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NEWS
Local 3A
Nation/World 4A
Obituaries 8A
INSIDE
Editorials 11A
Weather 12A
SPORTS 1B
Business 7B
Stocks 7B
LIFESTYLE 1C
Birthdays 3C
Movies 4C
Television 4C
CLASSIFIED 1D
Comics 18d
When Master Sgt. William
Janczewski and other re-
ghters at Little Rock Air
Force Base got called into
the ofce a while back,
Janczewski expected bad
news.
Nothing good arrives,
he said of those meetings
Wednesday by phone.
But this time was the excep-
tion.
The Harding native and the
rest of the assembled group
heard a voice on a speaker-
phone announce him as the
recipient of the Air Force
Times Airman of the Year.
The award was for his
heroic and courageous effort
to put out a re dangerously
close to 40,000 gallons of
aviation fuel and evacuate
aircraft and people safely dur-
ing an enemy mortar attack
at the forward operating base
he was stationed at in north
central Afghanistan last year.
He also was honored for
the volunteer work he and his
wife, Jessica, do supporting
families with children born
with heart defects, like their
6-year-old son, Ethan.
I was kind of taken aback
by it, Janczewski, 36, said.
I think one of the Navy guys
(who also was honored) put it
best, Why me?
He was commended for
what hes trained for, and
what hes always wanted to
do as a reghter since join-
ing the Air Force upon gradu-
ation from Wyoming Area
WASHINGTON Americans for genera-
tions have come to depend on door-to-door
mail delivery. Its about as American as apple
pie.
But with the Postal Service facing billions
of dollars in annual losses, the delivery ser-
vice could be virtually phased-out by 2022
under a proposal a House panel was consid-
ering Wednesday. Curbside delivery, which
includes deliveries to mailboxes at the end
of driveways, and cluster box delivery would
replace letter carriers slipping mail into front-
door boxes.
The proposal is part of broader legislation
by Rep. Darrell Issa, R-Calif., chairman of the
House Oversight and Government Reform
Committee, designed to cut costs at the cash-
strapped agency by up to $4.5 billion a year.
The Postal Service had a $16 billion loss last
year.
The agency has been moving toward curb-
side and cluster box delivery in new residen-
tial developments since the 1970s. The Postal
Service in April began deciding whether to
provide curbside or cluster box delivery for
people moving into newly built homes, rather
than letting the developers decide.
A balanced approach to saving the Postal
Service means allowing USPS to adapt to
Americas changing use of mail, Issa said.
Done right, these reforms can improve the
customer experience through a more efcient
Postal Service.
About one in three mail customers has to-
their-door delivery, Issa said. The shift would
include safe and secure delivery areas, Issa
said, especially for elderly customers who
receive Social Security checks and prescrip-
tions through the mail.
Sue Brennan, a Postal Service spokeswom-
an, said, While converting delivery away
from the door to curb or centralized delivery
would allow the Postal Service to deliver mail
to more addresses in less time, doing so is not
included in our ve-year plan.
Brennan said the agencys ve-year plan
does call for shifting 20 percent of business
address deliveries from door-to-door to curb-
side and cluster box delivery through 2016.
Rep. Steve Lynch, D-Mass., said the plan
Door-to-door
mail delivery
to be kicked
to the curb?
Cost cutting would eliminate
the service and replace it with
curbside or cluster box delivery
ANDREWMIGA
Associated Press
Submitted Photo
Master Sgt.
William G.
Janczewski,
a Harding
native,
received the
Air Force
Times Airman
of the Year
award earlier
this month.
Area native namedAir Force Times Airman of the Year
Heroism, volunteer work help Master Sgt.
WilliamJanczewski win military honors
JERRY LYNOTT
jlynott@timesleader.com
Clark Van Orden | The Times Leader
Fred George of Wilkes-Barre talks about his memories of working as a chef at the Hotel Sterling for 22 years, several as the head chef.
Demolition onW-B landmark set to begin today
WILKES-BARRE TWP.
Owners of area brick-and-
mortar businesses, includ-
ing businessman Peter
Sides, are keeping a watch-
ful eye on Congress, hop-
ing that the U.S. House will
soon follow the Senates lead
and adopt The Marketplace
Fairness Act.
Without a federal law that
requires online businesses
to collect sales taxes from
shoppers, businesses that
have the overhead of oper-
ating a physical store and
the requirement to collect
the state-mandated sales tax
from customers are at a dis-
advantage, Sides and others
say.
Businesses all over
Northeast Pennsylvania
simply want a level play-
ing eld when competing
against their online-only
competition, said Sides,
of State College, who
owns the Robert M. Sides
Family Music Centers in
Wilkes-Barre Township,
Williamsport and State
College.
The Marketplace Fairness
Act would take a giant step
toward doing just that. It
received a bipartisan vote
of approval in the U.S.
Senate on May 6, and simi-
lar legislation is already
pending in the House of
Representatives with more
than 60 bipartisan co-spon-
sors, including U.S. Rep.
Lou Barletta, R-Hazleton.
As a former mayor, I have
seen rsthand how badly
Retailers
appeal
for fair
tax plan
Businessman Peter Sides
among those seeking
law requiring online
frms to collect sales tax
ANDREWM. SEDER
aseder@timesleader.com
U.S. POSTAL SERvICE
I can still see it
as it was.
WILKES-BARRE This will be
the last day for what remains of the
Hotel Sterling to stand.
At 7a.m. todayBrdaricConstruction
Co. will begin dismantling the once-
glorious hotel, reducing it to a pile of
historical rubble.
It should take 30 days to demolish
the condemned hotel and another
month to clear the site clearing the
way for future development at a cor-
ner that is the premier gateway to the
citys downtown.
Not many people were around the
Sterling on Wednesday as workers
continued to move equipment onto
the site in preparation of the demoli-
tion. One former Sterling employee
As the Hotel Sterling faces its fnal days, its glory
lives on in the memory of a man who lived it.
BILL OBOYLE
boboyle@timesleader.com
Submitted photo
Chef Fred George, back left, stands at the ready to serve the Sterlings smorgasbord.
What did
coach OBrien
have to say?
SPORTS, 1B
A name ft for
a little king
Royal baby to be called ... NATION/WORLD, 4A
See HOTEL | 12A See MAIL | 2A
MORE ONLINE
To see video of the
interviewwith Peter Sides,
go to youtube.com/times
leadervideo.
See TAx PLAN | 12A
See AIRMAN | 12A
6 09815 10011
The police chief of a small
town in Pennsylvanias anthra-
cite coal country who is an
outspoken gun-rights advocate
and is trying to organize an
armed, non-government group
says he loves his country and
makes no apologies for post-
ing online videos that boast
his confrontational, profanity-
laced tirades punctuated by his
ring of automatic weapons.
At one point in one of the
videos, he res a weapon and
screams, Come and get it!
after he blasts U.S. Secretary
of State John Kerry as a trai-
tor for pledging to sign a
United Nations treaty that
requires ratifying countries to
begin controlling the interna-
tional arms trade.
The chief, Mark Kessler, the
one-man police force of tiny
Gilberton, population approxi-
mately 800, and some other
gun-rights advocates view
the treaty which Congress
would have to ratify for the
U.S. to ofcially take part
as a step toward restricting the
domestic use of more conven-
tional weapons that are per-
sonal property.
In a telephone interview,
Kessler told The Associated
Press that he made the videos
to draw attention to what he
views as the erosion of the con-
stitutional rights of free speech
and to bear arms and to speak
out for the many others who
are afraid to do so.
He also said he is increas-
ingly concerned about what
he views as a government out
of control, citing the FBIs
use of drones, the National
Security Agencys collection
of hundreds of millions of
Americans phone records
and the Internal Revenue
Services scrutiny of applica-
tions for tax-exempt status by
politically active groups.
Im trying to wake people
up to say, Hey, theres a lot
more going on than meets the
eye. Alot more, Kessler said
in an interview from Texas
where the 41-year-old father
of four was vacationing. It
goes way beyond the Second
Amendment, the First
Amendment. Its a shame.
Our founding fathers didnt
intend for our government to
be the way it is.
Kessler, who called him-
self a wholeheartedly good
man who loves his country,
acknowledged that some
people were upset by the
videos, but he said he does
not regret posting them and
insisted that many more peo-
ple were supportive of them.
Gilberton Mayor Mary
Lou Hannon said Wednesday
that she found the language
offensive and understood
that many others did, too.
Theyre like watching an
R-rated movie, Hannon told
AP. The profanity and vio-
lence in it was a little upset-
ting.
The weapons in the video
are legal weapons and belong
to the police department after
he purchased them with his
own money and donated them
in a transaction approved by
the borough council, Hannon
said.
The council, which has had
a contract with Kessler for 14
years, is planning to address
the matter with Kessler in a
private session Wednesday,
Hannon said. She said she sup-
ports his continued employ-
ment, noting that he has made
a lot of residents feel safe and
responds to emergencies at all
hours.
If you were in trouble and
you needed somebody to pro-
tect you, Mark would be the
person you would want run-
ning to your aid, Hannon
said. My experience and that
of many of our residents (is)
he will die for you. Hes loyal
and I think thats important.
Kessler, a former coal miner,
is active in gun-rights circles,
appearing on an online radio
broadcast on the conservative
conspiracy theory website
Infowars, hosting an online
radio show on a website that
bills itself as the voice of the
resistance, speaking at gun-
rights rallies and hosting his
own website where he is seek-
ing recruits for what he calls
the Constitutional Security
Force.
He also has claimed in
recent weeks that his outspo-
ken views on gun rights have
earned him death threats.
On Wednesday, he would
not say how many people
have signed up for the secu-
rity force, but said there are
chapters in 45 states and many
recruits are current or former
members of law enforcement
and the military.
PAGE 2A Thursday, July 25, 2013 NEWS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
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OBITUARIES
Dockett, Herbert
Ellis-Westwell,
Laura
George, David
Godeck, Jeffrey
Grosek, Helen
Lafrican, Charlotte
Malarkey, William
Nolan, John
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Issue No. 2013-170 2013-206
Four must
face trial in
meth ring
ALLENTOWN After almost three
days of testimony, a Lehigh County district
judge ruled four of the alleged main players
in a 23-person drug ring that brought meth-
amphetamines from Mexico to the Lehigh
Valley must face court.
District Judge David M. Howells ruled
Gary J. Kuehner, 32, of Allentown, James
Schwar, 35, of Red Hill, Montgomery
County, and Maria C. Wahlfield, 49, of
San Diego, must stand trial on a number
of dug offenses, including participating in
a corrupt organization. The judge also dis-
missed two possession with intent to deliv-
er charges against Kuehner, who faces 17
other felony counts.
Prior to the start of Wednesdays hear-
ing, Pawel Gajewski, 36, of Weisenberg
Township, gave up his right to a prelimi-
nary hearing and waived his case into
Lehigh County Court.
The Attorney Generals Office alleges the
drug ring brought millions of dollars worth
of meth and marijuana into the Lehigh
Valley over the past five years.
Authorities have identified Schwar as
Kuehners marijuana supplier and Gajewski
as his meth supplier. Gajewski allegedly
received the meth from Wahlfield, agents
with the Attorney Generals Office said.
For much of the three-day hearing, which
began in early June and continued on
Wednesday, lawyers for the four defendants
argued about the meanings of wiretapped
phone conversations that authorities say
helped take down a drug ring.
Agent Thomas Sedor with the Attorney
Generals Office deciphered dozens of
phone conversations and offered his expert
opinion in what was being discussed. In
some conversations, code words such
cousin or Bubba were used to refer to
marijuana, and dubious was used to refer
to meth, he testified.
On Wednesday, prosecutors played
phone conversations between Gajewski and
Wahlfield, his alleged meth supplier.
Wahlfield, Sedor testified, received large
amounts of meth from her connection in
Mexico and took it to Las Vegas, where it
would be shipped by truck to Gajewski at
a Lower Macungie Township hotel. Sedor
testified detectives in Las Vegas con-
ducted surveillance on a meeting between
Gajewski, Wahlfield and an unidentified
man. During this meeting, Sedor alleges, a
meth transaction was made.
Before the drugs could make their way to
the Lehigh Valley, Sedor testified, 14 ounc-
es of meth was intercepted by agents on
June 19, 2012 at a hotel in Lower Macungie
Township. A day later, Gajewski, upset
about the seizure, re-ups with Wahlfield,
ordering an additional eight to nine ounces
of methamphetamines, and asking her if
she can score him some heroin, Sedor testi-
fied.
All of the attorneys argued no drugs were
ever recovered on their clients and some of
them didnt even know each other. Joshua
Karoly, Kuehners attorney, and Charles
Laputka, Schwars attorney, both said their
clients didnt even know Wahlfield, yet they
were all tied to the same corrupt organiza-
tion.
Just because he doesnt know Mrs.
Wahlfield doesnt mean this isnt a corrupt
organization, deputy Attorney General
Michael Dugan argued back.
At the conclusion of the investigation,
agents with the attorney generals office,
along with police, raided several locations,
including Kuehners home and Schwars
home, on July 5, 2012 and recovered 103
handguns and rifles, $49,000 in cash, six
cars, four motorcycles, a four-wheeler and
drug paraphernalia.
Nineteen others charged in the drug
ring have either waived their hearings or
have been ordered to stand trial. Among
them are John Kerstetter, 38, and his wife,
Kimberly Kerstetter, 39, the former owners
of Magnolias Vineyard restaurant in South
Whitehall and were briefly part-owners of
the Trapp Door Gastropub in Emmaus.
Authorities say they discovered more
than 200 plants in a complex marijuana-
growing operation in their South Whitehall
Township home.
Prosecutors allege Mexico
to Lehigh Valley connection
MANUEL GAMIZ JR.
The Morning Call
AVOCA Two people were killed
in a violent crash involving a tractor-
trailer and a minivan that was stopped
in the middle of Interstate 81 early
Wednesday morning, state police at
Wyoming said.
Anthony Lizza, 58, of Old Forge,
driving a 2002 Ford minivan, was
stopped in the middle northbound
lane near the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton
International Airport when the van
was struck from behind by a tractor-
trailer driven by Charles Brown, 62,
of Sugarloaf, at about 2:30 a.m., state
police said.
The impact forced the two vehicles
into the median between the north-
bound and southbound lanes.
Lizza and Jeffrey Godeck, 52, of
Moosic, were killed in the crash.
Godeck was a passenger in the mini-
van.
The crash closed the interstate for
nearly seven hours, causing a seven-
mile backup.
Trafc was detoured at Exit 178-A
onto state Route 315, creating traf-
c congestion through Dupont and
Avoca.
The interstate reopened just after
10 a.m. after the wreckage had been
removed and the crash reconstructed
by investigators.
Southbound lanes were not affected
by the crash.
Jon OConnell | The Times Leader
Workers from Falzone Towing Service load fragments of a tractor-trailer onto a flatbed on Interstate 81 near the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton
International Airport on Wednesday morning. The truck collided with a car around 2:40 a.m., state police said.
2 area men killed in Interstate 81 wreck
Times Leader staf
AP file photo
Gilberton Police Chief Mark Kessler, right, explains the purpose of
his Second Amendment Preservation Resolution that was adopted
at a January meeting of the Gilberton Borough Council in Gliberton.
Listening to Kessler is Gilberton Mayor Mary Lou Hannon.
to move about 30 million
residential addresses from
to-the-door to curbside and
cluster box service would
be virtually impossible in
dense urban areas such as
his hometown of South
Boston crowded with tri-
ple-deckers three apart-
ments stacked on top of
each other.
Youd have to knock
houses down in my neigh-
borhood to build cluster
boxes, Lynch said. This
will not work.
It might work in places
like Manhattan with big
apartment buildings, he
said.
The nancially belea-
guered U.S. Postal Service,
an independent agency,
gets no tax dollars for its
day-to-day operations, but
is subject to congressional
control.
The Postal Service is pur-
suing a major restructuring
throughout its retail, deliv-
ery and mail processing
operations. Since 2006, it
has reduced annual costs
by about $15 billion, cut
its workforce by 193,000
or 28 percent, and consoli-
dated more than 200 mail-
processing locations.
The services losses are
largely due to a decline in
mail volume and a congres-
sional requirement that it
make advance payments to
cover expected health care
costs for future retirees.
About $11.1 billion of last
years losses were due to
payments for future retiree
health costs.
The Postal Service is con-
sidering several options to
x its nances, including
negotiations with unions
to reduce labor costs and
another possible increase in
prices.
The service earlier this
year backpedaled on its
plan to end Saturday mail
delivery after running into
opposition in Congress. It
has tried repeatedly and
unsuccessfully over the past
several years to persuade
Congress to approve ending
Saturday mail delivery and
to free the service from the
advance health payments.
The Senate last year
passed a bill that would
have stopped the Postal
Service from eliminating
Saturday service for at least
two years and required it to
try two years of aggressive
cost cutting instead. The
House didnt pass a bill.
Mail
From page 1A
Police chief stirs furor over abrasive videos
MARC LEVY
Associated Press
Gilberton ofcer takes issue with U.N.
treaty seen as attack on gun owners
www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER Thursday, July 25, 2013 PAGE 3A
NANTICOKE A
Hunlock Township man jailed
on charges he drove away
after striking a bicyclist who
later died is expected to plead
guilty to related charges.
Under a negotiated plea
deal between prosecutors
and attorney Jonathan Blum,
Matthew James Perkins
waived his right to a prelimi-
nary hearing before District
Judge Donald Whittaker on
Wednesday sending charges
of accidents involving death
and involuntary manslaughter
to Luzerne County Court.
Assistant district attorneys
Michele Hardik and Rebecca
Reimiller withdrew a homi-
cide-by-vehicle charge against
Perkins.
The deal calls for Perkins to
plead guilty to the charges he
waived to county court. If he
opts out, the vehicular homi-
cide charge will be reinstated
for trial.
Perkins, 20, of Hartman
Road, could face a mandatory
one year in jail when he is
sentenced. He remains jailed
at the county prison for lack
of $100,000 bail.
State police at Wyoming
allege Perkins, driving a 2007
Saab, struck Richard Stadts,
73, who was riding a bicycle,
on Route 11 in Plymouth
Township on Aug. 7. Stadts
died at Geisinger Wyoming
Valley Medical Center in
Plains Township the next day.
A witness wrote down the
license plate number on the
Saab, state
police said.
P e r k i n s
drove away
and returned
to his resi-
dence. He
told his
grandmother
he may have struck a person,
according to the criminal
complaint.
He told state police he con-
sumed a shot of liquor and ran
into the woods where, he told
state police, he did heroin
before returning to his grand-
mothers house, the complaint
says.
Perkins is scheduled to be
formally arraigned in county
court on Oct. 4.
He also waived an unrelat-
ed Jan. 2 Plymouth Township
drunken-driving charge to
county court. He is also fac-
ing unrelated drunken-driving
and drug offenses in county
court from a trafc stop by
Kingston Township police on
Aug. 18, according to court
records.
WILKES-BARRE
Nature Discovery Day
at farmers market
The Riverfront Parks Committee
invites the community to a day of nature
exploration at Nature Discovery Day
today from10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Wilkes-
Barre Farmers Market on Public Square.
Learn about the Kirby Park Natural
Area, invasive insects, local wildlife, water
conservation and more. Second Chance
Wildlife Preservation will have a special
exhibit of wild animals commonly seen in
our own back yards at 11 a.m.
There will also be several local busi-
ness and organization exhibitors at the
event, including the Riverfront Parks
Committee, Penn State Extension,
Pennsylvania American Water and DCNR
Bureau of Forestry.
Tonight, the Riverfront Parks
Committee and the Performing Arts
Institute of Wyoming Seminary invite
the community to An Evening of Jazz at
7:30 p.m. on the River Common at the
NorthamptonStreet Portal Amphitheatre.
Grammy winner Steve Fidyk will per-
form as a part of the Wyoming Seminary
Performing Arts Institutes program.
SWEETVALLEY
Community picnic
scheduled Saturday
The rst Annual Sweet Valley
Community Crime Watch picnic is
scheduled for Saturday.
The event will be at the North Lake
Pavilion in Sweet Valley beginning at
noon. There will be free food, a chance
to participate with Neighbors Helping
Neighbors and to hear guest speaker
Luzerne County Detective Charles
Balough.
Balogh will speak about topics includ-
ing mobile methamphetamine labs, van-
dalism and community awareness.
Directions to the pavilion are: state
Route 118 to Main Road in Sweet Valley,
left turn at the O-Live Restaurant, then
right turn onto North Lake Road by Wee
Care Day Care. Finally, a right at the
stop sign and straight on to North Lake
Pavilion, located on the right.
PALMERTON
Blues Festival at
Valley Lodge
Blue Mountain Ski Area and Michael
Cloeren, founder/producer of the
Pocono Blues Festival, announce the
third annual Pennsylvania Blues Festival
to be held at the Valley Lodge, Friday
through Sunday.
The three-day festival will be pre-
sented on two stages. A special fea-
ture of the festival will be the Friday
Night Pre-Fest Jam
with The BC Combo
(The Smith Brothers:
Nick Franclik, Josh
Kanusky & Joe Mack)
featuring Bev Conklin,
Georgie Bonds, Mike
Dugan, Charlie Brown
and Mike Mettalia.
Saturday and
Sunday will showcase national and inter-
national artists such as Bonerama, The
Slide Brothers, Robert Randolph & The
Family Band, Guy Davis, Ivan Nevilles
Dumpstaphun, Ruthie Foster, The
Bobby Rush Revue and Alexis P. Suter.
For ticket information, directions and
additional details, visit www.skibluemt.
com.
HANOVERTWP.
Award-winning BBQ
coming for good cause
Chef/Pitmaster Ernie Mellor of
Memphis is bringing his award-winning
Hog Wild BBQ to the area in support
of the Center of the Village after-school
program Aug. 17, 4 to 8 p.m., at R&D
Memories, 566 Fellows Ave., Hanover
Township.
Mellor is donating
his time, and all prof-
its will benet the free
program offered to
rst- through fourth-
grade students at
the Wyoming Valley
Presbyterian Church in
Wilkes-Barre.
The event includes
dinner and entertainment and cash bar.
Tickets are $20 for adults and $10 for
children 12 and under.
Mellors BBQ has won many awards
in his 23 years of competition at the
Memphis in May World Barbecue
Cooking Contest.
Tickets are available at Gallery of
Sound (Wilkes-Barre locations) and
IBOP Coffee Shop, Northampton and
Washington streets, Wilkes-Barre. For
more information, contact Greg Emery
at 855-2759, or at gregemeryaz@
yahoo.com.
HunlockTwp. man to plead guilty in fatal hit-run
EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
Woman seeks award payment out of childs death settlement
WILKES-BARRE A
woman who was injured in
a January 2008 car crash
has asked to intervene in
a wrongful death lawsuit
involving an infant to gain
money awarded by a jury in
her case.
In court papers led this
week, Jessica DAiello, of
Exeter, requests that Alicia
Balasavage, of Pittston, be
ordered to pay a $44,188
judgment made in DAiellos
favor stemming from the
car accident and a later jury
trial.
DAiello requests the pay-
ment, according to court
papers, because Balasavage
recently settled a wrong-
ful death suit involving her
infant daughter who died
after a re at their home on
George Avenue in Wilkes-
Barre in July 2007.
DAiellos ling, through
her attorney Anthony Ross,
states Balasavage had previ-
ously lacked the funds to pay
the jury award and recently
settled the wrongful death
suit for $140,000.
According to court papers:
In July 2007, 6-month-
old Emily Joan Hockenbury
died in a re at her parents
George Avenue home.
The girls mother and
father, Balasavage and Scott
Hockenbury, led a wrong-
ful death suit in March 2008
against landlords Anthony
Balucha and his wife, Karen,
alleging defective electrical
outlets caused the blaze.
DAiello sued Balasavage
and the owner of the car she
was driving in November
2008 stemming from a
January 2008 accident on
Scott Street in Wilkes-Barre.
DAiello alleged she was
injured as a result of the
crash.
On March 13, 2013,
DAiello was awarded
$44,188 after a jury trial.
On July 2, 2013,
Balasavage and Hockenbury
led a petition to settle
the wrongful death suit for
$140,000.
This week, DAiello fled
her petition to intervene in
the wrongful death suit to be
paid the money she is owed
from the car accident ver-
dict.
Under Pennsylvania law,
Ross wrote in the petition,
DAiello has an interest in
Balasavages other case
because she is a judgment
creditor of Balasavage.
An attorney who repre-
sents Balasavage, Barry
Penn, of Philadelphia, did
not return messages seeking
comment. Contact informa-
tion for Balasavage could not
be found.
Luzerne County Judge
Lesa Gelb scheduled a hear-
ing on DAiellos request for
Aug. 26.
SHEENA DELAZIO
sdelazio@timesleader.com
Taxpayer group behind billboard on
gas missing fromW-B city pumps
WILKES-BARRE An
investigation into fuel miss-
ing from Wilkes-Barre city
pumps has a taxpayer group
fuming a year after it began.
The Wilkes-Barre City
Taxpayers Association rented
a billboard along state Route
309 that pictures city Mayor
Tom Leighton pumping fuel
from the citys pumps into his
personal vehicle.
The groups president
knows the answer to the
question on the billboard,
Mayor Got Gas?, but wants
information on the status of
the investigation launched by
the Luzerne County District
Attorneys Ofce.
Thats why we did it,
said Frank Sorick, associa-
tion president. The ongoing
investigation surfaced well
over a year ago.
The one-month rental fee
was paid for with private
donations, Sorick said. The
photo used in the billboard
was taken by a member of
the association while on pub-
lic property.
The mayor did not return
a call left at his ofce
Wednesday.
District Attorney Stefanie
Salavantis said she was
unaware of the billboard,
adding she will not be rushed
into a conclusion.
This investigation is going
to be conducted properly and
it is going to be conducted
thoroughly, she said.
The district attorney said
her ofce has other cases,
including homicides, that
have taken priority over the
more than 67,000 gallons of
gasoline and diesel fuel that
went missing from the city
pumps between July 2010
and June 2012.
The investigation is active
and her staff has met more
than a dozen times on it, she
said. Its not being swept
under the rug, she said.
Bob Kadluboski, a towing
contractor in the city and
critic of Leightons adminis-
tration, led the complaint
with the district attorney on
the missing fuel and said he
planned on meeting with her
as soon as possible to see
whats going on with this.
He also asked the state to
investigate the matter.
The state Department of
Revenue ordered the city to
pay $23,018 in taxes on the
fuel it could not prove was
used for municipal purpos-
es. The penalty and interest
charges assessed raised the
amount to approximately
$26,000.
In June, the department
denied a city appeal of the
assessment. Last week, a
city spokesman said the
city would no longer seek
a refund of the money it
paid to the department and
acknowledged there was lax
oversight and record keep-
ing of who was lling up at
the city pumps located at the
Department of Public Works
yard on North Pennsylvania
Avenue.
But Kadluboski was not
satised with the citys deci-
sion and said he wants people
to be held accountable.
Somebody is responsible
for this $26,000 ne, he
said.
His next step is ling an
ethics complaint over the
missing fuel, he said.
Clark Van Orden/The Times Leader
The Wilkes-Barre City Taxpayers Association has rented this billboard along state Route 309 and wants answers
about the county District Attorneys Offices investigation of fuel missing from city pumps.
JERRY LYNOTT
jlynott@timesleader.com
IN BRIEF
K
LOCAL
Perkins
Rush
Mellor
Probe fuels
outdoor ad
State voter IDtrial recesses in confusion
HARRISBURG The
eighth day of a trial on
Pennsylvanias voter-identi-
cation law ended in disar-
ray Wednesday as plaintiffs
attorneys contesting the laws
constitutionality refused to
rest their case until they learn
more about potential prob-
lems in issuing mandatory
photo ID cards.
Commonwealth Court
Judge Bernard McGinley
expressed impatience at the
slow pace of the trial and
cleared the courtroom briey
to huddle with lawyers from
both sides, but court recessed
for the day with little sign of
a compromise. The state did,
however, present some testi-
mony in defense of the law.
At issue are about 500
registered voters who were
rejected for a Pennsylvania
Department of Transportation
identication card last year
and were referred to the
Department of State for a free,
voting-only ID card developed
in August. The Department
of State card was developed
as a last resort for voters who
certify that they do not have
other IDs acceptable for vot-
ing.
Attorneys for the plaintiffs
say more than 100 of those
voters applied for a special
voting-only ID card before the
2012 presidential election, but
didnt receive them until after
the election or, in some cases,
at all.
Enforcement of the March
2012 voter ID law has been
blocked by court orders
since before the election, but
lawyers say last years cases
point up the possibility that
future voters could be disen-
franchised by the law the
central issue in the lawsuit.
The plaintiffs cite their con-
sultants projections that the
law would disenfranchise hun-
dreds of thousands of voters.
Theres a lot of ways that
this law disenfranchises peo-
ple, but this is a very direct
way, said Jennifer Clarke,
executive director of the
Public Interest Law Center
of Philadelphia, a member
of the plaintiffs legal team
that includes the NAACP,
the Pennsylvania League
of Women Voters and the
Homeless Advocacy Project.
PennDOT condential-
ity restrictions limited dis-
closures about some of the
voters in question, fueling the
mutual distrust that is increas-
ingly apparent between the
two sides.
PETER JACKSON
Associated Press
www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER Thursday, July 25, 2013 PAGE 4A
APARECIDA, Brazil
Pope Francis urged Catholics
to resist the ephemeral
idols of money, power and
pleasure in celebrating the
first public Mass of his ini-
tial international foreign
journey as pontiff during an
emotional visit to one of the
most important shrines in
Latin America.
Thousands packed into
the cavernous Basilica of
the Shrine of Our Lady of
Aparecida, tucked into an
agricultural region of ver-
dant fields halfway between
Rio and Sao Paulo, and tens
of thousands more braved
a cold rain outside to catch
a glimpse of the first pope
from the Americas returning
to a shrine of great mean-
ing to the continent and him
personally.
Before the Mass, Francis
stood in silent prayer before
the 15-inch-tall image of
the Virgin of Aparecida, the
Black Mary, his eyes tear-
ing up as he breathed heav-
ily. It was a deeply personal
moment for this pontiff, who
has entrusted his papacy to
the Virgin Mary and, like
many Catholics in Latin
America, places great impor-
tance in Marian devotion.
During his homily, Francis
urged Catholics to keep their
values of faith, generosity
and fraternity, a message he
was expected to repeat later
in the day during a visit to a
drug rehabilitation center in
Rio de Janeiro.
It is true that nowadays,
to some extent, everyone
including our young people
feels attracted by the many
idols which take the place
of God and appear to offer
hope: money, success, power,
pleasure, he said. Often a
growing sense of loneliness
and emptiness in the hearts
of many people leads them
to seek satisfaction in these
ephemeral idols.
The church is struggling
in Latin America to keep
Catholics from straying to
evangelical and Pentecostal
churches that often prom-
ise help in finding material
wealth, an alluring attrac-
tion in a poverty-wracked
continent. Francis top pri-
ority as pope has been to
reach out to the worlds poor
and inspire Catholic lead-
ers to go to slums and other
peripheries to preach.
It was no coincidence,
then, that the first major
event of his first foreign
trip as pope was a Mass in
Aparecida. The tiny shrine,
which draws 11 million
pilgrims a year, hosted a
critical 2007 meeting of
Latin American bishops
who, under the guidance of
then-Cardinal Jorge Mario
Bergoglio, drafted a mis-
sion statement on how to
reinvigorate the faith on the
continent.
Ive seen people in my
own congregation leave
because the Evangelicals
offer them something
new and exciting and the
Catholic Church was seen as
kind of old and stuffy, said
Marcia Cecilia de Souza, the
52-year-old owner of a pri-
vate school in the southern
state of Santa Catarina, as
she searched for newspa-
per to stuff into her soaked
leather boots. Francis is
such an inspiration, so hum-
ble and giving I think hes
going to bring people back
into the fold.
MADRID
Dozens are dead
in train crash
A train derailed in northwestern Spain
on Wednesday night, toppling passenger
cars on their sides and leaving at least
one torn open as smoke rose into the air.
At least 35 were reported dead, with pos-
sibly even more injured.
The accident occurred on high-speed
tracks near the train station in Santiago
de Compostola, 60 miles south of El
Ferrol. Rescue workers were seen in the
television images caring for people still
inside some of the cars.
The train, which belongs to the state-
owned Renfe company, was headed to El
Ferrol from Madrid.
LONDON
George: A kingly
name for prince
The little prince was in need of a name,
and now, by George, hes got one.
Make that three: George Alexander
Louis.
The announcement Wednesday that
Prince William and his wife, Kate, had
selected a moniker steeped in British his-
tory came as royal ofcials said the new
parents were seeking quiet family time
away from the ashbulbs and frenzy that
accompanied the birth of their rst child.
While the news put torest intense spec-
ulation over what name the couple would
choose, the extreme interest around it
illustrated howthe 2-day-old future heir is
already on his way to a lifetime of fanfare
and public glare.
NEWORLEANS
Suit fled against
oil companies
Flood protection ofcials in the New
Orleans area have led a lawsuit seeking
to hold the oil and gas industry responsi-
ble for the erosion of hundreds of acres of
coastal land that serve as a natural buffer
against ooding from hurricanes.
The Southeast Louisiana Flood
Protection Authority-Easts board of com-
missioners led the lawsuit against doz-
ens of companies Wednesday in Orleans
Parish Civil District Court. The board
says corrosive saltwater froma network of
oil and gas access and pipeline canals has
killed vegetation and swept away moun-
tains of soil. The wetlands are considered
a crucial buffer against hurricanes.
The boardsays it will have tobear many
of the costs associated with the need for
increased ood protection. Its suit seeks
unspecied damages.
WASHINGTON
Delivery of jets
to Egypt delayed
The U.S. is delaying its delivery of F-16
ghter jets to Egypt in light of the mili-
tary overthrow of Mohammed Morsi as
president, but it has not decided whether
to suspend military aid more broadly, the
Pentagon said Wednesday.
Pentagon press secretary George Little
said President Barack Obama made the
decision to hold up the F-16 delivery while
the administration continues to review
options and consult with Congress on
military assistance generally.
The delay was the rst direct action the
U.S. has taken since the Egyptian military
ousted Morsi and installed a new civil-
ian government. Under U.S. law, military
aid to a country that underwent a coup
detat must be suspended. But the Obama
administration says it is still trying to
determine if what happened three weeks
ago in Egypt was in fact a coup.
Pope makes emotional plea in Brazil
Church is
struggling in
Latin America
to keep Catholics
fromleaving
JENNY BARCHFIELD
and NICOLE WINFIELD
Associated Press
Senate set
to fnish
work on
loan deal
WASHINGTON Borrowing
for tuition, housing and books
would be less expensive for college
students and their parents this fall
but the costs would start climb-
ing almost immediately under a
deal the Senate was poised to pass
Wednesday.
The bipartisan proposal law-
makers were considering would
link interest rates on federal stu-
dent loans to the nancial mar-
kets, providing lower interest rates
right away but higher ones if the
economy improves as expected.
Senate aides said lawmakers were
on track to nish work by late
Wednesday afternoon.
Liberal Democrats labeled the
White House-backed proposal
a bait-and-switch measure that
would lure in new borrowers with
low rates now but would cost
future students.
The bill before us today offers
students and families lower stu-
dent loan interest rates in the
near-term, but we can fully expect
higher student loan interest rates
in the years to come, said Sen.
Tammy Baldwin, D-Wis. Why on
earth would we want to expose our
students to higher rates?
The White House and its allies
said the new loan structure would
offer lower rates to 11 million bor-
rowers right away and save the
average undergraduate $1,500 in
interest charges. Democratic lead-
ers expected widespread defec-
tions from within their ranks but
expected Republican support
would help them win passage.
But there was no denying the
new structure could cost future
students if the economy improves
as expected and interest rates
climb. The White Houses allies
instead suggested the new formula
is better than the status quo.
Under the plan,
undergraduates this fall
could borrow at a 3.9
percent interest rate.
PHILIP ELLIOTT
Associated Press
GALESBURG, Ill.
President Barack Obama said
Wednesday that Washington
has taken its eye off the
ball as he pledged a stronger
second-term commitment to
tackling the economic woes
that strain many in the middle
class nearly ve years after the
country plunged into a reces-
sion.
Obama returned to the col-
lege campus where he gave his
rst major economic address
as a U.S. senator, and he
chided Congress for being less
concerned about the economy
and more about an endless
parade of distractions, politi-
cal posturing and phony scan-
dals.
I am here to say this needs
to stop, Obama said in a
speech at Knox College. This
moment does not require
short term thinking. It does
not require having the same
old stale debates.
The presidents attempt
to refocus on the economy
comes amid some hopeful
signs of improvement, with
the unemployment rate falling
and consumer condence on
the rise. But looming spend-
ing and budget deadlines this
fall could upend that progress
if Washington spirals into con-
tentious scal ghts like those
that plagued Obamas rst
term.
I believe there are members
of both parties who under-
stand whats at stake, Obama
said. But I will not allow grid-
lock, inaction or willful indif-
ference to get in our way.
Even before the president
spoke, Republicans panned his
pivot back to the economy as
little more than vague, empty
promises.
Its a hollow shell, its an
Easter Egg with no candy in
it, said House Speaker John
Boehner, R-Ohio.
The president announced
no fresh policy proposals,
though he promised new ideas
in a series of speeches he plans
in the coming weeks. They
will focus on manufacturing,
education, housing, retire-
ment security and health care.
On education, the presi-
dent promised to outline an
aggressive strategy to shake
up the system, tackle rising
costs, and improve value for
middle-class students and
their families. He renewed
his call for increasing the mini-
mum wage.
Despite pressing public
concerns over jobs and eco-
nomic security, the economy
has taken a back seat in
Washington to other issues in
the rst six months of Obamas
second term. Thats in part
due to the White Houses deci-
sion to focus on other agenda
items following Obamas re-
election, most notably stricter
gun control measures and
immigration.
Some distractions also have
thrown the White House off
balance, including revelations
that the Internal Revenue
Service targeted politi-
cal groups and the Justice
Departments seizure of jour-
nalists phone records. Foreign
policy crises, particularly in
the Middle East, have compet-
ed for Obamas attention, too.
The president said that
while he will continue to press
for his other agenda items,
there will be fewresources and
little resolve for solving other
problems without a strong
economy.
This growing inequality
isnt just morally wrong. Its
bad economics, Obama said.
When the rungs on the ladder
of opportunity grow farther
apart, it undermines the very
essence of this country.
Obama: Washington took
its eye of economic ball
DARLENE SUPERVILLE
Associated Press
Snowden to stay in Russia, for now, lawyer says
MOSCOW National
Security Agency leaker
Edward Snowden, who
ed to Moscows airport a
month ago, aims to stay in
Russia for the near future
and learn the countrys cul-
ture and language, his law-
yer said Wednesday.
To get him started,
Anatoly Kucherena said he
gave Snowden a copy of
Crime and Punishment,
Dostoyevskys lengthy novel
about the torment and
redemption of a man who
thought himself outside the
law.
I am not talking about
the similarity of inner con-
tradictions, Kucherena
said after meeting Snowden
in the transit zone of
Sheremetyevo international
airport, where Snowden has
apparently been marooned
since arriving from Hong
Kong on June 23.
The days developments
left the White House
and nearly everyone else
seeking clarity about
the status of the man who
revealed details of an NSA
program to monitor Internet
and telephone communica-
tions.
When Snowden rst
arrived at Sheremetyevo, he
was believed to be planning
just to transfer to a ight to
Cuba and then to Venezuela
to seek asylum. But the
United States, which wants
him returned for prosecu-
tion, canceled his passport,
stranding him. He hasnt
been seen in public since,
although he met with human
rights activ-
ists and law-
yers July 12.
Snowden
then applied
for tempo-
rary asylum
in Russia,
saying he
event ual l y
wanted to visit countries
that had offered him asy-
lum: Venezuela, Bolivia and
Nicaragua.
Its unclear how long
Russia will take to decide
on the asylum request.
Kucherenas meeting
Wednesday with Snowden
was preceded by a flurry of
reports that said the lawyer
would give him documenta-
tion that would allow him to
leave the airport while the
asylum process is underway.
But Kucherena said he
had no such paperwork to
pass along. The Federal
Migration Service, which
would issue such a docu-
ment, said it had no infor-
mation.
Asked about Snowdens
long-term intentions,
Kucherena told state televi-
sion that Russia is his final
destination for now. He
doesnt look further into the
future than that.
White House spokes-
man Jay Carney said the
U.S. was seeking clarity
as the reports swirled of
Snowdens possible immi-
nent departure from the
airport. The head of the
Senate Foreign Relations
Committee, Robert
Menendez, said provid-
ing any refuge to Edward
Snowden will be harmful to
U.S.-Russia relations.
JIM HEINTZ
Associated Press
President Barack Obama speaks Wednesday at Knox College in
Galesburg, Ill.
IN BRIEF
K
NATION/WORLD
Pope Francis waves to pilgrims as he arrives Wednesday at the Aparecida Basilica in Aparecida, Brazil. Francis top priority as pope has been to reach
out to the worlds poor.
AP photo
Snowden
AP photo
FIRE INTHE GULF
Afre burns Wednesday on the Hercules
265 drilling rig in the Gulf of Mexico
of the coast of Louisiana. Natural gas
spewed uncontrolled fromthe well on
Tuesday after a blowout that forced the
evacuation of 44 workers aboard the
rig, authorities said. No injuries were
reported.
www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER NEWS Thursday, July 25, 2013 PAGE 5A
County judges attending
conference inHershey
SHEENA DELAZIO
sdelazio@timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE Six
Luzerne County judges
will travel to Hershey this
week to take part in the
Pennsylvania Conference
of State Trial Judges to
brush up on several areas
of law.
The conference, which
began Wednesday and
continues until Saturday
morning, is one of two
meetings scheduled each
year for state judges to
come together to discuss
issues of the day and
topics of current interest
to trial judges, county
President Judge Thomas
Burke said.
The conference affords
an opportunity to judges
to talk and interact with
several hundred judges
from across the state,
Burke said. The annual
conference presents a sig-
nicant opportunity for
judges to attend seminars
and presentations on vari-
ous areas of law.
Burke said ve of the
full-time judges, includ-
ing himself, and one
senior judge will travel
to Hershey this week
whenever their schedules
allow to attend the confer-
ence.
Burke said this years
topics center on medi-
cal malpractice cases,
updates on new sex-
offender laws and a
review of appellate court
practices as they apply
to the responsibilities of
county judges.
In addition, Burke said,
judges are able to partici-
pate in meetings involv-
ing their areas of con-
centration, which include
civil, criminal, juvenile
delinquency and depen-
dency court proceedings.
Other informational
sessions to be presented
at the conference, Burke
said, include the use
of interpreters in court
proceedings and the care-
ful handling of child wit-
nesses in court proceed-
ings.
(Those topics) are
consistent with the theme
of access to justice,
Burke said.
He said other judges
who are not attending the
conference will be con-
ducting regular court pro-
ceedings for the remain-
der of the week.
Man wanted in Mich., facing trial
in Luzerne County released on bail
By EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
and SHEENA DELAZIO
sdelazio@timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE A
Mountain Top man cap-
tured last week on a fugi-
tive warrant charging him
with child sex crimes in
Michigan was released
from jail on Wednesday
after Luzerne County
Judge Lisa Gelb modied
his bail.
Authorities in Detroit,
Mich., were scheduled
to take custody of David
Zarn, 46, on Friday
to take him to Wayne
County, Mich., where
he is charged with eight
counts of criminal sexual
contact involving two
girls.
He also faces a num-
ber of charges in Luzerne
County relating to the
sexual assault of two girls.
Zarns attorney, Joseph
Sklarosky Sr., led a peti-
tion around 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday to modify
Zarns bail of $100,000.
David Zarn is inno-
cent of all these
charges both in
Pennsylvania and
Michigan and
intends to vig-
orously defend
against such
false charges,
Sklarosky wrote.
Sklarosky stated
the charges were vicious
and bogus.
The attorney stated
one of the girls had been
disciplined for conduct
between her and her boy-
friend, so the girl fabri-
cated the sexual assault
claim. Gelb also recently
ruled that that informa-
tion would be permitted
to be introduced at Zarns
November trial.
A hearing was sched-
uled by Judge Thomas
Burke for noonbefore Gelb
shortly after Sklarosky
led the petition with a
short notice given to the
District Attorneys
Ofce. First
Assistant District
Attorney Samuel
S a n g u e d o l c e
appeared at the
hearing.
Gelb reduced
Zarns bail to
$50,000, an amount
Zarn was able to post
through Michael Smith
Bail Bonds. The judge
said Zarn must wear an
electronic monitor and
have no contact with
minors.
Sklarosky wrote that
Zarn owns a home in
Wright Township, has
complied with the condi-
tions of his previous bail,
is not a ight risk and is
under severe nancial
strain. Zarn will have
to meet bail and defense
obligations in Michigan
and having Zarn released
on bail would allow him to
go to Michigan and secure
counsel there, Sklaroskys
petition stated.
Prosecutors said they
could not comment on the
hearing Wednesday.
Arrest warrants by
Detroit police issued on
May 7 allege Zarn sexual-
ly assaulted two girls for
several years in the mid-to
late 2000s.
Wright Township
police and county detec-
tives arrested Zarn on the
fugitive warrants from
Michigan on July 15.
Separately, court
records state Wright
Township police and
county detectives charged
Zarn in October after two
girls, ages 16 and 14,
said he sexually assaulted
them inside his Mountain
Top home.
Zarn
Zarns bail reduced to $50,000
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SUZANNE GAMBOA
Associated Press
WASHINGTON
Trayvon Martins father
told a crowded Capitol Hill
forum on Wednesday that
a statute or amendment
safeguarding young people
against the type of circum-
stances that resulted in his
sons death would be a t-
ting legacy for his son.
The question is, what
can we do as parents,
what can we do as African-
American men, to assure
our kids that you dont have
to be afraid to walk outside
your house? Tracy Martin
asked during a forum con-
vened by the Congressional
Caucus on Black Men and
Boys.
Trayvons dad adds voice
to help black men, boys
PAGE 6A Thursday, July 25, 2013 NEWS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
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Ofcials question Hazleton transit funding
JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES
jandes@timesleader.com
Luzerne County Council
somewhat reluctantly voted
Tuesday to give the Hazleton
Public Transit an annual allo-
cation of $127,949 toward its
bus service in the countys
southern end.
Several council mem-
bers hesitated because
Hazleton ofcials have
refused the states push to
put their busing service
under the Luzerne County
Transportation Authority.
The Pennsylvania
Department of
Transportation estimated a
merger could save as much
as $1 million annually and
reduce the countys overall
contribution toward busing,
said county Manager Robert
Lawton. The county pays
an annual allocation to the
LCTA, which is $485,345
this year.
Lawton also noted the
Hazleton Public Transit,
which serves the city and
its suburbs, has an estimat-
ed $400,000 reserve that
could be tapped as a local
match if the county halted its
funding.
Council members agreed
Tuesday night to require
city ofcials to appear before
them to explain why they
wont accept a merger or
stop relying on a county con-
tribution.
County Councilman Rick
Williams voted against the
Hazleton allocation Tuesday.
I support the people of
Hazleton. They should have
good bus service, but I have
yet to hear any really com-
pelling reasons why they
couldnt merge, so Imvoting
no, Williams said.
Council members
Stephen A. Urban, Stephen
J. Urban, Jim Bobeck and
Edward Brominski voted for
the allocation but voiced res-
ervations.
I do believe we are fund-
ing operational inefcien-
cies, Bobeck said, empha-
sizing Hazleton should not
count on county funding
next year.
Stephen A. Urban said
he wants Hazleton Mayor
Joseph Yannuzzi and other
city ofcials to justify the
county funding, especially
in light of the citys property
tax increase. The city millage
rate increased 45 percent this
year.
This is really a gift to the
city of Hazleton because they
cant or dont want to make
payments on their own, he
said.
Councilwoman Elaine
Maddon Curry, who support-
ed the allocation, disagreed
with the use of the word
gift and said Hazleton
ofcials told her they dont
believe a merger would save
money or maintain the qual-
ity of Hazleton-area bus ser-
vice.
Council members Eugene
Kelleher, Tim McGinley
and Linda McClosky Houck
also voted for the alloca-
tion. Council members Rick
Morelli and Harry Haas were
absent.
Yannuzzi weighs in
Yannuzzi said Wednesday
that the Public Transit, a
branch of city government,
has an executive director
and buses but relies on out-
side contractors to fuel, drive
and maintain the vehicles.
City ofcials believe these
contracts are cheaper than
hiring staffers.
We have no unions and
no pensions for bus transpor-
tation, said Yannuzzi. We
pay a at price, and weve
been doing well.
The city requests a county
match because one is pro-
vided to the LCTA for bus
transportation in the coun-
tys northern end, he said.
Yannuzzi also points to a
controversy over the track-
ing of senior citizen bus rid-
ers at the LCTAand said city
ofcials dont want to risk a
decline in service. Many
workers rely on the buses
to access workplaces in the
Humboldt Industrial Park in
Hazle Township, he said.
WILKES-BARRE A
Hazleton man charged
with pistol-whipping one
man and holding others
against their will in a
November 2012 incident
will stand trial on related
charges in September.
Reginald McCoy, 42, of
Peace Street, appeared
Wednesday in Luzerne
County Court, where he
was expected to enter
a guilty plea to three
related charges based on
an agreement made at
the time of his prelimi-
nary hearing. Instead,
McCoy said he elected
to stand trial, result-
ing in Assistant District
Attorney Molly Hanlon
Mirabito reinstating
the original 10 charges
against McCoy.
McCoy will be tried
Sept. 3 on two counts
of simple assault, two
counts of reckless endan-
germent, two counts
of harassment and one
count each of unlaw-
ful restraint, terroristic
threats, false impris-
onment and resisting
arrest, said County
Judge David Lupas.
McCoy is represented
by attorney Charles Ross.
McCoy previous-
ly had been jailed at
the Luzerne County
Correctional Facility but
was released in May on
$25,000 unsecured bail
that carries a number of
conditions, including a
curfew, counseling and
having no contact with
victims involved in the
case.
According to the crim-
inal complaint filed by
Hazleton police, they
were called on Nov. 25
to Monges Street for the
report of a man who was
assaulting people with a
gun. Police were told one
man, Gary Stemko, had
been pistol-whipped and
that several other people
were being held against
their will in a nearby
house.
Stemko told police he
was sleeping when he
heard a man he identified
as McCoy yelling out-
side. McCoy kicked open
the door to an apartment
on Lyons Court, Stemko
said.
McCoy allegedly said
he was looking for a
man known as Twinky
and he was going to kill
Twinky and his whole
family.
Stemko said he was
confronted by McCoy,
who hit him in the head
with a pistol, according
to the complaint. McCoy
then ran to the Lyons
Court home, Stemko
said.
Police said they could
hear yelling coming
from inside the apart-
ment. Police said two
adults and three children
6-years-old and under
were also in the apart-
ment, hiding in a bed-
room.
McCoy was using a
pellet gun in the incident
and had struck a male
inside the apartment
with it, police said.
When police tried to
place McCoy in a police
vehicle, he spit in the car,
refused to walk and had
to be carried by officers,
police said. McCoy con-
tinued to spit on officers
at police headquarters,
according to the criminal
complaint.
PAGE 7A Thursday, July 25, 2013 NEWS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
Man to stand trial in gun incident
Reginald McCoy, of Hazleton, allegedly pistol-whipped one person, terrorized others
SHEENA DELAZIO
sdelazio@timesleader.com
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W I L K E S - B A R R E
City police said
Wednesday they arrested
a convicted felon when
he was found with a load-
ed handgun and heroin
packets.
Phillip Maurice
Harvey, 37, of Irving
Place, Wilkes-Barre, was
arraigned Wednesday on
illegal possession of a
firearm and possession
with intent to deliver a
controlled substance. He
was jailed at the Luzerne
County Correctional
Facility for lack of
$50,000 bail.
Police said they
stopped Harvey walk-
ing in the area of Irving
Place and Academy
Street, which they call a
high-crime area, at about
3 p.m. Tuesday.
According to the crimi-
nal complaint:
An officer approached
Harvey, asking if he
lived in the area. Harvey
replied, Yes, I live at 40
Irving Place.
The officer asked
Harvey for identification,
which Harvey said was
in his residence. Harvey
became nervous, began
to breathe heavily and
avoided eye contact with
the officer, according to
the complaint. The offi-
cer then noticed a bulge in
Har vey s
w a i s t -
band.
A
r e c o r d s
c h e c k
s h o w e d
an active
a r r e s t
warrant for Harvey, the
complaint states. Police
said they lifted Harveys
shirt and found a con-
cealed gun. A quantity of
heroin, $391 and a cell-
phone were also found in
Harveys pocket, accord-
ing to the affidavit.
The gun, a .45-caliber,
was loaded, police said.
A search warrant was
served at Harveys resi-
dence, where police said
they found two boxes of
ammunition, a digital
scale, an address book, a
razor blade, small plastic
bags, a box containing
rubber bands, a pipe,
two plastic bags contain-
ing white powder and a
bag containing heroin,
according to the search
warrant return receipt.
Harvey had been con-
victed in 1998 on a drug
charge, police said.
A preliminary hearing
is scheduled on Aug. 6.
W-B police arrest man on drug, gun ofenses
Harvey
EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
Phillip Maurice Harvey,
37, allegedly
carried loaded
handgun, illicit drugs.
KANSAS CITY, Mo.
Education ofcials in most of
the states that have adopted
Common Core standards
say they will go forward with
the benchmarks for reading,
writing and math despite
objections, according to a
survey released Wednesday.
The independent non-
prot Center on Education
Policy at George Washington
University said 37 of the
40 states that responded
to its survey this spring
considered it unlikely that
they would reverse, limit
or change their decision to
adopt the Common Core
education standards during
the upcoming school year.
The center didnt identify
the states that participated
but noted that some of the
states that didnt respond
were dealing with pushback
a factor that could affect
the results.
The new Common Core
standards replace a hodge-
podge of educational goals
that had varied greatly from
statetostate. Thefederal gov-
ernment was not involved in
the state-led effort to develop
thembut has encouraged the
project. The only states not
to adopt the standards are
Alaska, Nebraska, Texas and
Virginia. Minnesota adopted
the reading but not the math
standards.
While proponents say
the new standards will bet-
ter prepare students, critics
worry theyll set a national
curriculumfor public schools
rather than letting states
decide what is best for their
students.
Efforts to slow down
or derail the standards
sprung up this year
in Kansas, Missouri,
Michigan, Pennsylvania,
Georgia, Indiana, Alabama,
South Carolina and Utah.
Meanwhile, the Republican
National Committee passed
a resolution calling the
standards an inappropriate
overreach.
Maria Ferguson, executive
director of the Center on
Education Policy, dismissed
the efforts against the stan-
dards. School districts and
states are practical, she
said. The resources that
have been put into this are
pretty profound. And you
have to think about, if not
this, what?
Most states described
overcoming resistance to
the Common Core as either
a minor or nonexistent chal-
lenge, the survey found.
Only two states found that
that overcoming resistance
from colleges and universi-
ties was a major challenge.
And only ve felt that over-
coming resistance from out-
side the education system
was a major challenge.
The opposition, however,
wasnt convinced.
I still think there are lin-
gering questions, to say the
very least, said Jonathan
Butcher, education direc-
tor for the Phoenix-based
conservative Goldwater
Institute, which has opposed
the standards. He said the
big issue is the rollout of new
tests designed around the
new standards. The tests are
electronic, and one concern
is that states lack the band-
width and enough comput-
ers to administer them.
Two upcoming reports
from the Center on
Education Policy will look
specically at testing issues,
Ferguson said.
People who say the federal
government has gone too far
point to the money provided
to consortiums developing
Common Core tests. They
also note that the Education
Department encouraged
states to adopt the standards
to compete for Race to the
Top grants and seek waivers
around some of the unpopu-
lar prociency requirements
of the No Child Left Behind
education law.
PAGE 8A Thursday, July 25, 2013 OBITUARIES www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
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In Loving Memory Of
Paula Mikush
Warmouth
1-16-66 to 7-25-01
Its hard to believe that its
been twelve years since
youve left us.
L O V E N E V E R D IE S
Sad ly m issed by her fam ily & frien d s
We miss you more
each passing day.
You are forever in our hearts.
And you dont have to buy a casket.
Kniffen OMalley
Wilkes-Barre & Avoca
823-7157 457-2801
BestLifeTributes.com
Viewing before
Cremation
Brian Leffer
CHARLOTTE LAFRICAN,
91, of Nanticoke, passed away
Friday, July 19, 2013, at the
The Guardian Eldercare Center,
Newport Township. Born July
12, 1922, in Passaic, N.J., she
was a daughter of the late
Charles and Catherine Farrell
Lafrican. She was employed
as an executive secretary and
Realtor. Surviving are her niece,
Mrs. Carmen Mary Cutro;
great-nieces and great-nephews.
A memorial Mass will be
held at 10 a.m. Friday in the
main site of St. Faustinas Parish
(Holy Trinity Church), 520 S.
Hanover St., Nanticoke. Final
interment will be in Calvary
Cemetery, Paterson, N.J.
Arrangements are by the Stanley
S. Stegura Funeral Home Inc.,
Nanticoke.
HERBERT DOCKETT, 91, of
Avoca, passed away Wednesday
at the Mountain View Care
Center, Scranton.
Funeral arrangements are
pending from Kiesinger Funeral
Services Inc., 255 McAlpine St.,
Duryea.
JOHN J. NOLAN, 86, of
Denver, passed away Sunday,
July 21, 2013. He was born in
Wilkes-Barre. He was the hus-
band of Sally (Murray) Nolan;
father of Ann (Dana) Nolan,
Carolyn Nolan, Jack (Rhonda)
Nolan, Patricia (Mike) Doyle
and the late Catherine Nolan
and Kelly Nolan Tonner; grand-
father of Shannon and Kyle
Sankey (Catherine Nolan),
Rachel Doyle and James Rost;
brother of Jane Nolan.
Memorial service was held
in Horan & McConaty Family
Chapel, 11150 E. Dartmouth
Ave., Aurora, Colo. Interment
was in Fort Logan National
Cemetery.
JEFFREY
GODECK
July 24, 2013
Jeffrey Godeck, 52, of
Moosic, died early Wednesday
morning from injuries suffered
in a motor vehicle accident on
Interstate 81.
Born in Scranton, he was a
son of Robert Godeck, Moscow,
and Virginia Ginger Butts
Godeck, and stepson of Thomas
Vermac, Moosic.
He was a graduate of Riverside
High School and also attended
both Penn State University
and Wilkes University. Jeff was
employed by TJs Auto Service,
Moosic, as a shop foreman.
Jeff was a member of the
Moosic United Methodist
Church and of several local
social clubs including the West
Side Social Club, Avoca; Polish
American Citizens, Dupont;
Polish Falcons, Duryea; and
VFW Post 4954, Old Forge.
He was an avid baseball fan,
his team being the Atlanta
Braves, and enjoyed spending
time outdoors.
Surviving, in addition to
his parents, are a son, Robert
Kobilinski, Moosic; aunts,
uncles and cousins.
The funeral service will be
10 a.m. Saturday at the Ruane
& Regan Funeral Home, 1308
Grove St., Avoca, with the
Rev. Barbara J. Roberts, pastor
of Moosic United Methodist
Church, ofciating. Friends may
call 4 to 7 p.m. Friday. Interment
will follow in Fairview Memorial
Park, Elmhurst.
Memorial contributions may
be made to Moosic United
Methodist Church, 609 Main
St., Moosic, PA 18507.
To leave an online condo-
lence, visit www.ruaneandre-
gan.com.
ABENT - Josephine, funeral
1:45 p.m. Friday in Independent
Bible Church, Duryea. Friends
may call 1 p.m. until services.
BAHL - Joan, funeral 8:45 a.m.
today at Kizis-Lokuta Funeral
Home, 134 Church St., Pittston.
Mass of Christian Burial
9:30 a.m. in St. Monicas
Church, Eighth Street, West
Wyoming.
BYRIEL - Kim, celebration of life
4 to 8 p.m. Saturday at Kings
Pizzeria, Mountain Top.
CILVIK - Carl, Mass of Christian
Burial 9:30 a.m. Friday in
Our Lady of Fatima Parish,
St. Marys Church of the
Immaculate Conception, 134 S.
Washington St., Wilkes-Barre.
Friends may call 8:30 a.m. until
Mass.
DUNN - Jeffrey Jr., memorial
Mass 6 p.m. Friday in St. John
the Evangelist Church, William
Street, Pittston.
FREEMAN - Joan, memorial
service 2 p.m. Saturday at
Harman Funeral Homes &
Crematory Inc. (East), 669 W.
Butler Drive, Drums. Friends
may call 1 p.m. until service.
HOOLICK - George, funeral
9:30 a.m. today at Yeosock
Funeral Home, 40 S. Main
St., Plains Township. Office
of Christian Burial 10 a.m. in
St. Mary Byzantine Catholic
Church, Wilkes-Barre. Friends
may call 9 a.m. until services.
HOUSTON - Earl, funeral
9:30 a.m. Friday at Kiesinger
Funeral Services Inc., 255
McAlpine St., Duryea. Services
10 a.m. in St. Johns Primitive
Methodist Church, Main Street,
Avoca. Friends may call 5 to
8 p.m. today.
KANIA - Eugene Sr., funeral
11 a.m. today at Davis-Dinelli
Funeral Home, 170 E. Broad St.,
Nanticoke. Mass of Christian
Burial 11:30 a.m. in St. Faustina
Kowalska Parish/Holy Trinity
Church, 520 S. Hanover St.,
Nanticoke.
KOCHER - Thelma, memorial
service 5 p.m. Saturday in
Christ United Methodist Church,
175 S. Main Road, Mountain Top.
Friends may call 4 p.m. until
service.
KRZYZEWSKI - Paul, Mass of
Christian Burial 10 a.m. Friday
at All Saints Parish, 66 Willow
St., Plymouth. Friends may
call 6 to 8 p.m. today at S.J.
Grontkowski Funeral Home, 530
W. Main St., Plymouth.
MCCABE - Ruth, funeral 8 p.m.
today at Charles L. Cease
Funeral Home, 634 Reyburn
Road, Shickshinny. Friends may
call 6 p.m. until services.
OWENS - Sheila, memorial
service 4 p.m. Saturday at
Metcalfe-Shaver-Kopcza Funeral
Home Inc., 504 Wyoming Ave.,
Wyoming. Friends may call
3 p.m. until service.
WEAVER - Glen, funeral 7 p.m.
today at Williams-Hagen
Funeral Home, 114 W. Main St.,
Plymouth. Friends may call
5 p.m. until service.
FUNERALS
OBITUARYPOLICY
The Times Leader publishes
free obituaries, which have
a 27-line limit, and paid
obituaries, which can run
with a photograph. Afuneral
home representative can
call the obituary desk at
570-829-7224, send a fax to
570-829-5537 or email to
ttlobits@civitasmedia.com.
If you fax or email, please
call to confrm. Obituaries
must be submitted by 7:30
p.m. for publication in the
next edition. Obituaries
must be sent by a funeral
home or crematory, or
must name who is handling
arrangements, with address
and phone number.
WILLIAMF. MALARKEY
July 23, 2013
William F. Malarkey, of
Wilkes-Barre, passed away
Tuesday, July 23, 2013, at his
home.
Born in Wilkes-Barre, he was
a son of the late William J. and
Lillian Padulsky Malarkey.
William was a 1952 graduate
of GAR High School, Wilkes-
Barre. He was a U.S. Army
veteran, having served in Korea
from 1956 to 1959, and received
the Good Conduct Medal.
Bill was employed as a trac-
tor-trailer driver for Friedmans
General Foam, Hazleton, as well
as several other companies, for
many years, and was a member
of the Teamsters Union Local
401, Wilkes-Barre.
He was a member of Our
Lady of Hope Parish, Wilkes-
Barre. He was an avid sher-
man, coached Little League
baseball and enjoyed watch-
ing his favorite football teams,
Norte Dame and the Chicago
Bears.
He was preceded in death by
his brother, Thomas Malarkey.
Surviving are his wife, the
former Phyllis Styczynski, to
whom he was married 57 years;
sons, William B. Malarkey and
his wife, Leslie, and Robert J.
Malarkey and his wife, Lisa, all
of Hanover Township; daugh-
ter, Phyllis Napkora and her
husband, Raymond, Reading;
grandchildren, Matthew, Jordan
and Erin Napkora and William,
Lyndsey and Leah Malarkey; sis-
ter, Margaret Dennis, Harveys
Lake; and his buddy, Charlie.
Funeral services will
be held 9 a.m. Friday at
Jendrzejewski Funeral
Home, 21 N. Meade St.,
Wilkes-Barre, with a Mass of
Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m. at
Our Lady of Hope Parish, Park
Avenue, Wilkes-Barre. The Rev.
John S. Terry, pastor, will be
celebrant. Interment with mili-
tary honors will be in St. Marys
Maternity Cemetery, West
Wyoming. Friends may call 5
to 8 p.m. today at the funeral
home.
LAURA ELLIS-WESTWELL
July 22, 2013
Laura Ellis-Westwell died of
natural causes on July 22, 2013,
in Clarks Summit, at the family
home. She is survived by her
husband of 14 years, Arthur
Evans Westwell.
She was born Aug. 24, 1946,
in Conrad, Mont., a daughter
of the late Thomas and Helene
Ellis. She was raised on the fam-
ily farm, where she engaged in
truck and tractor driving, live-
stock raising and horsemanship.
During her high school years,
she worked in the Immunology
Research Laboratory (now the
McClaughlin Research Center)
under an American Cancer
Society Fellowship.
After earning her bachelor
of arts from Carroll College
in Helena, Mont., she taught
English and choral music in
Hobson High School, Hobson,
Mont.
She married Michael
Schneller in Conrad in 1969.
After their divorce in 1982,
she returned to school, earning
a master of accountancy from
the University of Montana. She
worked as a CPA in Wyoming
and Montana.
In 1997, she earned her Ph.D.
from the University of Oregon
and joined the faculty of the
University of Scranton, where
she taught until her retirement.
She was a member of the
American Institute of CPAs,
Pennsylvania Institute of CPAs,
Montana Society of CPAs, Beta
Gamma Sigma, Beta Alpha Psi
and Spurs Honorary Sorority.
Laura was a member of Our
Lady of Snows Parish, Clarks
Summit.
She is survived by her chil-
dren, Ian Schneller and his wife,
LaDonna, Elkridge, Md.; Rachel
Schneller, Toulouse, France; and
Michael Schneller, Nanchang,
China; twin grandchildren, Cole
and Carson Schneller; broth-
ers, Thomas and Char Ellis,
Rathdrum, Idaho; Lawrence
and Joan Ellis, Camas, Wash.;
Peter Chris and Judy Ellis,
Conrad; and Patrick and Susan
Ellis, Bozeman, Mont.; sisters,
Elizabeth Ellis, Spokane, Wash.,
and Kathleen and Victor Van
Horn, Sparks, Nev.; numerous
nieces and nephews.
A viewing will be held at at
4 p.m. July 31 at the Pondera
Funeral Home, 302 S. Main St.,
Conrad. A Mass will be held at
10 a.m. Aug. 1 in St. Michael
the Archangel Parish, 106 South
Maryland, Conrad.
HELEN C. GROSEK
July 20, 2013
Helen C. Grosek, 87, a resi-
dent of Dallas and Marco Island,
Fla., passed away on July 20,
2013.
Born in Sugar Notch, she was
a daughter of the late Andrew
and Helen Durocko Hayduk.
A 1944 graduate of Ashley
High School, she subsequently
earned a degree as a regis-
tered nurse from Wilkes-Barre
General Hospital School of
Nursing. Though she was very
proud of that accomplishment
and cherished her work as a
private-duty nurse, she soon
decided to devote her full time
and energy to caring for her ve
children and beloved husband
of more than 61 years, the late
Anthony Grosek Jr.
