garten would be selling
frozen meals at the grocery store [Food
News]. They were sold out the first two
times I went to buy them (figured it must
be a good sign), so I was delighted to find
the Beef Stew Bourguignon and Shrimp
Scampi & Linguine on my third try. They’re
perfect for two, and all of the ingredients
taste homemade. Thanks, Ina, for the
convenient gourmet freezer staples.
Laurel Papke
San Jose, CA
Th b
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1 head romaine lettuce
½ cup blue cheese crumbles
½ cup dried cherries
2 tablespoons honey dijon dressing
½ cup crushed Honey Dijon
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F
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34 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
You Asked...
Food Network stars answer your burning questions.
Letters
H
ave a
question for a
Food N
etw
ork
star?
Write to us at
foodnetwork.com/
magazine.
The content of all submissions
(including letters, recipes and
photographs) should be original
and becomes property of
Food Network Magazine, which
reserves the right to republish
and edit all correspondence
received. By making a
submission, you guarantee
that you possess all necessary
rights to grant the material to
Food Network Magazine.
Ron, what is
your favorite
confection to
make at home?
Melody Durham
via Facebook
I love to bake yeast
cakes, such as kugelhopf
(similar to a Bundt cake)
and babka (a Ukranian
sweet bread). And my
braided challah is as
elaborate as some of my
cakes: Try the recipe
at foodnetwork.com/
ronschallahbread.
—Ron Ben-Israel
Kelsey, why do
potato salad
leftovers become
watery the next
day?
Kathy Hildebrand
Rochester, NY
The primary ingredients
in traditional potato
salad—potatoes, celery,
onions—contain a lot
of water. When salt is
added to season the
salad, it makes the
problem even worse by
drawing the water out
of these ingredients. I
think the best way to
combat this is to make
and eat the salad the
same day. The longer it
sits, the more watery
it will become.
—Kelsey Nixon
Aarón, what’s
the best way to
introduce dishes
with heat to
non-adventurous
eaters?
Daren McDougal
via Google +
With people who aren’t
adventurous with food,
you have to slowly build
up the heat. Start with
something like pureed
chiles topped with a
sweet fruit like mango
and work your way up
to hotter dishes.
—Aarón Sánchez
Sunny, what is
the perfect rub
for slow-roasted
pork butt and
ribs?
John R. Verdensky
via Facebook
The butt, or shoulder,
is my favorite thing
to slow-roast. Pork
accepts flavor really
well, so it’s fun to tailor
the seasoning blend to
your meal. The easiest
is my grandma’s recipe,
which is just Old Bay,
sweet paprika, garlic
and onion powder. I
also like pumpkin pie
spice blends or curry
blends with plenty of
salt and pepper. For
ribs, I’m a daughter of
the Carolinas, so I lean
toward vinegar in my
sauce. Or try rubbing
the ribs with a blend of
chili powder, lime juice
and honey.
—Sunny Anderson
Bobby, I love
grilling corn for
corn salads, but
I have trouble
getting the corn
to caramelize in
the husks. Any
tips?
Rod Kreuter
West Chester, OH
Take off the husks!
Removing the husks is
not a bad thing. If you
don’t, you really just
end up with steamed
corn—not grilled corn.
First, spray the grill with
a little bit of olive oil,
then clean the corn and
put it on the grill naked.
Just watch it closely as
you grill, and it will turn
a nice brown.
—Bobby Deen
Kelsey says to eat
potato salad the same
day you make it.
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LIXTORP kitchen starting at $1799* Based on a 10'×10' kitchen. LIXTORP brown solid
oak/oak veneer kitchen. *The total price includes cabinets, fronts, interior shelving, drawer
and door dampers, hinges, toekicks, legs, visible moldings and panels. Your choice of
countertop, sink, faucet, handles, appliances and lighting are sold separately. See IKEA store
for limited warranty, country of origin, and 10'×10' layout details. Valid in US IKEA stores only.
LIXTORP kitchen
Starting at
$
1799
*
Based on 10'×10' kitchen.
RESTAURANTS TO EXPLORE
APSLEYS, A HEINZ BECK RESTAURANT
Dine on Michelin-starred, Mediterranean-
inspired dishes under the stunning glass roof
at one of London’s most beautiful settings for
lunch, dinner or classic afternoon tea.
MARCO PIERRE WHITE STEAK & ALEHOUSE
Discover the British-style steakhouse, with beef
sourced from grass-fed Scottish cattle and a
menu of English specialties, just off Spitalfields
in the hip East End.
AND REMEMBER...
Take your MasterCard, because some top
restaurants don't take AMEX, including
In Parma, Seven at Brixton and The Lido Cafe.
FLAVORS OF LONDON
TASTE THESE ENGLISH CLASSICS:
Bangers and mash (sausages and mashed
potatoes), bubble and squeak (mashed
vegetables shaped into cakes and pan-fried),
beer-battered fish and chips, and shepherd’s pie.
CHEERS: BRITISH BREWS
BITTER OR IPA: Well-hopped pale ale
GUINNESS: A dark, dry stout flavored with
roasted barley, with a thick, creamy head
SHANDY: Half-and-half mix of beer and lemonade
SNAKEBITE: Lager and cider
PIMM'S CUP COCKTAIL: Sliced fruit, cucumber
(yes!) and Pimm's No. 1, a bracing British liqueur
LIVE LIKE A LOCAL
INSIDER TIPS: Dinner is later in London, 8:00
or after. For higher-end restaurants, be sure to
make a reservation, but most local pubs serve
good British fare and accept MasterCard.
For inspiration, exclusive offers and all the
ingredients for your priceless trip to London,
World cardholders are invited to call the
MasterCard concierge at 800-336-6420.
ADVERTISEMENT
DESTINATION
:
Delicious
F
ollow your culinary
passion anywhere around
the world and explore
Chopped-worthy ingredients
and one-of-a-kind dishes
firsthand with MasterCard in
your wallet. Accepted at twice
as many places worldwide as
AMEX, MasterCard opens
doors at restaurants from
corner cafés to four-star
destinations and gives you
access to exclusive offers and
priceless experiences.
Experience the British
revolution in dining and the
best of London with these
insider tips.
London,
ENGLAND
To get a MasterCard: FindACard.com
MasterCard, Priceless, World and the MasterCard Brand Mark are registered trademarks of MasterCard International Incorporated.
Everything’s better with a great cup of coffee.
Exceptionally smooth. Perfectly balanced. A harmonious blend of flavor, body, and aroma.
© 2013 Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc.
Excep
Brew a better day
THE BEST-SELLING BRAND FOR THE KEURIG
®
BREWING SYSTEM
Great morning
Shock Value
Food scientists think they’ve
found a way to extend the life
of fresh produce: Shock it in
warm water. Researchers at The
Cooking Lab, a research facility
started by Modernist Cuisine
author Nathan Myhrvold,
report that submerging fruit
and vegetables in hot water
slows the production of the
gases and enzymes that turn
them brown. Just fill a large pot
with hot tap water (between
122˚ and 131˚) and soak the
produce for two to three
minutes. Then drain, dry and
refrigerate as usual. Your fruit
and veggies might taste better,
too. W. Wayt Gibbs from the lab
says that in the study, they found
a slight increase in crunchiness.
Make your summer produce last.
Then, price-check your frozen yogurt
and test your diner knowledge.
JULY/AUGUST 2013 ● FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE 39
In the Know
PHOTOGRAPH BY KANG KIM
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Enjoy three uniquely shaped new pastas, each created
to complement its authentic sauce. Try rich basil Pesto
Sacchettini, our hearty Penne Bolognese and creamy
Tortellini Alfredo. Served with your favorite soup or salad.
Learn more at panerabread.com.
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JULY/AUGUST 2013 ● FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE 41
Food
news
In the Know
Give the resident griller some
fun steak-themed gear.
Arrange meats
and cheeses on
this Prime Cuts
serving board.
$30, Fred
& Friends;
perpetualkid.com
BOX SCORES
Maybe you should have
saved some of those
old cereal-box prizes: A
Kellogg’s Sugar Smacks box
and the flying rocket freebie
inside sold for $550 at an
auction last year. Dozens of
cereal-related items will hit
the block again on July 27–31.
To get in on the bidding, visit
profilesinhistory.com.
FROM THE
PROBLEMS-WE-
DIDN’T-KNOW-
WE-HAD
DEPARTMENT:
Old El Paso has
released flour
tortillas shaped
like a bowl. We
questioned the
idea until we
realized that they
hold a boatload
of toppings.
$3 for eight; at
grocery stores
UST 2013
Don’t worry: These
Steak Suckers are
cherry flavored.
$3.50; retroplanet.com
This Piece of Meat
tee makes the perfect
outfit for any barbecue.
$20; threadless.com
Even vegetarians
will flip over this
T-Bone Spatula.
$14; gamago.com
Keep track of grocery
lists with this T-Bone
Steak Noteblock.
$9; chroniclebooks.com

MARKET
MEAT
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Three in four people have shared an
ice cream cone or ice pop with their pet. SOURCE: PET360.COM
It’s been a busy year for food thieves.
SWEET OR SCARY?
J
U
MP FOR JOY
DURING A RECENT STUDY,
PEOPLE WHO EXERCISED WITH
VERTICAL MOVEMENT (LIKE SKIPPING ROPE)
REPORTED FEELING LESS HUNGRY THAN
THOSE WHO RODE A BIKE OR DID NOTHING.
SOURCE: APPETITE
HOT STUFF
42 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
In the Know
FIFTY AND
COUNTING…
We can’t imagine that
the latest Fifty Shades
book, Fifty Shades of
Kale ($20, HarperWave),
will be as riveting as the
provocative bestseller.
Oddly enough, it isn’t
the first food-related
knockoff. Also published
in the past year: Fifty
Shades of Smoothies,
Fifty Shades of Avocados
and—no kidding—Fifty
Shades of Quinoa.
Police arrested a man at a rest stop on the New Jersey Turnpike after he
stole 42,000 pounds of Wisconsin muenster cheese with intent to
resell it to East Coast retailers. The haul was worth $200,000.
Thieves heisted more than $100,000 worth of frozen hamburger
patties from a New Jersey trucking facility before the beef could make
its way to the Netherlands. As of press time, the police had no leads.
When someone drove a Krispy Kreme truck (carrying roughly 9,500
doughnuts) out of a Georgia parking lot, a high-speed chase ensued.
Cops took the thief into custody, but they didn’t keep the doughnuts.
A few weeks before the Super Bowl, two food-distribution center
employees stole $65,000 worth of frozen chicken wings. They used
a forklift to load 10 pallets onto a rental truck, but they forgot to turn off
the surveillance camera and were charged with felony theft.
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44 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
In the Know
SEARCH
Bill Pullman has been cast
in all sorts of roles, but in
The Fruit Hunters (out on
DVD July 16) he plays himself:
a real-life fruit obsessive.
Pullman and fellow fruit
lovers look for rare finds,
and at one point he tries
the famously stinky
durian fruit (above),
which brings us to
another little-
known fact about
the actor: A
stage injury in
college left him
with no sense of
smell. “It makes
me the perfect
candidate to
taste a durian,”
he says. $30;
amazon.com
FRUITFUL
CHEERS TO
OREGON FOR
SHOWING THE MOST
LOCAL-FOOD
PRIDE: STATE
REPRESENTATIVES
JUST PASSED A
RESOLUTION TO MAKE
BREWER’S YEAST
(SCIENTIFICALLY KNOWN AS
SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE)
THE OFFICIAL
STATE MICROBE.
NO BUTTS ALLOWED
Starting this summer, 350 cuts of pork and beef,
including ever-popular pork butt, will go by new
names on grocery-store labels. The National Pork
Board and the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association
say the names are meant to be less confusing. What
do you think? E-mail us at fnmeditor@hearst.com.
Almost 40 percent of grocery shoppers
now bring reusable bags to the store.
SOURCE: MACORR RESEARCH
pork loin rib chop
rib-eye pork chop
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30% SPF. 70% BFF.
100% You.
Follow us on Facebook, Twitter or Pinterest, and see much more at pier1.com/summerliving
46 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
In the Know
WORTH THE
WEIGHT?
Some toppings are
better deals than
others. Buying
1 ounce equals:
Marshmallow Fluff
3½ tablespoons
Fruity Pebbles
²⁄₃ cup
Blueberries
16 berries
Gummy worms
3 pieces
Banana slices
4 pieces
Mini chocolate chips
2½ tablespoons
Good Deals
Not-So-Good
Deals
Mini chocolate–peanut
butter cups: 22 pieces
Blackberries
4 berries
Yogurtland
Burbank, CA:
35¢
Orange Leaf
Rogers, AR:
45¢
Yogurt Mountain
Katy, TX:
49¢
16 Handles
New York City:
52¢
Yoforia
Old Greenwich, CT:
64¢
A cross-country
price comparison
(by the ounce):
Price Check
Pump with caution—the cost adds up quickly!
We filled small, medium and large cups with yogurt
and one topping at a New York City 16 Handles.
SWEET OR TART?
We polled readers to see which
type of fro-yo they prefer.
12%
Both
Sweet
45%
Tart
43%
(The person
at the
counter said
most people
share this
size with
someone—
but that’s
still more
than $8 per
person!)
Small:
$6.51
Medium:
$10.25
Large:
$16.59
Know It All:
self-serve fro-yo
We didn’t think America had room for any
more self-serve frozen yogurt shops—major chains
have opened about 630 stores in the past two years. But
almost 700 new ones will arrive by next summer. Fans
are simply obsessed with pumping their own fro-yo—
and piling on the toppings. Some stores keep more than
100 flavors and 70 topping options in stock. Before you
go nuts on your next stop, here are the facts….
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A hot-off-the-grill burger, a
crisp, bubbly Diet Pepsi
and friends make for one
of summer’s perfect
moments. Now, we’re
sharing refreshing ways to
spend less time cooking so
you can enjoy more of them.
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&

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PREPAHEAD
Chop veggies, buy store-bought sides
and stock the fridge with Diet Pepsi
the night before. With fewer dishes to
prepare, you’re free to dish!
COOKINYOURCOMFORTZONE
Unlock your stress-free summer spirit
with recipes you know well and flavors
everyone loves—like this super-easy
Diet Pepsi BBQ Sauce:
2 cups each Diet Pepsi & ketchup
1/2 cup each white vinegar & finely chopped onion
3 tablespoons each salt & chili powder
1 tablespoon black pepper
1/4 cup brown sugar
1. Bring ingredients to a boil.
2. Reduce to simmer and cook slowly
for 1 hour, stirring occasionally.
advertisement
Think you couldn’t love the crisp taste of Diet Pepsi any more?
There’s more to love at DIETPEPSICOMwith style tips and exciting prizes!
50 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
In the Know
Which Is Healthier?
Rock Candy vs Cotton Candy
Neither of these options is good for you: They’re
both sugar, corn syrup and food coloring on a
stick. Choose either; just don’t go overboard
on the portion size. Keep it to roughly one ounce
of cotton candy or two rock candies.
WINNER: It’s a draw
Yogurt-Covered Treats vs Chocolate-Covered Treats
Yogurt sounds more virtuous than chocolate, but the type that coats
pretzels, dried fruit and nuts is loaded with fat and sugar. Chocolate coating
has fat and sugar as well, but it also contains healthful antioxidants—
the darker the chocolate, the better.
WINNER: Chocolate-covered treats
Classic Gummies vs Sour Gummies
The calorie and sugar counts are almost identical, but studies
suggest that sour candy erodes tooth enamel more than
other types because it’s more acidic. And because gummies
stick to your teeth longer than other sweets, sour ones
pose a greater risk of dental damage.
WINNER: Classic gummies
Boardwalk Fudge vs Boardwalk Taffy
A 1-inch square of chocolate fudge has more than double the
fat of the equivalent amount of taffy (about seven pieces). Plus,
fudge is higher in saturated fat, which can raise cholesterol
in the bloodstream and lead to heart problems.
WINNER: Boardwalk taffy
Red Licorice vs Black Licorice
Many people assume that black licorice root can alleviate
health issues. This hasn’t been proven, but eating large
quantities of black licorice may be dangerous to people
40 and older because a compound in it has been linked
to heart problems, according to the FDA.
WINNER: Red licorice
Pay attention when you hit those touristy candy shops
this summer: Some treats are better than others.
Our Expert: Takami Kim is a registered dietitian with NewYork–Presbyterian
Hospital’s Department of Food and Nutrition Management.
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ADVERTISEMENT

LIVE YOUR PASSION
JUSTIN WARNER’S PASSION RULES IN
EVERYTHING HE DOES. A self-taught cook and
a restaurant veteran since age 13, Justin upends
the culinary world every day as owner/chef
of Do or Dine, one of the hottest destinations
on the cutting-edge Brooklyn scene. Now as a
past winner of Food Network Star, Season 8
and fearless roadmaster of Rebel Eats, his
never-ending exploration of the passionate spirit
continues. Find out more about what drives his
passion points in this exclusive Q&A.
DIG IN
What are 5 words that describe your approach
to cooking and life?
Fun, thoughtful, witty, intense, passionate.
CREATE YOUR OWN LUXURY
What’s your definition of luxury?
It’s knowing that I’m being treated better than I feel
I deserve, by a vehicle, a driver, a flight attendant
or a cell phone. It’s making life as comfortable as
possible. Luxury is free of worry. When I’m not
worried about something, I can be more productive.
What inspired your famous foie gras doughnuts?
Sometimes I like to make common food luxurious or
luxurious food in common ways. Anyone can have
luxury, especially if it’s presented and packaged
in an appropriate way. I like to make luxury more
approachable.
GRAB THE UNEXPECTED
What are your key ingredients for a great day?
Sun and doing something I’ve never done before.
Experiencing the unknown in an optimal climate
is my favorite rush.
A
Q
Q
Q
Q
A
A
A
BUICK.COM
PASSION TAKES THE SPOTLIGHT
WITH BUICK ENCORE, TOO.
’13
BUICK
ENCORE
Designed with a passionate focus on luxury, design and free-spirited fun. Join
Justin and Buick Encore for an inside look at letting your passion take you
where you want to go with the pull-out guide on the opposite page.
54 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
Road to a Restaurant
Even for restaurant veteran Michael Chiarello, opening a new spot is a big adventure.

In 2008, after focusing on Italian cooking for
about 30 years, Michael Chiarello visits his
daughter in Barcelona and becomes obsessed with
Spanish food. The chef decides his next restaurant
will be Spanish—the only trouble is that he’s about to
open an Italian spot, Bottega, in Napa Valley. He puts
the Spanish idea on the back burner.
3
While filming The Next Iron Chef in 2011,
Michael goes to a Spanish restaurant in
Santa Monica with his costar Robert Irvine, host of
Restaurant: Impossible. Just for laughs, they start
drinking wine from a porrón, a traditional Spanish
carafe with an extra-long spout. By the end of the
night, the whole restaurant joins them. Michael
decides he has to get porróns for his new place.
In the Know
ILLUSTRATIONS BY TOM GARRETT

Two years later, he’s ready to revisit the Spanish
restaurant concept. He takes four trips to
Spain and eats at 40 restaurants. He samples two
staples wherever he goes: patatas bravas (fried
potatoes) and croquetas (fritters, usually made with
ham). “After eating them 40 times, we earned the
right to add them to the menu,” he says.

Michael starts aging meat even before
the restaurant is under construction.
His purveyor in St. Louis strings
up 50 hams. Meanwhile,
the chef begins
conceptualizing the
menu and realizes
that he can’t
find calçots
(Spanish leeks)
anywhere in the
U.S. He imports the
seeds and persuades a
couple of farmers to grow
them for him.
ven before
onstruction.
rings
e,
he
zes
eks)
the
orts the
ersuades a
mers to grow
JULY/AUGUST 2013 ● FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE 55

While scouting
locations, Michael checks
out a 2,600-square-foot
space on San Francisco’s
famed Embarcadero with a
view of the bay, and he falls
in love. In October 2012, he
signs the lease, then he learns
the drawback of building a
restaurant on a historic pier:
He has to get permits for
everything—even putting
up a sign. And because the
restaurant is above the
water, crews have to wait for
low tide just to get to some of
the plumbing.
6
In November, tastings
begin. Michael tests and
retests dishes with chef de
cuisine Ryan McIlwraith, then
scores them on a 10-point
scale. Some work out (7 points
for the patatas bravas on
the first try) and some don’t:
Michael spends a while trying
to make toast out of crispy
paella rice, but he can’t figure
out how to keep the rice
together. He narrows the menu
to about 50 snacks, small
plates and entrées.
7
In April, with the opening
a week away, Michael
declares, “No new ideas.” It’s
time to cook. Day 1: He and
Ryan cook for the team.
Day 2: The team cooks for
Michael and Ryan. Days 3 and
4: Half of the team cooks and
serves for the other half. Days
5 and 6: Friends and family
act like customers so the whole
staff can practice. He asks for
honest feedback. “That’s the
hardest part,” he says.
8
April 13, 2013: Opening day!
Coqueta serves dinner only, so the
staff can work out kinks; lunch follows a
few days later. Michael lives and breathes
the restaurant for the first three months,
when all the key critics come to review
it. At this point, he says, “You take your
hands off the wheel, close your eyes and
hope you make it.”
cks
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rns
r:
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56 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
Star
Kitchen
Jamie Deen shows off his
renovated home kitchen.
PHOTOGRAPH BY PETER FRANK EDWARDS
No-fry zone
Jamie and Brooke
have banned frying
in their kitchen
because it’s too
messy, but they
kept this stainless-
steel frying pan for
sentimental reasons:
Jamie’s great-
grandmother used to
fry chicken in it.
The back door off Jamie Deen’s
Savannah kitchen is used more than
any other door in the house. Jamie
and his wife, Brooke, are always on
the inside cooking or hanging out
while their two sons (Jack, almost 7,
and Matthew, 2) run laps between the
backyard and the refrigerator. “They go
a million miles an hour from the pool
to the trampoline, then inside to get a
snack and then back outside,” says
the Home for Dinner host and author
of the upcoming cookbook Jamie Deen’s
Good Food. Before Jamie and Brooke
could call this their dream kitchen,
they had to finish a serious renovation:
They took out an awkward L-shaped
counter, replaced dark cabinets with
light ones, moved the oven from the
island to the wall and camouflaged the
refrigerator with a front that matches
the cabinets. Now it’s a perfect space
for the whole family: Jack has a counter
where he likes to do homework, and
Jamie and Brooke have a sitting area
where they can both relax—and decide
who’s making dinner.
Tune in
to Home for
Dinner with
Jamie Deen,
Sundays at
10 a.m. ET.
JULY/AUGUST 2013 ● FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE 57
Sitting pretty
The Deens thought a breakfast table would
make the room feel cramped, so they turned
this space into a sitting area. “I’m here at
six o’clock in the morning,” Jamie says. “I turn
on ESPN and drink my coffee.”
Unlimited ice
The couple installed a
separate ice maker in
this cabinet to free up
freezer space for food.
And there’s another ice
maker in the mudroom.
“We never run out of ice
when we have company
over,” Jamie says.
Turn the page to get
Jamie’s look.
He used this
cutting board on
the first season
of his show.
Water view
The proximity to
Richardson Creek
(just beyond the
backyard) sold Jamie
on the house. He
and the family take
their Jet Skis to
visit Grandma Ginny
(aka Paula Deen)
and Uncle Bobby,
who live nearby.
In the Know
In the Know
Get the Look
Pick up some of Jamie’s finds for your own kitchen.
58 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
This Imperial Trellis fabric isn’t
cheap, but you need only a little to
make a statement. $265 per yard;
24estyle.com for information
This Bryant
chandelier
comes in two
sizes (26 inches
and 36 inches)
and five finishes.
From $525;
circalighting.com
During the early 20th century, bakers in Eastern Europe made bread in
huge hand-carved dough bowls. Jamie and Brooke found theirs during a trip
to meet Jimmy Carter in Plains, GA. From $199; potterybarn.com
Jamie ordered his
Cole Wing chairs
in durable leather—
food wipes right off.
$3,155, American
Leather; 24estyle
.com for information
While on a business trip,
Jamie bought this penguin
clock—made from a
meatloaf pan, old forks and
other odds and ends—for
Jack, who was going
through a penguin phase.
$124; bossbrownart.com
C
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,

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60 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
In the Know
ęĆĐĊęčĎĘĖĚĎğęĔĘĊĊ
ĎċĞĔĚĉĊĘĊėěĊĆĘĕĔę
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ĆęęčĊĈĔĚēęĊėǤ
Tune in to
Diners, Drive-
ins and Dives,
Mondays at
10 p.m. ET.
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JULY/AUGUST 2013 ● FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE 61
1
4
5
6
3
7
Which state is often
called “the diner
capital of the world”?
Who painted
this famous
diner scene?
A Edward Hopper
B Vincent van Gogh
C Georgia O’Keeffe
D Grant Wood
A California
B New Jersey
C Texas
D New York
What’s the difference between a
luncheonette and a diner?
A There’s no difference.
B A luncheonette is usually
inside a department store.
C Diners are 1,500 square feet.
D A luncheonette serves only
lunch.
A nickname for a
diner waitress is a:
A Plate pitcher
B Counter guard
C Soup jockey
D Pancake kicker
A French fries B Doughnuts
and coffee
C Two poached
eggs on toast
F Franks and beans G Mustard D Pea soup E Hot dog
Adam and Eve on a raft __ Frenchman’s delight __
Coney Island chicken __
Abbott and Costello __ Frog sticks __
Mississippi mud __ Sinkers and suds __
Match the diner lingo with its menu translation:
Why do decaf coffee pots have
an orange rim?
A That’s how America’s first diner served it.
B Waitresses in the 1920s served decaf in
orange mugs.
C A popular decaf brand used to come in an
orange package.
2 Which of these isn’t
a dessert?
A Eve with
a lid on
B Houseboat
C Nervous
pudding
D Radio sandwich
C
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.

62 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
In the Know
8 10
12
11
Which two ingredients top
an order of disco fries?
A Bacon
B Mozzarella
cheese
C Gravy
D Marinara
sauce
“Keep off
the grass”
“Make it cry” “In the alley” “Ruff it”
When ordering, what do these phrases mean?
A Add whipped cream B Serve on the side C Serve rare D Add onions E Hold the lettuce
1 ___ 2 ___ 3 ___ 4 ___ 5 ___
“On the hoof”
Which pattern was often featured
on the classic waitress uniform?
A Black-and-white
houndstooth
C Pink pinstripes
B Blue-and-white
polka dots
D Red-and-black plaid
Which chain is not considered
a diner?
A Sonic
B Denny’s
C Johnny Rockets
D Waffle House
The Quality Cafe in Los Angeles
has been featured in all of these
movies except:
9
A When Harry Met Sally…
B Catch Me If You Can
C Se7en
D Old School
ASonic
N
O
.

