2013 Education

JULY

HERSAM ACORN NEWSPAPERS

Special Section to: Greenwich Post

I

The Darien Times

I

New Canaan Advertiser

I

The Ridgefield Press

I

The Wilton Bulletin

I

The Redding Pilot

I

The Weston Forum

I

The Lewisboro Ledger

Therapist, founder and director Karen Nisenson with client Ellen Price. In back is Gail Donovan from The Bank of New Canaan.

Enhancing communication and socialization through music and art
by Karen Nisenson, MM, MA, MT-BC
Why are music and art the best vehicles of
communication between people who don’t
speak the same language or between people who
don’t speak at all? Music is processed by the
“whole” brain and the emotional system simultaneously, and requires no cognitive work in
order to participate in an interactive experience.
Arts for Healing — a nonprofit organization
based in New Canaan, serving clients with emotional, physical, developmental, and social needs
throughout Fairfield and Westchester counties
— has been providing therapeutic experiences
and adaptive music lessons since 2000 with this
fact in mind. Socialization groups for various
age groups are now offered, in which children
and teens may explore creative expression while
enhancing social skills in the most natural way.
In a comfortable, nurturing environment,
language is facilitated using an improvisational
approach to music making, one in which every
individual’s part is incorporated into the whole,
whether the activity is songwriting, interactive
music making, or playwriting. Motivation for
further interaction is encouraged by fostering
independent thought, creativity and the recognition of one’s own ideas as important to the

experience as a whole. Self-consciousness and
discomfort are eliminated by the desire to create
something new.
Art activities are added to the program in
order to provide additional channels for verbal
expression. According to parents of children
who participated at Arts for Healing, 100% felt
their children’s self-confidence improved, and
93% had improved their communication skills.
The growing field of research in neurology and
music has increased public awareness of the
need for more arts-based programs. It has been
proven over and over again that music helps
students’ focus and attention, while improving
academic performance.
All of these opportunities are offered to children, teens and adults. This meaningful socialization experience may be incorporated for a
smoother transition into the greater community.
Fall groups are now being formed in
ArtWorks and MusicWorks. Arts for Healing
also offers individual music therapy, art therapy
and dance/movement therapy as well as adaptive music lessons.
More info: 203-972-2982, artsforhealing.org

Participants in Arts for Healing’s music making program.

• Education • Hersam Acorn Newspapers •

•2•

• July 25, 2013 •

To be, or not to be

an actor

�������������������
��������������������

������������������������������������������������������������

�������������������������������������������������
���������������������

How performing arts
schools can help
by Julie Butler

����������

����������������
������������������������������������������������������������������
��������������������������������������
���������������������������������
������������������������

Do you have a budding thespian in your
household, a child with a burning desire
and a passion to be on the stage, television
and/or the silver screen? Although participating in their school or community’s
theatrical productions can certainly help
them explore their perfoming abilities, you
might want to also consider enrolling him/
her in a performing arts acting program at
a local studio so that they can hone and
harness their talent under the supervision
of professional actors.
“It’s important for aspiring actors to be
part of productions, as this is part of the
process of the craft,” Catherine Lachioma,

executive director of the Performing Arts
Center of Connecticut in Trumbull, said.
“Just as crucial is taking classes ... what
you learn through scene study, improvisation, diction, monologues, and interaction with fellow students and instructors
can then be applied to your roles for
each character and performance. As in all
things, there is a process for learning, practice and application that make for a more
sound, versatile and secure actor.”
Acting is an important part of the holistic theater education offered at the PACC.
“The learning and creative process never
stops at PACC,” Lachioma said.
Performing Arts on page 17

�������� ��� ����������������

�������������������������������
���������������������������������
�����������������������������
�������������������������
���������������
������������������
���������������
��������������������
�������������������
���������������������
����������������������
������������������������
����������
����������������
�������������������
���������������������������
������
����������������������
������������������
�������������������
���������������
�������������������
������������������
����������������������
����������
�������������������������
������������������
�����������������������
�����������������������������
����������������������������
��������������
�����������������
������������������������������
��������������������
������������������������

������������������������
�������������������������������������������
���������������������������������������������

������������������������������ ���������������������
������������������������������������� ��������������������
�������������������������������������� �������������������

������������������
�����������������������
�����������������������
���������������������������
������������������������
��������������������������
������������������
���������������
��������������������������
�����������������������
��������������������������
��������������������
�������������
�����������������������
����������
�����������������������������
���������������������������
��������
�������������������
�����������������
����������������������
���������������
�������������������������
��������������������
��������������������������
��������������������������
�������������������
��������������
�����������������������
������������
���������������

���������������������������
�������������������������������������
�����������������������������������

• Education • Hersam Acorn Newspapers •

• July 25, 2013 •

•3•

Empowering
students
to
shape
the
future!
Empowering students to shape the future!

Academy of
Information
Technology &
Engineering

A 21st Century High School
��������������������
Education in a Small,
Caring Environment
�����������������
������������������
Empowering students
students to
shape
the
future!
Empowering
to
shape
the
future!
What makes AITE
�����������
unique?

�����������
������������
Small Student Population
IT & Pre-Engineering
Programs
Technology Rich
Environment

Rigorous Academic
Preparation
Early College Experience
Integration of Technology in
all Classes
Virtual High School
Multicultural Diversity
Develops the Whole Child

★ ��������������
����������
★ ���������������������
��������
A
21st
Century
HighSchool
School
A 21st
Century
High
Education
Small,
inin
aa
Small,
★Education
����������������
Caring
Environment
Caring
Environment
�����������
★ ������������������
What
makesAITE
AITE
What
makes
�����������
unique?
★unique?
��������������
����������
Small
Student
Population
Small
Student
Population
& Pre-Engineering
IT IT
& Pre-Engineering
★ ���������������
Programs
Programs
������������������
Technology
Rich
Technology
Rich
Environment
Environment
�������
Rigorous
Academic
★ �������������������
Rigorous
Academic
Preparation
Preparation
★ ��������������
Early
College
Experience
Early
College
Experience
Integration
Technologyinin
Integration
ofof
Technology
���������
Classes
all all
Classes
Virtual
High
School
★ �������������������
Virtual
High
School
Multicultural
Diversity
Multicultural
Diversity
�����
Develops the Whole Child

An Interdistrict Magnet Public
College Preparatory High School
Serving Lower Fairfield County

Academy
of
Academy
of
����������
��������
Information
Information
Technology
Technology&&
Engineering
Engineering

AITE @ Rippowam Campus
411 High Ridge Road
Stamford, CT 06905
���������������������������
(203) 977-4336
������������������
(203) 977-6638 (fax)
www.aitstamford.org

���������������������������
������������������
��������������������������
������������������

An Interdistrict
Magnet
Public
Interdistrict
Magnet
Public
��������������������������
�����������������
College Preparatory
High
College
Preparatory
HighSchool
School
�����������������������
Serving
Lower
Serving
LowerFairfield
FairfieldCounty
County
�����������������

Develops the Whole Child

AITE
Campus
AITE@@Rippowam
Rippowam
Campus
411
Road
411High
HighRidge
Ridge
Road
Stamford,
CTCT
06905
Stamford,
06905
(203)
(203)977-4336
977-4336
(203)
(fax)
(203)977-6638
977-6638
(fax)
www.aitstamford.org
��������������������
www.aitstamford.org

•4•

• Education • Hersam Acorn Newspapers •

• July 25, 2013 •

��������������������������������������������
��������������������������������������������

���������������������������������������������������������������������������

�������������
���������
�������������
��������������
����������������������������������
��������������������������������������
������������������������������������
��������������������������������������
�������������������������������������
����������������������������������

�������������������������
�������������������������

�����������������
����������������������
������������
�������������������������������
���������������������
��������������������������
�������������������������

��������������������������
�������������������������������������

• Education • Hersam Acorn Newspapers •

• July 25, 2013 •

•5•

It doesn’t have to be US versus THEM
by Polly Tafrate
Ideally, parents and teachers are
partners in a child’s education.
Unfortunately this isn’t always the
case. The following suggestions
are offered from someone who’s
sat on both sides of the desk.
Tips for parents
• Choose your battles carefully.
Give your child time to sort out
minor difficulties. Ask yourself if
this problem will have a long-lasting, negative effect on him before
confronting the teacher.
• Don’t encourage tattletales.
A child in Mrs. Brown’s class was
named Nicholas. Occasionally
she’d slip and call him Nick. The
following day she knew to expect
a note from his mother pointing
out her error. Wouldn’t a private
email have been more discreet and
not empowered her son?
• Send your teacher a short
note of appreciation, especially if
something made your child happy.
• If your child’s at fault and
it’s called to your attention, don’t
defend him by switching the
blame to the teacher or other students. Recognize your own possible blindness.
• When your child hears or

observes you criticizing his teacher, he’ll have no reason to respect
her either.
• Don’t go underground. Liza’s
mother had constant complaints
that she voiced regularly to the
teacher. She didn’t stop there, but
would network her dissatisfaction
with other parents. These complaints often got back to the teacher and made her laugh — especially the criticism about how she
dressed. Liza’s mother wanted her
to wear jeans and a sweatshirt like
a few other teachers so “she could
spend more time on the floor with
the kids.”
• When sending an email with
a concern to the teacher, don’t
copy the administrator or principal on it. More blatant than that is
arranging a conference with one of
them without conferring with the
teacher first. Chances are you’ll
be asked about this. Going over
her head is disrespectful and may
have a boomerang effect.
Tips for teachers
• Parents know their child betParent - Teacher on page 13

���������

��������������������
��������������������
������������������������
������������������������
��
��������
���������������
�������������������������
��
����������������������������
�����������������

��������
�������
���������

���������������������������������������������

�������������
����������������

��������������������������������
������������

�������������������������������������
���������������������������������������������������

���������
���������������������������
������������
�����������
�����������������������������������������������������
������������ ����������������������������������
�������������������������������

�����������������

�������������������������������������������������
������������
����������������������������������������������������������
���������������������
�����������������������������������������������������
������������������������������������

��������������
����������������������������
�����������������������������������������������������
����������������������������������������������

�����������������������������������
���������������������������������
��������������������������������������������

• Education • Hersam Acorn Newspapers •

•6•

• July 25, 2013 •

A bonus in
the classroom?

��������������������������������

Parents and students who want to improve grades and
classroom performance may want to look to extracurricular activities. There is evidence that some after-school
activities can actually help promote better results inside
of the classroom— even helping to mediate symptoms
of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.
Activities like sports, band, cheerleading, martial arts,
among other extracurriculars, can promote good feelings
about school and offer lessons that carry over into the
classroom environment, helping students become more
successful.
A study by the U.S. Department of Education revealed
that students who participate in co-curricular activities
are three times more likely to have a grade point average
of 3.0 or better than students who do not participate in
cocurricular activities.
Extracurricular activities also may be able to correct
behaviors associated with boisterous children or those
who have been diagnosed with a clinical medical condition, such as ADHD. In a study titled, “The Effects of
Mixed Martial Arts on Behavior of Male Children with
Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder,” researchers
found that a martial arts program two times per week
helped increase the percentage of completed homework, frequency of following specific classroom rules,
improved academic performance and improved classroom preparation of male children ages 8 to 11 with
ADHD.
There is also evidence that simple physical activ-

Tracy Scarfi photo

�����������������������������

�������������

������������
�����������������������������
���������������������������������

������
������������������
������������������������
���������������������
������������������������������������

�����������������������������������������������
����������������������������������������

���������������
�����������������

����������������

������������������

�������������������

���������

���������������

���������������
�����������������
�����������������
����

���������������

�����������������
����

�������������������������
��������������������������������������
����������������������������������������������

������
������������������������������������������������������������������������
�����������������������������������������������������������������������
�����������������������������������������������������������������
������������������������������������������������������������������
�����������������������������������������������������������������������
������������
���������������������������������������������������

����������������

������������ ������������������
���������������������������������������������������������
������������������������ �����������������������������������������������

• Education • Hersam Acorn Newspapers •

• July 25, 2013 •

ity can promote better opportunities for
learning. Studies largely conducted by the
California Department of Education have
found a correlation between physical activity and increased performance. Physically
active youths tend to show improved attributes such as increased brain function and
nourishment, higher energy/concentration
levels, increased self-esteem, and better
behavior, each of which can help a student
perform better in the classroom.
Beyond this, there are many ways that
extracurricular activities can support

improvements in the classroom.
• Most activities promote physical stamina and patience.
• Students develop self-esteem and good
relationships.
• Students are able to apply theories
learned in the classroom in a real-world
context.
• A healthy measure of competition is
developed.
• Students learn to value teamwork and
achieve a goal through common values.
• Children are able to exert energy in a

•7•

constructive way.
• Extracurriculars promote good attendance and participation in order to excel.
• Students learn self-motivation.
• Students can realize success that is not
measured by test scores.
• Many extracurricular activities have
a basis in rules that can keep students in
check.
• Students participate in a social setting,
learning through activities that they truly

enjoy.
It’s important to note that, in some
instances, too much of a good thing may
be detrimental. If a student is so busy with
a packed schedule of extracurricular activities, he or she may fall behind in school
work. Therefore, it’s vital to keep a balance
so that students may successfully manage
what goes on inside of school and outside
of school.