Preceding her in death, in
addition to her parents and
husband, are brothers, Edward
and Milton Hayduk; sister Ann
Cooney; and son-in-law, George
B. Sordoni.
Surviving are her sister Rita
M. Hayduk; children, Andrea
Sordoni; Ellie and her husband,
Paul Stein; Anthony III (daugh-
ter-in-law, Colleen Grosek);
Robert Grosek (daughter-in-
law, Patricia Mack Grosek);
David and his wife, Katie
Grosek; grandchildren, Sarah
and her husband, Matt Bruno;
Samantha, Nicholas and Abigail
Sordoni; Sam and Jack Stein;
Katrina, Julia and Alex Grosek;
Jake and Claire Grosek; and
Logan Grosek Gomez, Natalie
and Ben Grosek; and great-
grandchild, Ella Bruno.
Mass of Christian Burial 10
a.m. Saturday at St. Theresas
Church, Pioneer Avenue, Dallas.
Friends may call 8:30 a.m. until
Mass. A private interment will
follow.
In lieu of owers, the fam-
ily requests that memorial
donations, if desired, be made
to the Ruth Bourger Women
with Children Program at
Misericordia University, Lake
Street, Dallas, PA 18612.
Arrangements by the
Mamary-Durkin Funeral
Service, 59 Parrish St., Wilkes-
Barre.
DAVID LAQUANBIZ GEORGE
July 19, 2013
David LaQuan Biz George,
24, died suddenly just after
midnight Friday, from injuries
suffered as the victim of a sin-
gle gunshot wound in the citys
Heights section.
Born Nov. 12, 1988, in
Elizabeth, N.J., he was a son of
Yvonne R. George, with whom
he recently resided. He was
educated in both the Elizabeth
and Wilkes-Barre Area school
districts.
While at Meyers High
School, he excelled in sports,
including basketball and foot-
ball, and was an honor roll stu-
dent during his entire tenure at
the school.
Self employed, Biz was
an aspiring rap artist with the
local rap group known as the
Loud Boyzz.
In addition to his grand-
parents, David was preceded
in death by a sister, Cheryl
Thompson; and by a niece, Alia
Van Pelt.
Surviving, in addition to
his beloved mother, Yvonne,
at home, are his step-father,
Wayne Wright; his children,
Ja-Kari LaQuan George, Jossiah
Shakir George and Ja-Leyah
Marie George; brothers, Wayne
Wright and Eric George; sister
Jasmin George, all of Wilkes-
Barre; a host of cousins, nieces
and nephews, including his spe-
cial niece and friend, Cherylina
Thompson.
Relatives and friends may
join his family for visitation
and remembrances 9 to 11
a.m. Friday at the Wilkes-Barre
Heights location of the John V.
Morris Family Funeral Homes
Inc., 281 E. Northampton St.,
Wilkes-Barre. Interment will be
private and at the convenience
of Davids family.
To send his mother and fam-
ily online words of comfort,
friendship and support at this
time, please visit the funeral
homes website at www.johnv-
morrisfuneralhomes.com.
Survey: States sticking with
Common Core standards
HEATHER
HOLLINGSWORTH
Associated Press
Weiner faces
growing calls
to quit race
NEW YORK Anthony
Weiner pressed ahead with
his bidfor mayor Wednesday
despite growing calls for
him to drop out over a
new sexting scandal, say-
ing the campaign is too
important to abandon over
embarrassing personal
things becoming public.
Rivals, newspaper edito-
rial pages and at least one
former New York congres-
sional colleague urged the
Democrat to quit the race a
day after he acknowledged
exchanging raunchy mes-
sages and photos online
even after the same sort of
behavior destroyed his con-
gressional career two years
ago.
I think he should pull out
of the race. I think he needs
serious psychiatric help,
Rep. Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y.
Weiner brushed off such
calls and kept up his cam-
paign schedule. He was
greeted with boos as he
took the stage to speak at
a public housing meeting
Wednesday evening, but by
the end of his remarks, the
crowd loudly cheered.
I thought these things
would come out by the end
of the campaign, and some
of them have. Look, I am
pressing forward, running a
campaign about the issues,
and Im getting a good
response, he said after-
ward.
The latest scandal
erupted Tuesday after the
gossip website The Dirty
posted X-rated messages
and a crotch shot it said he
exchanged with a woman
last year while using the
online alias Carlos Danger.
At a news conference
Tuesday evening, Weiner,
who has been a favorite in
the polls since he launched
his political comeback
attempt in late May, stood
side-by-side with his clearly
uncomfortable wife, Huma
Abedin, and said he hoped
the voters would give him
another chance.
Abedin, a longtime
adviser to former Secretary
of State Hillary Rodham
Clinton, reafrmed her love
and support for her husband
and said the matter was
between us.
Two of the citys major
newspapers, The New
York Times and the Daily
News, said the 48-year-old
Democrat had exhausted
his opportunities for forgive-
ness with his latest indiscre-
tions.
The serially evasive
Mr. Weiner should take his
marital troubles and per-
sonal compulsions out of the
public eye and the mayoral
race, the Times wrote.
The Daily News declared
Weiner to be lacking
the dignity and discipline
that New York deserves
in a mayor, and said his
demons have no place in
City Hall.
At least three of his may-
oral rivals, Public Advocate
Bill de Blasio and for-
mer City Councilman Sal
Albanese, both Democrats,
and billionaire business-
man John Catsimatidis, a
Republican, said he should
drop out.
Anthonys presence
in this race has become a
never-ending sideshow that
is distracting us from the
debate of the serious issues
of this election, de Blasio
said.
City Council Speaker
Christine Quinn and for-
mer City Comptroller Bill
Thompson, Weiners stron-
gest rivals in the polls, criti-
cized him but didnt directly
call on him to quit.
Thompson said on
WNYC-AM that Weiner
should think about the peo-
ple of this city and make the
right decision, while Quinn
said at a news conference
that it is up to Weiner and
his family to decide whether
he should end his run, but
New Yorkers need a mayor
whose is sole focus isnt self-
aggrandizement.
Weiner has emphasized
that he said when launch-
ing his campaign that more
messages might emerge.
But until Tuesday, he never
said directly that some were
sent as recently as last year.
I regret not saying explic-
itly when these exchanges
happened, he told support-
ers in an email Wednesday.
But Weiner said the cam-
paign was too important
to give up because Ive had
embarrassing personal
things become public. And
he said he wasnt surprised
his opponents wanted him
out.
Democratic strategists in
New York and Washington,
where Weiner served seven
terms before resigning in
2011, said there are few
external means of pressur-
ing Weiner to drop out.
Weiner has nearly $5
million to spend on the
campaign, allowing him to
mount a vigorous defense
on television. Also, he was
not particularly close to his
colleagues in the congres-
sional delegation, the strat-
egists said, so he might be
unmoved if they urge him to
exit the race.
As for the voters, some
want Weiner to go.
Hes disgusting, said
magazine editorial assistant
Katelin Marinari, 24.
But others said they
would still vote for him.
Do I think morally hes
wrong? Of course. But Im
not voting for a minister; Im
voting for a mayor of New
York, said public relations
worker Raven Robinson, 22.
A Quinnipiac University
poll released Wednesday
continued to place Weiner in
the top rung of Democratic
contenders with Quinn and
Thompson, though it was
taken largely before the
scandal broke.
I have posited this whole
campaign on a bet, and
that is that, at the end of
the day, citizens are more
interested in the challenge
they face in their lives than
in anything that I have
done, embarrassing, in my
past, he told reporters out-
side his Manhattan home
Wednesday morning.
The unidentied woman
involved in the newly dis-
closed messages told The
Dirty that she was 22 when
she began chatting with
Weiner on a social network-
ing site in July 2012, and
that their exchanges lasted
six months.
The Dirty posted explicit
conversations of two people
fantasizing about various
sex acts, and ran a pixelated
photo of what it said were
Weiners genitals.
JENNIFER PELTZ
and JONATHAN LEMIRE
Associated Press
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER NEWS Thursday, July 25, 2013 PAGE 9A
Police Blotter
HANOVER TWP.
Township police reported
the following:
Police said they cited
Michelle Rogers, 48, of
Edwardsville, with retail
theft after she allegedly
failed to pay $41 for mer-
chandise from Family
Dollar on Carey Avenue.
Michael Wheaton, of
Rutter Street, reported
Tuesday someone dam-
aged two Power Wheels
electric toy cars and
smashed the windshield
on his vehicle.
HAZLETON City
police reported the follow-
ing:
Police said a green
1992 Jeep Cherokee,
Pennsylvania license
plate GTA-1871, was sto-
len sometime between 1
p.m. and 3 p.m. Tuesday
in the 100 block of North
Conahan Drive. The vehi-
cle has silver trim and
gray primer on the front
bumper.
Police said gun shots
were heard in the area of
Elm and Hazle streets at
9:15 p.m. Tuesday. There
were no reports of injuries
or property damage.
Gina Petrone of East
Seventh Street reported
Tuesday her vehicle was
entered while it was
parked in a garage in the
600 block of Pardee Street.
Police reported
Tuesday several win-
dows were damaged at a
house in the 500 block of
Garibaldi Court.
A rear door was dam-
aged at a house in the 100
block of South Locust
Street sometime between
8 a.m. and 5 p.m. July 19.
Police said gun shots
were heard in the area of
15th and Alter streets at
about 2:45 a.m. on Sunday.
There were no reports of
injuries or property dam-
age.
A woman reported
Monday her vehicle was
damaged in the 500 block
of West Second Street.
A residence in the 500
block of West Maple Street
was discovered ransacked
on Monday. No items were
reported missing.
HAZLE TWP. An
iPod and compact discs
were stolen from two
vehicles parked in the 600
block of Lattimer Road
sometime between 6 p.m.
Sunday and 7:30 a.m.
Monday, state police at
Hazleton said.
WILKES-BARRE
City police reported the
following:
Police cited Joseph
Jackiel, 57, of Wilkes-
Barre, with public drunk-
enness after he was alleg-
edly found intoxicated and
lying on the steps of the
Wilkes-Barre Area School
Administration building
on South Main Street on
July 9.
A preliminary hearing
is scheduled Aug. 27 for
William A. Lecitshon, 33,
of Wilkes-Barre, on charg-
es of possession of a con-
trolled substance, posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia
and public drunkenness.
Police said Lecitshon
was found sleeping in a
vehicle at Coal Street Park
on July 8. A syringe and
suspected illegal drugs
were found inside and
outside the vehicle, police
said.
The hearing is before
District Judge Rick
Cronauer.
A 21-year-old woman
reported a man who
threatened to use a gun
robbed her in the area of
Academy and South River
streets at about 2:50 a.m.
Wednesday.
The woman said she
left G&G Express and was
approached from behind
by a man, described as in
his 20s, tall with a thin
build, wearing baggy jeans
and a black T-shirt, who
demanded her wallet,
police said.
A property manager
at 266 Kidder St. reported
someone forced open a
rear door and stole about
20 feet of copper pipe
sometime between July 19
and Tuesday.
JACKSON TWP.
Township police arrested
Joshua Bobbin, 21, of
Nanticoke, on Wednesday
on a burglary charge.
Police allege Bobbin
and Ryan Briggs, 25, of
Nanticoke, burglarized
a barn owned by David
Roskos on Huntsville
Road on July 18. Briggs
was captured at the scene
and jailed on a parole vio-
lation.
Court records say a
Luzerne County judge
issued an arrest warrant
for Briggs on May 22
when he failed to appear
for a pre-trial hearing on
drug related charges.
Bobbin was arraigned
by District Judge James
Tupper in Kingston
Township on charges of
burglary, criminal tres-
pass, theft and criminal
conspiracy. He was jailed
at the Luzerne County
Correctional Facility for
lack of $5,000 bail.
Briggs is scheduled to
be arraigned later this
week on similar charges.
HAZLETON Victor
Donald Akey, 39, of East
Elm Street, Hazleton, was
arraigned Wednesday on
charges he held a womans
head in a swimming pool.
Akey was charged
with simple assault and
harassment. He was jailed
at the Luzerne County
Correctional Facility for
lack of $20,000 bail.
Police arrested Akey
after Amber Keck claimed
he held her head in a swim-
ming pool for 10 to 20 sec-
onds during an argument
Tuesday night, according
to the criminal complaint.
Akey told police they
both fell in the pool but
his shorts were dry, the
complaint says.
A preliminary hearing is
scheduled on Aug. 7.
HAZLE TWP.
Lisa Maria Mager, 42,
of East Northampton
Street, Wilkes-Barre, was
arraigned Wednesday
on three counts of def-
ant trespass and a single
count of retail theft.
State police allege
Mager stole merchandise
from Kmart at the Laurel
Mall on May 22, according
to the criminal complaint.
Mager was jailed at
the Luzerne County
Correctional Facility for
lack of $1,000 bail.
WRIGHT TWP.
A Mountain Top man
charged in June by the
state Offce of Attorney
General in Operation
Shape Up, which targeted
a cocaine and marijua-
na traffcking ring, was
arraigned Tuesday on alle-
gations he tampered with
an electrical meter.
Freddy Reyes, 45, of
Coplay Place, was charged
with criminal mischief.
He was remanded to
the Luzerne County
Correctional Facility for
lack of $5,000 bail. He has
been jailed since his arrest
on June 27 for lack of $1
million bail on drug traf-
fcking offenses.
Township police allege
in the criminal complaint
that an illegal wire was
attached to the PPL elec-
trical meter at Reyes resi-
dence. The wire attach-
ment ran to the basement
of the house to a separate
junction box, the com-
plaint says.
Police said in the com-
plaint it cost $4,159 in
materials to replace the
electrical line.
A preliminary hearing
on the latest charge is
scheduled on July 31.
Reyes was one of 17 peo-
ple charged by the state in
a cocaine and marijuana
traffcking ring centered
at the Master Barbershop
on Hazle Avenue in
Wilkes-Barre, according to
court records and a news
release.
WILKES-BARRE A
city man was arraigned
Tuesday on charges he
made several calls to 911
reporting that a baby was
in distress and needed
help.
Police allege Keith
Gilroy, 55, was intoxicated
when he called 911 twice
on Monday and once just
after midnight Tuesday
claiming a baby was in
danger. Gilroy identifed
himself as Joe Miller and
told police his address
was on Orchard Street in
Wilkes-Barre.
When an offcer arrived
at the Orchard Street
residence at 12:11 a.m.,
Gilroy stumbled outside.
The offcer asked Gilroy
if the offcer could speak
to a Joe Miller. Police said
Gilroy laughed, saying,
That was me, man.
Police said Gilroy nearly
fell twice and appeared
to be unable to care for
a lit cigarette allowing it
to burn down between
his fngers, the complaint
says.
Gilroy told police he
had concerns because
of a visit to the residence
by police and a child
caseworker Monday after-
noon. Police said no baby
was found inside the resi-
dence.
Gilroy was charged with
making a false alarm to a
public safety agency and
public drunkenness. He
was released on $5,000
unsecured bail.
HAZLETON State
police at Hazleton will
be conducting a sobri-
ety checkpoint within
the southern region of
Luzerne County the week-
end of July 26-28.
KINGSTONMalinda
Ann Hock, 33, of South
Sherman Street, Wilkes-
Barre, was arraigned
Tuesday on charges of
receiving stolen property,
frearms not to be carried
without a license, posses-
sion of a small amount
of marijuana, possession
of drug paraphernalia,
driving with a suspended
license and a vehicle viola-
tion.
She was jailed at
the Luzerne County
Correctional Facility for
lack of $15,000 bail.
Police said they stopped
Hock for driving a Jeep
Cherokee without head-
lights on Market Street at
about 3:10 a.m. Tuesday.
A loaded .38 caliber pistol
and a grinder containing
suspected marijuana were
allegedly found inside the
vehicle, according to the
criminal complaint.
Police said the handgun
was reported stolen during
a burglary in Philadelphia.
A preliminary hearing is
scheduled on July 31.
ROQUE BLUFFS, Maine
Authorities say two
women, including one from
Pennsylvania, who got lost
while hiking in a Maine state
park died in a car accident
shortly after their rescue.
Th i r t y - e i g h t - y e a r - o l d
Melissa Moyer, of Sunbury,
and 37-year-old Amy Stiner, of
Machias, were killed Tuesday
night when they drove their
car into the ocean after going
the wrong way down a road.
Washington County Sheriff
Donnie Smith said Stiner was
ve months pregnant.
Earlier in the evening, the
women hiked in Roque Bluffs
State Park but got lost and
called for help. A landowner
found them and their dog and
gave them rides on his ATV
back to his house, where a
warden picked them up and
brought them to their vehicle,
which was parked at the park.
But Stiner then drove
toward the boat ramp instead
of the other direction to
Machias, Smith said.
Authorities found the sub-
merged car about 175 feet off
the boat ramp, the women and
the dog inside with the doors
closed and the windows up.
Weather could have contrib-
uted to the accident, Smith
said.
They called on the phone
that they were in the water
and the car was filling up.
Then the phone went dead,
Smith said. An hour later,
the deputies found the car.
It appears they went the
wrong direction and drove
off the ramp, he said. If you
dont know the area, in the
fog and rain it wouldnt be a
difficult thing to do.
PAGE 10A Thursday, July 25, 2013 NEWS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
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3-4 ARBORVITAE
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NeedaNewRoof?
80002629
Sunbury hiker rescued, then dies in Maine car accident
The Associated Press
Defying state, gay
couple marry in
Montgomery County
JENNY DEHUFF
The Times Herald of Norristown
NORRISTOWN
Montgomery County made
history Wednesday by issu-
ing the rst same-sex mar-
riage licenses in the state of
Pennsylvania.
Loreen M. Bloodgood
and Alicia A. Terrizzi, both
of Pottstown, were married
hours after Register of Wills
and Clerk of the Orphans
Court D. Bruce Hanes grant-
ed them a marriage license
just after 8 a.m.
Hanes said he waived the
three-day waiting period
typical of all marriage licens-
es for the couple because
they were leaving the area
soon and wanted to expedite
their wedding. Waivers of
the sort are at the discretion
of the Clerk of the Orphans
Court.
Sasha Esther Ballen and
Diana Lynn Spagnuolo, both
of Wynnewood, Pa., came
in not long after and were
granted a marriage license.
They have been in a relation-
ship for 17 years and came
in with two school-age boys,
said Hanes.
I knew, driving in, that
we could have a line around
the block, said Hanes.
Tears, all over the place.
Everybodys crying.
In other states with same-
sex marriage bans, licenses
issued by deant local of-
cials have been voided by
courts.
Less than two weeks ago,
the American Civil Liberties
Union led a lawsuit against
the commonwealth, naming
Attorney General Kathleen
Kane and Gov. Tom Corbett
as defendants. The suit fol-
lows the U.S. Supreme Court
decision that declares the
federal Defense of Marriage
Act unconstitutional. Similar
suits are being pursued in
Virginia and North Carolina.
Attorneys with the
Americans Civil Liberties
Union had cautioned that
courts could invalidate the
marriages. The group has a
separate lawsuit pending to
challenge the state law.
County Commissioners
Chairman Josh Shapiro says
marriage equality will come
to Pennsylvania. He says its
just a question of howlong it
will take.
Current state law denes
a marriage as a civil con-
tract between a man and a
woman.
Editorial
It isnt often that the House gets it
right on immigration reform, at least
not in recent years. Yet it has done so
with the Border Security Results Act
of 2013, a sensible piece of legislation
that has miraculously emerged from
the Committee on Homeland Security
and that strikes a fair balance between
enforcement and scal responsibility.
Unlike the Senates approach, which
throws $46 billion at the U.S.-Mexican
border without any real strategy
behind it, the House bill would require
the Department of Homeland Security
to provide a status report on illegal
crossings and develop a strategy to
thwart the vast majority of unauthor-
ized entries.
The House and Senate bills share
some of the same goals, including
calling for a dramatic increase in sur-
veillance of the border and ensuring
that 90 percent of those attempting to
cross illegally are either turned back
or arrested. But the House bill would
require far more analysis before spend-
ing billions for more boots on the
ground and additional technology.
For example, the House bill calls
on Homeland Security, as part of its
status report, to identify high-trafc
areas within three months of the bill
becoming law. The department would
have another 30 days to create metrics
to measure the state of border secu-
rity. Within nine months of the bills
approval, the department would have
to have a border security strategy up
and running. Only after those bench-
marks were met would Congress pro-
vide additional funding for expanding
the strategy across the entire border.
The bill also demands far more
accountability from the department,
including progress reports to Congress
and Government Accountability Ofce
oversight. Unlike the Senate bill, it
does not tie the promise of a path to
citizenship for millions of immigrants
who are illegally in the U.S. to border
security, which is outside their control.
Much of the credit for the bill
belongs to Reps. Michael McCaul,
R-Texas, the chairman of the commit-
tee, and Candice S. Miller, R-Mich., the
vice chair, both of whom worked across
the aisle and consulted with academics
and experts rather than give in to the
arbitrary demands of some GOP House
members who feel that nothing short
of a U.S. version of the Great Wall of
China will guarantee border security.
On Tuesday, the committee is sched-
uled to hold hearings to compare the
House and Senate approaches to bor-
der security. We hope that McCaul and
Miller continue to prove that some
House Republicans are still capable of
having a sane and credible discussion
on immigration reform.
Los Angeles Times
oTher opinion: immigrATion
House gets it right
Nowtheres a shocker
mALLArD FiLLmore DooneSBUrY
Landlords directed
to helpful website
To all landlords:
This website is for landlords who
have rental properties. You can nd
out if a tenant has ever been evicted
for nonpayment of rent or had crimi-
nal charges. It is a free site. Lets get
these people to move out of the area.
http://ujsportal.pacourts.us/docket-
sheets/MDJ.aspx
Frank Catrrignano
Hanover Township
Diversity Picnic
deserves recognition
I recently attended the Diversity
Picnic in Kirby Park. Each year my
friends and I look forward to this monu-
mental event. The food is so delicious,
and the set-up is handicapped accessible.
With every passing year, the planners,
the workers, and the contributors man-
age to outdo themselves as they give of
their time, money and energy.
I was just disappointed by how
little media coverage this great event
received. The picnic always has a huge
turnout, witg activities for every age
group and noalcohol.
With so many sad stories dominating
the news headlines, you would think this
wonderful event would get top consid-
eration.
Jeanne E. Shuella
Kingston
YoUr opinion: LeTTerS FromreADerS
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER SERVING THE PUBLIC TRUST SINCE 1881 Thursday, July 25, 2013 PAGE 11A
SenD US YoUr opinion
Letters to the editor must include the writers name, address and daytime phone
number for verifcation. Letters should be no more than 250 words. We reserve
the right to edit and limit writers to one published letter every 30 days.
Email: mailbag@timesleader.com
Fax: 570-829-5537
Mail: Mail Bag, The Times Leader, 15 N. Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
In what passes for good news on
Capitol Hill, a bitterly divided Congress
nally took a step toward undoing the
dysfunctional marriage of convenience
between food stamps and farm subsi-
dies. House Republicans this month
pushed through a farm bill, minus nutri-
tion for the poor. It was the rst time
since 1973 that a farm bill had advanced
without food stamps a program the
Republicans say theyll fund in a sepa-
rate bill.
We take it as a positive sign. Farm
subsidies and food stamps should be
judged on their respective merits.
Both need reform. Both should be cut
back, farm subsidies more so than food
stamps. It wont happen if urban law-
makers feel compelled to support rural
giveaways in exchange for farm-state
votes to support feeding programs.
Most of this debate has focused on
food stamps. Despite the farm bill
moniker, the Supplemental Nutrition
Assistance Program makes up 80 per-
cent of spending in the existing farm
bill thats about to expire. Conservatives
have recoiled at the programs expan-
sion over the past decade to 47 million
Americans. The conservatives want
deep cuts.
Democrats accused their Republican
counterparts of being cruel to the
needy. Even in a Washington environ-
ment of near-constant acrimony, the
debate turned especially mean. Liberals
suggested that reining in a fast-growing
federal food stamp program was tanta-
mount to starving Americas children.
Thats not true. In fact, the House
Republicans gambit may be the best
thing to happen for food stamps. The
assumption that food stamps need
farm-state votes to survive congressio-
nal scrutiny is based on past experience
rather than a clear view of the future:
Food stamps do a lot of good. Fraud
and abuse exist, but theyre limited. The
program has grown too far too fast as
a result of easier standards for qualify-
ing. Still, the argument for continuing
it is strong, and it can be funded at a
level that protects the most vulnerable
Americans while also taking essential
steps to reduce federal spending. There
is no reason to believe that Congress
will hurt those truly in need.
Farm subsidies, conversely, are a relic
of the past. They hark back to Soviet-
style central planning. They funnel
taxpayer money to a wealthy special-
interest that hasnt needed it in decades.
Most ag subsidies should be eliminated,
or at least drastically curtailed.
It cant help food stamps in the long
run to be joined with obsolete farm pro-
grams that make no economic sense.
The political calculus is changing as
more members of Congress understand
that point:
Congress isnt ready to do away with
farm programs yet. Were disappointed
to see the House approve its food-stamp-
free farm bill without scaling back the
subsidies to big agriculture. Whats
more, this Republican bill is loaded with
pork that ies in the face of the partys
free-market, small-government prin-
ciples. It includes, for instance, a con-
tinuation of a so-called counter-cyclical
program that pays farmers when crop
prices fall below certain levels.
Worst of all, it includes a costly expan-
sion of the misnamed crop insurance
program: Farmers can use it to guaran-
tee the revenue from their businesses,
essentially locking in prots at taxpayer
expense. The House bill would expand
that boondoggle even more than the
Senate has proposed in its version of the
next farm bill which, as in the past,
marries food stamps to farm subsidies.
The House and Senate bills are so
different that reconciling them wont be
easy. One (bad) option is a short-term
extension of existing law. We hope the
Senate will accept the Houses notion
of keeping food stamps out of the sub-
sidies debate. That would improve the
odds of Congress someday ending the
subsidy programs.
Chicago Tribune
oTher opinion: FArmBiLL
Split food stamps from
obsolete farmprograms
commenTArY: jAneT TrAUTwein
The Afordable Care Acts youth problem
Young Americans may soon experi-
ence sticker shock when shopping
for health insurance. A new survey of
insurers estimates that premiums will
almost triple for a hypothetical 27-year-
old man next year, once all the federal
health reform laws rules take effect.
That could be problematic for its
efforts to cover young people. More
than a quarter of the 67 million
Americans between the ages of 19 and
34 are uninsured. They may well stay
that way if insurance becomes unaf-
fordable.
That doesnt have to be the case.
Lawmakers can make health coverage
more affordable by relaxing restrictions
on what insurers can charge young
adults thus allowing them to offer
lower premiums.
The Patient Protection and
Affordable Care Act (PPACA) regu-
lates the health insurance market in
three main ways. First, all Americans
with a few exceptions must
secure health coverage.
Second, because everyone must
carry coverage, the law requires insur-
ers to sell policies to whomever wants
to buy them. They cant deny coverage
because of health status or history a
reform called guaranteed issue.
Third, in an attempt to control the
cost of coverage, the law prevents
insurers from charging older individu-
als more than three times what they
charge younger beneciaries a rule
called community rating..
The community rating rules were
created to ensure that insurance com-
panies dont exclude sick people or
those with pre-existing conditions
by only offering them policies with
sky-high premiums. They were also
designed to ensure that coverage for
older Americans not yet eligible for
Medicare would be affordable.
The problem is a matter of facts.
It costs six times as much to insure a
64-year-old as it does an 18-year-old.
While we might like to think that we
can cap a 64-year-olds costs at three
times the level of an 18-year-olds, the
math just doesnt work. In the end,
younger, healthier people will subsi-
dize insurance for those who are older
and sicker.
Even with federal subsidies, those
higher premiums will be unaffordable
for most young Americans, who are
more likely to have lower incomes.
According to a ve-city survey con-
ducted by the American Action Forum,
community rating will contribute to a
190-percent rate increase for younger,
healthier people living in Milwaukee.
Across all ve cities, the average pre-
mium hike for young people will reach
169 percent.
To make matters worse, community
rating-fueled premium hikes wont just
affect young people - by 2014, small
businesses with up to 50 workers will
face them, too. And by 2016, the hikes
will hit all companies with less than
100 workers.
This will represent a dramatic rat-
ing shift for small employers in the
42 states where rates are based on a
number of factors including broad age
differentials.
In 49 states, employers with between
50 and 100 employees dont have to
shop in the small-group market but
rather in a mid-market akin to the way
larger groups purchase coverage. That
grants them greater choice of health
plans and more rate exibility.
Lumping all these rms together
may seem like a good idea because
it will increase the size of the health
insurance pool. But it will drive premi-
ums up for everyone by moving more
employers into the the mandatory
modied community rating structure.
If premiums spiral upward, millions
of young people will choose not to
buy coverage whether on their own
or through their employers and
instead pay nes the law prescribes for
being uninsured. If there arent enough
young people paying into the insurance
pool to subsidize coverage for older
Americans, premiums will shoot up
even further.
This process can repeat itself again
and again, resulting in what actuaries
call a death spiral of higher and high-
er premiums and lower and lower
coverage rates.
For evidence, look to the eight states
that adopted community rating and
guaranteed issue rules in the 1990s.
According to a study from Milliman,
a consultancy, the insurance markets
in all eight experienced death spirals
to some degree. Two states ultimately
abandoned their reforms.
Three others, however, took a differ-
ent approach. They chose to relax their
community rating rules. And their
insurance markets have survived.
Federal lawmakers should learn
from these state experiments and relax
PPACAs community-rating require-
ments, too.
Lawmakers must do everything they
can to ensure that the Affordable Care
Act actually makes insurance more
affordable. Revising the community-
rating rules is an effective way to do
so.
Janet Trautwein is CEO of the National Associa-
tion of Health Underwriters.
PAGE 12A Thursday, July 25, 2013 NEWS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
Monterrey
100/72
Chihuahua
91/67
Los Angeles
82/65
Washington
82/67
New York
74/66
Miami
89/75
Atlanta
88/70
Detroit
78/60
Houston
100/76
Kansas City
86/67
Chicago
79/63
Minneapolis
82/61
El Paso
91/75
Denver
88/59
Billings
86/59
San Francisco
69/55
Seattle
81/57
Toronto
74/60
Montreal
73/54
Winnipeg
68/51
SEVEN-DAY FORECAST
HIGH
LOW
TEMPERATURES
ALMANAC NATIONAL FORECAST
PRECIPITATION
Lehigh
Delaware
Sunrise Sunset
Moonrise Moonset
Today Today
Today Today
Susquehanna Stage Chg Fld Stg
RIVER LEVELS
ACROSS THE REGION TODAY
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation today. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Shown is
todays weather.
Temperatures are
todays highs and
tonights lows.
SUN & MOON
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy,
c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
Wilkes-Barre
Scranton
Philadelphia
Reading
Pottsville
Allentown
Harrisburg
State College
Williamsport
Towanda
Binghamton
Syracuse
Albany
Poughkeepsie
New York
PHILADELPHIA
THE JERSEY SHORE
FRI SUN
MON TUE
SAT
WED
TODAY
80
55
Partly
sunny and
pleasant
82 60
A couple
of thun-
derstorms
81 64
Sunny
82 58
Partly
sunny
82 60
A thunder-
storm pos-
sible
83 67
Times of
clouds and
sun
81 59
Nice with
clouds
and sun-
shine
COOLING DEGREE DAYS
Degree days are an indicator of energy needs. The more the
total degree days, the more energy is necessary to cool.
Yesterday 6
Month to date 309
Year to date 509
Last year to date 501
Normal year to date 311
Anchorage 72/61/pc 71/60/pc
Baltimore 82/62/pc 82/65/pc
Boston 74/64/r 74/64/r
Buffalo 74/55/s 81/66/pc
Charlotte 84/66/t 86/67/pc
Chicago 79/63/s 81/63/c
Cleveland 75/58/s 81/63/pc
Dallas 102/79/pc 100/76/t
Denver 88/59/t 87/59/t
Honolulu 87/74/s 88/74/s
Indianapolis 78/60/s 81/66/pc
Las Vegas 105/89/pc 104/90/s
Milwaukee 76/66/s 81/61/t
New Orleans 94/77/pc 95/77/t
Norfolk 82/72/r 83/68/pc
Okla. City 93/71/pc 84/69/r
Orlando 90/75/t 92/74/t
Phoenix 105/89/t 105/88/s
Pittsburgh 76/56/s 81/63/s
Portland, ME 74/59/c 75/60/c
St. Louis 83/65/s 85/69/t
San Francisco 69/55/pc 67/55/pc
Seattle 81/57/s 80/55/s
Wash., DC 82/67/pc 83/68/pc
Bethlehem 2.57 +0.68 16
Wilkes-Barre 1.60 -0.04 22
Towanda 1.69 +0.61 16
Port Jervis 2.97 +0.11 18
In feet as of 7 a.m. Wednesday.
Today Fri Today Fri Today Fri
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. 2013
July 29 Aug 6
Aug 14
Last New
First Full
Aug 20
5:52 a.m.
10:03 p.m.
8:27 p.m.
9:22 a.m.
THE POCONOS
Highs: 71-77. Lows: 49-55. Delightful today with clouds and sun. Partly
cloudy tonight. Nice tomorrow with clouds and sun.
Highs: 69-75. Lows: 66-72. Cooler today with on-and-off rain and
drizzle; breezy in the afternoon. Periods of rain tonight.
THE FINGER LAKES
Highs: 73-79. Lows: 52-58. Mostly sunny and pleasant today. Clear
tonight. Mostly sunny and pleasant tomorrow.
NEW YORK CITY
High: 74. Low: 66. Mostly cloudy and cooler today with a touch of
rain. Mostly cloudy tonight with a brief shower.
High: 79. Low: 66. Variable cloudiness today. Mostly cloudy tonight.
Variable cloudiness tomorrow.
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton International Airport
through 7 p.m. Wed.
High/low 76/65
Normal high/low 82/61
Record high 95 (1933)
Record low 49 (1985)
24 hrs ending 7 p.m. 0.00"
Month to date 1.19"
Normal m-t-d 2.88"
Year to date 16.39"
Normal y-t-d 20.71"
80/55
78/54
79/66
79/59
78/58
79/58
78/60
78/54
79/55
78/50
74/52
76/55
78/57
76/56
74/66
Summary: Downpours will affect part of the East Coast, South, Southwest and
the Upper Midwest today. Low humidity will reach from the Ohio Valley to
northern New England. The Northwest and California will be mainly dry.
8
1
4
8
8
4
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www.sectv.com
Sponsored By:
Summer Savings
Are Coming Down The Line
Summer Savings
Are Coming Down The Line
Fred George decided to
stop by to take his last look at
the building where he worked
as a chef for 22 years.
George, now 81, started as
a dishwasher in 1949 in the
Sterling kitchen and rose to
become head chef before he
left in 1971. Through his eyes
and memory, he talked about
the Hotel Sterling he knew
and will never forget.
As George recounted his
days at the Sterling speak-
ing in the shadows of the
seven-story structure cars,
trucks and buses whisked by
with few drivers even turn-
ing their heads to get a final
glimpse of the condemned
landmark. There were no
protesters, no gawkers, no
flashes from cameras as
George talked in detail about
dignitaries and crowded din-
ing rooms and a smorgasbord
with 100 items.
The hotel stood tall on its
final day, as pigeons flew in
and out and graffiti stained
several windows. Rooftop
ledges where peregrine fal-
cons still perch in search of
prey and remnants of home-
less overnight stays remain.
The marquee where then-
candidate John F. Kennedy
rode past on his way to a
presidential victory in 1960
is gone, but the memories
of grand events over the
Sterlings 115 years remain.
Gaping portals where his-
torical artifacts have been
removed offered a look into
a deteriorated lobby where
elegance and class flourished
decades ago.
Right over there, in that
corner of the lobby, there was
a news stand where you could
by a newspaper or a magazine
and get a great cup of coffee,
George said. I started out
washing dishes and then one
day they asked me to make
sandwiches. I had to quit
school to help my family.
George, of Wilkes-Barre,
remembers the Luzerne
County Courthouse employ-
ees filing in for lunch. There
were 20 cooks working at
the Sterling back then. He
remembers shucking oysters
and clams as dignitaries and
salesmen roamed the lobby
and walked the decorative
stairs to their rooms, bypass-
ing the shiny brass elevators.
Well-equipped hotel
The Sterling had its own
chiropractor and physician
who took care of the employ-
ees aches and pains. There
was a butcher on site and a
bakery, laundry department,
barber shop and manicurist.
We had everything there,
George said. And the VIP
Coffee Shop and Treasure
Island Lounge were always
busy.
Downtown Wilkes-Barre
had 12 restaurants within
walking distance of the
Sterling, but George said
everybody came to the grand
hotel. Coal barons, gover-
nors, politicians, Hollywood
stars and societys finest all
were patrons. They enjoyed
the oriental rugs, the ornate
woodwork, the fine art, crys-
tal chandeliers, the attention
to detail, the professional/
mannerly staff and the great
food.
I remember one Mothers
Day when we served more
than 1,600 customers,
George said. Our waiters
and waitresses worked with
such grace and profession-
alism. We paid attention to
detail. When you walked into
the Sterling you felt like you
came home. Like you kicked
off your shoes and relaxed.
Storied visitors
Entertainer and come-
dian Danny Thomas spoke
there. Singer Jerry Vale per-
formed. Jazz musician Louis
Armstrong ordered room ser-
vice. George remembers it all
the General Sullivan Room,
the Admiral Stark Room, the
Adams Room. Fireplaces,
paintings, mirrors, tapestries,
chandeliers are all still there
in Georges mind. His memo-
ries will never be demolished.
I can still see it as it was,
he said. Its still there.
On a day, months ago, when
George joined protesters try-
ing to save the building, a
car pulled up with out-of-
state plates. A woman asked
George what was going on
and he told her they were
protesting the demolition of
the Sterling. The woman said
her mother had lived in the
Sterling years ago.
Her mother was in the car,
and George said that when
she learned the Sterling was
going to be razed, she started
to weep.
Tomorrow, we all will be
weeping, he said.
Hotel
From page 1A
A post card of the Hotel Sterling in its heyday. One former employee fondly
recalls when the VIP Coffee Shop and Treasure Island Lounge were always
busy.
HOTEL STERLING HIGHLIGHTS
When the Hotel Sterling opened for business at the intersection of
West Market and North River streets on Aug. 14, 1898, the rst guests
in the door experienced the biggest, most luxurious hotel Wilkes-Barre
had ever seen.
Named for businessman and investor Walter G. Sterling, the newhotel
was seven stories tall and had a spacious, columned lobby designed to
evoke comparisons with the great metropolitan hotels all over America.
Wilkes-Barres population was on a sharp rise, and by 1900 census
gures would register a staggering growth from37,000 in 1890 to
51,000.
Within the next decade or so, competitors arose the Hotel Hart and
the Redington (even taller than the Sterling), facing each other across
East Market Street near the rail stations.
The owners employed Oppenheims String Orchestra to entertain
dinner guests in its restaurant, known after 1911 as The PalmRoom.
Wrote Harrison Smith, Afamous NewYork chef prepared such
delicacies as high-avored and well-dressed oysters, mince pie or plum
pudding and wine-cured cheeses.
Staying at the Sterling was, for the time, pricey. The hotel advertised
200 bed chambers and parlors and 125 baths at $1.50 and $3 a day.
The building was a beehive of activity. Well into the 20th century,
the Sterlings public rooms were packed with meetings, conventions
and banquets, and at all times it tried to maintain an air of upscale
sophistication. The menu for a 1916 testimonial dinner for a Luzerne
County judge included blue point oysters, broiled St. Johns River
shad, roast milk-fed squab chicken, Roquefort cheese and betting a
gathering of important men coee and cigars.
The key player in the Hotel Sterling had come to be Homer Mallow,
and the hotel for a time was known as the Mallow-Sterling. In the 1920s,
plans were laid for a major expansion. The owners built a 14-story
addition along West Market Street.
In 1936, a nancially troubled Sterling went into receivership. One of
the trustees, construction magnate and former state Sen. AndrewJ.
Sordoni, formed a newcorporation and became the Sterlings owner.
Mallowremained in a lesser capacity.
Perhaps the most striking feature of the Sterling, though, was the
huge neon sign atop the hotel, installed in 1939. With 10-foot-high
letters, it spelled out Hotel Sterling and was visible all over Wyoming
Valley. Apenthouse on top of the tower provided Sordoni, who lived in
the Back Mountain, with a home downtown.
In the 1960s, the Sterling was renting out much of the 1898 building
to Kings College for dormitory space, and by the 1980s the tower had
become a low-cost residential hotel.
By the turn of the century, a hundred years after construction of the
original part of the Sterling, the structure was vacant.
Anonprot developer, CityVest, then took over the property with a
plan to redevelop the site. With a budget of $6 million in Luzerne County
money, it tore down the 14-story tower and the connector building as
well as other nearby buildings. But no developer for the 1898 building,
the original Sterling, emerged.
Submitted photo
PRESS
CONFERENCE
Mayor TomLeighton will
hold a press conference at 10
a.m. marking the start of the
demolition of the Hotel Sterling
to mark the historic nature of the
landmark hotel.
The mayor will be joined by
other local, state, and federal
ocials on West Market Street
near the demolition site.
our cities and towns
depend on our local
merchants to keep our
economy moving and
create good jobs for our
citizens, said Barletta.
Local retailers have
been at a distinct disad-
vantage because online
stores often dont collect
sales tax. Ive heard many
times that people will
come into a shop to look
at items, particularly elec-
tronics, and then go home
and buy the same product
online to avoid the sales
tax.
Sides said the bill
includes a $1 million
threshold for companies
to have to earn before
they will be required to
collect the tax. The origi-
nal version had an even
lower threshold, but it
was raised, he said.
However, not all area
congressmen are in favor
of the bill as crafted.
While the bill has a
small-seller exception in
place, we have heard from
some small sellers that
the revenue requirements
are still too low, said
Rep. Matt Cartwright,
D-Moosic. While I, too,
want to level the playing
eld for businesses of all
sorts, my rst priority is
to ensure that small sell-
ers are not closing their
doors and laying off work-
ers.
Pennsylvania laws
State law requires
businesses with a physi-
cal presence in the
state to collect sales
tax, said Elizabeth
Brassell, a spokeswom-
an for the Pennsylvania
Department of Revenue.
That means online
retailers such as Amazon.
com are required to do
so because they operate
distribution centers in
Pennsylvania.
But an online company
based in another state
that has $1 million or
more in annual sales and
does not have any retail
operations or warehouses
in Pennsylvania is not
required to do the same.
States are prohibited by
federal law from requir-
ing out-of-state com-
panies to collect taxes
because its a violation
of interstate commerce,
Brassell said.
Companies such
as Amazon.com and
Walmart are supportive
of the idea, said Sides,
but other e-retailers
without operations in
multiple states, such as
eBay, have been outspo-
ken against the proposal.
Closing loopholes
A study conducted by
economists Art Laffer
and Donna Arduin
released Wednesday by
the Pennsylvania Chapter
of the Alliance for Main
Street Fairness shows
that closing the online
sales tax loophole has
many benefits, includ-
ing the potential to
lower overall tax rates
and jump-start economic
growth.
Laffers study suggests
that passing e-fairness
legislation such as the
Marketplace Fairness
Act would create a tax
system with fewer loop-
holes, a larger base and
lower rates for all tax-
payers, which could lead
to an increase in gross
domestic product of
$563.2 billion $15.1
in Pennsylvania and
more than 1.5 million
jobs nationally 43,803
in Pennsylvania over
the next 10 years.
With analysis like this,
everyone can see the ben-
efits of passing e-fairness
legislation, said Sides.
It will help small busi-
nesses, like mine, com-
pete against online-only
competition in a fair way
and create jobs for thou-
sands of Pennsylvania
families.
Sides added that with-
in the next five years
online purchases will out-
weigh brick-and-mortar
sales. This means the
potential revenue loss
for states will only grow
if no action is taken by
Congress, he said.
Tax plan
From page 1A
High School in 1995.
It was something that
they saw that I guess I really
didnt, said Janczewski with
the 119th Civil Engineer
Squadron Fire Emergency
Services.
Incident in Afghanistan
Late in the afternoon
at Camp John Pratt last
October a re caused by
hot coals thrown into a
Dumpster ignited about 10
feet from two, 20,000-gallon
fuel bladders. Out of sight of
the blaze on the other side of
a protective blast wall, heli-
copters were refueling.
Janczewski, the base re
chief, led the team of six
reghters and prevented a
catastrophe. The reght-
ers contained the blaze
using foam and prevented
the tanks from igniting.
Janczewski made sure the
people and aircraft were out
of danger.
I was yelling at them to
get the birds out of the area,
he said.
Medical-transport helicop-
ters and aircraft used in spe-
cial operations refuel at the
base. It was imperative that
we didnt let the place burn
up, he said.
He credited the ability to
work under pressure to the
training he and the other
reghters undergo.
Hes been training since
a teenager when he volun-
teered with the Mt. Zion and
West Pittston re depart-
ments.
He has the benet of two
former re chiefs in the
family. His father, William
Janczewski, held the posi-
tion with the Mt. Zion volun-
teer re company in Exeter
Township. His uncle, John
Janczewski, was chief in
West Pittston.
His mother, Wendy Sartin,
lives in Jenkins Township.
His father lives in West
Pittston.
Assistant re chief
In Little Rock, Janczewski
serves as assistant chief and
responds to calls ranging
from house res and motor
vehicle crashes to hazardous
materials incidents, aircraft
and medical emergencies.
When not on the job, he
and his wife provide support
to other parents with chil-
dren born with congenital
heart defects. The couples
son, Ethan, has had open
heart surgery and essentially
has half a heart that func-
tions. The Janczewskis work
with Mended Little Hearts
of Little Rock, answering
questions and sharing their
experiences dealing with
their son.
Its just parents being
concerned for their chil-
dren, Janczewski said.
Hes glad to be part of a
support network, having
gone through what many
of them are going through.
My phones never off at all,
Janczewski said.
Airman
From page 1A
Peter Sides of Robert M. Sides Family Music Center in Wilkes-Barre Township talks to the news media
about the need for a level playing field between brick-and-mortar Pennsylvania businesses and their
online-only competition and the results of a new study that examines the issues of e-retail fairness
in the nation.
Clark Van Orden | The Times Leader
HANOVER TWP. - The winning rally
started with the rst of seven straight
singles and didnt stop until the nal two,
decisive runs scored on a play of pure
hustle.
But really, Greater Pittstons Region 5
American Legion baseball title was won
even before that.
We were sitting in the dugout, as a
team, Greater Pittston catcher Trent
Grove said. Im going to play track and
eld in college at Temple. My other friends
arent playing baseball. Weve been playing
together since we were 4, 5 years old. We
said, This is the last baseball were going
to play in our whole lives.
If that is the last at-bat in my life, I
knew I had to do it.
He did, and so did the rest of Greater
Pittston.
Groves bases-loaded, two-run sin-
gle ignited a six-run rally that shocked
Swoyersville and turned a four-run decit
into Greater Pittstons 7-5 victory in the
Region 5 American Legion baseball cham-
pionship game at the Hanover Area High
School baseball eld.
I just kept telling them, Dont give up
and something goods going to happen,
said Greater Pittston manager Jerry
Ranieli, whose teamwill head to the eight-
team Pennsylvania state playoffs this com-
ing Tuesday.
His gritty team proved him right.
With two on and two out in a tie game,
ErikWalkowiakcappedthedramaticcome-
back by beating out a bouncer far behind
rst base by out-running Swoyersvilles
inelders to the bag for an ineld hit. Both
Justin Martinelli and Chuck Bressler - run-
ning hard all the way from second base
- scored the games nal two runs on the
play, completing Greater Pittstons gutsy
comeback against its powerful Wyoming
Valley league champion and rival.
Greater Pittston digs deep for title
NEW YORK Alex
Rodriguez certainly leads
the New York Yankees in
headlines this season even
though he hasnt played a
single major league game.
Injuries have kept him
away from the team since
last years playoffs, and
now Rodriguez faces dis-
cipline from Major League
Baseball in its drug inves-
tigation, possibly up to a
lifetime ban.
The likelihood of a
severe punishment for
Rodriguez is very high,
former Commissioner Fay
Vincent said Wednesday.
The three-time AL MVP
who turns 38 Saturday is
among more than a dozen
players MLB has targeted
following allegations they
were linked to a Florida
clinic accused of distribut-
ing performance-enhanc-
ing drugs.
A f t e r
R y a n
Br a u n s
a g r e e -
ment to
accept a
65- game
s u s p e n -
sion ear-
lier this week, attention
has turned to Rodriguez,
who four years ago admit-
ted using PEDs while
with Texas from 2001-03.
He has repeatedly denied
using them since, and
MLB has never said he
failed a test.
Lawyers for MLB and
the players association
were set to resume discus-
sions about the Biogenesis
investigation today.
Though it was unclear who
might be penalized next,
all eyes were on A-Rod.
The Yankees expect
Rodriguez to be accused
of using PEDs over mul-
tiple seasons, of recruit-
ing other athletes for the
clinic, of attempting to
obstruct MLBs investi-
gation, and of not being
truthful with MLB in the
past when he discussed
his relationship with Dr.
Anthony Galea, who plead-
ed guilty two years ago to
a federal charge of bring-
ing unapproved drugs into
the United States from
Canada.
The mess seems very
large indeed, said John
Thorn, baseballs ofcial
historian. If a lifetime sus-
pension is being brooded
about and a plea bargain
would involve something
Righty goes eight
strong innings
as slugger belts
three-run homer
in the victory
DAVE ROSENGRANT
drosengrant@timesleader.com
MOOSIC While the
RailRiders offense has
struggled over their pre-
vious ve games entering
Wednesdays matinee, the
pitching has been superb.
The staff had allowed
just 17 runs in that apan
while the offense had put
up just ve runs. Starter
Brett Marshall didnt
need much support on
the afternoon as he was
excellent for Scranton/
Wilkes-Barre going eight
innings, allowing just one
run on ve hits, retiring
10 of the last 11 batters
and helping SWB break
a ve-game losing streak
with a 4-1 win over
Toledo at PNC Field.
Marshall said he didnt
think he had his best
stuff on the afternoon,
but he didnt have to as
Mud Hens batters were
kept off-balance. When
Marshall wasnt inducing
one of the 12 groundball
outs he had on the after-
noon, he got a strikeout
when he needed one.
I felt like I was kind
of lucky. I felt like I
wasnt commanding
my fastball well, and
my change-up I didnt
throw very well today,
said Marshall, whose
eight innings tied for
the most by a RailRider
pitcher this season. He
has done it both times.
For most of the last ve
weeks, since Randy Ruiz
joined the RailRiders,
the offensive tempo has
performed much like
the slugger. So when the
35-year-old struggled
over the previous 14 days
entering Wednesday with
just one home run and a
.206 batting average in
that span, the RailRiders
went just 3-8 in that
period averaging just two
Will A-Rod play for
the Yankees again?
Marshall, Ruiz lead RailRiders
RONALD BLUM
AP Sports Writer
One year later: Nittany Lions are ready to move on
Unlike last year, NCAA
sanctions not a prime
topic for OBrien at
Big Ten media event
DEREK LEVARSE
dlevarse@timesleader.com
CHICAGO What Bill
OBrien remembers is that
glare.
Coming out to Chicago for Big
Ten media days last July wasnt
particularly pleasant for the
Penn State coach or the players
who came with him. The NCAA
had just hammered the Nittany
Lions with sanctions and line-
backer Michael Mauti still had
a distinctive scowl carved onto
his face when he made the trip
to the Windy City.
You remember him at
this last year? OBrien said
Wednesday. Whoo. Would you
want to mess with him?
One year and one day
removed from NCAA president
Mark Emmerts fateful press
conference, OBrien and the
Lions were no longer being
asked about impending doom.
Not that things are exactly
back to normal for Penn State as
the one-year anniversary of the
sanctions passes by. But com-
pared to last summer
Refreshing. OBrien said.
Very refreshing.
Joined along by a trio of
seniors guard John Urschel,
linebacker Glenn Carson and
safety Malcolm Willis
OBrien spent much of the rst
day of the media event discuss-
ing the quarterback battle (it
will be decided by mid-August),
the health of tailback Zach
Zwinak (hell be ready for the
season opener) and depth con-
cerns on defense (safeties may
get some work with the line-
backers).
A year ago at this time, many
of those same players werent
sure if they were going to stay
or take advantage of the NCAAs
declaration that Penn State play-
ers could transfer without pen-
alty because of the sanctions.
As it so happens, that transfer
period is still in effect and will
expire on Aug. 1.
That would seem to be an
important checkpoint to reach
for the program. But the play-
ers, for their part, have moved
past it.
Thats not a relevant date for
us, Urschel said. Thats not
an issue weve had. Our team
is very much together and very
much working toward one goal
winning games this fall.
OBrien has said since the
spring that he didnt anticipate
losing any more players to other
schools.
In 2013, quarterback Steven
Bench has been the only signi-
cant player to transfer, and that
was because he was edged out
by Tyler Ferguson during the
Aimee Dilger | The Times Leader
Greater Pittston Area American Legion players celebrate during a six-run rally in the Region 5 American Legion title game as Swoyersville catcher
Ryan Hogan sits at home plate Wednesday afternoon in Hanover Township.
Former commissioner says likelihood of a
severe punishment for Rodriguez is very high
timesleader.com
THETIMES LEADER Thursday, July 25, 2013
SPORTS
See A-ROD | 5B See RAILRIDERS | 5B See PENGUINS | 5B
See PSU | 5B
See LEGION | 5B
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Winger re-signed
earlier this month;
WBS also adds
new goaltender
TOMVENESKY
tvenesky@timesleader.com
Paul Thompson is thinking
about himself more than his
goal this offsea-
son.
Like any pro
hockey player,
Th o mp s o n s
ultimate goal
is to make it to
the NHL.
But thats not
his focus as he
spends the summer working
out and preparing for training
camp in September.
The NHL is the goal, but its
not something I worry about,
Thompson said. The goal that
Im concentrating on is making
a good impression when camp
starts and see what happens
from there. If I worry too much
about the other stuff, it takes
away from that focus.
This summer Thompson
doesnt have much other stuff
to worry about as the third-year
winger signed a two-way NHL
contract with Pittsburgh ear-
lier this month. For Thompson,
signing on for another year
with the only organization he
has known since coming out
of college in 2011 is a chance
to continue his development in
the Penguins system.
Last year his second as
a pro Thompson notched
a career-best 20 goals in 58
games. He also added a physi-
cal element to his game with 84
penalty minutes.
Thompson said he hopes to
continue to add other elements
to aid his goal of reaching the
NHL.
Coming out of college I
had more of a one-dimension-
al game, offense, he said. I
knew I needed to become a
better overall player. Thats the
only way Im going to become a
better offensive player.
Unlike last season when the
lockout wiped out NHL train-
ing camp, Thompson is looking
forward to Pittsburghs camp in
September as he eyes a spot on
one of the forward lines.
And just as important,
Thompson will have an oppor-
tunity to see how he stacks up
against NHL players.
Its great for a guy like
me. You can measure yourself
against NHL-caliber guys, he
said. Last year was unfortu-
nate because I didnt get that
chance.
With the departures of
Trevor Smith, Riley Holzapfel
and Chad Kolarik, along with
Brian Gibbons remaining
unsigned, if Thompson returns
to Wilkes-Barre/Scranton to
open the season he will be the
highest-scorer left from last
years roster.
The high rate of turnover
isnt a surprise to Thompson
and hes ready to contribute
more offense if needed.
The rst year I was here we
lost a good amount of guys as
well. In the AHL, every year its
like a new team, which is excit-
ing, he said. But at the same
time we had a good team last
year and its sad to see those
guys go.
WBS Pens add another
goaltender
Wi l ke s - Ba r r e / S c r a nt o n
signed goaltender Peter
Mannino to an American
Hockey League contract on
Wednesday.
Nowentering his sixth year of
Thompson
has clear
focus on goal
Thompson
Bill Tarutis | For The Times Leader
RailRiders starter Brett Marshall delivers a pitch against
Toledo at PNC Field in Moosic on Wednesday afternoon.
Rodriguez
Six-run eighth inning
lifs team to Region 5
championship and a
state playof berth
PAUL SOKOLOSKI
psokoloski@timesleader.com
PAGE 2B Thursday, July 25, 2013 Scoreboard TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
TUESDAYS LATE BOXES
Yankees 5, Rangers 4
New York Texas
ab r hbi ab r hbi
Gardnr cf 4 0 1 0 Kinsler 2b 4 0 1 0
ISuzuki rf 4 0 1 1 Profar 3b 2 0 0 0
Cano 2b 4 0 0 0 N.Cruz rf 4 1 0 0
Overay 1b 4 0 0 0 ABeltre dh 3 1 1 1
V.Wells dh 3 2 1 0 Przyns c 4 0 0 0
Nunez ss 4 1 2 1 Andrus ss 4 1 1 1
Lillirdg 3b 4 0 1 2 Morlnd 1b 3 1 1 2
Mesa lf 4 1 1 0 Gentry cf 3 0 1 0
AuRmn c 3 1 1 1 LMartn ph 1 0 0 0
Hafner ph 1 0 0 0 EBeltre lf 2 0 1 0
CStwrt c 0 0 0 0 JeBakr ph 0 0 0 0
DvMrp ph-lf 2 0 0 0
Totals 35 5 8 5 Totals 32 4 6 4
New York 002 100 002 5
Texas 000 004 000 4
E - Lillibridge (1). DP - New York 1, Texas 1. LOB -
New York 4, Texas 5. 2B - V.Wells (11), Mesa (1),
Au.Romine (5), Kinsler (18), A.Beltre (23), Gentry
(7), E.Beltre (1). 3B - Nunez (2). HR - Moreland
(14). SB - Lillibridge (1). S - Profar.
IP H R ER BB SO
New York
P.Hughes 5 2-3 4 3 0 3 1
Logan BS,1-1 0 2 1 1 0 0
Claiborne 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Chamberlain W,2-0 1 0 0 0 0 0
M.Rivera S,32-34 1 0 0 0 0 2
Texas
Ogando 5 6 3 3 0 2
Wolf 1 0 0 0 0 2
Frasor H,7 1 0 0 0 0 1
Cotts H,8 1 0 0 0 0 0
Nathan L,1-1 BS,2-33 2-3 2 2 2 1 1
R.Ross 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Logan pitched to 2 batters in the 6th.
WP - Nathan.
Umpires - Home, Kerwin Danley; First, Lance
Barksdale; Second, Vic Carapazza; Third, Wally
Bell.
T - 3:00. A - 42,739 (48,114).
Tigers 6, White Sox 2
Detroit Chicago
ab r hbi ab r hbi
AJcksn cf 5 0 1 0 De Aza cf 4 0 1 0
TrHntr rf 4 0 1 0 AlRmrz ss 4 0 0 0
Tuiassp lf 3 1 0 0 Rios rf 3 1 1 0
Dirks ph-lf 2 0 1 0 A.Dunn 1b 2 1 0 0
Fielder 1b 4 0 0 0 Konerk dh 3 0 1 2
VMrtnz dh 4 1 1 0 C.Wells pr 0 0 0 0
JhPerlt ss 4 2 2 2 Kppngr 2b 4 0 0 0
Avila c 2 1 0 0 Gillaspi 3b 4 0 2 0
D.Kelly 3b 2 0 0 1 Viciedo lf 3 0 0 0
HPerez 2b 3 1 2 2 Phegly c 3 0 0 0
Totals 33 6 8 5 Totals 30 2 5 2
Detroit 000 303 000 6
Chicago 000 000 002 2
E - A.Dunn (6), Rios (3), Gillaspie (6), Viciedo (2).
DP - Detroit 1, Chicago 1. LOB - Detroit 6, Chi-
cago 6. 2B - V.Martinez (22), Konerko (10). 3B
- H.Perez (1). HR - Jh.Peralta (9). SB - Rios (21).
CS - A.Jackson (3). SF - H.Perez.
IP H R ER BB SO
Detroit
Porcello W,7-6 7 4 0 0 3 1
Alburquerque 1 0 2 2 2 1
Benoit 1 1 0 0 0 1
Chicago
H.Santiago L,3-6 6 5 6 3 5 6
Axelrod 3 3 0 0 0 2
Alburquerque pitched to 2 batters in the 9th.
Umpires - Home, Chris Conroy; First, Gary Dar-
ling; Second, Jerry Meals; Third, Bruce Dreck-
man.
T - 3:01. A - 25,919 (40,615).
Athletics 4, Astros 3
Oakland Houston
ab r hbi ab r hbi
Crisp cf 5 1 1 2 Villar ss 4 0 0 0
Jaso c 3 1 2 1 Altuve 2b 4 1 2 1
DNorrs c 1 0 0 0 JCastro dh 4 1 1 0
Dnldsn 3b 2 0 0 0 Carter lf 3 0 0 0
Lowrie ss 4 0 0 0 Corprn c 3 1 1 2
Cespds lf 4 0 1 0 Wallac 1b 4 0 1 0
Moss 1b 4 0 0 0 Maxwll cf 4 0 0 0
Reddck rf 4 0 1 0 MDmn 3b 4 0 1 0
S.Smith dh 2 1 0 0 Krauss rf 2 0 1 0
Sogard 2b 4 1 1 1 Elmore ph-rf 2 0 0 0
Totals 33 4 6 4 Totals 34 3 7 3
Oakland 100 000 300 4
Houston 000 102 000 3
LOB - Oakland 8, Houston 6. 2B - Jaso (12), Red-
dick (13), Sogard (17), J.Castro (27). HR - Crisp
(10), Jaso (3), Altuve (4), Corporan (6). SB - Al-
tuve (24).
IP H R ER BB SO
Oakland
Griffn W,9-7 6 1-3 6 3 3 0 8
Blevins H,4 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
J.Chavez H,1 2-3 1 0 0 1 1
Cook S,2-5 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Houston
B.Norris 6 1-3 4 3 3 3 7
Blackley L,1-1 BS,1-1 1-3 1 1 1 0 1
Ambriz 2-3 0 0 0 1 0
W.Wright 2-3 1 0 0 1 1
Veras 1 0 0 0 0 1
HBP - by Griffn (Corporan), by B.Norris (Donald-
son).
Umpires - Home, Jordan Baker; First, Tim Mc-
Clelland; Second, Mark Wegner; Third, Marvin
Hudson.
T - 3:10. A - 24,831 (42,060).
LOCAL CALENDAR
WHAT S ON TV
FI GHT SCHEDULE
BASEBALL
HARNESS RACI NG
TRANSACTI ONS
Todays Events
LITTLE LEAGUE
State 9-10 Baseball
(at West Middlesex LL)
Back Mountain National vs. Harborcreek, 5:30
p.m.
State Junior Softball
(at West Point LL, Greenburg)
Nanticoke vs. Warrington/Warrick, 11 a.m.
Friday
LITTLE LEAGUE
State 10-11 Baseball
(at Southern Tioga Little League)
Back Mountain American vs. Lionville, 7 p.m.
State Junior Softball
(at West Point LL, Greenburg)
Nanticoke vs. Northwestern, 11 a.m.
State 9-10 Softball
(at Caln LL, Thorndale)
Greater Wyoming Area vs. Drexel Hill, 1 p.m.
Saturday
LITTLE LEAGUE
State 9-10 Baseball
(at West Middlesex LL)
Semifnals, 5 p.m. and 8 p.m.
State 10-11 Baseball
(at Southern Tioga Little League)
Back Mountain American vs. Morrisville, 1:30 p.m.
State 9-10 Softball
(at Caln LL, Thorndale)
Greater Wyoming Area vs. Lionville, 7 p.m.
State 10-11 Softball
(at Exton Little League)
Bob Horlacher vs. Warrington, 2 p.m.
AMERICAN LEGION
Junior Regionals
(at Bataglia-Cawley Field, Scranton)
Swoyersville vs. South Scranton, 7:30 p.m.
Sunday
LITTLE LEAGUE
State 9-10 Baseball
(at West Middlesex LL)
Championship game, 3 p.m.
State 9-10 Softball
(at Caln Little League)
Semifnal, 1 p.m.
Semifnal, 4 p.m.
Championship game, 7 p.m.
State 10-11 Softball
(at Exton Little League)
Bob Horlacher vs. Section 7 winner, 3 p.m.
CANADIAN FOOTBALL LEAGUE
7:30 p.m.
ESPN2 Edmonton at Montreal
GOLF
Noon
ESPN2 The Senior British Open Champion-
ship, frst round, at Southport, England
3 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Canadian Open, frst round, at
Oakville, Ontario
6:30 p.m.
TGC Web.comTour, Boise Open, frst round, at
Boise, Idaho (same-day tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
Noon
SNY Atlanta at N.Y. Mets
12:30 p.m.
ROOT Pittsburgh at Washington
2 p.m.
YES N.Y. Yankees at Texas
7 p.m.
CSN Philadelphia at St. Louis
9:30 p.m.
WGN Chicago Cubs at Arizona
MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m.
WQMY Toledo at Scranton/Wilkes-Barre
VOLLEYBALL
8 p.m.
NBCSN World Series of Beach Volleyball,
womens Grand Slam quarterfnals and mens
Grand Slam pool play, at Long Beach, Calif.
BASEBALL
American League
BOSTON RED SOX_Signed 2B Dustin Pedroia
to an eight-year contract beginning in 2014 and
continuing through the 2021 season.
MINNESOTA TWINS_Placed C Joe Mauer on
the paternity list. Recalled C Drew Butera from
Rochester (IL).
NEW YORK YANKEES_Placed INF Luis Cruz on
the 15-day DL, retroactive to July 23. Recalled
INF David Adams from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre
(IL).
OAKLAND ATHLETICS_Selected INF Adam Ro-
sales from Sacramento (PCL). Designated INF
Vinnie Catricala for assignment.
International League
DURHAM BULLS_Added OF Kevin Kiermaier to
the roster from Montgomery (SL). Sent OF Evan
Frey to Montgomery.
Eastern League
TRENTON THUNDER_Announced INF Jose
Pirela was assigned to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre
(IL) and INF Dan Fiorito was assigned to the team
from Tampa (FSL).
American Association
EL PASO DIABLOS_Signed RHP Reyes Dorado.
Released LHP Drew Coffey and C Ivan Villaes-
cusa.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
DALLAS MAVERICKS_Signed G Ricky Ledo.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
ARIZONA CARDINALS_Placed LB Dan Gior-
dano on the PUP list. Waived/failed physical LB
Tim Fugger.
ATLANTA FALCONS_Signed QB Sean Renfree.
Agreed to terms with CB Desmond Trufant on a
four-year contract.
DETROIT LIONS_Signed WR Chaz Schilens.
INDIANAPOLIS COLTS_Agreed to terms with LB
Bjoern Werner.
TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS_Signed WR Mike
Williams to a six-year contract.
Canadian Football League
HAMILTON TIGER-CATS_Signed LB Brandon
Isaac.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
DALLAS STARS_Named James Patrick assis-
tant coach.
FLORIDA PANTHERS_Agreed to terms with C
Scott Timmins on a one-year contract.
TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS_Signed D Paul
Ranger to a one-year contract. Promoted video
analyst Chris Dennis to assistant coach.
WASHINGTON CAPITALS_Named Pace Sag-
ester media relations manager.
ECHL
BAKERSFIELD CONDORS_Signed C Gary Stef-
fes.
SOCCER
Major League Soccer
NEW YORK RED BULLS_Signed F Bradley
Wright-Phillips.
VANCOUVER WHITECAPS_Signed F Kenny
Miller to a six-month contract extension.
COLLEGE
BAYLOR_Named Kassi Duncan and Emily Maike
acrobatics & tumbling assistant coaches.
GEORGE WASHINGTON_Named Maria Fuccillo
womens assistant tennis coach.
INDIANA STATE_Promoted assistant coach Bri-
an Sheppard to offensive coordinator.
RANDOLPH-MACON_Named Katie Gebhard
womens assistant soccer coach.