8
,

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64 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
In the Know
The owners of
many diners in the
Northeast descend
from:
A Greece
B Italy
C Spain
D Germany
When did this iconic
box first appear in
diner booths?
A 1920s
B 1930s
C 1940s
D 1950s
The Moondance Diner in
La Barge, WY, is famous for:
A Inventing the omelet.
B Traveling cross-country on a truck.
C Being the first diner to stay open 24-7.
D Selling pancakes for just one penny each.
Match the fictional diner to its television show:
The Peach Pit ___ Arnold’s ___ The Max ___ Mel’s ___ Monk’s ___
A Saved by the Bell B Beverly Hills, 90210 C Alice D Seinfeld E Happy Days
+
+
+
D Coffee with cream and sugar
C Coffee with cream
B Coffee with sugar
A Black coffee
Order a “coffee regular” and you’ll get:
13
17
18
15
14
16
Which of these diner
orders will get you a
glass of water?
A Guess water
B Adam’s ale
C Balloon juice
D Baby juice
+
N
O
.

1
3
,

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FOR A GREAT FINISH, START WITH FAGE TOTAL.
FAGE Total is a truly unique and versatile authentic Greek strained yogurt.
Discover how world-class chef Bobby Flay chooses to incorporate this
special yogurt into new and delicious dishes at fagetotalchallenge.com
© 2012-2013 FAGE USA Dairy Industry, Inc. Trademarks are used with permission by FAGE Luxembourg S.a.r.l. All rights reserved.
66 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
In the Know
How did you do?
Tally your score, then turn the page to reward yourself with some diner gear.
0 to 12 points
DINER D-LISTER You need a crash course in diner dining. Hit one for breakfast
this week and you’ll be on your way to Guy Fieri’s impressive 675 on-air diner visits.
Coincidentally, Guy and Walter Scott, the man who inspired the creation of diners as
we know them today, both got their start selling food from mobile carts.
13 to 25 points
COUNTER INTELLIGENT You know an impressive amount of diner trivia, but
there’s more to learn. Take a summer road trip to one of approximately 38 diners on
the National Register of Historic Places (foodnetwork.com/historicdiners) and get
firsthand experience at some of the country’s oldest diners.
26 to 39 points
BLUE PLATE SPECIALIST You know your stuff. Ready to take the next step?
There are a half dozen old diners for sale on americandinermuseum.org—and prices
start at just $12,000!
Score Sheet
Give yourself 1 point for each correct answer.
1. B
According to some counts,
New Jersey has more
diners than any other state.
2. D
A is slang for apple pie; B is
a banana split; C is gelatin;
D is a tuna fish sandwich.
3. C
Sanka hit stores in the
1920s and came packaged
with an orange label. Over
time, people began to
associate the color with
decaf—regardless of
the brand.
4. A
Nighthawks was Hopper’s
most famous piece. It
sold to the Art Institute
of Chicago for $3,000 in
1942 (within months of
its completion).
5. B
6. C
7. 1 point for each:
Frenchman’s delight D
Coney Island chicken E
Abbott and Costello F
Sinkers and suds B
Frog sticks A
Mississippi mud G
Adam and Eve on a raft C
8. B and C
9. A
The Quality Cafe is
no longer open, but
Hollywood directors
often use it for movie
shoots. The famous diner
scene in When Harry
Met Sally… was filmed at
Katz’s Delicatessen in
New York City.
10. C
11. A
Sonic is a drive-in.
12. 1 point for each:
1 C Serve rare
2 D Add onions
3 E Hold the lettuce
4 B Serve on the side
5 A Add whipped cream
13. 1 point for each:
Mel’s C
Monk’s D
The Peach Pit B
The Max A
Arnold’s E
14. B
A is slang for soup; C is
seltzer; D is milk.
15. D
16. B
In 2007, the Moondance
Diner was sold for $7,500
and moved from New York
City to Wyoming.
17. A
Greeks gained a noticeable
presence in the diner
business across the
Northeast during the
late 1950s.
18. D
The chrome Seeburg
Wall-O-Matic is the most
recognized remote selector
and offered 100 songs,
while other boxes had
options for only 24 or 40.

19. B
20. B
21. T
22. F
Pork roll is a type of
breakfast meat (often
compared to Canadian
bacon or bologna)
that’s popular in New
Jersey and Philadelphia.
23. T
24. T
25. F
True or False?
21 In a diner, a zeppelin
is another name for
a sausage.
22 A pork roll is made
with a biscuit.
23 In some places, diner
is spelled “dinor.”
24 Grilled cheese was
originally served
as an open-faced
sandwich.
25 Hash browns are the
same as home fries.
Someone who
cooks at a diner
is called a:
A Trade cook
B Short-order cook
C Short-lead cook
D First-order cook

T F

T F

T F



T F

T F
This diner is an
example of ___
architecture.
A Contemporary
B Art deco
C Modernist
D Mid-century
19
20
E
D
U
C
A
T
I
O
N

I
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U
I
G
/
G
E
T
T
Y

I
M
A
G
E
S
.

68 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
In the Know
Diner Specials
Order some retro gear for your own kitchen.
Help little ones
reach the table
with these
iconic plastic
booster seats.
$26 each;
katom.com
Store toothpicks in this
cool metal dispenser,
just like the ones by the
cash register.
$18; retroplanet.com
Trade in your kitchen chairs
for a ’50s-style diner booth:
You can customize the size,
colors and piping.
From $520;
americanchairs.com
These place mats are nicer than
the flimsy paper ones at most
diners: They’re backed with cork.
$50 for four, Bob’s Your Uncle;
annyxsagharbor.com
Eight-inch Blue Plate
Special Side Plates
are perfect for salads
and appetizers.
$13 each; fishseddy.com
Sweeten your morning
coffee with this classic
12-ounce sugar pourer.
$3.50, TableCraft;
kitchencollection.com
Give your kitchen a touch of
neon with this 16-inch red and
white Diner Wall Clock.
$150; hayneedle.com
P
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G
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70 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
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1 00% REAL MI LK THAT’ S EASY TO DI GEST.
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dairy, you can enjoy creamy, delicious milk with confidence. Discover our
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Fully Enjoy the
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knows all about how dairy sensitivity can be an
inconvenience for people who want to get the most out
of their meals. In fact, her husband and daughter are
both sensitive to the lactose in dairy, but she doesn’t let
that stop her family from eating what they love.
That’s why she’s so excited to share her love
of LACTAID
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Melissa believes that:
• Everyone with dairy sensitivity due to lactose
deserves to keep eating their favorite dairy
products with total confidence.
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*Melissa d’Arabian was compensated for her participation. ©McNeil Nutritionals, LLC 2013
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©
2
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1
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We’re
incredibly
slow.
We devote up to
14 hours to bake each
batch of our pita
chips to perfection.
Quality shuts the
door on shortcuts.
And we’re okay with that.
un Cooking
JULY/AUGUST 2013 ● FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE 75

Fire and Ice
We’re all for throwing
new things onto the
grill (see page 81),
but we were skeptical
of grilled lemonade
when we heard about
the trend. After trying
it, we’re sold: Grilling
the lemons makes the
drink taste caramelized
and slightly smoky. To
make a pitcher, dip the
cut sides of 16 halved
lemons in sugar and
grill until marked,
about 5 minutes; let
cool. Simmer 1¼ cups
sugar with 1¾ cups
water and a pinch of
salt until dissolved;
let cool. Squeeze the
lemons through a
strainer into a pitcher;
stir in the sugar syrup,
some ice and a few of
the grilled lemons.
PHOTOGRAPH BY KANG KIM
Squeeze new life into lemonade.
Then, reinvent the BLT and
grill something unexpected.
F
O
O
D

S
T
Y
L
I
N
G
:

K
A
R
E
N

E
V
A
N
S
.
We challenged Guy Fieri and
Melissa d’Arabian to a steak cook-off.
Who comes out on top?
GUY FIERI’S
BLOODY MARY
FLANK STEAK
ACTIVE: 30 min l TOTAL: 35 min
(plus marinating) l SERVES: 4
1 cup vegetable juice
(such as V8)
½ cup vodka
Sea s alt and freshly
ground pepper
1 teaspoon hot sauce
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1 tablespoon Worcestershire
sauce
1 to 2 cloves garlic, crushed
1 teaspoon onion powder
1 teaspoon celery seeds
1 tablespoon horseradish
¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
1 pound flank steak
1. Thoroughly mix the vegetable
juice, vodka, 1 teaspoon
each sea salt and pepper,
the hot sauce, lemon juice,
Worcestershire sauce, garlic,
onion powder, celery seeds,
horseradish and olive oil in a
1-gallon resealable plastic bag.
Add the steak. Let marinate in
the refrigerator, at least 8 hours
and up to 24 hours.
2. Preheat a grill to high.
Remove the steak from
the marinade and wipe of the
excess liquid with paper towels.
Grill the steak until marked,
about 2 minutes per side, then
reduce the heat to medium and
cook 7 to 9 more minutes per
side for medium rare.
3. Remove the steak from the
grill, cover with a clean towel
and let rest 5 to 10 minutes.
Slice against the grain.
Guy’s
secret
weapon
76 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
Fun
Cooking
He Made
“Make a
Bloody Mary
and put it on
flank steak—the
flavor is out of
this world!”
She Made
“Chimichurri
sauce is a simple
yet tasty way
to dress up this
thrifty steak.”
1. Prepare the steak: Set the steaks on a cutting
board and slice them in half crosswise. Using your
knife, round out the clean-cut edges so the sides
look softer. Use paper towels to pat the steaks dry,
then season all over with 1 teaspoon salt and
½ teaspoon pepper. Set aside 15 to 30 minutes to
bring to room temperature.
2. Meanwhile, make the chimichurri sauce: Place the cilantro, parsley, onion,
lemon juice, vinegar, garlic, red pepper flakes, 1 teaspoon salt and ¼ teaspoon
pepper in the bowl of a food processor and pulse until roughly chopped. Slowly
pour in the olive oil and process until the chimichurri is semi-smooth, about
4 seconds. Transfer to a small bowl and set aside.
3. Heat a grill or grill pan over medium-high heat. Brush both sides of each steak
with the vegetable oil, then cook, undisturbed, until marked, 3 to 5 minutes. Flip
and cook until a thermometer registers 125˚ for medium rare, 3 to 5 more minutes.
Transfer to plates and let rest 5 minutes. Serve with the chimichurri sauce.
FOR THE STEAK
2 10-to-12-ounce sirloin steaks
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
FOR THE SAUCE
½ cup fresh cilantro leaves, roughly chopped
½ cup fresh parsley leaves, roughly chopped
1 tablespoon finely chopped onion
Juice of ½ lemon
2 teaspoons white wine vinegar
1 clove garlic, minced or
pressed through a garlic press
Pinch of red pepper flakes
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
⅓ cup olive oil
Melissa’s
secret weapon
tttttt rifty steak. ttt
JULY/AUGUST 2013 ● FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE 77
“Chimichurri
sauce is a simple,
tasty way to
dress up this
thrifty steak.”
V
O
T
E
!

MELISSA D’ARABIAN’S
SIMPLE SIRLOIN STEAK WITH CHIMICHURRI
ACTIVE: 30 min l TOTAL: 45 min l SERVES: 4
T
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©

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1½ teaspoons grated lemon peel
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MAKES 3 SERVINGS
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1 tablespoon butter
¾ teaspoon chopped thyme
¾ teaspoon ground pepper
1 lemon, juiced and 1 teaspoon grated zest
½ cup white wine
1 cup half and half
¼ cup BUITONI Refrigerated Freshly Grated
Parmesan Cheese
8 large shrimp, cleaned
1 tablespoon chopped chives
MAKES 4 SERVINGS
DI RECT I ONS
COOK ravioli according to directions,
reserve ¼ cup water.
MELT butter with thyme and pepper in large
skillet over medium. Add lemon juice, zest
and wine; simmer to evaporate slightly.
Stir in half and half and parmesan until
thickened, 4 minutes. Add shrimp and
pasta water and cook 4 minutes. Add
ravioli and chives, toss to coat. Serve.
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JULY/AUGUST 2013 ● FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE 81
PHOTOGRAPHS BY LEVI BROWN
We raided the kitchen and threw just about everything
on the grill. Check out these surprise hits.
Can You
Grill It?
Fun
Cooking
82 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013 MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
BANANAS
PB & FLUFF
GRAPES
STRAWBERRIES
BOLOGNA
Fun
Cooking
FIGS
MOZZARELLA
GRAPES
STR
BOLO OLOGGNA N
Make
sure your grill
is clean, and
oil the grates
before
cooking.
JULY/AUGUST 2013 ● FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE 83
CITRUS
KALE
ICEBERG
LETTUCE
FROZEN
ONION RINGS
PICKLES
DRIED FRUIT
RICE
KRISPIES
TREATS
EGGS
(prick with a pin first)
Make Your Own...
HOMEMADE MAYONNAISE
ACTIVE: 15 min l TOTAL: 15 min l MAKES: about 1 cup
½ cup pure olive oil
½ cup vegetable or grapeseed oil
1 large pasteurized egg yolk, at room temperature
1 tablespoon distilled white vinegar
Kosher salt
1. Combine the olive oil and vegetable oil in a liquid
measuring cup or bowl; set aside. Whisk the egg yolk,
vinegar and ½ teaspoon salt in a small nonreactive bowl.
2. Set the bowl with the yolk mixture on a damp kitchen
towel to steady it. Drizzle in the oil mixture very slowly,
whisking constantly. (The mixture will begin to thicken
after about half of the oil is added; if at any point the oil is
not incorporating, stop drizzling and whisk until smooth.)
Refrigerate in an airtight container for up to 4 days.
HONEY-MUSTARD
MAYONNAISE
Make homemade mayonnaise
(above), stirring ⅛ teaspoon turmeric
into the olive oil mixture and
substituting champagne vinegar for
the white vinegar. Whisk 2 tablespoons
whole-grain mustard and 1 teaspoon
honey into the finished mayonnaise.
Season with salt.
SPICY SESAME-GINGER
MAYONNAISE
Mix 1 cup vegetable oil with
2 tablespoons sesame oil. Make
homemade mayonnaise (above) with
the sesame oil mixture instead of the
olive oil mixture; substitute rice vinegar
for the white vinegar. Whisk 1 tablespoon
grated ginger, 1½ teaspoons Sriracha
and ½ teaspoon each sesame seeds and
brown sugar into the finished mayonnaise.
Season with salt.
Step up your cookout condiment spread with
Food Network Kitchens’ homemade mayo.
CHIMICHURRI
MAYONNAISE
Puree ½ cup each fresh parsley,
olive oil and vegetable oil, ¼ cup
fresh cilantro, 1 tablespoon red wine
vinegar, 1 chopped garlic clove,
½ teaspoon kosher salt and ¼ teaspoon
each pepper and ground cumin
until smooth. Make homemade
mayonnaise (above) with the herb oil
instead of the olive oil mixture.
“You can switch up your mayo just
by changing the acid: Instead of
white vinegar, try lemon juice, apple
cider vinegar or even yuzu juice.”
—Leah Trent Hope,
Recipe Developer
84 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
Fun
Cooking
If you
add the oil
too quickly, the
mayonnaise may
separate. Just whisk
in warm water,
1 teaspoon at
a time, until
smooth.
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Find more delicious
ideas at PorkBeInspired.com
Fun
Cooking
Copy That!
FOR THE MARINADE
¼ cup packed light
brown sugar
2 tablespoons
apple cider vinegar
2 tablespoons
minced onion
1 clove garlic, minced
Kosh er salt and freshly
ground black pepper
2 4-to-5-pound racks
pork spareribs
FOR THE RUB
½ cup packed
light brown sugar
1 tablespoon
chili powder
1 tablespoon
garlic powder
1 tablespoon
onion powder
1 teaspoon celery salt
1 teaspoon celery seeds
¼ teaspoon cayenne
pepper
Kosh er salt and freshly
ground black pepper


86 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
Famous Dave’s ribs recipe
is a closely guarded secret,
so Food Network Kitchens
created this great knockoff.
THE RESTAURANT: Famous Dave’s
THE DISH: The Big Slab
THE STORY: Dave Anderson became “Famous”
by accident. In 1994, after spending years fine-
tuning his ribs recipe in a homemade garbage-can
smoker, Dave was about to open his first restaurant,
Dave’s Famous BBQ. But the sign arrived with the
first two words swapped. Dave decided to keep
the sign and has tried to live up to his name ever since:
He has entered hundreds of barbecue competitions,
winning 165 of them with his restaurant’s Big Slab of
ribs. The rub recipe is a corporate secret—only Dave
and two senior execs know it—but Food Network
Kitchens put together this close match.
ALMOST-FAMOUS
BARBECUE SPARERIBS
ACTIVE: 1 hr 30 min l TOTAL: 5 hr 30 min (plus
overnight marinating) l SERVES: 6 to 8
FOR THE BARBECUE SAUCE
2 tablespoons
vegetable oil
3 cloves garlic, smashed
¼ cup tomato paste
1 tablespoon chili powder
1¾ cups apple cider vinegar
¼ cup molasses
2 tablespoons
Worcestershire sauce
1 tablespoon honey
1 tablespoon mustard
powder
2 teaspoons instant
espresso powder
Freshly ground black
pepper
½ teaspoon cayenne
pepper
1 cup ketchup
1 cup pineapple
preserves
½ teaspoon liquid smoke
1. Make the marinade: Whisk the brown sugar, vinegar, onion,
garlic, 1 tablespoon salt and ½ teaspoon black pepper in a bowl.
Put the ribs meat-side down on a cutting board. Starting at one
end, slip a paring knife under the membrane that covers the back
of the rack. Loosen the membrane with the knife, then pull it of.
Coat the ribs on both sides with the marinade; wrap in plastic
wrap and refrigerate overnight.
2. Make the rub: Mix the brown sugar, chili powder, garlic powder,
onion powder, celery salt, celery seeds, cayenne, 1 tablespoon salt
and 1 teaspoon black pepper in a bowl.
3. Soak 2 cups hickory wood chips in water, 30 to 40 minutes.
Meanwhile, preheat a grill to medium low (275˚) and prepare for
indirect grilling: For a charcoal grill, bank the coals to one side;
for a gas grill, turn of the burners on one side. Cover the grate on
the cooler side of the grill with foil.
4. Drain the wood chips. For a charcoal grill, scatter the chips over
the hot coals; for a gas grill, put the chips in a smoker box and
place over direct heat. Close the lid and allow smoke to build up,
about 10 minutes. Rinse the marinade of the ribs and pat dry with
paper towels. Work the spice rub into both sides of each rack
with your hands.
5. Place the ribs, meat-side up, on the foil over indirect heat. Close
the lid and cook, undisturbed, until the meat shrinks back slightly
to expose a bit of the bone, about 1 hour, 30 minutes.
6. Rotate the ribs (keep them meat-side up and over indirect
heat), then close the lid and continue cooking, 2 hours to
2 hours, 30 minutes. (For a charcoal grill, add more hot coals as
needed to maintain the temperature.)
7. Meanwhile, make the barbecue sauce: Heat the vegetable oil
in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add the garlic and
cook, stirring occasionally, until golden, about 1 minute. Stir in
the tomato paste and chili powder until incorporated, about
1 minute. Whisk in the vinegar, ¼ cup water, the molasses,
Worcestershire sauce, honey, mustard powder, espresso
powder, ¾ teaspoon black pepper and the cayenne. Bring to a
simmer and cook, whisking occasionally, 5 minutes. Whisk in
the ketchup and pineapple preserves. Bring to a gentle simmer
and cook, whisking occasionally, until thickened, about
45 minutes. Whisk in the liquid smoke. Let the sauce cool to
room temperature, then remove the garlic. (The sauce will
keep, refrigerated, up to 2 weeks.)
8. Baste the ribs
generously with the
prepared barbecue
sauce. Close the lid and
continue cooking until
glazed, about 20 more
minutes. Transfer to a
cutting board; let rest
a few minutes before
cutting into individual
ribs. Serve with more
sauce on the side.
MARINATE FROM
THE INSIDE OUT
IN JUST 10 MINUTES.
Introducing French’s
®
New Flavor Infuser.

Its unique infuser tip injects phenomenal flavor
into your meals in just 10 minutes.
Available in four mouthwatering flavors.
Visit frenchs.com for more information © 2013 RB
F
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88 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● MONTH 2013 88 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● MONTH 2013
Fun
Cooking
Kids’ Meal
88 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
1 tablespoon vegetable oil, plus more for brushing
¾ cup ketchup
3 tablespoons soy sauce or teriyaki sauce
3 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
1½ tablespoons honey
1¼ pounds skinless, boneless chicken breasts,
cut into 1¼-inch pieces
1 8-ounce can water chestnuts, drained and rinsed (optional)
4 cups chopped pineapple (about ¾ pineapple)
1 small red or orange bell pepper, cut into chunks
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
4 small Hawaiian sweet rolls
1. Preheat the broiler. Soak 8 long wooden skewers in water, 15 minutes.
Line a baking sheet with foil and brush lightly with vegetable oil.
2. Meanwhile, whisk the ketchup, soy sauce, vinegar and honey in a
medium bowl. Transfer half of the sauce to a separate bowl and set aside
for dipping. Toss the chicken, water chestnuts, pineapple, bell pepper
and 1 tablespoon vegetable oil in a large bowl; sprinkle with ½ teaspoon
salt and a few grinds of pepper. Thread onto the skewers, alternating the
ingredients. Transfer to the prepared baking sheet.
3. Brush the kebabs with some of the remaining sauce and broil until they
start browning, about 4 minutes; flip, brush with more sauce and continue
broiling until the chicken is golden and cooked through, about 3 more
minutes. Serve with the reserved sauce and rolls.
Fun
Cooking
Kids’ Meal
Little ones will love this
tropical dinner on a stick.
HAWAIIAN CHICKEN KEBABS
ACTIVE: 25 min l TOTAL: 30 min l SERVES: 4
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4 1
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fun things up
© 2013 KRAFT FOODS GROUP INC.
The answer may surprise you, but not as much as what you need to reveal it: an open cup of red
JELL
-
O Gelatin and enough willpower not to eat it right away. Just follow the funstructions below
and…well, let’s just say you’re going to be one happy snacker.
Grab yourself a tasty cup of red
JELL
-
O Gelatin. If you don’t have
one, buy, borrow or steal one.
Actually, don’t steal one.
Peel off lid, but DON’T eat it just
yet.
(
Lid lick optional.
)
Place open JELL
-
O cup on top of
Jigglevision grid.
Making sure you have adequate
room for an uncontrollable LOL
fit, look through top of cup t o
reveal answer.
Visit jellojigglevision.com
to create and share your
own secret messages. Oh,
and you can eat your JELL
-
O
now too.
Why did the cake go
to the dentist
90 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
Fun
Cooking
Fun
Cooking
Wake-Up Call
1. Combine the granola and 1 cup milk in a blender
and puree until almost smooth. Add the remaining
1½ cups milk, the flour and melted butter; blend until
smooth. Transfer to a bowl, cover and set aside 1 hour.
(You can cover and refrigerate the batter overnight;
bring to room temperature before cooking.)
2. Heat a 10-inch nonstick skillet over medium
heat and brush with butter. Add ¼ cup batter and
swirl to coat the bottom of the pan. (If the batter
is too thick, add a splash of milk before cooking
the next crêpe.) Cook the crêpe until golden on the
bottom, 1 to 2 minutes. Carefully flip and cook until
golden on the other side, 30 seconds to 1 minute.
Transfer to a parchment-lined baking sheet. Repeat
with the remaining batter, brushing the pan with
more butter and adjusting the heat as necessary.
3. Assemble the cake: Set aside ¼ cup cream
cheese for topping. Lay a crêpe on a plate and
spread with some of the remaining cream cheese.
(If the cream cheese is hard to spread, microwave
15 to 20 seconds.) Sprinkle with some of the
granola. Top with another crêpe and spread with
some of the jam. Repeat with the remaining crêpes,
alternating layers of cream cheese–granola and jam
and ending with a crêpe.
4. Combine the reserved ¼ cup cream cheese, the
heavy cream and 1 tablespoon sugar in a small bowl;
whisk until smooth and slightly thickened. Toss the
plums with the remaining 1 tablespoon sugar in a
microwave-safe bowl; microwave 2 minutes. Top the
crêpe cake with the cream mixture and the plums;
sprinkle with granola. Cut into wedges.
¾ cup granola
(without dried fruit),
plus more for sprinkling
2½ cups whole milk,
plus more as needed
1½ cups all-purpose flour
6 tablespoons unsalted
butter, melted and
cooled slightly, plus more
for the pan
1 cup whipped cream
cheese
½ cup apricot or plum jam
¼ cup heavy cream
2 tablespoons sugar
2 plums, chopped
Turn a batch of crêpes into this over-the-top brunch treat.
CRÊPE CAKE WITH GRANOLA AND PLUMS
ACTIVE: 1 hr l TOTAL: 2 hr l SERVES: 6 to 8
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A coffee this bold, yet smooth? There’s only one name for it.
Go to Folgers.com to learn more about all the varieties of Black Silk.
©/® The Folger Coffee Company. Keurig, the Cup and Star design, Keurig Brewed and K-Cup are trademarks
of Keurig, Incorporated, used with permission. K-Cup® packs for Keurig® K-Cup® brewing systems.
Ritz Toasted Chips.
40% less fat than the leading
regular fried potato chips.
The chip makeover.
Sour Cream & Onion Original Cheddar Peppercorn Ranch
*
MONTH 2012 ● FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE 93 MONT MONT ONT MONTTT MONTHHHHH 201 01 201 201 2 22222 ●●●●● FFOOD FOOD FOOOD FOOD NETTT NET NET NEE NETWWOR WOR WORK WORK WORK W K MMA MAG MAG AG MAGGAAZ AZI ZI ZIN INEE 99999333
PHOTOGRAPHS BY JONATHAN KANTOR
Bacon, lettuce and tomato were made for each other. Try them in a new way!
Fun
Cooking
JULY/AUGUST 2013 ● FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE 93
BLT
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OPEN-FACED
ROASTED TOMATO BLTS
ACTIVE: 40 min l TOTAL: 4 hr l SERVES: 4
4 plum tomatoes, halved lengthwise
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
Extra-virgin olive oil, for drizzling
⅓ cup mayonnaise
1 tablespoon horseradish
1 cup sliced Savoy cabbage
¼ small red onion, thinly sliced
8 slices bacon
4 slices seeded rye bread
1 tablespoon fresh dill
1 teaspoon red wine vinegar
1. Preheat the oven to 250˚. Arrange the tomatoes
cut-side up on a baking sheet; sprinkle with
½ teaspoon salt, and pepper to taste. Drizzle
with olive oil. Roast until slightly dry on the
surface, about 3 hours, 30 minutes; let cool.
(The tomatoes can be roasted up to one day
ahead; refrigerate in an airtight container.)
2. Whisk the mayonnaise, horseradish, and
pepper to taste; cover and refrigerate.
3. Toss the cabbage, red onion, a splash of water
and ½ teaspoon salt in a colander set over a bowl;
let drain until the cabbage softens, about
20 minutes. Rinse well with cold water, squeeze
out the excess liquid and pat dry.
4. Meanwhile, cook the bacon in a large skillet
over medium-high heat until crisp; reserve
the drippings.
5. Toast the bread. Toss the cabbage mixture
with the dill, 1 teaspoon of the bacon drippings,
the vinegar, and pepper to taste in a bowl. Top
each piece of toast with some of the horseradish
mayonnaise, 2 slices of bacon, 2 roasted tomato
halves and some of the cabbage mixture. Drizzle
with more drippings.
Slow-roasting
the tomatoes
concentrates
the flavor.
BLT BREAD SALAD ACTIVE: 40 min l TOTAL: 40 min l SERVES: 6
¼ cup thinly sliced red onion
6 ounces thinly sliced pancetta
¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
½ loaf crusty Italian bread, cut into 1-inch
cubes (about 5 cups)
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
2 pounds mixed heirloom tomatoes, cut
into 1¼-inch chunks
3 cups baby arugula
1 cup fresh basil leaves, roughly chopped
¼ cup pitted kalamata olives, chopped
2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
2 ounces ricotta salata cheese, shaved