����������������������������������������
������������
�����������������������
�����������������������
������������������������
���������������������

��������������������������������������������������
�������������������
������������������������
����������������������������

���������������������

���������
����������
�����������
�����������������

������������
�������
��������������
��������

������������������
�����������������
�������������
����������������

�������������������������������������������������������������

REGISTER NOW FOR FALL 2013!
Pre-K 3 through Grade 8

�������������
�����������������������
�����������������������
�������������

For further information, visit our website
OR call 203.762.8100

�����������������������

�����������������������������������������������
�������������������������������������������
������������������������

�����������

������������������������������������������������������ ������������������

��������������������������������������������������������������������

• Education • Hersam Acorn Newspapers •

•8•

• July 25, 2013 •

by Polly Tafrate

It’s Sunday evening. Owen asks his
mother where he can find a shoebox.
“Why do you need it?” she asks.
“I need to make a diorama for a book
report,” he says. “It’s due tomorrow.”
Kaitlin creeps downstairs after her
mother thinks she’s asleep to tell her that
she “forgot” to study for a spelling test the
next day. Aiden accuses his dad of picking on him when repeatedly reminded to
clean out the gerbil cage or empty the garbage. “I told you, I’ll do it after dinner,”
he snarls, but he doesn’t. “Tomorrow,” he
promises when prodded again. But that
doesn’t happen either.
What are these kids hoping to accomplish by postponing these tasks? Do they
think they’ll go away? Or that you’ll forget
to remind them? Or do they hope that if
they delay doing them long enough you’ll
give in and do it for them?
If any of this sounds familiar, then
you’re living with procrastinators. They’ve
learned how to play for time and substitute something they’d rather do for a notso-fun responsibility. Unless channeled,
this stalling will become worse as they get
older and add unnecessary pressure to
their lives.
There is no procrastination gene
although it can develop into a personality

�����������������������������

�������������������������������������������������
�����������������������������������������������
������������������������������������������������������
����������������������������������������������
�����������������������������������������
����������������������������������

��������������������
����������������������������������������
ISYOUR
CHILD IN NEED OF A PHYSICAL EXAM
���������������������������������
FOR SUMMER���������������
CAMP, SPORTS ACTIVITY, OR
SCHOOL ASAP?
�����������������������������������������
Urgent Care of Connecticut to the Rescue!

855.FIX.BUBU
���������

No Appointment Necessary
Simply Walk In
Open Every Day!
��������������
�������������������������

�������
855.FIX.BUBU
G L A S T O N B U RY

N O RWA L K
�����������������������
���������
RID
GEFIELD

��������������������
������������������
������������������������������
������������������������������������
�������������������������������
�����������������������������������
����������������������������������
����������������������������
�����������������������������
����������������������������������
���������� ���������������� ��
�������������������� ������������ ��
������������

For a limited time, camp and school-required
physicals are offered at just $100 – a $40 savings!
and
Urgent Care of Connecticut will make a $30
donation to your child’s camp or school PTA

�����������������
��������������

�������������
B RO O K F I E L D
��������������

�������������������������������������������

No Appointment Necessary
Simply Walk In
Open Every Day!

��������������
���������

���� ���������������� ������������������
���������������������
���� �������������������������������
����������
���� �����������������������

�������������
����������������

������������������������

S O U T H B U RY

�����������������������������������������������������������

w w w. u c o f c o n n e c t i c u t . c o m
All required paperwork and forms will be provided to you at the time of visit. Offer valid June 1 - Sept. 15. Parents must present
documentation of previous immunizations and past physical forms. Please note clinics might be busier on weekend days during this offer.

���������������������������������������������
�������������������

�����������������������������
����������������������

����������
�����������

������������������
�������������������������
��������������������������������
���������������������������������
�������������������������
�������������������������

����������� ������������������

�������������������������
������������������������������������

���������������������������������������������

�������������������������������������������������������������
���������������������������������������������������
��������������������������������������
��������������������������������
�������������������������

• Education • Hersam Acorn Newspapers •

• July 25, 2013 •

•9•

Betty is the mother of teens. “I used to
be a procrastinator,” she says, “but not
anymore.” Every Sunday she sits down at
the kitchen table and makes three lists on
three different pieces of paper prioritizing what she needs to accomplish that
week. On the A list she puts things that
must be done the next day; on the B list
go the ones that need to be done within a
few days and on the C list are those that
should be accomplished by week’s end.
As she completes each one she takes a
Sharpie marker and crosses it off the list.
“Often I’ll walk to the other end of the
house just to do that,” she says. “It gives
me such a sense of completion.” If for
some reason there are a few still on the
C list the following Sunday, she transfers
them to next week’s B list. Her kids have
watched her do this and have become list
makers of their own although they sometimes have fun kidding her about which
job goes on which list.
Another mother was desperate about
her son’s increasing stalling and dawdling
whenever he was asked to do something.
When especially frustrated, she stooped
to calling him lazy, a loafer or a goof-off
and made unrealistic threats. He felt she
was always picking on him and became
moody whenever a must-do subject
arose. While shopping at Staples one day
she saw the “That Was Easy” button. She
bought it and gave it to him suggesting
that he push it when he finished a chore.
Hearing “That Was Easy” eliminated her
nagging and gave him a sense of accomplishment.
Breaking the procrastination habit isn’t
easy, but when you see success lavish
your kids with praise. As a positive takeaway from all your supportive coaching,
you may find that you’re less likely to
procrastinate yourself.

���������������������
��������������������������
�������������������
����������������

��
��
��
��
��

��������������������������

trait. This is a learned behavior and one
doesn’t need to wander too far from that
tree with the falling apples to discover
where they learned it.
“It gives kids a wonderful sense of
power,” says Rita Emmett, author of The
Procrastinating Child. “As they grow, they
begin to learn they have choices, not all
of which are dictated by their parents.
Procrastinating becomes just one way
kids express their dawning sense of independence.”
What can you, as a parent, do to help
your kids break this habit? The following
are a few suggestions.
First of all, when expecting your child
to do something, make it age appropriate. For example, telling a five-year old
to clean up her room is unrealistic, but
listing three things to make this happen works: “Put your dirty clothes in the
hamper, put your shoes in the closet, put
your books on the shelf.”
Giving kids a warning can be helpful as
it lets them finish what they’re doing and
gives them a sense of control. “In 15 minutes I want to see you start your homework.” If necessary, set a timer so it’s not
your voice they hear, but the bell.
As a working mother of three, Laura
jokingly calls herself the Queen of
Procrastination. Throughout the years
she’s developed a workable strategy to
help her overcome this tendency, which
she’s passing on to her kids.
“I call it the reward system,” she says.
“If I start the laundry, empty the dishwasher and change the sheets on the
beds, then I’ll treat myself to a phone
chat with Rita. Larger chores get larger
rewards,” she adds. “If I clean the bathrooms until they sparkle, then I will sit
down and read the next chapter in my
book.”