SAN FRANCISCO_Named Seth Etherton pitch-
ing coach.
ST. AUGUSTINES_Announced the resignation
of mens basketball coach Lonnie Blow, Jr. to ac-
cept the same position at Virginia State.
WENTWORTH TECH_Named Greg Basmajian
assistant athletic trainer.
Pocono Downs Results
Tuesday July 23, 2013
First - $8,500 Trot 1:56.3
4-Cds Eldorado (Ge Napolitano Jr)
3.00 2.20 2.10
1-Divas Photo (Ja Morrill Jr) 3.00 2.20
3-Irish Express (An Napolitano) 3.20
EXACTA (4-1) $7.00
50 CENT TRIFECTA (4-1-3) $23.20
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $5.80
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (4-1-3-6) $126.80
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $6.34
Second - $4,500 Pace 1:53.0
5-Donnie Bop (Ja Morrill Jr) 7.00 3.80 2.60
7-Sensationalist (Ge Napolitano Jr) 5.00 4.00
4-Tyber King (Jo Drury) 4.00
EXACTA (5-7) $31.20
50 CENT TRIFECTA (5-7-4) $143.20
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $35.80
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (5-7-4-1) $582.00
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $29.10
DAILY DOUBLE (4-5) $15.40
Scratched: Major Secret
Third - $12,000 Trot 1:59.1
2-Marion Mayfower (Wi Popfnger)
20.40 10.80 5.40
6-Callmeclassylady (Er Carlson) 5.00 2.80
3-The Lindy Label (Ja Morrill Jr) 2.20
EXACTA (2-6) $82.20
50 CENT TRIFECTA (2-6-3) $201.20
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $50.30
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (2-6-3-5) $1,087.20
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $54.36
PICK 3 - 15% TAKEOUT (4-5-2) $114.00
Fourth - $9,000 Pace 1:51.3
2-Bling (Ge Napolitano Jr) 7.40 3.20 2.10
8-Marinade Hanover (Ma Kakaley) 5.80 2.80
1-Blackjack Princess (Ro Pierce) 2.10
EXACTA (2-8) $47.20
50 CENT TRIFECTA (2-8-1) $102.80
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $25.70
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (2-8-1-7) $508.00
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $25.40
Fifth - $13,000 Trot 1:56.4
4-Dinero Fishman (Ma Miller) 4.80 3.40 3.00
8-Ugly Stik (De Minor) 17.00 10.60
7-Team Zordin (Ty Buter) 5.40
EXACTA (4-8) $142.00
50 CENT TRIFECTA (4-8-7) $845.80
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $211.45
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (4-8-7-5) $8,090.40
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $404.52
Sixth - $15,000 Pace 1:51.2
1-Beachfront (Ro Pierce) 13.00 6.00 4.00
2-Allaboutme Hanover (Ja Morrill Jr) 4.40 3.00
7-Alligator Falls (Ma Miller) 4.40
EXACTA (1-2) $51.20
50 CENT TRIFECTA (1-2-7) $346.40
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $86.60
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (1-2-7-6) $1,291.60
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $64.58
PICK 3 - 15% TAKEOUT (2-4-1) $384.00
Seventh - $10,000 Trot 1:54.3
4-Dcs Piggy Bank (Ja Morrill Jr) 4.20 2.60 2.20
7-Thekeptman (Ro Pierce) 4.00 2.80
2-Tioga Thunder (Mi Simons) 2.60
EXACTA (4-7) $14.80
50 CENT TRIFECTA (4-7-2) $59.20
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $14.80
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (4-7-2-6) $481.40
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $24.07
Eighth - $13,000 Pace 1:55.3
8-Fancy Desire (Ty Buter) 18.20 6.60 4.40
5-Rockodillian (Ro Pierce) 2.80 3.00
6-Terra Terror (Ma Kakaley) 3.00
EXACTA (8-5) $38.80
50 CENT TRIFECTA (8-5-6) $202.00
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $50.50
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (8-5-6-4) $1,299.40
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $64.97
Ninth - $12,000 Trot 1:55.0
1-Trading Places (Er Carlson) 5.40 3.80 2.80
7-Ballykeel Mike (An Napolitano) 9.80 4.20
3-C-O-To Bluegrass (Si Allard) 2.60
EXACTA (1-7) $40.60
50 CENT TRIFECTA (1-7-3) $155.00
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $38.75
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (1-7-3-5) $281.20
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $14.06
PICK 3 - 15% TAKEOUT (4-8-1) $88.60
Tenth - $15,000 Pace 1:52.4
6-Cc Heet Seeker (Da Bier) 2.40 2.20 2.10
5-Munndutch (Ja Morrill Jr) 13.00 9.60
8-Spartacus Pv (Ro Pierce) 7.00
EXACTA (6-5) $28.80
50 CENT TRIFECTA (6-5-8) $180.60
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $45.15
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (6-5-8-4) $689.60
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $34.48
Scratched: Ok Fame
Eleventh - $12,000 Pace 1:54.3
5-Western Nation (Ro Pierce) 76.00 31.80 6.40
4-Dharma Initiative (Br Simpson) 7.80 6.60
8-Fox Valley Wyatt (Ma Miller) 8.20
EXACTA (5-4) $584.40
50 CENT TRIFECTA (5-4-8) $3,605.60
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $901.40
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (5-4-ALL-ALL) $783.00
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $39.15
Twelfth - $11,000 Pace 1:51.2
2-Mr Coolie (Ge Napolitano Jr) 10.20 4.60 4.40
6-Appley Ever After (Ma Kakaley) 13.20 6.40
5-Alfredsson (Ja Morrill Jr) 2.40
EXACTA (2-6) $101.00
50 CENT TRIFECTA (2-6-5) $370.80
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $92.70
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (2-6-5-7) $3,718.80
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $185.94
PICK 3 - 15% TAKEOUT (6-5-2) $641.20
Scratched: Ourea Nourrir
Thirteenth - $13,000 Pace 1:53.1
4-Knocking Around (Br Simpson) 8.00 5.20 5.00
7-Galex (Er Carlson) 26.60 15.40
3-Tims Castoff (Mi Simons) 21.60
EXACTA (4-7) $127.40
50 CENT TRIFECTA (4-7-3) $1,371.00
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $342.75
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (4-7-3-6) $4,166.00
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $208.30
Fourteenth - $9,000 Pace 1:52.0
4-Hacienda (Ma Kakaley) 6.80 3.80 3.00
6-Eagle Jolt (Ge Napolitano Jr) 14.00 9.00
1-Cosmicpedia (Ja Morrill Jr) 2.40
EXACTA (4-6) $43.40
50 CENT TRIFECTA (4-6-1) $135.20
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $33.80
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (4-6-1-5) $481.60
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $24.08
LATE DOUBLE (4-4) $35.00
Total Handle-$445,401
Twins 10, Angels 3
Minnesota Los Angeles
ab r hbi ab r hbi
Dozier 2b 6 0 1 1 Shuck lf 5 0 1 0
Carroll 3b 6 1 2 0 Trout cf 5 0 2 0
Mornea 1b 4 2 2 0 Pujols dh 5 1 3 1
Doumit rf 5 1 2 2 HKndrc 2b 5 0 1 0
Colaell dh 3 0 0 0 Callasp 3b 3 0 0 0
Plouffe ph-dh 2 0 0 0 Field pr-3b 1 1 0 0
Thoms lf 4 2 2 0 Trumo 1b 4 1 2 1
CHrmn c 5 1 3 4 Conger c 2 0 0 0
Hicks cf 3 1 1 0 Iannett ph-c 1 0 0 0
Flormn ss 5 2 2 3 Cowgill rf 3 0 1 0
Aybar ss 3 0 0 1
Totals 43101510Totals 37 310 3
Minnesota 001 000 110 710
Los Angeles 000 200 001 0 3
DP - Minnesota 3. LOB - Minnesota 7, Los Ange-
les 8. 2B - Doumit 2 (19), Thomas (6), Florimon
(11), Trumbo (20). HR - C.Herrmann (2), Florimon
(6), Pujols (17), Trumbo (22). SB - Trout (22). S
- Hicks 2.
IP H R ER BB SO
Minnesota
Gibson 6 5 2 2 1 4
Burton 1 1 0 0 0 1
Fien H,13 1 2 0 0 0 1
Perkins W,2-0 BS,3-27 1 1 1 1 3 0
Roenicke 1 1 0 0 0 1
Los Angeles
Hanson 5 1-3 4 1 1 0 8
S.Downs H,18 2-3 0 0 0 1 0
D.De La Rosa BS,2-2 1 2 1 1 0 0
Jepsen 1 2 1 1 0 0
Richards 1 1 0 0 0 1
Frieri L,0-2 1-3 4 5 5 1 0
Buckner 2-3 2 2 2 0 0
T - 3:38. A - 39,177 (45,483).
Mariners 4, Indians 3
Cleveland Seattle
ab r hbi ab r hbi
Bourn cf 5 0 1 0 BMiller ss 3 0 0 0
Swisher rf 4 0 1 0 Frnkln 2b 3 1 0 0
Kipnis 2b 4 1 1 0 Ibanez lf 4 1 1 0
ACarer ss 4 0 2 1 EnChvz lf 0 0 0 0
Brantly lf 3 0 1 0 KMorls dh 4 0 2 1
CSantn dh 4 0 0 0 Seager 3b 4 1 3 1
MrRynl 1b 3 0 1 0 Smoak 1b 4 0 1 0
Stubbs pr 0 0 0 0 MSndrs rf 4 1 1 0
Chsnhll 3b 4 1 2 0 Zunino c 3 0 1 1
Aviles pr 0 0 0 0 Ackley cf 3 0 0 0
YGoms c 4 1 2 2
Totals 35 311 3 Totals 32 4 9 3
Cleveland 120 000 000 3
Seattle 103 000 00x 4
E - Chisenhall 2 (8), Kipnis (9). DP - Cleveland 1,
Seattle 3. LOB - Cleveland 7, Seattle 7. 2B - Kip-
nis (24), Ibanez (12), K.Morales (23), Seager (25),
M.Saunders (13). HR - Y.Gomes (7).
IP H R ER BB SO
Cleveland
McAllister L,4-6 5 8 4 3 3 5
Albers 2 1 0 0 0 0
Allen 1 0 0 0 0 1
Seattle
E.Ramirez W,1-0 5 2-3 8 3 3 2 4
Medina H,7 2 1-3 1 0 0 0 1
Wilhelmsen S,23-28 1 2 0 0 0 1
WP - McAllister.
T - 2:44. A - 16,308 (47,476).
Cardinals 4, Phillies 1
Philadelphia St. Louis
ab r hbi ab r hbi
Rollins ss 4 0 1 0 MCrpnt 2b 4 1 1 0
MYong 3b 3 0 0 0 Jay cf 5 0 2 0
Utley 2b 4 0 3 0 Beltran rf 4 1 1 0
DBrwn lf 4 0 0 0 Craig lf 3 1 2 2
DYong rf 4 0 1 0 YMolin c 4 1 1 1
Ruf 1b 4 1 1 0 MAdms 1b 3 0 1 0
Mayrry cf 4 0 1 1 Freese 3b 4 0 1 1
Ruiz c 3 0 0 0 Mujica p 0 0 0 0
Pettion p 1 0 0 0 Kozma ss 4 0 2 0
L.Nix ph 1 0 0 0 SMiller p 0 0 0 0
Valdes p 0 0 0 0 BPtrsn ph 1 0 0 0
DeFrts p 0 0 0 0 Choate p 0 0 0 0
Diekmn p 0 0 0 0 Maness p 0 0 0 0
Frndsn ph 1 0 0 0 Rosnthl p 0 0 0 0
LuGarc p 0 0 0 0 Descals ph-3b 1 0 0 0
Totals 33 1 7 1 Totals 33 411 4
Philadelphia 000 000 100 1
St. Louis 100 200 10x 4
DP - Philadelphia 1, St. Louis 1. LOB - Philadel-
phia 6, St. Louis 10. 2B - Rollins (19), Mayberry
(16), Jay (13), Craig (23), Y.Molina (29). 3B - Bel-
tran (3). SB - Kozma (2). S - S.Miller.
IP H R ER BB SO
Philadelphia
Pettibone L,5-4 5 7 3 3 3 4
Valdes 1 1-3 2 1 1 0 2
De Fratus 1-3 1 0 0 0 0
Diekman 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Lu.Garcia 1 1 0 0 1 2
St. Louis
S.Miller W,10-6 6 3 0 0 1 6
Choate H,11 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Maness H,8 2-3 2 1 1 0 1
Rosenthal H,23 1 0 0 0 0 1
Mujica S,29-31 1 2 0 0 0 1
Umpires - Home, Adam Hamari; First, Sam Hol-
brook; Second, Andy Fletcher; Third, Joe West.
T - 2:51. A - 44,780 (43,975).
Padres 6, Brewers 2
San Diego Milwaukee
ab r hbi ab r hbi
EvCarr ss 5 1 1 0 Aoki rf 4 0 1 0
Amarst cf 5 0 0 0 LSchfr lf 3 0 0 0
Headly 3b 5 1 2 0 Halton ph 1 0 0 0
Alonso 1b 3 0 2 1 Hndrsn p 0 0 0 0
Gyorko 2b 5 0 1 0 Segura ss 4 0 0 0
Venale rf 5 2 3 1 Lucroy c 3 0 0 0
Kotsay lf 4 1 3 1 CGomz cf 3 0 0 0
Denorf lf 1 0 0 0 Weeks 2b 4 0 0 0
Hundly c 4 1 3 3 JFrncs 1b 3 0 1 0
T.Ross p 2 0 0 0 Bianchi 3b 3 1 1 0
Guzmn ph 1 0 0 0 D.Hand p 0 0 0 0
Vincent p 0 0 0 0 Thrnrg p 1 0 0 0
Hynes p 0 0 0 0 Gindl ph 0 0 0 0
Grgrsn p 0 0 0 0 KDavis ph-lf 1 1 1 1
Totals 40 615 6 Totals 30 2 4 1
San Diego 100 102 200 6
Milwaukee 001 000 010 2
E - T.Ross (2). DP - Milwaukee 1. LOB - San
Diego 10, Milwaukee 4. 2B - Headley (19). HR
- Venable (12), Hundley (7), K.Davis (1). SB -
Alonso 2 (5), Aoki (12), Bianchi (2). CS - C.Gomez
(4). S - T.Ross.
IP H R ER BB SO
San Diego
T.Ross W,1-4 6 2 1 1 2 6
Vincent 1 1 0 0 0 2
Hynes 1 1 1 1 0 1
Gregerson 1 0 0 0 0 0
Milwaukee
D.Hand L,0-2 4 7 2 2 1 1
Thornburg 4 7 4 4 1 2
Henderson 1 1 0 0 0 2
HBP - by T.Ross (D.Hand).
T - 3:03. A - 28,242 (41,900).
Marlins 4, Rockies 2
Miami Colorado
ab r hbi ab r hbi
Hchvrr ss 5 1 2 1 Fowler cf 3 0 0 0
Yelich lf 4 0 3 2 LeMahi 2b 4 1 2 0
Stanton rf 4 1 1 1 CGnzlz lf 3 0 0 1
Morrsn 1b 4 0 1 0 Tlwtzk ss 4 0 1 0
MDunn p 0 0 0 0 Cuddyr rf 4 0 0 0
Cishek p 0 0 0 0 Helton 1b 4 1 1 1
Lucas 3b-1b 4 0 0 0 WRosr c 3 0 0 0
Mrsnck cf 4 0 0 0 Arenad 3b 3 0 1 0
DSolan 2b 4 0 2 0 Chacin p 1 0 0 0
Mathis c 4 1 2 0 Outmn p 0 0 0 0
Frnndz p 3 1 0 0 Escaln p 0 0 0 0
Polanc 3b 1 0 1 0 Blckmn ph 0 0 0 0
Pachec ph 1 0 0 0
Belisle p 0 0 0 0
Totals 37 412 4 Totals 30 2 5 2
Miami 001 020 010 4
Colorado 010 001 000 2
E - Morrison (2). DP - Miami 1, Colorado 2. LOB
- Miami 6, Colorado 4. 2B - Hechavarria (9),
D.Solano (4). 3B - LeMahieu (2). HR - Stanton
(11), Helton (7). SB - Hechavarria (6), C.Gonzalez
(19), Tulowitzki (1). CS - Fowler (4).
IP H R ER BB SO
Miami
Fernandez W,6-5 7 5 2 2 2 8
M.Dunn H,13 1 0 0 0 0 2
Cishek S,19-21 1 0 0 0 1 1
Colorado
Chacin L,9-5 7 8 3 3 0 4
Outman 1-3 2 1 1 0 0
Escalona 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Belisle 1 2 0 0 0 1
Umpires - Home, Gerry Davis; First, Dan Iassog-
na; Second, Brian Knight; Third, Mark Carlson.
T - 2:43. A - 34,223 (50,398).
Diamondbacks 10, Cubs 4
Chicago Arizona
ab r hbi ab r hbi
Lake cf 5 1 3 1 Eaton lf 4 3 3 0
StCastr ss 4 0 0 0 Pollock cf 5 2 2 3
Rizzo 1b 4 0 1 1 Gldsch 1b 3 1 2 1
LATEST LINE
BOXING REPORT: In the WBA/WBC super welterweight title fght on September 14 in Las Vegas,
Nevada, Floyd Mayweather Jr. is -$260 vs. Saul Alvarez at +$220.
BASEBALL
Favorite Odds Underdog..
American League
RANGERS -$150 Yankees.
Tigers -$140 WHITE SOX
BLUE JAYS -$200 Astros
RED SOX -$135 Rays
Orioles -$115 ROYALS
AS -$112 Angels
MARINERS -$170 Twins
National League
Braves -$107 METS
NATIONALS -$135 Pirates
BREWERS -$150 Padres
ROCKIES -$158 Marlins
CARDS -$170 Phillies
DBACKS -$170 Cubs
DODGERS -$130 Reds
NFL Pre-season
Favorite Points Underdog
AUG. 4 Hall of Fame Game
c-Cowboys 1 Dolphins
c- Canton, OH.
ASorin lf 3 1 0 0 C.Ross rf 5 0 0 0
Ransm 3b 4 0 0 0 ErChvz 3b 4 1 2 3
DNavrr c 4 0 1 0 DHrndz p 0 0 0 0
Gillespi rf 3 0 0 0 GParra ph 1 0 0 0
Schrhlt ph-rf 1 1 1 2 Sipp p 0 0 0 0
Barney 2b 4 0 0 0 Prado 2b-3b 3 1 2 2
TrWood p 2 1 1 0 Nieves c 4 0 1 1
Guerrir p 0 0 0 0 Gregrs ss 3 1 1 0
Borbon ph 1 0 0 0 Corbin p 2 0 0 0
HRndn p 0 0 0 0 Bell p 0 0 0 0
Bowden p 0 0 0 0 Kubel ph 1 1 1 0
Sappelt ph 1 0 0 0 Pnngtn 2b 1 0 0 0
Totals 36 4 7 4 Totals 36101410
Chicago 001 000 021 4
Arizona 000 013 33x 10
E - Bell (1), Gregorius (7). DP - Chicago 1.
LOB - Chicago 9, Arizona 7. 2B - Pollock (24),
Goldschmidt (25), Kubel (7). 3B - Pollock (3),
Er.Chavez (2). HR - Lake (2), Schierholtz (12),
Prado (9). CS - Eaton (1).
IP H R ER BB SO
Chicago
Tr.Wood L,6-7 5 2-3 8 4 4 2 2
Guerrier 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
H.Rondon 2-3 3 3 3 2 0
Bowden 1 1-3 3 3 3 1 1
Arizona
Corbin W,12-1 6 4 1 1 3 6
Bell H,6 1 1 0 0 0 2
D.Hernandez 1 1 2 2 1 1
Sipp 1 1 1 1 0 2
WP - Corbin 2, Sipp.
Umpires - Home, Dana DeMuth; First, Angel
Hernandez; Second, Paul Nauert; Third, Doug
Eddings.
T - 3:30. A - 21,278 (48,633).
Giants 5, Reds 3
San Francisco Cincinnati
ab r hbi ab r hbi
GBlanc cf-lf 4 0 0 1 Choo cf 3 0 0 0
Abreu 2b 5 2 2 0 CIzturs ss 5 0 0 0
Posey c 3 1 0 0 Votto 1b 4 0 2 0
Sandovl 3b 4 1 2 2 Phillips 2b 5 0 0 0
Pence rf 4 0 2 1 Bruce rf 5 2 3 0
Belt 1b 4 0 0 1 Frazier lf-3b 5 1 3 1
Francr lf 4 0 0 0 Hannhn 3b 1 0 0 0
Romo p 0 0 0 0 Heisey ph-lf 2 0 0 0
BCrwfr ss 3 1 1 0 CMiller c 3 0 1 2
Zito p 1 0 1 0 Mesorc ph-c 2 0 0 0
Dunnng p 0 0 0 0 GRynld p 1 0 0 0
Tanaka ph 1 0 0 0 Hoover p 0 0 0 0
Mijares p 0 0 0 0 Cozart ph 1 0 0 0
SCasill p 0 0 0 0 Partch p 0 0 0 0
J.Lopez p 0 0 0 0 DRonsn ph 1 0 1 0
AnTrrs cf 1 0 1 0 MParr p 0 0 0 0
Totals 34 5 9 5 Totals 38 310 3
San Francisco3100100005
Cincinnati 0200100003
E - Sandoval (12), Pence (5). LOB - San Fran-
cisco 6, Cincinnati 14. 2B - Sandoval (15),
B.Crawford (18), Frazier 2 (19), C.Miller (1). SB
- Belt (5), An.Torres (4). S - Zito, G.Reynolds. SF
- G.Blanco.
IP H R ER BB SO
San Francisco
Zito 4 2-3 6 3 3 3 4
Dunning 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Mijares H,6 2-3 1 0 0 1 1
S.Casilla W,4-2 H,9 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 2
J.Lopez H,7 2-3 1 0 0 0 1
Romo S,24-27 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 4
Cincinnati
G.Reynolds L,0-1 5 8 5 5 1 1
Hoover 1 0 0 0 0 0
Partch 2 0 0 0 0 1
M.Parra 1 1 0 0 0 1
HBP - by Dunning (Heisey), by G.Reynolds
(Posey). WP - Romo.
Umpires - Home, Phil Cuzzi; First, Chris Guc-
cione; Second, Ron Kulpa; Third, Quinn Wolcott.
T - 3:22. A - 42,310 (41,915).
International League
North Division
W L Pct. GB
Pawtucket (Red Sox) 56 47 .544
Rochester (Twins) 54 51 .514 3
Lehigh Valley (Phillies) 52 52 .500 4
Buffalo (Blue Jays) 51 51 .500 4
RailRiders 50 54 .481 6
Syracuse (Nationals) 44 58 .431 11
South Division
W L Pct. GB
Durham (Rays) 65 39 .625
Norfolk (Orioles) 54 49 .524 10
Charlotte (White Sox) 46 58 .442 19
Gwinnett (Braves) 45 59 .433 20
West Division
W L Pct. GB
Indianapolis (Pirates) 63 42 .600
Louisville (Reds) 52 53 .495 11
Columbus (Indians) 50 55 .476 13
Toledo (Tigers) 46 60 .434 17
Wednesdays Games
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre 4, Toledo 1
Louisville at Syracuse,(n)
Columbus at Buffalo, (n)
Gwinnett at Durham, (n)
Pawtucket at Norfolk, (n)
Lehigh Valley at Rochester, (n)
Indianapolis at Charlotte, ppd., rain
Thursdays Games
Lehigh Valley at Rochester, 11:05 a.m.
Pawtucket at Norfolk, 12:05 p.m.
Columbus at Buffalo, 1:05 p.m.
Louisville at Syracuse, 7 p.m.
Toledo at Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, 7:05 p.m.
Gwinnett at Durham, 7:05 p.m.
Indianapolis at Charlotte, 7:15 p.m.
Fridays Games
Buffalo at Toledo, 7 p.m.
Norfolk at Rochester, 7:05 p.m.
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre at Louisville, 7:05 p.m.
Lehigh Valley at Pawtucket, 7:05 p.m.
Syracuse at Indianapolis, 7:15 p.m.
Durham at Columbus, 7:15 p.m.
Gwinnett at Charlotte, 7:15 p.m.
Eastern League
Eastern Division
W L Pct. GB
Binghamton (Mets) 63 38 .624
New Hampshire (Jays) 52 49 .515 11
Trenton (Yankees) 52 50 .510 11
Portland (Red Sox) 52 52 .500 12
New Britain (Twins) 48 56 .462 16
Reading (Phillies) 43 58 .426 20
Western Division
W L Pct. GB
Harrisburg (Nationals) 56 48 .538
Erie (Tigers) 52 48 .520 2
Bowie (Orioles) 53 50 .515 2
Akron (Indians) 51 53 .490 5
Richmond (Giants) 47 56 .456 8
Altoona (Pirates) 45 56 .446 9
Wednesdays Games
Bowie 3, Akron 2
Portland 3, New Britain 1
Altoona at Trenton, 12:05 p.m.
Richmond at Erie, 12:05 p.m.
Reading at Binghamton, 6:35 p.m.
Harrisburg at New Hampshire, 7:05 p.m.
Thursdays Games
Trenton at Binghamton, 6:35 p.m.
Harrisburg at Portland, 7 p.m.
Altoona at New Hampshire, 7:05 p.m.
Bowie at Erie, 7:05 p.m.
Richmond at Akron, 7:05 p.m.
New Britain at Reading, 7:05 p.m.
Fridays Games
Trenton at Binghamton, 5:35 p.m., 1st game
Harrisburg at Portland, 6 p.m.
Richmond at Akron, 7:05 p.m.
Bowie at Erie, 7:05 p.m.
New Britain at Reading, 7:05 p.m.
Altoona at New Hampshire, 7:05 p.m.
Trenton at Binghamton, 8:05 p.m., 2nd game
July 26
At Thunder Valley Casino Resort, Lincoln, Calif.
(ESPN2), Juan Carlos Burgos vs. Yakubu Amidu,
12, junior lightweights; Josenilson Dos Santos vs.
Miguel Gonzalez, 10, lightweights.
July 27
At Macau, China (HBO2), Evgeny Gradovich vs.
Mauricio Munoz, 12, for Gradovichs IBF feath-
erweight title; Juan Francisco Estrada vs. Milan
Melindo, 12, for Estradas WBO and WBA Su-
per World fyweight titles; Andy Ruiz Jr. vs. Joe
Hanks, 10, heavyweights; Genesis Servania vs.
Konosuke Tomiyama, 10, super bantamweights.
At San Antonio (SHO), Andre Berto vs. Jesus
Soto Karass, 12, welterweights; Omar Figueroa
vs. Nihito Arakawa, 12, for the interim WBC light-
weight title; Diego Chaves vs. Keith Thurman, 12,
for the interim WBA World welterweight title.
Aug. 1
At Bangkok, Thailand, Kompayak Porpramuk vs.
Koki Eto, 12, for Porpramuks interim WBA World
fyweight title.
BULLETIN BOARD
CAMPS/CLINICS
Holy Redeemer Royals Softball
Skills Clinic will be July 29-31 2013
from9 a.m. to 1 p.m. for grades
5-9 at Kingston Recreation Center
Softball Field. The camp is open to
all area players. The cost is $65 per
player. Skills include hitting, bunting,
felding, throwing and more. To
register, call Mark at 704-7603.
Kings College Football Camp will be
held Aug. 3 at the Robert L. Betzler
Athletic Complex. The one-day
camp is available for students
entering grade 9 and above and
will be held from8:30 a.m. to
3:30 p.m. Cost is $55 per camper.
For a camp brochure, go to www.
kingscollegeathletics.com.
Kings College/Wilkes-Barre Kirby
Park Tennis is accepting registration
for its annual junior tennis camps.
Sessions are July 29 to Aug. 9 and a
short session runs fromAug. 12-16.
Camps run Monday-Thursday from
9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., with Fridays
as a make-up day. The camp is for
juniors ages fve through high school.
Groups are set up in age and ability
levels. Featured are fundamental
instruction, competition, strategy
and related tennis activities. Each
camper receives a free racket,
backpack and camp T-shirt. The cost
is $150, $135 if you bring your own
racket. To register, call 714-9697, visit
www.kirbyparktennis.net or www.
kingscollegeathletics.comor stop
by the courts. Registration will also
be accepted on the frst day of each
session.
Lady Monarch Volleyball Camp will
be held at Kings College fromJuly
30 to Aug. 2, from1-5 p.m. daily.
The camp is open to girls entering
grades 6-9. The cost of the camp is
$80, which includes a camp T-shirt
and prizes. For more information, call
Bernie Kachinko at 208-5900, ext.
5435, or email at bernardkachinko@
kings.edu.
Stan Waleski Basketball Camp
will be held at the Greater Pittston
YMCA. Girls camp for grades 3-8
will be July 29-Aug. 2. Boys and girls
camp for grades 2-8 will be Aug. 5-9.
All Camps run from9 a.m. to noon
each day. For camp information,
call Coach Waleski at 457-1206
or Coach LoBrutto at 654-8030.
For scheduling and registration
information, email stanwaleski@
yahoo.comor visit the camp web
site at stanwaleski.com. Players can
also register at the YMCA30 minutes
prior to any camp.
Wilkes University Mens Soccer
goalkeeping camp will be held July
29-Aug. 2 from9 a.m. to noon each
day at Ralston Athletic Complex for
boys and girls ages 12-18. For more
information, email Phil Wingert at
philip.wingert@wilkes.edu or call
408-4024.
LEAGUES
Brews Bros Softball Leagues have
openings in mens and co-ed fall
leagues. For more information, call
Tony at 693-0506.
Checkerboard Inn Bowling League
has openings for teams in the
upcoming season. This is an 80
percent handicapped mens league
that bowls on Wednesdays at 6:45
p.m. at Chackos Family Bowling
Center. League play is 34 weeks
and will begin in August. For more
information, call Chackos or Frank
Lipski at 675-7532.
Dick McNulty Bowling League needs
two teams to fll their Tuesday
night winter bowling league. The
league is a mens league with an 80
percent handicap. The league bowls
on Tuesday nights at 6:30 p.m. at
Chackos Family Bowling Center in
Wilkes-Barre. Call Wendy Thoman at
824-3086 or Fred Favire at 215-0180
for more information.
Kingston Recreation Center is now
accepting teams for its fall softball
leagues. League fees for mens
teams playing Monday, Tuesday,
Wednesday, Thursday as well as
Sunday co-ed are $125 per team.
Sunday mens leagues are $75 per
team. For more information, call
287-1106.
Swoyersville Fall Baseball League
is seeking teams, ages 12-14, The
league will play on Saturdays starting
on Aug. 17. For more information, call
Al at 881-2626.
Wyoming Valley USBC Association
will have its annual open board
meeting and election of ofcers
for the coming season at 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday, July 31, at the Ashley
Firemans Hall.
PHYSICALS
Lake-Lehman Sports Physicals for
all seasons will be conducted in the
nurses ofce. Players must have a
physical for each year. The following
schedule applies for the 2013-2014
school year. All girls in grades 10-12
will have their exams July 25 at 9
a.m. All boys in grades 7-9 will have
their exams July 30 at 9 a.m. All girls
in grades 7-9 will have their exams
Aug. 1 at 9 a.m. Make-up exams will
be held for boys and girls grades 7-12
Aug. 7 at 9 a.m. PIAAphysical forms
can be picked up in the main ofce
of the school. All forms must be
completed and signed by a parent or
guardian prior to the exam.
REGISTRATIONS/TRYOUTS
Duryea Little League will have
signups for fall ball July 29, 30 and
31 from6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the little
league feld for coach pitch, minors,
majors and girls softball. The costs
for fall ball are: $35 per child, $50
for two children and $65 for three or
more children.
Nanticoke Area Little League will
have fall baseball and softball
registrations July 25 at feld behind
the high school from6 p.m. to 7:30
p.m. The league costs $30 for ages
7-11 and $60 for ages 12-14. For more
information, call Wade Rowles at
735-0189.
Rollin Thunder 18U Gold Softball
Teamwill hold try outs at 2 p.m. on
Sunday July 28 for the upcoming
season. For more info call Mark at
687-4735 or Bill 760-9734.
West Side Little League will have
signups for fall ball Sunday, July 28,
at the Courtdale Field from5 p.m.
to 7 p.m. The cost is $20 for softball
and $25 for baseball. For more
information, call Rich Kachmarsky
at 709-0322 or Eric Fisher at 706-
6264.
Wyoming Valley West Youth Football
and Cheerleading Conference
is looking for football players and
cheerleaders to fll our rosters. Ages
5 14 are welcome to join. Please
contact your towns board member
for information. Back Mountain
Kingston Township: Jason Grobowski
760-0216 or Stacie Wydra 301-
8841. Dallas Plymouth: Kelly Cuba
313-3926 or Mark Kytor 301-9744.
Duryea Swoyersville: Joe Krishak
299-0277 or Mark Brennan 362-
1259. Edwardsville / Larksville West
Pittston: TomKoval 806-1333 or Ann
Marie Taggert 814-2380. Kingston
Wyoming / West Wyoming / Exeter:
Cherie Swainbank 239-6671 or
Donna Trottini 693-1999.
UPCOMING EVENTS/OTHER
Brussocks Bowling League
Clambake will be held at the
Swoyersville American Legion
Sunday, July 28. If participants bring
guests or cant attend, call Rick
Mazzillo at 499-467, Rob Michaels at
885-7673 or John Britt at 237-0171.
Dallas Kiwanis Club will have its 27th
annual golf tournament, in memory
of Walter Kozemchak, Friday, July
26, at Mill Race Golf and Camping
Resort. The cost is $75 per person,
which includes cart, green fees,
refreshments, dinner and prizes. The
tournament begins at noon followed
by dinner at approximately 5:30 p.m.
Registration is at 11 a.m. Proceeds
fromthe tournament beneft The
Senior Girls All-Star Softball game,
Key Club scholarships at Dallas and
Lake Lehman High Schools, the Back
Mountain Halloween Parade and
other area youth programs. For more
information, call Harold Stout at 574-
7888 or Bev Atherholt at 675-7295.
Dukeys Cafe will have its 9th annual
Rowan Elise Frederick Memorial Golf
Tournament Sunday, July 28, at Sand
Springs Golf Club. The tournament
will beneft the Childrens Hospital
of Philadelphia. There will be an 8
a.m. shotgun start and the format is
captain and crew. The cost is $80 per
person, which includes carts, green
fees equal prizes for three fights.
There will also be a hot bufet and
refreshments at Dukeys. For more
information, call Dukeys at 270-6718
or John Kebles at 881-0237.
Duryea Little League will have a
fundraiser at Yogurt in Love, in the
Pittston Plaza near Kmart, Thursday,
Aug. 1 from6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
John Viercinski 6th annual Memorial
Golf Tournament to beneft Wilkes-
Barre Free Clinic and St. Vincent
de Paul Kitchen will be held Friday,
Aug. 2, at Edgewood in the Pines in
Drums. There will be a shotgun start
at noon and the format is captain
and crew. The tournament includes
golf, refreshments on the course,
dinner, awards and prizes. Make
checks payable to John Viercinski
Golf Tournament c/o Kurt Kienle, 106
Elmwood Drive, Lafin, Pa., 18702. For
more information, email kkienle@
comcast.net or call 655-3571.
Jonathan Grula Memorial
Foundation Golf Tournament will
be held Sunday, July 28, at the Blue
Ridge Trail Golf Club in Mountain
Top. Registration is at noon and the
tournament starts at 1:30 p.m. The
format will be captain and crew.
The cost is $100, which includes
green fees, cart, awards dinner,
prizes and golfer gifts, snacks
and refreshments. To date, the
foundation has raised over $241,000
for the Four Diamonds Fund, which
benefts children with cancer and is
active in pediatric cancer research.
For more information, call 829-0971
or 823-1992.
Lehman Golf Club will host a Better-
Ball of Partners tournament Sunday,
July 28. The tournament is open to
members and non-members. Tee
times are available by calling the pro
shop at 675-1686.
Northwest Junior Rangers will be
hosting a golf tournament Friday,
July 26, at Mill Race Golf and
Camping Resort in Benton. It is an 8
a.m. shotgun will proceeds helping
the Junior Rangers. The tournament
is captain and crewformat and will
be $65 per golfer. Hole sponsorship
are $100, while co-sponsors are
$50. We are still seeking sponsors
and golfers. Any donation counts.
Please call Don at 336-0082, Casey
at 256-4353 or Mill Race pro shop at
925-2040 to register or sponsor.
Rally for the Cure will have its sixth
annual golf tournament at Villas
Crossing Golf Course Saturday, July
27. Registration begins at 11 a.m.
and the tournament begins with a
shotgun start at 12:30 p.m. Players
and sponsors will be celebrating
with those who have survived breast
cancer by placing pink fags around
the putting green. There will be
prizes, food and drinks. Proceeds will
beneft Susan G. Komen for the Cure.
For more details, call 386-4515.
Robs Pub and Grub will be hosting its
golf outing at Wilkes-Barre Golf Club
to beneft the Ed/Lark mini football
and cheerleader programs. The
event will take place Saturday, Aug.
3. Format will be captain and crew
with a 1:30 shotgun start. The cost is
$80 per golfer. For more information,
call Rob 779-1800 or Matt 417-4246.
Hole sponsorships are still available.
Rowan Elise Frederick Memorial
Golf Tournament, sponsored
by Dukeys Cafe, to beneft The
Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia
will be Sunday, July 28, at Sand
Springs Golf Club. The tournament
will start at 8 a.m. with a captain
and crewformat. The cost is $80 a
person, which includes carts, green
fees and equal prizes for three
fights. There will also be a hot bufet
and refreshments at Dukeys. For
more information, call Dukeys at
270-6718, John Kebles at 881-0237,
Ken Coley at 762-3397, Kevin Nichols
at 239-6147 or Tony Rasimas Jr. at
239-9825.
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER Sports Thursday, July 25, 2013 PAGE 3B
Back where she belongs
Jendrezjewski wins two state medals
despite injury.
JAY MONAHAN
For The Times Leader
With caution.
Thats how the Hanover Area track
and eld coaching staff guided Olivia
Jendrezjewski to two state medals.
Her back aching with every painstak-
ing triple jump and every high jump
landing, Jendrezjewski went beyond
expectations for an athlete that missed
her junior season. She won district gold
in the high jump and triple jump, placed
eighth in the triple jump, and earned a
silver medal at the PIAA Class 2A State
Championship.
Those efforts earned Jendrezjewski
The Times Leaders girls track Most
Valuable Player award.
Shes probably the best jumper weve
ever had at Hanover Area, Hawkeyes
coach Al Weston said. Shes the type of
athlete you never forget. What she did
this year was amazing.
An athlete who often participated in
dance, gymnastics, and track and eld
all in the same day, Jendrezjewski frac-
tured her back in gymnastics during her
sophomore year. The pain was too much
to bear during her junior season, forcing
her to sit out and wear a back brace for
three months. The pain still existed as a
senior but she pulled through it to one
of the more memorable postseason runs
in school history.
It progressively got worse, she said.
And then last year I couldnt jump, it
knocked the wind out of me and every-
thing. This year, it still hurt me but I did
my best.
Credit the Hanover Area coaching
staff Weston and eld coach Carl
Daubert for making all the right
moves in practice to get her ready for
Shippensburg.
Even this year, with her back being
the way it was, we modied a lot of
the workouts just to protect the back,
Daubert said. We didnt do a lot of
jumping and actual landings. We stayed
out of the sand. We didnt want to bang
that back up.
Jendrezjewski scathed by with just
the bare minimum number of jumps. In
the high jump, she won the district by
2 inches with a 5-foot, 4-inch jump. In
the triple jump, she jumped 37 feet, 5
inches on her rst ofcial leap. With
a state qualifying standard (and even-
tually a district title) around her belt,
Jendrezjewski didnt need any more
tries.
I essentially told her during the year,
if you take one more jump before states,
itll be districts, Daubert said. Shed
already jumped her qualifying jump to
get to districts. Thats what she did. She
went to districts, took one jump. It was
a break. So she had to come back, she
took a second jump, it was a 37 and we
said okay were good.
You want to keep them healthy for
Shippensburg, Weston added. Thats
the big dance there. It was a smart move
by coach Daubert to jump her once
before the state meet.
They ran into the same quandry at
PIAAs. Jendrezjewski used four of her
six jumps. Through four, she owned a
35-foot, 10-inch jump. She didnt exer-
cise her nal two jumps and nished in
eighth place.
We were wrestling with do we let
her keep trying to jump, Daubert said.
Essentially its her call. I told her its
not worth injuring yourself to the point
where youre in a back brace for another
three months.
Jendrezjewskis signature moment
came in her second-place high jump at
states. Her and Lakeviews Courtney
King were the last two standing after
the 5-4 mark. Both cleared the 5-5 mark.
Jendrezewski ew over the 5-6 on her
rst try. With the state title in the bal-
ance, King followed suit. Both jumpers
hit the bar at 5-7, and King won the tie-
breaker.
I didnt really see much of a dif-
ference in winning states and n-
ishing second, Jendrezjewski
admitted. This is just as good.
Pete G. Wilcox | The Times Leader
Olivia Jendrzejewski has been named The Times Leaders girls track MVP.
Second TeamAll-Stars
Marcyssa Brown,
Wyoming Area
Nicole Buerhle, Hazleton
Area
Riley Conahan, Meyers
Marissa Durako, Holy
Redeemer
Catie Gawlas, Dallas
Olivia Giambra, Pittston
Area
Tara Johnson, Pittston
Area
Mallory Kusakavitch, Holy
Redeemer
Catherine Lombardo,
Pittston Area
Samantha Mayers,
Pittston Area
Madison Mimnaugh,
Pittston Area
Taylor Powers, Pittston
Area
Cayle Spencer, Lake-
Lehman
Haley Stackhouse,
Wyoming Area
2013 TIMES LEADER GIRLS TRACK AND FIELD ALL-STARS
Melissa Cruz
Holy Redeemer
Senior - Mid-Distance
Cruz fnished her extraordinary high school
athletic career with a second-place state medal
in the 3200 relay. Her Holy Redeemer relay
teamcame away fromShippensburg with silver,
thanks to a 9:32.04 time. In the 800 run, Cruz
won the district title (2:19.45) and fnished 11th
at states (2:27.28). Her 1600 relay teamcame
second to Montrose at districts, and her Royals
teamwon their third consecutive district title.
Alyssa Sitch
Hazleton Area
Junior - Hurdles/Jumps
The Cougar junior came out of her element in
the hotly contested Class 3Along jump with a
17-foot, 6-inch leap to give her a district gold.
Sitch placed 31st at the state championships.
She slotted herself in fourth in the 100 hurdles
and ffth in the triple jump.
Rachel Sowinski
Holy Redeemer
Senior - Distance
Holy Redeemers top distance runner snagged
a state medal with a fourth-place fnish in the
1600 run, clocking in with a time of 5:15.56.
Sowinski led a distance teamthat contributed
greatly to Holy Redeemers third consecutive
District 2 Class 2Achampionship. After missing
her chance to run as a junior, she won the 1600
run in 5:09.11 at districts. She participated in
Holy Redeemers 3200 relay teamthat won a
silver medal in Shippensburg.
Olivia Magni
Northwest
Junior - Pole Vault
Magni surpassed teammate Emma Everett on
tiebreakers with an 8-feet, 6-inch pole vault for
a district crown. Magni, who had a season high
vault of 10 feet, surpassed a 9-foot pole to fnish
in 15th place at states.
Cassandra Gill
Holy Redeemer
Senior - Distance
Gill qualifed in three events but opted to run
in Holy Redeemers 3200 relay that fnished
second at the PIAAClass 2Achampionships.
The Royals clocked in at 9:32.04, dropping 14.92
seconds of their preliminary time, and 2.31
seconds short of state champion Villa Maria
Academy. She won a district title in the 3200 run
in 11:18.89. Gills second-place showing in the
1600 run (5:18.07) helped the Royals win their
third consecutive district championship.
Katie Kravitsky
Dallas
Freshman - Jumps
The lone freshman on The Times Leader girls
track and feld all-star team, Kravitsky made
the leap at states. Finishing in second in a Class
3Athree-way high jump tiebreaker between
Hazleton Areas Selena Garzio and Wyoming
Areas Haley Stackhouse at districts, Kravitsky
outpaced both at states with a 10th-place
showing. Her 5-foot, 2-inch jump tied for eight
place.
Ellie Bennett
Crestwood
Sophomore - Vaults
Bennett soared to her frst district
championship in the Class 3Apole vaults,
clearing the 10-foot pole and defeating North
Poconos Lucianne Burner in a tiebreaker. She
took 23rd at states with a 9-foot, 6-inch vault.
Selena Garzio
Hazleton Area
Sophomore - Jumps
Garzio came out victorious in a three-woman
tiebreaker for the District 2 Class 3Ahigh jump
championship. The Cougar sophomore came
out on top at 5 feet, 3 inches over Wyoming
Areas Haley Stackhouse and Dallas Katie
Kravitsky. Garzio placed 14th with a 5-foot jump
at states. Her 400 relay teamfnished second in
the district.
Shoshana Mahoney
Lake-Lehman
Junior - Sprints
Mahoney pulled of an upset win in the District 2
Class 2A100 dash in 13.19 seconds. She owned
the 16th fastest performance at PIAAs with a
12.88-second run in the 100 dash. Mahoney
came in third place (27.18) in the 200 dash.
Gabby Alguire
Tunkhannock
Senior - Throws
Alguire squashed Hazleton Area graduate (and
2012 state champion) Julia Franzosas District 2
Class 3Arecord in the javelin. The Tunkhannock
seniors 139-feet, 5-inch throwwas 4 feet, 4
inches farther than Franzosas 2012 record. At
states, Alguire medaled with a ffth place javelin
throwof 132 feet, 5 inches.
Fallyn Boich
Holy Redeemer
Senior - Throws
Boich boasted a pair of district championships
and a state medal to her senior campaign. She
crushed the local competition in the discus
(122 feet, 2 inches) and held out in the javelin
(126 feet, 11 inches). Boichs fourth place (131
feet, 6 inches) was one of the biggest surprises
in the javelin feld at states. The Royal thrower
was a foot of of medaling in the discus with a
ninth place fnish. Boich heralded a feld team
that balanced the Royals strong track stars en
route to the programs third consecutive district
championship.
Regan Rome
Dallas
Junior - Distance
Romes fnish in the 3200 run broke a 28-year
old district record by 14.57 seconds but came
fve seconds short to Abington Heights Tessa
Barrett. The Mountaineer junior ran 42.19
seconds faster than her seed time. If not for
Barrett, her time of 10:37.81 would have broken
Honesdales Renee Robbins 1985 run. Rome
added another state medal to her collection
with a fourth place fnish in the 3200 at
10:36.13.
Olivia Gregorio
Holy Redeemer
Sophomore - Mid-Distance
The youngest member of the Royals 3200 relay
contributed to their district championship and
state silver medal. Holy Redeemer crossed
the PIAAfnish line at 9:32.04, dropping 14.92
seconds of their preliminary time, and 2.31
seconds short of state champion Villa Maria
Academy. Gregorio aided the Royals in their
quest of a third straight district championship.
Individually, Gregorio shaved 4 seconds of her
800 run for a second place medal at districts.
Quieterriua Gross
Meyers
Junior - Hurdles
A 50.6-second run in the
100 hurdles left Gross with
a sixth-place medal at Class
2A states. Gross sparkled in
the long jump, leaping just
over 17 feet for the district
championship. She took 15th
at states, coming up a full
foot short of her seed mark.
The Mohawk junior earned a
pair of silver district medals
in the 100 hurdles and 400
relay.
PAGE 4B Thursday, July 25, 2013 Baseball www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER
StandingS StatS
Ms manager
Wedge sufers
mild stroke
Eric Wedge is out of
hospital and expected
to make a full recovery
The Associated Press
SEATTLE Mariners
manager Eric Wedge sus-
tained what the club called a
very mild stroke, but he was
released from the hospital on
Wednesday and is expected to
make a full recovery.
The 45-year-old Wedge was
hospitalized Monday when he
complained about light-head-
edness during batting practice.
He missed the entire three-
game series against Cleveland,
but after a battery of tests was
sent home from the hospital
Wednesday afternoon, the
Mariners said in a statement.
We are happy to announce
that Eric Wedge has been
released from the hospital, the
statement said. He is home
with his family resting and feel-
ing well.
After much testing the
doctors believe he suffered a
very mild stroke. The doctors
expect that he will have a full
and complete recovery.
Wedge, the Mariners manag-
er since 2011, wont be in uni-
form for the Mariners upcom-
ing four-game series against
Minnesota and he wont go on
the next road trip to Boston
and Baltimore.
What he needs to do is
stay home for a short period
of time. We expect him to be
back sooner than later, gen-
eral manager Jack Zduriencik
said. Hes excited. He sounds
normal. I talked to him and it
sounds like everything is ne
and he is ready to roll.
We are going to err on the
side of caution, and I think the
common sense thing is to have
Eric rest. It makes sense that
he doesnt take this trip to the
East Coast.
Zduriencik said Wedge will
be evaluated further the next
10 days.
Bench coach Robby
Thompson will continue to
ll in for Wedge, who was the
Indians manager from 2003-
09.
Im sure there is a lot of
concern out there, Thompson
said. Eric is a very caring man
and loves every one of those
guys in that clubhouse. I think
they have that in return for
him.
Zduriencik and Thompson
addressed the team and pro-
vided an update on Wedge
after the Mariners 10-1 loss to
Cleveland on Wednesday.
Any situation like this
that arises, there is concern,
Thompson said. We put our
hearts, thoughts and prayers
into him and Kate and their
extended families.
Fortunately, it was a mild
stroke but from here they know
what to work with and what to
do with him to work his way
back.
Seattle shortstop Brendan
Ryan stressed that Wedge
should take his time and not
try to rush back to the dugout.
Come back in his own
time, Ryan said. We will be
thinking of him and he will be
with us, so the sooner he gets
back the better.
We just wish him the best,
speedy recovery.
Wedge has been a staunch
supporter of many of the
Mariners younger players,
and now they are offering their
support to him.
Its not just me. Its a lot of
guys in here, rst baseman
Justin Smoak said. A lot of
guys, and hes stuck with us a
long time now. Hes going to
get through this, and we look
forward to have him back.
The loss Wednesday was
Seattles rst since July 12 and
it ended the Mariners season-
high, eight-game winning
streak.
Clevelands Scott Kazmir
allowed just one hit in eight
innings, Michael Bourn hit his
rst career grand slam, and the
Indians salvaged the nal game
of the three-game series.
The only hit Kazmir (6-4)
gave up was a clean leadoff
single to center by Smoak in
the fth. Kazmir struck out
seven, walked two and allowed
an unearned run.
He was a different pitcher
than in Cleveland, Thompson
said of Kazmir.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Boston 61 42 .592 5-5 L-1 34-19 27-23
Tampa Bay 60 42 .588 8-2 W-1 34-19 26-23
Baltimore 57 45 .559 3 7-3 L-2 29-20 28-25
New York 53 48 .525 7 3 4-6 L-1 28-23 25-25
Toronto 45 55 .450 14 11 1-9 L-7 25-27 20-28
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Detroit 55 44 .556 6-4 W-3 29-19 26-25
Cleveland 53 48 .525 3 3 6-4 W-1 30-19 23-29
Kansas City 47 51 .480 7 8 4-6 W-2 26-24 21-27
Minnesota 43 55 .439 11 12 6-4 L-1 23-24 20-31
Chicago 39 58 .402 15 15 4-6 L-2 21-24 18-34
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Oakland 59 42 .584 5-5 W-1 30-15 29-27
Texas 56 45 .554 3 3-7 W-1 29-23 27-22
Seattle 48 53 .475 11 8 8-2 L-1 27-26 21-27
Los Angeles 47 52 .475 11 8 4-6 W-1 27-28 20-24
Houston 34 66 .340 24 22 2-8 L-1 18-37 16-29
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Atlanta 57 44 .564 5-5 W-1 31-15 26-29
Philadelphia 49 51 .490 7 7 5-5 L-3 26-21 23-30
Washington 48 53 .475 9 9 1-9 L-6 27-24 21-29
New York 44 53 .454 11 11 5-5 L-1 20-30 24-23
Miami 37 61 .378 18 18 5-5 W-2 21-27 16-34
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
St. Louis 60 37 .619 7-3 W-2 30-17 30-20
Pittsburgh 60 39 .606 1 7-3 W-4 32-18 28-21
Cincinnati 57 44 .564 5 6-4 L-1 32-17 25-27
Chicago 44 54 .449 16 11 4-6 L-1 22-26 22-28
Milwaukee 41 58 .414 20 15 4-6 L-2 25-28 16-30
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Los Angeles 53 47 .530 8-2 W-6 27-23 26-24
Arizona 52 48 .520 1 4 5-5 W-1 28-21 24-27
Colorado 48 53 .475 5 9 5-5 L-2 28-24 20-29
San Francisco 46 54 .460 7 10 6-4 W-1 28-23 18-31
San Diego 45 56 .446 8 12 4-6 W-2 27-23 18-33
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Tuesdays Games
L.A. Dodgers 10, Toronto 9
Boston 6, Tampa Bay 2
N.Y. Yankees 5, Texas 4
Kansas City 3, Baltimore 2
Detroit 6, Chicago White Sox 2
Houston 5, Oakland 4
Minnesota 10, L.A. Angels 3, 10 innings
Seattle 4, Cleveland 3
Wednesdays Games
Oakland 4, Houston 3
L.A. Angels 1, Minnesota 0
Cleveland 10, Seattle 1
L.A. Dodgers 8, Toronto 3, 10 innings
Tampa Bay 5, Boston 1
Texas 3, N.Y. Yankees 1
Kansas City 4, Baltimore 3
Detroit at Chicago White Sox, (n)
Thursdays Games
N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 9-6) at Texas (D.Holland
8-5), 2:05 p.m.
Detroit (Verlander 10-7) at Chicago White Sox
(Peavy 7-4), 2:10 p.m.
Houston (Bedard 3-7) at Toronto (Buehrle 5-7),
7:07 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Hellickson 9-3) at Boston (Lackey
7-7), 7:10 p.m.
Baltimore (Mig.Gonzalez 8-3) at Kansas City
(Guthrie 9-7), 8:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 10-6) at Oakland (Straily
6-3), 10:05 p.m.
Minnesota (Correia 7-6) at Seattle (Iwakuma 9-4),
10:10 p.m.
Fridays Games
Boston at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Texas at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
Houston at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Philadelphia at Detroit, 7:08 p.m.
Kansas City at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
Minnesota at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Tuesdays Games
Cincinnati 9, San Francisco 3, 1st game
Pittsburgh 5, Washington 1
L.A. Dodgers 10, Toronto 9
N.Y. Mets 4, Atlanta 1
San Diego 6, Milwaukee 2
St. Louis 4, Philadelphia 1
Miami 4, Colorado 2
Arizona 10, Chicago Cubs 4
San Francisco 5, Cincinnati 3, 2nd game
Wednesdays Games
Pittsburgh 4, Washington 2
L.A. Dodgers 8, Toronto 3, 10 innings
Atlanta 8, N.Y. Mets 2
San Diego at Milwaukee, (n)
Philadelphia at St. Louis, (n)
Miami at Colorado, (n)
Chicago Cubs at Arizona, (n)
Cincinnati at San Francisco, (n)
Thursdays Games
Atlanta (A.Wood 0-2) at N.Y. Mets (Z.Wheeler
3-1), 12:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (A.J.Burnett 4-7) at Washington
(G.Gonzalez 7-3), 12:35 p.m.
San Diego (Volquez 7-8) at Milwaukee (Gallardo
8-8), 2:10 p.m.
Miami (Eovaldi 2-1) at Colorado (Nicasio 6-4),
3:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 9-6) at St. Louis (Lynn
11-5), 7:15 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Villanueva 2-6) at Arizona (Miley
6-8), 9:40 p.m.
Cincinnati (Latos 9-3) at L.A. Dodgers (Greinke
8-2), 10:10 p.m.
Fridays Games
N.Y. Mets at Washington, 1:35 p.m., 1st game
N.Y. Mets at Washington, 7:05 p.m., 2nd game
Philadelphia at Detroit, 7:08 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Miami, 7:10 p.m.
St. Louis at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Milwaukee at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.
San Diego at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
Cincinnati at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.
Athletics 4, Astros 3
Oakland Houston
ab r hbi ab r hbi
Crisp cf 5 1 1 2 Villar ss 4 0 0 0
Jaso c 3 1 2 1 Altuve 2b 4 1 2 1
DNorrs c 1 0 0 0 JCastro dh 4 1 1 0
Dnldsn 3b 2 0 0 0 Carter lf 3 0 0 0
Lowrie ss 4 0 0 0 Corprn c 3 1 1 2
Cespds lf 4 0 1 0 Wallac 1b 4 0 1 0
Moss 1b 4 0 0 0 Maxwll cf 4 0 0 0
Reddck rf 4 0 1 0 MDmn 3b 4 0 1 0
S.Smith dh 2 1 0 0 Krauss rf 2 0 1 0
Sogard 2b 4 1 1 1 Elmore ph-rf 2 0 0 0
Totals 33 4 6 4 Totals 34 3 7 3
Oakland 100 000 300 4
Houston 000 102 000 3
LOB - Oakland 8, Houston 6. 2B - Jaso (12), Red-
dick (13), Sogard (17), J.Castro (27). HR - Crisp
(10), Jaso (3), Altuve (4), Corporan (6). SB - Al-
tuve (24).
IP H R ER BB SO
Oakland
Griffn W,9-7 6 1-3 6 3 3 0 8
Blevins H,4 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
J.Chavez H,1 2-3 1 0 0 1 1
Cook S,2-5 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Houston
B.Norris 6 1-3 4 3 3 3 7
Blackley L,1-1 BS,1-1 1-3 1 1 1 0 1
Ambriz 2-3 0 0 0 1 0
W.Wright 2-3 1 0 0 1 1
Veras 1 0 0 0 0 1
HBP - by Griffn (Corporan), by B.Norris (Donald-
son).
Umpires - Home, Jordan Baker; First, Tim Mc-
Clelland; Second, Mark Wegner; Third, Marvin
Hudson.
T - 3:10. A - 24,831 (42,060).
Angels 1, Twins 0
Minnesota Los Angeles
ab r hbi ab r hbi
Thoms lf 3 0 0 0 Shuck lf 4 1 1 0
Bernier 2b 3 0 1 0 Trout cf 3 0 0 0
Mornea dh 4 0 0 0 Pujols dh 4 0 1 1
Doumit c 2 0 0 0 Trumo 1b 4 0 2 0
Carroll pr 0 0 0 0 HKndrc 2b 3 0 0 0
CHrmn rf 4 0 0 0 Callasp 3b 3 0 0 0
Plouffe 3b 3 0 0 0 Iannett c 3 0 0 0
Colaell 1b 3 0 0 0 Cowgill rf 3 0 2 0
Hicks cf 3 0 1 0 Aybar ss 3 0 1 0
Flormn ss 3 0 0 0
Totals 28 0 2 0 Totals 30 1 7 1
Minnesota 000 000 000 0
Los Angeles 100 000 00x 1
DP - Minnesota 1, Los Angeles 1. LOB - Minne-
sota 5, Los Angeles 7. SB - Bernier (1), Hicks (8),
Shuck (4).
IP H R ER BB SO
Minnesota
Pelfrey L,4-8 6 5 1 1 1 5
Swarzak 2 2 0 0 0 0
Los Angeles
Weaver W,5-5 8 2 0 0 1 9
Frieri S,25-27 1 0 0 0 2 1
HBP - by Pelfrey (Trout), by Frieri (Bernier).
Umpires - Home, Mike Muchlinski; First, Scott
Barry; Second, Alfonso Marquez; Third, Ted Bar-
rett.
T - 2:43. A - 38,209 (45,483).
Indians 10, Mariners 1
Cleveland Seattle
ab r hbi ab r hbi
Bourn cf 4 2 2 4 BMiller ss-3b 4 0 0 0
Swisher 1b 4 1 1 0 Frnkln 2b 3 0 1 0
Kipnis 2b 4 0 0 0 Seager 3b 3 0 0 0
ACarer ss 4 4 2 3 Ryan ss 0 0 0 0
CSantn dh 5 0 3 2 KMorls dh 3 0 0 0
Aviles lf 5 0 1 0 Bay lf 4 1 0 0
MrRynl 3b 4 1 1 0 Smoak 1b 3 0 1 0
YGoms c 4 1 2 0 MSndrs cf 4 0 0 0
Stubbs rf 3 1 1 0 EnChvz rf 3 0 0 0
HBlanc c 3 0 0 0
Totals 371013 9 Totals 30 1 2 0
Cleveland 301 041 001 10
Seattle 010 000 000 1
E - Mar.Reynolds (9), A.Cabrera (4), M.Saunders
(1). DP - Cleveland 1, Seattle 3. LOB - Cleveland
7, Seattle 6. 2B - A.Cabrera (21), C.Santana 2
(26), Y.Gomes (7). HR - Bourn (3), A.Cabrera (8).
S - Kipnis.
IP H R ER BB SO
Cleveland
Kazmir W,6-4 8 1 1 0 2 7
Pestano 1 1 0 0 2 1
Seattle
J.Saunders L,9-9 4 2-3 9 6 5 3 5
Noesi 2 1-3 2 3 3 2 1
Luetge 2 2 1 1 1 0
Umpires - Home, Lance Barrett; First, Bill Welke;
Second, Adrian Johnson; Third, Mark Ripperger.
T - 2:49. A - 25,688 (47,476).
MAJOR LEAGUE
LEADERS
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING - YMolina, St. Louis, .335; Craig, St.
Louis, .335; Cuddyer, Colorado, .327; CJohnson,
Atlanta, .326; MCarpenter, St. Louis, .324; Segu-
ra, Milwaukee, .321; Posey, San Francisco, .319.
RUNS - MCarpenter, St. Louis, 76; CGonzalez,
Colorado, 71; Votto, Cincinnati, 70; Choo, Cin-
cinnati, 69; Holliday, St. Louis, 64; Goldschmidt,
Arizona, 63; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 61; JUpton, At-
lanta, 61.
RBI - Goldschmidt, Arizona, 80; Craig, St. Louis,
79; Phillips, Cincinnati, 79; DBrown, Philadelphia,
69; Bruce, Cincinnati, 68; CGonzalez, Colorado,
67; FFreeman, Atlanta, 64.
HITS - Segura, Milwaukee, 126; Craig, St. Louis,
122; MCarpenter, St. Louis, 121; Votto, Cincin-
nati, 118; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 116; YMolina, St.
Louis, 113; McCutchen, Pittsburgh, 112; DWright,
New York, 112.
DOUBLES - MCarpenter, St. Louis, 31; Bruce,
Cincinnati, 29; YMolina, St. Louis, 29; Posey, San
Francisco, 28; Rizzo, Chicago, 28; McCutchen,
Pittsburgh, 27; GParra, Arizona, 27.
TRIPLES - CGomez, Milwaukee, 9; SMarte, Pitts-
burgh, 8; Segura, Milwaukee, 8; Span, Wash-
ington, 7; CGonzalez, Colorado, 6; Hechavarria,
Miami, 5; DWright, New York, 5.
HOME RUNS - CGonzalez, Colorado, 26; PAl-
varez, Pittsburgh, 25; DBrown, Philadelphia, 24;
Goldschmidt, Arizona, 21; Bruce, Cincinnati, 20;
Beltran, St. Louis, 19; Uggla, Atlanta, 19.
STOLEN BASES - ECabrera, San Diego, 34;
Segura, Milwaukee, 30; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 28;
Revere, Philadelphia, 22; CGomez, Milwaukee,
21; McCutchen, Pittsburgh, 21; EYoung, New
York, 20.
PITCHING - Wainwright, St. Louis, 13-5; Corbin,
Arizona, 12-1; Zimmermann, Washington, 12-5;
Lynn, St. Louis, 11-5; ClLee, Philadelphia, 10-
4; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 10-6; SMiller, St.
Louis, 10-6.
ERA - Kershaw, Los Angeles, 2.01; Locke, Pitts-
burgh, 2.11; Harvey, New York, 2.23; Corbin, Ari-
zona, 2.31; Wainwright, St. Louis, 2.44; Fernan-
dez, Miami, 2.74; SMiller, St. Louis, 2.77.
STRIKEOUTS - Harvey, NewYork, 157; Kershaw,
Los Angeles, 148; Wainwright, St. Louis, 137; Sa-
mardzija, Chicago, 134; HBailey, Cincinnati, 133;
Latos, Cincinnati, 132; ClLee, Philadelphia, 131.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BATTING - MiCabrera, Detroit, .358; Mauer, Min-
nesota, .324; DOrtiz, Boston, .324; Trout, Los
Angeles, .321; Loney, Tampa Bay, .313; CDavis,
Baltimore, .313; ABeltre, Texas, .312.
RUNS - MiCabrera, Detroit, 76; CDavis, Balti-
more, 74; AJones, Baltimore, 69; Trout, Los An-
geles, 67; DeJennings, Tampa Bay, 65; Bautista,
Toronto, 64; Encarnacion, Toronto, 62.
RBI - CDavis, Baltimore, 97; MiCabrera, Detroit,
96; Encarnacion, Toronto, 74; Fielder, Detroit, 71;
NCruz, Texas, 70; AJones, Baltimore, 70; Cano,
New York, 69.
HITS - MiCabrera, Detroit, 134; Machado, Bal-
timore, 133; Trout, Los Angeles, 126; ABeltre,
Texas, 123; AJones, Baltimore, 123; Pedroia,
Boston, 121; Ellsbury, Boston, 119; Mauer, Min-
nesota, 119.
DOUBLES - Machado, Baltimore, 39; Mauer,
Minnesota, 31; CDavis, Baltimore, 30; Trout, Los
Angeles, 29; JCastro, Houston, 27; JhPeralta,
Detroit, 26; 6 tied at 25.
TRIPLES - Trout, Los Angeles, 8; Ellsbury, Bos-
ton, 7; Drew, Boston, 6; Gardner, New York, 5;
DeJennings, Tampa Bay, 5; LMartin, Texas, 5;
Kawasaki, Toronto, 4; HKendrick, Los Angeles, 4.
HOME RUNS - CDavis, Baltimore, 37; MiCabre-
ra, Detroit, 31; Encarnacion, Toronto, 26; ADunn,
Chicago, 24; Ibanez, Seattle, 24; Bautista, Toron-
to, 23; NCruz, Texas, 23.
STOLEN BASES - Ellsbury, Boston, 37; RDa-
vis, Toronto, 26; McLouth, Baltimore, 25; Altuve,
Houston, 24; Trout, Los Angeles, 22; Andrus, Tex-
as, 21; Kipnis, Cleveland, 21; Rios, Chicago, 21.
PITCHING - Scherzer, Detroit, 14-1; MMoore,
Tampa Bay, 14-3; Colon, Oakland, 13-3; Tillman,
Baltimore, 12-3; FHernandez, Seattle, 11-4; Mas-
terson, Cleveland, 11-7; CWilson, Los Angeles,
10-6; Verlander, Detroit, 10-7.
ERA - FHernandez, Seattle, 2.43; Colon, Oak-
land, 2.52; Kuroda, New York, 2.65; Sale, Chi-
cago, 2.81; Darvish, Texas, 2.86; Lackey, Boston,
2.95; Iwakuma, Seattle, 2.99.
STRIKEOUTS - Darvish, Texas, 161; Scherzer,
Detroit, 157; FHernandez, Seattle, 147; Master-
son, Cleveland, 145; Sale, Chicago, 142; Verland-
er, Detroit, 128; DHolland, Texas, 127.