1. Preheat the oven to 400˚. Soak the onion in a bowl of cold water while you
prepare the salad.
2. Working in batches, cook the pancetta in a single layer in a large skillet over
medium heat until crisp, about 4 minutes per side. Transfer to paper towels to
drain; reserve the drippings.
3. Combine 1 tablespoon each olive oil and pancetta drippings in a small bowl.
Toss with the bread cubes on a baking sheet and sprinkle with ¼ teaspoon
each salt and pepper; spread in an even layer. Bake, stirring once, until lightly
toasted, about 15 minutes.
4. Drain the onion and chop all but 6 slices pancetta. Add to a large bowl
with the tomatoes, arugula, basil, olives, bread, vinegar and the remaining
3 tablespoons olive oil. Toss and season with salt and pepper.
5. Divide the salad among bowls. Top each with some ricotta salata and a
piece of reserved pancetta.
Fun
Cooking
Pancetta is
similar to bacon,
minus the intense
smoky flavor.
95
MEXICAN BLTS WITH SPICY SALSA ACTIVE: 35 min l TOTAL: 1 hr 10 min l SERVES: 4
FOR THE SALSA
1½ pounds tomatoes, halved if large
1 small onion, quartered
4 cloves garlic, unpeeled
3 jalapeño peppers, halved lengthwise
and seeded
¾ cup fresh cilantro (leaves and tender
stems), coarsely chopped
1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar
Kosher salt
FOR THE BACON
2 tablespoons ancho chile powder
½ teaspoon cayenne pepper
½ teaspoon dried oregano
½ teaspoon ground cumin
Pinch of ground cloves
3 cloves garlic, roughly chopped
2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
1 pound thick-cut bacon
FOR THE SANDWICHES
4 Portuguese rolls or soft hero rolls
8 ounces Oaxaca cheese or salted
mozzarella, shredded
3 tomatoes, sliced
½ small head iceberg lettuce,
shredded
1. Make the salsa: Preheat the broiler. Line a baking sheet with foil
and add the tomatoes, onion, garlic and jalapeños (cut-side down).
Broil, turning as needed, until the tomatoes and onion char and the
garlic softens, 6 to 8 minutes. Let cool, then peel the garlic. Coarsely
chop the tomatoes, onion, garlic and jalapeños; transfer to a bowl.
Stir in the cilantro, vinegar and ½ teaspoon salt.
2. Make the bacon: Preheat the oven to 350˚. Line a baking sheet
with foil and set a wire rack on top. Combine the chile powder,
cayenne, oregano, cumin and cloves in a small bowl; stir in the
garlic, vinegar and 1 tablespoon water. Lay the bacon on the rack in
a single layer; brush with the spice paste. Bake until the fat starts to
render, about 15 minutes. Flip using tongs, then continue baking until
browned, 10 to 20 more minutes, depending on the thickness of the
bacon. Drain on paper towels and let cool until slightly crisp.
3. Assemble the sandwiches: Halve the rolls and pull out some of
the bread from the insides. Lightly toast in the oven, 5 to 7 minutes.
Spread some of the prepared salsa on the bottom half of each roll,
then top with a layer of cheese, a few pieces of bacon, some tomato
slices and lettuce. Top with more salsa, then cover with the roll tops,
pressing them down. Cut in half with a serrated knife.
Fun
Cooking
To make this Mexican
sandwich, called a torta, we
pulled out some of the bread
to make room for fillings.
96 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
©2013 Colgate-Palmolive Company ©2013 Colgate-Palmolive Company
98 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
ASIAN BLT BUNS WITH CHILE MAYONNAISE
ACTIVE: 35 min l TOTAL: 35 min l SERVES: 4 to 6
1 pound thick-cut bacon
¼ teaspoon Chinese five-spice powder
3 tomatoes, sliced ½ inch thick
3 tablespoons hoisin sauce
3 tablespoons mayonnaise
2 to 3 teaspoons Sriracha (Asian chile sauce)
1 cup small watercress sprigs
2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro
Splash of rice wine vinegar
⅛ teaspoon toasted sesame oil
Kosher salt
10 Chinese steamed buns or hamburger buns
1 Persian cucumber, thinly sliced
1. Working in batches, cook the bacon in a large skillet over medium heat until crisp; drain on
paper towels. Sprinkle the bacon with the five-spice powder, then break the slices in half.
2. Preheat the broiler. Place the tomato slices on a baking sheet and brush with half of the hoisin
sauce. Broil until bubbling, about 3 minutes, then turn; brush with the remaining hoisin sauce
and broil 3 more minutes.
3. Combine the mayonnaise and Sriracha in a small bowl. Toss the watercress and cilantro in a
medium bowl with the vinegar, sesame oil and a pinch of salt.
4. Dampen 2 paper towels and squeeze out the excess water. Wrap the Chinese buns loosely
in the paper towels, then place in a large microwave-safe bowl; cover with plastic wrap and
microwave in 30-second intervals until hot and soft. (Alternatively, steam in a steamer basket
set over boiling water, 5 minutes.) If using hamburger buns, do not steam.
5. Spread the inside of the buns with some of the chile mayonnaise. Fill the buns with a few
slices each of cucumber, bacon and tomato, and some of the watercress mixture.
Fun
Cooking
Chinese steamed
buns are a fun
alternative to bread.
Look for them at
Asian markets, or just
use soft burger buns.
Quaker Up.
TM
©

Q
O
C

2
0
1
3
Nothing gets you going quite like the 18 grams of
whole grain per serving in Quaker Life.
®
®
GRILLED SALMON
BLT CLUBS
ACTIVE: 40 min l TOTAL: 40 min l SERVES: 4
½ cup mayonnaise
1 clove garlic, finely chopped
Grated zest and juice of 2 limes
2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill
2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
8 slices bacon
1¼ pounds center-cut skinless salmon fillet
1 small red onion, sliced
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
12 slices country bread, toasted
8 leaves red-leaf lettuce
3 plum tomatoes, sliced
1 avocado, halved, pitted and thinly sliced
1. Combine the mayonnaise, garlic, the zest
and juice of 1 lime, the dill and parsley in a small
bowl. Cover and refrigerate.
2. Cook the bacon in a large skillet over medium-
high heat until crisp. Break the slices in half.
3. Preheat a grill or grill pan to medium high. Slice
the salmon on the diagonal into 8 thin pieces.
Season the salmon and red onion slices with salt
and pepper and rub with the olive oil. Sprinkle
with the zest and juice of the remaining lime. Grill
the red onion slices, turning occasionally, until
tender and charred, about 5 minutes. Grill the
salmon until marked and just cooked through,
turning once, 1 to 2 minutes.
4. Lay out 4 slices of toasted bread; top with
some of the herbed mayonnaise, a lettuce leaf,
a piece of salmon, some tomato and avocado
slices and 2 bacon halves. Top each with a piece
of toast, then repeat the layering (mayonnaise,
lettuce, salmon, tomato, avocado and bacon).
Spread the remaining 4 bread slices with herbed
mayonnaise and place on top of the sandwiches.
Secure each sandwich with 4 toothpicks and
cut into quarters.
Fun
Cooking
100 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
Grilling the red
onion mellows
its bite.
What will you make today
that you can share tomorrow?
and Ball® TMs Ball Corporation, used under license. ©2013 Hearthmark LLC. All rights reserved.
The HEINZ marks are owned by H.J. Heinz Company and are used with permission.
MAKE
Kosher Dill Pickles
Share your pickles at
Facebook.com/BallCanning.
Whether it’s your first time or
hundredth, it’s easy to make your
very own fresh batch of pickles.
Using Ball
®
Kosher Dill Pickle Mix
will help you save on time and add
that extra delicious crunch, while the
Ball
®
Pint & Half Jars are the perfect
size for displaying your spears and
sharing with friends.
Learn more at FreshPreserving.com/Today.
Welcome to pickle perfection.
Shine through.
3 1/2 lbs pickling cucumbers
2 cups water
1 cup Heinz
®
White Vinegar (5% acidity)
1/4 cup Ball
®
Kosher Dill Pickle Mix
2 Ball
®
Pint & Half Fresh Preserving Jars
with lids and bands
Cut ends off cucumbers. Cut into spears.
Combine water, Heinz
®
Vinegar and
Ball
®
Kosher Dill Pickle Mix in a medium
saucepan. Heat to a boil.
Prepare canner, jars and lids according to
manufacturer’s instructions.
Pack spears into hot jars. Ladle hot
pickling liquid over spears leaving 1/2 inch
headspace. Remove air bubbles. Wipe rims.
Center lids on jars. Apply bands and adjust
to fingertip tight.
Process in boiling water canner for 15
minutes, adjusting for altitude.* For best
flavor, allow pickles to stand for 4-6 weeks.
*Increase processing time: 5 minutes for
1,001 to 3,000 ft; 10 minutes for 3,001 to
6,000 ft; 15 minutes for 6,001 to 8,000 ft;
20 minutes for 8,001 to 10,000 ft.
Share your jam at
Facebook.com/BallCanning.
makes about 4 (8 oz) half pints
2 2/3 cups crushed strawberries
3 Tbsp Ball
®
RealFruit
®
Classic Pectin
1/2 tsp butter or margarine
3 1/3 cups granulated sugar
1/4 vanilla bean split in half lengthwise
1 Ball
®
FreshTECH Automatic Jam &
Jelly Maker
Wash strawberries, drain, and remove stems
and hulls. Crush berries one layer at a time
using a potato masher. Measure required
quantity of crushed berries and remaining
ingredients for your recipe; set aside.
Sprinkle pectin evenly over bottom of the
Pot fitted with the Stirrer. Add vanilla bean to
crushed strawberries and pour evenly over
pectin. Add butter/margarine to help
reduce foaming.
Press jam button – the cook time will
automatically default to 21 minutes.
Press enter.
Wait 4 minutes for appliance to sound 4 short
beeps indicating that it is time to add sugar.
Add sugar gradually while Stirrer continues
running. Place the Glass Lid on the Pot.
The appliance will continue to automatically
stir your ingredients while it cooks. Stay
within earshot of the Jam & Jelly Maker; the
appliance will beep again at the end of the
process signaling jam cooking is complete.
Press cancel, unplug the appliance and
immediately remove Glass Lid.
Remove Stirrer using a potholder. Skim
foam, if necessary, from top of jam. Remove
vanilla bean.
Enjoy now (within 3 weeks in refrigerator),
freeze or preserve your jam and store for
up to one year.
Great homemade jam is an
expression of you. And now it’s
even easier to create with the
Ball
®
FreshTECH Automatic Jam
& Jelly Maker. All you need are
fresh ingredients, 30 minutes and
Ball
®
RealFruit
®
Classic Pectin, and
you’re well on your way to making
fresh jam that’s worth sharing.
Learn more at FreshPreserving.com/Today.
Fresh jam in 30 minutes.
MAKE
Vanilla Strawberry Jam
Shine through.
7 cups chopped cored peeled green
tomatoes (about 12 medium)
5 to 10 jalapeño or habanero peppers,
seeded and finely chopped
2 cups chopped red onion (about 2 large)
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
1/2 cup lime juice
1/2 cup finely chopped cilantro
2 tsp ground cumin
1 tsp dried oregano
1 tsp salt
1 tsp freshly ground black pepper
6 (8 oz) half pint glass preserving jars
with lids and bands
Prepare boiling water canner. Heat jars and
lids in simmering water until ready for use.
Do not boil. Set bands aside.
Learn more at FreshPreserving.com/Today.
Rethink herbs.
Combine tomatoes, peppers, onion, garlic
and lime juice in a large saucepan. Bring to a
boil. Stir in cilantro, cumin, oregano, salt and
pepper. Reduce heat and simmer 5 minutes.
Ladle hot salsa into hot jars leaving 1/2 inch
headspace. Remove air bubbles. Wipe rim.
Center hot lid on jar. Apply band and adjust
until fit is fingertip tight.
Process filled jars in a boiling water canner
for 20 minutes, adjusting for altitude.
Remove jars and cool. Check lids for seal
after 24 hours. Lid should not flex up and
down when center is pressed.
Quick tip:
Use from 5 to 10 hot peppers to reach the
level of heat you desire. When cutting or
seeding hot peppers, wear rubber gloves to
prevent hands from being burned.
MAKE
Salsa Verde
Share your salsa at
Facebook.com/BallCanning.
Shine through.
Ball’s innovative products are
designed to make your life easier.
With the Ball
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you can prolong the life of your
fresh herbs without the hassle, and
the Ball
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Dry Herb Jars are the
perfect companion pieces, offering
a simple storage solution for your
dry herbs, seasonings, spices and
homemade rubs.
Shine through.
For the Zesty Peach BBQ Sauce recipe on
previous page, visit FreshPreserving.com/Today.
Celebrate what you make.
Share your photos and videos at Facebook.com/BallCanning.
102 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
You can
buy pre-cleaned
soft-shell crabs,
but live ones are
better, and cleaning
them is easy
(see step 3).
JULY/AUGUST 2013 ● FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE 103
Fun
Cooking
Soft-Shell
Crab
1. Make the slaw.
❛❛
The first time
I had soft-
shell crab,
I thought I
had to crack
the claws
and shells!”
Try this at home:
Sandwich King
Jeff Mauro
shows us how to
prep and fry a
summer favorite.
SOFT-SHELL CRAB
SANDWICHES WITH
SINGAPORE SLAW
ACTIVE: 35 min l TOTAL: 35 min
SERVES: 4
FOR THE SLAW
½ large daikon
Juice of 1 lime
1 teaspoon honey
1 teaspoon chopped fresh
cilantro
Kosher salt and freshly ground
pepper
FOR THE AÏOLI
½ cup mayonnaise (preferably
Japanese Kewpie mayonnaise)
¼ cup sambal oelek (Asian chile
sauce)
1 teaspoon tomato paste
1 clove garlic
Kosher salt and freshly ground
pepper
FOR THE SOFT-SHELL CRAB
4 live soft-shell crabs
1 cup all-purpose flour
Kosher salt and freshly ground
pepper
5 tablespoons unsalted butter
4 Hawaiian sweet rolls, split open
Trim and peel the daikon, then shred on the large holes of a box grater. Transfer to a colander and
squeeze dry. Whisk the lime juice and honey in a medium bowl. Add the cilantro and daikon; season
with salt and pepper and toss to combine. Refrigerate the slaw until ready to serve.
F
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K
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PHOTOGRAPHS BY DAVID MALOSH
Fun
Cooking
104 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
2. Make the aïoli.
❛❛
Using frozen crabs is OK, but I always hold out
for live ones during soft-shell crab season.”
4. Cook the crabs.
5. Build your sandwich.
Flip the crab over and pull back
the small flap known as the
apron. Use your fingers to pull
it of.
3. Clean the crabs (if live).
Cut of the front of each crab
just behind the eyes and mouth
using kitchen shears; remove any
yellow matter from the inside
with your fingers, if desired.
Grab one of the pointy ends
of the top shell and peel it back
to reveal the gills; cut out the
gills and discard. Repeat on
the other side.
Put the flour in a shallow dish and season with salt and pepper.
Dredge the crabs in the seasoned flour, turning to coat
both sides; shake of the excess flour and set aside. Melt the butter
in a large skillet over medium heat and swirl the pan until the foaming
stops. Add the crabs to the pan and cook until they start to turn
an orange-red color, about 3 minutes per side. Remove to a paper
towel–lined plate to drain and season immediately with salt.
Combine the mayonnaise,
sambal oelek and tomato
paste in a small bowl. Grate in
the garlic, season with salt and
pepper and stir to combine.
Set your rolls cut-side down in the same pan
and cook until golden. Slather the roll tops
with some of the chile aïoli. Sandwich a hot
crab and a scoop of slaw on each roll.
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Weeknight
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JULY/AUGUST 2013 ● FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE 109
Make pasta with
fresh vegetables
in 25 minutes.
See page 112.
Try Food Network Kitchens’
super-easy dinners
with sides to match.
PHOTOGRAPHS BY JUSTIN WALKER
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110 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
Weeknight
Cooking
LOW-
CALORIE
DINNER
LOW-
CALORIE
DINNER
GRILLED BEER AND BUTTER SHRIMP
WITH POTATOES
ACTIVE: 25 min l TOTAL: 35 min l SERVES: 4
1½ pounds small potatoes, halved
1 medium red onion, cut into wedges
3 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into pieces
Kosher salt
1 12-ounce bottle lager beer
1½ pounds large shrimp, peeled and deveined (tails left on)
¾ teaspoon Old Bay Seasoning
¼ cup chopped fresh parsley
1. Preheat a grill to medium high. Stack 2 large sheets of heavy-duty
foil; spread the potatoes and onion wedges in the center. Fold up
the sides to form a bowl shape. Dot the vegetables with
2 tablespoons butter and sprinkle with ½ teaspoon salt; pour in
about two-thirds of the beer. Lay another large sheet of foil on top;
crimp the edges to seal.
2. Set the foil packet on the grill; cover and cook until the potatoes
are fork-tender, 20 to 25 minutes.
3. Meanwhile, stack 2 more large sheets of foil and spread the
shrimp in the center. Fold up the sides to form a bowl shape. Dot
the shrimp with the remaining 1 tablespoon butter, sprinkle with the
Old Bay and pour in the remaining beer. Top with another sheet of
foil; crimp the edges to seal.
4. When the vegetables are almost done, add the shrimp foil packet
to the grill; cover and cook until the shrimp are pink, 6 to 8 minutes.
Sprinkle the vegetables with the parsley, and salt to taste. Serve
with the shrimp and the cooking liquid from the packets.
Per serving: Calories 418; Fat 12 g (Saturated 6 g); Cholesterol 283 mg;
Sodium 526 mg; Carbohydrate 33 g; Fiber 4 g; Protein 38 g
FRESH TOMATO SOUP
WITH GRILLED CHEESE
ACTIVE: 30 min l TOTAL: 35 min l SERVES: 4
4½ pounds tomatoes (4 pounds quartered, ½ pound chopped)
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 clove garlic, minced
4 scallions, chopped
1½ tablespoons heavy cream
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
½ cup mini bow ties or other mini pasta
½ cup shredded part-skim mozzarella cheese
½ cup shredded sharp cheddar cheese
4 slices multigrain bread
2 thin slices low-sodium ham
Chopped fresh basil, for topping
1. Puree the quartered tomatoes in a blender. Heat 1½ tablespoons olive
oil in a pot over medium heat. Add the garlic and half of the scallions
and cook, stirring, 2 minutes. Increase the heat to medium high; strain
the pureed tomatoes through a mesh sieve into the pot. Stir in the
chopped tomatoes, 1 cup water, the cream, ½ teaspoon salt and
¼ teaspoon pepper. Bring to a simmer and cook until thickened, about
5 minutes. Add the pasta and cook until tender, about 10 minutes;
season with salt and pepper.
2. Toss the remaining scallions with the cheeses; divide half the mixture
between 2 bread slices. Top each with a slice of ham, the remaining
cheese mixture and the other 2 bread slices. Heat the remaining
½ tablespoon olive oil in a nonstick skillet over medium-low heat. Cook
the sandwiches until the cheese melts, 3 minutes per side; cut in half.
Ladle the soup into bowls; top with basil and serve with the sandwiches.
Per serving: Calories 418; Fat 20 g (Saturated 7 g); Cholesterol 36 mg;
Sodium 682 mg; Carbohydrate 44 g; Fiber 8 g; Protein 18 g
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Introducing a whole new kind of pizza with a crispy,
airy crust, flavorful sauce and premium toppings.
YES,THIS CAME
FROM YOUR OVEN.
LOW-
CALORIE
DINNER
112 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
Weeknight
Cooking
GRILLED STEAK AND VEGETABLES
WITH LEMON-HERB BUTTER
ACTIVE: 25 min l TOTAL: 35 min l SERVES: 4
1½ pounds beef sirloin steak (about 1 inch thick)
1 large red onion, sliced into ½-inch-thick rings
2 large zucchini or yellow squash, cut diagonally
into ¾-inch-thick slices
½ cup barbecue sauce
1 tablespoon chili powder
2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature
2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh parsley
½ teaspoon grated lemon zest
1. Preheat a grill to medium high. Combine the steak, red onion
and zucchini in a large bowl. Add the barbecue sauce, chili powder,
Worcestershire sauce, ½ teaspoon salt, and pepper to taste; toss to
coat. Let stand 5 minutes.
2. Meanwhile, mash the butter with the parsley, lemon zest and a
pinch of salt in a small bowl; set aside.
3. Transfer the steak to the grill and cook 4 to 5 minutes per side
for medium rare; remove to a cutting board and let rest. Add the
vegetables to the grill and cook, turning occasionally, until crisp-
tender and charred in spots, about 8 minutes.
4. Cut the steak into 4 pieces. Top each piece with some of the
lemon-herb butter. Serve with the grilled vegetables.
Per serving: Calories 326; Fat 13 g (Saturated 6 g); Cholesterol 84 mg;
Sodium 613 mg; Carbohydrate 12 g; Fiber 2 g; Protein 39 g
SHAVED SQUASH AND TOMATO PASTA
ACTIVE: 20 min l TOTAL: 25 min l SERVES: 4
Kosher salt
12 ounces mezzi rigatoni or other short pasta
1 clove garlic
1 small yellow squash
2 pounds assorted heirloom tomatoes, chopped
¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for drizzling
1 bunch basil, leaves chopped
Freshly ground pepper
¼ cup grated grana padano or parmesan cheese,
plus more for topping
4 ounces fresh mozzarella (regular or smoked),
roughly chopped
1. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add the pasta and garlic
and cook as the pasta label directs; reserve 1 cup of the cooking
water, then drain.
2. Meanwhile, thinly slice the squash on the wide side of a box grater
(or use a mandoline). Combine the squash, tomatoes, olive oil and
basil in a large bowl; add 1 teaspoon salt, and pepper to taste.
3. Mash the cooked garlic with the flat side of a chef’s knife; add
it to the bowl along with the pasta, grana padano and mozzarella.
Toss until combined, adding the reserved pasta water as needed to
moisten. Season with salt and pepper. Divide among bowls; drizzle
with olive oil and top with more grana padano.
Per serving: Calories 698; Fat 33 g (Saturated 10 g); Cholesterol 40 mg;
Sodium 766 mg; Carbohydrate 77 g; Fiber 7 g; Protein 25 g
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PROMOTION
LOW-
CALORIE
DINNER
Weeknight
Cooking
116 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
POACHED CHICKEN
WITH GARLIC-HERB SAUCE
ACTIVE: 20 min l TOTAL: 40 min l SERVES: 4
Kosher salt
1 bulb fennel, trimmed and cut into wedges, plus 1 cup fronds
3 medium carrots, cut into chunks
1 head garlic, cloves separated and peeled
1 bunch scallions (white and light green parts), roughly chopped
1½ pounds skinless, boneless chicken breasts, halved crosswise
½ pound green beans, trimmed and cut into small pieces
⅓ cup extra-virgin olive oil
1½ tablespoons white wine vinegar
1 tablespoon dijon mustard
½ cup fresh parsley
½ cup fresh basil
Freshly ground pepper
1. Fill a large pot halfway with hot water; add ½ teaspoon salt, the fennel
wedges and carrots. Bring to a boil; cook until the vegetables are crisp-
tender, 3 minutes. Remove with a slotted spoon. Reduce the heat to low.
2. Add the garlic, scallions, fennel fronds and chicken to the pot and
gently simmer until the chicken is cooked through, 10 to 15 minutes. Fill
a bowl with salted ice water. Transfer the chicken to the ice water using
tongs; let sit 30 seconds, then remove to a cutting board.
3. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the garlic, scallions and fennel fronds
to a blender; add ⅓ cup of the cooking liquid. Add the green beans to
the pot, remove from the heat and let sit 5 minutes; drain.
4. Add the olive oil, vinegar, mustard, parsley and basil to the blender
and puree; season with pepper. Cut the chicken into pieces and serve
with the vegetables; drizzle with the herb sauce.
Per serving: Calories 443; Fat 22 g (Saturated 3 g); Cholesterol 99 mg;
Sodium 525 mg; Carbohydrate 19 g; Fiber 7 g; Protein 43 g
PORK TACOS WITH BLACK BEANS
ACTIVE: 30 min l TOTAL: 30 min l SERVES: 4
2½ tablespoons vegetable oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 15-ounce can black beans (do not drain)
½ cup shredded mozzarella cheese (about 2 ounces)
1 pound ground pork
1 small red onion, finely chopped
1 teaspoon ground cumin
½ teaspoon cayenne pepper
Kosher salt
1 bell pepper (any color), cut into ½-inch pieces
1 zucchini, quartered and cut into ½-inch pieces
Freshly ground black pepper
12 corn tortillas, warmed
1. Heat ½ tablespoon vegetable oil in a small saucepan over medium
heat. Add half of the garlic and cook, stirring, until golden, about
1 minute. Add the beans and bring to a simmer. Remove from the heat,
sprinkle with the cheese and cover to keep warm.
2. Heat 1 tablespoon vegetable oil in a skillet over medium-high heat.
Add the pork, the remaining garlic, half of the red onion, the cumin,
cayenne and ½ teaspoon salt. Cook, stirring, until the pork is browned,
about 5 minutes; transfer to a bowl with a slotted spoon. Heat the
remaining 1 tablespoon vegetable oil in the skillet. Add the bell pepper,
zucchini and ¼ teaspoon salt and cook until crisp-tender, about
3 minutes. Return the pork to the skillet; add a splash of water, and
salt and pepper to taste.
3. Fill the tortillas with the pork and vegetable mixture. Serve with the
beans. Sprinkle with the remaining chopped onion.
Per serving: Calories 616; Fat 38 g (Saturated 12 g); Cholesterol 89 mg;
Sodium 596 mg; Carbohydrate 39 g; Fiber 6 g; Protein 33 g
#WishGranted
Prototype shown with options. Simulated screen shown.
1
Availability and accuracy of the information provided by the navigation system or any XM services mentioned (if installed) are dependent upon many factors. Use common
sense when relying on information provided. Services not available in every city or roadway. Periodic Entune
®
app updates do not include navigation updates. Navigation updates are available at an additional cost from your
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call 1-866-635-2349 to cancel. Fees and programming subject to change. Available only to those at least 18 years of age in the 48 contiguous United States and D.C. ©2013 Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A., Inc.
The 2013 RAV4 with available turn-by-turn navigation
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and
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Wish Granted.
LOW-
CALORIE
DINNER
118 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
Weeknight
Cooking
VIETNAMESE EGG SANDWICHES
ACTIVE: 20 min l TOTAL: 30 min l SERVES: 4
4 kaiser rolls, split open
1 carrot, thinly sliced
1 Persian cucumber, thinly sliced
1 tablespoon seasoned rice vinegar, plus more for the chips
1 tablespoon fish sauce
3 tablespoons mayonnaise
2 to 3 teaspoons Sriracha (Asian chile sauce), plus more for the chips
8 large eggs
4 ounces country pâté or liverwurst
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
½ cup fresh basil
Potato chips, for serving
1. Preheat the oven to 375˚. Wrap each roll in foil and bake until crisp
on the outside, about 15 minutes.
2. Meanwhile, toss the carrot, cucumber, vinegar and 2 teaspoons fish
sauce in a bowl; set aside, stirring occasionally, 10 minutes. Combine
the mayonnaise, Sriracha and the remaining 1 teaspoon fish sauce in a
small bowl. Beat the eggs in a medium bowl.
3. Unwrap the rolls; spread the bottom buns with the mayonnaise
mixture and top with the pâté.
4. Heat the vegetable oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat.
Add the eggs and cook, stirring, until just set, about 3 minutes; divide
among the rolls. Add the basil and carrot-cucumber salad to the
sandwiches and drizzle with some of the vinegar mixture from the
salad bowl. Serve with potato chips; sprinkle the chips with vinegar
and drizzle with Sriracha.
Per serving: Calories 525; Fat 30 g (Saturated 8 g); Cholesterol 467 mg;
Sodium 1,218 mg; Carbohydrate 39 g; Fiber 3 g; Protein 22 g
SPICY PASTA WITH TILAPIA
ACTIVE: 25 min l TOTAL: 35 min l SERVES: 4
½ pound tilapia fillets, cut into small chunks
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
3 cloves garlic, chopped
½ to ¾ teaspoon red pepper flakes
½ cup dry white wine
1 28-ounce can San Marzano tomatoes, crushed by hand
½ cup chopped fresh basil, plus more for topping
Kosher salt
10 ounces multigrain spaghetti
2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
1. Toss the tilapia, 1 tablespoon olive oil, 1 teaspoon of the garlic and
¼ teaspoon red pepper flakes in a medium bowl. Cover and refrigerate.
2. Heat the remaining 1 tablespoon olive oil in a large skillet over
medium heat. Add the remaining garlic and ¼ to ½ teaspoon red
pepper flakes and cook, stirring, until the garlic starts to soften, about
30 seconds. Add the wine and simmer until reduced by half, about
3 minutes. Add the tomatoes, ¼ cup basil and ½ cup water. Bring
to a boil and cook, stirring occasionally, until the sauce is slightly
thickened, about 12 minutes.
3. Meanwhile, bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add the
pasta and cook as the label directs.
4. When the pasta is almost done, add the tilapia to the skillet with
the tomato sauce and simmer, stirring gently, until just cooked
through, about 3 minutes. Stir in the parsley and the remaining ¼ cup
basil; season with salt. Drain the pasta and add it to the sauce. Divide
among bowls and top with more basil.
Per serving: Calories 435; Fat 9 g (Saturated 1 g); Cholesterol 28 mg;
Sodium 71 mg; Carbohydrate 63 g; Fiber 13 g; Protein 24 g
© 2013 Pinnacle Foods Group LLC.
LOW-
CALORIE
DINNER
120 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
Weeknight
Cooking
VEGETARIAN CHEF’S SALAD
ACTIVE: 35 min l TOTAL: 40 min l SERVES: 4
1 pound white mushrooms, trimmed and halved
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
4 large eggs
½ pound yellow wax beans, trimmed
3 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon red wine vinegar
4 ounces smoked or baked tofu
⅓ cup fat-free plain yogurt
12 cups mixed greens (about 12 ounces)
2 vacuum-packed cooked beets, cut into sticks
3 ounces sharp cheddar cheese, cut into sticks
2 tablespoons salted roasted sunflower seeds
1. Preheat the oven to 450˚. Toss the mushrooms with 2 tablespoons
olive oil, ¼ teaspoon salt, and pepper to taste on a baking sheet. Roast
until tender and golden, about 12 minutes.
2. Meanwhile, put the eggs in a saucepan and cover with cold water;
bring to a boil. Add the wax beans and remove from the heat; cover
and let stand 10 minutes. Drain, then rinse the eggs and beans under
cold water. Peel and quarter the eggs; set aside. Toss the beans with
1 teaspoon vinegar and a pinch each of salt and pepper in a medium
bowl. Cut three-quarters of the tofu into sticks.
3. Make the dressing: Combine one-third of the mushrooms, the
remaining tofu, 3 tablespoons vinegar and 1 tablespoon olive oil,
the yogurt, ¾ teaspoon salt, and pepper to taste in a food processor
and puree. Toss with the greens; season with salt and pepper. Divide
among bowls. Top with the remaining mushrooms and tofu, the eggs,
beans, beets, cheese and sunflower seeds.
Per serving: Calories 416; Fat 28 g (Saturated 8 g); Cholesterol 238 mg;
Sodium 894 mg; Carbohydrate 21 g; Fiber 6 g; Protein 24 g
GRILLED CHEESY MEATLOAVES
ACTIVE: 15 min l TOTAL: 30 min l SERVES: 4
1 bunch scallions (white and light green parts), cut into pieces
1 stalk celery, cut into pieces
¼ cup fresh parsley
1 pound 90% lean ground beef sirloin
1 cup panko breadcrumbs
1 large egg
2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce, plus more for brushing
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
3 ounces sharp cheddar cheese, cut into four 2-inch-long sticks
Cooking spray
3 assorted bell peppers, quartered or cut into large chunks
¼ cup ketchup
1. Preheat a grill to medium high. Pulse the scallions, celery and
parsley in a food processor until finely chopped; transfer to a bowl.
Add the beef, panko, egg, 2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce,
½ teaspoon salt, and pepper to taste. Mix with your hands, then
divide into 4 portions; set a piece of cheese on each. Mold the beef
around the cheese and form into mini oval-shaped loaves.
2. Stack 2 large sheets of heavy-duty foil; coat the top sheet with
cooking spray. Arrange the meatloaves 1½ inches apart in the center of
the foil; coat with cooking spray. Bring the foil edges together to make
a packet and crimp to seal. Set the packet seam-side down on the grill;
add the peppers to the grill, skin-side down. Cover and cook 10 minutes.
Flip the peppers, brush with Worcestershire sauce and sprinkle with
salt; flip the packet. Continue cooking, covered, 5 to 8 more minutes.
3. Remove the peppers and packet from the grill. Brush the meatloaves
with ketchup. Return the open packet to the grill; cook 5 more minutes.
Per serving: Calories 314; Fat 12 g (Saturated 6 g); Cholesterol 104 mg;
Sodium 748 mg; Carbohydrate 25 g; Fiber 3 g; Protein 28 g
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©201ă Healthy Mouths, Healthy Lives
Weeknight
Cooking
124 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
LOW-
CALORIE
DINNER
SALMON WITH CURRIED LENTILS
ACTIVE: 20 min l TOTAL: 40 min l SERVES: 4
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 tablespoon finely chopped peeled ginger
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
1 medium shallot, thinly sliced
¾ teaspoon curry powder
1½ teaspoons hot paprika
1 red bell pepper, chopped
½ cup red lentils, rinsed
Kosher salt
Juice of 1 lemon
4 6-ounce center-cut salmon fillets
5 cups baby arugula (about 3 ounces)
1. Heat 2 tablespoons olive oil in a medium saucepan over medium
heat. Add the ginger, garlic, shallot, curry powder and ½ teaspoon
paprika; cook, stirring often, until the shallot is soft, about 3 minutes.
Add the bell pepper and cook until slightly softened, 2 minutes. Add
the lentils, ½ teaspoon salt and 2½ cups water; increase the heat to
medium high and bring to a simmer. Partially cover and cook, stirring
often and adjusting the heat to maintain a simmer, until the lentils are
tender, about 15 minutes. Uncover and simmer until thick, 5 to 10 more
minutes. Add lemon juice and salt to taste.
2. Preheat the broiler. Put the salmon on a foil-lined baking sheet, skin-
side down. Sprinkle with ½ teaspoon salt and the remaining 1 teaspoon
paprika and broil until just cooked through, 6 to 8 minutes.
3.Toss the arugula with the remaining 1 tablespoon olive oil, and salt
and lemon juice to taste. Serve with the lentils and salmon.
Per serving: Calories 426; Fat 18 g (Saturated 3 g); Cholesterol 97 mg;
Sodium 617 mg; Carbohydrate 21 g; Fiber 5 g; Protein 45 g
SESAME-LEMON CHICKEN
ACTIVE: 30 min l TOTAL: 35 min l SERVES: 4
1 tablespoon toasted sesame seeds
1 tablespoon finely grated lemon zest
2 teaspoons dried thyme
½ teaspoon sugar
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
8 skin-on, bone-in chicken thighs, trimmed (2 to 2½ pounds)
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
2 romaine lettuce hearts, chopped (about 8 cups)
1 cucumber, chopped
1 tomato, chopped
2 cups lightly salted pita chips, crushed
1. Preheat the broiler. Make the rub: Combine the sesame seeds, lemon
zest, thyme, sugar, ½ teaspoon salt and ¼ teaspoon pepper in a spice
grinder; pulse until the seeds are slightly cracked.
2. Season the chicken with salt and all but about 1½ tablespoons of the
rub. Set skin-side down on a broiler pan and broil, flipping the chicken
and rotating the pan halfway through, until the chicken is golden and a
meat thermometer registers 170˚, 8 to 10 minutes per side.
3. Make the dressing: Mix 1 tablespoon of the reserved rub, the lemon
juice, vinegar, and salt to taste in a bowl. Whisk in the olive oil.
4. When the chicken is done, whisk 1 tablespoon of the pan drippings
into the dressing. Add the lettuce, cucumber, tomato and pita chips;
season with salt and pepper and toss. Sprinkle the chicken with the
remaining ½ tablespoon rub and serve with the salad.
Per serving: Calories 356; Fat 17 g (Saturated 3 g); Cholesterol 107 mg;
Sodium 777 mg; Carbohydrate 22 g; Fiber 5 g; Protein 30 g
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LOW-
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DINNER
126 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
Weeknight
Cooking
TURKEY AND QUINOA SALAD
ACTIVE: 35 min l TOTAL: 40 min l SERVES: 4
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1½ cups quinoa, rinsed
Kosher salt
1 pound turkey cutlets
3 tablespoons chopped fresh tarragon and/or parsley
Freshly ground pepper
½ small red onion, halved and sliced
1½ pounds assorted heirloom tomatoes, chopped
1 Cubanelle chile pepper or other Italian frying pepper,
seeded and chopped
4 Persian cucumbers, chopped
2 tablespoons sherry vinegar
1. Heat ½ tablespoon olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high
heat. Add the quinoa and cook, stirring, until lightly toasted, about
4 minutes. Add 4 cups water and ¼ teaspoon salt and bring to a boil.
Reduce the heat to medium and simmer until the water is absorbed
and the quinoa is tender, about 15 minutes.
2. Toss the turkey with half of the herbs, ¼ teaspoon salt, and pepper
to taste; set aside. Soak the onion slices in cold water, 10 minutes.
3. Toss the tomatoes, chile, cucumbers, vinegar, 1½ tablespoons olive
oil, the remaining herbs, ¼ teaspoon salt, and pepper to taste in a
large bowl. Drain the onion, add to the tomato mixture and toss.
4. Heat the remaining 1 tablespoon olive oil in a large nonstick skillet
over medium-high heat. Working in batches, add the turkey and cook
until golden, about 3 minutes per side. Drain on paper towels, then
cut into 2-inch pieces. Fluf the quinoa with a fork and divide among
bowls. Top with the tomato mixture and turkey.
Per serving: Calories 552; Fat 15 g (Saturated 2 g); Cholesterol 45 mg;
Sodium 483 mg; Carbohydrate 64 g; Fiber 9 g; Protein 41 g
PORK CHOPS WITH PINEAPPLE SALSA
ACTIVE: 20 min l TOTAL: 35 min l SERVES: 4
1 cup medium- or long-grain white rice
1 pineapple, peeled, quartered lengthwise and cored
1 tablespoon minced peeled ginger
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
1 tablespoon soy sauce, plus a splash for the salsa
½ teaspoon Chinese five-spice powder
1 bunch scallions
4 bone-in pork sirloin chops (½ inch thick; about 1¾ pounds)
Pinch of red pepper flakes
1. Combine the rice and 1⅔ cups water in a medium saucepan and
bring to a boil. Cover, reduce the heat to low and cook until the rice
is tender and the water is absorbed, about 15 minutes. Remove from
the heat and let stand until ready to serve.
2. Meanwhile, cut of a 2-inch piece of the pineapple and grate
it on the coarse holes of a box grater into a large bowl. Stir in the
ginger, vegetable oil, 1 tablespoon soy sauce and ¼ teaspoon five-
spice powder. Add the scallions and pork chops and turn to coat;
let marinate at room temperature, 10 minutes. Rub the remaining
pineapple with the remaining ¼ teaspoon five-spice powder.
3. Preheat a grill to medium high. Grill the pork chops until just cooked
through, about 3 minutes per side. Grill the scallions and pineapple,
turning occasionally, until charred, about 3 minutes.
4. Roughly chop the pineapple and scallions and transfer to a bowl.
Add the red pepper flakes and a splash of soy sauce and toss. Serve
the pork chops with the pineapple salsa and rice.
Per serving: Calories 484; Fat 16 g (Saturated 5 g); Cholesterol 71 mg;
Sodium 209 mg; Carbohydrate 58 g; Fiber 3 g; Protein 27 g
BA BA BAKE KEDDD WI WI W TH TH T BBBAR AR AA GA GA GAIN INN BBBRA RA RA AAND ND ND
CO CO CO C OK OK OK O IN ING GGG SP SP SP SSSPRA RA RA RA A R YYYYY
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RESI DUE
RESI DON