��������������������������
����������������������������������������������
����������������������������

�����������������������������������������
��������������������������������������������

�����������������������������������������������
�����������������������������������������������������������

���������������
���������������������
������������
��������������������������

���������������������������������������������������������������������������

���������������
�����������������

�����������������������������
��������������������������������

���������������������������
���������������������������

������
������������������
������������������

������������
������������������������������������������������
�������������������������������������������������
�����������������������������
����������������������������������������������������������������
������������������������������
�����������������������������������

�����������������������
The Ridgefield School of Dance

SUMMER DANCE BOOT CAMP
August 12-16 & 19-23

�����������
����������������������������
������������������������
�����������������������������
��������������������������������������������������������������������
����������������������������������������������������
���������������������������������������������������

Jazz • Modern • Ballet • Hip Hop • Lyrical
NEW Caribbean Dance Hall • Hip Hop for Beginners
Mighty Mites for 3 & 4 year olds

������������������������
������������������������������������������������������������

��������������
�������������������������������

Nancy Andrews, Director
203.664.1436
www.theridgefieldschoolofdance.com

�������������������������������������

���������������������������
����������������������������������������������������������������������������

• Education • Hersam Acorn Newspapers •

• 10 •

• July 25, 2013 •

by Julie Butler
As the parent of a rising high school senior
starting his journey on the whole college
admissions process, I am finding it all a tad
daunting. Although I have three older children, one entered the military right out of
high school and the other two applied to
non-traditional colleges with a simple admitting process, so this is really my “first time
at the rodeo,” as they say, of helping a child
apply to a traditional four-year college.
Exactly what constitutes a good and
appealing essay? Should he be sending emails
of “thanks for the tour” to the prospective
colleges he may want to attend? How should
he go about presenting himself in the best
possible light to the admission decision-makers? To help me with these questions and
more, I have decided to go the route of hiring
a college consultant.
According to Jed Applerouth, a teacher and
nationally certified counselor, the world of
college admissions is complex; with the high
costs and broad range of choices, the need for
reliable information is more important now
than ever. Parents frequently need help to
find their child a true college “fit” academically, socially and financially among the 2,750 or
so four-year colleges in the United States. “To
navigate the incredible variety of programs,
academic departments, student services, and
potential financial aid packages available, tens
of thousands of families are seeking the support of independent educational consultants,”
he said.
“The growth in the field of independent
consulting has been staggering,” Applerouth
said. According to the Independent
Educational Consultants Association (IECA),
in 1994 there were scarcely 150 “independents” in the U.S., and most of them focused
on boarding and day schools. Today there are
more than 6,000 full-time and 15,000 parttime independent educational consultants in
the U.S. and another 3,000 or so working
internationally.
One such college consultant is Cathy
Barton Zales, a member of NACAC and
associate member of IECA. Her firm, Next
Chapter College Consulting, is based in New
Canaan, but she works with students regard-

less of their location.
“Given the high cost of a college education and the ever-increasing complexity and
competitive nature of the admissions process,
professional guidance is more important than
ever,” Zales said. “I act as a student’s professional guide, personal resource and chief
cheerleader throughout the college planning,
search, application and decision-making process. My role supplements the work of the

best way possible, to demonstrate to admissions committees why they should be admitted.”
Pros and cons
It costs money to hire a college consultant and prices can range between $250
and $40,000, according to a report from
FoxBusiness.com. So, if the consultant
charges on the upper end of the spectrum,
that’s the “bad news.” On the other hand, “If
it helps your child realize their dreams, then
it’s easy to have a ‘money is no object’ mentality,” says Kevin Worthley, a certified financial
planner in Rhode Island, who advises clients
on spending for college. “But if you have a
smart child who has already proven themselves capable in school and you don’t have
the money, then maybe it’s not the best decision,”
The consultant should have detailed information about his or her background readily
available. Inquire about professional credentials, like the certified educational planner
(CEP) designation, and recognized affiliations,
like membership in the National Association
for College Admissions Counseling (NACAC),
the Higher Education Consultants Association
(HECA) or the Independent Educational
Consultants Association (IECA). These professional membership organizations demand
certain qualifications, including counseling or
admissions experience and documented college knowledge and campus visits.
“You and your family are about to make
a very significant investment in your education,” Zales says to a potential client (the
student) of the decision to use a college consultant. “It is understandable that you not
only want but need to make sure that you go
through the process of selecting and applying to schools in an informed and intelligent
student’s school counselor, who remains an
manner in order to maximize the chances of
integral and vital part of the college applicaan outcome that is best for you.”
tion process.”
And that — maximizing the chances of an
Zales, like other college consultants, acts as outcome that is best for your child — is a
an objective, unbiased source, and customizes good enough reason to use a consultant.
NCCC’s work to the student.
“No consultant can guarantee admission,
because the decision to admit is in the hands For more information on Next Chapter College
of the college,” she said. “What I can do is
Consulting, call 203-966-6891, or email Zales at
help students to present themselves in the
cathy@nextchaptercc.com.

����������������������������������������
��������������������������������������
��������������������������������������
������������������������������������������

�����������������
���������������

��������������

����������
��������������������������

���������������������

�����������������������
�����������������������������������������

����������������
����������������������������������������
�����������������������������������������������������������

��������������������
�������������������������������������������

��������������������������������������������������������������������

������������

�����������������

��������

��������������
������������������

����������������������������
���������������������������������������������
���������������

��������������������������������������������
��������������������������������������������
������������������������������

�����������
�����������
���������
���������

�����������������������������������������������
�������������������������������������������

��������������
��������
��������������
����������

�������������������������������������������
�������������������������
������������������������������������������

������������
��������
��������������
�����������

�����������

�����������
��������������
����������
���������
�����

���
�����������
�����������

�� �������������������������������

��������������������������������
������������������������
��������������������������������������
�������������������������������������

��������

���������������������������������� ���������
�����������������������������

• Education • Hersam Acorn Newspapers •

• July 25, 2013 •

• 11 •

by Melissa Ezarik
With a bachelor of science in finance from
Fairfield University, Jennifer Marchesseault was
a mom of two putting in 40- to 50-hour weeks
in the corporate world — which was all the
more challenging because one of her children
requires special education and the other has
faced medical issues.
“Juggling childcare and their appointments
became increasingly difficult, so I resigned,”
explained Marchesseault, whose family lives in
Milford. Two part-time jobs — one at a dentist’s office and the other in real estate — made
managing school meetings and speech and
occupational therapy appointments outside of
school much easier.
But now, Marchessaeault is mulling over
returning to school to complete a certificate
program and enter a new field, something
more lucrative and autonomous than administrative part-time work. The possibilities include
becoming a paraprofessional or pre-K teacher
“to marry my work schedule with their school
schedule,” she said. “Or medical coding, that
would lend itself to part-time in health care, a
growing field and where I already have experience as a business systems analyst. I’ve also
thought about becoming an ultrasound tech.”
Marchessaeault is hardly alone in being
attracted to the idea of a certificate program.
Seeking certificates
A 2012 Georgetown University Center on
Education and the Workforce study found cer-