Rays 5, Red Sox 1
Tampa Bay Boston
ab r hbi ab r hbi
DJnngs cf 4 1 1 0 Ellsury cf 4 0 0 0
Longori 3b 5 1 1 0 Victorn rf 4 0 2 0
Zobrist 2b 4 1 2 0 Pedroia 2b 4 0 0 0
WMyrs rf 4 0 2 2 D.Ortiz dh 4 0 1 0
Scott dh 3 1 1 1 Napoli 1b 3 1 2 1
SRdrgz lf 4 1 1 0 JGoms lf 3 0 0 0
Loney 1b 4 0 2 1 Drew ss 3 0 0 0
JMolin c 4 0 1 1 Sltlmch c 3 0 0 0
YEscor ss 4 0 0 0 Iglesias 3b 3 0 0 0
Totals 36 511 5 Totals 31 1 5 1
Tampa Bay 003 000 020 5
Boston 000 000 100 1
E - Doubront (1). DP - Tampa Bay 1, Boston 1.
LOB - Tampa Bay 8, Boston 3. 2B - Napoli (26).
HR - Napoli (14). SB - De.Jennings (16), Zobrist
(8), W.Myers (4). S - Zobrist. SF - Scott.
IP H R ER BB SO
Tampa Bay
Price W,5-5 9 5 1 1 0 4
Boston
Doubront L,7-4 6 2-3 6 3 3 2 5
Beato 2-3 1 1 1 0 0
Thornton 2-3 3 1 1 0 0
D.Britton 1 1 0 0 0 0
Umpires - Home, Larry Vanover; First, Brian
Gorman; Second, Manny Gonzalez; Third, Tony
Randazzo.
T - 3:00. A - 36,514 (37,499).
Pirates 4, Nationals 2
Pittsburgh Washington
ab r hbi ab r hbi
SMarte lf 4 1 1 0 Hairstn lf 3 0 0 0
Walker 2b 4 1 1 1 Rendon ss 4 0 1 0
McCtch cf 4 0 0 0 Zmrmn 3b 3 1 1 0
PAlvrz 3b 3 2 1 1 Werth rf 3 1 1 2
GJones 1b 3 0 0 0 AdLRc 1b 4 0 0 0
GSnchz 1b 1 0 0 0 WRams c 4 0 1 0
Snider rf 3 0 1 0 Span cf 4 0 0 0
Tabata ph 0 0 0 0 Lmrdzz 2b 3 0 1 0
JHrrsn rf 0 0 0 0 Strasrg p 2 0 0 0
McKnr c 4 0 1 2 KSuzuk ph 0 0 0 0
Barmes ss 4 0 0 0 Storen p 0 0 0 0
Liriano p 3 0 0 0 Abad p 0 0 0 0
JuWlsn p 0 0 0 0
Melncn p 0 0 0 0
Totals 33 4 5 4 Totals 30 2 5 2
Pittsburgh 010 000 003 4
Washington 000 000 002 2
E - Rendon (10). DP - Pittsburgh 1. LOB - Pitts-
burgh 4, Washington 5. 2B - Walker (12). HR -
P.Alvarez (26), Werth (15). S - K.Suzuki.
IP H R ER BB SO
Pittsburgh
Liriano W,10-4 7 2-3 2 0 0 3 8
Ju.Wilson H,9 1-3 2 2 2 0 0
Melancon S,3-4 1 1 0 0 0 1
Washington
Strasburg L,5-8 8 2 1 1 0 12
Storen 2-3 2 3 3 1 1
Abad 1-3 1 0 0 0 0
Ju.Wilson pitched to 2 batters in the 9th.
HBP - by Abad (Tabata).
Umpires - Home, Mike Estabrook; First, Mike
Winters; Second, Laz Diaz; Third, Tim Timmons.
T - 2:53. A - 33,636 (41,418).
Braves 8, Mets 2
Atlanta New York
ab r hbi ab r hbi
Smmns ss 5 1 2 2 EYong lf 4 0 0 0
Heywrd cf 3 0 0 0 DnMrp 2b 3 0 2 2
J.Upton rf 5 0 1 1 DWrght 3b 4 0 0 0
FFrmn 1b 4 0 0 0 Byrd rf 4 0 2 0
McCnn c 3 1 0 0 I.Davis 1b 3 0 0 0
Gattis lf 4 2 2 1 Niwnhs cf 2 0 0 0
Constnz lf 0 0 0 0 Germn p 0 0 0 0
Uggla 2b 4 1 2 3 ABrwn ph 1 0 0 0
CJhnsn 3b 4 1 1 0 Edgin p 0 0 0 0
Janish pr-3b 0 1 0 0 Atchisn p 0 0 0 0
THudsn p 2 0 0 0 Satin ph 1 0 0 0
Avilan p 0 0 0 0 Recker c 2 1 1 0
Walden p 0 0 0 0 Quntnll ss 3 1 1 0
RJhnsn ph 1 1 0 0 Hefner p 1 0 0 0
Ayala p 0 0 0 0 Lagars cf 2 0 0 0
Totals 35 8 8 7 Totals 30 2 6 2
Atlanta 010 050 002 8
New York 000 000 020 2
E - Dan.Murphy 2 (14). DP - Atlanta 3, New York
1. LOB - Atlanta 4, New York 4. 2B - Dan.Mur-
phy 2 (25). HR - Simmons (11), Gattis (15), Ug-
gla (20).
IP H R ER BB SO
Atlanta
T.Hudson W,8-7 7 2-3 4 2 2 3 9
Avilan 0 1 0 0 0 0
Walden 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Ayala 1 1 0 0 0 1
New York
Hefner L,4-8 4 1-3 6 6 5 1 3
Germen 2 2-3 0 0 0 1 3
Edgin 1 0 0 0 0 1
Atchison 1 2 2 0 1 0
Avilan pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
HBP - by Edgin (McCann). PB - Recker.
Umpires - Home, Chad Fairchild; First, Jeff Kel-
logg; Second, Eric Cooper; Third, Paul Schrieber.
T - 3:03. A - 28,194 (41,922).
Royals 4, Orioles 3
Baltimore Kansas City
ab r h bi ab r h bi
McLoth lf 4 0 2 0 L.Cain cf-rf 4 1 1 0
Machd 3b 2 0 0 0 Hosmer 1b 4 2 2 3
Markks rf 3 0 1 0 BButler dh 4 0 2 0
A.Jones cf 4 1 0 1 S.Perez c 4 0 0 0
C.Davis 1b 3 0 0 0 MTejad 3b 4 0 1 0
Wieters c 4 1 2 2 Lough lf 4 1 1 0
Hardy ss 4 0 0 0 AEscor ss 4 0 2 1
Urrutia dh 4 0 1 0 Getz 2b 3 0 0 0
BRorts 2b 4 1 2 0 EJhnsn rf 3 0 0 0
Dyson cf 0 0 0 0
Totals 32 3 8 3 Totals 34 4 9 4
Baltimore 000 200 010 3
Kansas City 100 000 021 4
One out when winning run scored.
E - Machado (7), Getz (2), Hosmer (6). DP -
Baltimore 1, Kansas City 3. LOB - Baltimore 6,
Kansas City 5. 2B - McLouth (21), B.Butler (19),
A.Escobar (15). HR - Wieters (14), Hosmer 2 (11).
S - Machado 2.
IP H R ER BB SO
Baltimore
W.Chen 7 1-3 7 3 3 0 3
ODay L,5-1 1 2 1 1 0 1
Kansas City
E.Santana 8 7 3 1 2 3
Hochevar W,3-1 1 1 0 0 0 0
Umpires - Home, Bill Miller; First, Todd Tichenor;
Second, CB Bucknor; Third, Dale Scott.
T - 2:32. A - 17,410 (37,903).
Rangers 3, Yankees 1
New York Texas
ab r hbi ab r hbi
Gardnr cf 4 1 2 0 Kinsler 2b 4 1 1 0
ISuzuki rf 4 0 1 0 Andrus ss 3 0 1 0
Cano 2b 4 0 2 1 N.Cruz rf 3 0 1 0
Overay 1b 4 0 0 0 ABeltre 3b 4 0 0 0
V.Wells dh 4 0 1 0 Przyns dh 4 1 2 2
Nunez ss 4 0 0 0 JeBakr lf 3 0 1 0
Lillirdg 3b 3 0 0 0 DvMrp lf 1 1 1 1
Mesa lf 3 0 0 0 Morlnd 1b 4 0 0 0
CStwrt c 2 0 0 0 G.Soto c 3 0 1 0
Hafner ph 1 0 0 0 Gentry cf 3 0 1 0
AuRmn c 0 0 0 0
Totals 33 1 6 1 Totals 32 3 9 3
New York 000 001 000 1
Texas 100 001 01x 3
E - A.Beltre (10), Garza (1). DP - Texas 1. LOB -
New York 5, Texas 8. 2B - Je.Baker (5). HR - Pier-
zynski (10), Dav.Murphy (11). SB - Gardner (17),
I.Suzuki (15), Gentry (9). S - Andrus.
IP H R ER BB SO
New York
Pettitte L,7-8 6 8 2 2 1 2
Kelley 2 1 1 1 1 0
Texas
Garza W,1-0 7 1-3 5 1 0 0 5
Cotts H,9 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Nathan S,32-34 1-3 1 0 0 0 0
Pettitte pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.
Umpires - Home, Lance Barksdale; First, Vic Car-
apazza; Second, Wally Bell; Third, Kerwin Danley.
T - 2:43. A - 42,360 (48,114).
Dodgers 8, Blue Jays 3
Los Angeles Toronto
ab r hbi ab r hbi
Crwfrd dh 6 1 2 0 Reyes ss 4 0 0 0
Puig rf 5 2 3 2 MeCarr lf 4 0 1 0
AdGnzl 1b 5 1 2 0 RDavis pr-lf 1 1 0 0
HRmrz ss 6 1 1 0 Bautist rf 4 0 2 0
Ethier cf 6 1 4 2 Encrnc 1b 4 0 0 0
A.Ellis c 5 0 1 0 Lind dh 5 0 0 0
Schmkr lf 4 0 1 0 ClRsms cf 3 1 0 0
Uribe 3b 3 1 1 1 MIzturs 2b 3 1 0 0
M.Ellis 2b 5 1 1 2 Arencii c 4 0 1 0
Bonifac pr 0 0 0 0
Thole c 0 0 0 0
Lawrie 3b 3 0 1 2
Totals 45 816 7 Totals 35 3 5 2
Los Angeles 011 000 001 58
Toronto 000 020 010 03
E - Uribe (4), Ad.Gonzalez (9), H.Ramirez (6),
Encarnacion (7), Col.Rasmus (4). DP - Toronto 1.
LOB - Los Angeles 13, Toronto 8. 2B - C.Crawford
(14), Puig (9), H.Ramirez (14), Ethier 2 (23), Law-
rie (5). HR - Puig (9), M.Ellis (5). SB - R.Davis
(27). SF - Uribe.
IP H R ER BB SO
Los Angeles
Nolasco 5 2-3 2 2 2 4 5
P.Rodriguez 1 1 0 0 0 2
Withrow 1-3 0 0 0 1 0
Belisario 0 2 1 1 1 0
League W,5-3 2 0 0 0 0 1
Jansen 1 0 0 0 0 1
Toronto
E.Rogers 7 10 2 2 1 4
Delabar 1 1 0 0 0 2
Janssen BS,2-20 1 1 1 0 1 2
J.Perez L,1-2 1 4 5 5 2 1
Belisario pitched to 3 batters in the 8th.
HBP - by E.Rogers (A.Ellis).
Umpires - Home, Will Little; First, Paul Emmel;
Second, Dan Bellino; Third, Mike Everitt.
T - 3:44. A - 35,368 (49,282).
natiOnaL LEagUE ROUndUP
AP photo
Pittsburgh Pirates starting pitcher Francisco Liriano delivers a pitch against
the Washington nationals during the first inning of a game at nationals Park
on Wednesday in Washington.
Liriano, Alvarez lead
Bucs past Nationals
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON Pirates
left-hander Francisco Liriano
did not allow a hit until the
sixth inning against a strug-
gling and depleted Nationals
lineup, and Pedro Alvarez
homered off an otherwise-
dominant Stephen Strasburg,
leading Pittsburgh past
Washington 4-2 Wednesday
night.
The Nationals fell to 0-6
since the All-Star break
scoring a grand total of 13
runs in that span and have
lost 11 of their last 13 games.
Already the owner of one
previous no-hitter, Liriano
(10-4) walked the rst batter
he faced, then retired 11 in
a row before another walk.
Five more outs followed,
before rookie Anthony Rendon
reached on what was ruled an
ineld single with two away in
the sixth.
Braves 8, Mets 2
NEW YORK Tim Hudson
took a shutout into the eighth
inning before getting spiked
at rst base and carted off
the eld during the Atlanta
Braves victory over the New
York Mets.
Evan Gattis, Dan Uggla
and Andrelton Simmons all
homered off an ineffective
Jeremy Hefner (4-8) to help
the Braves bats break loose
after scoring only four runs
in their previous three games.
But the nasty-looking injury
to Hudson is a huge concern,
leaving the NL East leaders
without a veteran winner who
was on a roll.
Hudson (8-7) was work-
ing on a four-hitter when
Eric Young Jr. hit a grounder
that was knocked down by
Braves rst baseman Freddie
Freeman. Hudson took
Freemans toss at the bag just
before Young arrived, and the
speedy outelder stepped on
the back of Hudsons lower
right leg, near his Achilles,
driving the pitchers right
ankle awkwardly into the
ground.
Tigers 6, White Sox 2
Detroit Chicago
ab r hbi ab r hbi
AJcksn cf 5 1 2 1 De Aza cf 4 0 3 0
TrHntr rf 5 2 2 1 AlRmrz ss 5 0 1 1
Tuiassp lf 2 1 0 0 Rios rf 5 0 0 0
Dirks lf 2 0 0 0 A.Dunn 1b 4 0 1 0
Fielder 1b 4 1 2 3 Konerk dh 3 0 1 0
VMrtnz dh 4 0 0 0 Kppngr 2b 4 0 1 0
JhPerlt ss 4 0 1 0 Gillaspi 3b 4 0 0 0
D.Kelly 3b 4 1 1 0 Viciedo lf 4 2 3 1
HPerez 2b 4 0 2 0 Phegly c 4 0 1 0
Avila c 4 0 1 1
Totals 38 611 6 Totals 37 211 2
Detroit 310 011 000 6
Chicago 000 000 101 2
E - Avila (4), Al.Ramirez (17). DP - Detroit 1.
LOB - Detroit 6, Chicago 10. 2B - Jh.Peralta (27),
De Aza (21). HR - A.Jackson (6), Tor.Hunter (9),
Fielder (17), Viciedo (9). SB - De Aza (12).
IP H R ER BB SO
Detroit
Ani.Sanchez W,8-7 6 6 0 0 1 5
B.Rondon 1 2 1 1 1 1
Smyly 1 1 0 0 0 3
Putkonen 1-3 1 1 1 0 0
Coke 0 1 0 0 0 0
Benoit 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Chicago
Joh.Danks L,2-8 7 11 6 6 1 3
Purcey 1 0 0 0 0 0
Troncoso 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
Veal 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Coke pitched to 1 batter in the 9th.
WP - B.Rondon, Smyly.
Umpires - Home, Gary Darling; First, Jerry Meals;
Second, Bruce Dreckman; Third, Chris Conroy.
T - 2:55. A - 26,793 (40,615).
aMERiCan LEagUE ROUndUP
Price goes the distance
in Rays win over Sox
The Associated Press
ARLINGTON, Texas
Matt Garza pitched into the
eighth inning of his Rangers
debut, the only run he allowed
unearned after his throwing
error, and Texas beat the New
York Yankees Wednesday.
Garza (1-0) was 6-1 in
his 11 starts this season for
the Chicago Cubs before
being traded Monday to the
Rangers, who had long cov-
eted the right-hander. He was
5-0 with a 1.24 ERA his last
six starts for Chicago, winning
the last ve.
After giving up consecutive
singles to start his rst game
in a Rangers jersey, Garza
retired 15 of the next 16 bat-
ters before his throwing error
on Brett Gardners comeback-
er leading off the sixth.
Rays 5, Red Sox 1
BOSTON David Price
pitched a ve-hitter for his
third complete game of the
season, Wil Myers had a two-
run single, and the surging
Tampa Bay Rays won for the
19th time in 22 games by beat-
ing the Boston Red Sox.
James Loney had two hits
and drove in a run for the
Rays. Tampa Bay moved
within a half-game of the AL
East-leading Red Sox.
Athletics 4, Astros 3
HOUSTON Coco Crisp
hit a two-run homer in
Oaklands three-run seventh
inning to help the Athletics
to a win over the Houston
Astros.
The As trailed by two before
an RBI double by Eric Sogard
with one out cut the lead to
3-2 and chased starter Bud
Norris. Crisp launched his
home run off Travis Blackley
(1-1) to put Oakland on top.
Angels 1, Twins 0
ANAHEIM, Calif. Jered
Weaver outpitched Mike
Pelfrey with eight innings of
two-hit ball and Albert Pujols
drove in the only run, leading
the Los Angeles Angels to a
victory over the Minnesota
Twins.
Weaver (5-5) struck out nine
and walked one in his rst
home start against the Twins
since his no-hitter on May 2,
2012. The three-time All-Star
retired 19 consecutive batters
during one stretch just
four days after teammate C.J.
Wilson set down 18 in a row
against Oakland.
Indians 10, Mariners 1
SEATTLE Scott Kazmir
allowed just one hit over his
eight innings, Michael Bourn
hit his rst career grand slam
and the Cleveland Indians
routed the Seattle Mariners.
The only hit Kazmir (6-4)
gave up was a clean leadoff
single to center by Justin
Smoak in the fth. Kazmir
struck out seven, walked two
and allowed an unearned run.
He threw 103 pitches and was
relieved by Vinnie Pestano in
the ninth. Pestano allowed a
hit.
Dodgers 8, Blue Jays 3
TORONTO Mark Ellis
hit a two-run homer to high-
light Los Angeles ve-run
10th inning as the Dodgers
beat the Toronto Blue Jays to
complete a three-game sweep.
Royals 4, Orioles 3
KANSAS CITY, Mo. Eric
Hosmer hit two home runs
and Alcides Escobar drove in
the winning run in the ninth
to lift the Kansas City Royals
to a victory over the Baltimore
Orioles.
David Lough singled and
scored the game-ending run
when Escobar doubled off the
fence in left center with one
out in the ninth.
Tigers 6, White Sox 2
CHICAGO Prince Fielder,
Austin Jackson and Torii
Hunter homered, and Anibal
Sanchez pitched six scoreless
innings to help the Detroit
Tigers overcome Miguel
Cabreras absence in a win
over the Chicago White Sox.
lesser but still very sub-
stantial, thats a whole
bucket of tar dumped on
his legacy.
With 647 home runs,
fth on the career list and
115 shy of matching Barry
Bonds career record,
Rodriguez is among the
most prodigious sluggers
in baseball history. And his
record contracts have put
him in the spotlight, rst a
$252 million, 10-year deal
with Texas that started in
2001 and later a $275 mil-
lion, 10-year agreement
with the Yankees that
began in 2008.
But his body has been
breaking down and hes
been on the disabled list
six times in six years.
Right hip surgery in March
2009 was followed by left
hip surgery this January,
three months after the
Yankees repeatedly pinch
hit for A-Rod and benched
him during the playoffs.
Just when it appeared
he was ready to rejoin the
Yankees this week, the
team said he strained his
left quadriceps.
Rodriguez has acknowl-
edged taking PEDs before
baseball started penaliz-
ing their use. In 2009, he
attributed his decision to
being young and stupid
and agreed to work for the
Taylor Hooton Foundation
to combat steroids.
If it turns out he was
violating drug rules all
along, his reputation may
be beyond repair.
Theres no question
its been diminished, and
more than many of his
contemporaries that also
were involved, because
in his case the percep-
tion now is that the use
has been ongoing, NBC
and MLB Network broad-
caster Bob Costas said.
Now that could change if
he somehow successfully
defends himself, but if that
doesnt happen, then the
perception would be that
it was not conned to a
certain period of time, so
it would be impossible to
parse how much of his per-
formance was unaided and
how much was aided. The
shame of all of it is that he
clearly would have been
an all-time great player
without ever using perfor-
mance-enhancing drugs.
Fox broadcaster and for-
mer major league catch-
er Tim Carver said he
regards Rodriguez unfor-
tunately, the way I view
Ryan Braun, and thats not
good. And I viewed A-Rod
as a really good guy.
Tarnished is understated
in these times.
While positive tests
lead to a set series of pun-
ishments 50 games for
a rst offense, 100 games
for a second and a lifetime
ban for a third MLB
is not bound by that for
players in the Biogenesis
probe because the xed
penalties are only for
failed urine and blood
tests.
In theory, they could be
suspended for ve games
or 500 games, union head
Michael Weiner said.
Braun negotiated the
length of his penalty rath-
er than contest it before
an arbitrator. If Rodriguez
were to le a grievance,
a suspension probably
would be pushed back
until after a decision and
would be delayed until
next year.
Vincent learned in the
Steve Howe case that
lifetime bans are difcult
to enforce. He suspended
the pitcher for life in June
1992 for Howes seventh
incident related to drugs
or alcohol, but Howe was
reinstated that November
by arbitrator George
Nicolau.
Despite that,
Vincent feels current
Commissioner Bud Selig
should not be reticent
about pursuing a stiff pen-
alty against Rodriguez.
I think he ought to
come down very hard. I
dont think he has much
to lose, and everything to
gain, Vincent said.
Rodriguez has been a
non-factor in the Yankees
season, and much of his
$28 million salary this
year is being covered by
insurance. He is owed an
additional $86 million in
salary over the next four
seasons.
Costas sees a rules
change regarding the
salary in long-term con-
tracts as the most effec-
tive deterrent to drug use.
He says management and
players should reopen the
labor contract and add a
new provision.
If you are found to
have used PEDs and you
exhaust your appeals
and youre in the midst of
a long-term contract, the
team has the right at its
discretion to void the con-
tract, he said. Thats an
enormous disincentive.
professional hockey,
Mannino went 10-7-0
in 20 games with the
Manchester Monarchs last
season, while recording a
2.47 goals against average
anda .919 save percentage.
An undrafted free-agent
out of the University of
Denver, Mannino began
his career with the New
York Islanders organiza-
tion in 2008-09, going
17-12-2 over 34 games
for the Bridgeport Sound
Tigers with a 2.94 goals
against average and .900
save percentage. He made
his NHL debut with the
Islanders against the
Boston Bruins on Nov. 28,
2008.
Mannino has played
a total of 159 AHL con-
tests between Bridgeport,
Chicago, St. Johns,
Portland and Manchester
and established a career
record of 81-52-8 with four
shutouts, a 2.83 GAA and
a .905 save percentage.
His best season came in
2009-10 with the Chicago
Wolves as he touted a
26-5-1 record and a .921
save percentage that
was tied for third in the
league. He has appeared
in six NHL games with
the Islanders, Atlanta
Thrashers and Winnipeg
Jets. The 29-year old has
also skated in 31 ECHL
games with the Utah
Grizzlies and Chicago
Express. Originally
from Farmington Hills,
Michigan, Mannino was
a four-year starter at the
University of Denver.
As a freshman, he led
the Pioneers to the 2005
NCAA Championship,
while earning honors as
the tournaments Most
Outstanding Player.
runs a game.
The designated hitter/rst
baseman broke out of his slump
early in the game clubbing a 1-0
pitch from Mud Hens starter
Jon Link just over the left eld
fence and into the bullpen for
a three-run home run giving
Marshall and the RailRiders a
4-0 lead in the bottom of the
rst.
Four of the rst ve batters
of the game for SWB reached
base. The rst run scored when
Dan Johnson singled in Adonis
Garcia.
It feels good. Weve been
struggling scoring runs maybe
the last week and fortunately we
did things right the rst inning
and we battled, Ruiz said. I
know we all struggle a little bit,
but hopefully we can bounce
back. Today was a good win.
Start today and take it onto the
road trip (which starts Friday).
Marshall ran into a tough-luck
inning in the top of the fth.
There wasnt a hard hit ball in
the frame by Toledo, but the
MudHens scratched out a run
on three bloop singles. The last
one, by Avisail Garcia, the top-
ranked prospect according to
Baseball America, trimmed the
SWB lead to 4-1. But Marshall
got former SWB Yankee Kevin
Russo to bounce into a double-
play to end the inning. After
that, the 23-year-old faced the
minimum number of batters
until he came out after the
eighth.
It makes you a little frus-
trated, but you know what its
a game, Marshall said about
the fth inning. Its the game
of baseball. That can happen 10
times in a row and you cant do
anything about it. I was able to
get a good groundball and get
out of it.
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER SPORTS Thursday, July 25, 2013 PAGE 5B
Bill Tarutis|For The Times Leader
Alex Rodriguezs final games in the New York Yankees organiza-
tion may have been played last weekend with the Scranton/
Wilkes-Barre RailRiders.
Penguins
From page 1B
Brett Marshall pitched eight
innings of one-run ball and
Randy Ruiz hit a three-run home
run helping the RailRiders snap
a ve-game losing streak with a
4-1 win over Toledo Wednesday
afternoon at PNC Field.
RailRiders at the plate: The
big blast came off the bat of
Randy Ruiz, who hit a three-run
homer in the bottom of the rst.
Six different players in the line-
up had one hit, all were singles,
including a run-scoring knock
from Dan Johnson and the rst
Triple-A hit for Jose Pirela and
Hector Crespo.
RailRiders on the mound:
For the second time this season
Brett Marshall pitched eight
innings in picking up a victory.
On Wednesday, he only gave up
one run on ve hits to improve
his record to 5-8. Dellin Betances
picked up his fourth save of the
season allowing two walks in a
scoreless ninth.
Riding the Rails: New Yorks
disabled list saw action once
again on Wednesday with third
baseman Luis Cruz becom-
ing the latest casualty. That
prompted RailRiders inelder
David Adams to get summoned
to the Yankees and inelder Jose
Pirela to join the RailRiders
from Double-A Trenton. The
23-year-old from Venezuela bat-
ted .257 with six home runs, 41
RBI and 14 stolen bases with the
Thunder.
Digging the longball: When
Randy Ruiz hit home run No.
12 in the bottom of the rst, it
was the 100
th
this season by the
RailRiders. Prior to Wednesdays
afternoon game, the only team
in the International League with
more homers was Buffalo with
103. The numbers are more
impressive because SWB hit just
36 longballs over the rst two
months of the season.
Attendance: 5,751
Time of Game: 2:05 (the
RailRiders quickest nine-inning
game this season)
Todays Game: The nale
of the four-game series against
Toledo at PNC Field is tonight
at 7:05.
Todays Probables: Scranton/
Wilkes-Barre LHP David Huff
(4-4, 3.57) vs. Toledo LHP Jose
Alvarez (7-4, 2.74)
On Deck: The RailRiders head
out on an eight-game road swing
to the west beginning with four
in Louisville.
Today at PNC Field: Theres
a lot going on at the ballpark this
evening with $1 beers and Pepsi
products from the time the gates
open for two hours. Its also
superhero night so pull out your
Batman or Superman costume.
Sticking with the community
night theme, tonight is Valley
View Community night.
On The Radio: All games can
be heard on WYCK 1340-AM,
1400-AM, 100.7-FM
On TV: Tonights game be
telecast live on My Network TV
(WQMY) at 7 p.m.
HOW THEY SCORED
RAILRIDERS FIRST: Adonis
Garcia was hit by a pitch. Corey
Patterson ied out. Ronnier
Mustelier singled as Garcia
moved to second. Dan Johnson
singled to score Garcia and move
Mustelier to second. Randy
Ruiz hit a three-run homer. J.R.
Murphy fouled out. Jose Pirela
grounded out. RAILRIDERS
4-0
TOLEDO FIFTH: Mike
Cervenak singled. Bryan
Holaday singled. Argenis Diaz
struck out. Avisail Garcia sin-
gled to score Cervenak. Kevin
Russo grounded into a double-
play. RAILRIDERS 4-1
The T.L. exPReSS
RailRiders
From page 1B
A-Rod
From page 1B
Legion
From page 1B
PSU
From page 1B
spring.
For a long time Ive felt
very condent of our play-
ers commitment to us and
our commitment to our
players, OBrien said. I
think our players theres
a lot of respect between the
coaches and the players.
Were not their friends, but
theres just a lot of respect.
So I dont really think about
that that much.
I understand the mile-
stone because of that
(Aug. 1) date. But I havent
thought of that transfer deal
really since the season start-
ed last year. I felt like those
were the guys that were
committed to us.
Though the school has
been tight-lipped on the
topic, OBrien recently met
with Penn States board of
trustees to start discuss-
ing a plan to work with the
NCAA to see about reduc-
ing the sanctions in some
fashion.
OBrien said last week
on a conference call with
reporters that he hoped the
NCAA might meet us half-
way at some point in the
future.
In the meantime, howev-
er, Penn State must prepare
as though the sanctions
will remain in effect with
three more seasons left on a
postseason ban, three more
recruiting classes capped at
15 scholarships and an over-
all limit of 65 scholarship
players that will run from
the 2014-17 seasons.
What the NCAA does is
up to them, Penn State ath-
letic director Dave Joyner
said Wednesday. What we
have to do no matter what
is plan on not having any-
thing happen. Because that
distracts you from what our
real goal is, and our real goal
is to be the best we can be
within the structure that
weve been given.
Our job is not to worry
about what outwardly may
or may not occur. Our job
is to pay attention to what
weve been given and to
go after it. Would you
like things to change? Sure
everybody would like them
to change, but Im not mak-
ing any plans on that hap-
pening. Im not going to
wake up every morning
thinking about how we do
that.
Everything that hap-
pens is in the hands of the
NCAA.
In an interview Tuesday
with ESPN, Emmert largely
dodged a question about
revisiting Penn States case,
saying that it would be up
to the entire NCAA execu-
tive committee, and not
just him. But he also did not
immediately shoot down
the idea.
Regardless, Penn States
perseverance in the rst
year under the sanctions
has given the school and the
program a blueprint with
how to proceed.
If the 2012 team taught
us anything, it taught us,
including me, about how to
handle things that arent in
your control, OBrien said.
You dont have any control
over certain things in your
life. But how do you handle
that? How do you pick your-
self up and keep moving for-
ward?
Regardless of the record
or whatever, thats what that
team and those group of
leaders taught us. But weve
got to continue to do it.
We cant just say, OK, that
was great. Now what do we
do? Everyday weve got to
lay another brick on top of
the other one and continue
to do things the right way,
which hopefully we will
do.
Bill Tarutis | For The Times Leader
RailRiders Adonis Garcia, right,
beats the tag of Toledo catcher
Bryan holaday in the bottom of the
first inning as umpire Jeff Gosney
watches the play at PNC Field in
Moosic on Wednesday afternoon.
WeDNeSDAYS BOx
RailRiders 4, Mud Hens 1
Toledo RailRiders
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Garcia cf 4 0 1 1 Garcia lf 3 1 1 0
Russo 2b 3 0 0 0 Patterson cf 4 0 0 0
Lennerton dh 3 0 1 0 Mustelier 3b 4 1 1 0
Castellanos lf 4 0 0 0 Johnson 1b 3 1 1 1
Dorn 1b 4 0 0 0 Ruiz dh 3 1 1 3
Guez rf 3 0 0 0 Murphy c 3 0 0 0
Cervenak 3b 4 1 2 0 Pirela 2b 3 0 1 0
Holaday c 3 0 1 0 Grice rf 3 0 0 0
Diaz ss 3 0 0 0 Crespo ss 3 0 1 0
Totals 31 1 5 1 Totals 29 4 6 4
Toledo 0000100001
RailRiders 400000000 4
E Crespo (2). LOB TOL 6, SWB 2.
TEAM RISP TOL 1-for-4, SWB 2-for-4.
HR Ruiz (12).
GIDP TOL 2 , SWB 1.
IP H R ER BB SO
Toledo
Link (L, 0-2) 7 5 4 4 0 4
Bonderman 1 1 0 0 0 0
RailRiders
Marshall (W, 5-8) 8 5 1 1 1 2
Betances (S,4) 1 0 0 0 2 0
HBP Garcia (by Link)
Umpires Home, Jeff Gosney; First, Carlos Torrez;
Second, Clint Fagam; Third, Ben May
T 2:05 A 5,751 (10,000)
We hustle, Walkowiak
said. Were not a team
that slows down running
to rst base because we
know were going to be
out. What I saw on that
ball was, This might be
deep enough that I could
beat him to the bag.
Essentially, that typi-
ed Greater Pittstons
pact of refusing to be
beaten.
Its a mindset that
showed up during
Tuesday mornings
tournament elimination
game, when Greater
Pittston went 11 innings
to defeat Jersey Shore,
9-7 for the right to play
Swoyersville for the
regional title in the after-
noon. Greater Pittston
scored three runs in
the top of the 12th in
that game on two bases-
loaded grounders and
Groves suicide squeeze
bunt single.
Thats how badly we
wanted it, Walkowiak
said, and howmuch this
really means to us.
It meant Greater
Pittston had to dig
even deeper when
Swoyersville built a
5-1 lead with just two
innings left in the cham-
pionship game.
We werent giv-
ing up, Grove said.
Everyone was together
with whatever it takes,
whether it was with hits,
bunts, diving into bases.
Whatever we could
do, we were going to do
that.
The unbreakable
resolve nally did in
Swoyersville.
Trailing by four runs
with six outs left to
Greater Pittston sea-
son, Jordan Zezza,
Jake Granteed and Joe
Gavenonis began the
eighth inning with sin-
gles. Grove then ground-
ed a two-run single past
third base to pull Greater
Pittston within 5-3, then
Dylan Maloney beat
out a bunt single and
Martinelli ried a run-
scoring single to right
eld.
On the verge of tying
the game, Greater
Pittston got a little too
aggressive trying to
bunt the tying run home
with the bags jammed
again, as Grove was
tagged out on a missed
suicide squeeze play.
But Bressler regrouped
by grounding a single
into left eld, scoring
Maloney with the game-
tying run.
An out later,
Walkowiak produced the
winning runs with a hit
that didnt even leave the
ineld.
We play small ball
here, Ranieli said. We
dont have the big power
guys in the middle of
our lineup. The way we
score runs, we bunt, we
squeeze, we hit-and-run.
Its 100 percent National
League baseball with
us.
Its about something
else, too.
Team condence
really picked us up,
Walkowiak said. Weve
won a state champion-
ship in teeners, almost
won district in high
school (with Wyoming
Areas District 2 semi-
nalist team last season).
We have trust in each
other and we have con-
dence.
Greater Pittston
needed every ounce of
it against a Swoyersville
team that won its rst
23 games this season,
already defeated Greater
Pittston three times dur-
ing that run, and seemed
headed to another win
against its league nem-
esis with a four-run
lead entering the eighth
inning.
Mike Leonard started
Swoyersvilles surge
when the began the bot-
tom of the rst with a
double, then scored on
Ryan Hobans sacrice
y.
After Greater Pittston
tied the game when
Grove raced home on
Martinellis squeeze bunt
in the top of the fourth,
Swoyersville got the run
back on Matt Zielens
RBI ineld single in the
bottom of the frame.
Then Swoyersville
started pulling away.
Nick Hogan tripled
home Jeremy Sabecky
in the fth inning, then
scoredonadeepsacrice
y by Joe Pachulis. And
Sabecky raced across
the plate on Leonards
second double of the
day, giving Swoyersville
a seemingly-comfortable
5-1 lead in the bottom of
the seventh.
WeDNeSDAYS BOxeS
Championship Game
Greater Pittston AB R H RBI 2B 3B HR
Erik Walkowiak p,cf 5 0 1 2 0 0 0
Jordan Zezza cf,lf 5 1 2 0 0 0 0
Jake Granteed 3b,2b,p 5 1 2 0 0 0 0
Joe Gavenonis lf,3b 3 1 1 0 0 0 0
Trent Grove c 4 1 2 2 0 0 0
Dylan Maloney rf 5 1 2 0 0 0 0
Justin Martinelli ss 2 1 1 2 0 0 0
Chuck Bressler 1b 4 1 1 1 0 0 0
Mike Carey 2b,p 3 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals 36 7 12 7 0 0 0
Swoyersville AB R H RBI 2B 3B HR
Mike Leonard 2b 5 1 3 1 2 0 0
Nick Hogan lf 5 1 2 1 0 1 0
Ryan Hogan c 2 1 0 1 0 0 0
Joe Pechulis 3b 3 0 0 1 0 0 0
Evan McCue 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 0
Logan Zavada p 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Matt Labashosky dh 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Ricky Stayer rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Chris Nixon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Billy Gregory p 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Matt Zielen rf,p 3 0 1 1 0 0 0
Jeremy Worlinsky ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 0
Dan Flaherty pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Jeremy Sabecky cf 3 2 2 0 0 0 0
Totals 31 5 9 5 2 1 0
Greater Pittston 000 100 060 - 7
Swoyersville 100 120 100 - 5
LOB- Greater Pittston 9, Swoyersville 7. DP- Swoyers-
ville 1. E - Grove, Carey. Sac - Martinelli, Labashosky.
SF - R. Hogan, Pechulis. SB - Sabecky 3, Zielen 2,
Walkowiak 2, R. Hogan. CS - N. Hogan, Sabecky.
Greater Pittston IP H R ERBBSO
Walkowiak 4 1/3 5 4 4 3 2
Carey,W 2 2/3 2 1 1 1 3
Granteed, S 2 2 0 0 0 4
Swoyersville IP H R ERBBSO
Zavada 5 3 1 1 3 2
Zielen, L 2 6 5 5 1 1
Nixon 1 2 1 1 0 1
Gregory 1 1 0 0 1 1
HBP - Sabecky (by Walkowiak), Gavenonis (by Za-
vada).
WP - Carey.
Elimination Game
Greater Pittston AB R H RBI 2B 3B HR
Erik Walkowiak cf,p 5 2 0 0 0 0 0
Jordan Zezza lf,cf 5 2 0 1 0 0 0
Jake Granteed p,2b 6 0 2 1 0 0 0
Joe Gavenonis 3b 4 2 0 1 0 0 0
Trent Grove c 6 2 3 1 0 0 0
Dylan Maloney rf 5 0 2 1 0 0 0
Justin Martinelli ss 4 0 0 1 0 0 0
Chuck Bressler 1b 2 0 0 1 0 0 0
Adam Romanowski p,lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Mike Carey 2b 1 1 1 0 0 0 0
Totals 42 9 8 7 0 0 0
Jersey Shore AB R H RBI 2B 3B HR
Colton Potter ss 4 2 1 1 0 0 0
Boone Costa cf,p 3 0 1 0 0 0 0
Christian Rishel lf,cf 6 0 2 3 0 0 0
Zach Miller 2b 6 0 1 0 0 0 0
Chris Glunk p,lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Zach DePasqua dh 4 1 0 0 0 0 0
Eric Huling c 5 1 1 0 0 0 0
Travis Eiswerth 3b 5 1 0 0 0 0 0
Jordan Bartges 1b 5 1 1 1 0 0 0
Cody Bradley rf 4 1 1 1 0 0 0
Totals 43 7 8 6 0 0 0
Greater Pittston 10021002003 - 9
Jersey Shore 00001400101 - 7
Greater Pittston IP H R ERBBSO
Granteed, S 7 6 5 1 3 6
Mott 2 1/3 1 1 1 1 0
Walkowiak, W 1 2/3 1 1 0 1 0
Jersey Shore IP H R ERBBSO
Glunk 9 1/3 6 6 3 5 3
Costa, L 1 2/3 2 3 0 1 2
PAGE 6B Thursday, July 25, 2013 SPORTS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
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27 Unique Holes
One Breathtaking Course
Lions quarterback battle may not last long
By DEREK LEVARSE
dlevarse@timesleader.com
CHICAGO His top quar-
terback from the spring remains
three time zones away from
campus. His other candidate for
the starting job isnt allowed to
talk football with him until next
month. Neither has played a
down of major college football.
Through it all, Bill OBrien
sees an opportunity.
Whether its Tyler Ferguson
or Christian Hackenberg who
starts under center against
Syracuse in ve weeks, the Penn
State coach is going to enjoy the
time he has to work with them.
One thing thats really excit-
ing about working with young
quarterbacks is that you get
a chance to really mold that
quarterback, OBrien said
Wednesday at the rst session
of Big Ten media days. You
get a chance to really teach that
quarterback. And (quarterbacks
coach) Charlie Fisher and I are
going to do that and work hard
at teaching our quarterbacks
how to play in our offense, man-
aging a game and play smart,
tough Penn State football. We
are excited about that.
We are going to have to
make a decision at some point
during training camp to allow
the starter to get enough reps to
be ready for the Syracuse game.
It sure is exciting for us, a chal-
lenge for us and we are looking
forward to it.
OBrienreiteratedWednesday
that he will split reps between
Ferguson and Hackenberg for
the rst two weeks of training
camp, with the rst practice
scheduled for Aug. 5.
He will then make a decision
on a starter at the midway point
of camp.
I think in order to give that
guy whoever that guy will
be, Tyler or Christian in
order to give him enough time
to prepare for an excellent
Syracuse team that throws a lot
at you defensively, you have to
give them a couple of weeks to
get ready for the rst game at
the very least, OBrien said.
Especially a young quarter-
back.
Probably halfway through,
well have enough evaluation
of our practice lm and all the
different things that go into
being the starting quarterback
at Penn State, not only on the
practice eld but in the meeting
room, and well make a good
decision. Well do whats best
for the football team.
Hackenberg, a ve-star
recruit regarded by some ser-
vices as the top pocket passer
in the country for the last class,
arrived in State College in June.
OBrien and the coaching staff
cant begin working with him,
however, until camp opens.
After emerging as the top can-
didate in the spring, Ferguson
returned home to California
this month for personal reasons.
Fergusons mother is undergo-
ing treatment for breast cancer.
Hell be back, OBrien said.
Summers voluntary, right?
The last time I read the NCAA
rulebook, summers voluntary.
Hes not there. Hes at home.
Hes got some personal things
that hes dealing with at home.
To me, hell come in, hell be
here for training camp. What
time, what day, all those things,
I mean, I dont know. I am sure
hell be in the rst teammeeting
and hell be ready to compete
with Christian for that job.
A few new linebackers?
As the Nittany Lions roster
continues to shrink as a result
of the NCAA sanctions, the
coaches have admitted they
may have to get creative with
the depth chart.
Already things are looking
thin at linebacker, where the
Lions have only two players
with signicant experience in
Glenn Carson and Mike Hull.
One option could be to line
up safeties Adrian Amos and
Stephen Obeng-Agyapong in
the box from time to time.
Weve got to look at all the
different players we have on
defense as it relates to the line-
backer position, OBrien said.
What can a guy like Adrian
Amos do? Can he play safety?
Can he play corner? Can he play
linebacker? Stephen Obeng, can
he come down and play some
linebacker for us?
A bit later in the day, OBrien
said it wasnt something that
was set in stone, but that the
Lions are in a position where
they have to consider all
options.
Amos in particular drew
heaps of praise from coaches
and teammates a year ago as
one of the strongest players on
the team pound-for-pound. Had
the Lions needed him to step in
at linebacker in 2012, he prob-
ably could have pulled it off
despite playing exclusively in
the secondary.
I think really from the end of
the season until now, weve talk-
ed about a lot of different sce-
narios, OBrien said of Amos.
Hell be a safety for us but can
he do some things down in the
box, even as a safety, which
means maybe youve got to
play a little bit more post-safety
coverage, which is hard in this
league because there are some
really good outside receivers.
Belichick: Pats will learn from Hernandez case
Belichick
The Associated Press
FOXBOROUGH, Mass.
A grim-faced coach Bill
Belichick said Wednesday
the New England Patriots
will learn from the ter-
rible experience of Aaron
Hernandezs arrest on a
murder charge and work to
improve their player evalu-
ation process.
Speaking publicly for
the rst time since the
tight end was arrested four
weeks earlier, Belichick
said he was shocked and
disappointed to learn of
the criminal investigation
while he was out of the
United States.
He also sought to mini-
mize future attention on
the case.
My comments are cer-
tainly not in proportion to
the unfortunate and sad
situation that we have here,
but Ive been advised
to address the subject
once, and its time for
the New England
Patriots to move
forward, Belichick
said. Moving for-
ward consists of what
its always been here
to build a winning
football team, to be a strong
pillar in the community and
be a team that our fans can
be proud of.
Im not trying to make
this story disappear, but I
respect the judi-
cial process and
have been advised
not to comment
on ongoing legal
proceedings. Im
advising our play-
ers to do the same
things.
The Patriots
cut Hernandez after he was
arrested the morning of
June 26 and before he was
charged that afternoon.
Hernandez has pleaded not
guilty.
Players are scheduled
to report to training camp
today when quarterback
Tom Brady and the ve
other captains from last
season will be available to
reporters. The rst practice
is scheduled for Friday.
GWAtops
Northwest
in tourney
The Times Leader staf
THORNDALE
Stephanie Nowak pitched a
complete game, striking out
six, toleadGreater Wyoming
Area past Northwest 11-3
Wednesday in the 9-10 girls
softball state tournament.
Kaitlyn Slusser had a home
run and two RBI to lead
GWA offensively. Ellie Glatz
had a triple, a single and
two RBI, while Lily Harden
had two singles and Nicole
Silinskie had a double for
GWA. Greater Wyoming
Area resumes play plays
Friday against Drexel Hill.
9-10ALL-STAR STATE
TOURNAMENT
Back Mountain National
7, Liberty 4
Kyle Sincavage had his
second home run of the tour-
nament, while Mike Rother
and Colin Marshalll each
had one RBI in the Back
Mountain National victory
Wednesday. Max Paczewski
was the winning pitcher and
had a single with run scored,
while Zach Holthaus had
two hits and Connor Morgan
had one hit and a run scored.
Back Mountain National
continues play today at
5:30 p.m. A victory will put
National in the seminals.
South Columbia 7, Back
Mountain National 5, 7
innings
Kyle Sincavage had a two-
runhome runandscoredtwo
runs in the Back Mountain
National loss from Tuesday
night. Zach Holthaus pitched
4.2 innings, while Max
Paczewski hit double and
scored two runs in the loss.
PAGE 7B Thursday, July 25, 2013 www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER
BUSINESS
IN BRIEF
$3.64 $3.45 $3.46
$4.06
on 7/17/2008
CANDICE CHOI
The Associated Press
It seems that not even Beyonce or
new, lower-calorie options can convince
Americans to drink more soda.
Coca-Cola Co., PepsiCo Inc. and Dr
Pepper Snapple Group Inc. all sold less
soda in the second quarter in North
America, dashing hopes for the moment
that splashy new marketing and differ-
ent sweetener mixes could get drinkers
back.
Coca-Cola Co. said it sold 4 percent
less soda in North America, while
PepsiCo Inc. simply said its decline for
the region was in the mid-single dig-
its. Dr Pepper sold 3 percent less of the
zzy drinks.
Coca-Cola, based in Atlanta, blamed
the sluggish sales on a cold, wet spring.
But the declines continue a years-long
trend. According to the industry tracker
Beverage Digest, per capita soda con-
sumption in the U.S. has been slipping
steadily since 1998 amid concerns that
sugary drinks fuel weight gain.
Another problem is that people now
have so many more choices when it
comes to drinks. An endless array of
bottled waters, teas of many colors,
even energy shots and relaxation
drinks are vying for the attention of the
thirsty, with store coolers getting more
crowded all the time.
The trend wont change and will
probably get worse without a major
breakthrough in new sweeteners, said
John Sicher, editor and publisher of
trade publication Beverage Digest.
PepsiCos decline for the quarter
came despite its stepped-up marketing
over the past year; the company signed
pop star Beyonce to star in its ads and
signed a multiyear deal to sponsor the
Super Bowl halftime show. The com-
pany also introduced a mid-calorie soda
called Pepsi Next to win back people
whove quit soda because they dont
like the calories in regular or the taste
of diet.
To make up for the declines in the
meantime, the industry is relying on
bottled waters, teas, sports drinks and
other beverages to boost sales.
Soda sales losing their pop among North Americans
CHRISTOPHER S.
RUGABER
AP Economics Writer
WASHINGTON
Americans snapped
up new homes in June
at the fastest pace in
ve years, a sign the
housing recovery is
strengthening.
The Commerce
Department said
Wednesday that sales
rose 8.3 percent last
month to a seasonally
adjusted annual pace
of 497,000. Thats up
from an annual pace of
459,000 in May, which
was revised lower.
While sales are still
below the 700,000 pace
consistent with healthy
markets, they have
risen 38 percent in the
past 12 months. Thats
the biggest annual gain
since January 1992.
Home sales and pric-
es have climbed since
early last year, buoyed
by solid hiring and
low mortgage rates.
Housing has helped
drive economic growth
this year at a time when
other parts of the econ-
omy have languished,
such as manufacturing
and business invest-
ment. New-home sales
make up only a small
part of the market, but
each home built cre-
ates an average of three
new jobs and generates
about $90,000 in tax
revenue, according to
data from the National
Association of Home
Builders. One concern
is that rising mortgage
rates could slow sales
in the coming months.
The average rate on the
30-year xed was 4.37
percent last week a
full percentage point
higher than in early
May. At the same time,
mortgage applications
to purchase homes have
fallen in the past few
weeks.
Rates surged
after Chairman Ben
Bernanke said the
Federal Reserve could
slow its bond-buying
program later this year
if the economy contin-
ues to improve. The
Feds bond purchases
have kept long-term
interest rates low,
encouraging more bor-
rowing and spending.
Still, other indicators
suggest housing should
continue to support the
economy this year.
Sales of previously
occupied homes slipped
in June to seasonally
adjusted annual rate of
5.08 million but stayed
near the 3-year high
reached in May.
Homebuilders are
more condent about
the housing recovery
than at any time in
seven years, accord-
ing to a survey by the
National Association of
Home Builders/Wells
Fargo. That suggests
home construction
should keep increas-
ing. Customer trafc
and builders outlook
for single-family home
sales over the next six
months are at the high-
est levels since the
housing bubble burst in
2006.
US newhome sales jump inJune
AP photo
The Commerce Department said Wednesday that sales of new homes, such as this one under construction in Matthews, N.C., rose 8.3 percent last month to a seasonally adjusted annual pace
of 497,000. Thats up from an annual pace of 459,000 in May.
Dell shareholder
vote delayed again
Dells founder is boosting his offer for
the struggling computer maker by a dime
to $13.75 per share in hopes of attracting
more shareholder support for his plan to
buy the company and take it private.
The move came just hours before Dells
shareholders were scheduled to vote on
the previous offer from Michael Dell and
the investment rm Silver Lake Partners.
The Round Rock, Texas, company said
it was delaying its shareholder meeting
for a second time, moving it to Aug. 2
to give its board time to consider the
offer. The meeting had been set for later
Wednesday, after being delayed the week
before in a sign that the offer didnt have
enough shareholder support.
Caterpillar sales
slowto a crawl
Second-quarter earnings at Caterpillar
fell 43 percent as dealers cut inventories
more than the company expected. The
worlds largest maker of construction and
mining equipment cut its prot and rev-
enue outlook for the year.
Caterpillar reported earnings of $960
million, or $1.45 per share, compared
with $1.7 billion, or $2.54 per share a
year ago. Revenue slid 15.8 percent to
$14.63 billion. Thats well short of Wall
Streets expectations. Analysts surveyed
by FactSet had expected a prot of $1.69
per share on revenue of $15.09 billion.
The Peoria, Ill., company said dealers
cut inventories by $1 billion as the global
mining industry slowed due to reduced
growth in China.
Commodity prices have fallen as well,
forcing miners to cut back on orders.
Boeing sees Q2
profts take of
Boeing posted a bigger-than-expected
second-quarter prot as it ramped up
deliveries of commercial planes like its
737 and 787.
The company also raised its full-year
earnings guidance, and its shares rose
nearly 2 percent in premarket trading.
Boeing is in the midst of a boom in
airplane orders as airlines in Asia and
Latin America expand. It is speeding up
production of its 737 as well as the new
787. Deliveries of all commercial planes
rose 13 percent to 169 planes during the
quarter.
Deliveries of the 787 were temporar-
ily halted earlier this year when the
plane was grounded because of battery
problems. But they resumed in May and
Boeing delivered 16 of the jets during the
quarter. It said it still expects to deliver at
least 60 of the 787s this year the same
goal it had before the battery problems
surfaced in January.
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Ryder 61.66 -.96 +23.5
Safeway 25.51 -.06 +41.0
Schlmbrg 82.85 -.72 +19.6
Sherwin 172.06 +.26 +11.9
SilvWhtn g 22.77 -.83 -36.9
SiriusXM 3.68 ... +27.3
SonyCp 22.81 -.20+103.7
SouthnCo 45.04 -.58 +5.2
SwstAirl 13.76 -.13 +34.4
SpectraEn 35.71 -.27 +30.4
SterlngBcp 13.62 +.27 +49.5
Sysco 34.43 -1.08 +9.7
TECO 17.46 -.27 +4.2
Target 73.32 +.07 +23.9
TenetHlt rs 43.17 +.07 +33.0
Tenneco 48.84 -.76 +39.1
Tesoro 53.36 -.70 +21.1
Textron 27.92 -.99 +12.6
3M Co 116.33 -.42 +25.3
TimeWarn 62.30 -.54 +30.3
Timken 59.94 -.79 +25.3
Titan Intl 17.38 -.48 -20.0
UnilevNV 40.79 ... +6.5
UnionPac 159.40 -2.26 +26.8
Unisys 26.40 +1.43 +52.6
UPS B 86.98 -.53 +18.0
USSteel 18.68 -.40 -21.7
UtdTech 104.99 -.13 +28.0
VarianMed 72.11 -.40 +2.7
VectorGp 16.42 -.10 +10.4
ViacomB 72.61 -1.11 +37.7
WestarEn 33.46 -.35 +16.9
Weyerhsr 28.86 -.47 +3.7
Whrlpl 129.82 -1.22 +27.6
WmsCos 33.44 -.85 +2.1
Windstrm 8.15 -.03 -1.6
Wynn 131.13 -.39 +16.6
XcelEngy 29.68 -.44 +11.1
Xerox 9.83 +.04 +44.1
YumBrnds 71.45 +1.02 +7.6
Mutual Funds
Alliance Bernstein
CoreOppA m 16.74 -.02 +19.7
GlblRskAllB m15.19 -.09 -1.0
American Cent
IncGroA m 33.07 -.06 +22.2
ValueInv 7.75 -.03 +22.5
American Funds
AMCAPA m 25.56 -.09 +20.4
BalA m 22.85 -.10 +13.0
BondA m 12.49 -.05 -2.4
CapIncBuA m56.17 -.20 +8.3
CpWldGrIA m41.31 -.02 +12.7
EurPacGrA m44.22 +.02 +7.3
FnInvA m 47.64 -.22 +17.5
GrthAmA m 40.64 -.14 +18.3
HiIncA m 11.35 -.03 +3.5
IncAmerA m 19.69 -.09 +10.9
InvCoAmA m 35.48 -.06 +18.6
MutualA m 32.86 -.16 +17.1
NewPerspA m35.42 -.06 +13.3
NwWrldA m 55.76 -.14 +2.3
SmCpWldA m46.41 -.19 +16.3
WAMutInvA m37.14 -.13 +20.2
Baron
Asset b 58.88 -.18 +20.5
BlackRock
EqDivI 22.67 -.11 +14.8
GlobAlcA m 21.23 -.07 +8.2
GlobAlcC m 19.75 -.06 +7.8
GlobAlcI 21.33 -.06 +8.4
CGM
Focus 36.31 -.14 +23.9
Mutual 32.28 -.22 +13.6
Realty 30.78 -.62 +5.2
Columbia
AcornZ 35.27 -.24 +17.3
DFA
EmMkCrEqI 18.93 -.10 -6.5
EmMktValI 27.34 -.17 -7.6
USLgValI 28.48 -.20 +25.3
DWS-Scudder
EnhEMFIS d 10.58 -.06 -5.1
HlthCareS d 33.53 -.02 +28.6
LAEqS d 28.35 -.37 -13.3
Davis
NYVentA m 39.31 -.18 +22.1
NYVentC m 37.73 -.18 +21.6
Dodge & Cox
Bal 90.85 -.16 +17.6
Income 13.54 -.03 -0.9
IntlStk 38.91 +.07 +12.3
Stock 150.32 -.24 +24.4
Dreyfus
TechGrA f 38.16 -.21 +10.6
Eaton Vance
HiIncOppA m 4.60 -.01 +4.5
HiIncOppB m 4.60 -.01 +3.9
NatlMuniA m 9.07 -.06 -9.3
NatlMuniB m 9.07 -.06 -9.7
PAMuniA m 8.71 -.02 -3.3
FPA
Cres d 31.82 +.01 +13.5
Fidelity
AstMgr20 13.36 -.04 +2.4
Bal 22.23 -.09 +11.0
BlChGrow 59.01 -.12 +20.3
Contra 89.72 -.22 +16.7
DivrIntl d 33.35 -.03 +11.4
ExpMulNat d 25.23 -.11 +15.3
Free2020 15.17 -.06 +6.7
Free2030 15.52 -.06 +9.3
GrowCo 111.88 -.18 +20.0
LatinAm d 39.02 -.50 -15.7
LowPriStk d 47.92 -.18 +21.3
Magellan 86.92 -.29 +19.2
Overseas d 36.24 -.09 +12.1
Puritan 21.29 -.08 +10.6
TotalBd 10.59 -.04 -1.8
Value 94.01 -.61 +23.1
Fidelity Advisor
ValStratT m 34.59 -.15 +17.5
Fidelity Select
Gold d 22.11 -.96 -40.2
Pharm d 18.19 +.01 +23.0
Fidelity Spartan
500IdxAdvtg 59.80 -.22 +19.6
500IdxInstl 59.80 -.23 +19.6
500IdxInv 59.79 -.23 +19.5
TotMktIdAg d 49.42 -.22 +20.2
First Eagle
GlbA m 53.14 -.28 +9.4
FrankTemp-Franklin
CA TF A m 6.98 -.03 -5.2
Income C m 2.37 -.02 +8.1
IncomeA m 2.35 -.01 +8.5
FrankTemp-Mutual
Discov Z 33.19 +.02 +15.9
Euro Z 24.03 +.20 +13.7
Shares Z 26.53 -.04 +18.0
FrankTemp-Templeton
GlBondA m 13.14 -.04 +0.3
GlBondAdv 13.09 -.04 +0.3
GrowthA m 22.59 +.07 +16.3
GMO
IntItVlIV 22.83 ... +9.9
Harbor
CapApInst 49.23 +.01 +15.8
IntlInstl 65.69 -.04 +5.7
INVESCO
ConstellB m 24.34 -.01 +14.7
GlobQuantvCoreA m13.37-.03+17.5
PacGrowB m 21.26 -.14 +4.8
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
52-WEEK YTD
HIGH LOW NAME TKR DIV LAST CHG %CHG
52-WEEK YTD
HIGH LOW NAME TKR DIV LAST CHG %CHG
Combined Stocks
AFLAC 60.90 +1.18 +14.6
AT&T Inc 35.40 -.41 +5.0
AbtLab s 36.45 -.23 +16.3
AMD 3.63 -.03 +51.3
AlaskaAir 61.16 -.84 +41.9
Alcoa 8.05 -.09 -7.3
Allstate 50.99 -1.09 +26.9
Altria 35.57 -.42 +13.1
AEP 46.38 -.72 +8.7
AmExp 75.36 +.95 +31.6
AmIntlGrp 45.96 -.64 +30.2
Amgen 106.60 -.02 +23.7
Anadarko 89.53 -1.62 +20.5
Annaly 11.72 -.29 -16.5
Apple Inc 440.51+21.52 -17.2
AutoData 72.22 -.27 +26.9
AveryD 43.93 -.69 +25.8
Avnet 37.54 +.58 +22.6
Avon 23.07 ... +60.7
BP PLC 43.44 -.11 +4.3
BakrHu 47.76 +.01 +16.9
BallardPw 2.04 -.08+233.9
BarnesNob 18.05 -.19 +19.6
Baxter 73.62 -.67 +10.4
Beam Inc 64.19 -.88 +5.1
BerkH B 116.46 -1.75 +29.8
BlockHR 30.63 -.33 +64.9
Boeing 106.95 -.84 +41.9
BrMySq 44.59 -.60 +38.3
Brunswick 33.10 ... +13.8
Buckeye 71.81 +.54 +58.1
CBS B 52.48 +.01 +37.9
CMS Eng 27.98 -.41 +14.8
CSX 24.94 -.33 +26.4
CampSp 46.41 -.92 +33.0
Carnival 36.92 +.20 +.4
Caterpillar 83.44 -2.08 -6.9
CenterPnt 24.45 -.33 +27.0
CntryLink 35.87 -.07 -8.3
Chevron 126.37 -.89 +16.9
Cisco 25.59 +.03 +30.2
Citigroup 52.19 -.69 +31.9
Clorox 85.12 -.48 +16.3
ColgPalm s 58.47 +.06 +11.9
ConAgra 36.73 -.21 +24.5
ConocoPhil 65.59 -.53 +13.1
ConEd 59.63 -.77 +7.4
Corning 15.14 +.12 +20.0
CrownHold 44.27 -.08 +20.3
Cummins 116.24 -1.43 +7.3
DTE 69.65 -1.19 +16.0
Deere 82.59 -1.31 -4.4
Diebold 33.16 -.21 +8.3
Disney 64.64 +.19 +29.8
DomRescs 58.85 -1.01 +13.6
Dover 85.22 -1.18 +29.7
DowChm 34.37 -.18 +6.3
DryShips 2.04 -.05 +27.5
DuPont 57.38 +.26 +27.6
DukeEngy 70.50 -.81 +10.5
EMC Cp 26.75 +1.42 +5.7
Eaton 68.08 -.87 +25.7
EdisonInt 49.25 -.45 +9.0
EmersonEl 60.00 -.23 +13.3
EnbrdgEPt 32.65 +.25 +17.0
Energen 56.29 -1.14 +24.8
Entergy 70.42 -1.91 +10.5
EntPrPt 63.65 +.05 +27.1
Ericsson 11.68 +.02 +15.6
Exelon 31.18 -.92 +4.8
ExxonMbl 94.99 -.21 +9.8
FMC Corp 63.55 +.58 +8.6
Fastenal 45.45 -.94 -2.6
FedExCp 105.88 -.91 +15.4
Fifth&Pac 23.80 +.63 +91.2
FirstEngy 38.24 -.93 -8.4
Fonar 5.81 -.15 +34.2
FootLockr 35.65 -.69 +11.0
FordM 17.37 +.43 +34.1
Gannett 26.15 +.20 +45.2
Gap 44.81 -.06 +44.4
GenCorp 17.31 +.42 +89.2
GenDynam 85.31 +1.28 +23.2
GenElec 24.62 -.09 +17.3
GenMills 51.06 -.40 +26.3
GileadSci s 59.88 +.76 +63.0
GlaxoSKln 51.66 +.20 +18.8
Hallibrtn 44.82 -.76 +29.2
HarleyD 55.86 -.10 +14.4
HartfdFn 31.21 -.36 +39.1
HawaiiEl 26.57 -.43 +5.7
HeclaM 3.19 -.12 -45.3
Heico 56.47 +.66 +26.2
Hess 72.63 -.80 +37.1
HewlettP 26.11 +.38 +83.2
HomeDp 80.27 +.08 +29.8
HonwllIntl 83.01 -.26 +30.8
Humana 91.57 +.98 +33.4
INTL FCSt 18.80 -.11 +8.0
ITW 71.41 -.19 +17.4
IngerRd 60.55 -.47 +26.3
IBM 196.61 +1.63 +2.6
IntPap 47.21 +.33 +18.5
JPMorgCh 56.63 -.04 +29.7
JacobsEng 59.39 -.09 +39.5
Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD
Stocks of Local Interest
101.03 76.78 AirProd APD 2.84 100.56 -.09 +19.7
43.72 35.50 AmWtrWks AWK 1.12 42.82 -.68 +15.3
50.45 37.63 Amerigas APU 3.36 46.37 -.17 +19.7
34.17 24.06 AquaAm WTR .76 33.15 -.85 +30.4
36.80 24.38 ArchDan ADM .76 36.07 -.49 +31.7
441.50 341.98 AutoZone AZO ... 436.35 -2.10 +23.1
15.03 6.90 BkofAm BAC .04 14.71 -.23 +26.7
32.36 20.13 BkNYMel BK .60 31.92 -.29 +24.2
22.68 6.22 BonTon BONT .20 19.58 -.58 +61.0
62.36 43.65 CVS Care CVS .90 61.66 -.23 +27.5
78.87 39.01 Cigna CI .04 78.11 -.05 +46.1
43.43 35.58 CocaCola s KO 1.12 40.86 -.10 +12.7
45.45 31.05 Comcast CMCSA .78 44.96 -.18 +20.3
33.63 25.50 CmtyBkSy CBU 1.08 33.27 -.16 +21.6
51.29 22.51 CmtyHlt CYH .25 43.08 -.34 +40.1
66.27 40.06 CoreMark CORE .76 64.09 -.71 +35.4
60.95 45.01 EmersonEl EMR 1.64 60.00 -.23 +13.3
65.40 40.34 EngyTEq ETE 2.58 63.19 +.19 +38.9
10.99 5.28 Entercom ETM ... 10.46 -.26 +49.9
15.75 11.14 FairchldS FCS ... 12.92 -.12 -10.3
5.15 3.59 FrontierCm FTR .40 4.28 +.03 0.0
21.30 14.82 Genpact G .18 20.97 +.14 +35.3
10.00 5.14 HarteHnk HHS .34 9.68 -.02 +64.1
93.81 68.09 Hershey HSY 1.68 92.87 -.72 +28.6
45.16 24.76 Lowes LOW .72 44.75 -.35 +26.0
119.54 83.42 M&T Bk MTB 2.80 118.43 -.27 +20.3
103.70 83.31 McDnlds MCD 3.08 96.66 -.10 +9.6
32.10 24.31 Mondelez MDLZ .52 30.80 -.28 +21.0
22.89 18.92 NBT Bcp NBTB .80 22.99 +.24 +13.4
39.75 6.22 NexstarB NXST .48 35.36 -.37 +233.9
77.65 53.36 PNC PNC 1.76 77.10 -.04 +32.2
33.55 27.74 PPL Corp PPL 1.47 31.16 -.45 +8.8
22.54 13.25 PennaRE PEI .72 21.47 +.66 +21.7
87.06 67.39 PepsiCo PEP 2.27 85.64 -.56 +25.1
96.73 82.10 PhilipMor PM 3.40 88.54 -.24 +5.9
82.54 63.25 ProctGam PG 2.41 80.27 -.68 +18.2
79.49 44.96 Prudentl PRU 1.60 78.40 -.53 +47.0
3.21 .95 RiteAid RAD ... 2.90 +.03 +113.2
26.17 15.13 SLM Cp SLM .60 24.56 -.23 +43.4
71.98 45.00 SLM pfB SLMBP 2.07 68.75 ... +29.7
52.96 40.08 TJX TJX .58 51.60 -.34 +21.6
42.11 29.72 UGI Corp UGI 1.13 41.18 -.55 +25.9
54.31 40.51 VerizonCm VZ 2.06 50.38 +.02 +16.4
79.96 67.37 WalMart WMT 1.88 78.23 -.32 +14.7
51.92 37.65 WeisMk WMK 1.20 49.78 -.61 +27.1
44.79 31.25 WellsFargo WFC 1.20 44.31 -.26 +29.6
USD per British Pound 1.5313 -.0075 -.49% 1.5790 1.5504
Canadian Dollar 1.0317 +.0036 +.35% 1.0030 1.0220
USD per Euro 1.3195 -.0037 -.28% 1.3371 1.2061
Japanese Yen 100.17 +.72 +.72% 89.96 78.18
Mexican Peso 12.6362 +.1410 +1.12% 12.6472 13.7154
6MO. 1YR.