T
BAKED WITH
Weeknight
Cooking
Easy Sides
Da i l y s Co c k t a i l s . c o m
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BUTTERY BEANS WITH ALMONDS
Boil 1 pound each halved wax beans and green beans in salted water
until crisp-tender, 8 minutes; drain. Cook ¼ cup sliced almonds in
3 tablespoons melted butter until golden, 4 minutes. Remove from
the heat; stir in 1 tablespoon lemon juice. Toss with the beans and
2 tablespoons chopped chives. Season with salt and pepper.
MACARONI AND EGG SALAD
Soak ¼ cup minced red onion in cold water, 10 minutes; drain. Cook
8 ounces elbow macaroni as the label directs; drain and rinse under
cold water. Toss the macaroni, onion, 1 chopped celery stalk,
1 chopped hard-cooked egg, ⅓ cup mayonnaise, a pinch of cayenne
pepper, 1 tablespoon each olive oil and white wine vinegar, and
3 tablespoons chopped parsley. Season with salt and pepper.
AVOCADO-RADISH SALAD
Soak ¼ cup thinly sliced red onion in cold water, 10 minutes;
drain. Combine 2 tablespoons sour cream, the juice of 1 lime
and ½ teaspoon hot sauce in a bowl. Thinly slice 2 avocados and
arrange on a platter. Top with 4 thinly sliced radishes and the onion.
Drizzle with the sour cream dressing and sprinkle with chopped
cilantro and crumbled cotija or feta cheese.
ARUGULA WITH GRILLED PLUMS
Halve and pit 3 plums; toss with ½ tablespoon olive oil and a pinch
each of cinnamon, salt and pepper. Grill over medium-high heat,
turning, until softened and charred in spots, about 5 minutes.
Cut into wedges; toss with 6 cups baby arugula, ¼ cup chopped
chives, another pinch of cinnamon, ½ tablespoon lemon juice and
2 tablespoons olive oil. Season with salt and pepper.
130 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
(
NOW, TO GO.
)
Only Sold
Cold
A CHILLY, VANILLA
Kic to the
Beans
OF COFFEEHOUSES
EVERYWHERE.
© 2013 WhiteWave Foods
Weeknight
Cooking
W k i ht WWeekkniighhtt Weeknight
Cooking
Hot Tips
from Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:
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Poach like a pro.
Make your own flavorful broth for poaching
chicken or fish by adding vegetables and herbs
to simmering water. It’s called a court-bouillon (or
“short broth”), and you can customize it with your
favorite flavors (we used garlic, scallions and
fennel fronds on page 116). Don’t throw out the
liquid when you’re done poaching: Store it in
the fridge and use it like regular chicken broth.
Grill veggies right.
You don’t need a special basket
to grill vegetables. Just slice
them on the bias to expose more
surface area: This prevents skinny
vegetables like zucchini or yellow
squash from falling through the
grates, and it lets more of the
vegetable come in contact with
both your marinade and the grill.
Give fish sauce a try.
Don’t be scared off by a recipe that calls for fish sauce.
It smells pungent, but you won’t detect any fishiness
in your dish—just a rich, salty, almost meaty flavor.
Fish sauce can be used in more than just Asian dishes:
Add a splash to tomato sauce or whisk some into salad
dressing. Just remember that a little goes a long way.
Braise in foil.
Foil packets make great braising vessels for the grill. We formed this oversize foil bowl
to hold the beer-braised potatoes and shrimp on page 110:
2. Fold up and crimp the
edges of the foil to create a
bowl shape.
1. Stack 2 large sheets
of heavy-duty foil. Place
the solid ingredients
in the center.
3. Pour in 1 to 1½ inches
of liquid, then top with
another large sheet
of foil and crimp the
edges to seal.
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grilled pizza party better.
INGREDIENTS
1 12oz pkg Sundried Tomato
Chicken Sausage
1 12” Mama Mary’s
Thin & Crispy Pizza Crust
2 tbsp Roasted Garlic olive oil
2/3 cup pizza sauce
1 cup shredded Italian cheese
blend, reduced fat
1/3 cup crumbled feta cheese
1 1/2 tsp dried oregano
Servings: 4 Ready in 20 minutes
Let’s Make...
MEDITERRANEAN GRILLED PIZZA
Visit alfrescoallnatural.com/promos/mamamarys for more recipes.
70% LESS FAT
than pork sausage
INSTRUCTIONS
Preheat grill on medium. Place sausages on oiled grill rack, set
4” to 5” over heat. Grill 7-9 minutes until heated through. Cool
slightly & cut into 1/4” slices. Brush both sides of pizza crust
with olive oil. Place crust topside down on rack and grill for 2-3
minutes until warm. Turn crust over. Quickly spread pizza sauce
& arrange sliced sausage on top. Sprinkle with cheese & oregano.
Grill with cover shut for 8-10 minutes or until cheese has melted.
Cut into slices & serve.
Weekend
Cooking
Use tangy green
tomatoes in
this simple salad.
See page 139.
JULY/AUGUST 2013 ● FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE 135
Try Food Network Kitchens’
new summer menus. Then, make
an impressive peach dessert.
PHOTOGRAPHS BY CON POULOS
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Weekend
Cooking
Night
● Pappardelle with Lobster and Corn
● Sparkling Sangria
● White Chocolate Mousse
Lobster
You can cook
the lobster and
make the sauce
up to 1 day ahead;
wait to add the
corn until
you reheat.
WHITE CHOCOLATE MOUSSE
ACTIVE: 30 min l TOTAL: 55 min (plus chilling) l SERVES: 6
1 vanilla bean, split lengthwise
3 tablespoons hazelnut liqueur
(or other liqueur)
1 teaspoon unflavored gelatin
powder
1¼ cups heavy cream
8 ounces white chocolate, chopped
⅓ cup plus 1 tablespoon pasteurized
egg whites (from a carton), at
room temperature
⅛ teaspoon cream of tartar
Shaved dark chocolate, for topping
1. Scrape the seeds out of the vanilla bean and combine with the liqueur in a small
saucepan. Sprinkle the gelatin on top and let stand 5 minutes. Add ½ cup heavy cream
and cook over low heat, stirring, until the gelatin dissolves. Add the white chocolate and
continue to cook, stirring, until melted. Transfer to a large bowl; let cool 25 minutes.
2. Beat the egg whites and cream of tartar in a large bowl with a mixer on medium-
high speed until stif peaks form, about 4 minutes. Fold the egg whites into the white
chocolate mixture until almost incorporated. Add the remaining ¾ cup cream to the
mixer bowl and beat on medium-high speed until medium peaks form; fold into the
white chocolate mixture until incorporated. Divide among small bowls. Refrigerate until
set, at least 3 hours or overnight. Top with shaved chocolate.
SPARKLING SANGRIA
Combine 1 cup white grape juice,
½ cup cognac, the juice of 1 lemon,
3 tablespoons superfine sugar and
1 cup water in a pitcher. Add 1 cup
each halved grapes and pitted cherries,
and 1 sliced peach. Chill 3 hours or
overnight. Before serving, add a bottle
of cold sparkling wine. Pour into flutes.
JULY/AUGUST 2013 ● FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE 137
PAPPARDELLE WITH LOBSTER AND CORN
ACTIVE: 1 hr l TOTAL: 2 hr 15 min l SERVES: 6
3 live lobsters (1½ pounds each)
3 ears of corn
3 tablespoons unsalted butter
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
½ cup dry white wine
1 stalk celery, halved crosswise,
plus 3 tablespoons chopped
celery leaves
2 shallots (1 whole, 1 diced)
2 sprigs parsley, plus ⅓ cup
chopped leaves
2 tablespoons tomato paste
¼ teaspoon sweet paprika
½ cup heavy cream
Kosher salt
1 pound pappardelle pasta
⅓ cup chopped fresh chervil
and/or chives
1. Fill a large pot with 2 inches of water; bring to a boil. Add the lobsters, cover
and cook over medium heat until the shells turn bright red, 8 to 10 minutes.
Remove with tongs and rinse under cold water to cool slightly. Meanwhile, cut
the kernels of the corn; reserve the cobs.
2. Remove the meat from the lobster shells: Twist of the claws, then break of the
tail; set the bodies aside. Pull the flippers of the tail, then insert your thumb into
the flipper end and force out the meat. Crack the claws with a lobster cracker,
mallet or the flat side of a knife and remove the meat. Chop the lobster meat into
1-inch pieces and transfer to a bowl; cover and refrigerate until ready to use.
3. Rinse the lobster bodies to remove any green matter (tomalley) and roe. Heat
2 tablespoons butter and the olive oil in a large saucepan over medium-high heat.
Add the lobster bodies and cook, turning occasionally, until the butter starts to
brown, about 3 minutes. Add the wine, bring to a boil and cook until reduced
by half, about 2 minutes. Add the corn cobs, celery stalk, whole shallot, parsley
sprigs and 6 cups water; bring to a boil, then lower the heat and simmer until the
liquid is reduced by about one-third, about 30 minutes. Strain the stock into a
bowl or large measuring cup.
4. Heat the remaining 1 tablespoon butter in a saucepan over medium heat. Add the
diced shallot and cook until softened, about 2 minutes. Add the tomato paste and
paprika; cook, stirring, until slightly darkened, about 1 minute. Stir in the prepared
stock and cream and simmer until reduced by one-third, about 20 minutes (you
should have 2¾ cups sauce). Add the corn kernels; simmer 5 more minutes.
5. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add the pappardelle and cook as
the label directs. Drain, then return to the pot. Add the sauce and the reserved
lobster meat and cook over medium heat, stirring, until the lobster meat is heated
through, about 1 minute. Stir in the chopped celery leaves and parsley and most
of the chervil. Divide among plates and top with the remaining chervil.
Weekend
Cooking
Brunch
To give
this strata a
Southwestern
twist, we used fried
tortillas instead
of the usual
bread.
● Cheesy Chile Strata
● Spicy Green Tomato–Avocado Salad
● Mango-Guava Batidos
Southwestern
JULY/AUGUST 2013 ● FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE 139
CHEESY CHILE STRATA
ACTIVE: 40 min l TOTAL: 2 hr 30 min (plus refrigerating) l SERVES: 6 to 8
SPICY GREEN TOMATO–
AVOCADO SALAD
ACTIVE: 10 min l TOTAL: 35 min l SERVES: 8
1½ pounds green (unripe) tomatoes, cut into wedges
Kosher salt
Juice of 1 lime
1 teaspoon dijon mustard
1 tablespoon honey
1 small jalapeño pepper, seeded and minced
1 tablespoon fresh thyme, minced
Freshly ground pepper
¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
2 avocados
2 cups mâche or Bibb lettuce leaves
1. Put the tomatoes in a bowl and sprinkle with 1 teaspoon
salt; let sit 30 minutes.
2. Meanwhile, whisk the lime juice, mustard, honey,
jalapeño, thyme, ½ teaspoon salt, and pepper to taste
in a large bowl. Gradually pour in the olive oil, whisking
constantly until emulsified.
3. When ready to serve, halve the avocados, remove
the pits, peel and thinly slice. Add to the bowl with the
dressing, then add the lettuce and tomatoes. Gently toss
to coat. Season with salt and pepper.
MANGO-GUAVA
BATIDOS
Combine 3 cups
guava nectar,
1 cup milk,
1½ teaspoons
vanilla and
3 tablespoons
sugar in a large
bowl; add 3 cups
frozen mango
chunks. Working in
batches, puree
in a blender until
smooth and frothy.
Divide among
small glasses.
4 poblano chile peppers, halved
lengthwise and seeded
1 bunch medium spring onions,
stems cut into 2-inch pieces,
bulbs quartered
¼ cup masa harina (instant corn
flour) or all-purpose flour
Vegetable oil, for frying (3 to 4 cups)
10 corn tortillas, cut into 2-inch
pieces
8 ounces Oaxaca or muenster
cheese, grated (about 2 cups)
8 ounces pepper jack cheese,
grated (about 2 cups)
8 large eggs
3 cups whole milk
Kosher salt and freshly ground
pepper
½ teaspoon chili powder
Sour cream, chopped jalapeños
and/or chopped cilantro, for
topping (optional)
1. Preheat the broiler. Arrange the poblanos skin-side up on a baking sheet.
Add the spring onions and broil until the poblano skins are charred and the
onions are blackened around the edges, 7 to 8 minutes. Transfer the poblanos
to a large bowl, cover with plastic wrap or a plate and let cool 10 minutes. Rub
of the skins with your fingers, then pat dry. Roughly chop the poblanos and
onion bulbs, then toss with the masa harina in a medium bowl; set aside while
you fry the tortillas.
2. Line a baking sheet with paper towels. Heat about 1 inch of vegetable oil
in a high-sided skillet or Dutch oven over medium-high heat until a deep-fry
thermometer registers 350˚. Working in batches, fry the tortillas, stirring, until
stif but not browned, about 5 minutes. Transfer to the paper towels to drain.
3. Spread half of the fried tortillas in a 3-quart baking dish. Top with half of
the poblano-onion mixture and half of each cheese. Layer the remaining
tortillas, poblano-onion mixture and cheeses on top.
4. Whisk the eggs and milk in a large bowl; whisk in 1½ teaspoons salt, pepper
to taste and the chili powder. Pour the egg mixture into the baking dish. Cover
and refrigerate 8 hours or overnight.
5. Remove the dish from the refrigerator about 30 minutes before baking and
uncover. Preheat the oven to 350˚. Bake until the strata is lightly pufed and
golden on top and just set in the center, 50 minutes to 1 hour. Let cool 10 minutes
before serving. Top with sour cream, jalapeños and/or cilantro.
Weekend
Cooking
● Beer Bratwursts
● Sweet-and-Sour Onions
● Bell Pepper Relish
● Smoky Beer Cheese
● Strawberry-Pretzel Trifles
Bar
Sausage
You
can simmer
the bratwursts a
day ahead: Cover
and refrigerate in
the cooking liquid,
then grill before
serving.
JULY/AUGUST 2013 ● FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE 141
BEER BRATWURSTS
ACTIVE: 30 min l TOTAL: 1 hr (plus cooling) l SERVES: 6 to 8
STRAWBERRY-PRETZEL TRIFLES
ACTIVE: 45 min l TOTAL: 1 hr 10 min (plus cooling and chilling)
MAKES: 6 to 8
2 12-ounce bottles lager beer
1 large onion, cut into wedges
4 cloves garlic, smashed
1 2-inch piece ginger, thinly sliced
1 teaspoon caraway seeds
2 bay leaves
2 whole cloves
6 to 8 links fresh bratwurst (about 2½ pounds)
4 tablespoons unsalted butter
6 to 8 sub rolls or Italian-bread segments
Whole-grain mustard, for serving
Assorted toppings, for serving (below)
1. Combine 6 cups water, the beer, onion, garlic, ginger, caraway
seeds, bay leaves and cloves in a large pot over medium-high heat;
bring to a gentle simmer and cook 10 minutes. Add the bratwursts,
return to a simmer and cook until almost done (the meat should
still be slightly pink in the center), about 15 minutes. Remove from
the heat and let the bratwursts cool completely in the cooking
liquid, about 1 hour.
2. Preheat a grill to medium high. Transfer 2 cups of the cooking
liquid to a small saucepan over medium heat. Add the butter and
bring to a boil; cook until the butter melts, about 1 minute.
3. Grill the bratwursts, occasionally turning and basting with the
butter mixture, until marked and cooked through, 10 to 12 minutes.
Serve on rolls with mustard and other toppings.
BELL PEPPER RELISH
Pulse 1 each chopped yellow bell pepper
and orange bell pepper, 4 each chopped
radishes and scallions, 1 chopped celery stalk
and 1 garlic clove in a food processor until finely chopped.
Whisk 2 tablespoons each cider vinegar and chopped
parsley, 1 tablespoon olive oil, 2 teaspoons brown sugar,
½ teaspoon each celery salt and kosher salt, and pepper to
taste in a large bowl. Add the vegetable mixture; toss to coat.
FOR THE STRAWBERRIES
2 pints strawberries, halved
(about 6 cups)
¾ cup granulated sugar
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
FOR THE CRUMBLE
1 stick unsalted butter,
melted, plus more for
the pan
3½ cups small pretzel twists
1 large egg white
SWEET-AND-SOUR ONIONS
Cook 2 chopped red onions in a skillet with 2 tablespoons
olive oil over medium-high heat, stirring, until golden, about
8 minutes. Add ½ teaspoon caraway seeds; cook, stirring,
30 seconds. Add ¼ cup red wine vinegar, 1 tablespoon
brown sugar and ½ teaspoon kosher salt; cook, stirring until
the onions are glazed, 1 minute. Let cool completely.
SMOKY BEER CHEESE
Combine ¼ pound each shredded sharp cheddar and
smoked gouda, 1 minced garlic clove, ½ cup lager beer,
2 teaspoons hot sauce, ½ teaspoon kosher salt, and
pepper to taste in a food processor; pulse until smooth.
⅓ cup granulated sugar
1 tablespoon all-purpose
flour
Kosher salt
FOR THE CREAM
2 8-ounce packages cream
cheese, at room
temperature
1 cup confectioners’ sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1¼ cups cold heavy cream
1. Prepare the strawberries: Combine 4 cups strawberries and the
granulated sugar in a large saucepan over medium heat. Cook until
bubbling, then increase the heat to medium high and cook, stirring
occasionally, until the berries are soft and the liquid is thick enough
to coat the back of a spoon, about 15 minutes. Remove from the
heat and stir in the remaining 2 cups strawberries and the lemon
juice. Let cool, then transfer to a bowl, cover and refrigerate at least
1 hour or overnight.
2. Meanwhile, make the crumble: Preheat the oven to 350˚.
Generously butter a 9-inch-round cake pan. Combine 3 cups pretzels,
the melted butter, egg white, granulated sugar, flour and ¼ teaspoon
salt in a food processor; pulse until a wet dough forms. Press the
dough evenly into the prepared pan. Break the remaining ½ cup
pretzels into pieces and press into the dough. Bake until golden,
25 to 30 minutes. Transfer to a rack and let cool completely in the
pan, then break into bite-size pieces.
3. Make the cream: Just before serving, beat the cream cheese,
confectioners’ sugar and vanilla in a large bowl with a mixer on
medium-high speed until smooth, about 2 minutes. Beat the heavy
cream in another bowl with a mixer on medium-high speed until soft
peaks form, about 3 minutes. Gently fold half of the whipped cream
into the cream cheese mixture, then fold in the rest.
4. Layer the cream, crumble and strawberry mixtures in individual
glasses or bowls. Cover and chill, at least 1 hour and up to 6 hours.
These
toppings also
taste great on
burgers or
hot dogs.
Weekend
Cooking
To make this
menu vegetarian,
leave out the
prosciutto in
the zucchini
parmesan.
● Squash Blossom Frittata Squares
● Zucchini Parmesan
● Chocolate-Zucchini Cake
Zucchini
Menu
JULY/AUGUST 2013 ● FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE 143
ZUCCHINI PARMESAN
ACTIVE: 1 hr 30 min l TOTAL: 1 hr 45 min l SERVES: 6
SQUASH BLOSSOM
FRITTATA SQUARES
Soak ½ cup bread cubes
in ½ cup milk, 5 minutes.
Whisk with 4 eggs, and
salt and pepper. Add ¼ cup
each chopped parsley
and grated parmesan,
6 chopped stemmed
squash blossoms, 1 grated
garlic clove and 1 shredded yellow squash. Heat
1 tablespoon olive oil in a small ovenproof skillet; add
the egg mixture and cook 5 minutes, then bake at
375˚ until set, 20 minutes. Cut into pieces.
CHOCOLATE-ZUCCHINI CAKE
ACTIVE: 30 min l TOTAL: 1 hr (plus cooling) l SERVES: 6 to 8
Unsalted butter, for the pan
1½ cups all-purpose flour, plus more for the pan
½ cup plus ⅓ cup semisweet chocolate chips
¼ cup unsweetened cocoa powder
(not Dutch process)
½ teaspoon kosher salt
½ teaspoon baking soda
¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg or allspice
1¼ cups sugar
½ cup plus 1 teaspoon extra-virgin olive oil
2 large eggs
½ teaspoon vanilla extract
1 medium zucchini, grated and squeezed dry
1 teaspoon honey
1. Preheat the oven to 350˚. Butter the bottom and sides
of a 9-inch-square cake pan. Dust the pan with flour,
tapping out the excess.
2. Toss ½ cup chocolate chips with 1 tablespoon flour in a
small bowl. Whisk the remaining flour, the cocoa powder,
salt, baking soda and nutmeg in a medium bowl; set aside.
3. Beat the sugar, ½ cup olive oil, the eggs and vanilla in a
large bowl with a mixer on medium speed until smooth and
pale, about 3 minutes. Add the flour-cocoa mixture; beat on
low speed until combined, about 2 minutes (the batter will
be thick). Add the zucchini and beat until combined, about
2 more minutes. Fold in the flour-coated chocolate chips
with a wooden spoon.
4. Transfer the batter to the prepared pan and bake until
a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean,
30 to 35 minutes. Transfer to a rack and let cool completely.
5. Make the glaze: Combine the remaining ⅓ cup chocolate
chips, 1 teaspoon olive oil and the honey in a microwave-
safe bowl. Microwave on medium-high power in 30-second
intervals, stirring, until the chocolate is melted. Spread over
the cake, then cut into pieces.
FOR THE SAUCE
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
½ teaspoon fennel seeds, chopped
¼ to ½ teaspoon red pepper flakes
3 pounds plum tomatoes, cored
and roughly chopped
Kosher salt
½ cup chopped fresh basil
FOR THE ZUCCHINI
2 medium-to-large zucchini
¾ cup all-purpose flour
2 large eggs
⅓ cup milk
2 cups panko breadcrumbs
½ cup grated parmesan cheese,
plus more for sprinkling
¼ cup chopped fresh parsley
1 clove garlic, grated
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
1 cup olive oil, for frying
6 ounces fresh mozzarella, sliced
into 12 pieces
2 ounces thinly sliced prosciutto,
torn into 12 pieces, plus more for
topping (optional)
⅔ cup ricotta cheese
1. Make the sauce: Heat the olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat.
Add the garlic, fennel seeds and red pepper flakes and cook, stirring, until the
garlic is lightly golden, about 1 minute. Add the tomatoes and 1 teaspoon salt;
cook, stirring occasionally, until the tomatoes begin to sizzle, about 5 minutes.
Add half of the basil and ½ cup water and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to
medium low and simmer, stirring occasionally and smashing the tomatoes with
the back of a spoon, 25 minutes. Stir in the remaining basil and season with salt.
2. Prepare the zucchini: Preheat the oven to 400˚. Trim the zucchini and halve
crosswise, then slice lengthwise into 18 strips, about ¼ inch thick. Put the flour in
a shallow dish. Whisk the eggs and milk in another dish. In a third dish, combine
the panko, parmesan, parsley, garlic, ½ teaspoon salt, and pepper to taste.
Working in batches, dredge the zucchini in the flour and shake of the excess.
Dip in the egg mixture, turning to coat; let the excess drip of, then dredge in the
panko mixture, pressing to help it stick. Set aside.
3. Heat the olive oil in a large, deep skillet over medium-high heat. Working
in batches, add the zucchini in a single layer and fry until golden brown,
2 to 3 minutes per side. Drain on paper towels; season with salt.
4. Lay 6 pieces fried zucchini a few inches apart in a 9-by-13-inch baking dish.
Top each with a few tablespoons of the tomato sauce, a slice of mozzarella and a
piece of prosciutto. Repeat the layering (zucchini, sauce, mozzarella, prosciutto),
then top with the remaining zucchini. Top with a little more sauce, sprinkle
with parmesan and dollop with the ricotta. Bake until heated through, about
15 minutes. Top the stacks with more prosciutto. Serve with the remaining sauce.
P
i
t
a