��� ��



��

��� ������
����

Community College in Bridgeport are in
advanced manufacturing, said Public Relations
Certificate Program Links
Coordinator Anson Smith. Launched last
year, the two-certificate program (six months
• Fairfield University: fairfield.edu/gradad• Sacred Heart University (Fairfield): sacredfor each part) prepares students for positions
mission/ga_programs.html
heart.edu/academics
such as machine operators, computer number
• Gateway Community College in New
• Southern Connecticut State University:
control operator, assembler or quality control
Haven: gatewayct.edu/Programs-Courses/
southernct.edu/ (certificate listings within
inspector.
Certificate-Programs
each academic school)
“Manufacturing is coming back to the
• Housatonic Community College in
• University of New Haven: newhaven.edu/
United
States and to Connecticut, albeit in a
Bridgeport: hcc.commnet.edu (certificate
academics/10836/
high-tech form,” Smith said.
listings within each academic school)
• Western Connecticut State University:
Housatonic offers 25 certificate programs
• Norwalk Community College: ncc.comwcsu.edu/academics/ (listings within each
mnet.edu/dept/extstudies/
academic school)
in business, computer information, criminal
justice, early childhood education, English as
a Second Language, graphics, health careers,
human services, manufacturing, and math/science.
Community colleges are good places to
tificate programs to be the fastest growing form
Four-year colleges and universities offer a
check out for affordable certificate programs.
of post-secondary credentials in the U.S. In
Take Gateway Community College, which has variety of certificate programs as well. Fairfield
1980, certificates made up 6% of all post-secUniversity, for example, has 26 certificate
ondary awards, but now that number is 22%.
a new campus in downtown New Haven, for
programs at the graduate and continuing eduIn 2010, one million certificates were awarded, example. There are 46 programs to choose
cation levels, spanning the arts and sciences,
up from 300,000 in 1994.
from, with fast track certifications through
business, education, engineering, nursing,
What’s the big attraction? Certificate prothe Workforce Development division (offering
grams are generally affordable and can be com- continuing education credits and in some cases and other fields, plus non-credit occupational
certificate programs. And through University
pleted in less than a year. There can also be a
cost nothing, but they’re not always able to
College at Sacred Heart University, there are
big return on investment, particularly for those apply toward a higher degree) and traditional
11 certificate options, both for-credit and nonwho choose in-demand fields.
track programs such as business and early
credit.
Certificate holders may even earn more than childhood education (where credits earned
The intensity and time commitment of local
those with degrees. For example, the study
can be applied toward a degree). “For us, the
certificate programs also varies. At Gateway, for
found that men with certificates earn more
‘hottest’ programs are connected to the medithan 40% of men who have associate’s degrees cal and technical industries,” said Evelyn Gard, example, some programs require internships or
clinicals, and some have online components,
and 24% of men with bachelor’s degrees; for
director of public affairs and marketing.
for anytime/anywhere learning and study.
women, those numbers are 34% and 24%.
The marquee programs at Housatonic

���������������������������������������������������������������
�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������

�����������������������������������������

������������������

Belden Hill Montessori
����������������������

�����������������������

�������������������������������������������������������������������

��������������������������������������������������
�������������������������������������������������

�����������������������������������������������������
�����������������������������������������

������������������������

���������������

����������������������

���������������������
���������������������������������������

���������������
������������

����������������������������������������������������������������

�����������������������������������
������������������������������������������������������������������
�����������������������������������������������������������������������������
����������������������������������������������������������������������������

�����������������������������������

�������������������

Information
Coffee

���������������������������������
������������������������
���������������������������
��������������������������
�����������������
���������������
����������������������������������
���������������

����������������������������������������
����������������������������������������
������������������������������������������
����������������������������
��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������

�����������������������������������������������������������������������������
��������������������������������������������

The Stanwich School
����������������������������������������������

���������������������������������������
�������������������������������������

• Education • Hersam Acorn Newspapers •

• 12 •

Breakfast has long been referred to as the most important
meal of the day and it is beneficial for students heading off to
school to enjoy a meal before they catch the bus.
Studies have found that children who eat a healthy breakfast have higher energy levels and better learning abilities
than similar students who do not eat breakfast. Harvard
University researchers found that those who eat breakfast are
significantly more attentive in the classroom and have fewer
behavioral and emotional problems.
Many families find that time is not in abundance in the
morning when they are getting ready for school or work.
As a result, breakfast might be skipped in an effort to get to
work or school on time. But families can solve the issue of
time with a few on-the-go foods all can enjoy.
• Individually packaged yogurts make a healthy and quick
meal for anyone in the family. A good source of protein and
calcium, yogurt is also filled with helpful bacteria that pro-

mote digestive health.
• Microwaveable convenience foods come in various
shapes and sizes. Choose the healthiest options among them,
such as whole wheat or multigrain waffles or pancakes. These
foods are easy to heat and eat on-the-go.
• Keep a container of fresh fruit salad in the refrigerator. A
bowl of mixed fruit is refreshing and healthy.
• Whole grain granola bars that feature fruit and nuts can
be a quick meal and a satisfying snack.
• Smoothies made from fruit and yogurt are fast and can
be stored in portable cups to take in the car on the way to
school.
• The cereal aisle at the local grocery store is filled with
healthy breakfast options. Cereal manufacturers are increasingly reducing the sugar and boosting the fiber content of
popular brands. It doesn’t take long to enjoy a bowl of cereal,
even one topped with banana slices or a few strawberries.

�����������������
���������������

• July 25, 2013 •

• Whip up a fast egg sandwich. Sauté egg whites in a frying pan and place between two slices of toasted whole wheat
bread.
• Make a batch of low-fat, high-fiber muffins over the
weekend. Grabbing a muffin and a banana is an easy breakfast.
• Instant oatmeal is available in a number of flavors and is
a very healthy and filling breakfast option.
• Create parfaits with layers of vanilla yogurt, fruit and
granola.
• Use a sandwich or panini maker to create homemade
breakfast tarts. Fill bread or pitas with fresh fruit or peanut
butter and use the cooker to seal them shut.
For families who simply can’t get in the breakfast swing
of things, many schools participate in breakfast programs or
offer breakfast items in the school’s cafeteria, specifically in
middle and high school.

Pilar Menacho
����������������������
����������������
������������������������������������������
�������������������
����������
������������������������������������������
��������������
��������������������
�����������������
�����������

A native of Per�, Mar�a del
Pilar Menacho began teaching
Spanish at Long Ridge in 1997.
Pilar has worked as a translator of English, French, and
Italian, as well as teaching in
the Peruvian Air Force and in
New York public schools.