CURRENCY CLOSE PVS. %CH. AGO AGO
Copper 3.18 3.20 -0.52 -13.18 -5.73
Gold 1319.70 1335.10 -1.15 -20.95 -17.93
Platinum 1455.20 1442.10 +0.91 -13.50 +4.31
Silver 20.01 20.25 -1.15 -36.85 -27.08
Palladium 744.40 738.55 +0.79 +2.54 +31.90
Foreign Exchange & Metals
JPMorgan
CoreBondSelect11.66 -.03 -2.1
John Hancock
LifBa1 b 14.65 ... +8.8
LifGr1 b 15.12 ... +12.2
RegBankA m 18.39 +.02 +29.5
SovInvA m 18.33 -.06 +15.0
TaxFBdA m 9.65 -.04 -5.9
Lazard
EmgMkEqtI d 18.35 -.12 -6.1
Loomis Sayles
BdInstl 15.12 -.06 +2.3
Lord Abbett
ShDurIncA m 4.57 ... +0.3
MFS
MAInvA m 25.48 -.03 +18.8
MAInvC m 24.57 -.03 +18.4
Merger
Merger b 16.03 -.02 +1.3
Metropolitan West
TotRetBdI 10.59 -.03 -1.0
TotRtBd b 10.59 -.03 -1.2
Mutual Series
Beacon Z 15.77 -.01 +18.0
Neuberger Berman
SmCpGrInv 24.10 -.03 +25.4
Oakmark
EqIncI 32.10 -.11 +12.6
Intl I 24.67 +.07 +17.9
Oppenheimer
CapApB m 47.93 -.15 +13.2
DevMktA m 35.06 -.18 -0.7
DevMktY 34.71 -.18 -0.5
PIMCO
AllAssetI 12.28 ... -0.9
AllAuthIn 10.40 ... -4.6
ComRlRStI 5.76 -.08 -12.2
HiYldIs 9.59 -.03 +2.8
LowDrIs 10.27 -.03 -1.1
TotRetA m 10.78 -.05 -2.9
TotRetAdm b 10.78 -.05 -2.8
TotRetC m 10.78 -.05 -3.3
TotRetIs 10.78 -.05 -2.7
TotRetrnD b 10.78 -.05 -2.8
TotlRetnP 10.78 -.05 -2.7
Permanent
Portfolio 46.55 -.39 -4.3
Principal
SAMConGrB m16.17 -.07 +12.3
Prudential
JenMCGrA m 35.93 -.22 +15.0
Prudential Investmen
2020FocA m 18.14 -.04 +17.1
BlendA m 21.92 -.08 +18.9
EqOppA m 19.17 -.14 +20.9
HiYieldA m 5.71 -.02 +3.7
IntlEqtyA m 6.88 -.02 +9.6
IntlValA m 21.56 -.03 +8.2
JennGrA m 24.14 ... +15.6
NaturResA m 46.04 -.89 +2.1
SmallCoA m 27.08 -.16 +20.8
UtilityA m 13.54 -.17 +16.0
ValueA m 19.12 -.10 +22.5
Putnam
GrowIncB m 17.82 -.11 +22.3
IncomeA m 7.07 -.02 -0.9
Royce
LowStkSer m 14.63 -.19 +5.7
OpportInv d 15.13 -.13 +26.6
ValPlSvc m 16.38 -.10 +18.4
Schwab
S&P500Sel d 26.52 -.10 +19.5
Scout
Interntl 35.23 -.09 +6.7
T Rowe Price
BlChpGr 54.00 -.23 +18.3
CapApprec 25.46 -.03 +14.4
DivGrow 31.12 -.14 +19.0
DivrSmCap d 21.65 -.11 +24.1
EmMktStk d 31.27 -.28 -8.2
EqIndex d 45.45 -.18 +19.4
EqtyInc 31.41 -.17 +19.8
FinSer 18.80 -.09 +25.8
GrowStk 44.17 -.18 +16.9
HealthSci 53.65 -.19 +30.2
HiYield d 7.11 -.01 +5.5
IntlDisc d 51.25 -.15 +11.2
IntlStk d 15.11 -.05 +4.9
IntlStkAd m 15.03 -.06 +4.7
LatinAm d 31.93 -.52 -16.1
MediaTele 63.61 -.11 +19.3
MidCpGr 68.40 -.35 +21.1
NewAmGro 41.83 -.13 +16.5
NewAsia d 16.23 -.03 -3.5
NewEra 44.53 -.56 +6.3
NewHoriz 42.31 -.21 +27.6
NewIncome 9.44 -.04 -2.7
Rtmt2020 19.56 -.09 +9.4
Rtmt2030 21.18 -.10 +11.9
ShTmBond 4.79 -.01 -0.3
SmCpVal d 46.49 -.37 +18.7
TaxFHiYld d 11.02 -.05 -5.4
Value 32.79 -.18 +24.3
ValueAd b 32.42 -.18 +24.1
Thornburg
IntlValI d 29.81 -.01 +7.2
Tweedy, Browne
GlobVal d 25.97 +.07 +11.7
Vanguard
500Adml 155.56 -.59 +19.6
500Inv 155.55 -.59 +19.5
CapOp 42.85 +.02 +27.5
CapVal 14.26 -.11 +28.6
Convrt 14.14 -.01 +12.8
DevMktIdx 10.72 -.03 +9.9
DivGr 19.81 -.05 +20.2
EnergyInv 64.47 -.66 +9.1
EurIdxAdm 64.43 +.05 +9.0
Explr 99.79 -.52 +25.6
GNMA 10.43 -.04 -3.1
GNMAAdml 10.43 -.04 -3.1
GlbEq 21.33 -.07 +14.2
GrowthEq 14.37 -.01 +17.0
HYCor 6.03 -.02 +2.0
HYCorAdml 6.03 -.02 +2.0
HltCrAdml 75.00 -.09 +27.2
HlthCare 177.75 -.21 +27.2
ITGradeAd 9.83 -.04 -2.2
InfPrtAdm 26.34 -.21 -7.2
InflaPro 13.42 -.10 -7.2
InstIdxI 154.53 -.59 +19.6
InstPlus 154.54 -.59 +19.6
InstTStPl 38.46 -.16 +20.2
IntlExpIn 16.82 -.05 +14.3
IntlStkIdxAdm 25.98 -.10 +5.4
IntlStkIdxIPls 103.89 -.43 +5.4
LTInvGr 9.89 -.09 -6.1
MidCapGr 24.49 -.10 +20.2
MidCp 27.19 -.18 +21.0
MidCpAdml 123.44 -.84 +21.1
MidCpIst 27.27 -.18 +21.1
MuIntAdml 13.67 -.04 -3.3
MuLtdAdml 11.01 ... -0.3
PrecMtls 11.10 -.14 -30.4
Prmcp 85.26 -.13 +22.7
PrmcpAdml 88.48 -.13 +22.8
PrmcpCorI 18.21 -.02 +22.0
REITIdx 23.58 -.50 +9.7
REITIdxAd 100.63 -2.12 +9.8
STCor 10.69 -.01 -0.1
STGradeAd 10.69 -.01 -0.1
SelValu 26.09 -.04 +24.4
SmGthIdx 30.67 -.31 +22.5
SmGthIst 30.74 -.31 +22.6
StSmCpEq 27.19 -.12 +25.2
Star 22.54 -.08 +9.1
StratgcEq 26.60 -.16 +24.0
TgtRe2015 14.32 -.05 +7.0
TgtRe2020 25.90 -.10 +8.7
TgtRe2030 26.05 -.11 +11.4
TgtRe2035 15.89 -.07 +12.8
TgtRe2040 26.33 -.12 +13.6
TgtRe2045 16.53 -.07 +13.6
Tgtet2025 14.95 -.07 +10.0
TotBdAdml 10.67 -.03 -2.3
TotBdInst 10.67 -.03 -2.3
TotBdMkSig 10.67 -.03 -2.3
TotIntl 15.53 -.07 +5.3
TotStIAdm 42.44 -.18 +20.2
TotStIIns 42.44 -.19 +20.1
TotStIdx 42.42 -.19 +20.1
TxMIntlAdm 12.16 -.03 +10.1
TxMSCAdm 38.56 -.28 +23.8
USGro 24.78 -.10 +16.6
USValue 14.64 -.08 +23.4
WellsI 25.04 -.11 +5.4
WellsIAdm 60.67 -.25 +5.5
Welltn 37.67 -.11 +12.7
WelltnAdm 65.06 -.19 +12.8
WndsIIAdm 62.20 -.26 +20.6
WndsrII 35.05 -.15 +20.5
Wells Fargo
DvrCpBldA f 7.93 -.06 +14.0
DOW
15,542.24
-25.50
NASDAQ
3,579.60
+.33
S&P 500
1,685.94
-6.45
RUSSELL 2000
1,043.83
-8.37
6-MO T-BILLS
.07%
...
10-YR T-NOTE
2.59%
+.08
CRUDE OIL
$105.39
-1.84
q q n n q q q q
p p q q q q p p
NATURAL GAS
$3.70
-.04
6MO. 1YR.
METALS CLOSE PVS. %CH. AGO AGO
STEVE MOCARSKY
smocarsky@timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE Times
Leader Executive Editor Joe
Butkiewicz, a journalist with
the newspaper for the past
three decades, announced his
resignation on Wednesday.
The company is changing,
going in a direction with pro-
duction and it doesnt t my
style, Butkiewicz, 55, said in
an interview after informing
newsroom staffers at an emo-
tional meeting.
Butkiewicz penned a July 7
column explaining a change
in the newspapers appear-
ance resulting from The Times
Leader and its associated com-
munity papers moving the lay-
out and assembly of pages to a
pagination hub in Miamisburg,
Ohio.
Butkiewicz said pagination
hubs have been successful for
other newspaper chains, and
he thinks it can succeed here
with the right resources. But
for him, its not a good t.
And, I think for it to succeed,
I think I need to step out of the
way and let it go the way the
company wants to go. Its hard
because I love so many aspects
of it. But I do think that in my
old-fashioned way, Im in the
way of progress, Butkiewicz
said.
Walt T. Lafferty, regional
business development director
and general manager for The
Times Leader, said Butkiewicz
will remain on as executive edi-
tor until Labor Day. Lafferty
will begin the process of nd-
ing a replacement.
Joe has been the face of
this newsroom for many years
and has led The Times Leader
through many challenges and
successes, and we will be for-
ever grateful for that leader-
ship. As Joe navigates the next
challenge in his career, I would
like to extend best wishes and
nothing but success and happi-
ness, Lafferty said.
A Kingston native,
Butkiewicz graduated from
Bishop OReilly High School,
attended Luzerne County
Community College and gradu-
ated from New York University
with a degree in lmand televi-
sion. After living in New York
after college, he returned to
the Wyoming Valley.
Times Leader editor Butkiewicz to leave post
PAGE 8B Thursday, July 25, 2013 BUSINESS www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER
ROGER DUPUIS
rdupuis@civitasmedia.com
Citing their value to the
states economy, U.S. Sen. Bob
Casey has co-sponsored a bill
that would allow short-line
railroads to take a tax deduc-
tion of up to 50 percent on
track improvements and other
infrastructure work.
Casey said the legislation
could affect a number of short
lines across the state, includ-
ing the Reading & Northern
Railroad, which serves parts
of Luzerne County.
Short lines are regional or
local carriers that connect
freight shippers and custom-
ers with larger railroads. Their
work saves the government
millions of dollars in highway
costs, Casey said.
Short-line railroads
help businesses across
Pennsylvania move their
goods, Casey said. Renewing
this tax credit will allow rail-
road companies to upgrade
their infrastructure so that
rail continues to have a role in
boosting the Commonwealths
economy.
The Short line Railroad
Rehabilitation and Investment
Act of 2013 would extend
a previous tax credit that is
expected to expire on Dec.
31, 2013. The tax credit act
originated with the American
Jobs Creation Act of 2004 and
already has been extended
once.
The extension would run
through 2016, and would
allow new short-line
railroads that were
constructed after
2004 to be included
in the tax incentive.
A tax credit will
be given for 50 cents
of every dollar that
a customer or sup-
plier spends on
rail improvements,
allowing small rail-
road companies to
deduct up to 50 per-
cent of investments
made in track repair
and other qualifying
investments.
Port Clinton-based
Reading & Northern
operates freight ser-
vices in seven east-
ern Pennsylvania
counties, with
its main line and
branch lines serv-
ing Luzerne County.
R&N is a major pres-
ence in the Pittston
and Dupont areas,
where it has connec-
tions and a fracking
sand terminal.
Reading &
Northern is very
appreciative of Sen. Casey
support for this important
tax credit. Every year RBMN
spends millions of dollars to
maintain and upgrade its 320
miles of railroad in order to
provide high-quality service
to our dozens of customers,
President Wayne Michel said
Wednesday.
We totally support Sen.
Caseys efforts in support-
ing this bill. It has allowed
our regional rail system to
grow from 580 (freight) cars
in 1985 to over 7,000 cur-
rently, said Larry Malski,
president of the Scranton-
based Pennsylvania Northeast
Regional Railroad Authority, a
100-mile network of regional
rails around Lackawanna and
Monroe counties.
Sen. Casey: Pro-railroad bill would aid short lines
DAVID A. LIEB
Associated Press
As the once-proud city of
Detroit humbles itself in bank-
ruptcy court, its nancial future
might hinge on this key ques-
tion: Is the city obliged to its
past? Or can Detroit renege on
its promises to thousands of
retirees for the sake of its pres-
ent city services?
The legal question at the heart
of Detroits bankruptcy ling has
never denitively been answered
by the nations highest courts.
But it could become increasingly
important as cities from coast to
coast are grappling with short-
falls in pension funds that left
unchecked could force cutbacks
to police, reghters and other
essential city services.
On Wednesday, the federal
judge overseeing Detroits bank-
ruptcy ruled that city employees
could not go to state courts to
keep their pensions out of the
bankruptcy case. Bankruptcy
Judge Steven Rhodes said he
would hear the pensioners argu-
ments in his court.
Some cities, such as Detroit,
are located in states where pen-
sion benets are guaranteed in
full according to state constitu-
tions, statutes or court prec-
edent. Yet Detroits emergency
manager is asserting that those
guarantees go away in federal
bankruptcy court, leaving retir-
ees in the same pool as numer-
ous other creditors who might
get mere cents for each dollar
they are owed.
Theres not a lot of previ-
ous case law that tells us whats
going to happen here, said Paul
Secunda, a Marquette University
law professor who specializes in
labor and benets issues.
Its not just an issue of
bankruptcy law and pension
law, its also an issue of federal-
ism, Secunda said. Can a fed-
eral bankruptcy court basically
ignore a state constitutional
provision and allow a city like
Detroit to ignore its previous
promises concerning public
employee pensions?
The question matters because
pensions pose a major liabil-
ity for states, counties, cities,
schools and other local gov-
ernmental entities. A report
released earlier this year by the
Pew Charitable Trusts found
that the nations largest cities
had a combined pension short-
fall of almost $100 billion and
an even larger shortfall in retir-
ee health-care benets as the
nations nancial crisis peaked
in the 2009 scal year.
Although municipal nances
generally have improved since
then, many local retirement
plans remain on an unsustain-
able path, the Pew organization
said.
Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder
and Detroit emergency manager
Kevyn Orr contend that retiree
benets should be able to be
trimmed along with other debts
to restore the citys nances.
Detroit has about 21,000 retired
workers who are owed benets,
with underfunded obligations of
about $3.5 billion for pensions
and $5.7 billion for retiree health
coverage.
There have to be conces-
sions, Orr said earlier this
week. A similar situation is
unfolding in Stockton, Calif.,
which entered bankruptcy in
April after its property tax rev-
enues were hit hard by the hous-
ing crisis. Stockton owes the
California Public Employees
Retirement System about $900
million to cover pension promis-
es, by far the citys largest nan-
cial obligation. The city already
has tried to save costs elsewhere
by slashing employment, cutting
health benets for current work-
ers and limiting its police force
to responding only to emergen-
cies in progress.
Bondinsurerscontendpension
cuts should be part of Stocktons
debt reduction plan to be sub-
mitted to a bankruptcy judge
in September. Attorneys for the
creditors argue employees who
beneted when economic times
were good should have to share
the pain now that times are bad.
But union representa-
tives contend retiree benets
already have been earned and
shouldnt be part of the dis-
cussion in bankruptcy court.
Its essentially similar to sal-
ary you just dont reach inside
somebodys savings account and
take their pay back, nor should
you reach inside their pension
and deny them their pension
benets, said Steve Kreisberg,
director of collective bargaining
and pensions for the American
Federation of State, County and
Municipal Employees.
Detroits bankruptcy case to test strength of state pension planguarantees
AP Photo
Firefighters protest Wednesday outside the Theodore Levin United States
Courthouse in Detroit. The citys bankruptcy is hitting a courtroom for the
first time as a judge considers what to do with challenges from retirees.
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www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER Thursday, July 25, 2013 PAGE 1C
LIFE
The boy-band bandwagon
KRISTINTILLOTSON
Star Tribune (Minneapolis)
MINNEAPOLIS When One Direction rolls into
town, the collective sighs of Midwest tween and
teen girls will pack enough oomph to inate several
Metrodomes. The British quintet of uffy, sugar-dust-
ed pastries with adorable haircuts are better known as
Harry, Niall, Louis, Zayn and Liam to their fans, most
of whom would just fall down and die literally, die
if the objects of their extremely intense affection
sidled up next to them and said Hallo.
They wouldnt expect their mothers, or even anyone
over 15, to understand why 1D (thats fan shorthand)
are simply the best, the cutest, the sweetest, the most
talented singing group ever born.
Sorry, girls, but this particular phenoms not new.
Your mom, and maybe even your granny, went through
her own version of the contained hysteria gripping
your heart at the moment. Its been cycling around
every several years since Beatlemania rst hit the tar-
mac in 1964.
For proof, you need only check out New Kids on
the Block, swinging through on another reunion tour.
They might be too long in the tooth and thin on the top
for todays 12-year-olds to crush on, but about 25 years
ago, they attracted as many high-decibel squeals and
fevered mash notes as 1D does now (though in 1Ds
case, its tweets and posts).
Whether they form organically or are manu-
factured in a pop-cultural petri dish, boy bands
serve a very important purpose in the lives of
girls of a certain age. Hint: Its not making music.
Behold, a phenomenon in which some things never change
Hype not tearing up the hearts of local fans
Bands of the80s and90s still top the
charts compared to todays hitmakers
CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES
chughes@timesleader.com
The children of the 1980s and 1990s say they
recognize the hype associated with boy bands
like the fresh-faced members of One Direction.
They know it because theyve lived through
it.
The hype they survived as part of the legions
of fans supporting New Kids on the Block,
the Backstreet Boys, NSYNC and even The
Monkees and The Beatles seems to hit a new
cycle every few years.
The hype now is not nearly as big as it was
in the late 80s and early 90s for NKOTB,
Scranton resident Carrie Ferrone said. The
bands ability to continue to play to fans and
include their 90s counterparts shows their
staying power.
Die-hard BSB fan Kristina Oakley, of Jessup,
said she was always a little more protective
over the photos and articles about her favorite
boy band than others may have been.
I was such a crazy fan that I wouldnt put
their posters and pictures from the magazines
up on the walls, she said. They were put in
binders with plastic covers around them so
they didnt get messed up.
Other fans were all about the merchandise
from the Joey McIntyre doll Scranton resi-
dent Stephanie Longo owned to the New Kids
sheets and pillowcases that covered Keystone
College graduate and Staten Island, N.Y. resi-
dent Nicole Thompsons bed.
For some, fandom knows know end.
Clarks Green resident Katherine Franchino
Jenkins said she has always been, and always
will be, a loyal BSB fan, and Dunmore resi-
dent Aubrie Hugenbruch Collins recalls her
membership in the NKOTB fan club.
Hanson fan Holly Gibbs of Nicholson said
shes still an active member of the MMMBop
makers fan club since 1997. Shes seen the
group in concert more than 50 times and has
met them on several occasions.
No matter the generation, it seems boy
bands wont quit playing games with girls
hearts.
Dont call them One Direction. Use 1D if you dont want to date yourself.
WORDPRESS.COM
Howto recover from
fve classic faux pas
Case Scenario Survival
Handbook: Dating &
Sex. If youve loudly
expressed your dis-
dain for stamp collect-
ing, which turns out to
be your gracious hosts
favorite hobby, you might
say, Well, thats just my
opinion. Tell me what you
nd so interesting about
stamp collecting. Or you
could try humor: Im
sorry. That was a stupid
thing to say. My father
was killed by a stamp
collector. I obviously
have a lot of issues.
Great expectations:
Advice for the worlds
most-anticipated royal baby
GEORGEA KOVANIS
Detroit Free Press
Theres a lot of love out there for
William and Kates new addition. The
world and those who shop it is
welcoming the new heir who is third
in line to the British throne with every-
thing from limited-edition cheese and
onesies to commemorative biscuits and
mugs. But being a member of the royal
family isnt easy. Make a false move, put
your foot in your mouth or in some-
one elses, as one royal did and youll
end up as tabloid fodder for the entire
world. Have the misfortune of being
snapped in the nude by a rogue photog-
rapher and you could become the butt
of jokes. Do something ridiculous and
you may get pinned with an unatter-
ing nickname. Which is why, baby royal,
its best to learn from the royal familys
good works and stupid mistakes. Heres
some advice:
DO: follow your familys example of
service. Your parents and Uncle Harry
(Prince Henry of Wales) are patrons
of their own charity The Royal
Foundation of The Duke and Duchess of
Cambridge and Prince Harry which
focuses on the welfare of children, mem-
bers and veterans of the armed forces
and conservation. Your paternal grand-
mother, Diana, the former Princess of
Wales, sold her stunning dresses at auc-
tion and donated the proceeds to char-
ity.
DONT: forget as your naked par-
tying uncle, Prince Harry, did that
what happens in Vegas doesnt neces-
sarily stay in Vegas. The family was not
amused when Harry went to Las Vegas
last year and photos of him covering his
family jewels with just his hand showed
up in newspapers.
DO: realize, in fact, that if you take
off your clothes someone will photo-
graph you. Your mother and your grand-
mother, Diana, were both snapped by
photographers while sunbathing topless
on vacation. Your grandfather, Charles,
Prince of Wales, was naked when he
was photographed looking out a win-
dow of a so-called private retreat. Your
great grandfather, Prince Philip, Duke
of Edinburgh, was accused of ashing
an audience last year at the Gathering
for the Highland Games in Scotland.
Photos showed he apparently failed to
wear underwear beneath his kilt.
DONT: let anyone suck your toes
in public especially if, like your
Aunt Sarah (Ferguson), Duchess of
York, you are half-naked. The inci-
dent ended her marriage to your great
uncle, Prince Andrew, Duke of York.
See FAUX | 2C
See BAND | 2C
See BABY |2C
NARA SCHOENBERG
Chicago Tribune
It was the rst week
of my rst job, and one
of my co-workers was
showing me around the
building.
My boss was the nic-
est guy ever, my new co-
worker told me, and the
books he edited liter-
ary ction, music-relat-
ed nonction were
amazing. I was nervous
and a bit embarrassed
by the strong implica-
tion that my job was bet-
ter than my co-workers,
and I went with the rst
boss-effacing statement
that popped into my
head: Well, at least he
doesnt do cookbooks.
A brief silence ush-
ered in my co-workers
chilly reply.
Um, actually, my boss
does cookbooks, she
said.
Oops.
We hear a lot about
high-concept faux pas,
such as actress Jennifer
Lawrences stumble at
the Oscars, but the truth
of the matter is that most
of our social suffering
arises from smaller set-
backs. We inadvertently
insult someone, spill a
beverage on a date, for-
get a persons name at a
social function, pass gas
during a lull in the con-
versation or tell a joke
that falls at.
And then, we wonder,
what on earth do I do
now?
Experts advise apolo-
gizing where appropri-
ate, maintaining your
sense of humor and
moving on fairly quickly.
Dont take yourself
so seriously that you
derail the conversa-
tion, not with your
ub, but actually with
your response to your
own mistake, says
Jessica Hagy, author of
How to Be Interesting
(In 10 Simple Steps)
(Workman).
It also may be helpful
to remember that your
faux pas likely looms
larger in your mind than
in anyone elses.
Theres something
called the spotlight
effect people think
that theyre in the spot-
light but everyone
thinks theyre in the
spotlight, says Rodolfo
Mendoza-Denton, an
associate professor
of psychology at the
University of California
at Berkeley.
So in the eyes of other
people, ones actions
arent being analyzed as
carefully as one thinks,
he adds. I nd that to
be a great relief. When I
put my foot in my mouth
or I trip on the street,
people notice, but then
they kind of move on.
And now for specic
solutions to ve of lifes
stickiest social scenari-
os:
Youve inadvertently
insulted someone:
Essentially, you want
to keep calm, acknowl-
edge the mistake and
change the subject,
says David Borgenicht,
co-author of The
Worst Case Scenario
series of books and its
newest, The Worst-
O
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PAGE 2C Thursday, July 25, 2013 COMMUNITY NEWS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
Baby
From page 1A
Band
From page 1A
Faux
From page 1A
(Im thinking I might
have addressed my unfor-
tunate cookbook comment
in the same style, saying,
Im sorry. This is my rst
week, and Im really ner-
vous, before moving on
with How long have your
worked here? or Do you
like to cook?)
Youve spilled a bever-
age on someone:
Apologize, offer to pay for
any dry-cleaning bills and
help clean up where appro-
priate, Borgenicht says.
If youre on a date and its
going well, congratulations!
Youre going to be forgiven.
If youre on a date and it isnt
going well, congratulations!
You just provided yourself
with a convenient excuse to
cut the night short.
Whatever you do, dont
panic and jump around
excitedly as you try to
obtain cleaning materials.
You want to minimize an
embarrassing incident, not
draw attention to it.
You cant remember a
name at a party:
If youre called upon to
introduce two people and
the name of one of those
people escapes you, use
the name you do know,
Borgenicht advises. Tell the
mystery person, I really
want you to meet Jenny.
Let them shake hands and
wait for the mystery per-
son to say his name, or for
Jenny to ask for his name. If
youre alone at a party with
someone whose name you
dont recall, you can wait it
out and hope your memory
improves, or you can look
for someone to introduce
you to the mystery person.
You snort, burp or
pass gas:
Were human and these
things happen, Hagy says.
Theres no real reason to
comment, unless someone
else does. It may help to
remember that this isnt
fourth grade, when he who
denied it supplied it passes
for clever conversation.
I think for the most part,
the more polite the compa-
ny is, the less this will come
up as an actual issue, Hagy
says.
Your joke falls at:
This happens to every-
one, including top come-
dians. Borgenicht recom-
mends acknowledging the
silence, maybe with a one-
liner: Thanks, everyone! Ill
be here all week! and then
moving on to another topic.
Whatever you do, he says,
dont try to repair the dam-
age by telling another joke.
DO: follow in the foot-
steps of your mother,
Catherine, Duchess of
Cambridge (a.k.a. Kate
Middleton), and grand-
mother, Princess Diana,
and pay attention to fash-
ion. The world is going to
talk about you, they may as
well be talking about how
great you look. And please
tell the men in your family
that double-breasted suits
look dorky.
DONT: ever make fun
of Queen Elizabeths clunky
purses. Theyre wacky, but
shes the boss lady.
DO: realize you will
probably be tall. Your father
is 6-feet-3, your mom 5-feet-
10.
DONT: upstage your
sibling at his or her own
wedding. (Yes, Aunt Pippa,
were talking about you
and that fabulous dress
you wore to the wedding
of your sister and Prince
William. )
DO: have adven-
tures. Prince Harry, for
example, was recently
named Apache Helicopter
Commander for the British
Army. Also, hes served a
tour in Afghanistan. Your
father and your great uncle
(Andrew) are pilots, too.
DONT: forget your
phones might be tapped.
Thats how the world dis-
covered the sordid details
of the relationship between
Prince Charles and his
then-mistress, Camilla
Parker Bowles.
DO: realize that its
a very small world out
there. The ex-husband
(Andrew Parker Bowles)
of Prince Charles current
wife, Camilla, Duchess of
Cornwall, used to date your
great Aunt Anne, Princess
Royal. Prince Charles used to
datethesister of your deceased
grandmother (Diana).
DONT: develop a repu-
tation as a spendthrift like
Prince Andrew, who has
been dubbed Air Miles
Andy due to his fondness
for taking helicopters dis-
tances he could easily drive.
DO: realize that people
will make comparisons
between you and Princess
Diana because you share
the same sign of the zodiac.
Traditional Cancer traits:
emotional and loving;
intuitive and imaginative;
shrewd and cautious; pro-
tective and sympathetic;
changeable and moody,
overemotional and touchy,
clinging and unable to let
go.
DONT: court contro-
versy. Learn from the many
errors in judgment made by
Prince Andrew. According
to published reports, in
recent years he allowed
a convicted pedophile to
pay off the debts of his
ex-wife (Sarah Ferguson)
and allowed a convicted
Libyan gun smuggler to
pay for a four-day holiday
in Tunisia. Funny, at one
point, dating a porn star
was Andrews biggest prob-
lem. Meanwhile, Sarah
Ferguson offered an under-
cover journalist access to
Andrew in exchange for
money. And Andrew lost
his job as a trade envoy.
DO: expect to be sur-
rounded by horses. Your
Aunt Anne, and her daugh-
ter, Zara Philips, both com-
peted in equestrian events
in the Olympics. Your
father, Prince Charles and
Uncle Harry all play polo.
DONT: be surprised if
your family is rattled by the
new movie, Diana, which
stars Naomi Watts as your
grandmother and opens in
London on Sept. 5. Diana,
adored by the public, is a
sensitive subject.
DO: make sure to always
wear a seat belt. Princess
Diana wasnt wearing one
when she died.
DONT: date jerks.
Diana had an affair with
James Hewitt, a cavalry
ofcer, who tried to sell her
love letters after her death.
DO: be charming. If you
need lessons, take them
from Prince Harry, who,
despite his occasional
lapses in judgment (Las
Vegas), is very well-liked
and known for his ability to
talk to everyone and make
everyone feel comfortable.
DONT: forget that peo-
ple loved Diana because
she cared about children,
people who were sick, peo-
ple who were injured by
landmines and those less
fortunate than your family
members.
DO: remember to marry
for the right reasons.
Charles and Diana married
for the wrong reasons and
in doing so harmed the
lives of several people.
Hint: Its not making
music.
From the Monkees to
Menudo, the Jackson 5
to the Jonas Brothers,
the Bay City Rollers to
the Backstreet Boys, boy
bands are who you and
your friends practice
your fantasies on in order
to prepare for real-life
interaction. Theyre the
transition between imagi-
nary friends of your child-
hood and actual boys you
know and might, like, go
out with someday. And
though musical styles
may evolve, the essen-
tial ingredients to a suc-
cessful boy band never
change.
1. The more, the
merrier. Justin Bieber
has his beliebers, as did
early-1970s dreamboat
David Cassidy and other
pretty-boy solo pop stars
targeted at tweens and
teens, but a whole group
gives a pack of girlfriends
more options, so theyre
not competing with their
BFFs over the same star.
With 1D, Liam is the
smart one, Harry the
irty one, Niall the cute
one. How its determined
that any one of these be-
gelled cherubs is more
attractive than the oth-
ers is a matter of ercely
friendly debate. You like
Harry, Ill take Niall. We
dont have time for con-
ict because we have to
tweet about them for the
29th time today.
2. Baby-faced is bet-
ter. Soulfully blue-eyed
Niall Horan and Harry
Styles, whose neck seems
ready to snap from the
weight of his gorgeous
brunet moptop, are the
most popular members
of One Direction. Same
thing happened with
Paul McCartney of the
Beatles, Davy Jones of the
Monkees, Donny Osmond
of the Osmonds and Ricky
Martin of Menudo. Why?
They all have (or had)
faces that are at most gen-
der-neutral, some of them
downright girlish, and
they sing tenor, or even
falsetto.
Boy bands are about as
sexually suggestive as a
teddy bear, and thus just
as non-threatening, safe-
ly dreamy objects upon
which to hurl unbridled
and unconsummated
affection. No 11-year-
old wants to daydream
about some bearded,
cursing, pelvis-thrusting
rocker and her parents
want that even less.
The members of 1D
are all under 21, making
them legit boys, but most
boy-band idols are a bit
older, so they have to look
to Peter Pan for grooming
tips to avoid alienating
their target market with
gross man stuff like too
much hair anywhere but
on top. Thats why most
are clean-shaven and keep
the number of scary tat-
toos to a minimum. For
girls this age, nice beats
nasty any day.
3. Singin my life with
his words. Fans will bris-
tle at the mere suggestion
that their crushes might
not be the most musi-
cally original or talented
pop stars to sell out an
arena, but talent takes
a back seat to personali-
ties and lyrics. The suc-
cessful boy bands songs
must be easy for anyone
with braces and a pink
diary to personalize. One
Directions biggest hit to
date, What Makes You
Beautiful, is brilliant for
the way it taps into the
psyche of adolescence
with all its insecurities
and vanities. Ditto for
Please Dont Go Girl,
the 1988 NKOTB ballad,
sung high and plaintively
by then-bundle-of-squee
Joey McIntyre (still
pretty darn cute, at 40).
Theres nothing a young
girl dipping a toe into the
rejection-fraught world of
romance nds more reas-
suring than being begged
by a guy to stay forever
and ever.
4. Gotta have a guru.
Of marketing, that is.
One Direction is the cre-
ation of TV talent-contest
impresario Simon Cowell,
who knows a thing or two
about promotion. In the
1990s, Lou Pearlman was
the mastermind behind
both the Backstreet Boys
and N Sync (in 2008, he
was convicted of a far-
reaching nancial scam).
As far back as 1966, the
Monkees were pre-mold-
ed as Americas answer to
the Beatles on a week-
ly TV show, no less.
Boy bands are pack-
aged as a product to be
gobbled like candy, by
proteers engaged in the
pop-music equivalent of
the smash-and-grab, cash-
ing in before their stars
ve oclock shadow gets
too dark.
While the formula still
stands, one very signi-
cant modern twist affects
both the perception and
marketing of todays boy
bands. In the old days, the
only outlets were Tiger
Beat, 16 and a couple
of other fan mags from
which to tear out a poster
or six. Now YouTube and
social media, plus a jug-
gernaut of tie-in merchan-
dise, have made nearly
instant, worldwide adora-
tion possible, with One
Directions more than 6
million Twitter followers
as Exhibit A. The down-
side: Internet saturation
can shorten shelf lives.
Maybe thats why One
Directions 1D World
pop-up store at Mall of
America was shrewdly
open for only six weeks
last spring.
Wyoming Valley West High School Student Council raised $350 in support of
the Wyoming Valley Childrens Associations Do It For the Kids walk-a-thon.
The proceeds from the walk support children with developmental disabilities
ages birth to ve. Members of Student Council assisted with set up, games,
trafc control and tear down. Participants, from left, rst row: Julia Mericle;
Christina Sickler, adviser; and Jackson Williams. Second row: P.J. Ender,
Elizabeth Wood, Bethany Lindsey, Emily Urbanovitch, Kiersten Wiedwald,
Laura Thompson and Tyler Wozniak.
Student Council supports childrens association
Service is our salesman
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Dr. Jason Nataupsky welcomes all newpatients and their families. Most insurances are accepted.
To experience a newlevel of conservative, compassionate dental care, please call (570) 331-8100.
Dr. Gary M. Nataupsky is proud and excited to welcome Dr. Jason G.
Nataupsky to his dental practice in Kingston, PA. Dr. Jason Nataupsky is
a graduate of Wyoming Seminary. He received his bachelor of science
degree from the University of Hartford in Hartford, CT and then received
his doctorate in dental medicine from the Kornberg School of Dentistry at
Temple University in Philadelphia, PA. He went on to complete a one-year
residency in advanced general dentistry at the Virtua Hospital System in
southern New Jersey.
Dr. Jason Nataupsky represents the third generation of dentists in his family.
His enthusiasm for dentistry was inspired by his maternal grandfather, Dr.
Daniel Gordon, and his father, Dr. Gary M. Nataupsky . Dr. Jason brings to
the practice his extensive knowledge in all phases of dentistry including
restorative dentistry, childrens dentistry, cosmetic care, implants,
endodontics (root canals), non-surgical periodontic treatment for gum
disease, Invisalign orthodontics and laser dentistry.
We Welcome Dr. Jason G. Nataupsky
Dr. Gary Nataupsky
Riverside Commons, 575 Pierce St. Suite 201 Kingston PA
570-331-8100 www.drnataupsky.com
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www.timesleader.com THETIMES LEADER COMMUNITY NEWS Thursday, July 25, 2013 PAGE 3C
Photographs andinforma-
tionmust bereceivedtwo
full weeksbeforeyour childs
birthday.
Your informationmust be
typed or computer-generat-
ed. Includeyour nameandyour
relationshiptothechild(parent,
grandparent or legal guardians
only, please), your childs name,
ageandbirthday, parents,
grandparents andgreat-
grandparents names andtheir
towns of residence, anysiblings
andtheir ages. Dont forget to
include a daytime contact
phone number. Without one,
wemaybeunabletopublish
abirthdayannouncement on
time.
Wecannot guaranteereturnof
birthdayor occasions photos
anddonot returncommunity-
news or publicityphotos. Please
donot submit precious or origi-
nal professional photographs
that requirereturnbecause
suchphotos canbecomedam-
aged, or occasionallylost, inthe
productionprocess.
Email your birthdayannounce-
ment topeople@timesleader.
comor sendit to: Times Leader
Birthdays, 15NorthMainSt.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA18711-0250.
Youalsomayusetheform
under thePeopletabonwww.
timesleader.com.
Childrens birthdays (ages 1-16) will be published free of charge
GUIDELINES
HAPPYBIRTHDAY!
Parker Mosley
Parker Mosley, son of Tom
and Bonnie Mosley, Bear
Creek, is celebrating his
eighth birthday today, July
25. Parker is a grandson
of Barbara and Casimer
Rynkiewicz, Plymouth; Jane
and Fred Bettica, Drums;
and the late Thomas Mosley,
Bear Creek.
Aidan E. Davies
Aidan Everett Davies,
son of Jonathan and
Shannon Davies, Wilkes-
Barre, is celebrating his
sixth birthday today, July
25. Aidan is a grandson
of Joseph and Patricia
Shumoski and David
and Della Davies, all of
Wilkes-Barre. He is a great-
grandson of Florence Jones,
Wilkes-Barre; the late Elmer
Jones; the late Joseph and
Mary Ann Shumoski; the late
John and Belle Conahan;
and the late Williamand Ann
Davies. Aidan has a sister,
Ireland, 13.
Bethany Santey
Bethany Santey, daughter
of Frank and Robin Santey,
Hanover Township, is
celebrating her third
birthday today, July 25.
Bethany is a granddaughter
of Frank and Judy Santey,
Sugar Notch; Richard
Achuf, Wilkes-Barre; and
the late Beverly Achuf. She
has two sisters, Samantha,
22, and Hannah, 8, and
four brothers, Joshua, 21,
Zachari, 19, Raymond, 14,
and Matthew, 11.
Kaitlyn M. Kundla
Kaitlyn Madison Kundla,
daughter of Michael and
Kelly Kundla, Moosic, is
celebrating her seventh
birthday today, July 25.
Kaitlyn is a granddaughter
of Judy Kizewich, Pittston;
Jack Kizewich, West
Pittston; David Kundla, Port
Grifth; and the late Dolores
Kundla. She is a great-
granddaughter of Jeanne
Micklo, Forty Fort, and the
late Howard Balbach. Kaitlyn
has a sister, Kira, 4.
Amanda M. Kamowski
Amanda Marie Kamowski,
daughter of Rachel Pettit,
Nanticoke, is celebrating
her second birthday today,
July 25. Amanda is a
granddaughter of Robert
and Gloria Brezinski. She is a
great-granddaughter of Henry
and Eleanor Brezinski and the
lateJoseph and Mildred Grilly,
all of Nanticoke.
IN BRIEF
WYOMING: The
Friends of the Wyoming
Free Library, 358
Wyoming Avenue, will
open their book shop
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
every Thursday and
Saturday starting today.
The book shop is locat-
ed in the church next
door to the library.
The library is host-
ing a bus trip to New
York City on Sept. 22.
Seats are $35 a person.
The bus will pick up at
7 a.m. at the Wyoming
Valley Mall and arrive
at Rockefeller Center
at 10 a.m. Travelers are
on their own all day.
The bus will depart at
7 p.m. from New York
City. Payment by check
only should be made
payable to Wyoming
Free Library and mailed
to NYC Bus Trip,
358 Wyoming Ave.,
Wyoming, PA 18644.
***
Zumba with Ryan is
held from noon-1 p.m.
every other Saturday.
To register for a class,
call 693-1364.
The library is sell-
ing books for $3 a bag
every Friday. Customers
should bring their own
bag or inquire at the
circulation desk.
REUNIONS
AVOCAHIGHSCHOOL
Alumni andfriendsare
invitedtoattendthesecond
annual dinner dancefrom6:30-
11p.m. onSept. 7at St. Marys
auditorium, Avoca. Tickets
are$20per personandcanbe
purchasedfromanycommittee
member. Contact CaroleBerry
at 570-451-1620for moreinfor-
mationor tickets.
COUGHLINHIGHSCHOOL
Class of 1958 will meet
at 7p.m. onWednesday at
Norms Pizza andEatery,
Wilkes-Barre. Plans will be
nalizedfor the 55thanni-
versary reunionplannedfor
Aug. 24at the Wyoming Valley
Country Club. All classmates
are invitedtothe meeting.
Class of 1964 will meet at 7
p.m. onAug. 1at Norms Pizza
andEatery, 275 N. Sherman
St., Wilkes-Barre. Plans for the
50thanniversary reunionwill
be discussed.
EXETERHIGHSCHOOL
Class of 1963will meet at
7p.m. onWednesday at the
Avenue Diner, Wyoming.
GARMEMORIALHIGH
SCHOOL
Classes of 1950 and1951
will meet at 12:30 p.m. on
Aug. 21 for a luncheonat the
Lakeside Skillet, Pole 279,
Lakeside Drive, Harveys Lake.
All classmates, spouses and
friends are invited. For reserva-
tions, call Gil at 824-9425 or
Marilynat 288-3102.
Class of 1961 is holding its
70thbirthday year reunionon
Aug. 10 at the Wyoming Valley
Country Club. Class members
are remindedtosendreserva-
tions as soonas possible. For
more information, call Carol
Demmeck Anstett at 570-823-
9222.
KINGSTONHIGH
SCHOOL
Class of 1959 will meet at 1
p.m. onWednesday at Norms
Pizza andEatery, North
ShermanStreet, Wilkes-Barre.
Plans are being made for the
55thanniversary reuniontobe
heldnext year. All class mem-
bers are urgedtoattend.
LAKE-NOXENAND
LAKE-LEHMANHIGH
SCHOOLS
Classes of 1959 and
1960 are joining together to
celebrate ANight Out at
6p.m. onAug. 9 at Grotto
Pizza, Harveys Lake. Tomake
reservations, call Beverly
Wandel at 570-639-5898, Betty
Spencer at 570-639-5543 or Al
Niezgoda at 302-734-5045 by
Aug. 1.
MARYMOUNTHIGH
SCHOOL
Class of 1960 is planning
a class picnic onSept. 15at
the Catholic War Veterans
Grove, Ashley. Cost is $20 per
personandreservations and
payments are due by Aug. 23.
Avariety of picnic fare and
homemade desserts will be
available. The nal planning
meeting will be at 6p.m. on
Aug. 28at Norms Pizza and
Eatery, Wilkes-Barre. For more
information, contact Ann
Wielgopolski at 825-5711 or
annwig@verizon.net.
MEYERSHIGHSCHOOL
Class of 1963is holdingits
50thanniversary reunionat 6
p.m. onAug. 31 at Appletree
Terrace, Newberry Estates,
Dallas. Atour of the school
will take place at 10 a.m. on
Aug. 31. Participants should
meet at the ag pole. Anice
breaker will be heldfrom
6:30-10:30 p.m. onAug. 30 at
Happy Pizza, 40 W. MainSt.,
Plymouth. For more informa-
tion, contact Maddy Shaver at
570-829-1529 or GordonKutz
at 570-474-5683.
NEWPORTTOWNSHIP
HIGHSCHOOL
Class of 1961 is holding a
70thbirthday bashonSept.
28at the Riverlands, Route
11, SalemTownship. The fee
is $20 per person. The affair
is being catered. Reservations
andpayments are due by Sept.
10. Contact Al Yarasavage
at 570-678-3037 or ayarasav-
age@epix.net for more details
andinstructions onsending
payment.
OLDSCHOOLDAYS
Reunionwill be heldon
Aug. 4 at the home of Sandy
Morris andthe Rev. Tom
Morris, JacksonChurchRoad,
JacksonTownship. Acovered-
dishpicnic lunchwill beginat
1p.m. For more information
call HelenFranklinat 675-
4238.
PLAINSMEMORIALAND
SACREDHEARTHIGH
SCHOOL
Class of 1961 is holding its
monthly get together at 12:30
p.m. onAug. 7at Norms Pizza
andEatery, 275 N. Sherman
St., Wilkes-Barre. All class-
mates, family andfriends are
invited. A70thbirthday party
picnic is scheduledfor Sept. 8
at Konefals Grove.
WESTHAZLETONHIGH
SCHOOL
Wildcat RoundupXXIII
will be heldfor all alumni,
teachers andanyone who
attendedthe former West
HazletonHighSchool onAug.
24 at the Nescopeck Township
Fire Hall, Briggsville.
Reservations are due by
Aug. 14. For information
andreservations, call Robert
Hildebrand, chairman, at 570-
788-2515 or Barry Hawk at
570-956-6697.
WYOMINGAREA
HIGHSCHOOL
Class of 1973 is planning
a 40thanniversary reunion
for Labor Day weekend.
Addresses are neededfor
the followingclassmates,
Sheree Bachman, Cleta
Barber, JohnBartolomei,
ElizabethBerulis, Dennis
Bohan, DavidBrakeeld,
Debbie Bray, Suzanne Bruno,
Andrea Buczynski, Nancy
Cairl, Cathy Chepalonis,
ElizabethCiannilli, Richard
Colarusso, Mary Collins,
Denise Costello, Ellen
Coulter, Sandy DAmbrosio,
JoEllenDevers, AlanFreed,
Rosemarie Grabosky, David
Gravell, Kathy Guddy, Charles
Huthmaker, KevinJones,
Eugene Kelly, SusanKimber,
RichardKing, Deborah
Kiwak, LeonardKuchinskas,
Teresa MacLean, Mary Agnes
Mantione, Gus Marini, Steven
Mattie, Alberta Mazonis,
Barbara Mears, Carl Ninassi,
NereoNinotti, WilliamOwens,
Michael Owens, Elaine
Panzitta, WilliamPayne,
AnnMarie Price, Kathy
Reilly, George Rooney, Jane
Rogers, Thomas Rosencrance,
Rebecca Rowlands, Ann
Scoble, Charles Searfoss,
Virginia Snyder, James
Staley, SusanStash, Barbara
Stefanko, HughTracy, Nancy
Vandermark, Daniel Yadrnak,
Stanley Waskiewicz and
Barbara Werts. Anyone with
addresses for any of these
classmates is askedtocontact
Dotty Martinat dottymartin@
comcast.net.
Daniel M. Mazzocco, DMD
announces his retirement from
the practice of Periodontics
Please call 822-9202 or
459-2526 with concerns
After 37 years of
practice in the field of
Periodontics,
Dr. Mazzocco will
close his doors at his
offices in both
Wilkes-Barre and
Hazleton on
September 30, 2013.
Sincere thanks and best wishes to all our
patients throughout the years.
Independent Licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association.
Registered Mark of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association.
1.866.632.7209
|
BlueCrossNEPAstore.com
If youre an individual looking for comprehensive
and affordable insurance, we have a health plan that
works for you. If youre a large or small employer and
want to stay with or switch to Blue Cross, its easier
than ever. Call, shop online, or visit our retail stores.
Health Care Reform is here and
its never been easier to go with Blue.
Denise Cesare, President and CEO
Blue Cross of Northeastern Pennsylvania
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Professional
PAGE 4C Thursday, July 25, 2013 TV www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
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Wars
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Wars
Property
Wars (N)
Airplane Repo (N)
(CC) (TV14)
Property
Wars
Property
Wars
DSY
Good
Luck
Charlie
Jessie
(CC)
(TVG)
Good
Luck
Charlie
Dog With
a Blog
(TVG)
Beverly Hills Chihuahua 2 (G, 11)
Voices of Odette Yustman. A litter turns
Papi and Chloes lives upside down.
Jessie
(CC)
(TVG)
Shake It
Up! (CC)
(TVG)
Good
Luck
Charlie
Dog With
a Blog
(TVG)
E!
Summer Catch
(5:00)
E! News (N) Keeping Up With the
Kardashians
Keeping Up With the
Kardashians
Co-Ed Nightmares
(TV14)
Chelsea
Lately
E! News
ESPN
SportsCenter (N)
(Live) (CC)
Preview/Recap: X Games Anthology (N) Baseball Tonight (N)
(Live) (CC)
SportsCenter (N)
(Live) (CC)
ESPN2
Around
the Horn
Interrup-
tion
NFL His-
tory
CFL Football Edmonton Eskimos at Montreal Alouettes. From
Percival Molson Memorial Stadium in Montreal. (N) (Live)
NFL Live (N) (CC) NFL His-
tory
FAM
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(TV14)
Melissa &
Joey
Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 (PG-13, 10) Dan-
iel Radcliffe. Harry sets out to destroy the secrets to Voldemorts power.
The 700 Club (CC)
(TVPG)
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Chopped Crunch
Time (TVG)
Chopped (TVG) Chopped (TVG) Chopped Sweet
Surprises (TVG)
Food Court Wars
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Food Network Star
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FNC
Special Report With
Bret Baier (N)
FOX Report With
Shepard Smith
The OReilly Factor
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Hannity (N) On Record, Greta
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The OReilly Factor
(CC)
HALL
Little House on the
Prairie (CC) (TVPG)
Little House on the
Prairie (CC) (TVPG)
The Lost Valentine (11) Jennifer
Love Hewitt, Betty White. (CC)
Frasier
(TVPG)
Frasier
(TVPG)
Frasier
(TVPG)
Frasier
(TVPG)
HIST
Pawn
Stars
Pawn
Stars
Pawn
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Pawn
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Duck
Dynasty
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God,
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H&G
Love It or List It (CC)
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Hunters
Intl
House
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Rehab
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Rehab
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Renovation Raiders
(N) (CC)
House
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Hunters
Intl
House
Hunters
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LIF
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Project Runway (CC)
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Project Runway Million Dollar
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Supermarket Super-
star (TVPG)
Double
Divas
MTV
Ridicu-
lousness
Ridicu-
lousness
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Ridicu-
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Money
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Ridicu-
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Sponge-
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Sponge-
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Sam &
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Hatha-
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(CC) (TVG)
Full
House
Full
House
The
Nanny
The
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Friends
(TVPG)
Friends
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OVAT
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The Art
of...
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Music
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TBS
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Advent.
Time
Regular
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the Wig (N) (TV14)
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How I Met How I Met Lead-Off
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Topic A: Live at Five Legally
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Diddy hopes
to bring music
back to TV
Hes launching Revolt TV
in the fall.
Theres ESPN for sports,
CNN, Fox News for news
and the AP. There should be
a brand for music, and now
we have that brand thats
going to focus on music and
not reality shows, he said.
Theres been a gaping hole
once some of the other chan-
nels stopped having focus on
music and focused more on
reality, and it left a gaping
hole for artists and fans of
not having a place to go.
The 43-year-old entre-
preneur announced last
week that Revolt TV had
reached a deal to have his
network distributed on Time
Warner Cable. Comcast
Corp. announced a deal with
Diddys network last year.
Sean Diddy Combs
has produced shows like
Making the Band for MTV,
and hes hoping to bring the
avor of whats buzzing on
the Internet viral vid-
eos, behind-the-scene music
moments and raw inter-
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NEWYORKDiddy had
been working on develop-
ing a TV network for years.
When he was almost shut
out of performing on ABCs
Dancing With the Stars
around the release of a 2010
album, the rapper-producer
realized he needed to launch
the network sooner rather
than later.
I had to beg to be on
Dancing With the Stars,
and it was something to me
that wasnt right about that,
he said.
Diddy believed there
werent enough outlets for
musicians on TV and that
moment drove home the
point.
www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER PUZZLES Thursday, July 25, 2013 PAGE 5C
UNIVERSAL SUDOKU
MINUTE MAZE
W I T H O M A R S H A R I F & T A N N A H H I R S C H
CRYPTOQUOTE
GOREN BRIDGE
B Y M I C H E A L A R G I R I O N & J E F F K N U R E K
JUMBLE
B Y H O L I D A Y M A T H I S
HOROSCOPE
CROSSWORD
PREVIOUS DAYS SOLUTION
HOW TO CONTACT:
Dear Abby: PO Box 69440, Los Ange-
les, CA 90069
For more Sudoku go to www.timesleader.com
O N T H E W E B
Dear Abby: I have
read you for years,
and I must take
issue with your
answer to Needs
the Right Words
(March 17). He
asked about his son
and his sons half-brother visiting
his beach house. (He didnt want the
half-brother included.)
While you addressed the writers
needs, and yes, he is entitled to his
feelings, I think you should have
taken this a step further.
Once you become a father, it is not
all about you anymore. The 12-year-
old boy is now, and forever will be,
his sons half-brother. Unless this man
wants to distance himself from his
son and cause permanent damage
to their relationship, he needs to get
some therapy so he will be able to
think of that boy in a different way
and can deal with him in the future.
The two boys seem to have a good
relationship, and a future with his son
will include the half-brother.
Someday that boy will be a grown
man, and he will recognize the kind-
ness shown to him. The boy is not
responsible for his mothers behavior
and the father needs to realize that.
Deborah in Chandler, Ariz.
Dear Deborah: You are right. It
would have been better for all con-
cerned if I had been harder on the
father and more sensitive to the feel-
ings of the boys involved, which many
readers pointed out to me:
Dear Abby: I almost always agree
with your answers, but your answer
to that letter was off the mark. Its ad-
mirable that his son has such a close
relationship with his half-brother, and
not allowing the boys to do some-
thing they enjoy together for a week-
end is wrong. That the writer admits
he still has problems with the past is
his problem, not the kids.
Since he admits it brings up feel-
ings he THOUGHT he had put be-
hind him, he should get professional
help to finally deal with those unre-
solved issues. Also, if he doesnt want
the 12-year-old in his house for one
weekend of fun, then he should take
his wife away for a romantic weekend
and let the boys use the beach house
in his absence.
Been There, Done That in Kansas
Dear Abby: Tell that man to get
a psychotherapist! The child isnt
responsible for his mothers behav-
ior. The man needs to expand his
heart. When hes an old man he will
never regret hosting the boy, but he
WOULD regret having hurt a child
and perhaps alienating his own son.
You called that one wrong, Abby!
Leslie R., Champaign, Ill.
Dear Abby: I agree with your advice
more often than not, although I sus-
pect we are at opposite ends of the
political spectrum. That father needs
to grow up and put the feelings of his
son and his sons half-brother before
his own. Its time people learned once
more what it means NOT to be selfish
and think of their own feelings, but
the feelings of others. Please recon-
sider your response.
Paul W., Johnson City, Tenn.
Dear Paul: I have, and I regret my
initial answer.
DEAR ABBY
A D V I C E
Readers take Abby to task for going way too easy on a selfish father
To receive a collection of Abbys most
memorable and most frequently re-
quested poems and essays, send a busi-
ness-sized, self-addressed envelope, plus
check or money order for $3.95 ($4.50 in
Canada) to: Dear Abbys Keepers, P.O. Box
447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage
is included.)
ARIES (March 21-April 19). Getting
on the same page in relation-
ships is the challenge of the day.
Someone may be thinking of you
as a sweetheart while you are
still working out the logistics of
friendship.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20). Youll
derive pleasure from helping
others, and it wouldnt occur to
you to want a reward. But youll
be rewarded anyway with the
highest esteem of your peers.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21). Your gen-
eral rule is that if youre speak-
ing more than youre listening,
youre talking too much. But
today, what you have to say is
so crucial to the group that you
may have to break this rule.
CANCER (June 22-July 22). The
audience you want may not be
the audience you have. But if
you give more to the people who
are already listening to you, you
will attract the ones who are not.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). It is very
tempting to get caught up in the
high praise of others and run
with it, but this is not gracious.
You will be most proud of what
you do from a humble place.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). Your
tendency to hold everyone to
a high standard is an outcrop-
ping of your love of humanity.
You believe people are capable
of reaching their full potential,
and some will because you make
them accountable.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). As a
socially sophisticated person,
you realize that sometimes when
people are telling secrets, they
actually mean to be overheard.
Youll leverage your social savvy
this evening.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). You
have an impulse to make bold
moves tonight, but will you?
Much depends on your confi-
dence in the moment, which
depends on your habits earlier in
the day.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21).
The effort involved in trying to
impress someone will have the
payoff of accomplishing the
exact opposite. In some games,
the only winner is the one who
forfeits.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19).
Expectations are dangerous,
especially if another person is
expecting something of you.
Dont let people build you up in
their minds, because it will be
too much work for you to fill the
role, and youll wind up resentful.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). Just
about everyone speaks logically,
but you do something that sets
you apart: You paint pictures
with your words, and this makes
your stories compelling and your
personality charismatic.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). Theres
a fine line between overthinking
the future and planning ahead.
Youll know you have crossed
into overthinking when all of
your thoughts are preventing
you from moving.
TODAYS BIRTHDAY (July 25). A
loving person will strongly influ-
ence decisions over the next 10
weeks. A sweet someone makes
you happy, and your happiness
leads to victories outside of your
personal life. September brings a
lifestyle enhancement. Aries and
Gemini people adore you. Your
lucky numbers are: 1, 3, 33, 39
and 18.
PAGE 6C Thursday, July 25, 2013 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
SPECIAL ADVERTISING FEATURE PAGE
KEEPS YOU SAFE: The phone lines are ringing off the hook. Thats because brand new Senior Mobile cell phones are being handed over to Manchester
area seniors for free just by covering a simple one-time activation fee before the deadline ends. Im so happy we got the phones. Now I know shell be safe and
I dont have to worry about her going out alone anymore, said Chuck G. The Senior Mobiles exclusive large red E safety button is a life saver that never leaves
you alone in an emergency situation. It immediately sends help wherever you are by instantly calling emergency medical, police, fire and rescue for free. I love
the fact that we can just push a button and instantly get help wherever were at for free, said Carol G.
CONNECTICUT The phone lines are ring-
ing off the hook.
Thats because Manchester area seniors who
call the Toll Free Hotlines today are getting
the new easy-to-use Senior Mobile

cell phones
free.
So, if youre still risking your safety by not
having a cell phone, well now theres no reason
not to get one and the phone is free.
This is all happening because the U.S. Govt
put a Federal Regulation in place that makes cell
phone giants transmit free emergency calls in
all 50 states, which is why this announcement is
being so widely advertised. This allows U.S. res-
idents to use the newSenior Mobile cell phone as
an emergency phone to call emergency medical,
police, fire and rescue for free as well as an ev-
eryday cell phone with nationwide coverage, no
contracts, no deposits and no monthly bills.
The only thing residents need to do is call the
Toll Free Hotline before the 48-hour order dead-
line ends to cover just a one-time activation fee
to instantly be awarded the new Senior Mobile
cell phone for free. But only the first Manchester
area seniors who do are also getting nationwide
coverage with no long distance charges, no con-
tracts, no deposits and no monthly bills.
Its important that seniors call right away to
get the free cell phones because after the dead-
line ends the phones are no longer free and res-
idents will be required to pay $199.00 for each
new phone, said David Martin, Executive Di-
rector of U.S. based CompTek.
To get the free phones seniors need to call the
Toll Free Hotline at 1-800-313-6640 before the
48-hour order deadline ends.
Everyone who does is being given the new
easy-to-use cell phone free just by covering the
one-time
$
97 activation fee and shipping which
includes assigning a cell phone number, a SIM
card loaded with 100 anytime minutes good for
sixty days which allows the Senior Mobile phone
to be used as anemergency phone as well as your
everyday cell phone, preprogramming the one-
touchE911 Emergency Buttonthat gives your lo-
cation to E 911 (Enhanced 911) highly trained first
responders who will send emergency help wher-
ever youre at for free, a portable home phone
charger and installing the lithium long life bat-
tery so its ready to use right out of the box.
Safety research shows that 74% of Americans
who own a cell phone have used it in an emergen-
cy situation to get help when they needed it.
Yet millions of seniors are still risking their
safety by not having one. The main reason for
this is that seniors find most cell phones too dif-
ficult to use.
Thats why the new easy-to-use Senior Mobile
cell phones are being given to seniors for free.
It was made just for seniors with big buttons,
a large screen and magnified text that make it
easy to see. Its also hearing aid compatible with
an extra loud speaker that makes it easy to hear.
Plus its the only cell phone in the world that was
the exclusive Senior Mobile E one-touch safety
button that instantly calls emergency medical,
police, fire and rescue for free.
The Senior Mobile cell phone is perfect for
seniors on fixed incomes because its free and
comes with no contracts or deposits. And since
its so easy-to-use many seniors are getting rid
of their home phones and saving hundreds of
dollars in long distance and service charges,
Martin said.
Seniors just want to be safe or stay in touch
with family and friends, so the Senior Mobile cell
phone doesnt play games, take pictures or go on
the Internet, which makes it among the easiest
cell phones to use in the world, said Martin.
Thousands of Manchester area seniors are ex-
pected to call to get the free Senior Mobile cell
phones today. So if lines are busy keep trying, all
calls will be answered.
Seniors set to get easy to use cell phones free
New cell phones that keep seniors safe are being given away free to everyone who beats the 48 hour deadline to
cover just the one-time activation fee, but only the first Connecticut area seniors who call are also getting
nationwide coverage with no long distance charges, no contracts, no deposits and no monthly bills
Big buttons, large screen and magnified text make it easy to see; extra loud speaker makes it easy to hear and the
one touch emergency safety button instantly calls emergency medical, police, fire and rescue free
How to get the phones free:
The National Toll Free Hotlines are now open. Seniors have just 48
hours to get the free Senior Mobile cell phones beginning at 8:30am
this morning. CompTek is authorizing the giveaway of the easy-to-use
cell phones to everyone who beats the 48-hour deadline to cover just a
one-time
$
97 activation fee and shipping. But only those who are among
the first Manchester area seniors to call are also getting nationwide cov-
erage with no long distance charges, no contracts, no deposits and no
monthly bills.
HELP WHEN YOU NEED IT: Things can change in the blink of an eye. Imagine being all alone in an
emergency situation like the one shown above with no one to help. Thats why its so important to have a
cell phone. They act as a personal safety net in case of emergency to keep people safe. A cell phone with
a one touch emergency safety button that instantly calls emergency medical, police, fire and rescue for
free is the best one to get. That way you never have to worry about being stuck alone.
Cell phones prove to be safety net
in case of emergency
CONNECTICUT - When it comes to person-
al safety every senior should have a cell phone.
They can save your life. In the U.S. Depart-
ment of Interiors Safe and Secure memo it
even urges citizens to carry them.
In real emergencies they provide people with a
lifeline of communication if hurt, stranded or to
report a crime. No matter where or what kindof
emergency or duress a person finds themselves
underespecially if theyre all aloneif they
have a cell phone they can call 911 for help.
Cell phones act as valuable lifelines in health-
related issues, too. At the very least, they pro-
vide an easier way to keep in touch with family
and friends. Theyre easy to get and seniors
may even find special deals that require no con-
tracts, deposits or monthly service charges.
Theres no question that everyone should have
a cell phone for safety. But theres no real need
to have one that plays games, takes pictures or
goes on the Internet. Its important to make sure
the phone can be pre-programmed or has a one
touch emergency safety button that instantly
calls for emergency help when needed.
It should also be easy-to-use with big but-
tons, a large display screen and big numbers
so its easy to see. And last of all the phone
should be hearing aid compatible with an ex-
tra loud speaker that makes it easy to hear.
But remember, a cell phone cant help you un-
less you have one.
*
Cell phones provide sig-
nificant economic gains for low-income American
households.
U.S. Dept. of Interior urges
citizens to carry cell phones
2013 UNIVERSAL COMMERCE P6453A OF17322R-1
E244
To get the Senior Mobile phone Free: Read the important information listed below about the Senior Mobile cell phone.
Then call the National Toll Free Hotline before the 48-hour deadline ends at: 1-800-313-6640
1-800-313-6640
To get the free phones begin
calling at 8:30 a.m. today
Who gets the Senior Mobile phones Free: All Manchester area seniors who beat the 48-hour order deadline are getting the new easy-to-use Senior Mobile cell
phones free with nationwide coverage, no long distance charges, no contracts, no deposits and no monthly bills.
What if I already have a cell phone: Even seniors who already have a cell phone are getting the Senior Mobile cell phones free. This allows seniors to
save money by getting rid of high monthly cell phone bills and lengthy contracts associated with other cell phones. The Senior Mobile cell phone is perfect for
seniors because its easy-to-use with big buttons, a large screen, magnified text, a loud speaker and a one touch safety button that instantly calls emergency
help for free.
Do I have to pay for minutes: No. Seniors who plan on using the phone just for emergencies get unlimited emergency calls for free. Thats because the
U.S. Govt put a Federal Regulation in place that makes cell phone giants transmit free emergency calls in all 50 states. But heres the good news. You can call
family and friends too because the Senior Mobile phone comes with 100 anytime minutes good for sixty days. After that just dial 7768 on your Senior Mobile
phone to reload your phone with unlimited minutes as an added option with nationwide coverage, no long distance charges, no contracts, no deposits and no
monthly bills.
Why is the activation fee so lowfor seniors: The U.S. based company responsible for distributing the free phones is giving every senior who beats the deadline
a 50% savings to help cover the cost of the one-time activation. The Senior Mobile phone is perfect for seniors because it comes with nationwide coverage, no long
distance charges, no contracts, no deposits and no monthly bills. After the deadline each Senior Mobile phone is $199, but seniors who beat the 48-hour deadline
to get the phones free and save 50% off the activation cover just
$
97 and shipping as long as they call the National Toll Free Hotline at 1-800-313-6640 before
the deadline ends.
CONSUMERS MAY, AT THEIR OWN EXPENSE, RETURN THE SENIOR MOBILE WITHIN 10 DAYS OF RECEIPT IN LIKE-NEW CONDITION FOR A REFUND. SHIPPING CHARGES AND PRE-PAID MINUTES WILL NOT BE REFUNDED. NO RETURNS
AFTER 10 DAYS. SCREEN IMAGES ON THE SENIOR MOBILE ARE SIMULATED. UNIVERSAL COMMERCE DBA COMPTEK IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR LOST RETURNED SHIPMENTS. 8000 FREEDOM AVE., N. CANTON OH 44720
800
3 1 3
6640
MARKETPLACE
570. 829. 7130
800. 273. 7130
PLACE YOUR AD 24/7 AT TIMESLEADER.COM
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Thursday, July 25, 2013 PAGE 1D
Special Notices
OCTAGON FAMILY RESTAURANT
375 W. Main St.
Plymouth, PA 18651
570-779-2288
CLOSED FOR OUR ANNUAL
SHUTDOWN BEGINNING
SUN. JULY 21
RE-OPENING
WEDNESDAY, JULY 31
Home of the original 'O-BAR' Pizza
Special Notices
OCTAGON FAMILY RESTAURANT
375 W Main St. Plymouth, PA 18651
570-779-2288
CLOSED SUNDAY, JULY 21 FOR
OUR ANNUAL SHUTDOWN.
RE-OPENING WEDNESDAY,
JULY 31.
Watch for our weekly specials then
Home of the ORIGINAL "O-BAR' Pizza
Auctions
AUCTION
SATURDAY JULY 27 @ 4:30PM
ROUTE 924 SHEPPTON PA (868 Center st.)