W
o
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Nothing adds a dash of “pow” to your
dips like NEW Town House
®
Pita Crackers.
Perfect for your casual get-togethers.
Sunny Anderson,
host of Food Network’s
Home Made in America,
combines a love of classic comfort
foods with a passion for unique
fl avors. She also understands the
need for uncomplicated dishes with
easy-to-fi nd ingredients,
whether feeding a family or
entertaining friends.
Need an easy summer dish that everyone will
love? Whip up this delectably creamy dip recipe
from Town House
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. Combine pesto, easy-to-find
cheeses and a sprinkle of toasted pine nuts to
pair with new Town House
®
Pita Crackers. The
preparation is so easy, you’ll have more time to
enjoy the great weather and good company!
Creamy Pesto Dip
Prep Time: 10 minutes • Total Time: 10 minutes
1 tablespoon pine nuts
1 package (8 oz.) cream cheese, softened
½ cup prepared pesto
2 teaspoons lemon juice
½ teaspoon grated lemon peel
½ teaspoon pepper
½ cup grated pecorino romano cheese
¹
/
³
cup milk
¼ teaspoon kosher salt (optional)
Keebler
®
Town House
®
Pita Crackers Sea Salt
1. In small skillet heat pine nuts over
medium heat for 2–5 minutes or until
golden brown, shaking pan frequently.
Remove from heat. Set aside.
2. In medium bowl stir together cream
cheese, pesto, lemon juice, lemon peel and
pepper. Stir in cheese and milk. Stir in salt
(if desired). Transfer to serving bowl. Sprinkle
with pine nuts. Serve with KEEBLER TOWN
HOUSE Pita Crackers Sea Salt.
Yield: 2 cups; 16 servings
(1 serving = 2 tablespoons dip)
Simple. Summer. Sunny.
ADVERTISEMENT
s
w
e
e
t
COCONUT-WATERMELON SALAD ACTIVE: 20 min l TOTAL: 20 min l SERVES: 6
⅓ cup sweetened coconut flakes
3 tablespoons sweetened condensed milk
2 tablespoons heavy cream
Juice of ½ lime
Kosher salt
5 cups chopped seedless watermelon
Pinch of ground cinnamon
1. Preheat the oven to 400˚. Spread the coconut on a baking sheet
and bake, stirring occasionally, until golden brown, 5 to 8 minutes.
Transfer to a bowl and let cool.
2. Combine the condensed milk, heavy cream, lime juice and a
pinch of salt in a small bowl. Put the watermelon in a large bowl
and drizzle with the condensed milk mixture. Sprinkle with the
toasted coconut and the cinnamon.
146 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
We made two watermelon salads: one sweet, one savory. Take your pick.
BY
Side
Side
PHOTOGRAPHS BY KANA OKADA
ASIAN
WATERMELON
SALAD
ACTIVE: 20 min l TOTAL: 30 min
SERVES: 6
⅓ cup peanut or vegetable oil
2 small shallots (1 thinly sliced,
1 finely chopped)
Kosher salt
Juice of 3 limes
1 tablespoon fish sauce
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 clove garlic, minced
1 2-inch piece ginger, peeled
and minced
1 red jalapeño pepper, thinly
sliced
4 cups chopped seedless
watermelon
⅓ cup chopped fresh cilantro
⅓ cup chopped fresh basil
⅓ cup chopped fresh mint
3 tablespoons cocktail peanuts,
roughly chopped
1. Heat the peanut oil in a small
saucepan over medium-high heat
until a deep-fry thermometer
registers 350˚. Add the sliced shallot
and cook, stirring often, until golden
brown, about 3 minutes. Remove
with a slotted spoon and drain on
paper towels; season with salt.
2. Whisk 2 tablespoons of the
frying oil, the chopped shallot, lime
juice, fish sauce, soy sauce, garlic,
ginger and jalapeño in a large bowl.
Add the watermelon and toss to
combine. Let sit 10 minutes.
3. Add the cilantro, basil, mint
and 2 tablespoons peanuts to
the salad and season with salt;
toss to combine. Top with the
remaining 1 tablespoon peanuts
and the fried shallot.
s
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JULY/AUGUST 2013 ● FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE 147
Weekend
Cooking
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Turkey Teriyaki Burgers
with Asian Slaw
cups shredded green cabbage
cup grated, peeled jicama
cup grated carrot
tablespoons chopped cilantro
tablespoon sesame oil
tablespoon rice vinegar
cup low-fat mayonnaise
cup teriyaki baste and glaze
package Honeysuckle White
®
Fresh Turkey Patties
sesame hamburger buns, toasted or grilled
Red cabbage strips for garnish (optional)
Serves: 4 ❘ Prep Time: 15 minutes ❘ Total Time: 25 minutes
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1. To make Asian slaw: In large bowl, toss together cabbage, jicama, carrot,
cilantro, oil and vinegar. 2. Mix mayonnaise with 1 tablespoon of the teriyaki.
3. Brush turkey patties with half of the remaining teriyaki. 4. Preheat lightly
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Peach
PRETTY
Turn juicy summer peaches into five amazing desserts.
AS A
JULY/AUGUST 2013 ● FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE 151
Weekend
Cooking
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PHOTOGRAPHS BY YUNHEE KIM
152 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
1½ cups granulated sugar
Juice of 1 lemon
4 peaches, peeled and cut into ¾-inch pieces
1 sleeve graham crackers (9 whole crackers)
½ cup chopped pecans
4 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
4 pints vanilla ice cream
Cooking spray
2 10-to-12-ounce pound cakes
1½ cups cold heavy cream
3 tablespoons confectioners’ sugar
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
PEACH COBBLER ICE CREAM CAKE ACTIVE: 40 min l TOTAL: 1 hr 40 min (plus freezing) l SERVES: 12
1. Stir 1¼ cups granulated sugar, the lemon juice and peaches in a large
pot; let sit 15 minutes. Bring to a simmer over medium-high heat, then
reduce the heat to low and cook until the peaches are tender, about
15 minutes. Remove ¾ cup peaches with a slotted spoon and refrigerate
for topping. Puree the remaining peaches and cooking liquid in a
blender; transfer to a bowl and freeze until very thick, about 1 hour.
2. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 350˚ and line a baking sheet with
foil. Coarsely crush the graham crackers and toss with the remaining
¼ cup granulated sugar, the pecans and butter on the prepared baking
sheet; spread into a thin layer. Bake 7 minutes, then stir and continue
baking until golden brown, 6 to 10 more minutes. Let cool and harden,
then crumble and set aside.
3. Assemble the cake: Let 2 pints ice cream soften at room temperature
until spreadable, about 10 minutes. Coat a 9-inch springform pan with
cooking spray and line the bottom and sides with plastic wrap, leaving
a 2-inch overhang. Spread the softened ice cream in the prepared pan,
then top evenly with the peach puree. Freeze until the puree is firm,
about 45 minutes.
4. Let the remaining 2 pints ice cream soften, 10 minutes, then spread
over the peach puree. Sprinkle with 1 cup of the pecan mixture and
press it into the ice cream. Cut the pound cakes lengthwise into
1½-inch-thick slices; arrange the slices in a single layer on top of the
ice cream, trimming as needed. Cover with plastic wrap and freeze until
firm, at least 6 hours or overnight.
5. Beat the heavy cream, confectioners’ sugar and vanilla in a bowl
with a mixer on medium speed until soft peaks form. Uncover the cake,
then invert onto a plate; remove the springform ring and the remaining
plastic wrap. Cover the top and sides with the whipped cream. Top with
the reserved peaches and remaining pecan mixture. Freeze until firm,
about 1 hour.
MON/MON 2011 ● FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE 153 MMMMON MMON MO MON/ MON/ MMO MOON/ N//////// MM // MMON/ MM /// MMO /// N// MM / M NN M NN/ NNN//MON MON MON ON ON NN MOON MON MM NN 201 20 01 01 0111 220 01 22200001 00 111111111 ●●●●●●●● FOO FOOD FOOD FOOD FOO OO FOO OOD FOO FOO FOO FOO OOD OOODDDDD OOO OO OO OOOODDDDDD FOOD OO FOOOOOO OODDDDD O DDDD FOOODDD OO OO OOO OOD FOOOOO FOOOOOOOOOOOO OOO DDDDDDDDDDDD NE NE NNNNNNNE NE NE NE NETTTTTTTT EEE NETT NEEEETT NNEEEETTTTTT NET ETT ETT NETTTTT NNETTTT ETT N TTTTWWORK WORK WOR WOR WORK WORK ORK ORK WWWORK WORK WWO WOOOO KK WWWW MAG MA MAG MAG MAG MMA MAG MAG AG MA MMMAG MAG AGG MAGAZ AAZI AZIN I ZINNN IN IN IN AZI AZ AZINNN AZ NN AZINN Z NEEEEEEEEEEEEE 1111111155553 53 53 5333 53 3
FOR THE CRUST
3 cups all-purpose flour, plus more
for dusting
2 tablespoons sugar
¾ teaspoon salt
2 sticks cold unsalted butter, cut
into small pieces
FOR THE FILLING
4 pounds peaches, peeled and cut
into wedges
¾ cup plus 1 tablespoon sugar
¼ cup all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
¼ teaspoon ground cardamom
¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon
⅛ teaspoon ground allspice
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut
into small pieces
COUNTRY PEACH PIE ACTIVE: 45 min l TOTAL: 3 hr 35 min (plus cooling) l SERVES: 8
1. Make the crust: Pulse the flour, sugar and salt in a food processor. Add the butter and pulse
until the mixture looks like coarse meal with pea-size bits of butter. Add ½ cup ice water and
pulse until the dough just starts to come together. Divide the dough between 2 pieces of plastic
wrap and form each into a disk; wrap tightly and refrigerate until firm, at least 1 hour.
2. Make the filling: Toss the peaches in a bowl with ¾ cup sugar, the flour, lemon juice and spices.
3. Lightly dust a large piece of parchment paper with flour. Roll out 1 piece of the dough into a
12-inch round on the parchment. Ease the dough into a 9-inch pie plate. Add the filling, mounding
it slightly in the center; dot with the butter and refrigerate. Roll out the second piece of dough into
a 12-inch round and cut it into ½-inch-wide strips. Lay half of the strips on the pie in one direction,
leaving about 1 inch of space between each strip. Lay the remaining strips on top, crossing them
diagonally to make a lattice pattern (no need to weave); trim the edges of the strips, leaving a small
overhang. Fold the overhanging dough under itself and crimp the edge of the crust with your fingers.
4. Beat the egg with 1 tablespoon water and brush on the crust edge and lattice top. Sprinkle with
the remaining 1 tablespoon sugar and refrigerate until firm, about 30 minutes.
5. Position a rack in the lower third of the oven. Put a baking sheet on the rack and preheat to 425˚.
Put the pie on the hot baking sheet and bake 20 minutes. Reduce the oven temperature to 375˚ and
continue baking until the pie is golden and the filling is bubbly, 50 minutes to 1 hour. (Cover loosely
with foil if the top is browning too quickly.) Transfer to a rack to cool completely before slicing.
Weekend
Cooking
154 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
HOT PEACHES AND CREAM
ACTIVE: 15 min l TOTAL: 15 min l SERVES: 4
4 peaches
⅓ cup elderflower liqueur
(such as St. Germain) or
sweet dessert wine
1 tablespoon unsalted butter
2 tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons
demerara sugar
¼ cup mascarpone cheese or
sour cream
1. Preheat the broiler. Halve and pit the peaches, then lightly score the
cut sides of each peach a few times with a knife.
2. Combine the liqueur and butter in a medium ovenproof skillet over
medium heat; cook, stirring, until the butter melts and the liquid just
begins to simmer. Add the peaches, cut-side up, and cook until the
bottoms begin to soften, about 4 minutes. Sprinkle each peach half with
1 teaspoon sugar and transfer the skillet to the broiler. Broil until the
peaches brown in spots, about 3 minutes. Let cool slightly.
3. Divide the peaches among plates and drizzle with the syrup from the
skillet. Serve with the mascarpone.
Weekend
Cooking
©2012 Nestlé Waters North America Inc.
Every drop of Poland Spring
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100% Natural Spring Water
comes from carefully selected natural springs. When
you start with something better, you get something better.
PolandSpringBornBetter.com
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156 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● MON/MON 2011 15 15 15 15 115 1 6666 6 666 FOOD FOOD FOOD O FOOD FOOD O FO FOO OD NET NNNET ET ET ETWORK WORK WOORK WO MAG MAG MAGAZIN AAZIN AZIN I ZI ZI ZINN Z EE ●●●●●● MON/ MON/ O MON/MON MON ON 201 201111 156 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
FOR THE CRUST
½ cup sliced almonds
¾ cup all-purpose flour
2 tablespoons granulated sugar
¼ teaspoon salt
6 tablespoons cold unsalted butter,
cut into small pieces
FOR THE GLAZE
1 peach, diced
½ cup granulated sugar
2 wide strips lemon zest
1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice
FOR THE FILLING AND TOPPING
½ cup ricotta cheese
1 8-ounce package cream cheese,
at room temperature
¼ cup confectioners’ sugar
Pinch of freshly grated nutmeg
2 firm peaches, thinly sliced
½ cup raspberries
PEACH MELBA TART ACTIVE: 40 min l TOTAL: 1 hr 40 min (plus cooling) l SERVES: 6 to 8
1. Make the crust: Preheat the oven to 375˚. Spread the almonds on a baking sheet and bake until
slightly golden, about 5 minutes. Transfer to a bowl and let cool completely.
2. Combine the flour, ⅓ cup of the toasted almonds, the granulated sugar and salt in a food
processor and pulse until finely ground. Add the butter and pulse until the mixture looks like coarse
meal. Add 2 tablespoons ice water and pulse until the dough just comes together. Turn out the
dough onto a piece of plastic wrap and form into a disk; wrap tightly and refrigerate until slightly
firm, about 15 minutes. Unwrap the dough and press evenly into the bottom and up the sides of a
9-inch tart pan with a removable bottom. Freeze until firm, about 10 minutes.
3. Place the tart pan on a baking sheet. Line the crust with foil and fill with pie weights or dried
beans. Bake until the edge of the crust is slightly golden, about 20 minutes. Remove the foil
and weights and continue baking until the crust is golden brown all over, 15 to 20 more minutes.
Transfer to a rack to cool completely.
4. Make the glaze: Combine the diced peach, granulated sugar, lemon zest and juice, and
1 cup water in a small saucepan. Bring to a simmer over medium heat and cook until the peach is
soft and the glaze is thickened, about 10 minutes. Remove the lemon zest; let the glaze cool.
5. Make the filling: Mix the ricotta, cream cheese, confectioners’ sugar and nutmeg in a bowl with
a mixer until smooth; spread evenly in the crust. Arrange the sliced peaches on top of the filling in
concentric circles. Brush with all but about 1 tablespoon of the glaze. Gently toss the raspberries
with the remaining glaze, then scatter on top of the tart along with the remaining toasted almonds.
Serve immediately or cover and refrigerate up to 4 hours.
Weekend
Cooking
158 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
FOR THE PASTRY CREAM
2 cups whole milk
⅔ cup granulated sugar
Pinch of salt
5 large egg yolks
⅓ cup cornstarch
½ vanilla bean, split lengthwise, seeds
scraped out and reserved
FOR THE PEACHES
4 peaches, cut into thin wedges
¼ cup granulated sugar
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
½ vanilla bean, split lengthwise, seeds
scraped out and reserved
FOR THE PUFF PASTRY
Cooking spray
2 sheets frozen puff pastry (one 17-ounce
package), thawed
All-purpose flour, for dusting
Confectioners’ sugar, for dusting
1. Make the pastry cream: Whisk ½ cup milk, ⅓ cup granulated sugar, the salt, egg yolks
and cornstarch in a medium bowl. Combine the remaining 1½ cups milk and ⅓ cup
granulated sugar with the vanilla seeds and pod in a medium saucepan; bring to a low
simmer over medium heat. Slowly pour the hot milk mixture into the bowl with the yolk
mixture, whisking constantly. Return to the pan and bring to a simmer, whisking; cook,
whisking, until thickened, 1 more minute. Transfer to a bowl and remove the vanilla pod. Lay
plastic wrap directly on the surface and refrigerate until cold, about 1 hour, 30 minutes.
2. Meanwhile, roast the peaches: Preheat the oven to 400˚. Combine the peaches,
granulated sugar, lemon juice, and vanilla seeds and pod in a medium bowl; toss gently to
coat. Transfer to a rimmed baking sheet and spread in a single layer. Roast, tossing once,
until tender and glossy, about 30 minutes. Let cool.
3. Cook the puf pastry: Coat a baking sheet with cooking spray. Unroll the puf pastry
sheets on a generously floured surface and arrange them so they overlap by about
2 inches to make 1 large piece of pastry. Lightly flour a rolling pin and roll out the dough
into a 17-by-12-inch rectangle. Carefully transfer the dough to the prepared baking sheet
and prick all over with a fork. Bake, pricking it again halfway through, until golden and
crisp, 25 to 35 minutes. Let cool completely on the baking sheet, then transfer to a cutting
board and cut crosswise into 3 equal pieces.
4. Assemble the napoleon: Lay 1 piece of puf pastry on a platter. Spread with half of the
pastry cream, then top with half of the roasted peaches. Repeat with another piece of
puf pastry and the remaining pastry cream and peaches, reserving a few peach slices for
topping. Top with the remaining piece of puf pastry and dust with confectioners’ sugar.
Top with the reserved peaches. Slice with a serrated knife.
Weekend
Cooking
ROASTED PEACH NAPOLEON ACTIVE: 50 min l TOTAL: 2 hr l SERVES: 6 to 8
PROMOTION
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Party Time
PHOTOGRAPH BY KANG KIM
Make ice pops in bags. Then,
plan your July 4 menu and
get 50 ideas for fresh corn.
Totally
Tubular
Americans have been
squeezing ice pops
out of plastic tubes
since Fla-Vor-Ice was
invented more than
40 years ago. But we
had to wait a while to
make them ourselves:
For years the sleeves
have been tricky
to find outside the
Philippines, where
homemade push-up
pops are super popular.
Now you can get the
bags stateside, thanks
to an ice-pop fan
who recently started
importing them. Fill
with any fruit juice,
tie the top and freeze.
$10 for 100;
icecandybags.com F
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JULY/AUGUST 2013 ● FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE 163
164 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
Catch
The Pioneer
Woman,
Saturdays at
10 a.m. ET.
MONTH 2012 ● FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE 165 MONT MONT MONT MO MO MONT MO MONT MONT ON MONT MON ONT ONT ONTTT NT MONT MMONT MOONT MONT ONTT ONTT OOON ONT NT ONTTTT NNNTT NT NTT NT NTT N ON NN ON ONT NTT NT NTTT MMMONT ON NNNNNTT NT NT NTTT ONT MOONNNNT NT NTTTT MOOONNNNNNT NTT NTTTTTT ONNNTT OOOONNNNNNT NNNT ONT ONNNNNNTTT ON NNNN HHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH 20 201 201 20 011111 0111222222222222222222222222222222222222222 ●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●● FFFFFFOOOOOOOO FO FOOD FOOD OD OOD FFFFFOOOOOO FFOOO FO D FFFOO FFFFO FFFFFO FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF NE NNNEEE NEEEETTTTTTT NNNNE NEEEEEET ET NETT ETTT NNEEEEEE NETT EEEEEETT NNEEET ET EEETT NNNEEEEEEETT NNEET ET ET ETT NNNNNEEEET NNNNNNNNNNNE NNNEE WWWWWWWWWWWWORK WORK WORK ORK WWWWWWWWWOR WWWWWWWWWWORK WWWWWWWORK WWWWWORK WWWWWW K WWWWWW KKK WORK WWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWW MMMAG MMMAG MAG MMMMMA MAG AAG AG AG AG AAG AG AGGGGGGG MAG MMMMMMMA AAG AAAGGGGGGGGG MMMMMAAG AGGGGG MAG MMMMMMMMMAG AAGGGGGG MAG MMMMA MMMA AAGGG MMMMA MA MMMA AG AGGG MMMMMMMMA MAG AGGGG MMMMAG A MAGGG MAGG MMM GG MMMMMMAGG MAG MMMMM GG MMMMMMAGG MM GAAAAAAZIN AZIN AZIN AAZIN AAAAAZIN AZINEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE 11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111666666665 65 65 65 66666665 666665 666666665 665 655
The problem with living on a sprawling ranch is that, come cookout time, there’s always room for
one more—or, in the case of Ree Drummond, a couple hundred more. The Pioneer Woman host
throws a Fourth of July bash at her Oklahoma cattle ranch every year, and she often ends up
cooking for 200 of her closest friends, along with her husband, Ladd, and their kids, Alex, Paige,
Bryce and Todd. (You can watch the party unfold on her show on June 29.) She started the
tradition more than 10 years ago with a few relatives, but one Sunday she accidentally
took the party to the next level. “We stood up in church and announced, ‘We’re
having this Fourth of July thing, if anyone wants to come,’ and the whole church
came!” Ree says. “And they brought friends!” Since then she has learned
that the best way to serve a Fourth of July crowd is to give them a little
freedom and independence, in the form of a DIY burger bar
with tons of toppings. “I love the fixin’s,” she says. “I’ll
literally add eight toppings to my burger and
eat it with a fork and knife.”
AMERICAN
Cookout
Ree Drummond celebrates the Fourth of July with
lots of food—and plenty of friends.
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1. Preheat a grill to medium high and oil the grates. Place the ground beef in a medium mixing
bowl. Add 1½ teaspoons salt and ¾ teaspoon pepper. Add a few dashes of Tabasco sauce,
then with your hands, mix the meat and seasoning well.
2. Form the meat into six 1-inch-thick patties and place on the grill. Cover and cook 3 minutes, then
rotate, leaving them on the same side, and cook 3 more minutes. Flip and repeat on the other side.
3. Meanwhile, slice the rolls in half and spread each cut side with ½ tablespoon butter. Grill the
rolls, cut-side down, until lightly toasted. Build the burgers with assorted toppings.
Vegetable oil, for the grill
3 pounds 80% lean ground beef
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
Tabasco sauce, to taste
6 kaiser rolls
6 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened
Assorted toppings, for serving (right)
GRILLED BURGERS
ACTIVE: 25 min l TOTAL: 25 min l SERVES: 6
166 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
SAUTÉED MUSHROOMS
Melt 2 tablespoons butter
in a large skillet over medium-
high heat; add 1 pound sliced
mushrooms, season with
salt and pepper and cook
2 minutes. Add 2 to
3 tablespoons broth or wine
and cook 6 to 8 more minutes.
BACON
Cook over medium-high
heat until crisp.
CARAMELIZED ONIONS
Melt 4 tablespoons butter in
a skillet over low heat. Add
2 large sliced red onions and
3 to 4 tablespoons brown sugar.
Cook until caramelized, tossing
occasionally, about 20 minutes.
GUACAMOLE
Mash 3 avocados in a bowl
with a fork, leaving them
chunky; season with salt. Add
a generous helping of pico de
gallo (left), then fold together.
Stir in the juice of ½ lime.
PICO DE GALLO
Finely chop 5 plum
tomatoes, ½ large
onion, 3 jalapeño
peppers and
1 bunch cilantro.
Toss with the juice
of ½ lime, and salt
to taste.
LETTUCE
BLUE CHEESE
SPICY MAYO
Mix mayonnaise with
Tabasco sauce to taste.
Kosher salt
12 ounces mostaccioli or penne pasta
½ cup mayonnaise
¼ cup whole milk
¼ cup white vinegar, plus more if needed
Freshly ground pepper
1½ teaspoons adobo sauce from a can
of chipotles (or 1 minced chipotle)
1 10-ounce package grape tomatoes,
halved lengthwise
½ pound smoked gouda cheese, cut
into small cubes
24 fresh basil leaves, thinly sliced
1. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil.
Add the pasta and cook as the label directs.
Drain and rinse under cold water until no longer
hot; set aside.
2. Make the dressing: Mix the mayonnaise, milk,
vinegar, ½ teaspoon salt, pepper to taste and
the adobo sauce in a small bowl.
3. In a large bowl, combine the pasta, dressing,
tomatoes and gouda. Taste for seasoning,
adding more salt and pepper if needed,
and even an extra teaspoon or 2 of vinegar,
if necessary. Stir in the basil at the end.
Refrigerate for a couple of hours before serving.
SPICY PASTA SALAD WITH SMOKED GOUDA,
TOMATOES AND BASIL
ACTIVE: 20 min l TOTAL: 30 min (plus chilling) l SERVES: 6
168 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
RASPBERRY LEMONADE
MAKES: about 2½ quarts
2 cups fresh lemon juice (from about
15 lemons)
1½ cups sugar
½ 10-ounce bag frozen raspberries
1. Put the lemon juice in a pitcher. Mix the
sugar and 1½ cups water to make a syrup,
stirring well until the sugar dissolves. Add the
sugar syrup to the lemon juice and top with
4 cups water. Taste to make sure it’s sweet
enough for you, then add the raspberries.
(Keep in mind that the raspberries are tart, so
be sure to sweeten enough!) Stir the lemonade,
then chill in the fridge.
2. Fill mason jars with ice cubes and top them
of with the lemonade.
170 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● MONTH 2012 17 17 17 777 17 17 17 77 17 17 7 17 17 7 117 17 17 1117 17770000000000000000000000000 FFOOD FFFOOOOOOD OOD OOOD OD OD FO FOO FO FOOD OOOO OOOOD OD NET NET NET NET NET N T ET NET T E NET TT NET TTTTT ETTTTTTTWORK WWO WO WORK WORK WORK WO WO WO WORK ORK WORK R WORK WORK WORK WOR WORK WORK WORK RK WOO WORK RK OOR WOR ORK WORK WOR WOR RRKK WOR WORK RKK RR W R WOR WWWWORK WWOR WWO W MA MA MMMA MAG MAG MMAG MAG AG A MAGG MMAG MMA MAG A MA MAG MMAG MMMMAG AA MMM AAAZIN AZIN AZIN ZI AZINN IN ZINN ZI EEE EE EE ●●●●●●●●●● MONT MO MONT MONT MONT N MONT MON MON MONT MONTT NT NN MONT NT ONNT ONT ONT NT MONT NTT MO MONTTT MONT ONT NTT ONT MMOO MONT NT NTT ONT MMONTTT ONT MOO MONT NT MO MONT NNT MMOONT NT MMMOOOONNNT NTT NT MMOOON OO T NT MMOONNTTT OO TTTTHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH 2222201 201 201 22001 0122222222
BLACKBERRY CHIP
ICE CREAM
ACTIVE: 25 min l TOTAL: 55 min (plus freezing)
MAKES: about 1 quart
2 pints fresh blackberries
1¼ cups sugar
Juice of ½ lemon
1½ cups half-and-half
5 large egg yolks
1½ cups heavy cream
4 ounces semisweet chocolate
1. Combine the blackberries, ¼ cup sugar and
the lemon juice in a saucepan. Cook over low
heat until the blackberries are broken down and
syrupy, about 20 minutes.
2. Pour the mixture through a fine-mesh strainer
into a bowl, using a whisk or spoon to force as
much of the deep purple liquid through as you
can; set aside to cool. Discard the blackberry
pulp and seeds.
3. Heat the half-and-half and the remaining
1 cup sugar in a saucepan over medium-low heat.
Meanwhile, whisk the egg yolks in a bowl until
pale yellow and thick. Temper the egg yolks by
splashing in a very small amount of the warm
half-and-half mixture while whisking constantly.
Slowly pour the tempered yolks into the saucepan
with the half-and-half and cook over medium-low
heat, stirring constantly, until thick enough to
coat the back of a spoon, about 5 minutes.
4. Stir the heavy cream into the bowl with the
berry mixture, then pour in the egg mixture
and stir to combine. Churn in an ice cream maker
(in batches, if necessary) according to the
maker’s instructions.
5. Chop the chocolate into chunks and stir into
the ice cream. Transfer to a freezer-safe container
and freeze for several hours or overnight.
170 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
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172 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013 172 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013 17 17 17 111 2222 17 17 111 2222 FOOD FOOD FOOD OO FOOD FOODDDD NET NET NNET E NET ET EETWORK WORK WWORK RKKK RR W R MAG MAG MAG MAG MAG AAAGAZIN AZIN AZIN AZZ AA E E EE FOOD FOOD FOOD OO FO FOODDDD NET NET ET NET ET EETWORK WORK ORK RKK RR W R MAG MAG MAG MAG MAG AGAZIN AZIN ZIN AZZ AA EEEE ●●●● JU JULY JULY LY LYYY/AUG /AUG /AUG AU /AUG AUG AUG UU /AUG UG UG U / UG / UST UST UST UST UUST JU JULY JULY LYYY/AUG /AUG /AUG U /AUGG UG U /AUG U / U / UST US UST UST U T 20 20 201 20111 201 20013333333 20 2001 20111 201 0013333333
Summer
Anne’s
String Bean and
Potato Salad
A ’
Bobby’s
Grilled
Sweet Potato
and Scallion
Salad
B bb ’
Alex’s
Baked Potato
Salad
Sunny’s
Creamy Potato
and Prosciutto
Salad
S ’
Robert’s
Bacon-and-Egg
Potato Salad
R b t’
Potatoes
172 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
PHOTOGRAPHS BY ANNA WILLIAMS
Food Network chefs give us
their spin on the ultimate
cookout side: potato salad.
MONTH 2013 ● FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE 173
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1. Make the salad: Preheat the oven to 400˚. Brush a baking sheet with the olive oil
and arrange the prosciutto in a single layer. Bake until the fat is rendered and the
prosciutto is crisp, 12 to 14 minutes. Remove the prosciutto to a rack and let cool
completely, then break into pieces and set aside.
2. Meanwhile, fill a large pot with cold water; add the potatoes and a pinch of salt.
Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to medium low and simmer until the potatoes
are just fork-tender, about 15 minutes. (The potatoes will continue to cook when you
remove them from the water, and you don’t want a mushy potato salad!) Drain in a
colander, then place the colander over the now-empty pot, of the heat, to allow the
excess moisture to evaporate from the potatoes.
3. Make the dressing: In a large bowl, whisk the mayonnaise, scallions, sugar, paprika,
mustard and vinegar. Taste and then season with salt and a few grinds of pepper.
4. Add the potatoes to the bowl with the dressing and gently toss. Refrigerate at
least 1 hour. Sprinkle the crispy prosciutto on top before serving.
FOR THE SALAD
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
4 ounces sliced prosciutto
2 pounds baby tricolor or red bliss
potatoes, quartered
Kosher salt
FOR THE DRESSING
1 cup mayonnaise
2 scallions, finely chopped
1 teaspoon sugar
½ teaspoon sweet paprika
¼ cup stone-ground mustard
2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
SUNNY ANDERSON’S
CREAMY POTATO AND PROSCIUTTO SALAD
ACTIVE: 20 min l TOTAL: 35 min (plus chilling) l SERVES: 4 to 6
JULY/AUGUST 2013 ● FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE 173
174 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● MONTH 2013
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BOBBY FLAY’S GRILLED SWEET POTATO
AND SCALLION SALAD
ACTIVE: 30 min l TOTAL: 1 hr l SERVES: 8
1. Preheat the oven to 375˚. Bake the
potatoes until they can be just pierced
with a knife, about 45 minutes. Cut into
large chunks.
2. Preheat a grill to high. Brush the potatoes
and scallions with ⅓ cup olive oil and
arrange on the grill. Grill the potatoes until
just tender, about 5 minutes per side. Grill
the scallions until softened and marked,
about 1 minute per side. Remove the scallions
and potatoes from the grill; cut the scallions
into small pieces.
3. In a large bowl, whisk the remaining
⅓ cup olive oil, the mustard, vinegars and
honey; season with salt and pepper. Add the
potatoes, scallions and parsley and toss until
the potatoes are well coated.
4 large sweet potatoes
8 scallions
⅔ cup extra-virgin olive oil
2 teaspoons dijon mustard
2 tablespoons apple cider
vinegar
1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
1 teaspoon honey
Kosh er salt and freshly ground
pepper
¼ cup roughly chopped fresh
parsley
174 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
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ALEX GUARNASCHELLI’S BAKED POTATO SALAD
ACTIVE: 30 min l TOTAL: 1 hr 10 min l SERVES: 4 to 6
2 pounds small Yukon gold potatoes
1 bunch parsley, about 1 inch of stems
still attached, roughly chopped
with scissors
1 bunch basil, about 1 inch of stems still
attached, roughly chopped with scissors
Kosher salt and freshly ground white pepper
⅓ cup extra-virgin olive oil
Pinch of sugar
4 to 6 tablespoons red wine vinegar
2 shallots, sliced into ¼-inch-thick rounds
2 tablespoons smooth dijon mustard
1 tablespoon capers, plus 1 teaspoon
brine from the jar
4 to 6 gherkins, finely chopped, plus
1 tablespoon brine from the jar
1. Preheat the oven to 350˚. Arrange the
potatoes in a single layer in a baking dish and
put in the center of the oven. Bake until the
potatoes are tender and can be pierced with
the tip of a knife, about 50 minutes.
2. Meanwhile, combine the parsley and basil in
a food processor or blender. Season with
salt and white pepper, add 2 tablespoons
water and blend. With the motor running, pour
the olive oil through the top in a slow, steady
stream. Add the sugar and taste for seasoning.
Pulse to combine and set aside. (This doesn’t
need to be a smooth puree: It should be a little
rustic and chunky.)
3. In a large bowl, combine the vinegar,
shallots, mustard, capers and brine, and the