Pilar loves teaching because, ìIím using my foreign
language and most importantly, Iím opening the door
to the world for children. With a new language comes
new opportunities.î The most important ingredient
in classroom teaching, Pilar says, is love and respect.
ìChildren listen and learn if they feel loved and
respected.î
Pilarís two children attended Long Ridge, making
the school ìour life, our home, our family.î Outside of
school, Pilarís family loves ìforeign languages, world
history and traveling together.î
There are always challenges in teaching, Pilar says.

����������

Sunday, October 20, 2 pm
RSVP 203 322-7693

ìBut they are made easier at LRS with great colleagues
and familiesî who are both leaders and friends for
advice and support.

An Independent Day School Beginners | Nursery | Kñ5 478 Erskine Road, Stamford, CT longridgeschool.org

• Education • Hersam Acorn Newspapers •

• July 25, 2013 •

Continued from page 5
ter than you ever will, despite the number
of classroom hours you spend with them.
Understand that many kids behave differently
in school than they do at home.
• Accept the fact that today’s parents are a
little helicopter-ish, hyper-involved and tend to
overprogram their child.
• You’re not going to love every child. At a
parent-teacher conference a mother confronted
her son’s teacher: “He thinks you don’t like
him.” She was right; the teacher didn’t, but was
aghast that her feelings were transparent. From
then on, she faked it, praising him lavishly and
ignoring his irritating ways. He soon adored
her, and while this feeling wasn’t reciprocal,
she did develop a fondness for him.
• As a way of being friendly, a teacher mentions at curriculum night that she wants parents to call her by her first name. Best wait for
a similar invitation from them.
• While it’s hard enough the first weeks of
school to remember your students’ names, it’s
important to spend time learning their last
names, how they’re pronounced and which
parents have different or hyphenated surnames.
• Purchase the “praise cards” in the teacher

store, or just take time to jot a short note to the
parents every so often citing something admirable their child did. Make certain that every
child gets about the same amount with the
same frequency.
• Understand, but don’t dwell on the fact,
that you’re often the subject when parents get
together.
• Some baggage children have isn’t school
related but nevertheless too important to dismiss, as Sophie’s teacher did. Sophie was devastated not to be invited to Kirsten’s birthday
party. For weeks she started her day in tears.
When her mother mentioned this to the teacher, she snapped, “That’s not a school problem.”
• Know the limitations of communicating
with parents electronically. If a matter is of delicate nature pick up the phone, (don’t leave a
message on the answering machine), or arrange
a conference. Inform the parents of your schedule and when you have time to respond to
your email.
• Parents compare how their child measures
up to his classmates — everything from handwriting, athletic ability, clothes worn, to choice
of backpack and contents of their lunches.
Be alert not to get hoodwinked into this trap
when talking with them.
With a smile and a positive and flexible
attitude, this coming year will be a harmonious
one for you, your child and the teacher.

• 13 •

�������������
����������
����������

����������
�����������
����������
����������

���������������������������
�����������������������
���������������������������������������
����������������������������������
���������������������������
���������������������������������������

����������
���
���������
��������� �����

������������������������������
�����������������������������������������

��������������������������������������������������������

����������������������

�����������������������������������������������������
����������������������������
������������������������������

���������������������������������������������
�������������������������������������������
���������������������������������������������

����������������������
�����������������������������������������
����������������������������������������������������
����������������������
�������������������

����������������������������
�������������������������

����������������������������������
��������������������������������
2 LOCATIONS:
2 East Avenue
Larchmont, NY

43 Tokeneke Road
Darien, CT

We can bring LinguaKids
to your child’s school.
Ask us how!

Take advantage of the best time of your
child’s life to learn another language!
Register now for our Spring and Summer
Class Sessions in our studio locations.
Private lessons are also available.
(203) 426-7004 • (914) 525-0328
michele@linguakids.com
www.linguakids.com

����������������������������������������
��������-����������������������������������
���������������������������������������������
�����������������������������������������
�����������������
�������������������
�������������
������������
�����������������
��������������������
���������������
���������������
��������������

���������������
���������������������
��������������������������������������

• Education • Hersam Acorn Newspapers •

• 14 •

• July 25, 2013 •

to save on school expenses

Every year parents spend significant
amounts of money on school expenses. While
there’s not much parents can do about tuition,
there are ways to save on additional expenses,
including clothing. Restocking a student’s
wardrobe can be costly, but savvy moms and
dads can lessen the blow in a variety of ways.
Although students may not yet be ready to
head back to class, both parents and children
may not be looking forward to school shopping for a number of reasons.
• Expenses: Statistics posted on Chiff.
com indicate that $7.2 billion were spent on
school clothing in 2009 for American students. Shopping for school items can be a
big expense, one that’s especially tough to
handle after paying for a summer vacation
or financing kids’ stays at camp.
• Time: Crowded stores can make
shopping stressful, especially when kids
(and adults) would rather be spending time
elsewhere.
• Intimidation: Facing a store full of stocked
racks and shelves can make even the most
avid shopper feel a little anxious. Parents face
decisions about choosing clothing that is both
acceptable to the school and trendy enough
for their kids. This can put added pressure on
shoppers.
• Cranky kids: While some children may
relish the idea of picking out a new wardrobe,
others may become disgruntled by heading to
the store having to try on different things and
spend time away from friends.
Whether school shopping is fun or feared,
it’s a necessity for parents and kids alike. Here
are eight tips to make the process a bit easier
and help parents save money as well:

��������������

1. Assess what is already on hand. Shopping
doesn’t have to mean creating an entirely new
wardrobe from scratch. It often means supplementing existing clothing with new pieces that
can make things look fresh. Unless a child
has entirely outgrown pants and shirts from
last year, chances are there will be a number
of pieces that are still usable and appropriate.
Take a day or two to go through kids’ wardrobes and set aside items that can be used for
school. Make a list of new items to purchase.
2. Establish a budget. Set a limit as to how
much will be spent on each child and don’t
stray over that limit. Around $150 to $200
may be adequate to pick up a few basics.
Taking out cash from the bank and spending
only what is in hand may make shoppers less
likely to overspend or turn to credit cards for
purchases.
3. Stock up on the basics. New undergarments and socks will be needed. Aim for about
10 to 12 pairs of each. This also may be a good
School Expenses on page 18

������������������-�
������������������

����������
���������������������������������������

�������������

��������������������������������������
��������������������������������������

�������������������������

�������������������������������������
����������������������������������������

����������������������������������������-��������
��������������-�����������������������������������������
�����������������������������������������������������������������������

��������������������������������
���������������� �
���������������������������

�����������������������������
� �����������������������������
� �������������������������

�����������������������������������������������������������������
���������

�������������������������������������������
�����������������������������������������������
�������������������������������������

��������������

��������������������������������������������
������������������������������������������

�����������������������������������������������������������
����������������
�������������������
������������
�����������������

������������������
��������

�����������������������������

�������������������������������������������������������������������������������
���������������������������������������������������������������������������������
��������������������������������������������������

������������������������������������������������������������������
������������������������������������������������������������������

�����������������������������������������������
�������������������������������������������������������

������������������������������

�������������

• Education • Hersam Acorn Newspapers •

• July 25, 2013 •

• 15 •

Teen leaders discover same passions as Kiberian teens
What do diverse kids from Fairfield County
and the Kibera slum in Nairobi have in common? At first glance, you might say very little.
But LEAP (Leaders Educated and Prepared)
students from both communities didn’t have
to dig too deep to find that they face some of
the same issues and are passionate about finding solutions to them.
Based in Darien, LEAP trains culturally
competent leaders and entrepreneurs in
diverse teams from two local and one global
community. LEAP to Kibera is comprised
of students from New Canaan, Stamford
and Kibera who have “committed to two
significant initiatives to change their world
— together,” according to a release.
The LEAP program originated as collaboration between the New Canaan YMCA, the
Boys and Girls Club in Stamford and FAFU
student center in Kibera, Kenya. During the
first six months together, the team identified two common issues in both Kenya and
Fairfield County: first, a surge in bullying
that elicits insecurity, self-abuse and fear
of attending school; and second, a need to
focus on environmental issues such as how to
transform garbage to energy in order to foster
healthier lives.

more affluent community, can solve problems
with money,” Calahan said. “LEAP, however,
teaches students that real change comes as
a result of our personal connections, a commitment to a vision and respectful, weekly
conversations.”
LEAP trains students to connect with
experts to reach their goals. The LEAP to
Kibera team established their first partnership
with a Swedish company called Peepoople.
They negotiated an agreement to train the
LEAP community to build a business that will
simultaneously transform sanitary behavior of
thousands of slum dwellers, generate income
and transform the human waste on the streets
to fertilizer that will healthfully grow the food
they need.
LEAP in Kibera
Their second partnership is being develIn June 2010, students from Stamford traveled to Kibera to meet their partners and fur- oped with Africa AHEAD to provide the needed materials to train the facilitators in Kibera
ther galvanize their mission for change. Two
and a half years later, the high school students to identify the sanitation issues that spread
disease and effect a cultural change in behavcontinue to meet weekly, have connected 75
ior throughout the community. In return for
people around their vision and worked hard
their materials, Africa AHEAD wants to share
to break down cultural barriers of distrust
the LEAP to Lead leadership curriculum with
in order to build a partnership of equals.
their communities to offer further impact
Today, still committed to develop successful programs to meet their goals, these LEAP throughout the world.
The third NGO to offer support, Ubuntu,
students have inspired three NGO’s — Africa
has developed successful health programs in
AHEAD, Peepoople and Ubuntu — to share
South Africa, and invited the LEAP team to
needed expertise in associative partnerships.
meet with them to use components of their
“LEAP aims to empower people in a commodel as a prototype for success in Kibera.
munity to make collaborative change rather
The LEAP with Peepoople team is committed
than raise funds to donate to the cause,”
Lauren Calahan, founder and executive direc- to develop health clubs in Kibera, first with
50 students, and then, once established, scale
tor, said.
“Normal outreach teaches us that we, as the the programs to 12,000 students in the slum.

LEAP at home
Closer to home, the LEAP students’ commitment to understand why people bully
and how to remain confident in the face of
adversity has led them to write five skits,
which were performed on May 24, Diversity
Day, at Dolan Middle School in Stamford. The
team from New Canaan, Darien, Norwalk and
Stamford chose topics that negatively impact
communities in the U.S., as well as in Kibera
— topics like physical and verbal aggression, suicide, cyber bullying, clique and gang
behavior, and anorexia.
In the meantime, all their knowledge will be
LEAP to Lead leadership workshops will
shared with still more LEAP teams in Uganda, begin in August for new students and weekly
Sierra Leone, India and across the globe,
meetings will begin again in September.
according to a release.
More info: leap-edu.org, or Lauren@leap-edu.org

440 Danbury Road • Wilton, CT 06897

(203) 493-4003

www.appleblossomschool.org

Apple Blossom

School and Family Center

������ ��� ������
Ages birth to three years

� ���� � ��������
Ages 2 years to 6 years
2-day, 3-day and 5-day

� ��������� � �������
September through June
Call to schedule your personal
tour of our school or attend one
FREE class with your toddler!
�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������
������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������

������������������
�������������

��������������������
������������������

������
������
������
����
���
������������
�����
������������

������������������������������������������
�����������������������������������������

�����������������������������������
�������������������������

��������������������
������������

������������������������
������������������
������������

• Education • Hersam Acorn Newspapers •

• 16 •

• July 25, 2013 •

by Michelle Sagalyn
President and Founder, Successful Study Skills 4 Students
There is no doubt that there are myriad
demands placed upon students these days.
Between new and rigorous academic goals set
forth by the Common Core State Standards
(CCSS), state testing pressures, concerns over
getting into college, requirements of schools,
and extracurricular commitments, it is a wonder that students can even find the time to
think.
How can parents do their part to support
and make sure their student is less burdened
by stress and better able to succeed happily in
today’s competitive academic landscape?
One answer seems very simple at first
glance — perhaps too simple: teach them
study skills. In other words, make sure that
they know how to study, process and remember what they learn.

In other words, they must be able to explain
why inverting is necessary, rather than simply
memorizing the idea that a fraction must be
flipped before it can be divided. This is a different level of teaching and learning.
“This shift will require teachers to learn
new strategies and approaches to teaching,”
adds Glass.

Key skills needed to succeed
While teachers are busy organizing lessons
to meet CCSS, they likely will not have the
bandwith to teach basic study skills, if they
ever did before. But imagine how much easier
life would be for teachers, students, parents
and districts, if students arrived in class
already knowing how to approach, learn and
delve deeper into their studies.
By focusing on key learning methods, proCommon Core State Standards and
cesses, and strategies, students can establish
your student: Going deeper
a foundation for high-level thought, greater
The Common Core State Standards are
retention and deeper understanding of their
set of academic goals adopted by 46 state
academic material. To have the best chance at
departments of education and, voluntarily,
success in today’s classrooms, students need
by a number of private and parochial schools a collection of skills, strategies, and systems,
across the country. They are shared, measurwhich can be classified into three main catable goals and provide consistency in expecegories.
tations for student achievement and prepare
1. Active reading and listening: note-takstudents for success in college and careers.
ing, self-assessment techniques, building on
The goals are ambitious; they set an intention knowledge, determining main ideas and supfor students to become adept at critical think- porting
ing and analysis.
2. Time management: planning out assignThe CCSS are not a curriculum, nor do
ments and study time, using a planner, setting
they require or provide curriculum. What,
goals, setting priorities
specifically, is taught to reach the aims of
3. Executive functioning: breaking down
the CCSS is left up to teachers and districts.
large tasks into smaller pieces, self-evaluaHowever, the standards require students to
tion, choosing the right strategy for the task at
approach their studies in a different way and hand, making decisions
teachers to teach material in a different way.
When practiced, good study skills can lead
For example, students have always been
to better:
taught that they need to invert before dividing
• Classroom engagement
fractions (for example, 1/2 + 1/4 becomes 1/2
• Preparation for class, tests and projects
x 4/1). Now, under CCSS, they will need to
• Information synthesis
understand and explain the concepts behind
• Understanding of the material
the procedure of inverting, says Dr. Bill Glass,
• Independent learning
deputy superintendent of schools in Danbury.
Learning key study systems provides a