3 door, 2 door & 1 door commercial refrigerators; 2 door com-
mercial freezer; large curio; new bedroom set; drop leaf table
& 4 chairs; 2 Heatrolas; 2400psi power washer; generator; air
compressors; sliding miter saw; circular saws; drills; angle
grinders; routers; wrenches; sockets; table saws; acetylene
torch; welder; chain saw; all types of hand & power tools; ex-
tension & step ladders; featherweight sewing machine; large
collection of Beswick Beatrix Potter figurines; antique Ger-
many dolls; Shirley Temple doll; scuba gear; Mauser rifle,
Ranger shotgun & Ryder BB gun; crocks; kitchen bowls; Bear
bow; safe; new textiles; collectables; household; VERY FULL
AUCTION with lots of great items AU1839-L
J & J AUCTION 570-384-4041
Note. Check web site jandjauction.net for pictures and listing.
Special Notices
IF YOU'RE NOT
SELLING YOUR
JUNK
VEHICLES
or HEAVY
EQUIPMENT
TRACTORS,
TRAILERS,
SCHOOL
BUSES, DUMP
TRUCKS TO
HAPPY TRAILS
YOU'RE LOSING
MONEY
570-760-2035
570-542-2277
FREE PICK UP
Free Books: Normal
Christian Life By Watchman
Nee Economy Of God.
By Witness Lee
Www.Bfa.Org/Newbooks
ADOPT: A teacher hopes to
adopt a baby! I promise to
provide a lifetime of uncondi-
tional love & opportunities.
Expenses paid.
1-866-408-1543
www.AdeleAdopts.info
Christian Friends of
Brother Watchman Nee
We meet in the Meadows
Nursing Home Chapel
Call 570-267-8250,
sdekw@yahoo.com.
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
Buying Heavy
Equipment
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
"ADOPT: Adoption is a brave
loving choice. Secure life, joy
and endless love await your
newborn.
Julia & Travis 888-826-2705"
Like Us
On
Facebook
pananaman
Summer i s f i nal l y her e.
Check out the Oyster Garden
Tea Bri dal Showers hel d
Pool si de!
bridezella.net
Special Notices
MONTY SAYS
Happy Birthday to Joan. I am
sure there are pl ans upon
plans for dinners and activities
all month long! Have a great
day and a great summer. I will
see you i n al l the fami l i ar
pl aces.. Happy Bi rthday to
Joan. I am sure there are
plans upon plans for dinners
and activities all month long!
Have a great day and a great
summer. I will see you in all
the familiar places.
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
Luzerne County Community
College Purchasing Depart-
ment will receive sealed PRO-
POSALS for the fol l owi ng:
COOKING SHOW HOST AND
COORDI NATI NG PRODU-
CER. Firms interested in sub-
mitting a proposal should call
the Colleges Purchasing Of-
fice at 570-740-0370, Monday
through Friday, 9 a.m. to 4
p.m. to request specifications.
Proposals must be received
before 3 P.M. local prevailing
time, on Friday, August 9,
2013. Luzerne County Com-
munity College reserves the
right to waive any informalities,
irregularities, defects, errors, or
omissions in, or to reject any or
all proposals or parts thereof.
ESTATE NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that Letters of Administration
have been granted to Edward
Gedrich, Executor of the Es-
tate of Henry Gedrich, late of
the Borough of Avoca, Luzerne
County, Pennsyl vani a who
died on June 1, 2013. All per-
sons indebted to said Estate
are required to make payment
and those having claims or de-
mands to present the same
without delay to the Adminis-
trator in c/o Gregory S. Skibit-
sky, Jr., Esquire, Skibitsky &
Molino, 457 North Main Street,
Suite 101, Pittston, PA 18640.
Lost & Found
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
Vito &
Gino's
FREE
PICKUP
570-288-8995
LOST tabby cat with black
st ri pes. Swoyersvi l l e area
since July 13, 2013. REWARD.
570-331-4444
LOST. Tuxedo Cat, July 17,
Meyers St., Duryea. Medical
needs. Call 457-4553
Lost & Found
ALL JUNK
VEHICLES
WANTED!!
-CALL ANYTIME
-HONEST PRICES
-FREE REMOVAL
CA$H PAID
ON THE SPOT
570.301.3602
Attorney
DIVORCE No Fault
$295 divorce295.com
Atty. Kurlancheek
800-324-9748 W-B
FREE Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans. Carol Baltimore
570-283-1626
Child / Elderly Care
HOUSEKEEPING
FOR SENIORS
I will do light cleaning, etc. in
your home. Very reasonable,
references. 570-885-8212
Travel Entertainment
BROADWAY
SHOW
BUS TRIPS
BALTIMORE INNER
HARBOR & THE
NATIONAL AQUARIUM
Sat. August 10th $89
MOTOWN THE MUSICAL
Wed., Oct. 16th
$149. (Mezz Seats)
WICKED
Wed., Oct. 16th
$149 (Orchestra seats)
JERSEY BOYS
Wed., Oct 16th
$129
Pick Ups from Pittston &
Wilkes-Barre Park & Rides
CALL ROSEANN @ 655-4247
To Reserve Your Seats
CAMEO HOUSE
BUS TOURS
Now Accepting
Reservations For..
Sat., Aug. 24
Wilmington Delaware
Docent Tour of Nemours
Mansions & Gardens
Lunch @ the Inn at
MonchaninVillage & more.
Sat., & Sun. Oct 5 & 6
Pittsburgh, PA
F.L. Wright's Fallingwater,
Clayton, Flight 93 Memorial
Shanksville PA
Dinner @ Bedford
Springs Resort
570-655-3420
anne.cameo@verizon.net
cameohousebustours.com
FUN GETAWAYS!
King of Prussia Mall
7/27
Knoebels Park 7/31
Yankees/Tigers 8/9
Phillies/Dodgers 8/18
Ocean City, NJ 8/21
Ocean City, MD
5 Day Sept. 2-6
Hampton Beach, NH
Seafood Festival
3 Day - Sept. 6-8
1-800-432-8069
Travel Entertainment
NEW
NONSTOP
FLIGHTS
Philadelphia to
Puerto Vallarta
Jan. 25 to Jan. 31, 2014
From only $1378.00
per person
All Inclusive Package
CALL
TENENBAUMS
TRAVEL
TODAY!
Other dates and rates
available, call for details
Phone: 570-288-8747
All rates are per person,
subject to Change and
Money To Lend
We can erase your bad credit -
100% GUARANTEED. Attorneys
for the Federal Trade Commission
say theyve never seen a legitim-
ate credit repair operation. No one
can legally remove accurate and
timely information from your credit
report. Its a process that starts with
you and involves time and a con-
scious effort to pay your debts.
Learn about managing credit and
debt at ftc. gov/credit. A message
from The Times Leader and the
FTC.
Accounting /Financial
BOOK KEEPER
Full time
Monday-Friday
8:30-5:30
Will train
Computer experience helpful
Valid driver's license
$10.00 to start
Raise after training
Apply:
Community Family Services
Thrift Shop
102 Martz Manor
Plymouth
SENIOR ACCOUNTANT
Senior Accountant needed
for Luzerne County firm offer-
ing audit, tax & consulting
services to companies, indi-
viduals, non-profits & govern-
ments. Candidate requires a
BS in Acctg., CPA & minim-
um. of 4 yrs public acctg.
exp. Salary commensurate
with Exp., Excellent Benefit
Package, CPE, & PTO. Send
resume & salary req. to:
The Times Leader
15 N. Main Street
Box 4465
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
Automotive
SERVICE
ADVISOR
Wyomi ng Val l ey Motors i s
seeking a professional and ex-
perienced service advisor to
join our Volkswagen/Mazda
service team. Applicant must
possess good people skills
and be able to manage a team
of flat-rate technicians. ADP
experience preferred. A clear
dr i vi ng r ecor d and val i d
drivers license are required.
We offer outstanding career
potential, strong management
support, and an excellent be-
nefit package. All applicants
must be able to pass a drug
test. Send your resume to
Charlie Kasko at:
WYOMING VALLEY
MOTORS
126 NARROWS ROAD
LARKSVILLE, PA 18651
charliek@
wyomingvalleymotors.com
Drivers & Delivery
CDL A WANTED
Owner operators/Lease to own
81% TT, 77% T Only
Flatbed experience.
Short or long haul.
Sadowski Trucking
570-256-3553
Drivers & Delivery
CDL-A Driver
Gas field/landscape drivers plus
hands on labor required. Operate
dump trucks & load equipment on
lowboy. Deliver to job site. Must op-
erate skid steer excavator, hydro-
seed truck, etc. Will plow in winter.
Must have clean driving record and
pass drug test. Top Wages Paid.
Call Harvis Interview Service @
542-5330. Leave message.
Will send an application.
Or forward resume:
varsity.harvis@gmail.com
Employer is Varsity, Inc.
No walk-ins. EOE
CLASS A
CDL DRIVER
Owner Operators .95 cpm
plus fuel surcharge. Local driv-
ing positions out of Pittston.
845-616-1461
CLASS B DRIVER
Full time position.
Local work.
CDL required with
1 year experience.
Straight truck & material
handling. Benefits included.
Apply in person at:
Winroc/SPI
2 Stevens Road
Wilkes-Barre, PA
EOE
NOW HIRING
SCHOOL BUS
DRIVERS
Best pay.
Will Train if necessary.
Pace Transportation
570-883-9797
TOW TRUCK
DRIVERS
Full time & part time posi-
tions available. Experience
required.
Call 570-574-0062
TRUCK
DRIVER
CDL REQUIREd
ALSO HIRING
AN OPERATIONS
FOREMAN M/F
Apply in person at
Solomon Container
Service
495 Stanton St.
Wilkes-Barre
570-829-2206
Education
CHILDCARE
TEACHERS
NEEDED AT OUR
Wilkes-Barre, Dallas and
Mountain Top Locations.
CALL 570.905.3322
Ask for Lake Gemzik
or email resume to
lgemzik@buildingblocks
learningcenter.com
TEACHER
Spanish, K thru 8th grade.
Mondays, Tuesdays,
Wednesdays, 11:30-3:30.
Send resume and
references to:
Wilkes-Barre Academy
20 Stevens Road,
Wilkes-Barre, Pa 18702
THE GREATER NANTICOKE
AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT
is seeking applications for:
ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL
(High School)
Closing date: August 2, 2013
Send application or letter of
interest to:
Mr. Anthony Perrone,
Superintendent
427 Kosciuszko St.
Nanticoke, PA 18634
perronea@gnasd.com
Food Services
ALL POSITIONS &
MANAGERS NEEDED
Apply in person
Sonic Drive-In
755 Kidder Street,
Wilkes-Barre, PA
Help Wanted General
AVIATION
New Fixed-Base Operator at
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton
International Airport
is now hiring - all shifts- for
September 1, 2013 start date
Customer Service
Line Service
Accounting
Management
Aircraft Mechanics
Flight Instructors
Must pass background check
and drug/alcohol screening.
Clean driving record re-
quired.
Apply on line at
www.
aviation-technologies.com
An Equal Opportunity
Employer
INVENTORY SUPPLY
CHAIN PLANNER
Immediate opening for an
inventory supply chain
planner with an expanding
flooring co. in the Hazleton
Area. The candidate should
have a 2 year degree in
logistics or equivalent ex-
perience, strong verbal and
organizational skills, self
starter able to multi task,
detail oriented and strong
problem solving skills.
Responsibilities include
inventory management for
multiple locations, purchase
order creation and pro-
cessing, air freight quotes
and deliveries. Analyze
sales and inventory data to
review and plan materials.
SAP, order management
and inventory tools, MS
office, proficient in Excel are
needed. Excellent benefits
and competitive salary
based on qualifications,
Please send resume and
salary requirements to:
ATTN: HR Dept.
Box 667
Hazleton, PA 18201
Fax: 570-450-0231
Email:
donna.reimold@ forbo.com
STYLIST
At BONTON SALON In Wilkes-
Barre. Includes weekends.
Salary vs. commission, paid
benefits. Clientele a Plus.
Call Carolyn
1-800-789-5478 ext 180
WAREHOUSE/
DISTRIBUTION
CENTER POSITIONS
Job duties may include: order
picking/packing, inventory of
incoming merchandise, and
shipping. Physical require-
ments include the ability to
twist, bend, squat, reach, stand
and/or walk for extended peri-
ods of time. Lifting up to 45 lbs
may be required. Applicants
must possess a strong work
ethic, sharp attention to detail,
and be reliable. Employees
must work quickly and
efficiently with a high level of
accuracy.
vkasha.aad@gmail.com
Human Resources
HR/PAYROLL SPECIALIST
Local flooring company is seek-
ing a HR/PR Specialist.
The candidate should be strong
in HR and have ADP Payroll
experience. College degree or
minimum of 5 years experience.
Candidate must have strong
computer skills, ability to
communicate well and be able
to multi-task in a busy office.
This job will consist of main-
taining vacation/PTO time,
training, insurance bills, payroll
backup and maintain job
descriptions and policies.
Competitive starting salary with
benefits.
If you are looking to be part of
a growing team in a fast paced
and challenging environment,
fax or e-mail resume with salary
requirements to:
HR Department
Box 667
Hazleton, Pa. 18201
Fax: 570-450-0231
donna.reimold@forbo.com
Installation / Maintenace / Repair
FORKLIFT
MECHANIC
Action Lift, Inc., located in
Pittston, PA, is the exclusive
dealership for Crown and
TCM forklifts for NEPA. We
are seeking a full time forklift
mechanic to troubleshoot, re-
pair and diagnose Crown and
other makes of lift trucks.
Good written and verbal com-
munication skills, as well as
customer care skills are
necessary. A valid drivers li-
cense and the ability to safely
operate lift trucks are re-
quired. Previous forklift mech-
anical experience or technic-
al school graduate will be
considered. We offer an
excellent wage and benefits
package, as well as 401K
Retirement Savings Plan,
paid holidays, paid vacation
and much more.
E-mail your resume to
mermar@actionliftinc.com
or fax to 570-603-2880
HVAC
INSTALLER
Qualified candidates must
read & interpret HVAC sys-
tem drawings, specs & sub-
mittals, as well as fabricate
& install fiberboard ductwork.
Have experience installing:
all types of commercial units,
refrigerant & gas piping,
control wiring & components.
Salary commensurate with
experience & includes full
benefit package. Please
reply with cover letter to:
Mericle Construction, Inc.
100 Baltimore Dr.
Wilkes-Barre PA 18702
hr@mericle.com
Logistics/Transportation
TRUCK DRIVER
Exp. H20 driver preferred in
Marcellus shale industry. must
have Class A or B. Sign on bo-
nus for exp. Clean MVR, safety
record & excellent attendance.
Must have 2 yrs exp. min.
Health, dental & great starting
pay. Call 298-0924
Maintenance / Supervisory
CARPET + TILE
CLEANERS
Stanl ey Steemer i s hi ri ng.
Drivers license required; must
work Saturdays, 7 am - done;
good OT. Wage + commission.
Call Lou Refice 570-955-3536
at Harvis HR Servics to re-
quest employment application
or leave message. stanley-
steemer.com. EOE
timesleaderautos.com
Find
Your Next
Vehicle
Online.
timesleader.com
Get news when
it happens.
K
PAGE 2D Thursday, July 25, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Business / Strategic Management
Regional New Media Sales Manager
Do you want to be part of the winning Team? Are you interested in being part of
a company expanding and setting the standard for their Industry? Do you have
what it takes to be a True Hunter?
Civitas Media and The Times Leader is hiring a Regional New Media Manager
who can not only source their leads, but close them as well. This is a revenue-
producing, sales-based position. The ability to work with and achieve quotas is a
must. We are looking for someone who wants to come into this position and turn
themselves into a powerhouse. We want candidates who will always be scouting
for new opportunities in every interaction while representing our organization in
the best possible light. We are looking for applicants who can leverage related
experience in local merchant advertising, along with respective connections to
build partnerships. Both a sense of professionalism and adaptability are a must.
The ideal candidate will have excellent written and verbal communication skills,
the ability to adapt and work well in a fast-paced environment, a positive attitude
and willingness to learn, a friendly and personable presence, the ability to work
seamlessly both alone and within a team, attention to detail, and exceptional
organizational capabilities. Most importantly, must possess the ability to both
establish and maintain proftable business relationships.
This position will work closely with management to implement and execute
new digital revenue streams and train digital & traditional salespeople on how
these new products ft into our overall digital portfolio. This individual will be an
experienced feld sales representative with outstanding digital knowledge as well
as being knowledgeable in emerging and existing facets of digital media. Strong
candidates will exceed specifc activity metrics and revenue goals.
Qualifcations: Education, Certifcations, and/or Licenses and Experience
Compensation: Salary plus Commission
Full Time Position: Exempt
Candidates must be Social Media users and have a strong comprehension
of emerging media and technologies.
2-4 years industry or digital sales experience preferred.
Effectively deliver formal presentations to audiences (example-PowerPoint).
Requires the ability to travel to customer sites and industry functions.
Requires a valid drivers license.
Civitas Media is a growing Company and is currently adding associates with a
variety of skill sets. Civitas Media has publications in NC, SC, TN, KY, VA, WV,
OH, IL, MO, GA, OK, IN and PA.
Send resume and cover letter to wlafferty@civitasmedia.com or to
Walt Lafferty
The Times Leader
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre PA 18711
80016384
Education
HEAD START CURRENTLY HIRING
We are looking for DEDICATED individuals to join the HEAD START TEAM!
Part Time Assistant Teacher positions available Nanticoke and Plymouth
Head Start Centers; Full Time Cooks needed in Edwardsville and Wilkes-
Barre. Classroom Substitutes needed for all locations. Visit our website at
www.lchs.hsweb.org for all the details. Extensive Fringe Benefit package in-
cludes Paid Holidays, Paid Sick time, Paid Training and more; FT
positions are eligible for health insurance or cash out option. Submit/Fax/
resume/ cover letter/copy of degree and transcripts and 3 Written Letters of
Reference to:
LCHS, ATTN: Human Resources, PO Box 540, Wilkes-Barre, PA
18703-0540. Fax: #570-829-6580; Email: lchshumanresources@hsweb.org
Applicants must possess current ACT 34 State Police Clearance and ACT
151 Child Abuse Clearance/FBI Fingerprints (via DPW) as conditions of
employment. Due to the volume of responses anticipated, only qualified
candidates will be contacted. E.O.E. M/F/V/H. NO PHONE CALLS.
Medical/Health
DATA ENTRY
PERSON
Temporary part time data
entry person for
medical office.
Send resume to:
BOX 4460
C/O TIMES LEADER
15 NORTH MAIN STREET
WILKES-BARRE, PA
18711
MEDICAL BILLING
CLERK
Full-time position for very busy
medical practice. Experience in
medical billing a MUST. Salary
commensurate with experi-
ence. Send resume to:
The Times Leader
Box 4440
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
Pittston/Scranton Area
Aids/Med Techs/Care givers
Will Train
3-11 & 11-7
For Personal Care Home
May Call on 7-3
To Pittston Heavenly Manor or
Angels Family Manor
570-341-5012
570-655-0272
RNs & LPN's
Needed immediately.
Full time, part time &
per diem positions. Covering
Luzerne & Lackawanna
counties. Competitive salary,
mileage reimbursement. Pleas-
ant working conditions.
For interview call
Superior Health Services at
570-883-9581
The Greater Hazleton
Health Alliance
has the following
openings:
Cook (80% w/full benefits)
Medical Technologist
Casual (Nights)
Exercise Physiologist
Supervisor
(BS w/3-5 years experi-
ence)
Radiology Supervisor FT
Ultrasonographer/
Vascular Tech FT
Cat Scan Tech Casual
(Ultrasound/Vascular
Certification Preferred)
Physical Therapist
(Rehab) FT
Physical Therapist
(Home Health) FT
Operating Room RNs
Casual
(experienced preferred)
Home Health RNs
FT, PT & Casual
SDU/Endo/PACU Float RN
- Casual
Med/Surg/Tele./Peds RNs
FT/PT
Speech & Occupational
Therapists Casual
Excellent benefit package for
full time employees, which
includes medical, dental, vis-
ion, tuition reimbursement,
STD, LTD, Life insurance
and defi ned contri buti on
pl an.
Candidates interested can
forward their resume in con-
fidence to: jobs@ghha.org
Employment Applications
are available for download
from our web site at
www.ghha.org
Other
PROFESSIONAL
PET GROOMER
with experience.
570-829-5904
Part-Time/Temporaries
MAINTENANCE
PERSON
The Target Shopper
Magazine, Inc. located
at 102 N. Main St. Old
Forge is looking for a
part time maintenance
person to handle main-
tenance in it's new 7,500
sq. ft. bldg. Qualified
candidate must be will-
ing to work a flexible
schedule. Please con-
tact Sherry @ (570)
457-7020 for more de-
tails and to set up an in-
terview. Wage com-
mensurate with experi-
ence.
Restaurants
COOK &
DISHWASHER
Experienced line cook and
flexible dishwashers for
Agolino's Restaurant.
Call to schedule an appoint-
ment, or apply in person after
2:00pm, 570-655-3030.
Kitchen Manager
& Head Cook
for Fine Dining Restaurant &
Tavern in Montoursville,
Lycoming County, PA
570-777-0777
Commercial
PITTSTON
8 unit apartment building.
$145,000. Call for details,
570-655-1606
Commercial
Hanover Twp
Parkway Plaza
Sans Souci Parkway
Commercial Space For
Lease 1,200 sq. ft. store-
front starting at $700/
month. Plenty of parking.
Central heat & air. Call
570-991-0706
KINGSTON
Great opportunity for this 2,900
sq. ft. professional office build-
ing in high traffic area. Last
used as a veterinary clinic but
i s easi l y adapted for other
uses. See how this space can
be used for you! Open entry
space, individual offices, full
basement for storage, central
air, and gas heat. Parking for
12 cars.
MLS#12-416
$299,900
Call Rhea for details
570-696-6677
NANTICOKE
212 E. Main Street
Building on Main St. near Anto-
nio's. Former business & res-
idential combination with 4
floors containing 3000+ sq. ft.
Walk-in street level entry both
front and back. Small off street
parking area in rear. Great op-
portunity with new Main St.
projects and foot traffic nearby.
$ 40,000. 570-760-7888 or
570-735-6879.
NANTICOKE
Newly remodeled, immaculate
office building. 1,600 sq. ft,
central air, plenty of parking,
abundant storage areas, han-
dicapped accessible.
MLS #13-667
$79,900
Dana Distasio
570-9333
PITTSTON
$69,900
68 William St.
Great investment property with 3
units and separate utilities. Each
unit has 2 entrances and washer
hook up. Roof is 5 years old. For
more info visit:
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
MLS 12-1897
Call Tom
570-262-7716
PITTSTON
$99,900
37-39 & 45 Cliff St.
Multi family, 5 units! Great in-
vestment opportunity.Duplex
and 3 unit sold together. Plenty
of off street parking. Directions:
Traveling North on Main St.,
Pittston, R onto Chapel St., L
onto Cliff. Property is on the
right. www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
MLS 13-2970
Keri Best - 570-885-5082
Commercial
Pittston
For sale
5 Unit
Money Maker
Available immediately. Fully
rented, leases on all five
units. Separate utilities, new
roof in 2007, 4 new gas fur-
naces, off street parking for 6
vehicles, 3 bay garage. Over
$29,000 in rents. A true
money maker for the serious
investor. Must Sell!
$150,000.
Call Steve at
(570) 468-2488
SWOYERSVILLE
Great investment property. On
corner lot. Close to all major
highways & conveniences. Bring all
offers. 1 unit needs to be updated &
you are all done.
MLS #13-1983
$155,900
Call Pat Doty at
570-394-6901
-
696-2468
WEST NANTICOKE
$139,900
30 E. Poplar St.
Multi - Family
5 apartments and a 2 car garage,
all rented. Off street parking for 8
cars. Great investment.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-680
Tom Salvaggio
570-262-7716
WEST SIDE
Well established Italian Res-
taurant on the West Side with
seating for 75. Business only
includes good will, all furniture
and fixtures, all kitchen equip-
ment and del i very van for
$150,000. Building sold separ-
ately. Restaurant on 1st floor
and 2 bedroom luxury apart-
ment on 2nd f l oor f or
$250, 000.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 12-3433
Call Charlie
BEST $1 SQ. FT.
LEASES
YOULL EVER SEE!
WILKES-BARRE
Warehouse, light manufactur-
ing distribution. Gas heat,
sprinklers, overhead doors,
parking. We have 27,000
sq.ft., and 32,000 sq. ft.
There is nothing this good!
Sale or Lease
Call Larry @ 570-696-4000
or 570-430-1565
For Sale By Owner
EXETER
39 Memorial Street
Great location near schools,
nice yard, 10 rooms, 4 bed-
rooms, 2 bath, gas heat,
private driveway. Detached
2 car garage. Walk-up attic,
f ul l basement . As I s.
$69, 900. 570- 474- 0340
FORTY FORT
1670 MURRAY ST.
FOR SALE
BY OWNER
Qualified buyers only. Very
versat i l e 2 f ami l y home,
ranch style. Large lot. Beauti-
fully landscaped. $162,000.
Call 570-283-3469
leave message.
PLAINS
39 SLOPE STREET
For sal e by owner, 3 bed-
rooms, 1 1/2 baths, modern
eat-in kitchen, large deck, off
street parking on a 50X150 lot,
nice neighborhood, all appli-
ances i ncl uded. Aski ng
$89, 000
570-310-1697
For Sale By Owner
HANOVER TWP.
REALTORS WELCOME
Exceptional 3,165 sq. ft. home
in Liberty Hills. Heated in
ground pool, deck. Marble
flooring, wainscoting & crown
molding. New kitchen, Cherry
cabi nets & Brazi l i an hard-
wood floors, stainless steel ap-
pliances, granite counter tops.
Master bedroom with built-ins
& walk in closet. 3 fireplaces.
Lower level wet bar, theater,
exercise & laundry rooms.
Central vac & air, security & ir-
rigation systems. New roof,
furnace & pool liner. Pictures
on www.forsalebyowner.com.
L i s t i n g I D # 2 3 9 5 0 9 0 6 .
$318,000. Call 570-814-8010
for appointment.
HARVEYS LAKE
Barnum Street
Awesome lake view double
wi de, Mobi l e vi nyl si ded,
peaked roof, covered deck on
foundation two car detached
paved driveway 100x100 lot.
$120,000 Call: 404-271-6728
HARVEYS LAKE
BRICK RANCH
50' LAKEFRONT
DOCK
3 bedrooms, 1. 5 bat hs,
modern kitchen, living room
with floor to ceiling brick fire-
place, huge 105'x130' lot.
Large deck off living room
overlooking lake. Reduced
$475,000. Serious inquiries
only. 570-760-6820
LAFLIN
Move in Ready!
3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, su-
per closet space, attic stor-
age. Open floor plan, with
ki tchen, fami l y & di ni ng
areas. Great room wi t h
cathedral cei l i ngs, hard-
wood floors & wood burning
fireplace. 1st floor, full size
l aundry room. Fi ni shed
basement with wet bar, slid-
ing glass doors to yard. Two
car garage. Design your
own backyard landscaping.
$174,000
570-814-8157 or eims-
tella@yahoo.com
MOUNTAIN TOP
Bow Creek
Four bedroom, 2. 5 bat hs,
2, 300+ sq. f t . , 1. 5 acres.
$285,000 for information text
570-262-2375
MOUNTAIN TOP
5 Pine Tree Road
Five bedrooms, 2.5 baths, fam-
ily, living, dining & laundry
rooms. Eat in kitchen, finished
basement with storage room,
attached 2 car garage. Re-
duced to $229,900
For appointment call
570-474-5463
PITTSTON TWP.
RENT TO OWN
2 bedroom, clean, needs no work. re-
modeled throughout. Minutes from I-
81 & PA Turnpike. $550/month.
570-471-7175 or 610-767-9456
PLAINS TWP.
29 Jay Drive
2 st ory, 4 bedroom, 2. 5
baths, on half acre. Fenced
yard with heated in ground
pool.
$250,000.
570-235-1624
SHAVERTOWN
18 Genoa Lane
NEW LISTING!
For Sale By Owner
Executive downsize home, 4
bedrooms, 2.5 baths, private
back yard with 16 x 36 in
ground pool. Meticulously
maintained. $389,000
www.forsalebyowner.com
ID 23949718
or call 315-382-5295
WEST PITTSTON
PRICE REDUCED!!
33 Delaware Ave.
2 bedroom ranch, completely re-
modeled, includes spare build-
ing lot, $39,900. 570-299-5415
For Sale By Owner
SHAVERTOWN
Cozy 3 bedroom, 1 bath
home for sale in the Dallas
school district. Living room
boasts a gas fired cultured
Stone fireplace. Formal
dining room and eat in
kitchen that opens onto very
large deck, situated on 3/4
acre with rock walls along
side and back yard. Plenty of
off street parking. All
appliances included. Good
neighborhood, convenient to
everything. Appraised at
$125,000, selling price is
negotiable. For more inform-
ation call (570)574-0134
SHAVERTOWN
OPEN HOUSE
SAT. & SUN.
JULY 27 & 28
10 AM TO 1 PM
4 Marilyn Drive
Well-maintained 2,450 sq. ft.
home with 4 bedrooms, 1.75
baths, attached 2 car garage
on 1.09 acre plus an
additional 1 acre lot. Finished
basement with laundry room.
Hardwood floors and
carpeting. New roof, Guardi-
an backup generator, large
wrap-around deck. Located
on a quiet cul-de-sac with
wooded surroundings.
Asking $240,000
Call 570-357-8126
WILKES-BARRE TWP.
Single House, 3 bedrooms. 1
bath, sunroom 10x25, kitchen,
dining room, parlor, & base-
ment. Gas baseboard, hot wa-
ter. 1448 sq ft. 50x130 ft lot,
75% fenced in. Buses to all
area schools nearby. Property
available to make a driveway.
$40,000. Call 570-822-2382
HAZLETON/
ZION'S GROVE
Watch the wildlife from
your back porch!
Modern, 1 bedroom loft style
townhouse in gated
community. Enjoy fishing,
swimming & the large com-
munity lodge. Taxes
$400/year. Maintenance fee
$70/month. $28,000, negoti-
able. 5 minutes to Hazleton,
1 mile to Eagle Rock Resort.
570-824-6887 or
570-793-9390
Houses For Sale
DALLAS
Newberry Estate Exceptional
4 bedroom, 3 bath townhouse.
Hardwood floors. Bright & airy
kitchen. Finished lower level
with walk-out to patio. Enjoy
carefree living with swimming,
golf & tennis amenities.
MLS#13-2185. $199,000
Call Geri 570-862-7432
Houses For Sale
S. WILKES-BARRE
REDUCED $99,900
43 Richmont Ave.
Near Riverside Park. Motiv-
ated seller, make reasonable
offer. 3 bedroom, 2 bath Cape
Cod, central air, hardwood
f l oor, above ground pool ,
f enced yard.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-789
Tom Salvaggio
570-262-7716
EXETER
40 Lincoln Street
$119,900
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday, July 28th, 2-4
Remodeled home has some
great sur- prises! Two mod-
ern baths, first floor laundry,
three ni ce si ze bedrooms,
large new kitchen with granite
counters and tile floor, corner
lot with nice yard. Everything
is new, so you don't have any-
thing to do but move in!
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS #13-3008
Call Colleen
PITTSTON
PENDING
Reduced $99,900
328 S. Main St.
3 story Victorial with 10 rooms, 4
bedrooms, 2 baths, 2 car garage
with newer driveway. Central air,
large yard. MLS 13-1073
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
Call Tom
570-262-7716
DALLAS
Newberry Estate
The Greens
4,000 sq. ft. condo with view of
ponds & golf course. Three
bedrooms on 2 floors. 5 1/2
baths, 2 car garage & more.
$425,000.
MLS# 12-1480
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
Houses For Sale
BACK MOUNTAIN
$135,000
Spacious country living! This
roomy 3 BR ranch features an
open concept floor plan with
cozy radi ant fl oor heati ng,
huge screened porch, and two
level deck on .91 acres in the
Dallas School District.
Call Christine Kutz
(570) 332-8832
570-613-9080
BACK MOUNTAIN
Country location. 3 bedroom
ranch, large deck off 1st floor
family room, vinyl siding, 1
acre lot.
MLS #13-2811
$159,000
Besecker Realty
675-3611
BEAR CREEK
Spaciously satisfying from the
open kitchen/eating area, im-
pressive. Fireplace in great
room to an expanded family
room, you will enjoy life more
in this picturesque 4 bedroom
in Laurel Brook Estates.
MLS#13-1587
$395,000
Arlene Warunek
570-714-6112
Smith Hourigan Group
570-696-1195
FORTY FORT
1426 Wyoming Ave.
REDUCED $189,900
You will fall in love with the grand
Victorian with magnificent entry foy-
er, modern ki t chen wi t h new
counter tops, enclosed 3 season
side and rear porch. Renovated
large front porch, off street parking
and so much more! Property could
also be Professional office in home
use.
MUST SEE. MLS 12-3604
Jay A. Crossin
Extension 23
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
K
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Thursday, July 25, 2013 PAGE 3D
Automotive
AUTOMOBILE SALES
PROFESSIONAL
Earn the top compensation you deserve!
Superior pay plan
Paid benefts package
Aggressive advertising budget
Huge, Constantly replenished inventory
5 Day work week
Excellent work environment
Modern Facility
Must have valid PA drivers license
Please send resumes to
ajdetrick@kpautogroup.com
OR apply in person to
Ken Pollock Auto Group,
339 Highway 315,
Pittston, PA18640.
Automotive
8
0
1
0
4
3
290 Mundy St., Wilkes-Barre 570-301-2277
NEPAs PREMIER PRE-OWNED
AUTO DEALERSHIP IS SEEKING
AUTO SALES EXECUTIVES
& BUSINESS MANAGER
EARN THE TOP COMPENSATION YOU DESERVE
Superior Pay Plan
Paid Benefts Pkg.
Paid Vacation
Aggressive Advertising Budget
Huge, Constantly
Replenished Inventory
5 Day Work Week
Excellent Working Conditions
Modern Facility
High Traffc Location
FAX RESUME: 570-824-1599
EMAIL RESUME: jbaloga@nationwidecarsales.net
AMERICAS NEW CAR ALTERNATIVE
Accounting /Financial
Come growwith us! GWCWarranty, a nationwide leader in vehicle service contracts, is seeking bright, energetic
and ambitious individuals to join our analytics team in our brand newWilkes-Barre executive ofce.
Business Analyst
The Business Analyst provides analytical, fnancial and reporting support for actuarial performance, risk-based
pricing and related considerations. In addition, the Business Analyst will design meaningful dashboards to
measure the impact of strategies and support corporate initiatives with high-level analysis. Candidates must
possess a strong analytical background and a bachelors degree, with a strong preference given to candidates
having Masters Degrees. An advanced working knowledge of Microsoft Excel, including Excel VBA and macros,
and Microsoft Power Point is required. Experience with SQL Server Management Studio and SQL Server BI
Development Studio is strongly preferred.
Marketing Analyst
The Marketing Analyst provides analytical and reporting support for product, customer, and general market
performance. In addition, the Marketing Analyst will measure the impact of marketing programs and support
strategic marketing initiatives with high-level analysis. The position will have direct involvement with pricing
and competitive analysis and market opportunity assessment. This job is MBA-level work but may also be
perfect for the high-performing individual aiming to gain business experience. Candidates must possess a
bachelors degree, with a preference given to candidates having Masters Degrees. A strong working knowledge
of Microsoft Excel and Microsoft Power Point is required.
GWC Warranty ofers a competitive salary and comprehensive benefts package including medical and 401k.
Interested candidates may submit their resumes via email to careers@gwcwarranty.com or by fax at
570-456-0967.Please visit our website at: www.gwcwarranty.com
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
The Housing Authority of the County of Luzerne will receive
Bids for the Capital Grant Program 2012 consisting of six (6)
contracts, until 10:00 A.M. (local time) on the 15thday of August,
2013 at the Offices of the Housing Authority of the County of
Luzerne, 250 First Avenue, Kingston, Pennsylvania 18704.
The Contracts are as follows:
Contract No. 1 Site Work
Contract No. 2 General Construction Work
Contract No. 3 Exterior Door, Frame & Hardware Replace-
ment Work
Contract No. 6 Elevator Upgrades
Contract No. 7 Fire Alarm Upgrades
Contract No. 8 Emergency Generator Upgrades
Bids will be publicly opened and read aloud beginning at 10:00
A.M. that same day at the Offices of the Housing Authority.
A pre-bid conference will be held on August 8th@ 10:00 A.M. in
the offices of the Housing Authority at 250 First Avenue, King-
ston.
Online Contracting Documents: Documents may be obtained on
or after July 22, 2013 by contacting the Office of A+E Group, Inc.
Online access will be provided through the Engineers FTP site.
Printed Contracting Documents: Documents may be obtained
after July 25, 2013 by contacting the Office of A+E Group, Inc.,
140 Maffett Street, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18705, phone 570-822-
8500, and payment of a $50.00 non-refundable fee per contract
to A+E Group, Inc.
Each Bid when submitted must be accompanied by a Bid Se-
curity which shall not be less than ten (10%) percent of the
amount of the Total Base Bid; a Non-Collusion Affidavit; State-
ment of Bidders Qualification; and Representations, Certifica-
tions and Other Statements of Bidders HUD Form 5369-A. The
successful Bidder will be required to furnish and pay for a satis-
factory Performance Bond and a Labor and Material Payment
Bond.
Refer to other bidding requirements described in Instruction to
Bidders. Bidders must submit their Bid on the Bid Form provided.
Bidders shall not alter this form in any way. All Bidders must be
registered on the A+E Group, Inc. Bidders List. A Bidder must
obtain Contracting Documents from A+E Group, Inc., or instruct
A+E Group, Inc. in writing to register the Bidder on the Bidders
List.
Attention is called to the provisions for Equal Employment Op-
portunity and the payment of not less than the minimum salaries
and wages as set forth in the Non-Technical Specifications must
be paid on the Project. All contractors and subcontractors will be
required to adhere to Section 3 of the Housing and Urban De-
velopment Act of 1968 as amended.
The Housing Authority of the County of Luzerne reserves the
right to accept or reject any or all Bids and to waive any informal-
ities, irregularities, defects, errors or omissions in the bidding.
No bid shall be withdrawn for a period of sixty (60) days sub-
sequent to the opening of the Bids, without consent of the Hous-
ing Authority of the County of Luzerne.
THE HOUSING AUTHORITY OF THE
COUNTY OF LUZERNE
DAVID J. FAGULA
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
Real Estate Auction
FORMER U.S. POSTAL SERVICE
CARRIER ANNEX
30,600 +/- GSF Building
with 4.67 acres land
85 Young Street
Hanover Township,
Luzerne County, PA
Inspect Property
July 24 & 30
1 pm - 5 pm
Contact: Jack Fannin
(404) 215-6822
Auction Opens July 18, 2013
www.realestatesales.gov
Houses For Sale
BEAR CREEK
Enjoy the country in this spa-
cious Cape Cod home situ-
ated on 7.6 acres, located just
minutes from town, major high-
ways and Geisinger Hospital.
This home features 4/5 bed-
rooms, two baths, hardwood
floors, huge family & living
rooms with fireplaces & a two
car garage.
MLS #12-2627
$179,900
Karen Ryan
283-9100 x 14
283-9100
BERWICK
Wooded building lot consisting
of 2.64 acres within minutes of
Berwick. Country setting, but
close to conveniences.
Located on Confers Lane.
Price: $60,000
Call Patsy at 570-204-0983
STRAUSSER REAL ESTATE
570-759-3300
DALLAS
VIEWMONT ACRES
All this 2.8+ acre lot needs is
your vision for your dream
home. Located i n a qui et
country setting, this partially
cleared lot has a great view of
t he mount ai ns. Sept i c i s
already on site and ready for
Summer building.
MLS #13-1705
Only $65,000
Call Barbara Metcalf
570-696-0883
570-696-3801
DALLAS
This 4 bedroom, 2.5 bath Cape
Cod style home has so much
to offer! Plenty of room for
everyone. Master bedroom
with walk in closet & full bath,
family room w/fireplace, rec.
room with half bath in lower
level. hardwood floors on 1st
fl oor, new wi ndows, above
ground pool .
MLS# 13-1109
$165,000
Call Tracy Zarola
574-6465
DALLAS
19 Glen Riddle Lane
Peaceful surroundings over-
whelm the senses when you
step foot on this lovely prop-
erty. Tudor style 2 story with 4
bedrooms and 2.5 baths, fam-
ily room with fireplace. Access-
ible outdoor deck from kitchen,
family room Basement area
can be finished off for addition-
al living space. MLS 13-1818
$284,500
Jay A. Crossin
Extension 23
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
DALLAS
$469,000
Beautiful well kept 2 story Co-
lonial features 3,900 square
feet, 5 bedrooms, 3.5 baths,
hardwood & tile floors, gor-
geous entry foyer, bui l t-i n
POOL, fenced yard, 3 car gar-
age.
ONE YEAR HOME
WARRANTY INCLUDED.
MLS 13-1932
Tracy Zarola
574-6465
696-0723
DALLAS
NEW LISTING
Great Location. 3 bedrooms,
2.5 baths, central air condition-
ing, gas hot water heat. Two
car garage. Large corner lot.
MLS #13-2825
$194,500
Besecker Realty
675-3611
Houses For Sale
DALLAS
Spacious Cape Cod in wonder-
ful Back Mountain Develop-
ment. tree lined streets & side-
walks with a country feel. Up-
dated windows & electric.
MLS#13-1913
$185,000
John Shelly
570-702-4162
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
DRUMS
Bright, sunny raised ranch with
beautifully landscaped yard. Cul-
de-sac location. Large oak kitchen
with skylights and beamed ceiling
in dining area. Wood burning fire-
place in the living room. Large Mas-
ter bedroom suite. Family room,
hobby room, huge garage and
deck.
MLS#13-1638
$164,900
Call Mary Ann Desiderio
570-715-7733
Smith Hourigan Group
Mountain Top
570-474-6307
DUPONT
Very nice 2 story, move in con-
di t i on. Ori gi nal woodwork,
stained glass windows, hard-
wood under carpet, fenced
yard on corner lot.
MLS#13-2310
$95,000
Arlene Warunek
714-6112
Smith Hourigan Group
696-1195
DUPONT
OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 1-3
Remodel ed cont empor ar y
home wi t h new ki t chen &
baths. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths,
great outdoor living space with
fenced yard, above ground
pool & detached garage.
MLS#PM-2459
Call George Zygmunt
646-706-2934
570-629-6100
HANOVER TWP.
HANOVER GREEN SECTION
80 Steele Street
Three bedroom brick ranch,
fenced back yard, pool, fin-
i shed basement, encl osed
pat i o. One car gar age.
$160, 000. 570- 706- 6479
Houses For Sale
DUPONT
250 Main Street
$89,900
Affordable brick ranch home
with 3 bedrooms, deck over-
looking fenced in yard. de-
tached two car garage. a low
mai ntenance home i n very
convenient location with new
propane furnace.
MLS #13-3009
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
Colleen Turant
570-239-4293
DURYEA
REDUCED
$82,900
226 Church St.
Large 2 story with 3 bedrooms and
2 full baths. Extra large room sizes,
stained glass and natural woodo-
work. Not flooded in 2011. MLS
#13-190. For more information and
photos visit atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Charlie
EDWARDSVILLE
Priced to sell! Charming home
on a nice tree lined street. 3
bedrooms 1 bath, great room
sizes. Large eat in kitchen, 1
bedroom of f ers a wal k i n
closet, hardwood floors in bed-
rooms, 3 year ol d above
ground pool with deck, pool
comes with an extra, brand
new, liner, modern bathroom.
A great home at a great price
just waiting for its new owner.
Sold as is; inspections are for
buyer information only.
MLS #13-2085. $47,900
Call/text Donna Cain
947-3824 or Tony Wasco
570-855-2424
Weichert Realtors
TradeMark
570-901-1020
Houses For Sale
EXETER
13 Thomas Street
Handicap accessible. 2 bedroom
rancher with vinyl siding. Modern
kitchen and walk-in shower. Cent-
ral air conditioning. One car gar-
age. 3 season porch. Nice fenced
rear yard.
MLS # 13-2428. $95,000.
Ask for Bob Kopec
Humford Realty, Inc.
570-822-5126.
EXETER
362 Susquehanna Avenue
Completely remodeled, spec-
tacular, 2 story Victorian home,
with 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths,
new rear deck, full front porch,
tiled baths & kitchen, granite
counter tops. All cherry hard-
wood floors throughout, all new
stainless steel appliances &
lighting. New oil furnace, wash-
er/dryer in first floor bath.
Great neighborhood, nice yard.
$174,900 (30 year loan,
$8,750 down, $739/month, 30
years @ 3.25%)
NOT IN FLOOD
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
WALSH REAL ESTATE
GANOGA LAKE GEM!
665 CREST AVE. BENTON
This lovely residence is on a
spring fed 88 acre lake. 112
feet of lake frontage with dock.
2700+/- sq. ft. of energy effi-
cient living space with open
floor plan and vaulted ceilings
and great natural l i ghti ng.
Abundant windows plus ex-
pansive deck provide fabulous
views of the lake. Four bed-
rooms, three+ baths, fireplace
and more! Community beach,
tennis courts and 2000 acres
are all available to association
members.
#13-1857
RECENTLY REDUCED TO
$599,000
Carole Poggi
283-9100 x19
283-9100
LEHMAN TWP.
477 Trojan Road
Nice 3 bedroom modular, 2
baths, finished basement. All
on six country acres
Offered @ $139,500
Call Jim for details
TOWNE & COUNTRY REAL
ESTATE CO.
735-8932 542-5708
Houses For Sale
GLEN LYON
194-196 E. Main St.
Large home with mother in law
suite that can either be open to the
rest of the house or closed off with
its own entrance and used as an
apartment. This home has vinyl sid-
ing, newer electrical, replacement
windows, large yard and 2 car gar-
age. Home offer a 1st floor master
and bath, 3 fireplaces and tons of
room. Come check out all the pos-
sibilities for yourself.
MLS 13-2419
$84,900
John Polifka
570-704-6846
FIVE MOUNTAINS REALTY
570-542-2141
GLEN LYON
Large 5 bdrm, 2-1/2 bath
move-in condition home with
Home Warranty included. 3rd
floor has separate heat, small
kitchen and can greatly en-
hance home as bonus area or
rental income. Zoning is R-2.
MLS# 13-2241
$59,900
Call Dana Distasio
474-9801
HANOVER TWP
Lovely home in the Korn Krest
section of Hanover Twp. Open
downstairs floor plan. 3 bed-
rooms, l arge deck, above
ground pool . Out of fl ood
zone. Beautiful views. Very
low heating costs.
MLS #13-1358
$94,900
David Krolikowski
885-6731
CROSSIN
REAL ESTATE
288-0770
timesleader.com
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it happens.
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K
PAGE 4D Thursday, July 25, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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Rentals
Maple Manor
A Quality Manufactured Housing Community
New and Pre-Owned Homes for Sale!
Rentals Available
Select Homes for Lease with Option to Purchase
Financing Available to Qualified Buyers
18 William Street,
Taylor, Pa. 18517
Rental Office: 570-562-1931
www.umh.com
Licensed by the Pa. Dept. of Banking NMLS 200331
FRESH
INVENTORY
ARRIVING
DAILY!
Visit Us 24/7 WWW.VALLEYCHEVROLET.COM
2001 Chevrolet
Cavalier Coupe
#13747A, 2.2L 4 cyl., 5 SPEED Manual Transmis-
sion, Air Conditining, Steel Wheels, Am/FM Stereo,
Dual Air Bags, Cloth Front Buckets
$
6,980
*
2002 Buick LeSabre
#13158AA,Auto., Air, PW, PDL, Steering Wheel
Radio Controls, AM/FM CD, LOW MILE
$
7,893
*
2005 Kia Sorento
LX 4x4
#13158AA , 6 Cyl., AT, A/C, PW, PDL, Alloy
Wheels, Roof Rack, CD
$
9,997
*
2006 Chevy
Impala LS
#Z2989A, 3.5L AT, A.C, Sport Red Metallic, Cruise,
CD, 8 Way Power Seat, PW, PDL, Sport Mirrors
$
9,998
*
one
owner
ONLY
33K
MILES
1998 ChEvY
COrvEttE COupE
#Z3016, V8 Automatic, Climate Control, Removable GlassRoof Panel
ONLY
48K
MILES
2007 toyota
Camry CE
#13771B, Automatic, Air Conditioning, PW,
PDL, Cruise Control, AM/FM/CD
$
11,963
*
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MILeS
2005 Chevy Silverado
1500 Ext. Cab 4x4 Z71
#13294A, 5.3L AT, A/C, PW, PDL,
Tow Package, Cruise, Alloy Wheels, Bedliner, CD
$
18,950
*
one
owner
2012 volkswagen
Beetle turbo
#13172A, 4 CyL., TURBO Fuel Injected Automatic,
Air Conditioning, Power Options, Heated Leather,
Spoiler, Alloy Wheels, CD & Much More!
$
18,999
*
one
owner
ONLY
7K
MILES
2010 Dodge Nitro heat
All Wheel Drive
#13414A, Automatic,
Air Conditioning, PW, PDL, Cruise Control,
Chrome Wheels, Chrome Mirrors And Door Handles
$
21,992
*
one
owner
ONLY
12K
MILES
2008 Chevy Silverado
1500 Crew Cab 4x4
#13235A, 5.3L V8 Auto, Air, PW, PDL, Trailering Pkg, Alum.
Wheels, Locking Rear Differntial, CD/MP3, Remote Start Prep Pkg,
Chrome Grille Surround
$
21,948
*
one
owner
2007 Chevrolet
Cobalt Lt 4 Dr
#13821A, 2.2L 4 Cyl., Automatic, Air Conditioning,
Power Windows & Door Locks, Keyless Entry, Tilt
$
11,980
*
ONLY
15K
MILES
2010 Jeep patriot
Sport 4x4
#13259B, 2.4L 4 Cyl., Automatic, Roof Rack, Pw, Pdl,
Air Conditioning, Keyless Entry, Cruise, Privacy Glass,
$
13,950
*
2008 Nissan Xterra
4WD 4 Door
(Auto Off Road)
#13483B, 4.0L 6 Cyl., Automatic, Air, Alloys, Pw,
Pdl, Cruise, Running Boards, Cd, Keyless Entry, Hill
Start Assist,
$
14,968
*
2006 Chevrolet
trailblazer LS 4x4
#Z3034, 4.2L Automatic, Front/Rear Air, Alloy
Wheels, PW, PDL, CD, Cruise Control, Privacy Glass
$
14,987
*
2002 YAMAhA
r6
#13658B
$
3,999
*
2008 Jeep Liberty
Sport 4x4
#13179A, 3.7L 6 cylinder Automatic Transmission,
Alloy Wheels, Sunroof, PW, PDL, Traction Control
$
16,857
*
Low
MILeS
2007 Chevrolet
Suburban 1500 LtZ 4x4
#12592A, Auto., F/R Air, Power Options, Sunroof,
Power Seats, Navigation, Running Boards, Tow Pkg.,
Leather, Quad Seating
$
29,888
*
We Accept ALL Trades! Cars, Trucks, ATVs, Campers, Boats,
Motorcycles... You Bring It...WE WILL TRADE IT!
Prices plus tax & tags. Select pictures for illustration purposes only. Prior use daily rental on select models.
Not Responsible for Typographical Errors. XM Satellite & OnStar Fees where applicable
2007 Chevy Silverado
1500 Ext Cab Lt 4x4
$
18,949
*
Z71
#13694A, 5.3L 8 Cyl. Auto, A/C, PW, PDL,
Tow Pkg., Cruise, Alloy Wheels, Remote Start
one
owner
Scan From
Mobile Device
For More Specials
2011 Chevy
Silverado 2500 Ext.
Cab 4x4
#13548B, 6.0L Auto., PW, PDL, Remote Start Prep Pkg.,
Air, Cruise, 17 Aluminum Wheels, CD, Snow Plow Prep
Pkg., Locking Rear Differential
$
29,850
ONLY
31K
MILES
2011 Chevy Silverado
1500 Crew Cab 4x4 LtZ
White Diamond
#14018A, 5.3L AT, A/C Folding Hard Tonneau Cover, Sunroof, Feated/
Cooled Leather, Chrome Pkg., Running Boards, All Power Options,
Navigation, Locking Wheel House Liner, Rear Park Assist & More.
$
34,980
ONLY
22K
MILES
2009 Chevy Silverado
1500 Crew Cab 4x4 Z71
#13506A, 5.3L V8 Auto., Stabilitrak, Locking Rear
Differential, 18 Aluminum Wheels, HD Trailering Equip-
ment, PW, PDL, Remote keyless Entry, CD, Chrome Grille
$
20,924
*
one
owner
SALE PRICE
$
20,911
Houses For Sale
HANOVER TWP
291 Vanessa Drive
Scenic view of the Wyoming
Valley. Located at the end of a
nice private road. Minutes to
Wyoming Valley Country Club,
Industri al Park & school s.
Close to Rtes. 81 & 309. Cus-
tom bui l t, 4 bedrooms & 4
baths. 1st floor family room
with wood burning fireplace.
formal dining room off the liv-
ing room. 1st floor laundry,
large enclosed patio with tile
floor, hardwood floors on first &
second f l oors. Large t wo
vehicle garage. Lower level re-
creation room with bar, extra
room with coal/wood burning
stove which can be used as
5th bedroom. Lots of closet
space.
Must See to Appreciate
MLS #12-4610
$269,900
Louise Laine 283-9100 x 20
HANOVER TWP.
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday, July 14, 1-2:30
437 Plymouth Ave.
Lyndwood Gardens
Newer 2 story. kitchen with island &
breakfast area open to family room
with fireplace. Formal dining room,
living room, master suite & 3 addi-
tional bedrooms with main bath on
second floor. 2 car garage. Fenced
yard. Deck. Central air.
Home warranty included.
MLS# 12-3070
$249,900
Call Linda
(570) 956-0584
Coldwell Banker Rundle
Real Estate
570-474-2340, ext 19
NANTICOKE
393 E. Noble St.
Check out this 4 bedroom, 1.5 bath
home with 1 car detached garage.
This home features a Jacuzzi tub,
newer roof, furnace, hot water heat-
er, replacement windows, fenced
yard and large covered deck.
MLS 13-613
$77,900
Call John Polifka
570-704-6846
FIVE MOUNTAINS REALTY
570-542-2141
Houses For Sale
HANOVER TWP.
Ext raordi nary qual i t y bui l t
4000+ sq. ft. Home - rear yard
with stone patio backs up to
the 8th Fairway of the Wyom-
ing Valley Country Club! Cus-
tom cherry eat- in kitchen with
island, formal living, dining &
fami l y rooms have custom
hardwood floors, 1st floor fam-
ily room has Vermont Stone
fireplace & wet bar, 1st floor
Master Suite has his & her
dressi ng rooms & powder
rooms opening to a tiled mas-
ter bath with jetted tub & sep-
arate tiled shower. Second
floor has 3 additional bed-
rooms with walk in closets, 2
full baths & large attic, gigantic
lower level family room has
stone fireplace, seated bar
area with sink & mirrored back
splash, workout area & powder
room. Stunning landscaping
wi t h an i ndoor & out door
speaker system, over sized 2
car garage & underground
spri nkl er system.
$395,000
Call Pat today @
570-287-1196
Smith Hourigan Group
570-287-1196
HANOVER TWP.
This brick beauty on a corner
lot boasts 4 bedrooms, 2 full &
2 half baths, a spacious, mod-
ern kitchen with granite island
& counters, family room with
fireplace, media room, living
room, formal dining room, fin-
ished lower level with pool ta-
ble & powder room, in ground
pool, sun porch, central air, 3
bay carport + 2 car garage -
Wyoming Valley Country Club,
Hanover Industrial Parks &
Rte. 81 access nearby.
$330,000
Call Pat today @
570-287-1196
Smith Hourigan Group
570-287-1196
NANTICOKE
West Green St.
Nice 2 bedroom ranch style
home, gas heat, finished base-
ment, vinyl siding, deck. Move
in condition.
Reduced to $69,500
Call Jim
TOWNE &
COUNTRY
REAL ESTATE
570-735-8932
570-542-5708
Houses For Sale
HARVEYS LAKE
184 State Route 29
Nice charming home in Har-
veys Lake. Open eat in kit-
chen, 2 bedrooms, 1 1/2 bath
and a nice large private lot.
Home also offers a 2 car de-
tached garage. Home is just
waiting for your personal
touch. $142,900
MLS#13-1787
Call/text Donna Cain
947-3824 or Tony Wasco
855-2424
Weichert Realtors,
Trade Mark
570-901-1020
HARVEYS LAKE
37 Marina Drive
Immaculate 3BR, 2.5 bath End
Uni t Townhouse! Cherry &
granite eat-in kitchen with ap-
pliances open to living room
with fireplace and sliders to
patio; large dining area & foy-
er; spacious master bedroom
suite; each bedroom has walk-
in closet; A/C; 1st floor laundry;
garage; Beach Membership &
Boat slip available. $214,900.
Call Rae 570-899-1209
288-9371
NANTICOKE
PRICE REDUCTION
260-262 E. Green Street
Double Block
Plenty of parking with paved
back alley. Close to LCCC.
New roof i nstal l ed i n 2007
along with a kitchen & bath up-
date in #260.
MLS #13-694
$59,900
Call Dana Distasio
570-715-9333
Houses For Sale
JENKINS TWP.
46 Old Mill Road
Stunning English Tudor in a
desirable neighborhood. Mod-
ern kitchen with cherry cabin-
ets, stainless steel appliances,
island with Jenn air & tile floor.
Separate glass surrounded
breakfast room. Family room
with gas fireplace & hardwood
floors. Formal dining room with
bay wi ndow. French doors
throughout. Master bedroom
suite with master bath, walk-in
closet & separate sitting room.
Lower level rec-room and of-
fice. Two car garage. Pittston
Area School District.
MLS#13-1076
Price Reduced
$285,000
Call Sandra Gorman
570-696-5408
Smith Hourigan Group
570-696-1195
PENN LAKE
1529 Lakeview Drive
OPEN HOUSE
Sat , July 20th, 1:30 - 3:00
Cozy 2 bedroom cottage on
the lake! Open living area, 3/4
bath, large deck facing lake.
Double patio doors from kit-
chen and l i vi ng area al l ow
great lake views! Move in and
relax!
MLS#13-2286
$179,000
Linda Gavio
474-2231, ext 19
TOWN & COUNTRY
PROPERTIES
474-2340
Houses For Sale
KINGSTON
This 3 bedroom, 4 bath brick
town home offers a spacious
floor plan, high ceilings, re-
cessed lighting & rich hard-
wood floors. Cherry cabinets,
a large island, granite coun-
ters, stainless steel appliances
& over sized sink highlight the
kitchen. Corian counters &
European style tile & vanities
accent the baths. Finished
lower level (above ground).
2nd floor has new hardwood
Brazilian cherry floors. New
landscaped patio, all fenced in.
Owner Will Consider Rent
with "Option"
$279,900.
Call Ruth K Smith
570-696-5411
Smith Hourigan Group
570-696-1195
KINGSTON
$139,900
129 S. Dawes Ave.
Three bedroom, 2 bath cape
cod with central air, new win-
dows, doors, carpets and tile
floor. Full concrete basement
with 9' ceilings. Walking dis-
tance to Wilkes Barre. Electric
and Oil heat. MLS #12-3283.
For more information and
p h o t o s v i s i t
www. at l as r eal t y i nc . c om
Call Tom
570-262-7716
Houses For Sale
KINGSTON
$139,900
129 S. Dawes Ave.
Three bedroom, 2 bath cape cod
wi th central ai r, new wi ndows,
doors, carpets and tile floor. Full
concrete basement with 9' ceilings.
Walking distance to Wilkes Barre.
Electric and Oil heat. MLS #12-
3283. For more information and
photos visit:
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Tom 570-262-7716
KINGSTON
58 1st Avenue
Reduced to sell fast. Quiet,
convenient street. 3 bedroom,
1 1/2 bath. Finished family
room, modern t hroughout.
MLS#11-3245. $148, 000
Call Joe Gilroy
Gilroy Real Estate
570-288-1444
570-690-0394
Houses For Sale
KINGSTON
19 Church Street
Lovely Kingston home that will
''capture'' you upon entry! From
it's inviting 10 x 6 foyer with
hardwood floors to the modern
kitchen with pristine white cab-
inetry, this house is an abso-
lute ''doll house!'' Master Suite
on 2nd floor with two addition-
al bedrooms and another room
on the 3rd floor + 3 season
porch, off-street parking with 2
car garage and so much more!
Call today!
MLS# 13-2893. $144,900
Don Crossin 570-498-3287
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
Major Price Reduction!!
LAFLIN
Well maintained and a great
location. Large Florida room, 3
bedrooms, central air, gas fire-
place in large family room,
hardwood floors and more! Re-
duced by $20,000 to $239,900.
MLS #13-2346
Call John Piszak
570-313-8586
Joseph P. Gilroy
Real Estate
570-288-1444
K
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Thursday, July 25, 2013 PAGE 5D
NEW 2013
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0
A
P
R
NEW 2013
LINCOLN
MKS AWD
NEW2013
LINCOLN
MKZ HYBRID
All Wheel Drive, 3.7L V6, Remote Keyless Entry, Reverse
Sensing, HID Headlamps, THX Sound Sys with CD, 19
Premium Alum. Wheels, Dual Zone Electronic Auto Temp
Control, Pwr. Heat/Cool Leather Seats, SYNC, Personal
Safety Sys., Safety Canopy Sys., Anti-Theft
Sys., Navigation Sys, Rearview Camera
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied including Factory Conquest Rebate. **Lease payments based on 24 month
lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $645 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 6/30/13.
$
429
LEASE
FOR
24
MOS.
PRICE INCLUDES 4YR/50,OOO MILE LIMITED MAINTENANCE PLAN
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied including Factory Conquest Rebate. **Lease payments based on 24 month
lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $645 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 6/30/13.
$
389
LEASE
FOR
24
MOS.
PRICE INCLUDES 4YR/50,OOO MILE LIMITED MAINTENANCE PLAN
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP 1,821
COCCIA
FORD
LINCOLN
WWW.COCCIALINCOLN.COM
CALL NOW 823-8888 OR 1-800-817-FORD
SATURDAY SERVICE HOURS 7:00 AM - 1:00 PM
LOCATED BETWEEN WILKES-BARRE & SCRANTON
577 EAST MAIN STREET- PLAINS, PENNSYLVANIA
YOUR PRICE $34,999
MSRP $36,820
VIN#3LDR819585
45 MPG
24
MOS.
24/7 ROADSIDE ASSISTANCE
6 YR./100,000 MILE COMPREHENSIVE WARRANTY COVERAGE
CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED BENEFITS INCLUDE:
CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED BENEFITS INCLUDE: CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED BENEFITS INCLUDE:
JUNE JUNE
SPECIAL SPECIAL
1.9% APR 1.9% APR
Financing Financing
Available Available
for up to 60 Mos. for up to 60 Mos.
With Approved Credit With Approved Credit
AWD, Power Moonroof, Leather, Heated and Cooled Seats,
Power Seats, Parking Assist, Sync, Reverse Camera,
Low Miles, Some with Navigation
CERTIFIED
CERTIFIED 2010-2012 LINCOLN MKZ CERTIFIED
STARTING AT
$
24
,
990
$
24, 990
$
24, 990
TO CHOOSE
FROM
10
10 10
Moonroof, Leather, Power, Heated & Memory Seats, Some with Navigation,
Power Panoramic Vista Roof, Parking Sensors,
Adaptive Cruise Control, Low Low Miles
CERTIFIED
CERTIFIED 2009 LINCOLN MKS AWD CERTIFIED
$
26
,
990
$
26, 990
$
26, 990
TO CHOOSE
FROM
2
22
200 POINT INSPECTION
Starti ng at
Starti ng at Starti ng at
AS LOW AS 3700 MILES
60
MOS
$
2000
P
L
U
S
0
A
P
R
Hybrid, Leather Seats, CD, Message Center,
Side Air Curtains, Fog Lamps, Personal Safety
w/Anti-Theft Sys., SYNC, PL, PW
VIN#1LDG615310
MSRP $48,560
YOUR PRICE $43,999
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP 4,561
60
MOS
$
2000
P
L
U
S
0
A
P
R
NEW 2013
LINCOLN
MKS AWD
All Wheel Drive, 3.7L V6, Remote Keyless Entry, Reverse
Sensing, HID Headlamps, THX Sound Sys with CD, 19
Premium Alum. Wheels, Dual Zone Electronic Auto Temp
Control, Pwr. Heat/Cool Leather Seats, SYNC, Personal
Safety Sys., Safety Canopy Sys., Anti-Theft
Sys., Navigation Sys, Rearview Camera
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied including Factory Conquest Rebate. **Lease payments based on 24 month
$
429
LEASE
FOR
24
MOS.
PRICE INCLUDES 4YR/50,OOO MILE LIMITED MAINTENANCE PLAN
PRICE INCLUDES 4YR/50,000 MILE LIMITED MAINTENANCE PLAN
60
MOS
$
2000
P
L
U
S
0
A
P
R
MSRP $64,745
VIN#5LDEL06064
YOUR PRICE $58,999
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP 5,746
60
MOS
$
2000
P
L
U
S
0
A
P
R
$
799
LEASE
FOR
24
MOS.
PRICE INCLUDES 4YR/50,OOO MILE LIMITED MAINTENANCE PLAN
* Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied Inlcuding Factory Conquet Rebate. **Lease payments based on 24 month
lease 21,000 allowable miles. First payment, $645 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 7/31/13.
All Wheel Drive, 5.4L V8, Power Moonroof, Keyless Entry
with Keypad, THX Audio, Sync, Sirius Satellite, Power
Leather Heated Seats, 3rd Row Power Fold Flat Seat,
Running Boards, 20 Inch AL Wheel, Trailer Tow, and
Navigation System.
NEW2013
LINCOLN
NAVIGATOR
AWD
* Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied Inlcuding Factory Conquet Rebate. **Lease payments based on 24 month
lease 21,000 allowable miles. First payment, $645 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 7/31/13.
* Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied Inlcuding Factory Conquet Rebate. **Lease payments based on 24 month
lease 21,000 allowable miles. First payment, $645 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 7/31/13.
JULY
SPECIAL
NEW2013
LINCOLN
MKZ HYBRID
$
389
LEASE
FOR
24
MOS.
PRICE INCLUDES 4YR/50,OOO MILE LIMITED MAINTENANCE PLAN
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP 1,821
YOUR PRICE $34,999
MSRP $36,820
VIN#3LDR819585
45 MPG
60
MOS
$
2000
P
L
U
S
0
A
P
R
Hybrid, Leather Seats, CD, Message Center,
Side Air Curtains, Fog Lamps, Personal Safety
w/Anti-Theft Sys., SYNC, PL, PW
All Wheel Drive, 3.7L V6, PremiumPkg., Auto. Temp Control, 18
Alum. Wheels, Advanced Trac. Leather Heated/Cooled Seats, Keyless
Entry with Keypad, Satelight Radio, Side Air Curtains, CD, Reverse
Sensing Sys., Pwr. Liftgate, HID Headlamps, MyLincoln Touch, Rear
Camera, Remote Start, SYNC
* Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied Inlcuding Factory Conquet Rebate. **Lease payments based on 24 month
lease 21,000 allowable miles. First payment, $645 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 7/31/13.
* Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied Inlcuding Factory Conquet Rebate. **Lease payments based on 24 month
lease 21,000 allowable miles. First payment, $645 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 7/31/13.
O
60
$
2000
P
L
U
S
A
P
R
MOS
* Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied Including Factory Conquet Rebate.
**Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First payment, $645 Bank Fee,
and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 7/31/13.
* Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied Including Factory Conquet Rebate. **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First payment, $645 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 7/31/13.
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP 5,746
YOUR PRICE $58,999
MSRP $64,745
VIN #5LDEL06064
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP 4,561
YOUR PRICE $43,999
MSRP $48,560
VIN #1LDG615310
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP 1,821
YOUR PRICE $34,999
MSRP $36,820
VIN #3LDR819585
45 MPG
NEW2013
LINCOLN
MKZ
HYBRID
NEW2013
LINCOLN
NAVIGATOR
AWD
NEW2013
LINCOLN
MKS AWD
PRICE INCLUDES 4YR/50,000 MILE LIMITED MAINTENANCE PLAN
Hybrid, Leather Seats, CD, Message
Center, Side Air Curtians, Fog Lamps,
Personal Safety w/Anti-Theft Sys., SYNC,
PL, PW.
All Wheel Drive, 5.4 V8, Power Moonroof,
Keyless Entry with Keypad, THX Audio, SYNC,
Sirius Satellite, Power Leather Heated Seats, 3rd
Row Power Fold Flat Seat, Running Boards, 20
AL Wheel, Trailer Tow, and
Navigation System.
All Wheel Drive, 3.7L V6, Remote Keyless Entry,
Reverse Sensing, HID Headlamps, THX Sound
Sys with CD, 19 Premium Alum. Wheels, Dual
Zone Electric Auto Temp Control, Pwr. Heat/Cool
Leather Seats, SYNC, Personal Safety
Sys., Safety Canopy Sys.,
Anti-Theft Sys., Navigation Sys,
Rearview Camera.
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP 3,011
YOUR PRICE $37,999
MSRP $41,010
VIN #3LDR803208
LEASE FOR
$
349
24
MOS.
PRICE INCLUDES 4YR/50,000 MILE
LIMITED MAINTENANCE PLAN
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP 5,271
YOUR PRICE $39,999
MSRP $45,270
VIN #2LDBL35050
NEW2013
LINCOLNMKZ
AWD
NEW2013
LINCOLNMKX
AWD
All Wheel Drive, Leather Seats, CD, Message
Center, Side Air Curtains, Fog Lapms, Personal
Safety w/Anti-Theft Sys., SYNC, PL, PW, Rear
Camera, Pwr. Moonroof,
18 Alum. Wheels.
All Wheel Drive, 3.7L V6, Premium Pkg., Auto.
Temp Control, 18 Alum. Wheels, Advanced Trac.
Leather Heated/Cooled Seats, Keyless Entry with
Keypad, Satelight Radio, Side Air Curtains, CD,
Reverse Sensing Sys., Pwr. Liftgate, HID Headlamps,
MyLincoln Touch, Rear Camera,
Remote Start, SYNC.
* Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied Including Factory Conquet Rebate.
**Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First payment, $645 Bank Fee,
and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 7/31/13.
* Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied Including Factory Conquet Rebate.
**Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First payment, $645 Bank Fee,
and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 7/31/13.
* Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied Including Factory Conquet Rebate. **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First payment, $645 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 7/31/13.
LEASE FOR
$
349
24
MOS.
PRICE INCLUDES 4YR/50,000 MILE
LIMITED MAINTENANCE PLAN
PRICE INCLUDES 4YR/50,000 MILE LIMITED MAINTENANCE PLAN PRICE INCLUDES 4YR/50,000 MILE LIMITED MAINTENANCE PLAN
LEASE
FOR
$
389
24
MOS.
LEASE
FOR
$
799
24
MOS.
LEASE
FOR
$
429
24
MOS.
O
60
$
2000
P
L
U
S
A
P
R
MOS
O
60
$
2000
P
L
U
S
A
P
R
MOS
O
60
A
P
R
MOS
339
379
379
399
60
MOS
$
2000
P
L
U
S
0
A
P
R
COCCIA
60
MOS
$
2000
P
L
U
S
0
A
P
R
45 MPG
NEW 2013
LINCOLN
O
60
A
P
R
MOS
K
PAGE 6D Thursday, July 25, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
PRE-OWNED SUPER CENTER
Route 309 Hazleton 570-454-2414 962 Wyoming Ave Exeter 570-602-0226
Mon-Thurs 8:30-8, Fri 8:30-5, Sat 9-4:30 Mon-Thurs 9-8, Fri 9-6, Sat 9-4
Route 309 Hazleton
570-454-2414
962 Wyoming Ave.
Exeter 570-602-0226
Mon-Thurs 8:30-8: Fri 8:30-5, Sat 9-4:30 Mon-Thurs 9-8, Fri 9-6, Sat 9-4
Sale Ends July 31, 2013. (T) All vehicles plus tax, tags, doc and registration fees. Trades accepted at cash value.
MSRP
$
28,110
Ford Rebate 1,500
Barber Discount 995
Ford Competitive
Lease Rebate 1,000
College/Military
Rebate 500
2013 FORD ESCAPE SE 4WD 2013 FORD ESCAPE SE 4WD
$
24,115
3
$
3,995
in
Savings!
(4) Plus tax, tags, license & dealer doc fees w/ approved credit. 10,500
miles/yr. $2500Down (cash or trade). Add $645 Acquisition Fee; first
payment due at signing; no security deposit.
Auto, 1.6L EcoBoost, Sync Voice
Activated #7451T
$
189/mo
4
for 24 months
Lease
It For
2011
2010ACURA RDX
$
25,680
T
NOW!
Auto,
PW, PL,
Tilt, A/C,
Cruise
#7522A
NOW!
PRE-OWNED SUPER CENTER
2009 MERCURY MILAN PREMIER
$
13,980
T
NOW!
PW, PL,
Tilt, A/C,
3L V6,
Cruise
#P3347A
NOW!
Barber Ford Auto Loan Center
602-0226
Call Dustin
C
re
d
it
C
o
n
c
e
rn
s
?
at
the
All applicatons will
be processed.
See dealer for details.
602-0226
Barber Ford Auto Loan Center
Factory-backed warranty Free vehicle history report
172-point inspection by factory-trained technicians
(2) Plus tax, tags, license & dealer doc fees w/ approved credit. 10,500
miles/yr. $2500Down (cash or trade). Add $645 Acquisition Fee; first
payment due at signing; no security deposit.
Auto, Advancetrac, Tilt, PL
#3629
2013 FORD FIESTA SE
MSRP
$
17,090
Ford Rebate 1,250
$
15,840
1
for 24 months
Lease
It For
$
149/mo
2
$
1,250
in
Savings!
2013 MAZDA CX-5 SPORT
$
22,700
T
NOW! NOW!
Auto,
PW, PL,
Tilt, A/C,
Cruise
#P3335B
(4) Plus tax, tags, license & dealer doc fees w/ approved credit. 10,500
miles/yr. $2500Down (cash or trade). Add $645 Acquisition Fee; first
payment due at signing; no security deposit.
Auto, Advancetrac, PW, PL,
Sync Voice Activated #3559
2013 FORD FOCUS SE 2013 FORD FOCUS SE
MSRP
$
20,185
Ford Rebate 2,000
Barber Discount 595
Ford Credit Retail
Bonus Cash 500
College/Military
Rebate 500
$
16,590
3
for 24 months
Lease
It For
1
.9
%
Financing for 60
months +
$
1500
Ford Bonus Cash with
approved credit
6
2013 FORD FIESTA SE
$
15,840
(4) Plus tax, tags, license & dealer doc fees w/ approved credit. 10,500
miles/yr. $2500Down (cash or trade). Add $645 Acquisition Fee; first
payment due at signing; no security deposit.
2013 FORD FUSION SE
Auto, A/C, Sync Voice
Activated, Advancetrac #3709
$
19,730
3
$
179/mo
4
for 24 months
Lease
It For
2013 FORD FUSION SE
MSRP
$
24,625
Ford Rebate 1,500
Barber Discount 895
Ford Competitive
Lease Rebate 1,000
Ford Credit Retail
Bonus Cash 1,000
College/Military
Rebate 500
$
149
$
189
$
179
$
139/mo
4
2010 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT
$
17,800
T
NOW!
3.7L V6,
PW, PL,
Tilt,
A/C
#P3337B
NOW!
$
139
0
.9
%
Financing for 60
months +
$
1000
Ford Bonus Cash with
approved credit
6
2010 CHRYSLER TOWN &COUNTRY TOURING
NOW!
FWD,
Auto, A/C,
3.8L V6,
PW, PL
#P3316B
NOW!
2012 FORDFOCUS SE
$
14,480
T
Auto,
PW, PL,
A/C, Cruise,
Tilt
#P3308A
NOW! NOW!
2010 FORDESCAPE LIMITED
$
15,980
T
3.7L V6,
PW, PL,
Tilt,
A/C
#3685A
NOW! NOW!
2012 CHEVROLET CRUZE LT
$
16,380
T
NOW!
Auto, A/C,
Cruise,
Tilt,
PW, PL
#P3339A
NOW!
$
15,980
T
2013 FORD F-150 LARIAT PLATINUM EDITION
MSRP
$
54,140
Ford Rebate 2,500
Barber Discount 3,697
Ford Retail Trade
Assistant Bonus
Cash 750
Ford Credit Retail
Bonus Cash 1,000
Ford Competitive
Lease Rebate 1,000
College/Military
Rebate 500
Eco Boost, Moonroof,
Max Trailer Tow,
Sync Voice Activated #7347T
$
4,895
in
Savings!
Bring in your vehicle to Barber Ford today!
See dealer for details.
w
e
w
i
l
l
top
dollar car car w
e
o
f
f
e
r
f
o
r
y
o
u
r
Whether or not you buy fromus
www.barberautogroup.com
0
%
Financing
60 Months
for
on select models with approved credit
6
Financing
60 Months
0
%
for
make
an offer
w
e
o
f
f
e
r
f
o
r
y
o
u
r
top
dollar
make
an offer
vehicle
o
n
y
o
u
r
w
e
w
i
l
l
o
n
y
o
u
r
vehicle
2013 FORD F-150 SUPERCAB STX
MSRP
$
37,920
Ford Regional
Package
Discount 1,500
Ford Rebate 3,000
Barber Discount 2,420
Ford STX Bonus
Cash 1,000
Ford Credit Retail
Bonus Cash 1,000
Ford Competitive
Lease Rebate 1,000
College/Military
Rebate 500
Sync Voice Activated, Fog Lights,
Chrome Step Bar #7586T
$
10,420 in
Savings!
2013 FORD F-150 SUPERCAB STX
0
%
Financing for
60 months with
approved credit
6
$
27,500
8
2013 FORD F-150 LARIAT PLATINUM EDITION
Now
at
Barber
Ford
BUY BUY BUY BUY BUY AMERICAN AMERICAN AMERICAN AMERICAN AMERICAN
$
9,447 in
Savings!
0
%
Financing +
$
750 Ford Bonus
Cash for 60 months with
approved credit
6
$
44,693
9
$
44,693
Sale ends 07/31/13. (1) (2) (3) (4) (8) (9) All vehicles plus tax, tags, license and dealer doc fees with approved credit. (3) (4) (8) (9) College Student Rebate applies to a full-time college student, recent college or current graduate school student. Military Rebate applies to active military personnel. To qualify for Ford Lease Renewal, customer
must be returning a Ford Lease. (2) (4) $2,500 Down (cash or trade). (8) (9) Ford Credit Retail Bonus Cash requires financing with Ford Credit. (6) Must finance through Ford Credit. 0% Financing for 60 months with approved credit in lieu of rebates. (3) (4) (8) (9) Ford Competitive Lease Rebate customer is required to trade-in or terminate
their lease of a 95 or newer non-Ford vehicle for added lease and retail incentives when purchasing a new Ford vehicle. (9) Must finance through Ford Credit. 0% Financing for 60 months with approved credit in lieu of rebates. To qualify for Retail Trade-Assist Bonus Cash customer is required to trade-in or terminate their lease 95 or
newer vehicle.
$
27,500
2012 MITSUBISHI OUTLANDER SPORT
$
19,400
T
NOW!
Auto,
PW, PL,
Tilt, A/C,
Cruise
#P3338B
NOW!
$
25,680
T
$
19,400
T
$
22,700
T
2014 Ford Explorers and
2014 Ford Escapes are
here and in stock!
2014 Ford Explorers and
2014 Ford Escapes are
here and in stock!
$
3,595
in
Savings!
$
16,590
1
.9
%
Financing for 60
months +
$
1500
Ford Bonus Cash with
approved credit
6
1
.9
%
Financing for 60
months +
$
2000
Ford Bonus Cash with
approved credit
6
(4) Plus tax, tags, license & dealer doc fees w/ approved credit. 10,500
miles/yr. $2500Down (cash or trade). Add $645 Acquisition Fee; first
payment due at signing; no security deposit.
MSRP
$
38,730
Ford Rebate 2,500
Barber Discount 1,960
Ford Credit Retail
Bonus Cash 500
Ford Competitive
Lease Rebate 1,000
College/Military
Rebate 500
$
289/mo
4
for 24 months
Lease
It For
$
32,270
3
2013 FORD EDGE SEL AWD 2013 FORD EDGE SEL AWD
Panoramic Vista Roof, Sync,
205a Pkg, Leather #7446T
$
289
$
6,460
in
Savings!
0
%
Financing for 60
months +
$
1750
Ford Bonus Cash with
approved credit
6
MSRP
$
35,985
Ford Rebate 1,500
Barber Discount 1,986
Ford Competitive
Lease Rebate 1,000
Ford Credit Retail
Bonus Cash 1,000
College/Military
Rebate 500
Auto, A/C, PW, PL, Sync Voice Activated, Heated Leather, Moonroof,
Navigation, Driver Assist Package #3709
$
19,730
$
24,115
$
32,270
$
29,999
3
$
29,999
2013 FORD FUSION TITANIUM AWD
$
6,460
in
Savings!
1
.9
%
Financing for 60 months
+
$
1500
Ford Bonus Cash with
approved credit
6
2013 FORD FUSION TITANIUM AWD
$
14,480
T
$
17,800
T
$
13,980
T
$
15,980
T
$
15,980
T
$
16,380
T
K
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Thursday, July 25, 2013 PAGE 7D
Houses For Sale
KINGSTON
561 MERCER AVE.
This roomy 2-Story includes a
modern kitchen & bath, living &
dining rooms, 3 bedrooms & a
family room in the lower-level.
The yard is small, but there is
generous off-street parking.
Enjoy the outdoors from your
15 x 10 two-tier deck, or the
new front porch. This home in-
cludes 2 free-standing gas
stoves. For more details & to
view the photos online, go to:
www.prudentialrealestate.com
& enter PRU8N9T9 i n the
Home Search.
REDUCED TO!
$93,000.
MLS#13-1538.
Call today to
schedule a private showing.
Mary Ellen Belchick 696-6566
Walter Belchick 696-2600
PRUDENTIAL
POGGI & JONES
696-2600
KINGSTON
MUST SEE THIS
KINGSTON GEM!
Charming three bedroom 2
story featuring pretty living
room. Formal dining room.
New ki tchen wi th stai nl ess
steel appliances. Beautiful
hardwood floors. Great third
f l oor mul t i -purpose bonus
room! Gas heat. Charming
front porch. Pri vate dri ve
provides plenty of off street
parking. Call Ruthie for an
appointment today!
MLS #13-754
$111,900
714-6110
Smith Hourigan Group
287-1196
KINGSTON
REDUCED!
80 James St.
This stately 4 bedroom, 1.5
bath Kingston home has the
WOW factor! Meticulously well
car ed f or wi t h ol d wor l d
touches throughout. Like a
stained glass window, built ins
and tiled fireplace in living
room. Kitchen is modern eat in
with washer/dryer closet for
conveni ence. Lar ge f r ont
porch, rear deck and detached
garage.
MLS 13-1761
$278,500
Jay A. Crossin
Extension #23
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
LAFLIN
PRICE REDUCED!
OAKWOOD PARK
If you like comfort & charm, youll
love this sparkling 4,100 + sq. ft. 5
bedroom, 4 bath two story tradition-
al home in perfect condition in a
great neighborhood. Nothing to do
but move right in. Offers formal liv-
ing & dining rooms, 1st floor family
room with fireplace, granite counter
tops in kitchen & baths, lower level
recreation room with fireplace &
wet bar.
MLS #13-549
Only $309,900
Barbara Metcalf
570-696-0883
570-696-380
LAFLIN
3 bedroom Bi-Level situated on
lovely lot with formal dining
room, lower level family room
with gas fireplace, central air,
conven- iently located to inter-
states & Casino.
A Must See!
MLS #13-1100
$187,500
Marie Montante
881-0103
288-9371
SWEET VALLEY
NORTH LAKE
Picture perfect lake front, 2
story, 3 bedrooms. 1 3/4
baths, furnished. Truly a
Must See! $249,000.
845-778-7605
Houses For Sale
LAFLIN
Impressive home with quality
construction. Two floors of liv-
ing space. double corner lot,
central air. Two complete kit-
chens, l i vi ng/di ni ng rooms.
Each bedroom has pri vate
bath. Lovely back yard with in
ground pool in need of repairs,
enclosed sun room, lots of
storage, and many other fea-
tures.
MLS#12-1441
$229,000
Call Nancy Answini
570-237-5999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
570-288-1444
LAFLIN
New Price
$124,900
111 Laflin Road
Nice 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath Split
Level home with hardwood
fl oors, 1 car garage, l arge
yard and covered patio in very
convenient location. Great curb
appeal and plenty of off street
parking. Rt. 315 to light @
Laflin Rd. Turn west onto Laflin
Rd. Home is on left.
For more info and photos
visit: www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 12-2852
Keri Best
570-885-5082
LAFLIN
REDUCED $219,900
7 Concord Drive
Beautifully maintained 2 story
in Oakwood Park. 3 bedrooms,
2.5 baths with 2 car garage
and private rear yard. Mature
landscaping, gas/electric heat
with central air.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-2215
Call Charlie
LAFLIN
$254,900
24 Fordham Road
Great Split Level in Oakwood Park,
Laflin. 13 rooms, 4 bedrooms, 2 1/2
baths. 2 car garage and l arge
corner lot. Lots of space for the
large or growing family.
www. atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-452
Call Charlie
LARKSVILLE
$149,900
511 E. State St.
Everythi ng you need i s i n thi s
house. 4 bedrooms, lower level
family room, den open, living/din-
ing room, nice yard with above
ground pool and covered patio, ex-
tra parking. 1 car garage. Very well
maintained home. Move right in!
MLS 13-2432
CALL COLLEEN
570-237-0415
PITTSTON
PENDING
PRICE REDUCTION
$169,900
69 Curtis St.
Spacious 3 bedrooms home, re-
built in 1980 with 2 full baths and a
3/4 master bath. Private pool area
with brand new liner, 2 car garage
with 1/2 bath and full 2nd story for
hobby room, etc. Located at the
end of dead end street, affords lots
of privacy.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-2079
Call Charlie
Houses For Sale
MOOSIC
REDUCED
$87,500
R. 1104 Springbrook
Cape Cod home with endless
possibilities. 3-4 bedroom, 1
bath, central air, plenty of stor-
age. Enclosed porch, garage
with carport. Situated on 3 lots.
Di recti ons: 1-81, Exi t 180
Moosic (Rt. 11) L. onto 502,
straight 1/2 mile. Turn R onto
8th St., up hill, turn left, house
3rd on right.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-607
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
NANTICOKE
1210 S. Hanover St.
Large 3 bedroom 1 bath home with
a big yard. Possible off street park-
ing in the back off the alley. This
home has replacement windows on
the second floor and awnings over
the windows. This will be a great
home with a little TLC.
MLS# 13-2093
$59,900
John Polifka
570-704-6846
FIVE MOUNTAINS REALTY
570-542-2141
PITTSTON
$64,900
62 Pine St.
Enjoy the warm weather in this
3 bedroom, 1 bathroom home
with great curb appeal, sun
room and patio. New roof and
newer windows.(Traveling N.
on Main St. Pittston turn R.
onto Pine St., home is on left).
MLS 13-1897
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
PITTSTON
REDUCED
$106,900
67 Carroll St.
Open House Sunday 7/21
12-1:30 PM
The WOW factor! Move right in and
enjoy this renovated home with no
worries! 3 bedrooms with lots of
closet space. 2 full baths including
a 4 piece master bath with custom
tile work, open floor plan with mod-
ern kitchen with island, corner lot
with off street parking and nice
yard. Come and take a look!
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-863
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PITTSTON
REDUCED $109,000
25 Swallow St.
Grand 2 story home with Vic-
torial features, large eat in kit-
chen with laundry, 3/4 bath on
first floor, 2nd bath with claw
foot tub, lots of closet space.
Move in ready, off street park-
ing in rear. MLS 12-3926
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PLAINS
3 bedroom, 2 bath, modern kit-
chen & bathroom. Hardwood
floors. Two garages with long
driveway. Natural gas heat,
furnace, water heater & roof
recently purchased. Front &
back sun porches. Floored at-
tic, all appliances. 80 x 96.
$80,000. Susan 570-822-3578.
Houses For Sale
PITTSTON
94,900
60 E. Columbus Ave.
Very well kept double block with 2
bedrooms each side, one side is all
redone with new bath, kitchen and
electric. www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
MLS #13-2724.
Call Charlie
829-6200
PLAINS
''Busy People Compatible''.
Enjoy the daily convenience of
living in the vicinity of what's
happeni ng ' ' Woodcrest Es-
tates''. Move in ready, finished
lower level, relax on rear deck
with view of Mohegan Sun.
MLS#13-1110
$120,000
Arlene Warunek
570-714-6112
Smith Hourigan Group
570-696-1195
PLAINS
REDUCED
$199,900
4 Spruce Ave.
BIRCHWOOD HILLS
3 bedrooms, 3 baths. Hardwood
floors, central air. Finished base-
ment with fireplace, great yard, su-
per location. MLS 13-1251
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Tom 570-262-7716
PLAINS TWP
$189,900
20 Nittany Lane
Affordable 3 level townhome fea-
tures 2 car garage, 3 bedrooms,
3.5 baths, lower level patio and up-
per level deck, gas fireplace, cent-
ral air and vac and stereo system
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-871
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PLYMOUTH
PRICE REDUCED!
433 FAIRVIEW ST.
Your COOL oasis awaits, both
inside and out. When its hot
outsi de, rel ax i n ai r condi -
tioned comfort. Or venture out-
doors to sit under the shade
trees or catch a breeze from
the front porch. This home is
high above the valley, well out
of the flood zone. Updated 2-
story with modern kitchen with
vaulted ceiling, modern bath,
LR, DR and 2 generous bed-
rooms. Updates include new
roof, windows, front door, light-
i n g , w- t o - w c a r p e t i n g,
interior/exterior painting & se-
curity system. OSP & large
level yard.Details at:
www.prudentialrealestate.com
SEARCH: PRU5B4G9.
#13-2080
$79,000
Walter or Mary Ellen Belchick
696-6566
696-2600
PLYMOUTH
232 Reynolds Street
Well kept house in a very quiet
neighborhood. Replacement win-
dows, Hardwood Floors, Concrete
Patio with roof, Carport, Alarm Sys-
tem. MLS# 13-1958 $64,000.
Charles J. Prohaska
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
WARRIOR RUN
2 story, 2 bedroom with fenced in
yard, all appliances included.
REDUCED TO $47,000. Call Ed
Appnel. 570-817-2500
WALSH REAL ESTATE
570-654-1490
Houses For Sale
SHAVERTOWN
Stately home on 1.27 wooded
acres. Private lot in upscale
subdi vi si on, fi ni shed base-
ment, tankless water heater,
built-in stereo system, spa-
cious kitchen w/granite coun-
tertops & stainless steel appli-
ances. Encl osed 3 season
porch, deck, grand entry foyer
w/double closets.
MLS#13-876
$425,000
Carl Georinger
696-5429
Smith Hourigan Group
696-1195
HUNTINGTON MILLS
2 story home in Huntington
Township offers quiet country
living. Living room, den, dining
room, eat in kitchen. 3 bed
rooms, bonus room, full bath. 2
car garage situated on 1.12
acres. Lower portion of rear
yard abuts Huntington Creek.
Part of property is in a Flood
Zone but not the structure.
MLS #13-2799
$105,900
Patsy Bowers
570-204-0983
Strausser
Real Estate
570-759-3300
SHICKSHINNY LAKE
Lake Front Property at Shick-
shinny Lake! 4 Bedrooms, 2.75
baths, 2 kitchens, living room,
l arge f ami l y room. 2 sun
rooms, office & laundry room.
Two car attached gar- age with
paved driveway, above ground
pool, dock & 100' lake front-
age.
$375,000
MLS #12-860
Kenneth Williams
542-8800
Five Mountains Realty
542-2141
SHICKSHINNY LAKE
Choice Location
A most unique & desirable
lakefront property. This is an
opportunity to
purchase a centrally situated
lot with an unmatched view of
this beautiful lake. If you are
looking for that special build-
ing site, this is it!
MLS# 11-1269
$159,900
Call Dale Williams
Five Mountains Realty
570-256-3343
ROSS TWP.
Very nice, totally remodeled Bi-
Level with 3 bedrooms,1.75
baths and partially finished
lower level on a nice country
lot in Lake Lehman School Dis-
trict.
MLS#13-2754
Call Ken Williams
570-542-8800
Five Mountains
Real Estate
570-542-2141
SUGAR NOTCH
113 Hemlock Street
3 huge bedrooms, with closet
space, 2 full modern tiled bath-
rooms, modern kitchen featur-
ing Disney trim, tiled floors,
breakfast counter, and mod-
ern half bath off of kitchen,
back porch/deck and yard
leads to parking in rear on
corner lot. $72,772. MLS# 13-
2630
Call Vieve 474-6307 ex. 2772
Smith Hourigan Group
Houses For Sale
SUGAR NOTCH
127 Hemlock Street
Deep 40x170 lot, with room for
good parking in the rear. Sur-
round yourself in the warmth of
hardwood floors trim and pock-
et doors. Closet in each bed-
room, original vintage bath-
r oom wi t h cl aw f oot t ub.
$59, 900. MLS# 12- 3049
Call Vieve 570-474-6307
ex. 2772
Smith Hourigan Group
SWOYERSVILLE
$140,000
Completely remodeled home
with space galore! This must
see 3 bedroom features a 1st
floor master bedroom, spa-
ci ous ki tchen wi th l aundry
area, deck, fenced yard, over
sized 2 car garage, separate
10 x 15 insulated and heated
office/workroom with electric.
New 200 amp electric, 3 year
old furnace and newer roof.
Call Christine Kutz
332-8832
570-613-9080
SWOYERSVILLE
Great investment property. On
corner lot. Close to all major
hi ghways & conveni ences.
Bring all offers. 1 unit needs to
be updated & you are all done.
MLS #13-1983
$160,000
Call Pat Doty at
570-394-6901
570-696-2468
PENN LAKE
This pristine 2 year old log
home is truly an amazing ex-
perience. No expense spared
and the immaculate design in-
cludes, energy efficient Geo-
Thermal heating system, su-
perior wall foundation, 5-inch
wide hardwood plank floors,
42-inch kitchen cabinets, cus-
tom designed quartz counter
top, built-in finished 2 car gar-
age. To top it all off, it sits in a
perfect, 5.79 acre private loca-
tion.
MLS# 13-2048
$349,900
Robert Altmayer
570-793-7999
RUNDLE
REAL ESTATE
570-474-2340
TRUCKSVILLE
Elegance & comfort combine
to give you all you dream of.
1st floor mater,guest suite with
full bath,fabulous breakfast
r oom over l ooki ng pr i vat e
wooded yard. Plenty of built ins
and plantation shutters give
this home wonderful character.
MLS#13-2678
$459,000
Tracy Zarola
570-574-6465
570-696-0723
WYOMING
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday, June 30, 12-1:30
Great income in this 4 unit apt.
building plus building lot in
lovely setting on almost an
acre. Two-2 BR apartments,
and two-1 BR apartments.
MLS 12-4538
Call Nancy Answini
570-237-5999
GILROY REAL ESTATE
570-288-1444
Houses For Sale
WEST PITTSTON
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday, July 21st, 12-2
40 Exeter Avenue
A grand stone wraparound
porch with swing surrounds
this century house loaded with
charm and character. Marble
entry foyer, 1st floor office with
tile floor, grand staircse, form-
al living room,& sitting & din-
i ng rooms wi t h hardwood
floors. eat in kitchen, master
bedroom with walk in closet &
screened porch. walk up attic,
o f f s t r e e t p a r k i n g i n
rear........this outstanding home
is in move in condition and is
priced right @ $149,900.
Call Pat today @
Smith Hourigan Group
570-287-1196
WEST PITTSTON
Great value in this totally ren-
ovated 2 story, spacious living
room with brick fireplace and
hardwood floors. Beautiful kit-
chen and very nice size dining
room. Pl enty of storage i n
wal k-up atti c.
MLS# 13-2116
$99,000
Arlene Warunek
714-6112
Smith Hourigan Group
696-1195
WEST PITTSTON
REDUCED $99,900
214 Fremont St.
Very well cared for 3 bedroom
home in move in condition. Large
eat in kitchen, nice yard, freshly
painted bedrooms with new carpet.
Newer windows. Not Flooded
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-2032
Colleen Turant
570-237-0415
WEST WYOMING
Delightful 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath
Cape Cod in charming neigh-
borhood i s yours f or onl y
$115,000. Offers oversized liv-
ing room, modern kitchen with
breakfast room, and 1st floor
master bedroom.
Don't miss this one!
MLS #13-2722
Call Barbara Metcalf
570-696-0883
570-696-3801
WEST WYOMING
$74,500
384 Tripp St.
3 bedroom, 1 bath, 2 story with
large kitchen, dining room and liv-
ing room. Private rear yard, nice
neighborhood gas heat.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-2179
Call Charlie
WILKES-BARRE
Very nice home all on one
floor. Large kitchen, 1.5 baths.
Great views of park, dike. &
large open area with lots of
trees. Basement partially fin-
ished with 1/2 bath, commode
& utility sink. Convenient loca-
tion.
MLS#13-2283
$118,000
Call Nancy Answini
570-237-5999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
570-228-1444
K
PAGE 8D Thursday, July 25, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Autos For Sale
YOULL FEEL APPRECIATED
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2014 CHEVY
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NEw
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$26,999*
*Tax and tags additional. Not responsible for typo-
graphical errors. All incentives applied.
Offer expires 7/31/13.
Autos For Sale
CRUISE IN FOR A
CRAZY CRUZE
LEASE
FOR
$99*
*39 MONTH LEASE, 10,000 MILES A YEAR. TAX & TAGS EXTRA. $2,500 DOWN ON
APPROVED CREDIT THROUGH GM FINANCIAL. OFFER ENDS 7/31/13
21 IN STOCK 19 LEFT
TAKE UP TO AT LEAST $2,000 OFF
ANY 2013 CRUZE IN STOCK!
2013 CHEVY CRUZE LS
MSRP 17,940
Fairway Discount -$500
Rebate -$1,500
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STK. #26977
OR
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FAIRWAY CHEVROLET
Sales Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8:30am-8pm; Sat. 8:30am-3pm; Sun. Closed.
1101 N. Church St. (Rt. 309), HazleTownship, PA 18202
570-455-7701 or 877-OK-FAIRWAY
TO GUARANTEE OUR QUALITY, WE BACK IT
100,OOO-MILE/5-YEAR
POWERTRAIN WARRANTY
Whichever comes rst. See dealer for limited warranty
www.fairwaymotors.com
Houses For Sale
WHITE HAVEN
NEW LISTING
211 Wilkes-Barre Street
Enjoy this 2 story, 3 bedroom,
2 bath home. Recently up-
dated! Large living room with
stone fireplace. Eat-in kitchen
with new stove Large 1st floor
family room directly off the kit-
chen area with sliding glass
door to backyard. 2 car gar-
age with loft area for a great
workshop or additional living
space when finished. Addition-
al access to backyard alley.
From Mountain Top take 437
to White Haven, LEFT on the
Wilkes-Barre Street. White
Haven is 17 miles from Wilkes-
Barre and 4 miles from I-476
and I-80 interchange.
MLS # 13-2054
$109,900
Craig Yarrish
696-6554
696-2600
WILKES-BARRE
PRICE REDUCED
$49,900
735 N. Washington Street
Spacious 2 story, 3 bedrooms with
2 car detached garage, good
starter home, needs TLC. MLS
#12-3887. For more information
and photos visit:
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Tom 570-262-7716
WILKES-BARRE
37 Flick Street
Nice 2 possibly 3 bedroom home
with a large driveway and garage.
This home has a newer kitchen and
a full bath with laundry area on the
1st floor. There is a nice yard and
deck for your outside enjoyment.
There is a newer furnace and roof
also. Come and check it out.
MLS# 13-2103
$37,900
John Polifka
570-704-6846
FIVE MOUNTAINS REALTY
570-542-2141
WILKES-BARRE
166 Jones St.
Nice 3 bedroom single. Gas
heat, off-street parking. Con-
venient location. Affordable!
REDUCED TO $29,500
Towne & Country R.E. Co.
735-8932
or 542-5708
WILKES-BARRE
NEW LISTING
Looking for your new home at
a good price? Move-in condi-
tion and priced to sell! 4 bed-
room home in a quiet South
Wilkes-Barre neighborhood.
Open floor plan with large liv-
ing & dining rooms. Newer ap-
pliances and gas heat. Nice
level backyard and off-street
parking. Motivated seller!
#13-2980
$62,000
Carol Holton
814-2116
283-9100
WILKES-BARRE
166 Jones St.
Nice 3 bedroom single. Gas
heat, off-street parking. Con-
venient location. Affordable!
REDUCED TO $29,500
Towne & Country R.E. Co.
735-8932
or 542-5708
WILKES-BARRE
Completely Renovated
Quiet area, 3 bedrooms, 2
baths, large eat in kitchen,
dining & living rooms, walk
in closet, huge bonus room.
Recent roof, new boiler, up-
graded plumbing & electric.
New carpeting & vinyl, huge
backyard, driveway, front &
rear porch, patio, new win-
d o ws . Ap p r a i s e d a t
$86, 900, f or s al e at
$49, 900. 610-389-8226
Houses For Sale
WILKES-BARRE
29 Amherst Ave.
REDUCED TO $43,400
A Charming, move-in ready
double. This well-kept home is
a must see. Spacious living
room and dining room, 3 bed-
rooms and 1.5 baths. 3rd floor
is a walk-up attic with 3 rooms
that can be converted into ex-
tra l i vi ng space. Off-street
parking for 2 cars. Offered at
$44,900. MLS#13-990.
Matt Hodorowski
570-714-9229
570-288-9371
WILKES-BARRE
33 Yale St.
3 Bedrooms, 1 3/4 baths,
New windows, Corner lot
Quiet neighborhood, 2 car
garage detached, Ready to
move-in home. $125,000
Call 570-817-4028
WYOMING
JUST LISTED
This charming 3 bedroom of-
fers Hardwood floors in the
dining room, an eat in kitchen,
gas heat & an enclosed front
porch. Nicely landscaped &
conveniently located
PRICED TO SELL $51,900.00
Ann Marie Chopick
BELL REAL ESTATE
570-288-6654 Office
570-760-6769 Cell
WYOMING
(FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP)
1705 W. 8TH STREET
There is plenty of summer left
to enjoy the 40x20 heated in-
ground pool. Then watch the
leaves change color around
your large country lot. A well-
maintained 2-story with 3 BRs
and 1.5 modern baths is wait-
ing for its new owners. This
charming home has a modern
kitchen with breakfast nook,
formal dining room, large liv-
ing room and an added family
room with vaulted ceiling and
fireplace. 2-car detached gar-
a g e . Ch e c k i t o u t a t :
www.prudentialrealestate.com.
SEARCH: PRU7W7A3
Listed at $228,900
MLS#13-2539
Call to schedule a private
showing.
Walter or Mary Ellen Belchick
696-6566
696-2600
YATESVILLE
$159,900
12 Reid St.
Spacious Bi-level home in semi
private location with private back
yard, 3 season room, gas fireplace
in lower level family room. Re-
cently updated kitchen, 4 bed-
r ooms, 1 3/ 4 bat hs, gar age.
www. at l asr eal t yi nc. com
MLS 13-1949
Call Charlie
YATESVILLE
$169,900
603 Willowcrest Dr.
Super end unit townhouse, no fees.
2 bedrooms, 3 baths, central air,
electric heat, cathedral ceiling with
skylights. Large family room with
propane stove and its own duct-
less air. MLS 13-482
Call Tom 570-262-7716
Land (Acreage)
DALLAS TOWNSHIP
63 acres with about 5,000
roadf ront on 2 roads. Al l
Wooded. $385, 000. Cal l
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
LAFLIN
$32,900
Lot#9 Pinewood Dr
Build your new home in a great
neighborhood. Convenient loc-
ation near highways, airport,
casino and shopping
156 x 110 x 150 x 45
DIRECTIONS Rt 315 to laflin
Rd; make left off Laflin Rd onto
Pinewood Dr. Lot is on corner
of Pinewood Dr. and Hickory-
wood Dr. MLS 13-23
atlasrealtyinc.com
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
LAFLIN
$99,500
2.44 acres of land zoned R-3 for
townhouse or could be used for
single family building lots (with ap-
proval). Public water and sewer
available. www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-1389
Call Charlie
NEWPORT TWP.
LOTS - LOTS-LOTS
1 mile south of L.C.C.C. Estab-
lished development with under-
ground utilities including gas.
Cleared lot. 100 frontage x
158. $30,500.
Lot 210 frontage 158 deep on
hill with great view $30,500.
Call 570-736-6881
SHICKSHINNY LAKE
Choice Location. Central water,
low ($140) association dues.
Priced to sell!
MLS# 11-1269
$159,900
Call Dale Williams
Five Mountains Realty
570-256-3343
SHICKSHINNY LAKE
Build your dream home on this at-
tractive 1.2 acre level lot with lake
privileges. Priced to sell. HOA FEE
IS $140 YEARLY.
MLS#13-40
$50,000
Call Barbara Metcalf
570-696-0883
WYOMING/EXETER
BUILDING LOTS
FOR SALE
$35,000 - $39,900
Build your new home here. 2
new developments, prices
range from $35,000 to
$39,900. Public water sewer
& gas available. NOT in flood
zone. Lot sizes range from
50x100 to 80x105.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
CALL CHARLIE
Lots
DALLAS TOWNSHIP
2 acres $39,900 or 7 acres
$89,900, blacktop road,
soil-tested and approved for
building. Nice woods, great
views, wide frontage, great
property/neighborhood for
kids, #1 rated Dallas School
District. Call 570-245-6288
DUPONT
Two lots, 80 x 140, sewage &
water. $15,000 each.
570-466-2468
EAGLE ROCK RESORT
99 Chestnut Drive
Wooded level buildable lot in
Four Seasons resort wi t h
Membership includes all resort
ammenities. Within walking
distance of Choctow Lake. An
amazing quick sale price of
$11,500. MLS#13-1426.
Call Vieve
570-474-6307 Ext. 2772
Smith
Hourigan Group
Jenkins Township
Lot for Sale on Cul-De-Sac in
Hi ghl and Hi l l s. 0.88 Acres.
$65,000. Call, 570-947-3375
Lots
WEST WYOMING
Fifth Street Manor
Two building lots in beautiful,
established development. Call
for information.
570-814-1316
Apartments /Townhouses
ASHLEY
2 bedroom, stove & refrigerat-
or, washer /dryer hook up, off
street parking. No pets or
smoking. $550 + utilities, se-
curity & references.
570-825-3932
BACK MOUNTAIN
2 bedrooms, 2nd floor apart-
ment, no yard. Heat, lights and
garbage included. No Pets.
570-639-2175
BENTON
Room for rent. Private en-
trance to room & bath.
$75. PER WEEK.
12 miles from Shickshinny.
Nanticoke
Roommate Wanted
$400/month
570-313-7735
DALLAS
2nd floor, 2 bedroom. Includes
heat, water & garbage. Off street
parki ng. No pets/no smoki ng.
$650/month + 1 month security.
570-690-1591
DALLAS
MEADOWS
APARTMENTS
220 Lake St.
Housing for the elderly & mo-
bility impaired; all utilities in-
cluded. Federally subsidized
program. Extremely low in-
come persons encouraged to
appl y. I ncome l ess t han
$12, 450. 570- 675- 6936
TDD 800-654-5984
8 am-4 pm, Mon-Fri.
Equal Housing Opportunity
Handicap Accessible
FORTY FORT
2 APTS AVAILABLE
1693 Wyoming Ave
1st floor, spacious 3 bedroom
apt. Oak hardwood fl oors,
formal dining room, eat-in kit-
chen, living room with fire-
p l a c e , t i l e b a t h r o o m.
Washer/dryer hookup in base-
ment, 1 stall garage, big back
yard. No pets. $900 mo. plus
electric.
2nd floor 2 spacious bed-
rooms, sun room, off living
room smal l den/offi ce, oak
hardwood floors, formal dining
room, eat-in kitchen, tile bath,
1 stall garage, separate wash-
er/dryer hookup in basement,
bi g back yar d. No pet s.
$800/ mo pl us el ect r i c.
570-239-1010
GLEN LYON
1 bedroom, 2nd floor apt.
Living room, kitchen, full bath,
heat, hot water & garbage fee
included. Tenant pays electric.
$575/ month + security.
Call or text 201-304-3469
HANOVER TWP
BRESLAU
6 room apt. includes heat &
water $700 month + utilities,
security & references. Refri-
gerator & stove included.
Parking available.
570-287-8766
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
1, 2, 3 & 4
Bedrooms
- Light & bright open
floor plans
- All major appliances
included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term leases
available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflowercrossing.com
Certain Restrictions Apply*
KINGSTON
Renovated, large kitchen & liv-
ing room, 2 bedrooms, all ap-
pliances, dishwasher, laundry,
washer/dryer hook up. Hard-
wood floors/Berber carpet, off
street parking, deck. Quiet,
conveni ent nei ghborhood,
soundproofing. Close to Col-
l eges, Mont essor i , Sem,
stores, highway. $810, in-
cludes heat, water, sewer. No
smoking, cats considered.
No Section 8. 610-389-8226
KINGSTON
Clean, Large 3 bedroom and
1.5 bath, Wash area.
1st, last month rent & security.
Call 570-817-0601,
Will Return Call.
Mountain Top Area
Near Lily Lake
Available Immediately
3 bedrooms, 1.5 bath, Farm
house. Modern kitchen, hard-
wood floors. $950/month +
security & 1 year lease
Call 570-791-1036
Apartments /Townhouses
KINGSTON
47 Price Street
1st floor, 2 bedroom apart-
ment, interior redone, good
condition. Off street parking,.
No pets, no exceptions. Gas
heat. $525/month + utilities &
1 month security deposit. 570-
4720395 for appointment.
KINGSTON
Available August 1st!
2nd floor, 1 bed, 1 bath, kit-
chen, living room, washer &
dryer. Next to the Post Office,
off street parking, $500 + utilit-
ies, water & sewer included, 1
year lease, security & refer-
ences. No pets, no Smoking.
LAWRENCE REAL ESTATE
570-822-9821
KINGSTON
Beautiful, over sized exec-
uti ve styl e apartment i n
large historic home. Two
bedrooms, one bath, gran-
i t e ki t chen, har dwood
floors, dining room, living
room, basement storage,
beaut i f ul f r ont por ch.
$1,000 monthly + utilities.
No smoking. Call
570-472-1110
Available August 1st
KINGSTON
Deluxe, quiet, airy 3 bedroom,
2nd floor, 1.5 baths & office. All
appliances, washer/dryer in unit.
Wall-to-wall, C/A, garage, attic, no
pets/no smoking, lease.
570-287-1733
KINGSTON
E. WALNUT ST.
Light, bright, 3rd floor,
2 bedrooms, elevator, carpeted,
entry system. Garage. Extra
storage & cable TV included.
Laundry facilities. Air
Conditioned. Fine neighborhood.
Convenient to bus & stores. No
pets. References. Security.
Lease. No smokers please.
$785 + utilities.
Call 570-287-0900
KINGSTON HOUSE
Nice, clean furnished room, starting at
$340. Efficiency at $450 month fur-
nished with all utilities included. Off
street parking. 570-718-0331
NANTICOKE
1 bedroom, 1 bath, living room
& kitchen. Refrigerator & stove,
washer/dryer hook up.
$500/month, includes heat &
water. 570-735-4074 Leave
message
Apartments /Townhouses
KINGSTON
R-69 Price St.
Nice and cozy 3rd floor. 1 bedroom
living room and kitchen. lots of
closets, and 2 enclosed porches.
Includes heat, hot water, stove,
fridge and off street parking. no
pets, non smoker. $525/mo secur-
ity deposit. 1 year lease.
570-288-0770
KINGSTON
SDK GREEN
ACRES
HOMES
11 Holiday Drive
A Place To Call Home
Spacious 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom
Apts.
Gas heat included
FREE
24 hr. on-site Gym
Community Room
Swimming Pool
Maintenance FREE
Controlled Access
Patio/Balcony
and much more...
570-288-9019
www.sdkgreen acres.com
Call today for
move-in specials.
Kingston
Spacious 2 bedroom. Living &
dining rooms. Off street park-
ing. All new appliances. Gas
heat. Water & sewer included.
$575 + utilities, security &
references. No pets, no
smoking. Call 570-239-7770
LUZERNE
276 Bennett Street
2nd floor, 2 bedroom, large liv-
ing & dining rooms, den, tile
bath, kitchen with stove & re-
frigerator, washer/dryer hook
up, off street parking, water &
sewer paid. $600 + utilities &
securi ty. No pets/smoki ng.
References. 570-288-7309.
Leave message.
WEST PITTSTON
1 bedroom, living room,
dining room, wall to wall car-
peting, washer/dryer refriger-
ator and stove. Modern
kitchen and bath. 2nd floor.
$635/month. Heat, sewer and
water included, 1 month se-
curity with 1 year lease. Ref-
erences required. No Pets.
Available Immediately
570-654-4040 or
570-446-7682
Apartments /Townhouses
WYOMING
Midtowne
Apartments
100 E. 6th St.,
Apartments for
Elderly (62+)
and/or
Handicapped & Disabled
Income Limits Apply
ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED
570-693-4256
Monday - Friday
8am - 4pm
MINERS MILLS
2 br., 1st floor, $575 + $575
security. Refrigerator, range,
wat er & sewer i ncl uded.
Washer hook up $25 extra per
month.
Call Bernie 570-655-4815.
Rothstein Realty
1-888-244-2714
MOCANAQUA
2 bedroom, water & sewer in-
cluded. $525/month. Section 8 con-
sidered. Call 570-592-3497
MOUNTAIN TOP
Three- 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath
apartments. Being renovated,
will be available soon. New ap-
pliances, carpet and paint.
Some utilities included, $695
and other apartments avail-
able for $550 and up.
570-854-8785
Nanticoke
1 bedroom, 1st floor, refrigerat-
or, stove, washer/dryer hook-
up & porch. $400/month + util-
ities, security & references.
Water, sewage, garbage in-
cluded. No smoking. no pets.
570-760-6959.
WEST PITTSTON
GARDEN VILLAGE
APARTMENTS
221 Fremont St., Housing for
the elderly & mobility impaired;
all utilities included. Federally
subsidized program. Extremely
low income persons encour-
aged to apply. Income less
than $12,450.
570-655-6555
TDD 800-654-5984
8 am-4 pm
Monday-Friday.
Equal Housing Opportunity
Handicap Accessible
K
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Thursday, July 25, 2013 PAGE 9D
Sponsored by
GARAGE & YARD
PLACE YOUR
GARAGE SALE
AD
CALL 829-7130
TODAY
Estate Sales
WILKES-MARRE
MULTI FAMILY SALE
MALLERY PLACE
Sat., July 27th 8am-2pm
Clothes, furniture, enamel top
tables, tools, costume jewelry,
Vi ntage l i nens, VHS/CDS/
DVDs, antiques, glassware,
books, holiday, collectibles,
games, and everything else
you need!
Yard Sale
BLAKESLEE
ESTATE SALE
121 ORCHARD LANE
(Formerly Church St)
Saturday July27th
9 am - 4 pm
DIRECTIONS: Follow Rt 115
to Burger Rd. Turn right onto
orchard lane (formerly Church
St) Home is on right. Watch for
signs.
COMPLETE CONTENTS OF
BEAUTIFUL HOME
Anti ques 4 pi ece Bedroom
Suite, oak Table & Chair Set,
maple Table & Chairs, cedar
Chest, Collectibles, Chairs,
Tables, Desk, Recliners, Sofa
Set, Wall Art, Linens, Clocks,
Vintage Kitchenware, House-
wares, Sewing and So Much
More!!! Something For Every-
one!!! All Items priced to Sell!!
Sale by Wm. Lewis
EXETER
Craft Show
St. Cecelia's Church
1670 Wyoming Ave.
Saturday, 7/27, from 10-4.
Crafts, Baked Goods, Direct
Sales. Indoor & Outdoor Event.
DALLAS
GARAGE SALE
335 E. 42nd Street
Saturday July 27, 2013
9:00-3:00
Directions: Rt 415 N, turn
right at Bryant RV Sales.
Furniture, luggage, kitchen
items, vintage cameras and
Fiestaware, exercise equip-
ment, men's & women's cloth-
ing. Christmas decorations,
flatware & much more!
Yard Sale
CLARKS SUMMIT
ESTATE SALE
112 Fox Run Circle
Fri., Sat & Sun.
Antiques & collectibles in-
cluding vintage prints, pic-
tures & paintings, glassware,
furniture including: dining
room table & chairs, bed-
room suite, antique stacking
bookshelves, buffets, china
cabinets, brass, copper &
silver ware, coins, costume
& vintage jewelry, militaria,
advertising, vintage toys &
postcards & much more!
Rain or shine. Bring cash &
boxes, credit cards accep-
ted.
Legacy Estate Services
607-592-7884
DRUMS
Sand Springs Golf Course
21 Shaw Drive
Sat., July 27th 9 am to 1 pm
Miscellaneous items, house-
wares, bar stools, clothing &
holiday items.
EXETER
TAG
SALE
19 Thomas St.
(Schooley to Warsaw to
Thomas)
Sat. July 2:00-3:00
CONTENTS OF NICE
ODLER HOMES
Living room suite, tables,
lamps, Kitchen items, mi-
crowave, computer desk,
Gl assware, l i nens, bed-
room furniture, wardrobes,
Cost ume j ewel ry, VHS
tapes, tools, air conditioner.
Many smal l i t ems. Too
much to list, all priced to
sell!
EXETER
Multi-Family Yard Sale
137 Valley Street
Fri. & Sat, 8-2
Household, clothes, antiques,
jewelry, lots of car parts, tools,
sports & more!
PLAINS
YARD SALE
90 Hudson Road
Sat., July 27, 9-3
House items, clothing, toys,
tools, child's drum set & guitar
& much more!
Yard Sale
EXETER
Wild Flower Village
Community
Garage Sale!
Sat., July 27, 8-1, Rain or
Shine! Follow the signs!
EXTER
Yard Sale
128 Mason Street
Sat., July 27, 9-1
Good Stuff Cheap!
HUNLOCK CREEK
HOUSE SALE
137 Pavlick Road
Sat, July 27th, 9-3
Small household items, aquari-
um, 1 end table, 1 coffee table,
1 sofa table, power & hand
carpenter tools & more!
HUNLOCK CREEK
1260 STATE ROUTE 29
SAT., JULY 27, 9AM-3PM
1st TIME YARD SALE
VARIETY OF ITEMS
KINGSTON
32 W. Walnut St.
Sat., July 27, 8 to 1
Everything reasonably priced.
First come, first served!
rain date Sat, Aug 3
KINGSTON
505 RUTTER AVE
Sat., July 27, 9 to 1
Tools, new & used toys, sand
box, Power Wheels, furniture,
slide, housewares, & more.
KINGSTON
YARD SALE
76 S. Thomas Ave.
Sat., July 27, 8-12
Furni ture, dressers, coffee
tables, entertainment centers,
strollers, toys, tons of baby
i tems, books & househol d
i tems.
PLAINS
CHRISTMAS IN JULY
PLAINS UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
133 N. Main Street
Fri. July 26, 4-7
Sat., July 27, 8-1
Gently used seasonal itemS in-
cluding jewelry, decorations,
clothing, crafts & more. Most
l i ke new. Pri ced t o Sel l !
Serving Supper on Friday &
Brunch on Saturday.
Yard Sale
KINGSTON
ESTATE SALE
100 2ND AVE.
SATURDAY, JULY 27, 2013
8:00-4:00
DIRECTIONS:
OFF PIERCE ST.
ENTIRE CONTENTS OF
HOME
INCLUDING ANTIQUES
Beautiful dining room set, very nice
sofas, bedroom furniture, antique
barrister bookcase, antique oak in-
dex/file unit, glassware & porcel-
ain jewelry, vintage toys, stained
and leaded glass windows, historic-
al books, Jazzy scooter, Craftsman
walk behind lawn mower, lawn &
garden and much more!
Credit Cards Accepted!
Sale by Cook & Cook
Estate Liquidators
www.cookandcookestate
liquidators.com
MOUNTAIN TOP
160 NUANGOLA ROAD
SAT., JULY 27TH 8AM-1PM
Furniture, school supplies,
sports equipment, homemade
piog-pong table &
miscellaneous items
NANTICOKE
Multi-Vendor Sale!
147 E. Main St., Former
Bartuska Furniture Bldg.
Sat., July 27, 8-1
Vintage furniture, baby boy
clothes, holiday decor, dishes
& glassware, adult jeans, beer
trays & signs, HO trains, col-
lectibles & much more!
WILKES-BARRE
ESTATE SALE
363 S. Meade Street
Sat, July 27, 8-3:30
Furniture, dishes, glassware,
small appliances, lines, book
records & more!
NO EARLY BIRDS!
WILKES-BARRE TWP.
3rd Community Wide
Yard Sale
Sat, July 27, 9am-2pm
Complete yard sale list can
be obtained at 59 S. Walnut
St., 302 Center St., 663 E.
Northampton St., Corner of
Ash & Willow Sts., 38 North
Walnut St. & 1011 Spruce
St.
Yard Sale
NUANGOLA
ESTATE SALE
Corner of Nuangola &
Blytheburn Rd.
Nuangola Service Station
PETE'S GAS STATION
SATURDAY, JULY 27, 2013
9:00-4:30
DIRECTIONS: From 81 Nuan-
gola Exit to Nuangola Rd. Go
less than 2 miles to corner of
Nuangola and Blytheburn.
ENTIRE CONTENTS OF
NUANGOLA SERVICE
STATION. PREVIOUSLY
PETE'S GAS STATION
Incl udi ng Vi ntage Ti n And
Cardboard Advertising Signs,
Two Antique Oak Showcases,
Stainless Steel Upright Dis-
play Cooler, Large Air Com-
pressor, Auto Parts, Auto Part
Displays Some Vintage, Warm
Morning Enameled Coal Stove,
Coats 10.10 Tire Changing
Machine, Large Vises, Hand
Tools, Walter Floor Jack, Small
Oak National Cash Register,
Air Powered Grease Machine,
Alaskan Wood/Coal Stove, '81
Buick Century, 2007 Buick Lu-
cerne Cxl, 26,000 Miles, Great
Condi t i on, ' 64 Pl ymout h
Baracuda Parts Car, 1940'S
Dodge Wrangler Parts Truck,
Lots Of Service Station Re-
lated Items And Much More!
Credit Cards Accepted!
Sale by Cook & Cook
Estate Liquidators
www.cookandcookestate
liquidators.com
PITTSTON
183 ELIZABETH STREET
SAT. JULY 27, 9AM-3:30PM
Savannah's Yard Sale: jewelry,
clothes, glassware, lemonade
stand & a lot of fun stuff!!
PLAINS
Jade Hills Estate
Community Wide Yard Sale
Bear Creek Blvd, by VA
Hospital & Wyoming Valley
Sports Dome
Sat., July 27th, 8-1
Furniture, baby gear, tools,
housewar es, decor at i ons,
cl ot hi ng.
Something for Everyone!
WILKES-BARRE
YARD SALE
161 S.Grant Street
Sat., July 27, 9-1
Books, DVD' s, househol d,
handbags & purses, decora-
tions & so much more!
Yard Sale
Plains-Birchwood Hills
30 Spruce Ave
SAT. JULY 27 8AM TO 1PM
Lots of baby/kids toys-kiddy
pool with slide, doll house,
barbie items. Girl/boy bedding
and crib. Household items,
new Avon, exercise equip!
SWOYERSVILLE
86 GRANDVILLE DRIVE
SAT. JULY 27, 10AM TO 2PM
7 1/2 X 10 1/2 Zebra area rug,
mini fridge, window fans &
more! Back to School sale!!!
SWOYERSVILLE
MULTI-FAMILY YARD SALE
Corner of Hughes & Main Sts.
Sat., , July 27th, 8-1
Jewelry, name brand purses,
shoes, cl othi ng, perfumes,
tools, household, toys, Depres-
si on gl ass, new heal t h &
beauty i tems, shampoos &
cl eani ng i tems.
TRUCKSVILLE
MULTI-FAMILY YARD SALE
16 Harris Hill Road
Sat., July 27, 8-2
Antiques, Jenn-Air ss stovetop,
fireplace Dura Flame, rugs,
tools, stereos, bedding/linens,
outside pond, jewelry, clothing
& much, much more!
TRUCKSVILLE
YARD SALE
306 TERRACE AVE
Sat., July 27th, 8am-1pm
Many indoor holiday decora-
tions, outdoor swing, Elliptical
exercise bike, office desk &
more!
WEST PITTSTON
YARD SALE
915 Wyoming Ave.
Sat., July 27, 8-2
Pine corner hutch, glass sil-
vertone coffee & end tables,
jewelry, scarfs, clothes, lots of
beautiful, well priced items!.
WILKES-BARRE
ST. ALOYSIUS
CHURCH
FLEA MARKET
143 West Division St.
July 25, 26 and 27
10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
August 1, 2 and 3
6 p.m. to 10 p.m.
(Church bazaar)
Yard Sale
WILKES-BARRE
ESTATE SALE
36 BROWN STREET
Sat., July 27th 9am-4pm
DIRECTIONS: Turn onto Stan-
ton St., from Hazle St. Follow
Stanton St. to Brown St, Turn
left onto Brown St. Home is on
left.
SALE TO INCLUDE CON-
TENTS OF NICE HOME: 4
Piece Art Deco Bedroom Suite,
Victorian Oak Sideboard, So-
fas, Chairs, Jewelry, china
closet, tables, dressers, cat de-
cor, Credenza, Kitchenware,
Vintage Christmas & Holiday,
Vintage Clothing, Linens, Wall
Art , Cabi net s, Rel i gi ousm
Tools, Coll ectibles, Sewing
Machine, Oak Table & Chairs,
& So Much More!!
Something For Everyone!! All
Items Priced To Sell!!!
Sale by Wm. Lewis
www.wvestates.com
WILKES-
BARRE/SOUTH
47 OLD RIVER RD
Sat., July 27th, 9 to 3
Where Academy meets Old
River rd. park in lot, use rear
entrance.
Items for sale from a lovely
home, ladies knee hole desk,
Ethan Allen Hitchcock style
dining room table & chairs,
queen size iron headboard,
Noritake china, service for 8
with serving pieces SriLanica
manor gold, tall upholstered
chairs, 4 low back upholstered
chairs, 2 beige Lazy Boy re-
cliners, art decor floor lamp,
book case, smal l t abl es,
lamps, pictures, wrought iron
table & 2 chairs, electric grill,
glassware, linens, men's, wo-
men's clothing, clothing racks,
apt. sized refrigerator, kitchen
items & more.
WYOMING
LEFT OVER YARD SALE
575 Susquehanna Ave.
sat. July 27, 9 to 1
Country decor make offer. Roll top
desk with chair $300. Kindle &
Nook $40. each.
Apartments /Townhouses
NORTH WILKES-BARRE
PLAINS VICINITY
FIRST FLOOR
*VICTORIAN*
Vi c t o r i a n r e mo d e l e d
beauty, 1 bedroom, brand
new - maple kitchen with
appliances, genuine pantry
restored, laundry, asthetic
tiled fireplace in bedroom,
more. 2 YEARS @ $600.
month + utilities. NO PETS.
EMPLOYMENT APPLICA-
TION REQUIRED /NEAR
GENERAL HOSPITAL.
AMERICA REALTY
570-288-1422
OLD FORGE
4 rooms, 2nd floor, heat, water
& sewage furni shed. $695
month. Security & references.
570-457-7854
PITTSTON
MUST SEE!
2 bedroom apartment, com-
pletely renovated with new
hardwood floors & ceramic tile.
New appliances, off street
parking, coin operated washer
& dryer in basement. No pets,
no smoking. $600/month + se-
curity & utilities.
570-357-1383
PITTSTON
2nd floor, 4 rooms & bath.
Washer/dryer hook up. Heat &
hot water furnished. No pets.
Sec ur i t y & r ef er enc es .
$675/mo. 570-654-1193 or
570-332-7951.
PITTSTON TWP
1 bedroom, stove, refri gerator,
$350 month plus electric. 1 year
lease plus security. No pets.
570-237-0968
PLAINS TWP.
2nd floor, 2 bedroom, heat,
water & hot water included.
Off street parking, pets al-
lowed. $750/month one year
lease & references.
570-406-8218
PLAINS
Modern 2 bedroom, 1 bath,
2nd floor apartment. Kitchen
with appliances. New carpet.
Conveni ent l y l ocat ed. No
smoki ng - no pet s.
$600 PER MONTH.
Call Rae
570-899-1209
LEWITH & FREEMAN
288-9371
PLYMOUTH
3 rooms, 2nd floor. Utilities by
tentant. Water furnished, stove
provided. No pets. Security, 1
year lease $400 month.
Call 570-760-8526
SHAVERTOWN
1 Bedroom Efficiency, large liv-
ing room, furnished or unfur-
nished. Close to colleges.
Private entrance, $700/month.
1st month and security deposit.
570-606-9638
WILKES-BARRE
SOUTH
SECURE BUILDINGS
1 & 2 bedroom apartments
Starting at $440 and up. Ref-
erences required. Section 8
OK. 570-357-0712
Apartments /Townhouses
TRUCKSVILLE
MANOR
APARTMENTS
170 Oak Street
Low and Moderate
Income Elderly
Rentals Include:
*Electric Range & Refrigerator
*Off Street Parking
*Coin Operated Laundry
Applications Accepted
by Appointment
570-696-1201
8a.m. - 4p.m.
TDD only,
1-800-654-5984
Voice Only,
1-800-654-5988
Handicap Accessible
Equal Housing Opportunity
WEST PITTSTON
1st floor, 1 bedroom apt. Refri-
gerat or & st ove i ncl uded.
Ample secure parking. Small
pets allowed. $450 month +
utilities. 570-357-1138
WEST PITTSTON
2nd floor 2 bedroom, laundry
room on 2nd floor, kitchen ap-
pliances included, extra large
closets, front & back porches,
ext r a st or age. No pet s.
$650/ mont h + ut i l i t i es.
570-417-4311 or
570-287-9631
WHITE HAVEN
Route 940. Large 2 bedroom
near I-80 & PA Tpke. Fresh
paint, w/w carpet, stove & refri-
ger at or . Wat er , sewer &
garbage included. No pets.
$550 + electricity & security
deposit. 570-443-9639
WILKES-BARRE
1 bedroom, Second Fl oor,
Heat and Hot Water included.
$460 a month, plus one month
security deposit. References,
No pets and No Smoking.
570-675-7768
WILKES-BARRE
Clean, 2 bedrooms, Off street
parking, 1st & last months rent
+ security. Call 570-817-0601,
will return call.
WILKES-BARRE
ROOM
FOR RENT
1 room. Security deposit re-
quired, back ground check.
$350 month plus security de-
posit. 347-693-4156
WYOMING
84 Fifth Street.
2 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, off
street parking, nice yard. Large
kitchen, 1st floor laundry with
washer/dryer. Mint condition
$800/month + 1 year lease &
security deposit.
Call Jill Hiscox
696-0875
696-3801
Apartments /Townhouses
WILKES-BARRE
-1 bedroom
water included
-2 bedroom
single
-2 bedroom
water included
-3 bedroom,
single
-4 bedroom,
large
HANOVER
-2 bedroom 1/2
double.
-4 bedroom
double
LUZERNE
-1 bedroom,
water included.
PITTSTON
-Large 1 bed
room water
included
OLD FORGE
-2 bedroom,
water included
PLAINS
-1 bedroom,
water included
McDermott & McDermott Real
Estate Inc. Property
Management
570-675-4025
(direct line)
Mon-Fri. 8-7pm
Sat. 8-noon
WILKES-BARRE
/KINGSTON
Efficiency 1 & 2 bedrooms. In-
cludes all utilities, parking, laundry.
No pets. From $390 to $675.
Lease, securi ty & references.
570-970-0847
WILKES-BARRE/NORTH
1st floor, 1 spacious bedroom
wi th si de room. Cl ean, re-
modeled. $525/month + utilit-
ies. 570-825-2901
WILKES-BARRE
2 bedroom, 1 bath apartment near
General Hospital. No Pets. $525 +
utilities, first, last + security deposit.
570-417-3427
WILKES-BARRE
2nd floor - 4 nice rooms. Only one
quiet apartment below. Has stove,
new refrigerator, washer & dryer.
All widows are newer vinyl thermal
pane. New mini-blinds and curtains.
Your own private entrance. Small
back porch. Water & sewer in-
cluded. Close to town & bus stop.
$485/month. 570-650-3803
WILKES-BARRE
3 BEDROOM, OFF STREET
PARKING, WASHER & DRY-
ER HOOK UP. NO PETS.
$575 + UTILITIES & SECUR-
ITY. 570-822-7657
WILKES-BARRE
307-309 South Street East
4 bedrooms on 2 levels, (2 & 3
floor). 1.5 Baths, with hook-
ups. Big kitchen with 6x8
porch. $900/month, Landlord
pays water and heat. NO
PETS, 1 month security.
Available Aug. 1.
Call Manny 917-295-6254
718-946-8738
WILKES-BARRE
Historic Wheelman
439 S. Franklin Street
Unique studio apartment. Sun
porch, hardwood floor, secur-
i ty system & l aundry. Off
street parki ng. $550.
821-5599
Apartments /Townhouses
WILKES-BARRE
425 S. Franklin St.
APTS FOR RENT!
For lease. Available immedi-
at el y , was her / dr y er on
premises, no pets. We have
studio, 1 & 2 bedroom apart-
ments. On site parking. Fridge
& stove provided. 24/7 secur-
i ty camera presence & al l
doors electronically locked.
1 bedroom - $450. 2 bedroom -
$550. Water & sewer paid
1 month security deposit.
Email
obscuroknows@hotmail.com
or Call 570-208-9301
after 9:00 a.m. to schedule an
appointment
WILKES-BARRE
447 S. Franklin Street
1 bedroom with study. New
kitchen, hardwood floors, off
street parking, laundry facility.
Includes heat, hot water &
trash removal. $580/month.
Call 821-5599
WILKES-BARRE
PARK AVENUE
2nd floor, 1 bedroom. Water in-
cluded. $500 + utilities, secur-
ity & lease. No pets.
570-472-9494
WILKES-BARRE
PARRISH ST
Very Nice 4 Rooms + Bath,
2nd Floor. Perfect for Single or
Doubl e Occupancy Qui et
Building, Washer/dryer hook-
up. Off-Street Parking $520 +
utilities. Security. References.
Background check.
570-332-8792
WILKES-BARRE
South Welles St.
2 Bedrooms, 2nd floor. New
bath. Washer/dryer hookup.
Heat, hot water, sewer &
garbage included. $625 +
security, pets negotiable.
Available Immediately
Call 570-589-9767
WILKES-BARRE
Studio near Wilkes
Wood floors, parking, no pets,
short term OK. $425, all utilit-
ies included. 570-826-1934
WILKES-BARRE
VICTORIAN CHARM
34 W. Ross St. Fully furnished,
Delightful 2nd floor, excellent
condition, brand new queen
bed, Secure, private off street
parking. Historic building is
non-smoking/no pets. Base rent
$700/month. Security,
references required. View at
houpthouse.com
570-762-1453
WILKES-BARRE
Remodel ed 3 bedr oom,
har dwood f l oor s.