gherkins and brine. Add half of the
parsley-basil puree and toss. Taste
for seasoning.
4. When the potatoes are done, remove them
from the oven and let cool for a few minutes.
Peel half of the potatoes (some skin adds a
nice flavor to the salad). Cut any big potatoes
into quarters and cut the rest in half. Put the
potatoes in the bowl with the dressing; season
lightly with salt and pepper and gently toss.
Serve at room temperature with the remaining
herb puree on the side.
JULY/AUGUST 2013 ● FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE 175
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2 pounds small red-skinned potatoes,
quartered
1 pound bacon, chopped
2 large eggs
2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
¾ cup mayonnaise
3 tablespoons whole-grain mustard
6 scallions, finely chopped
1 medium red onion, diced
1 tablespoon sugar
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
176 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
3. Drain the potatoes (do not rinse), transfer
to a baking sheet and let cool 6 to 8 minutes.
In a small bowl, combine the vinegar,
mayonnaise, mustard, scallions, red onion,
sugar, and salt and pepper to taste. Transfer
the potatoes to a large bowl and add the bacon
and hard-cooked eggs; fold in the mayonnaise
mixture. Serve at room temperature.
ROBERT IRVINE’S BACON-AND-EGG POTATO SALAD
ACTIVE: 30 min l TOTAL: 40 min l SERVES: 4 to 6
1. Put the potatoes in a medium saucepan
and cover with cold water. Bring to a boil, then
reduce the heat to medium and cook until fork-
tender, about 15 minutes. Meanwhile, sauté
the bacon in a skillet over low heat until crispy,
about 12 minutes. Drain on paper towels.
2. Put the eggs in a small saucepan and cover
with cold water. Bring to a boil, then remove
from the heat, cover and let stand 6 minutes.
Drain and run under cold water to cool; peel
and chop.
THE PACKAGE SAYS ‘LEAN’.
THE TASTE SAYS ‘BALL PARK’.
WELL DONE, AMERICA.
BALL PARK
SO AMERICAN YOU CAN TASTE IT
©

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ANNE BURRELL’S STRING BEAN AND POTATO SALAD
ACTIVE: 30 min l TOTAL: 40 min l SERVES: 6 to 8
2 pounds red bliss potatoes
2 cloves garlic
Kosher salt
¼ to ⅓ cup sherry vinegar
¼ to ⅓ cup extra-virgin olive oil
½ pound haricots verts, stem ends
removed
½ cup pitted and slivered gaeta or
kalamata olives
½ bunch fresh oregano, leaves finely
chopped
3 scallions, thinly sliced on the bias
Pinch of red pepper flakes
1. Put the potatoes and garlic in a pot and
cover with well-salted water. Bring to a boil
over medium heat and cook until the potatoes
are fork-tender, about 20 minutes; drain.
When they are cool enough to handle but still
hot, carefully cut the potatoes in half (try not
to pull of the skins) and transfer to a large
bowl. Finely chop the garlic and add it to
the potatoes along with 2 tablespoons each
vinegar and olive oil; season with salt. (It is
important to do this while the potatoes are
still warm so they absorb the vinegar and oil
and are seasoned all the way through.)
2. Meanwhile, bring another pot of well-salted
water to a boil over medium heat. Set up a
bowl of ice water and season it generously
with salt. Add the haricots verts to the boiling
water and cook until tender, 5 to 6 minutes
(bite a bean to be sure they are properly
cooked); drain and immediately put in the ice
water to “shock” them, or stop the cooking.
When they are cold, drain the haricots verts
and let them dry a little. Cut them in half.
3. Add the haricots verts, olives, oregano,
scallions and red pepper flakes to the bowl
with the potatoes. Stir to combine well; taste
and adjust the seasoning. Add the remaining
oil and vinegar, if needed. This salad is good
now, but it will be even better if you let it sit
for at least 1 hour at room temperature.
178 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
SEE MORE WAYS TO FETA
AT ATHENOS. COM
FETA & WATERMELON
YIAYIA’ S WAY
Organize arranged marriage
for daughter
Crumble Athenos Feta over
watermelon in bowl
If daughter resists,
call priest
Sprinkle cucumber
and mint over salad
Exorcise demon
from daughter
Enjoy feta and
watermelon salad
180 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● MONTH 2012 18 18 18 18 18 18 18 888 18 18 18 88 18 18 18 18 18 118 18 88 18 8 18 18 18 18 18 8 18 88888 1118 8888 18 118 18 18 18 888888 18 118 18 888 188888 18 18 118 88888 111888888 18 88888 18 88888 1188888 18 188 118 8 18888 188 1188 18888 18888 11880000 000000000 000000000000 0000000000000000000 000000 FOOD FOOD FOO FOO FOO FOOD FOOD FOOD O FO FOOD FOOD O FOOD FOOD FOOD FOO OOOOD OO D O NET NET NET NET NET TTTTTT NEETT NET EET EET NET ET T NNNET TTT NET ET NET NET NNEETT NET T N T NN TT NNNN T NN TT NN T NNN T NNETTTT NNEEET NNEETWO WO O WO WO WOR OORK OR ORK WORK ORK WO WO WWORK O K WWOR WO OO WORK WO O WO WOOOO WO WWO OOOOOO WO O WOR OR MMA MA MMAAG AGGGG AGG MAAGG AAG AG AGG AGG MMAG MAAG AG AAGG MAAAG AAG AGGGGG MMAG AG AGG AGG MAAG AGGGG AGGG AG MAGG MAG AAAGGGGG AAG AGGGG AGGGGGG MMAAGGGG M GG AGGGG MAGGGG AGGG A AZ AZ AZI AZI AZIN ZINN AZ AZIN AAAAAAAAAAAA EEE ●● MO MON MOONT ONT ONT ONT ONT ONT N ON ON HHHHHHHH 201 201 201 222 222
Spanish Corn S i h C
No.
11
180 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
Ways
50
Fully loaded cobs, easy salads, corn
ice cream…find dozens of new ideas.
PHOTOGRAPHS BY
JENNIFER CAUSEY
Fresh Corn
MONTH 2012 ● FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE 181 ONT ONT ONT MONT MO MON MO MONT MONT MONT ONT ONT ONT ONTT MMONTT NT MMMON MOOONNNT ONT MMM NT MM N MO MO MO M N MM N HHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH 201 201 20 201 201 201 01 201 201 201 201 001 00 200 20 20 2222222222222222 ●●●●●●●●●●● FOOD FOOD FOOD FOOD FOOD FOOD OO OO OO OOOOD FOODD FOOD OOD FOOD OD OOOOD FOOD FOOD OOD O OOOD FOO NET NET NET NET NET NNNET NET NET NET NETT NNET NET NE NET NET NET E NET NET N T N WORK WORK WORK WORK WORK WORK WORK WORK WORK O WORK WORK WORR WORK RRRRK WORK WORK WOOORK WORRK R WOR WOORK WORKK WORK WW KK MAG MAG MAG MAG AG MAG AG MAG MAG AG AG MAG MMMAG AG MMAAG MAG AG AG AGGGG MMMMAGG A M G ZIN AZI AZ AZIN AAZ AZIN AZI AZIN AZIN AZIN ZIN ZIN ZINN IN AZI ZIN AZI ZINN ZIN AZIN IN AAZ Z NNNN ZZIN AZI AZI AZ N AAAAZIINNN AAA NNNEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE 111111111111111118888881 81 81 81 81 81 8881 81 81 8888
Corn Crostini C C ti i
No.
31
Cover
recipes inside!
See Nos. 5, 7
and 11.
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PHOTOGRAPHS BY JENNIFER CAUSEY
Ways
50
No.
8
JULY/AUGUST 2013

FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE
7. Buffalo Corn Whisk
6 tablespoons melted butter
and 3 tablespoons Bufalo wing
sauce; brush on cooked ears of
corn. Sprinkle with crumbled blue
cheese, celery salt and chopped
scallions.
8. Jerk-Salted Corn Mix
½ teaspoon each allspice, nutmeg
and minced garlic, 2 teaspoons
each red pepper flakes, minced
scallions and minced thyme, a
pinch each of cloves and cinnamon,
and 2 tablespoons kosher salt.
Sprinkle on cooked ears of corn.
9. Lemon-Pepper Corn Mix
¼ cup kosher salt, 2 teaspoons
pepper and the zest of 1 lemon.
Sprinkle on cooked ears of corn.
10. Mexican Corn Brush grilled
ears of corn with mayonnaise;
sprinkle with cotija cheese,
cayenne pepper and lime juice.
11. Spanish Corn Mix
3 tablespoons mayonnaise and
1 grated garlic clove. Brush on
grilled ears of corn, then sprinkle
with grated manchego and
smoked paprika.
12. Parmesan Corn Mix ¼ cup
grated parmesan, 2 tablespoons
olive oil, 2 grated garlic cloves,
½ teaspoon kosher salt and
¼ teaspoon each chopped oregano
and pepper. Brush on raw ears of
corn. Roast at 425˚ until golden.
13. Beer-Boiled Corn Bring two
12-ounce bottles amber beer,
2 cups water, 2 tablespoons
Old Bay Seasoning and some
salt to a boil in a large pot. Add
raw ears of corn and boil until
tender, about 4 minutes.
Fresh Corn 50 Ways
1. Maple-Chipotle Corn
Puree 1 stick softened butter,
2 tablespoons maple syrup and
1 tablespoon sauce from a can
of chipotles in adobo. Spread
on cooked ears of corn.
2. Sweet Curry Corn Puree
1 stick softened butter with
3 tablespoons mango chutney
and 2 teaspoons roasted curry
powder. Spread on cooked ears
of corn.
3. Dill-Caper Corn Mix 1 stick
softened butter with ¼ cup
chopped dill, 2 tablespoons capers
and the zest and juice of 1 lemon.
Spread on cooked ears of corn.
4. Anchovy Corn Mix 1 stick
softened butter with 2 teaspoons
anchovy paste. Toast ½ cup panko
breadcrumbs in 2 tablespoons
of the anchovy butter in a skillet.
Spread the remaining anchovy
butter on cooked ears of corn, then
roll in the toasted panko.
5. Bacon-Wrapped Corn Wrap
raw ears of corn with 2 pieces
bacon each; wrap individually in
foil. Grill over medium-high heat,
turning once, 15 minutes.
How to Cook Corn:
■ Boil: Bring a large pot of
salted water to a boil; add
husked corn and cook until
tender, about 4 minutes.
■ Grill: Brush husked corn
with oil; grill over high
heat, turning, until lightly
charred, 8 to 10 minutes.
1 ear=½ cup kernels
No.
6
Corn with
Herb Oil
Warm ¹⁄
³
cup
olive oil over
low heat.
Stir in ½ cup
chopped
mixed fresh
herbs. Drizzle
over cooked
ears of corn.
8. J
½ t
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FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE

JULY/AUGUST 2013
21. Corn Gazpacho Make Corn
and Tomato Salad (No. 20); puree
with ½ chopped red bell pepper
and 1 cup tomato juice. Chill.
22. Corn-Bean Salsa Toss 2 cups
cooked corn kernels, a 15-ounce
can black beans (drained and
rinsed), 1 diced mango, ½ diced
red onion, 2 tablespoons each
lime juice and olive oil and ¼ cup
chopped cilantro.
23. Corn-Edamame Salad
Toss 2 cups each cooked corn
kernels and cooked shelled
edamame with 2 tablespoons
each vegetable oil, rice vinegar
and chopped scallions, a pinch of
red pepper flakes, 2 teaspoons soy
sauce and 1 teaspoon each grated
ginger and sesame oil.
24. Corn and Bacon Pancakes
Mix 1 cup cooked corn kernels and
½ cup crumbled cooked bacon into
2 cups pancake batter; cook by
¼ cupfuls in a hot buttered skillet.
25. Corn Ice Cream Bring
2 cups each raw corn kernels and
half-and-half to a simmer; season
with salt and cook 5 minutes. Cool
slightly. Puree with 1 cup sweetened
condensed milk; chill. Churn in an ice
cream maker, then freeze until firm.
26. Corn-Bacon Syrup Cook
½ cup diced bacon in a skillet
until crisp. Remove, reserving
1 tablespoon fat. Add 1 cup raw
corn kernels and ½ teaspoon vanilla
to the skillet; cook 2 minutes.
Add 1 cup maple syrup and ½ cup
toasted walnuts and cook until
thickened, 5 minutes. Add the
bacon and a squeeze of lemon juice.
Serve on ice cream or pancakes.
Fresh Corn 50 Ways
14. Caesar Corn Mix 3 tablespoons
mayonnaise with 2 chopped
anchovies, 1 grated garlic clove,
2 teaspoons dijon mustard and
the juice of ½ lemon; brush on
grilled ears of corn. Sprinkle with
grated parmesan and toasted
panko breadcrumbs.
15. Corn in Marinara Sauté
6 sliced garlic cloves in olive oil,
1 minute. Add two 15-ounce cans
crushed tomatoes, 2 cups water,
2 sprigs basil and a pinch each of
red pepper flakes and salt; simmer
10 minutes. Add raw ears of corn
and cook 10 minutes. Sprinkle
with parmesan.
16. Cheddar Cornbread
Prepare an 8.5-ounce box of
cornbread mix as directed; stir
1 cup cooked corn kernels, ½ cup
shredded cheddar and ¼ cup
chopped chives into the batter
before baking.
17. Corn Succotash Melt
3 tablespoons butter in a skillet.
Sauté 1 chopped red bell pepper,
2 minutes. Add 2½ cups raw corn
kernels, 1 cup thawed frozen lima
beans, ¼ cup water, 2 teaspoons
chopped thyme, and salt and
pepper to taste. Cover; simmer
5 minutes. Stir in 2 sliced scallions.
18. Southwestern Succotash
Make Corn Succotash (No. 17),
swapping 1 chopped poblano
chile for the bell pepper. Stir in
2 tablespoons chopped cilantro
and a squeeze of lime juice.
19. Italian Succotash Make
Corn Succotash (No. 17), adding
1 cup diced zucchini with the corn.
Top with chopped basil.
No.
20
Corn and
Tomato
Salad
Toss 2 cups
cooked
corn kernels
with 1 pint
halved cherry
tomatoes,
2 diced
Persian
cucumbers,
the juice of
2 limes,
¼ cup chopped
cilantro,
2 tablespoons
olive oil,
1 chopped
seeded
jalapeño, and
salt to taste.
JULY/AUGUST 2013

FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE
34. Cold Corn Soup Cut the
kernels from 4 raw ears of corn;
reserve the cobs. Sauté 2 chopped
leeks in olive oil in a pot, 5 minutes.
Add the corn and cobs, 1 chopped
peeled potato and 8 cups water;
simmer 30 minutes. Discard the
cobs. Puree, strain and season with
salt and pepper; chill.
35. Corn Egg Drop Soup Cook
1½ cups raw corn kernels in
4 cups simmering chicken broth,
5 minutes. Mix 4 teaspoons each
cornstarch and water; whisk into
the broth and bring to a boil. Slowly
pour in 2 beaten eggs; simmer
1 minute. Season with salt and
pepper. Top with sliced scallions.
36. Corn Chowder Cook
2 chopped leeks, 1 chopped red
bell pepper and 1 tablespoon fresh
thyme in butter in a saucepan,
3 minutes. Add 2 quarts chicken
broth, 3 cups raw corn kernels,
1 pound diced potatoes and ½ cup
heavy cream. Simmer until the
potatoes are tender, 15 minutes.
Stir in some chopped parsley.
37. Savory Corn Custard Puree
2 cups raw corn kernels, 1 cup
chicken broth, 1 teaspoon each
kosher salt and soy sauce and a
pinch of sugar. Mix with 4 beaten
eggs. Strain into four 4-ounce
ramekins. Cook in a steamer basket
set over simmering water, covered,
10 minutes. Top with sliced scallions.
38. Cheesy Corn Toast
Brush frozen Texas toast with
mayonnaise; top with shredded
cheddar, sliced tomatoes and raw
corn kernels. Season with salt and
pepper. Bake at 400˚ until the
cheese melts, 8 minutes.
Fresh Corn 50 Ways
No.
33
27. Corn Pasta Salad Mix ⅓ cup
each mayonnaise, sour cream and
diced pickles with 2 tablespoons
each chopped parsley and chives.
Stir in 12 ounces cooked macaroni
and 1 cup each diced celery and
cooked corn kernels. Add salt and
cayenne pepper to taste.
28. Corn Quesadillas Cook
1 cup raw corn kernels, 1 diced
zucchini, ½ diced red onion and
½ teaspoon ground cumin in olive
oil until soft. Spread on 4 small
tortillas; top with shredded cheddar
and fold in half. Cook in a hot oiled
skillet, 2 minutes per side.
29. Corn Stir-Fry Cook 2 teaspoons
grated ginger in 2 teaspoons
vegetable oil in a skillet over high
heat, 1 minute. Add 1 cup raw
corn kernels, 2 cups frozen stir-fry
vegetables, 2 teaspoons soy sauce
and 1 tablespoon water; cook
2 minutes. Drizzle with sesame oil.
30. Shrimp-Corn Stir-Fry Make
Corn Stir-Fry (No. 29), adding
8 ounces small shrimp (peeled and
deveined) before the vegetables;
cook until pink, 2 minutes.
31. Corn Crostini Toss 1 cup
cooked corn kernels with 1 cup each
diced tomato and fresh mozzarella,
¼ cup chopped basil and
2 tablespoons each white wine
vinegar and olive oil. Spoon onto
toasted baguette slices.
32. Chile-Corn Vinaigrette
Puree ½ cup cooked corn kernels
with 2 tablespoons water and
1 teaspoon each sherry vinegar
and brine from a jar of Peppadew
peppers. Whisk in 3 tablespoons
vegetable oil.
Corn Frittata
Mix 8 beaten
eggs with
½ teaspoon
kosher salt,
1 cup cooked
corn kernels,
3 chopped
scallions and
1 cup grated
cheddar.
Pour into an
oiled 8-inch
ovenproof
skillet. Cook
over medium
heat,
5 minutes,
then bake at
400˚ until
set, 15 more
minutes.

No.
48
Fresh Corn 50 Ways
JULY/AUGUST 2013

FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE
39. Corn Waffles Whisk 1 cup
self-rising flour, ½ cup cornmeal,
1 egg, 1 tablespoon vegetable oil,
1 cup raw corn kernels, a pinch
of salt and ¾ cup milk. Cook in a
wafe maker until golden.
40. Corn Blini Make the
batter for Corn Wafes (No. 39)
using 3 tablespoons oil and
1 cup milk. Cook mini pancakes
in a hot buttered skillet. Top
with crème fraîche and chopped
mixed herbs.
41. Mexican Blini Make the
batter for Corn Wafes (No. 39)
using 3 tablespoons oil and
1 cup milk. Cook mini pancakes
in a hot buttered skillet. Top with
salsa, guacamole and sour cream.
42. Corn Pasta Cook 8 ounces
pappardelle; reserve 1 cup cooking
water, then drain. Cook ½ cup
diced pancetta in 2 tablespoons
olive oil until crisp. Add 1 cup each
raw corn kernels and chopped
scallions, and 2 cups halved cherry
tomatoes; cook, stirring, until
tender. Add the pasta water and
bring to a simmer; stir in the pasta.
Top with basil and parmesan.
43. Corn Baked Potatoes Bake
potatoes at 400˚, 1 hour. Puree
½ cup cooked corn kernels with
6 tablespoons softened butter.
Stir in 2 more tablespoons butter,
1 tablespoon cream and 1 teaspoon
kosher salt. Serve on the potatoes.
44. Hush Puppies Whisk ¼ cup
flour, ¾ cup cornmeal, 1 cup raw
corn kernels and ¾ teaspoon each
kosher salt and baking powder; stir
in ¾ cup milk. Fry spoonfuls of batter
in 350˚ vegetable oil, 3 minutes.
Mozzarella
Corn Fritters
Make Hush
Puppies
(No. 44) with
just ½ cup
corn kernels;
add ½ cup
finely diced
mozzarella
and a pinch of
dried oregano
to the batter
before frying.
No.
45
p
hopped
he
9)
NNo.
46. Creamed Corn Cook 3 cups
raw corn kernels and 1 tablespoon
flour in 2 tablespoons butter,
5 minutes. Whisk in 1 cup milk
and ¼ cup cream cheese; simmer
until thickened, 15 minutes.
Stir in chopped chives, salt and
pepper to taste.
47. Light Creamed Corn Cut
the kernels of 6 raw ears of corn.
Scrape the cobs with the back of
a knife to extract the milk; puree
the milk with half of the kernels and
1 cup water. Cook the remaining
kernels and ½ chopped onion in
2 tablespoons butter until soft. Add
the puree, and salt and pepper to
taste. Simmer, stirring, 10 minutes.
48. Corn Pizza Stretch refrigerated
pizza dough into a large rectangle
on parchment; brush with olive
oil. Top with minced garlic, sliced
mozzarella, raw corn kernels and
grated parmesan; drizzle with olive
oil and season with salt. Bake at
475˚, 10 minutes. Top with basil.
49. Corn Risotto Cook 1 cup each
raw corn kernels and chopped onion
in 2 tablespoons butter until soft.
Add 1 cup each arborio rice and
white wine; simmer until the wine
is absorbed. Add 3 cups hot broth,
stirring, until absorbed. Add 3 more
cups broth and cook, stirring, until
tender, 10 minutes. Stir in ¼ cup
parmesan. Season with salt.
50. Corn Relish Chop 1 cup
cooked corn kernels, 1 each red and
green bell pepper, 1 stalk celery
and 3 scallions in a food processor.
Toss with 3 tablespoons cider
vinegar, 1 tablespoon each olive oil
and brown sugar, and ¾ teaspoon
each celery seeds and kosher salt.
ADVERTISEMENT

Dawn Jackson Blatner, RD, CSSD, LDN, is a Chicago-based registered dietitian and a certified
specialist in sports dietetics. She is the author of The Flexitarian Diet, a nutrition consultant to
the Chicago Cubs and a blogger for The Huf ngton Post.
DAWN’S 3 RULES FOR
SUMMER ENTERTAINING

Cook ahead: The bottom line is,
I don’t want to be stuck in the
kitchen. I want to be able to enjoy
my own party.

Create a healthy variety: I ofer
nutritious foods with diferent
tastes and textures so there is
something to please anyone’s palate.

Stick to finger foods: It definitely
supports more of a mingling type
of atmosphere, which I love.
To find delicious recipes and watch videos featuring
Grapes from California, visit FoodNetwork.com/Grapes.
FRESH
THOUGHTS
S
ummer offers so many different ways
to enjoy good food. Dawn makes every
summer occasion all the more savory
and special by taking advantage of
what’s currently in season. “In the
summer, we like things that are refreshing and
cold. So I turn to fresh seasonal produce—one
of my favorites being Grapes from California.”
Here, Dawn shares her simple tips for creating
delicious, nutritious and refreshing options for
any summer occasion.
Summer Entertaining
Hosting parties in her backyard is one of the things
Dawn loves most about summer. And she always
makes sure she plans a healthy, delicious menu
using what she calls her ABCD checklist. “It’s the
perfect equation for summer entertaining. The
A stands for antipasti. My biggest crowd pleasers
are marinated vegetables, cheese, nuts, crackers
and pickled grapes. The B stands for balance. My
checklist includes a grain dish, a protein dish and
a vegetable dish. The C stands for cocktail. Every
really awesome event I’ve thrown has a signature
cocktail—and mocktail, of course. The D stands for
desserts. My desserts are always fruit-based. I top
fresh or grilled fruit with something special such as
whipped cream or drizzled dark chocolate.”
Road Trips
Whether getting away to the beach for the day or
hitting the road for vacation, Dawn proves it’s easy
to take good food with you. “Pack something in
advance so you don’t have to be a victim of roadside
food. Store a little cooler in the backseat of your
car and use frozen water bottles to keep everything
cold.” Dawn’s favorite snack to bring on a road trip:
trail mix. “I make mine with roasted edamame,
nuts, seeds, dark chocolate chips and fresh grapes.”
Everyday Meals
For the times in between special events and
getaways, everyone needs a plan to keep meals
interesting, healthy and refreshing. Dawn chooses
one seasonal ingredient to transform the recipes
she relies on most for breakfast, lunch and dinner.
“Even with your most basic recipes, adding one
choice ingredient can elevate the taste, nutrition
and beauty of the dish. I love to use Grapes
from California. They’re versatile and easy
to add to just about any sweet or savory
recipe. I love them in everyday basics
such as smoothies, wraps and salads.”
SCAN THIS CODE TO
GET GREAT RECIPES
WITH GRAPES.
Grapes from California can add an unexpected burst of sweet, juicy flavor
to your summer favorites. Grab a bunch today.
Red,
MONTH 2013 ● FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE 185 MONT O MONT MONT MONT ON MONT MONT MONT ONT TTTH 2 HH 20 H 200 2 H 20 2 H 20000 H 20 H 20 H 2000 H 200 20 H 220 0 20 H 20000 H 2200013 13 13 1133 1333 1133 113 13 1113 1111333 113 ●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●● FFFFFOOD FOOD O FO FOO OO FOO OO FOOO FOOD OOD FOOD FOODD FFFOOOOOO FOOOD FOODD O FO FOOOO OO OO FOO FOOD FOOD FFFFO FOOO FFOO O FOO OOOOOO FOO OOD OOODD NET NET NET NET NET ET NET ET NET NET N T NNET ET ET NETT ET ETT NEETWWWWWWWO WOORK ORK ORK RK WWWORK WWOORKKKK WWWW R W R MA MMMA MAAG AG AG MA MMAAGG MMMMMAGGGGAZ AAAZ AZIN ZIN AAZ AZ AAZIN AZINEEEEEEE 111111185 85 8555 85 85 85 85 85 885 JULY/AUGUST 2013 ● FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE 185
White & ...
Blueberry
Skip the old-fashioned flag cake this year—
these desserts are just as patriotic.
PHOTOGRAPHS BY CON POULOS
JULY/AUGUST 2013 ● FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE 187
RASPBERRY-WATERMELON
TERRINE WITH
BLUEBERRY SAUCE
ACTIVE: 1 hr l TOTAL: 2 hr (plus refrigerating)
SERVES: 8 to 10
FOR THE WHITE LAYER
2 teaspoons unflavored gelatin powder
1 cup cold whole milk
⅓ cup plus 1 tablespoon sugar
1 cup sour cream
½ teaspoon vanilla extract
Pinch of salt
FOR THE RED LAYER
4 cups chopped seedless watermelon
2 cups raspberries
¼ cup sugar
2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice
Pinch of salt
4 teaspoons unflavored gelatin powder
FOR THE BLUEBERRY SAUCE
2 cups blueberries, plus more for sprinkling
(about 1 pint)
¼ cup sugar
Pinch of salt
1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice
1. Line a 9-by-5-inch loaf pan with plastic wrap,
leaving a 2-inch overhang on all sides.
2. Make the white layer: Sprinkle the gelatin over
½ cup milk in a medium bowl. Let stand 2 minutes.
Heat the remaining ½ cup milk in a small saucepan
over medium heat until steaming. Pour over the
gelatin mixture and whisk until combined. Add the
sugar and whisk until dissolved. Whisk in the sour
cream, vanilla and salt until smooth. Pour the mixture
into the prepared loaf pan, then lightly tap the pan on
the counter to make an even layer. Refrigerate until
set, 45 minutes to 1 hour.
3. Make the red layer: Combine the watermelon,
raspberries, sugar, lemon juice and salt in a blender;
process until smooth. Strain through a fine-mesh
sieve into a bowl, pressing the puree through with
the back of a spoon. Transfer 1 cup of the puree to
another bowl and sprinkle with the gelatin; let stand
2 minutes. Heat 1 cup of the remaining puree in a
saucepan over medium heat until steaming. Pour
over the gelatin mixture and whisk until combined.
Stir in the remaining puree; let cool.
4. Spoon the cooled puree over the white layer;
loosely cover with the overhanging plastic wrap.
Refrigerate until completely set, about 3 hours.
5. Make the sauce: Combine the blueberries, sugar,
salt and ¼ cup water in a saucepan over medium
heat. Cook, stirring, until the berries burst, about
5 minutes. Transfer to a blender and add the lemon
juice; puree until smooth. Let cool completely.
6. Unwrap the terrine; invert onto a platter. Slice and
serve with the blueberry sauce and fresh blueberries.
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RED VELVET–BLUEBERRY ICE CREAM PIE
ACTIVE: 30 min l TOTAL: 45 min (plus freezing) l SERVES: 8 to 10
4 store-bought red velvet cupcakes
1½ pints vanilla ice cream
1½ pints blueberry sorbet
2 cups cold heavy cream
2 tablespoons confectioners’
sugar
1. Scrape of and discard the frosting from the cupcakes; crumble the cupcakes into crumbs. Press all but
¼ cup crumbs into the bottom and up the sides of a 9-inch deep-dish pie plate. Freeze 30 minutes.
2. Meanwhile, let the ice cream and sorbet soften at room temperature, about 15 minutes. Spread the ice
cream evenly over the crust using an ofset spatula or rubber spatula; spread the sorbet on top. (Return the
pie to the freezer between layers if the ice cream gets too soft.) Freeze while you make the whipped cream.
3. Beat the heavy cream and confectioners’ sugar in a large bowl with a mixer on medium-high speed until
soft peaks form, about 3 minutes. Top the pie with the whipped cream and sprinkle the reserved cupcake
crumbs around the edge. Freeze until firm, at least 4 hours or overnight.
188 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
STAR-STUDDED BERRY TARTS ACTIVE: 45 min l TOTAL: 3 hr 15 min l MAKES: 8
FOR THE CRUSTS
2¼ cups all-purpose flour, plus
more for dusting
¾ cup pecans
6 tablespoons granulated
sugar
¼ teaspoon salt
1½ sticks cold unsalted butter,
cut into ½-inch pieces
1 large egg, beaten
FOR THE PASTRY CREAM
1 cup whole milk
⅔ cup granulated sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
½ cup plus 3 tablespoons
buttermilk
3 large egg yolks
3 tablespoons cornstarch
1 pint raspberries
1 pint blueberries
Confectioners’ sugar, for dusting
1. Make the crusts: Pulse the flour, pecans, granulated sugar and salt in a
food processor until the nuts are finely ground. Add the butter and pulse
until the mixture looks like coarse meal. Drizzle in 6 tablespoons ice water
and pulse until the dough comes together. Turn out onto a piece of plastic
wrap and form into a disk; wrap and refrigerate until firm, about 1 hour.
2. Lightly flour a large sheet of parchment paper. Roll out the dough on
the parchment into a 9-by-13-inch rectangle. Trim into an 8-by-12-inch
rectangle (reserve the scraps). Cut into eight 3-by-4-inch rectangles.
Separate the pieces slightly on the parchment, then use your fingers to
crimp the edges. Slide the parchment onto a baking sheet. Roll out the
scraps until ¼ inch thick. Cut out 8 stars using a small floured star-
shaped cookie cutter; arrange on the baking sheet around the crusts.
Refrigerate until firm, about 20 minutes.
3. Preheat the oven to 375˚. Poke holes in the crusts with a fork. Brush
the stars and the edges of the crusts with the beaten egg. Bake until
golden brown, about 25 minutes; remove to a rack to cool completely.
4. Make the pastry cream: Combine the milk, ⅓ cup granulated sugar
and the vanilla in a saucepan and bring to a simmer over medium heat.
Whisk ½ cup buttermilk, the egg yolks, cornstarch and the remaining
⅓ cup sugar in a bowl. Slowly pour the hot milk mixture into the egg
mixture, whisking constantly. Pour the mixture back into the saucepan
and cook, whisking, until thick and bubbling, about 3 minutes. Transfer
to a bowl; stir in the remaining 3 tablespoons buttermilk. Lay plastic
wrap on the surface and refrigerate 45 minutes.
5. Carefully transfer the crusts to a platter. Spread the pastry cream
on the crusts, then top with the berries. Top each tart with a star. Dust
with confectioners’ sugar.
190
Sarah K. says:
Sorry for the confusion. But these NEW SKINNY COW® tasty treats are low-fat ice cream AND candy in one
scrumptious 160 calorie bar. Try Salted Caramel Pretzel and Cookies ‘n Dough. Just not both at once.
Unless noted to the contrary all trademarks are owned by Société des Produits Nestlé S.A., Vevey, Switzerland, or used with permission.
And visit skinnycow.com for the chance to win delicious prizes.
And visit skinnycow.com for the chance to win delicious prizes.
NEW
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ICE CREAM DELICIOUSNESS
160 CALORIES OF LOW-FAT
192 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
BLUEBERRY BUTTERMILK BUNDT CAKE ACTIVE: 1 hr l TOTAL: 2 hr 30 min (plus cooling) l SERVES: 10
FOR THE CAKE
2 sticks unsalted butter, at room
temperature, plus more for the pan
3 cups plus 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
2½ teaspoons baking powder
1¼ teaspoons salt
1¾ cups granulated sugar
¼ cup vegetable oil
4 large eggs, at room temperature
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
¾ cup buttermilk
2 cups blueberries (about 1 pint)
FOR THE TOPPINGS
2 to 3 cups large strawberries, halved or
quartered (about 1 pint)
1 to 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
2½ cups confectioners’ sugar
1 tablespoon unsalted butter,
at room temperature
4 to 5 tablespoons milk
1. Make the cake: Preheat the oven to 350˚. Generously butter a nonstick 12-cup Bundt pan.
Whisk 3 cups flour, the baking powder and salt in a medium bowl.
2. Beat 2 sticks butter, the granulated sugar and vegetable oil in a bowl with a mixer on medium-
high speed until flufy, at least 5 minutes, scraping down the sides of the bowl with a rubber
spatula as needed. Reduce the mixer speed to low; beat in the eggs one at a time, then beat in
the vanilla. Add about one-third of the flour mixture and half of the buttermilk; beat until almost
incorporated. Add another one-third of the flour mixture and the remaining buttermilk. Beat,
scraping down the sides of the bowl as needed, until just combined. Add the remaining flour
mixture and beat 30 seconds. Finish incorporating the flour by hand to avoid overmixing.
3. Toss the blueberries with the remaining 2 tablespoons flour in a small bowl. Spoon one-third
of the batter evenly into the prepared pan. Sprinkle in half of the blueberries, then top with
another one-third of the batter. Scatter the remaining blueberries on top and cover with the rest
of the batter; smooth the top. Bake until the cake is golden brown and a toothpick inserted into
the center comes out clean, 1 hour to 1 hour, 10 minutes. Transfer to a rack and let cool 30 minutes
in the pan. Run a small sharp knife around the edge of the pan to loosen the cake, then invert onto
the rack to cool completely.
4. Meanwhile, make the toppings: Toss the strawberries with the granulated sugar in a bowl;
set aside to macerate, 30 minutes. Just before serving, make the glaze: Whisk the confectioners’
sugar, butter and 4 tablespoons milk in a bowl; if the glaze is too thick, whisk in up to 1 more
tablespoon milk, a little at a time. Pour the glaze over the cake, letting it drip down the sides.
Serve with the strawberries and their juices.
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What’s black,
white, and red
all over?
JULY/AUGUST 2013 ● FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE 195
On the Road
See who eats the most
ice cream. Then, find the best
frozen treat in your state.
Washington, D.C.
Capitol Chill
We finally know what it takes to keep the nation’s
capital running: ice cream. Washington, D.C., residents
go out for a scoop almost twice as often as the rest
of the country, according to a report by Bundle, a
spending-analysis company. Jimmy Cenkci, owner
of Larry’s Ice Cream (1633 Connecticut Ave. NW;
202-234-2690), isn’t surprised: He believes a
combination of high summer temperatures and high
stress is to blame. “People know that ice cream will
help them feel better,” he says. Need your fix? Turn
the page to find America’s best ice cream treats.
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50
50
States
ICE CREAM
TREATS
WE TRACKED DOWN THE MOST DELICIOUS
FROZEN DESSERTS IN AMERICA:
ONE IN EVERY STATE (AND D.C., TOO)!
PHOTOGRAPHS BY JAMES WOJCIK
JULY/AUGUST 2013 ● FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE 197
On the Road
See some of our
favorite treats on
Cooking Channel’s
Ice Cream Nation,
Sunday, July 14 at
8 p.m. ET.
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Toffee
Sundae
ALABAMA
Boll Weevil Special
Milky Moo’s,
Enterprise and Troy
This peanut-lover’s
ice cream—chock-full
of peanut butter with
peanut-butter chips and
peanuts—is named after
an unlikely state hero:
In the early 1900s, boll
weevil insects destroyed
the cotton harvest and
made peanuts Alabama’s
king crop.
$1.38 to $3.69;
two locations;
milkymooicecream.com
ALASKA
Rum Raisin
Hot Licks Homemade
Ice Cream, Fairbanks
Alaska may not be home
to much sun and sand, but
Hot Licks does its part to
conjure the beach: This
scoop comes full of giant
Monukka raisins soaked
in dark rum.
$2.40 to $7; two locations;
hotlicks.net
ARIZONA
Toffee Banofi Sundae
Sweet Republic, Scottsdale
This sundae version of English Banoffee pie
is Alton Brown’s favorite ice cream treat. It’s
a mountain of Madagascar vanilla ice cream,
salted caramel, bananas and toffee brittle in
an oversize waffle bowl.
$6.70; 9160 E. Shea Blvd.; sweetrepublic.com
198 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
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Ice Cream
Soda
ARKANSAS
Chocolate Marvel
Le Pops Gourmet
Ice Lollies, Little Rock
In an unassuming
shopping-mall stall,
Le Pops founder Laurie
Harrison cranks out
homemade ice pops.
This fan favorite is
a serious take on a
Fudgsicle, made with
cocoa and chocolate.
$2.49; 400 President
Clinton Ave.; lepops.com
COLORADO
Chocolaty Defrost
Crave Dessert Bar
& Lounge, Denver
An after-theater crowd
flocks to Crave, a swank
downtown café, for a
popular (if unusual) treat:
chocolate-chestnut
ice cream on a brown-
butter waffle covered
with grapefruit sauce and
Mexican ganache.
$10; 891 14th St.;
cravedenver.com
CONNECTICUT
Chocolate Chip
Shady Glen, Manchester
What makes this particular
scoop so special is its
texture: The staff at the
’50s-style diner pours hot
melted chocolate onto
vanilla ice cream, then the
chocolate hardens and
shatters, so you get tons
of chips in every bite.
$2.50 to $4.60;
840 E. Middle Turnpike;
860-649-4245
CALIFORNIA
Ice Cream Soda
Jerry’s Soda Shoppe, Canoga Park
The soda fountain inside De Soto Pharmacy
is only 17 years old, but its ice cream
soda is already a legend: The mug is dipped in
chocolate, then filled with Lappert’s ice cream,
chocolate syrup, seltzer and whipped cream.
$4.25 to $4.75; 20914 Roscoe Blvd.;
818-341-9515
On the Road
JULY/AUGUST 2013 ● FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE 199
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Ice Cream Sandwiches
FLORIDA
Edison Crullers
Edison: Food + Drink
Lab, Tampa
Chef Jeannie Pierola
calls the kitchen her lab,
and this dessert is an
experiment gone right:
carrot ice cream
with crisp crullers,
cardamom glaze and a
white raisin puree.
$6; 912 W. Kennedy Blvd.;
edison-tampa.com
DELAWARE
Scorpion Sting
The Ice Cream Store,
Rehoboth Beach
The sweet-looking Ice
Cream Store sells one
wicked treat: scoops
of ice cream flavored
with cinnamon, cayenne
and hot sauce, and
topped with a dried
edible scorpion.
$4.49 to $5.29;
6 Rehoboth Ave.;
rehobothbeach
icecream.com
PEACH
CHOCOLATE
COCOA-NIB CRUNCH
BROWN
BUTTER
GEORGIA
Ice Cream Sandwiches
Miller Union, Atlanta
This lunchtime-only dessert is called “ice cream
sandwich” on the menu, but it’s not that simple:
It’s a rich brownie-ish cookie on the outside,
with fun specialty ice cream flavors (like brown
butter) on the inside.
$5; 999 Brady Ave. NW; millerunion.com
200 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
On the Road
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Ever wonder how we make our delicious Vanilla Honey Caramel Greek Frozen Yogurt?
No? Well, we’ll tell you anyway. First, the bees churn out the honey we swirl into our
creamy Greek yogurt. Then, we stir in the Fairtrade vanilla and the caramel swirls, before
putting the whole concoction in the freezer. Not the bees though, they taste weird.
It’s really Greekin’ good.
Hula
Pie
IDAHO
Lemon Thrills
Capital City
Public Market, Boise
Saturday at the farmers’
market is when you can
buy the cult-favorite
brand Sugar Sugar’s ice
cream “sammies,” such as
lemon ice cream between
almond-meringue cookies.
$3.75; 8th St. and Idaho
St.; sugarsugarid.com
ILLINOIS
Pistachio Sundae
Balena, Chicago
The interesting mix of
textures in this sundae
is the secret to its
popularity: creamy
pistachio gelato, fluffy
pistachio nougat and
chewy orange confit.
$9; 1633 N. Halsted St.;
balenachicago.com
INDIANA
Peaches & Cream
Rocket Science,
Nappanee
Steve Helmuth flash-
freezes his ice cream
with liquid nitrogen. In
this favorite: peaches
and marshmallow cream.
$3.50 to $5.60;
401 E. Market St.;
574-773-7003
IOWA
Salted Nut Roll
Hickory Park, Ames
The place mats at Hickory
Park advertise 49
specialty sundaes. We
love this one, with vanilla
ice cream, marshmallow,
caramel, salted peanuts
and a wafer.
$2.95 to $3.95;
1404 S. Duff Ave.;
hickoryparkames.com
HAWAII
Hula Pie
Kimo’s and Duke’s, multiple locations
Hawaii is home to killer waves and macadamia
nuts, and this slice of ice cream pie is a
combination of the two: a behemoth wavelike
mass of macadamia nut ice cream, chocolate
cookie crust and hot fudge.
$7.95; tsrestaurants.com
On the Road
202 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
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hampton.com
© 2013 Hilton Worldwide
A fresh, clean duvet on your bed and
Great Getaways at over 1,900 locations.
KENTUCKY
The Avocado
Seviche, Louisville
Chef Anthony Lamas’
love of avocados (he sold
them at a stand as a kid)
inspired his avocado
ice cream, served in a
chocolate shell with a pit
of dark chocolate and
bourbon dulce de leche.
$7; 1538 Bardstown Rd.;
sevicherestaurant.com
LOUISIANA
All Things NOLA
Sucré, New Orleans
and Metairie
This sundae is an ode
to two New Orleans
favorites: bananas Foster
and bread pudding. The
brown-butter pecan gelato
comes with bananas
Foster sauce, pecans and
bread-pudding chunks.
$8.50; two locations;
shopsucre.com
MAINE
Affogato
The Gelato Fiasco,
Brunswick and Portland
Instead of milk in your
coffee, try ice cream:
Locals come here for a
double shot of espresso
served in a mug over
gelato (like the fresh
cream flavor).
$4.75; two locations;
gelatofiasco.com
LIME
GRAPE
MANGO
TEQUILA
KANSAS
Helado
Paleteria La Reyna, Wichita
Few know the owner’s recipe for this Mexican
helado (ice cream), but two secrets are out: The
produce for the fruit flavors is hand-picked, and the
ice cream is 14 percent milk fat instead of the usual
5. Translation: It’s extra creamy!
$1.25 to $3; 2925 N. Arkansas Ave.; 316-831-9196
Helado
204 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
On the Road
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ent wi ne- wi nes. com
Find our wines online at
entwine-wines.com/where-to-buy
MARYLAND
Pig Brittle with
Vanilla Ice Cream
Newton’s Table, Bethesda
You don’t really need a
spoon for this treat: You
can scoop up the ice
cream with big shards of
pig brittle (candy-coated
prosciutto and toasted
pecans) that come on
the side.
$12; 4917 Elm St.;
newtonstable.com
MASSACHUSETTS
“Adult” Ice Cream Soda
Picco, Boston
This smart, grown-up version
of a float is bittersweet—in
the best way: tart raspberry
lambic beer poured over
vanilla ice cream in a tall
hefeweizen glass.
$11; 513 Tremont St.;
piccorestaurant.com
Hot
Fudge
Cream
Puff
MICHIGAN
Hot Fudge Cream Puff
Sanders Candy & Dessert Shops,
multiple locations
Michigan ice cream addicts have enjoyed this
twist on the cream puff since the 1920s:
The pastry is filled with vanilla ice cream and
drenched in hot fudge.
$5.95; sanderscandy.com
206 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
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Meet the Tyson® Mini Chicken Sandwich.
Warm, wholesome and made with 100%
all white meat chicken, it’s perfectly sized for
life on the go. Learn more at TysonToGo.com.
100% all white meat goodness.
(Now in our convenient travel size.)
®/© 2013 TYSON FOODS, INC.
Strawberry
Malt
MISSISSIPPI
Moon Pie–RC Cola
Sandwich
The Hook Up Bar &
Restaurant, Biloxi
This winner is two
Southern favorites,
moon pies and Royal
Crown Cola, in one: A
moon pie with RC Cola
ice cream inside.
$4; 200 8th St.;
thehookuprestaurant.com
MISSOURI
Blackberry Tart
Bailey’s Chocolate Bar,
St. Louis
The motto at Bailey’s is
“Every day is Valentine’s
Day”—and customers
fall hard for this warm
berry tart crowned with
lemon-sage ice cream.
$9; 1915 Park Ave.;
baileyschocolatebar.com
MONTANA
Ranch Dressing
Ice Cream
Sweet Peaks,
multiple locations
The owners’ 8-year-old
daughter, a ranch-dressing lover,
inspired this flavor. It comes
with carrot sticks for dipping.
$2 to $3.50;
sweetpeaksicecream.com
NEBRASKA
Root Beer Float
University of Nebraska–
Lincoln Dairy Store,
Lincoln
Take a campus tour and
you might see food-
science students making
the vanilla ice cream
for this frothy float.
$3.19; 114 Food
Industry Complex;
dairystore.unl.edu
MINNESOTA
Strawberry Malt
Convention Grill, Edina
Edina’s vintage diner serves its strawberry
malt shake the old-school way—in a tall
glass with two straws and a frosted metal
mixing cup on the side. Add fresh banana
for just 50 cents.
$5.95; 3912 Sunnyside Rd.;
conventiongrillmn.com
208 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
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M&M’S
®
Milk Chocolate with peanut butter.
Obviously irresistible.
®
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NEVADA
King Kong Sundae
Sugar Factory American
Brasserie, Las Vegas
This dessert is as
intimidating as its
namesake: 16 scoops
of ice cream with
12 toppings, like
marshmallows, two
waffle cones, gummy
candies, bananas and
giant lollipops.
$50; 3655 Las Vegas
Blvd.; sugarfactory.com
NEW
HAMPSHIRE
Baklava Ice Cream
Puritan Backroom,
Manchester
The Greek owners here
pay tribute to their native
country by mixing pieces
of baklava (phyllo pastry
filled with chopped nuts),
cinnamon and honey into
vanilla ice cream.
$2.50 to $4; 245 Hooksett
Rd.; puritanbackroom.com
NEW JERSEY
Sweet & Salty
Ninety Acres
Culinary Center,
Peapack
Fans of chocolate-covered
pretzels can’t resist this
sundae. The chefs flavor
ice cream with pretzels
and sea salt and top it
with hot fudge and a
pretzel-panko crumble.
$10; 2 Main St.;
natirar.com
NEW MEXICO
Sopaipilla Sundae
El Milagro, Santa Fe
El Milagro’s sopaipilla
(sweet fried dumpling)
comes covered in caramel
and whipped cream, but
the best part is on the
inside: vanilla ice cream
that melts and oozes out.
$6; 3482-C Zafarano Dr.;
505-474-2888
American Globs
NEW YORK
American Globs
Big Gay Ice Cream, New York City
The creative founders of the Big Gay Ice Cream
truck and shop (yes, they’re gay) cover soft-serve
cones in fun, clever toppings. The American
Globs is a bestseller: vanilla covered with pretzel
pieces, sea salt and chocolate.
$6; two locations; biggayicecream.com
210 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
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NORTH DAKOTA
Whirla Whip with
Dill Pickle Relish
Dakota Drug Co., Stanley
Dakota Drug Co. is home
to what is likely America’s
only surviving Whirla
Whip, a 1940s machine
that whips vanilla ice
cream with toppings. Be
brave and try it like a local:
with dill-pickle relish.
$3.50; 107 S. Main St.;
701-628-2255
OHIO
Choco Taco
Barrio Tremont, Cleveland
Savory tacos are only part
of the draw at little Barrio
Tremont: Customers love
the chocolate-covered
dessert taco, made with
cayenne ice cream.
$4; 806 Literary Rd.;
barriotremont.com
OKLAHOMA
Grand Lake
Monte Cristo
The Mule, Oklahoma City
The PB&J at The Mule
grilled-cheese shop is
nothing like the one you
had as a kid: It’s peanut
butter, dark chocolate
and raspberry preserves
on white bread, grilled
and served with salted-
caramel ice cream.
$6; 1630 N. Blackwelder
Ave.; themuleokc.com
Icebox Cake
NORTH
CAROLINA
The French Connection
Bouchon French
Comfort Food, Asheville
It’s a frozen treat with a
little heat: vanilla ice cream
swirled with cognac and
crushed pink peppercorns,
and dusted with sweet
praline morsels.
$5; 62 N. Lexington Ave.;
ashevillebouchon.com
OREGON
Double Chocolate
Icebox Cake
Imperial, Portland
Pastry chef Michelle
Vernier makes this
icebox cake with layers
of chocolate ice cream
and dense chocolate
cake (instead of
whipped cream and
chocolate cookies).
Then she blankets
the whole thing with
toasted meringue.
$9; 410 SW Broadway;
imperialpdx.com
212 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
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PENNSYLVANIA
Hazelnut Waffles with
Praline Ice Cream
Supper, Philadelphia
Chef Mitch Prensky
makes his waffles with
a little cornmeal for
crunch. Then he turns
them into a sandwich
with praline ice cream,
brûléed bananas and
Nutella ganache.
$8; 926 South St.;
supperphilly.com
RHODE ISLAND
Spumoni
Camille’s, Providence
A storied Italian
restaurant is a fitting
spot for an iconic Italian
dessert (with a twist):
strawberry, pistachio and
chocolate ice creams on
a graham-cracker crust
with candied cherries and
orange peel.
$10; 71 Bradford St.;
camillesonthehill.com
SOUTH
CAROLINA
Smoked Chocolate
Parfait
Tristan, Charleston
As weird as it sounds, this
dish is like a chocolate
sausage: cold-smoked
chocolate ice cream
wrapped in a pudding-
skin casing, served with
chocolate Pop Rocks.
$10; 10 Linguard St.;
tristandining.com
SOUTH DAKOTA
Cookies ’n Cream
Dairy Sales Bar, South
Dakota State University,
Brookings
SDSU claims it invented
cookies-and-cream ice
cream. We can’t be sure,
but the school’s version,
made cow-to-cone on
campus, is legendary—
and worth the fuss.
$1.09 to $3.50;
1111 Rotunda Ln. North;
605-697-2585
TENNESSEE
Honey Beet
The Silly Goose, Nashville
Turns out, beets are
an ingenious ice cream
ingredient: They balance
sweet custard with earthy
flavor, plus the color is
amazing. A drizzle of local
honey finishes the deal.
$4.50 to $7.50;
1888 Eastland Ave.;
sillygoosenashville.com
Black Betty
TEXAS
Black Betty
Gourdough’s Public
House, Austin
You’ll find more than two
dozen great doughnuts
at Gourdough’s, but
the Black Betty is the
reigning queen. It’s
filled with blackberry
jam, glazed with cream
cheese icing and topped
with cake-mix crumbles,
honey butter and a
heaping scoop of vanilla
ice cream.
$6.75; 2700 S. Lamar
Blvd.; gourdoughspub.com
214 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
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through transferees, assignees, outside agencies, brokers or others who
are not retail distributors of our merchandise. Any sales tax must be paid
by consumer. Void where prohibited, licensed, taxed or restricted by law.
Cash value 1/20th of 1¢. Domino Foods, Inc., P.O. Box 880270, El Paso,
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UTAH
Plátano Macho Split
Frida Bistro, Salt Lake City
Owner Jorge Fierro’s
Mexican heritage
inspired this banana
split: baby plantains
cooked in brown sugar
and tequila, served with
Mexican chocolate,
strawberry and tres
leches ice creams.
$14; 545 W. 700 South;
fridabistro.com
VERMONT
Maple Creemee
Morse Farm, Montpelier
It’s not summer in
Vermont without a
creemee (the local name
for soft serve). The
maple syrup–making
Morse family swirls
their Grade B syrup into
ice cream and serves it
in a cone.
$1.75 to $2.50; 1168
County Rd.; morsefarm.com
VIRGINIA
Banana Pudding
The River and Rail,
Roanoke
This dessert-in-a-jar is
full of surprises: Under
the jalapeño-coconut ice
cream you’ll find banana
pudding and crunchy
cornbread bits.
$7; 2201 Crystal Spring
Ave. SW; riverandrail
restaurant.com
WASHINGTON
Apple Cup Crisp
Ferdinand’s Ice Cream
Shoppe, Pullman
The Apple Cup Crisp,
named after an annual
college football battle,
makes the most of the
state’s signature crop. It’s
vanilla ice cream mixed
with apple flavoring,
crushed oatmeal cookies
and caramel.
$1.85 to $3.15; 2035
NE Ferdinand’s Ln.;
public.wsu.edu/creamery/
ferdfront.htm
WASHINGTON,
D.C.
Cuba Libre Float
Bar Pilar
For his take on the
Cuba Libre cocktail, bar
manager Jonathan Fain
fills a modified Coca-Cola
bottle with vanilla gelato,
rum and Mexican Coke,
then tops it off with
absinthe-laced whipped
cream and a Southern
Comfort–soaked cherry.
$12; 833 14th St. NW;
barpilar.com
WEST VIRGINIA
Apple Butter Ice Cream
Café Bacchus,
Morgantown
This local favorite is an
ingenious flavor combo:
West Virginia apple
butter ice cream drizzled
with Mexican apple jack
caramel sauce and topped
with bacon sprinkles.
$7; 76 High St.;
cafebacchus.net
WISCONSIN
Kopp’s Special Sundae
Kopp’s Frozen Custard,
multiple locations
The local landmark Kopp’s
has been dishing out
custard since 1950. And
this sundae is a menu
mainstay—vanilla custard
layered with hot fudge,
raspberries, banana slices
and pecans.
$6.05; kopps.com
WYOMING
Wild Huckleberry
Moo’s Gourmet Ice
Cream, Jackson Hole
Wild huckleberries
grow rampant in the
Rockies—and the ice
cream makers at Moo’s
don’t let them go to
waste. They use natural
and organic ingredients
(no preservatives or
colorings): The berries
create that vibrant hue.
$2 to $4; 110 N. Center
St.; moosjacksonhole.com
216 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
On the Road
ICE CREAM SCOUTS:
John Andrews, South Dakota
Magazine; Tony Barbour, The
Roanoker, VA; Darlene Hutchinson
Biehl, River Region Living Magazine,
AL; Marcelle Bienvenu, The Times-
Picayune, New Orleans; Joe Bonwich,
St. Louis Post-Dispatch; Addie
Broyles, Austin American-Statesman;
Julian Brunt, Sun Herald, MS; Darin
Burt, Washington Magazine, WA;
Dave Cathey, The Oklahoman; Ann
Christenson, Milwaukee Magazine;
Gail Ciampa, Providence Journal; Rob
DeWalt, Santa Fe New Mexican; Janna
Farley, Argus Leader, Sioux Falls, SD;
MaryEllen Fillo, Hartford Courant;
Carrington Fox, Nashville Scene; Brian
Freedman, The Food, Drink & Travel
Report, Philadelphia; Sydne George,
Great Falls Tribune, MT; Lori Grannis,
Vine & Beast, MT; Laura Hahnefeld,
Phoenix New Times; Eric E. Harrison,
Arkansas Democrat-Gazette; Jennifer
Hazard, Yarmouth, ME; Meg Heckman,
NH; Karen Herzog, Bismarck Tribune,
ND; Anne Hillerman, Santa Fe, NM;
Lori Hogan, Cheyenne, WY; Brad
Kaplan, Creative Loafing, Atlanta;
Leslie Kelly, Seattle Magazine; Jolene
Ketzenberger, The Indianapolis
Star; Jeff Korbelik, Lincoln Journal
Star, NE; Carol Kugler, Bloomington
Herald-Times, IN; Joe Lawler, Des
Moines Register; Eric Levin, New
Jersey Monthly; Mary Brown Malouf,
Salt Lake; Dana McMahan, Louisville
Courier Journal; Leah Mennies, Boston
Magazine; Tara Morgan, Boise Weekly,
ID; Robert Moss, Charleston City
Paper, SC; Cliff Murray, Alaska Foodie;
Denise Neil, The Wichita Eagle,
KS; Melissa Pasanen, Vermont Life
Magazine; Emily Patrick, Mountain
Xpress, Asheville, NC; Mikenna
Pierotti, WV Living Magazine; Sylvia
Rector, Detroit Free Press; Laura
Reiley, Tampa Bay Times; Heidi
Knapp Rinella, Las Vegas Review-
Journal; Besha Rodell, LA Weekly;
Tracy Saelinger, Portland, OR; Kim
Schneider, Cleveland Magazine;
Jonathan Scott, The Oxford Eagle,
MS; Elina Shatkin, Los Angeles;
Carole Sugarman, Bethesda
Magazine; Joy Summers, City
Pages, MN; Patricia Talorico, The
News Journal, DE; David Tamarkin,
Middlewest, Chicago; Jessica Voelker,
Washingtonian; Claire Walter, Culinary
Colorado; Audrey Wilson, Hawaii
Tribune Herald
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THE HELLMANN’S
®
TASTE YOU LOVE
WITH OLIVE OIL
NOW THIS IS
AMORE
BRINGING THE BEST
TOGETHER FOR 100 YEARS
Q: What is low-fat half-and-
half? Seems like an oxymoron!
Lois Brichta, Santa Fe, NM
A: Low-fat or fat-free half-and-half
is not half milk and half cream,
as the name suggests; it’s often a
combination of nonfat milk, corn
syrup and a thickening agent. Be
careful when cooking with low-fat
half-and-half: It can curdle if it gets
too hot. If you’re trying to save fat
and calories, you’re better off just
using whole milk.
Q: Can I brine steak? Forest Shelnutt, Gerber, CA
A: Brining is not an ideal way to tenderize steak—even tough
cuts. Soaking beef in a saltwater solution can turn it a dull gray
color, and while brining increases the meat’s moisture content,
that’s not necessarily a good thing: The added water can prevent
a crust from forming during cooking. Marinating is a better way
to tenderize beef. Or try a “dry brine”: Coat the steak generously
with kosher salt and other dry seasonings and let stand for at
least 1 hour or up to 24 hours; brush off the brine before cooking.
Good Question...
Follow Up
Have a question about cooking? Visit foodnetwork.com/goodquestion.
Q: What’s the best way
to peel an onion?
Vincent Notarangelo,
Lutherville, MD
A: Slice off the pointy
stem end with a chef’s
knife, then stand the
onion on the cut end and slice it in half through the root. Grab the skin from the cut side and pull
it back. You can leave the pulled-back skin attached to the root and use it to stabilize the onion as
you chop. For a step-by-step chopping video, go to foodnetwork.com/onion. S
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INGREDIENTS
1 lb. bow tie pasta
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 lb. chicken breast, cut into thin strips
1/2 red onion, sliced into half moons
3/4 cup green olives, pitted and halved
1/2 cup raisins
1 cup Hellmann’s
®
Mayonnaise Dressing
with Olive Oil
1/2 cup orange juice (or more to taste)
DIRECTIONS
1. Cook pasta according to the package
instructions. Set aside to cool.
2. Add oil, chicken strips, onions, olives and
raisins to a hot pan. Cook until chicken is
cooked through and onions are softened.
Set aside to cool.
3. In a large bowl, combine Hellmann’s
®
Mayonnaise Dressing with Olive Oil and
orange juice to create a dressing.
4. Add cooled pasta, chicken, olives,
raisins and onions to dressing and toss
to coat.
CRAFTED ESPECIALLY FOR HELLMANN’S
®

BY MARIO BATALI ©
2
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creamy

chicken pasta salad
WITH GREEN OLIVES AND RAISINS
220 FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE ● JULY/AUGUST 2013
Contest
Name This Dish!
Dream up a clever name
for this fried chicken
and you could win big.
How to enter:

Read the recipe and
come up with a creative
name for this fried chicken.
We’re looking for fun,
surprising, inventive names!

Go to foodnetwork
.com/namethisdish and
enter your best name
from June 25 to July 16,
2013. The winner will
receive a $500 gift card to
foodnetworkstore.com, and
three runners-up will each
receive a $50 gift card.
W
ha
t do
y
ou think?
????????????????
ACTIVE: 50 min l TOTAL: 1 hr 5 min (plus marinating)
SERVES: 4 to 6
2 tablespoons curry powder
2 teaspoons cayenne pepper
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
8 small chicken drumsticks (about 2½ pounds)
1 cup low-fat plain yogurt
1⅓ cups whole milk
4 cloves garlic, smashed
1 cup sweetened shredded coconut
3 cups all-purpose flour
Peanut or vegetable oil, for frying (5 to 6 cups)
Vegetable shortening, for frying (5 to 6 cups)
½ cup finely chopped red onion
½ cup finely chopped mango
½ cup cilantro leaves
Juice of ½ lime
1. Combine the curry powder, cayenne, 2 teaspoons
salt and 1 teaspoon black pepper in a bowl. Combine
the chicken, half of the spice mixture, the yogurt, 1 cup
milk and the garlic in a large resealable bag; shake to
coat. Refrigerate at least 2 hours or overnight.
2. Preheat the oven to 350˚. Spread ½ cup coconut on
a baking sheet and toast, stirring occasionally, until
golden, about 12 minutes; transfer to a medium bowl
and set aside. Combine the remaining ½ cup coconut,
the flour and the remaining spice mixture in a large
bowl; work in the remaining ⅓ cup milk with your
fingers until small lumps form.
3. Set a wire rack on a baking sheet. Heat about
4 inches of equal parts peanut oil and shortening in
a large pot over medium-high heat until a deep-fry
thermometer registers 350˚.
4. Remove the drumsticks from the marinade, letting
the excess drip of. Using your hands, coat the
chicken with the flour mixture, pressing it so it sticks
to the meat. Place on a plate.
5. Working in 2 batches, carefully add the chicken
to the hot oil mixture. (The temperature will drop to
300˚ to 325˚; adjust the heat to maintain this lower
temperature.) Fry, undisturbed, 2 to 3 minutes to set
the crust. Continue frying, turning as needed, until
golden brown and cooked through, 10 to 12 minutes.
Remove to the rack; sprinkle with salt, transfer to the
oven and bake until a thermometer inserted into
the thickest part registers 165˚, 10 to 15 minutes.
6. Meanwhile, add the red onion, mango, cilantro,
lime juice and a pinch of salt to the toasted coconut.
Sprinkle the mixture on the chicken.
Beth Davis
Dublin, OH
Margajito
Nancy
Boardman
Naples, FL
Borderlime
Mary
Argyros
St. Louis
Margarita
Banderita
Patricia
Ramos
Sammamish,
WA
Recent Winner:
GULP OF MEXICO
Margar
Bander
EXICO
RUNNERS -UP
NO PURCHASE NECESSARYTO ENTER OR WIN. Name This Dish! Contest is sponsored by Hearst Communications, Inc. To enter, go to
foodnetwork.com/namethisdish and complete and submit entry form, including your recipe name. Contest begins 12:01 a.m. ETJune 25, 2013,
and ends 11:59 p.m. ETJuly 16, 2013. Must be 18 years or older and a legal resident of the 50 United States, District of Columbia or Canada.
Void in Puerto Rico, Quebec and where prohibited by law. Contest is subject to complete official rules available at foodnetwork.com/namethisdish.
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SPF 25 Anti-aging cream fights aging
signs with everything we’ve got for a
younger-looking you.
Over 4.6 million women have
already experienced the power of
the Plantscription™ collection –
what are you waiting for?
Read their reviews at origins.com.
formulated with
Raspberry
Plant Stem Cell
Technology
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Suggested retail price: $55.00
Available at Origins Retail Stores, origins.com,
select Macy’s, Dillard’s, Bon-Ton, Belk and
now Sephora.

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