215-932-5690
WYOMING
Quiet Apt., 2nd Floor, yard,
storage, heat, garbage i n-
cluded. $650 - Available 8/1.
call 570-351-4651
WYOMING
Modern 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath,
Townhouse style, Washer/Dry-
er hookup, Stove and Refriger-
ator, Basement. $750+utilities.
Call or Text 203-969-5650
Commercial
PLAZA 315
ROUTE 315 - PLAINS
1,750 SQ. FT. & 2,400 SQ.FT
OFFICE/RETAIL, 2,000 FT.
With Cubicles.
570-829-1206
BEAR CREEK
Beautiful move-in condition
3BR, 2 full & 1 3/4 bath home.
Garage 28x48 with 3/4 bath &
kitchen area. 10x12 attached
shed & covered 10x28 patio.
3.5 acres. Cedar sided house
& garage. Electric heat in gar-
age & lower level.
One Year Home Warranty .
MLS #13-1702
$389,000
Call Matt Hodorowski
714-9229
DOLPHIN PLAZA
Route 315 1,200 Sq. Ft.
Up to 10,000 sq. ft.
Will build to suite
Call 570-829-1206
EXETER
1,000 sf. on Wyoming ave.,
very busy street, good front-
age. 1st floor. bathroom in unit.
will renovate to suit. Minimum
2 year lease. Central Air, elec-
tri c Heat, you pay el ectri c,
garbage and $30 flat rate a
month for water. off street
parking. no smoking. serious
renters only. $700 a month. 1st
months rent and 1 month se-
curity due on lease sign. call
Joe at 570-881-0090 for a
vi ewi ng.
GLEN LYON
75 E. Main Street
Commer ci al St or e Fr ont .
1, 000 sq. f t .
Call 570-881-0320
HANOVER TWP.
1,400 sq. ft, near the Cross-
roads on the Sans Souci Park-
way. High traffic & visibility.
$1,400/month. Call
570-760-5215
KINGSTON
5 car garage, 1,500 sq, ft, bath-
room, electric possible. 10 CEIL-
INGS, BLOCK WALLS, I-beams,
new roof. great Area. Available
Immediately $500/month.
610-389-8226
PITTSTON
COOPERS CO-OP
Lease Space Available.
Light manufacturing, ware-
house, office, includes all
utilities with free parking.
I will save you money!
ATLAS REALTY
829-6200
Commercial
PITTSTON TWP.
$1,750/MONTH
3002 N. Twp Blvd.
Medical office for rent on the
Pittston By-Pass. Highly vis-
i bl e l ocati on wi th pl enty of
parking. $1,800 sq. ft. of beau-
tifully finished space can be
used for any type office use.
$1,750/ mo. plus utilities.
MLS 13-098
Call Charlie
Condominiums
VACATION RENTAL
WILDWOOD CREST
Ocean front, on the beach. 1
bedroom, pool , 7/27/13 to
9/7/13. $1,500/week.
570-693-3525
Houses For Rent
BEAR CREEK
3 bedroom ranch in quiet coun-
try setti ng. Washer, dryer,
stove, refrigerator included. Oil
hot air heat, well & septic.
$600/month + utilities & one
month security . Small pets.
at additional cost.
973-887-1169
DALLAS TWP.
3 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath home
with 1 car garage. Close to
309. Large yard. Cats allowed.
$950/month + security deposit.
Call Barbara Mark @
570-696-1195
Smith Hourigan Group
DORRANCE TWP.
2 bedroom country setting,
yard, garage, oil heat. $750 +
security. No pets.
610-759-7138
**********
HOUSE
BEAUTIFUL
Edwardsville/Kingston hedged
manicured yard enhances re-
modeled 2 story, 2 enclosed
porches, dining room, colonial
kitchen with center island &
built-ins, washer, dryer, gas
fireplace-cherry mantle, 1.5
bat hs. 2 YEARS @ $900.
MONTH + UTILITIES. NO
PETS. EMPLOYMENT AP-
PLICATION REQUIRED.
AMERICA REALTY
288-1422
Houses For Rent
KINGSTON
15 South Thomas Ave.
3 bedroom, single home in a
ni ce nei ghborhood, l i vi ng
r oom, di ni ng r oom, l ar ge
house, new wall to wall carpet-
ing. New interior and exterior
doors, deadbolt locks, smoke
det ect or s, f r ont and r ear
covered porch. Nice yard. Full
attic and basement storage.
E x c e l l e n t c o n d i t i o n .
$800/month+utilities and se-
curity deposit. No Pets.
570-288-4501
MOUNTAIN TOP
Three bedroom, 2.5 bath bi-
level, eat in kitchen, enclosed
porch, 2 car garage, l arge
yard. No pets or smoking.
$1,200/month + utilities & se-
curity. 570--510-6223
PITTSTON
2 bedrooms, laundry room, en-
closed porch, gas heat, fully in-
sulated, off street parting. No
pets or smoking. Available Au-
gust 1. $725/month & security.
570-603-7277
PITTSTON
Grand Historic Victorian
Four bedrooms, 1.5 baths.
New kitchen/cherry/stainless/
granite. Beautiful woodwork &
hardwood. Large fenced yard,
2 car garage. Quiet street.
Too much to list. MUST SEE!.
Pet s consi der ed. $1, 200/
month + utilities, security &
references. Call 570-328-0784
PITTSTON TWP
GLENDALE SECTION
Country living two bedroom
single home. $650/month +
utilities & security No pets or
smoking. 570-457-8626
SHAVERTOWN
3 bedroom Colonial, huge deck
& wooded yard, garage & fire-
place. $1,200/month 570-675-
8103. Walk to 309.
SOUTH WILKES-BARRE
HALF-DOUBLE
Nice neighborhood, big back-
yard. 6 rooms, carpeting
throughout. Remolded kit-
chen and bath, new energy
efficient windows throughout.
All appliances included. No
Pets, $675+utilities. 1 month
security, references and
credit check. 570-824-2935
WILKES-BARRE
Large 1 family house. 4 large
bedrooms, 2 full baths, large
living 7 dining rooms, back
yard, washer/dryer hook up.
$675/month + 1 month secur-
ity + rent. 609-356-8416
WILKES-BARRE
Clean, 2 bedroom, duplex.
Stove, hookups, parking, yard.
No pets/no smoking.
$475 + utilities.
570-868-4444
K
PAGE 10D Thursday, July 25, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Houses For Rent
Wyoming
2nd floor, 1 bedroom. New
central air, kitchen cabinets &
counter tops. Bathroom com-
pletely remodeled. New carpet-
ing, porch, private washer/dry-
er, storage area. $575/month +
1 year lease at signing, 1 &
last+ security deposit, back-
ground and credit check.
Tenant pays gas, electric and
water. No Pets.
Available immediately.
Call 570-430-7077
Land (Acreage)
ROSS TWP.
Beautiful 40 acre wooded parcel on
both sides of the road.
MLS#12-2239
$200,000
Call Ken Williams
570-542-8800
Five Mountains Realty
570-542-2141
Half Doubles
DALLAS
Adorable, newer, 2 bedroom,
1.5 bath, quiet street with
porch and deck. Full dry base-
ment washer/dryer hookup. 1
year lease required, Off Street
Parking. Electric baseboard
heat. No Pets- No exceptions.
$750/month+security. Tenant
pays utilities. Cell: 406-8455
Office: 674-4100
GLEN LYON
3 BR RENOVATED
1/2 double, off street park-
ing, 2 porches, oil heat. NO
DOGS. References & applic-
ation required. $525 month +
security.
570-714-1296
HUDSON
3 bedroom, stove, refrigerator
included. No pets. All utilities
by tenant. $610/month.
570-760-5095
KINGSTON
Fully remodeled. 3 bedrooms,
1 bath. Close to schools &
shopping. All new appliances.
Front & rear porches, full base-
ment & attic. Off street park-
ing. $900/month + utilities, se-
curity & lease.
Call 570-824-7598
KINGSTON
PROPERTIES
CURRENTLY AVAILABLE
LARGE 1/2 DOUBLE
full kitchen, living room,
formal dining room & study.
4 bedrooms, 1.5 baths.
****************
1/2 DOUBLE
3 bedrooms, 1 bath
****************
TOWNHOUSE
3 bedrooms, 1 bath
*****************
Quiet residential neighbor-
hoods, utilities & heat by ten-
ant, no pets, no smoking. 1
month security, 1 year lease.
Call Rosewood Realty
570-287-6822
NEWPORT TWP
6 large rooms & bath, newly in-
stalled carpet, washer/dryer
hook up, fenced yard, off street
parking, no animals. Security &
references. $550/month.
570-736-6557
PITTSTON
1/2 DOUBLE, 2 BEDROOMS,
1.5 baths, central air & heat,
off street parking, deck & yard.
Dishwasher, stove & refrigerat-
or. 1st floor washer & dryer
hookup. Spray foam insulation.
New furnace, very cheap utilit-
ies. NO SMOKING. NO PETS.
$800 per month + security, ref-
erences & lease.
Call 570-237-7219
PITTSTON
2 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath. Private
parki ng, hal f doubl e yard.
washer/dryer hookup, cable &
satellite ready, enclosed back
porch. $650 + utilities, secur-
ity & references. No pets or
smoking. Available August 1st.
570-239-4293
PLAINS
HALF-DOUBLE
3 bedroom, recently updated,
new carpet , washer/ dryer
hookup. Off street parking,
yard. No Pets. Close to shop-
pi ng, ni ce nei ghbor hood.
$775/month i ncl udes heat.
570-829-2759
PLYMOUTH
Completely remodeled 2 bed-
room, 2 new tile baths. Gran-
ite counter tops, maple kitchen
cabinets & new appliances in-
cluded. Central air & new gas
furnace. No pets. $795 + utilit-
ies, security & lease. Not ap-
proved for Section 8.
570-779-1626
TRUCKSVILLE
1/2 Ranch
2 bedrooms, living & dining
rooms, kitchen, washer/dry-
er, basement, yard, 2 car gar-
age. Security & references. No
Pets. $700/month. Sewer &
trash included.
Call 570-474-9321
or 570-690-4877
WILKES-BARRE
3 bedrooms, 1 bath, living &
dining rooms, large eat in kit-
chen i n a ni ce, tree l i ned
neighborhood. Washer/dryer,
refrigerator, double sink, stove,
water, sewer, recycl i ng i n-
c l u d e d . Ni c e g a r d e n .
$800/month, 1 year lease, rent
& deposit. 570-820-7049
WILKES-BARRE/EAST END
4 bedroom, 1.5 bath, wall to
wall carpet. Stove, dishwash-
er, washer/ dryer hook up.
Heat. garbage & sewer in-
cluded. Many Extras!. No
pets. $975 + security & refer-
ences. 570-824-4288
MANUFACTURED
HOUSING
DORRANCE TWP
1 Bedroom, laerge kotm coun-
try setting, $500 month plus 1
month secuirty. No pets.
610-759-7138
Sales
DALLAS
1995 Trailer, 56'x14', 2 bed-
rooms, 1.5 bath, no hallways.
Some appliances. $17,500. ne-
gotiable 570-706-5201
Resort Property For Sale
Florida
Winter Retreat!
2 Bedroom 2 Bath home in
gated community on Lake
Yale in Grand Island Florida.
1128 sq ft of living space,
fully furnished. Paved drive-
way with carport. 8x8 shed.
$20,000 negotiable. (570)
690-3621
Animal Supplies
CAGE. Large ferret. 3 floors,
ramps, 3 doors. $75 firm.
570-328-0579
FISH TANK, 100 gallon with
cabinet stand, filters and heat-
ers, $175. 570-655-9877
Pets
St. Bernards, Poms, Yorkies,
Chihuahuas Labs & More.
Bloomsburg 389-7877
Hazleton 453-6900
Hanover 829-1922
COCKER SPANIEL &
GOLDEN
RETRIEVER AKC PUPS
4 male Cocker Spaniels, 1
buff, 1 black & 2 white &
black $550. each. 3 male
Gol den Retri evers $800
each. All vet checked, shots
& wormed. 13 weeks old.
Call 570-437-3069
AUSTRALIAN SHEPHERDS
Mini, Beautiful, registered, and
Registered Standard Australi-
an Shepherds, Vet Checked,
First Shots and De-wormed.
Blue and Red Merle and Black
and Red Tri. 570-925-2951
BEAUTIFUL KITTENS, FREE
to good home. Call after 5.
570-592-4418
JACK RUSSELL PUPS
Vet bred/raised, 1st shots,
dewormed, heart worm
prevention, ready to go.
$400 each. 570-417-1192
KITTENS (4), 5 weeks old, 2
black, 2 gray. Litter trained &
l ovabl e. FREE TO GOOD
HOME. 570-594-3655
KITTENS FREE: all colors,
t wi ns go t oget her , WI LL
TRANSPORT. Cal l
570-299-7478 for details
LAB PUPS
AKC, Parents family pets with
ancestry papers, males 3 black
1 chocolate. Female, 1 black.
Ready in August. $400.
Call 570-401-7213
POMCHI
PUPPIES
9 weeks old. $300 each
570-280-9596
YORKIE AKC
TEACUP PUPS
Home raised. Adorable!
Ready August 3rd. $800 to $1,100.
570-436-5083
Garden & Produce
PICK YOUR OWN
BLUEBERRIES!
8 am to 8 pm
Cosed Sundays
Sickler Blueberry
Farm
Vernon
570-333-5286
NO PETS IN THE FIELD!!
AUTOMOTIVE
Chevrolet `86
Corvette
Automatic, black with red interior.
66,350 miles, ZR tires. All options.
$7,650. Call after 3 p.m.
570-868-3866
Autos Under $5000
FORD 94' MUSTANG GT
CONVERTIBLE 5.0 Auto
Good driving, Nice looking.
New inspection. Many new
parts. Buy a car that will in-
crease i n val ue. R-Ti t l e.
$4,200. OBO 570-283-8235
Autos For Sale
SUBARU '09 OUTBACK
WAGON
Pzev, Pale green. AWD, 45K
miles. Good condition, non-
smoker. Auto transmi ssi on
$15,500. Call 570-205-4510.
Toyota 04 Celica GT
112K miles. Blue, 5 speed. Air,
power windows/locks, CD/cas-
sette, Keyless entry, sunroof,
new battery. Car drives and
has current PA inspection.
Slight rust on corner of
passenger door. Clutch slips
on hard acceleration. This is
why its thousands less than
Blue Book value. $6,500 OBO.
Make an offer! Call
570-592-1629
HONDA '04 CR-V EX
Silver, 4 cyl., 89,000 miles,one
owner, garage kept, very good
condition. $8,900
570-474-9321 or 570-6904877
Autos For Sale
ACME AUTO
SALES
343-1959
1009 Penn Ave
Scranton 18509
Across from Scranton Prep
GOOD CREDIT, BAD CREDIT,
NO CREDIT
Call Our Auto Credit
Hot Line to get
Pre-approved for a Car Loan!
800-825-1609
www.acmecarsales.net
AUTOS
11 AUDI S5 Convertible, Sprint
blue, black / brown leather
interior, navigation, 7 spd auto
turbo, AWD
10 CHEVY IMPALA LT silver
59k miles
08 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX blue,
auto, V6
07 BUICK LUCERNE CXL silver,
grey leather
06 AUDI A8L grey, black leather,
navigation, AWD
06 VW JETTA GLS blue, auto,
sunroof
06 HYUNDAI SONATA GLS grey,
auto, 4 cyl
05 CHEVY MONTE CARLO LS
gold
05 INFINITI GX3 AWD grey, black,
leather, sunroof
05 CHEVY MONTE CARLO LT
white V6
02 VW BEETLE GLS lime green
5 speed, 4 cylinder
01 HONDA CIVIC green 5 speed
73 PORSCHE 914 green & black,
5 speed, 62k miles.
SUVS, VANS, TRUCKS, 4 X4s
08 FORD ESCAPE XLT blue, tan
leather, sunroof, 4x4
08 JEEP PATRIOT SPORT black,
4 cylinder, 5 speed 4x4
08 FORD EDGE SE white V6 AWD
07 DODGE CARAVAN SXT green,
07 GMC YUKON DENALI
electric blue, black leather,
navigation 4x4
07 NISSAN XTERRA off road
yellow V6 4x4
06 CHEVY EQUINOX LT
grey, V6, AWD
06 NISSAN MURANO SE
white AWD
06 MERCURY MARINER silver,
V6, AWD
06 JEEP COMMANDER LTD blue,
grey, 3rd seat, leather 4x4
06 HONDA PILOT EX silver, 3rd
seat, 4x4
06 CHEVY 1500 SILVERADO REG
CAB truck red, 4x4
06 DODGE RAM 1500 QUAD CAB
Black, V8, 4x4 truck
06 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER LS
silver, 4x4
05 DODGE DURANGO SXT blue,
3rd seat 4x4
05 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER white,
V6, 4x4
05 CHEVY COLORADO CLUB
CAB grey 4x4 truck
05 CHRYSLER TOWN &
COUNTRY TOURING blue,
7 passenger mini van
05 FORD ESCAPE XLT Red,
V6 4x4
05 KIA SORRENTO LX silver,
V6 AWD
05 TOYOTA SIENNA LE gold,
7 passenger mini van
05 HYUNDAI TUSCON LX green
auto, AWD
04 GMC ENVOY
black, V6, 4x4
04 FORD EXPLORER XLS
gold V6 4x4
04 FORD EXPLORE3R XLT
silver 3rd sEAT 4x4
04 CHEVY AVALANCHE LT
green, grey leather, 4 door
4x4 truck
03 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LTD
grey black leather sunroof 4x4
03 FORD EXPEDITION XLT silver,
3rd seat, 4x4
03 NISSAN PATHFINDER black
V6 4x4
03 MITSUBISHI OUTLANDER XLX
red, V6, 4x4
02 FORD F150 SUPER CAB
red & tan 4 door. 4x4 truck
02 MERCURY MOUNTAINEER
PREMIER black, tan leather
3rd row seat AWD
00 FORD F150 XLT SUPER CAB
blue, V8, 4x4 truck
01 FORD EXPLORER XLT red,
4 door, 4x4
01 DODGE DAKOTA CLUB CAB
SPORT blue, V6, 4x4 truck
00 FORD F150 SUPER cAB
blue, 4X4 truck
99 FORD F 150 SUPER CAB
silver 4x4 truck
97 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LTD
4x4
BMW '00 Z3
2.3 Roadster Convertible
Silver & black, 52,000 miles.
Very good condition. Asking
$10,000. 570-760-6533
CHEVROLET '03 IMPALA
By owner in W-B, beautiful,
well maintained, 6 cylinder,
deep mar oon, aut omat i c,
power seats with lumbar ad-
justment, keyless remote entry,
power windows, heated power
side mirrors, special XM radio
with satellite system. Good
tires, dual climate control sys-
tem, new heavy duty battery.
All over excellent condition.
98,000 miles. $5,750. May be
seen at St Luke's Villa, 80 E.
Northampton. Wilkes-Barre,
18701. Call for an appoint-
ment 570-829-2542.
CHEVROLET '04 CORVETTE
Purchased new, glass roof
panel, 18k miles, silver/black
leather, 6 speed manual, tires
in new condition. Many op-
tions. $24,695. 570-262-0676
CHEVROLET '06 HHR LS
Power windows, locks, seats
air. Sharp!
$6,450.
570-825-7577
Freshl y state i nspected &
warrantied. Financing avail-
able. CAR FAX available.
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS!
CA$H PAID
570-301-3602
Autos For Sale
CHEVROLET '07 COBALT
Auto, air, am/fm. 65k
Economical!
$7,425.
570-825-7577
Freshly state inspected &
warrantied. Financing avail-
able. CAR FAX available.
CHRYSLER '05 SEBRING
Power windows, locks , seats,
moonroof, 68k. Sporty!
$5,850.
570-825-7577
Freshly State Inspected
and Warranted.
Financing Available.
Car FAX available
FORD '02 MUSTANG
Convertible, power windows,
locks seats, air. Sharp!
$6,750.
570-825-7577
Freshl y state i nspected &
warrantied. Financing avail-
able. CAR FAX available.
FORD '09 MUSTANG GT
CALIFORNIA SPECIAL
4.6 liter, V8 engine, still under
warranty, performance white
clear coat, five speed manual,
traction control, 17" premium
wheels, hood scoop, Shaker
500 audio system, 6 CD, satel-
lite radio, heated seats, one
owner, like new. $19,000.
570-817-1803
LEO'S AUTO
SALES
93 Butler Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
570-825-8253
Chevy 97 Blazer
4 door, 6 cylinder., auto, 4WD,
new tires. Very good condition.
$1,550
Ford '98 Escort
4 door, 4 cylinder, auto. New tim-
ing belt, tune-up, oil change.
Good condition.
$1,450
Ford '00 Taurus
4 door, 6 cylinder, auto.
Excellent transportation.
$1,350
Current Inspection
On All Vehicles
DEALER
HONDA '10
ACCORD EX-L
Only 33,000 miles, one owner
garage kept , 4 cyl . grey
sedan, all amenities. All power,
sun, roof, heated leather seats.
Excellent condition.
$16,250. 570-831-5091
HYUNDAI '05 XG 350
Power windows, locks, air,
seats, moonroof. 77K.
SHARP! $6,950,
570-825-7577
Freshly state inspected &
warrantied. Financing avail-
able. CAR FAX available.
KIA '02 OPTIMA LX
Power windows, locks, air,
Excellent! $3825
570-825-7577
Freshley state inspected &
warrantied. Financing avail-
able. CAR FAX available.
NISSAN '04 ALTIMA
Power windows, locks, air.
Must see & drive $5,950.
570-825-7577
Freshly state inspected &
warrantied. Financing avail-
able. CAR FAX available.
NISSAN '07 ALTIMA
37,000 miles, 2.5S Automatic
CVT. Navy blue. Garage kept,
push button start, smart key
entrance, CD/Radio/Aux In,
well maintained. Set of 4
snow and regular tires
included. $12,500, OBO.
570-735-1005
Autos For Sale
VW '03 PASSAT WAGON
Power windows, locks, air,
moonroof. Economical! $4995
570-825-7577
Freshly state inspected &
warrantied. Financing avail-
able. CAR FAX available.
VW '02 CABRIO
Power windows, locks, air.
Sharp! $4,275.
570-825-7577
Freshly state inspected &
warrantied. Financing avail-
able. CAR FAX available.
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS!
CA$H PAID
570-301-3602
Auto Classic /Antiques
Jaguar 88' XJ-S V-12, Under
28,000 Miles, White/Tan
Leather, $5995, Car is in Back
Mountain. Call 775-450-1089
Miscellaneous
LIKE
NEW
Used Tires &
Batteries
for $20
& Up
VITOS
&
GINOS
949 Wyoming
Ave. Forty Fort
288-8995
Motorcycles
SUZUKI
GZ250
6000 mi l es, garage kept,
never dumped, serviced reg-
ularly. Has windshield and
saddlebags, blue. $1700.00
Call 570.204.7183
YAMAHA '09
V Star 1100 Custom
Candy Appl e Red, Vance-
Hynes pipes. 13,000 miles,
showroom condition. $4,500.
570-550-4660
Trucks / SUVs / Vans
OLDS '99
BRAVADA
New parts.
Needs some body work.
$3,400.
(570)760-2791
DODGE '02
GRAND
CARAVAN SPORT
GMC '97 SAFARI
AWD
2 MINI VANS FOR SALE
$2,000 each.
Call Jim 570-589-9181 or
Rick 570-852-1457
JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE
Laredo 2005
82,000 miles, Well maintained,
excellent condition. Beige in
color, $11,995. 570-654-7451
or 570-466-4669
Kia Sorento EX 05' Gray
4WD 4 door SUV. 99,400
miles. Clean title. Very good
condition. Excellent running
and handling. V6. Automatic.
Loaded with extras. $7,500.
Full details at your request.
570-793-3686
Utility Trailers
Utility Trailer, ' 09. 5' x 8' .
Pressure treated floor, spare
tire, excellent condition. $400.
570-675-1393
Auto Parts
Vito &
Ginos
LIKE NEW
USED
TIRES &
BATTERIES
$20 & uP
570-288-8995
Forty Fort
Auto Services
$ WANTED JUNK $
VEHICLES
LISPI TOWING
We pick up
570-822-0995
Air Conditioners
AIR CONDITIONER 10,000
BTU Frigidaire $70. OBO.
570-283-0575
AIR CONDITIONER 12,000
BTU. $75. Good condi ti on.
$75. 570-824-4383
AI R CONDI TI ONER 5, 000
BTU Gibson, excellent $90.
570-287-2073
AIR CONDITIONER Frigidaire
casement 8,000 BTU with re-
mote. Bough best Buy 2012,
used 2 weeks $300.
570-8235497
AIR CONDITIONER SPT port-
able 8,000 BTU use any win-
dow or vent $195. 472-8567
AIR CONDTIONER 25,000
BTu $150. Hose and caddy
$15. 570-820-8339
FRI GI DAI RE AI R CONDI -
TIONER, 10,000btu. Like new,
only used one season, $175.
570-829-0828
MAYTAG 16000BTU Air Con-
ditioner, remote control, $175.
570-262-2143
Antiques & Collectibles
$ Antiques
Buying $
Old Toys, Model Kits,
Bikes, Dolls, Guns,
Mining Items, Trains
& Musical Instruments,
Hess. 474-9544
ANTIQUE BREAKFRONT ex-
cel l ent condi ti on 3-4 gl ass
shelves includes dish service
for 24 peopl e. (2) DINING
TABLES with pull up exten-
sions attached can be used for
2-8 persons. Regular DINING
ROOM TABLE seats 6-8 com-
fortably. END TABLES ma-
hogany wood. Student/adult
DESK with 7 drawers. End
tables for antique upscale fur-
ni t ure, Cal l 570-793-5129
leave message will return call
ASAP.
BARBER CHAI R vi nt age
Koken St. Loui s Mo. bl ack
leather, hydraulics work, leath-
er sharpening strap $750. 570-
779-1256 or 570-855-2506
COKE COLLECTIBLES, (4)
Cases, vintage coke bottles.
570-824-5033
COLLECTIBLE PLATES (100)
Col oni al Heri t age pat t ern,
Ridgewood collection, most
boxed $400. for all. 489-2675
DOLLS 2 Ami sh porcel ai n
Ruth - sewing quilt, Samuel
making cradle $40. for both.
Excellent condition. 779-3841
MI LK CANS (5) very ol d,
Farmers $20. each.
570-472-3615
REFRIGERATOR G.E. "Monit-
or" cooling unit on top outside
type D.R.-2-T16 serial#42-953-
799 Circa 1942 $475. 570-779-
4228 or 570-262-1032
SPORTS CARDS, 4 boxes of
1600 count, $7.50ea. BASE-
BALL COMMON CARDS, 2
boxes of 2400 count, $10ea.
1987 BASEBALL CARDS, 2
boxes of 1600 count, $7.50ea.
C O M M O N B A S E B A L L
CARDS, 2 boxes of 1600
count, $7.50ea. 1973 to 1988
FOOTBALL CARDS, 1 box of
3200 count, $25.
570-313-5214 570-313-3859
TABLE & upholstered cush-
ioned matching chairs oak, ex-
cellent, leaf on track 80 years
$150. each. 570-287-2073
Appliances
55" VIZIO LED HDTV, excel-
lent condition, amazing picture
& sounds, model #M550SV,
pai d $1600, seeki ng $725.
570-239-9840
DRYER Kenmore, gas, heavy
duty, good condition $125.
570-825-4031
DRYER white, Samsung, $500
neg. refrigerator BLACK KEN-
MORE $450. All appliances 1-
3 years old. 570-905-0175
HOTPOINT 30" GAS SINGLE
OVER RANGE, 4.8 cu. ft.
black control panel & oven
door & white top & sides, x-
large capacity self-clean oven,
four sealed cooktop burners in-
clude a Simmer 600 burner &
per f or mance pl us bur ner,
wor ks gr eat , $225.
570-824-6014
MICROWAVE OVEN, Emer-
son 900W, very good condi-
tion, $35. 570-696-1030
REFRIGERATOR. Mini, Magic
Chef, 4 cu. ft. 49.6x18.6". Used
5 months. Great for dorm
room. $75. 570-239-1501
TELEVISION, JVC 36", excel-
lent condition, $20
570-472-3888
WASHER & DRYER G. E.
large capacity $425. for both.
570-696-0187
WASHER. General Electric
Ul t ra. BRAND NEW. Was
$700, now $200. 762-4047
Baby Items
CRIB
$100. 570-881-8979
GRACO-2 in 1 Infant Bouncer
and Swing with mobile and
music box. Graco adjustable
highchair. Graco pack n play
with changing table and carry
along bag. All in excellent con-
dition. All under two years old.
Matching prints on pack n play
and bouncer/swing, $200.
407-276-6011
Baby Items
MACLAREN VOLO BABY
STROLLER, gi r l s, $45.
BRITAX DECATHLON CON-
VERTIBLE CAR SEAT, $75.
FISHER PRICE STARLIGHT
CRADLE SWING, $45. PEG-
PEREGO PRI MA PAPPA
HI GH CHAI R, $45. PEG-
PEREGO PRIMO VIAGGIO
CAR SEAT, $75. MACLAREN
BABY ROCKER, $45.
570-430-4054
Building Materials
BATHROOM SI NK, hut ch,
granite 64" $999. 417-9540
SCREEN Anderson window
screen 31 3/4 x 55 1/2 $10.
570-288-4847
WINDOW Anderson double
pane casement window 2'x4',
white vinyl $50. OBO.
570-287-4723
WOOD PLANKS deconstruc-
ted from barn, 2" THICK, 7
1/2"W & 5'6 TO 6'0l, approxim-
ately 55 pieces, misc., shorter
2" planks, many 2"X4" boards.
$510. 570-779-4228 or cell
570-262-1032
Clothing
COAT knee l ength, bl ui sh
grey, size 22W "Bromley with
matchi ng gl oves, excel l ent
condition $30. 570-283-0805
Comm. / Industrial Equipment
BEAUTY SALON SUPPLIES.
(2) salon dryers, black chairs
attached, $175 each, (2) Hy-
daulic chairs $50 each, bleach
lights, $50, Dry unit with large
mirror, $100, straight chair,
$25, manicure table $25, up-
hol stered strai ght chai r to
match, $35. 570-655-9877
Computer Equip. & Software
AFFORADBLE INK
CARTRIDGES!
Why overpay to use
your printer?
visit www.keystoneinkand
more.com
COMPUTER, Ga t e wa y .
EV700b series monitor, AMD
ATHLON Processor tower,
Keyboard, Mouse, Cambridge
soundworks speakers & print-
er , $250. SI GNATURE
SERIES, Single cellular galaxy
shades, width 73 7/8 length 55
3/4, pinecone, $100. SIGNA-
TURE SERIES, Single cellular
galaxy shades, width 73 7/8
width 55 1/2, chocolate, $100.
570-235-6188
COMPUTER, Wi ndows XP
Professional. Includes tower,
monitor, mouse & keyboard.
Excellent condition, $50.
570-824-7354
COMPUTERS new gami ng
computer $650, all new com-
ponents, black Raidmax super
blade case, 3 120mm fans,
575 power supply, LG DVD
24Xmilti drive, 8 gigs Corsair
1600 vegence memory, ex-
pandable, AMD 6450 video
card call for more details
570-693-2713
Exercise Equipment
EXERCI SE EQUI PMENT,
Glide Walk, $50. 570-824-5033
HARDCORE GYM, pl at e
loaded cable pulley machine,
lat pull down, chest press, pec
deck, leg extension, lower pul-
ley for curling, $150. CHILD-
LIFE SWINGSET, 2swi ngs,
trapeze bar, climb ramp, fire
pole, chin up bar, slide, knot-
ted rope & net, $800.
570-868-6024
TREADMILL, excellent condi-
tion, $100. COUNTRY BLUE
RECLI NER SECTI ONAL
COUCH, 4 recl i ners, need
12x12 room, exc condi ti on
$400. KITCHEN TABLE, exc
condition, $200. 570-820-7117
W A L K I N G W E I G H T S ,
dumbell. 3lb, total of 3. All 5
for $15. 570-735-6638
WEIGHT LIFTING BENCH,
with leg lift & lifting bar & 300
lbs of weights included, $280.
Call after 1pm 570-239-7894
WEIGHTS, with bench, $25.
570-736-6319
Floor Coverings
RUG Southwestern excellent
condition, reversible, 9x11,
Southwestern lamps, pictures,
painting $10. each.
570-822-6386
Furnances & Heaters
AFFORDABLE, clean, safe
and efficient wood heat. Cent-
ral Boiler OUTDOOR WOOD
FURNACE. Heats mul ti pl e
buildings. B & C Wood Fur-
naces LLC
570-477-5692
GAS HEATER, can heat whole
house, $650. SIDE TO SIDE 5
DRAWER FI LE CABI NET,
beige, $250. TOSHIBA, 28"
COLOR TV, 2 remotes, old
style, $75. 570-280-2472
WATER HEATER portabl e
outdoor water heater, battery
operated with battery charger,
Col eman model #2300-700.
Great for campi ng/outdoor
activities, used only several
t i mes, excel l ent condi t i on
$100. 570-825-2961
Furniture & Accessories
2 CHAIR SOLID WOOD KIT-
CHEN TABLE, very good con-
dition, $45. QUEEN SLEIGH
BED FRAME, includes head &
foot board & side rails, $45.
570-313-5707
2 OAK ROCKERS with pad-
ded seats, $40ea or 2 for $75.
570-443-7946
3 PIECE BEDROOM SUIT,
$100. MAPLE ROCKER, 3
months old, $15. BRAND NEW
RADIO, $20. USED RADIO,
$8. GEORGE FOREMAN
GRILL, $30. LENOX CANDY
DISHES (2), $5ea. LADIES
CLOTHING SIZE 12.
570-824-2571
5 1/2 foot bar with 2 stools.
Excel l ent condi t i on, $100.
HUNTING SUIT, 3 piece, jack-
et, pants and liner (3 sets),
$65ea
570-735-4892
K
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Thursday, July 25, 2013 PAGE 11D
Furniture & Accessories
BEDROOM FURNITURE SET,
cherry finish, two dressers, one
with mirror, nightstand, queen
bed frame, very good condi-
tion, $275. SONY STEREO
RECEI VER, $75. SONY 5
DI SC CD PLAYER, $65.
SPEAKERS, $40. FISHER
PRI CE PI NK CORVETTE,
$85. PEG PEREGO BABY
STROLLER, MODEL PLIKO
P3, girls, $45 570-430-4054
BEDROOM SET, twi n bed
complete, dresser with mirror,
night stand, high boy & desk
with hutch, $500 for all. Excel-
lent condition. 570-735-4892
COFFEE TABLE, solid cherry,
2 solid cherry end tables with
drawers $250. 570-779-1256
or 570-855-2506
COUCH and matching beige
flowered chair, $40. TALL OAK
FI NI SH CURI O CABI NET,
$30. COFFEE TABLE, $7.
FULL SIZE HEADBOARD &
FRAME, $10. HOSPITAL BED
GEL PAD, FREE.
570-822-2994
DESK Roll top desk with chair
$300. Call 570-885-6848
DI NI NG ROOM TABLE &
HUTCH tabl e wi th 2 l eafs,
lighted hutch with glass doors,
beautiful solid wood $250. 6
PI ECE OUTDOOR FUR-
NITURE SET Martha Stewart,
tan, l oveseat, 2 rockers, 2
chairs, ottoman $325. MOV-
ING MUST SELL.
570-606-9767
DI NI NG ROOM TABLE, 4
chairs cherry $400. Large 5
drawer desk, 1960's excellent
shape $100. Anti que wood
saws $75. 60's & 70's Coca
Cola bottles 1 case $35.
570-820-8023
DINING ROOM TABLE, with 6
chairs, $125 obo.
570-472-9117
DRESSER men's 3 drawer, old
$15. 570-313-5214 or 570-
313-3859
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
Sauder, walnut finish $75.
70-288-4847
FURNITURE. Bedroom Set, 3
piece, $224, Recliner, $45, (2)
wooden rockers $45 each, 26"
TV, $45. All in very good con-
dition. Double bed, $550. Will
del i ver. 570-696-1410/570-
239-8042
HUTCH PA Hutch 4100. COF-
FEE TABLES $50. each. Drum
roll table $50. 2 Sofas $50.
each. marble top table $40.
570-287-7245
KI TCHEN TABLE & 6
CHAIRS, in excellent condi-
tion. Formica top, metal legs,
green upholstered chairs, $75.
570-825-6231
Lazy Boy Leather
Sofa & Chair
(both reclining). New condi-
tion, brown. Paid $3,300,
asking $1,995.
570-474-9122
MAGNUSSEN MODESTO
Cof f ee Tabl e & 2 Si de
Tables. Tempered glass tops,
with leather wrapper bases &
storage. Purchased from Ray-
mour & Flannigan for $1030.
Asking $400. 570-332-4953
MATTRESS SALE
We Beat All Competitors Prices!
Mattress Guy
Twin sets: $159 Full sets: $179
Queen sets: $239...All New!
American Made 570-288-1898
MULTI -USE RECTANGLE
TABLES (2), 30"x72", white
top, vinyl, folding metal legs,
$20ea. 570-328-5611
PATIO SET brand new 4 swiv-
el chairs, cushions, round ta-
ble $225. neg. Student com-
puter desk $40. 570-714-5386
PATIO SET Redwood lawn
furni ture, 5 pi eces, chai se
lounge, single chair, double
chairs with attached table in
between insert for umbrella. 2
side tables $100. 902-5598
Furniture & Accessories
PATIO SET, 4 spring chairs &
48 i nch round gl ass tabl e,
beige, good condition, $65.
LAZY BOY RECLINER, bur-
gundy, good condition, $75.
570-714-4350
PATIO SET, bar height, beige
tile table with umbrella & four
swivel chairs, $175.
570-466-4669
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs,
rod-iron plus blue and white
with umbrella with stand and
covers. $350. DESK, antique
with 7 drawers, brown wood.
31Lx48Wx24W $300.
570-654-4440
QUEEN FULL WALL HEAD-
BOARD/BED Queen oak full
wall headboard/bed. 2 side
columns have double doors
with 3 shelves and 3 drawers.
2 deep storage compartments.
32x52 mirror with 2 dim-
ming lights. Overall 83 long x
95 wide. Ex Condition. Ask-
ing $500 OBO. 570-479-0298
RECLINER, good condition,
$40. BIRCH BEDROOM SET,
queen si ze, bed, dresser,
wardrobe, very good condition,
$200. OSTERIZER BLENDER,
$10. DINING ROOM BREAK-
FRONT & TEA CART, $40. 36"
SONY TV, $25. 24" SONY TV,
$20 (both work fine).
570-696-1410 570-760-5000
S E C T I O N A L C O U C H
(Berkline) with Chaise & Re-
cliner (Beige) from Raymour &
Flanigan, excellent condition
$900. SWIVER ROCKER/RE-
CLINER (Microfiber Beige),
$100. 570-696-4020
BED, single, complete with
headboard. $90. Excellent con-
dition. 570-655-1217
SOFA, 3 cushion-3 months
old, brown design, $200. Call
after 6pm 570-779-1215
TABLE Plus 6 chairs, new
condition, PA Oak, beautiful
$750. 570-740-1392
TABLE, r ed mapl e, 47
1/2x34x30, $50. METAL CAB-
I NET, but cher bl ock t op,
30x19x36, 1 drawer, 2 doors,
$ 3 0 . M A P L E D E S K ,
42X21X30, $25. FILE CABIN-
ET, 2 drawer, black, 15x25x28,
$20. HOSPITAL BED, $100.
BATH TRANSFER CHAIR,
$50. POTTY CHAI R, $20.
WHEELCHAI R, $75.
570-288-9180
THOMASVI LLE DI NI NG
ROOM TABLE, & 6 chai rs
from the 70's, custom made ta-
ble pads & 2 leafs, seats 10-12
people, solid wood, table lin-
ens, $500. MATCHING DRY
S I NK , $ 1 0 0 . ROUND
CORNER ACCENT TABLE,
$75. 570-477-2996
TV STAND, swi vel , oak,
26x15x24, very good condition,
$15. 570-693-4483
WARDROBE AMERIWOOD,
48x20x72H $75. DESK, roll
t op $50. PORCH BLI ND,
Lar ge, whi t e, $20.
570-824-5033
WI CKER RATTAN SUN
ROOM SET, with glass table
top & 4 chai rs. COUCH &
CHAIR, with 1 end table. $300.
570-654-3673
WROUGHT IRON RAILING,
measures 92" from wall, small
piece 39", rail to go down steps
measures 42", covers 6 steps,
$175.
Landscaping & Gardening
CANNA PLANTS. Big Tall red
blooming in pots. $7.00 Perein-
nals + Hostas $ 3.50.
call 570 288-9843
LAWN TRACTOR, Craftsman,
14.5 HP, 42" cut, serviced,
new battery, Briggs/Stratton
engine, very good, $450.
570-655-4518
PUSH MOWER 18", Great
States brand, $50.
570-639-2780
LAWNMOWERS (2) will not
start both for $15. 735-6638
Landscaping & Gardening
LAWNMOWER, with bag, runs
good, $75. SEARS CHIPPER,
SHREDDER, gas powered,
$100. POULAN GAS WEED
WHACKER, 16" CUT 25cc,
motor good running cond.,$60.
HEDGE CLIPPERS, black &
decker, electric, good cond.,
$25. Call after 3pm.
570-655-3197
Machinery & Equipment
GAMEFISHER 5HP BOAT
MOTOR, $450. MINNKOTA
TROLLING MOTOR 40 thrust
42" shaft new in box, $150. 6
GAL METAL TOTE TANK,
$40. 570-902-9805
GENERATOR, Predator 4000
watt portable, with 2 year war-
ranty, $360 firm. 570-788-2388
Medical Equipment
ADULT BATH BENCH, $60.
PortaPotty, $25. Walker with
basket, $15. Singer sewing
machi ne i n cabi net, $200.
Patio set, 4 chairs, stand, ta-
ble & umbrella, $75. Entertain-
ment unit, brown, 52x60x18,
$200. 570-331-2088
BRUNO STAIR LIFT, 153" 12
stair, straight lift. FREE.
570-696-1708
CHAIR LIFT, reclines, remote
control, electric, good condi-
tion $175. 570-825-4031
HOSPITAL BED, with fences
& remote control, never used,
$150. LIFT CHAIR, brand new
with remote, 225lb capacity,
$275. MANUAL WHEEL
CHAIR, used, with foot rests,
$40. 570-540-3000
POWER CHAIR, Jazzy. Barely
used perfect upholstery, no
wear on the tires, joystick and
charger. Needs battery. $250.
570-406-8304
STAIRGLIDE. Acorn super
glide, 120 stair lift. Excellent
condition. Fits 10 steps. In-
stalled for 1 year, dismantled
due to move. Seat, glide, 2 re-
motes, hardware and manual.
$1000, 570-239-9665
STERLI NG BATH LI FT,
minivator 302, new, battery op-
erated, seat can be folded and
used as transfer bench, $275.
570-970-8065
WANT ED: SHOUL DER
ST ABAL I Z I NG SL I NG.
call 570-287-5493
Miscellaneous
$40 TANNI NG SESSI ON
VOUCHER, good for 30 con-
secutive days/or 10 sessions,
exp 9/13/13, $20.
570-819-4951
10 GALLON FISH TANK, with
filter & hood, $25.
570-287-3056
1 9 7 8 VI KI NG POP- UP
CAMPER, needs some work,
$600 obo. 570-288-1651
570-301-3602
CALL US! TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
BEST PRICES IN
THE AREA
Ca$h on the $pot
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
ANTIFREEZE & COOLANT
(2) $5 each. 570-655-2154
AUTUMN LEAF PATTERN
KITCHEN WARE, 12 pieces,
$100. HAND SAWS (assorted
sizes), $1ea. MITER BOXES-
wood, $2ea. END TABLES (2),
glass top, walnut base, $10.
EXPANDABLE SUITCASE,
$5. TRAVEL IRONS (2), $3ea.
LARGE LUGGAGE CARRY
ON BAG, $2. 570-779-3841
Bedroom Set, Queen honey
pine, $700, Vanity with mirror
(no bench) $35, Presto Fryer
with thermostat, $10, Copier,
black & white plus printer, both
FREE. 570-871-3052
BEER TAP, Hoff Stevens, with
spicket & pump, in good condi-
tion, $15. 570-735-6638
Miscellaneous
BIKE men's triathlon bike, 58
cm frame. Computer, new
Vetta helmet, pump included,
excellent condition, only rode
once paid $1,200 need to sell
all for $100. 570-735-3940
BIRD HOUSE, cape cop style
with mounting bracket, new in
box, $40. 570-696-2008
BISSELL POWER FORCE
CARPET CLEANER, $30.
TRAVEL BAG, for golf clubs,
$20. 10 GALLON WET/DRY
SHOP VAC, $15. 5CD SHELF
STEREO SYSTEM, wi t h
AM/FM & dual speakers, $50.
HOMEDI CS MASSAGI NG
CUSHI ON, $50. HOOVER
PLUS STEAM VAC, $50.
BOWLING BALL, bag, size 10
shoes, $25. 570-674-9005
BLENDER VITA-MIX commer-
cial, the quiet one, on counter,
model 36019, new i n box
$899. 99 570-562-1804
BX CABLE WIRE 12-2 ap-
proximate 100' $25. Call after 1
pm 570-822-1227
CHANDELIER 3 ti er gl ass
$25. 5 blade lighted ceiling fan
$25. Hanna Montanna bed-
ding set $10. Microwave oven
cart $20. Purses $5 & up. Kids
books $1 & up. Wedding gown
size 10 $25. 570-855-8764
CHINA CUPBOARD, Cherry
Wood, 2 piece. Glass doors
with metal inserts. $100.
570-740-7446
FRI GI DAI RE AI R CONDI -
TIONER, 5450 BTU, $50. GAS
WEED WHACKER, needs
primer, $25. PUNCH BOWL
SET, 18 pieces, never used,
$10. SAMSONITE, cranberry
color garment bag, medium
bag, wheeled foldable luggage
cart, $50 for all. XM SATEL-
LITE RADIO, delphi SA 1001
boombox, remote, ac adapter,
delphi receiver, in box, $50.
570-693-1454 leave msg
GARAGE SALE LEFTOVER
ITEMS: Oak hutch with 2 doors
& l i ght $40. Oak server, 5
drawers, 4 doors $40. Infant
cabana beach tent $40. Tod-
dler potty seat $5. 954-4715
GARAGE SALE LEFTOVERS
TREADMI LL wi t h f an, 10
speed. $55. COMPUTER, Dell
Desktop, $50. DISC PLAYER,
Sony Bl u-Ray, $50. PLAY
PEN, Safety 1, CAR SEAT, (2)
$ 1 5 e a c h . C A M E R A ,
recorder/player, $100. COM-
FORTERS, Twin (2) $5 each.
GLASS, 6 piece salad bowl
set, $5. Clothes, .50 each. El-
liptical, New $250.
570-338-2665
G A R A G E S A L E
LEFTOVERS: Col ored 25
RCA Console TV, Stereo Con-
sole, Zenith Fan, 2 Walkers,
Carpets, Blanket/Throws, Step
stool, Afgan, Lawn Chair, Nick
Nacks, Canister Set, 2 Cookie
Jars. BEST OFFER
570-287-1939
GE AI R CONDI TI ONER
8,000btu, 1 year excellent con-
dition, $100. 570-678-3339
GYM Weider master trainer
universal gym with 200 lbs of
weights $50. Boy's 10 speed
26" & girl's 24" 12 speed bike
$20. for both, 4 Goodrich lite
t r uck t i r es wi nt er t r ead
265/70/17 $60 for all. 2 Bridge-
stone tires 225/55/17 $20 for
both. Contractors wheelbar-
row $35. 100's of baseball &
football cards, make an offer.
570-690-2721
KAPLAN MCAT BOOKS,
chemistry, organic chemistry,
physics, biology, verbal reas-
oning, test prep, 2011, like
new, $100. THE PRINCETON
REVIEW VERBAL ACCELER-
ATOR, verbal accel erat or
reader & MCAT verbal reason-
ing & writing review, 2010,
$40. 570-696-3528
LAWN MOWER, Riding Crafts-
man, barely used, needs bat-
tery perfect condition $800.
JACKET, Pittsburgh Steelers,
$80, BRAS, Victoria Secret,
size 38DD, $15 each, DISH-
WASHER, $50 570-709-9090
Miscellaneous
MAGIC WORKS SETS (5),
$2ea. GERMAN ELEMENT-
ARY BOOKS ( 4) , $1ea.
PETITE BLOUSES (8), size 6,
$.50ea. WOMANS BLAZERS
(4), size 6, $1ea. MAHOGANY
DESK, with hutch top, $50.
LARGE FRAMED FLORAL
PRI NT, $45. WOMANS
SMALL TOPS (10), $.50ea.
570-822-5560
MANNEQUIN plus size male
$450. Concrete fishing boys
$300. Holiday choir singers (5)
$200. All life size, all vintage.
570-262-2204
MI CHELI N LTX AT2 SUV
TIRES, 245-65-17, set of 4, 5K
miles used, $175. MICHELIN
PRIMACY MXV4 CAR TIRES,
set of 4, 10K mi l es, $125.
SPRAYTECH COMMERCIAL
PAI NT SPRAYER, model
1920, extras, used about 20
hrs, $135. PASLODE FRAM-
ING NAILER (gas), used once,
comes with box of nails, $95.
CHI CCO DOUBLE BABY
STROLLER, red, never used,
$135. STIHL SH 85 HAND-
H E L D B L OWE R/ L E A F
SHREDDER, with leaf bag &
gutter cleaning tubes, $100.
STI HL BRUSHCUTTER
BLADES (100), 225mm x
20mm, new, $2ea.
570-901-1242
MOVING SALE Couch tan with
floral prnt, removable cush-
ions, $75, Office Desk for com-
puter, L shaped, $100, TV,
Sharp 32" with remote, $30,
Kitchen table 6 chairs, $50,
Washer, Kenmore heavy duty,
$75, China Closet, with metal
glass doors, $50, Microwave,
$30. Call 570-902-5598
OAK WOOD CASINO GAME
TABLE, multi games, excel-
l e n t c o n d i t i o n , $ 2 0 0 .
SIMPSON'S DVD'S, seasons
4,5,11, Simpsons Christmas
special & Simpsons Movie),
$20. APEX 20" TV, $20.
POKEMON VCR, $20. 4inch
CHICAGO PLATE JOINER,
$50. LITTLE TYKES PLAY
KITCHEN, with accessories,
$20. 17" GATEWAY MONIT-
OR, $30. DECORATIVE BIRD
CAGE, $60. REESE TOW-
POWER STARTER KIT, $20.
BOY'S ARIZONA SKI COAT,
size 18/20, $10. 570-237-1583
ORANGE JUICER great for
summer canning/freezing, like
n e w $ 3 5 . Sh a r p Mi n i
AM/FM/CD system, remote,
speakers very new condition
$55. 570-740-1392
PATIO SET COVER, shields
bugs, $5. JAZZ SHOES, sizes
5 & 6 1/ 2, $10ea. PI NK
BUNNY CHAIR, $5. LEAD
PAD SYSTEM, with 4 games,
grades 3-5, $10. SESAME ST
KIDS SOFA, $5. RICE COOK-
ER, $4. PHILLIPS TV, $10. LIL
BRATZ COMFORTER SET,
$6. 570-696-3368
POOL TABLE, full size, plus
accessori es, $350. WARD-
ROBE, walnut, 6' high 2 1/2'
wide, 1 shelf, like new, $50.
MENS SHIRTS (6), x-large,
never wor n, $5. ea. BAR
STOOLS (4), oak wood, $50.
570-735-7619
POSTERS Br asai f r amed
posters "Pont Neuf Paris" &
"The Steps of Montmarte" mint
condition, both for $25 or $15.
each. Full size comforter &
shams, Nate Brkus design,
cream background with rust
colored stripes, excellent con-
dition $25. 570-825-2961
SCREEN HOUSE $10. Cabin
tent 12x12 $40. Electric lawn
mower $25. Contractor radial
arm saw $100. 570-823-2889
STOCK POT 3 piece, 12 quart
with steamer basket, new in
box $20. ANTI FREEZE &
COOLANT (2) $5. each. air
compressor FOR CAR 12
VOLT, NEW I N BOX $10.
570-655-2154
TIRES 2 Wi nterforce snow
tires, 175/70R/13 mounted on
'92 Geo Prizm rims, both rims
& tires like new $100. 570-825-
8438 after 6pm
Miscellaneous
CANES & WALKING STICKS
made from sl i ppery mapl e
t rees $5-$6. each. COAL
BURNING STOVE , Whi te
Dickson. $550. telephones 1
table, 1 wall $8. each. HOUSE-
HOLD & CHRISTMAS ITEMS
over 200 pieces for $60. Over
20 skeins yard, many colors all
for $15. 570-735-2081
STROYFOAM PEANUTS 5
extra l arge bags, great for
shi ppi ng $2.50 per bag.
570-655-1808
TIRE, brand new, never used,
size 245/75R/16, $50.
570-825-8460
TIRES 4 Goodyear Wranglers
AT 265/70/R17 $170.
570-606-9882
TIRES 4 Michelin Tour HP
P255/60R17, very good condi-
tion $150. for all. 570-262-
6581 or 570-655-6399
TRUCK CAP, fits Ford F-150
97'-2004, 6 1/2 ft box. ARE,
white, fiberglass, MX Series,
$300. LAWN TRACTOR 16 hp
wheel horse 1986 runs & cuts,
needs battery, $300.
570-822-3660
TV Zenith 36" HDTV with glass
enclosed cabinet $100. Rust
velour electric lift chair $100.
Propane gas heater, portable
$100. Portable golf cart $20.
570-693-3978
VINTAGE COLUMBIA BIKE,
mens, silver & black, 26in.,
with accessories, $200. VIN-
TAGE SCHWINN TORNADO,
womans, 26in., with accessor-
i es, $100. RED STREAK
WAGON, rounded bed 14 in.
hgt., $50. VINTAGE CHILDS
SIDEWALK BIKE, $40. 38, 1
PINT COKE BOTTLES, $100.
2 RED & WHITE WOODEN
COKE CASES, $100. 4
WOOD & TIN AD FOR GOLD
MEDAL FLOUR, $100. PEPSI
THERMOMETER, 28"", reads
Pepsi please, $75.
570-655-3463
WASHER/DRYER. Whirpool
Estate Series. Excellent, $250
each, $475 both. COFFEE
MAKER, Bunn, never used.
$400. 570-288-4273
WEDDING BOWS, for church
Pews. $4 each. 570-654-4440
WHITE CEILING FAN, with
light set, fan doesn't work, $20.
SHARON ORNAMENTAL
SEEDLINGS (15), color varies
per soil, 12 ft at maturity, $5ea.
VINTAGE WHITE KITCHEN
SINK, double sideboard, 72"
wide farmhouse, deep sink,
cast iron/porcelain, fair condi-
tion, $750. 570-825-2901
WINDOW doubl e hung re-
placement 30x53 full screen
$40. 2 tailgates for '85 Chevy
truck - 1 new & 1 used $125.
for both. Snapper riding lawn
mower 26" cut, 190.5 hp, elec-
tric start $350. 570-477-5681
Musical Instruments
BALDWI N STUDI O CON-
SOLE PI ANO, oak, wi t h
matching bench. 1 owner, like
new, tuned & delivered, $950.
570-474-6362
ORGAN FREE good condition.
Call 570-822-9668
PIANO
Baldwin Acrosonic Upright
early 1960's. Cosmetic
signs of use and wear, but
fully operational and func-
tions as intended. Bench in-
cluded, but not original.
Downsizing and cleaning
house. A great buy for
teacher or new student
to begin lessons.
Value $1,500. Priced to sell
at $1,000, Negotiable. Call
570-262-1056.
Located in Mountain Top
Musical Lessons /Services
DRUM INSTRUCTOR
SEEKING STUDENTS.
Wyoming Valley Area
20+ Years Experience.
Call 570-574-0893
Personal Electronics
KINDLE & NOOK $40. each.
570-885-6848
Pools & Spas
POOL HEATER. Hayward,
100,000 btu above ground.
Purchased 2004, never used.
New in box with owners manu-
al and original receipt. $500
OBO 570-695-4525
POOL LADDER. Vinyl a-frame
with security gate. Used one
season. Asking $100.
570-735-6527
Sporting Goods
CALLOWAY CART BAG,
used 1 season, red & black,
$50. SURF ROD & REEL
COMBO, $75. WOOLRICH
BIG GAME HUNTING OUT-
FIT, blaze orange like new, xlg,
$60. TREK MT BIKE, $150
570-885-5858
CUSTOM MADE I RONS.
Three thru P,W, $50. Plus oth-
er clubs & golf balls.
570-262-2731
DIRT BIKE Schwinn 26", 26
speeds, front suspension. Paid
$390. Reduced $99. 655-2154
GOLF CART Pull $20.
570-472-3615
Televisions /Accessories
TV Samsung color, about 10
years old, works great $25.
570-288-4219
Tools
CHOP SAW 10" new condi-
tion with table $100. TABLE
SAW 10" new condition with
table $100. SABER SAW $10.
570-655-8056
STEP LADDER fi bergl ass,
heavy duty, 250 lbs. & up, like
new $30. 570-283-0805
Toys & Games
12' TRAMPOLINE, like new,
safety net also, $175.
570-592-1828
BIKE, Boy's, 16" Hot Wheels.
Good condition, $25. Childs
Pottery Barn first table and 2
chairs set. Very good condi-
tion; $50. 570-675-1277
CAR motori zed ride on for
kids. Pink / white. Looks like
VW Beetle. $30. 570-883-7049
FI SHER PRI CE POWER
WHEELS, mot ori zed j eep,
needs new bat t er y, $25.
POWER WHEELS, Harl ey
Davidson edition, motorized
motorcycle, needs new battery,
$25. LITTLE TYKES PLASTIC
TOY HOUSE, $25,
570-332-1912
TOYS. All priced at $25 each.
Fisher Price Power Wheels,
motorized jeep, needs batter-
ies; Power Wheels, Harley mo-
torcycle, needs batteries; Little
Tikes Plastic Playhouse, Little
Tikes Plastic Jungle gym with
slide, 570-696-0312
Stereo /TV /Electronics
NETBOOK Asus N2600, 10.1"
LCD, HDMI can be connected
to any HDMI TV for display,
320GB, 1GB $120. 472-8567
NOOK TABLET barley used,
in box $100. 570-762-4914
RADIO/RECORD PLAYER
Stewart Warner excel l ent,
plays 33 records 75 years old.
$150. 570-287-2073
TV-21 inch Magnavox, great
picture works perfectly, not a
flat screen, $20 570-457-3486
Swimming Pools /Hot Tubs
POOL LINER. Brand new.
24x52 solid blue. Opened box,
liner too big for our pool. Ask-
ing $90. 570-288-6847
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PAGE 12D Thursday, July 25, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
CALL AN
E
X
P
E
R
T
To place an ad call
829-7130
Air Conditioning & Heating
STRISH A/C
Ductless / Central Air Conditioning
Free Estimates
Licensed & Insured
570-332-0715
Appliances
A.R.T.
APPLIANCE
REPAIR
We service all major
brands.
570-639-3001
Building & Remodeling
1ST. QUALITY
Construction Co.
Roofing, siding, gutters,
insulation, decks, additions,
windows, doors, masonry &
concrete. Ins. & Bonded. Sr.
Citizens Discount! State Lic.
# PA057320 570-606-8438
ALL OLDER HOMES SPECIALIST
825-4268.
Porches and Decks
Home repair
www.davejohnson
remodeling.com
Bathrooms/Kitchens
Carpentry A/Z 570-819-0681
FIND OUT HOW
TO BECOME A
MEMBER
OR CALL FOR
A QUALIFIED
CONTRACTOR
Building Industry
Association Of NEPA
411 MAIN ST.,
KINGSTON, PA 18704
Contact:
Janet Campis
www.bianepa.com
570-287-3331
Building & Remodeling
Shedlarski
Construction
Home Improvement Specialist
Licensed, insured & PA registered.
Kitchens, baths, vinyl siding &
railings,replacement
windows & doors,
additions, garages, all phases of
home renovations. Free Estimates
570-287-4067
Chimney Service
A-1 ABLE CHIMNEY
Rebuild & Repair Chimneys. All
types of Masonry.
Liners Installed,
Brick & Block,
Roofs & Gutters.
Licensed & Insured
570-735-2257
Cleaning & Maintenance
LIGHT TO MEDIUM
HOUSECLEANING
for Greater Pittston/Plains
area. Reasonable rates.
Contact Julie 570-655-5009
Concrete & Masonry
A STEP-UP MASONRY
Specializing in All Types of
Masonry. Stone, Concrete
Licensed & Insured Free
Estimates Senior Discount
PA094695-570-702-3225
D. PUGH CONCRETE
All phases of masonry &
concrete. Small jobs welcome.
Senior discount. Free est.
Licensed & Insured
288-1701/655-3505
L & A
CONCRETE
WORKS
Why Live With
Ugly Concrete?
Try Concrete
Resurfacing,
Stamped or Stenciled
Overlays
Licensed & Insured
PA088910
570-840-0803
Concrete & Masonry
STESNEY CONCRETE
& MASONRY
Brick, Block, Stucco, Stone,
Steps, Sidewalks, Driveways,
Foundations, Floors, Chim-
neys etc. Lic. & Ins. Call 570-
328-1830 or 570-283-1245
Construction & Building
GARAGE
DOOR
Sales, service, installation
and repair.
FULLY INSURED
HIC# 065008
CALL JOE
570-735-8551
Cell 606-7489
Electrical
RNI ELECTRIC, LLC
Licensed & Insured
Retired Veteran
Panel upgrades.
New & old work.
25 Years Experience
570-814-8979
SLEBODA ELECTRIC
Master electrician
Licensed & Insured
Service Changes & Replacements.
Generator Installs.
570-868-4469
Gutter Repair & Cleaning
GUTTER CLEANING
Window Cleaning
Pressure Washing.
Insured. 570-288-6794
Hauling & Trucking
ALL KINDS OF
HAULING & JUNK
REMOVAL
SUMMER CLEAN UP!
TREE/SHRUB REMOVAL
DEMOLITION
ESTATE CLEANOUT
Free Estimates 24 hour service
Small and large jobs!
570-823-1811 570-239-0484
AAA CLEANING
A1 General Hauling
Cleaning attics, cellars, garages,
Demolitions, Roofing & Tree
Removal. Free Est. 779-0918 or
542-5821; 814-8299
Hauling & Trucking
A.S.A.P HAULING
Estate Cleanouts, Attics,
Cellars, Garages, were
cheaper than dumpsters!.
Free Estimates, Same Day!
570-855-4588
AA CLEANING
A1 Always hauling, cleaning
attics, cellar, garage, one piece
or whole Estate, also available
10 & 20 yard dumpsters. 655-
0695 592-1813 or 287-8302
ALWAYS READY
HAULING
Property & Estate Cleanups,
Attics, Cellars,
Yards, Garages,
Construction Sites, Flood
Damage & More.
Cheaper Than a Dumpster!!
Same Day Service
Free Estimates
570-301-3754
BOB & RAY'S HAULING
We Haul Everything!
Cheap, fast, clean &
respectful. Keep Smiling
Free Estimates.
570-655-7458
570-604-5224
HAULING &
BUYING
JUNK CARS
& TRUCKS
Vito & Ginos
570-288-8995
Mikes $5-Up
Hauling Junk & Trash from Houses,
Garages, Yards, Etc
826-1883 704-8846
Will Haul Anything
Clean cellars, attics, yards & metal
removal. Call Jeff
570-735-3330 or 570-762-4438
Landscaping
Foltz Landscaping
Skid-Steer
Mini Excavating New Landscapes/
Lawns. Retaining walls/patios.
Call: 570-760-4814
KELLER'S
LAWN CARE
Cleanups
Landscaping, mowing,
mulching, trimming, planting.
Commercial & Residential.
570-332-7016
TOUGH BRUSH
& TALL GRASS
Mowing, edging, mulching, shrubs
& hedge shaping. Tree pruning.
Garden tilling. All Seasons Clean
Ups. Leaf removal. Weekly
& bi-weekly lawn care.
Fully Insured
Free Estimates
570-829-3261
Painting & Wallpaper
A & N PAINTING
SUMMER SPECIAL
TIME IS RUNNING OUT TO
SCHEDULE YOUR
EXTERIOR WORK.
18 years exp. Exterior
Painting, Power Washing,
Deck Staining.
570-820-7832
ATTENTION
Serra Painting
Book Now For Summer & Save.
All Work Guaranteed Satisfaction.
30 Yrs. Experience. Powerwash &
Paint Vinyl, Wood, Stucco
Aluminum. Free Estimates!
You Cant Lose! 570-822-3943
Daniels Paint and Wall Covering
Lic. PA100671 & Ins.
20 YEARS EXP.
570-604-2961
JACOBOSKY
PAINTING
We Are An Expert Building
Restoration Company.
High end painting, Power Washing
& Masonry. Please Call Only The
Best! 570-328-5083
Paving & Excavating
EDWARD'S ALL
COUNTY
PAVING
*DRIVEWAYS
*PARKING LOTS
*ROADWAYS
*HOT TAR & CHIP
*SEAL COATING
Licensed and
Insured. Call Today
For Your
Free Estimate
570-474-6329
Lic.# PA021520
Pressure Washing
PJs Window Cleaning &
Janitorial Services
Windows, Gutters, Carpets,
Power washing and more.
INSURED/BONDED.
pjswindowcleaning.com
570-283-9840
Roofng & Siding
BEST PRICE METAL
ROOF INSTALLATION
& OLD BARN
RESTORATION
LIC. & INS. 570-675-2430
CORNERSTONE
CONSTRUCTION
Roofing Siding Carpentry
40 yrs. experience
Licensed & Insured
PA026102
Call Dan: 570-881-1131
J.R.V. Roofing
570-824-6381
Roof Repairs & New Roofs.
Shingle, Slate, Hot Built Up,
Rubber, Gutters & Chimney
Repairs. Year Round. Li-
censed/Insured
FREE Estimates
*24 Hour Emergency Calls*
Roofng & Siding
Free Estimates
JO Home Improvement.
Roofing, over the top: $160 a
square, rip-off: $265. Roof val-
leys replaced, siding, painting.
interior & exterior remodeling.
Fully insured. PA100512
570-829-3261
570-817-2548
SPRING ROOFING
McManus Construction
Licensed, Insured. Everyday
Low Prices. 3,000 satisfied
customers. 570-735-0846
Tree Service
APEX TREE AND EARTH
Tree Removal, Pruning, Stump
Grinding, Hazard Tree
Removal, Grading, Drainage,
Lot Clearing.Insured.
Reasonable Rates
apextreeandearth.com
Serving Wyoming Valley,
Back Mountain &
Surrounding Areas.
570-550-4535
Upholstery
Sandra's Custom Slipcovers
Draperies + Shades
Boat Covers + Upholstery
COSTUMING Theater, Opera
Residential & Commercial &
Institutional Sewing for any
reason since 1977
Call 570 519 0214
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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Thursday, July 25, 2013 PAGE 13D
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F U N N I E S THURSDAY, JULY 25, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
SALLY FORTH
CLASSIC PEANUTS
STONE SOUP
BLONDIE
BEETLE BAILEY
THATABABY
FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE
GET FUZZY
CLOSE TO HOME
ARGYLE SWEATER
B.C.
PICKLES
PARDON MY PLANET
MARMADUKE HERMAN
DRABBLE
GARFIELD
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
TUNDRA