�����������������
������������

�������������������������������
���������������������������������
�������������������������
������������������������
������������
������������������������������������������

sturdy scaffold upon which students are able
to build their learning. With practice, these
study methods become habits that provide a
platform for achieving academic success, and
eventually, career goals and opportunities.
With a well-equipped toolbox, students are

able to take ownership of their learning and
are more confident, independent, and successful in their academic work and their lives
beyond.
More info: corestandards.org

Free study skills
booklet offered
School is out, but that doesn’t mean that parents
shouldn’t start preparing their student for the next grade.
Both parents and their students may be nervous about making the transition from elementary to
middle school, or middle
school to high school. Or,
perhaps they’re excited, but
just unsure of what, exactly,
to expect. Each transition
takes students to a new level
of responsibility and expectations-as well as great opportunities and experiences.
To help ease these transitions, S4 (Successful Study
Skills 4 Students, LLC, located in
Southport) is offering two complimentary e-books: S4’s Successfully
Transitioning to Middle School, and
S4’s Successfully Transitioning to
High School. In each guide, parents and students will learn about
key skills that will help students
succeed in a new school:
• Self-advocacy
• Active learning
• Planning
• Time management
• Confidence
• Responsibility
The strategies are adapted
from S4’s study-skills workshops, which will in July
and August in Connecticut
and Westchester counties.
The workshops “offer a
more in-depth approach
to studying, note-taking,
time management, project management, and
self-advocacy,” according to a release.
Parents may download the free e-books at
S4StudySkills.com.
S4 partners with public, independent, charter and parochial schools to offer “an accessible, logical, and easy-toimplement study-skills system.” The program is designed to
work with all curricula. To date, more than 1,000 students
have participated in the S4 program to learn valuable skills
for better classroom engagement, increased focus, and
better preparation for class, tests, and projects, according
to a release. In addition to hosting student workshops, the
company also offers professional development and parent
workshops.
More info: S4StudySkills.com/Upcoming_Workshops.html

�������������������

�����������������������

�������������������������

���������������������������������������������������
��������������������������������������������������

������������������������������������������������������

���������������

����������������������������������������������

��������������

�����������������������������������������
����������������������������
����������������������������
��������������������������������������
���������������������������������

�����������������������������������������������������������������
����������������������������������������������������

������������
���������������������������������������
�������������������������

��������������������������������������������
������������������������������������������������

�����������������������������������������������������������
����������������������������������������������������������
���������������������

������������������������������������������������������������
���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������
��������������������������������������������������������������

• Education • Hersam Acorn Newspapers •

• July 25, 2013 •

• 17 •

Continued from page 2
The faculty encompasses educated professionals who are active in the theater
business, as well as being passionate about teaching eager young thespians their
craft. PAW (Performing Artists Workshop) combines acting, voice and musical theater dance training in a fall and spring session that culminate in informal
performances for family and friends for students ages 7 through high school
who are striving for the “triple threat” status. For the more single-minded focus,
PACC’s acting classes are held on Tuesday evenings and present monologue and
scene studies at the end of their sessions.
The Performing Arts
Conservatory of New Canaan,
now in its 10th year, also
offers experiences and proOther local performing
grams that introduce chilarts programs include:
dren of all ages and builds
Curtain Call, Stamford; 203-329-8207
proficiencies, life skills and
appreciation of the performing
Music Theatre of Connecticut,
arts, according to Ed Libonati,
Westport; 203-434-3883
owner, whose wife, Melody
founded the studio and is its
The Studio of Performing Arts,
director.
New Canaan; 203-966-7056
Melody Libonati has
performed lead roles on
Wire Mill Academy,
Broadway, regional theaters,
Georgetown/Redding;
TV and radio, written music
203-544-9494
for children’s TV shows, and
created children performance
programs.
“All conservatory instructors
are experienced teachers and skilled professional performing artists trained to
nurture each student to have fun, build skills and develop an appreciation of the
performing arts,” Melody said. “Our teachers are exceptionally talented professionals each dedicated to their students’ growth and enjoyment in the arts.”
PAC’s faculty also includes professionals who hold degrees not only in their
area of expertise, but also many as educators.
“Their goal is to inspire and nurture the talent and desire of their students
on both a technical and performance level while recognizing each individual’s
unique abilities,” Lachioma said. “Whether the student’s aspirations are to be a
professional or just recreational, our desire is still the same: to give each person
who comes to PACC a positive experience in the arts.”
In addition to group classes at the Peforming Arts Conservatory of New
Canaan, there are also private acting, dance and voice classes offered to help students prepare for school, college and professional auditions.
“Our goal is to awaken, nurture and expand each student’s creative potential
by offering professional training, workshops and performance opportunities,”
Libonati said.
“I will always be grateful to the acting teachers I worked with at a studio during high school,” Jess Evans, 20, an acting major at a peforming arts college in
Los Angeles, said. “Acting is a hard profession to break into, but if you are persistent and hold onto your dreams you can be a working actor. This is the belief
those teachers instilled in me.”

GREENWICH ACADEMY
��������������������������������

ADMISSION OPEN HOUSE | OCTOBER 20, 2013
1:00 PM Lower & Middle School
2:30 PM Diversity at GA
3:30 PM Upper School
RSVP: gat.rs/13open2

More info: PACC — 203-372-ARTS, PACofCT.org; Peforming Arts Conservatory — 203-9666177, PerformingArtsConservatory.com

Greenwich Academy is an
independent
college-preparatory
day school for girls in
grades Pre-K through 12.

200 North Maple Avenue, Greenwich CT 06830
greenwichacademy.org | 203.625.8900

�����������
�����������������������

������
������������������������������
����������������������������
�������
�������������������������
�����������������������������
�������������������������������
���������

�������

������������������������
�������������������������
�����������������������������
�������������

����������������������������
���������������������������
������������������������
��������������������������������
�������
�������������������������������
���������

���������������������������������������������������������������������������
������������������������������������������������������������������������
���������������������������������������

�������������������������
�����������������������������
�����������
�������������������������������

�������������
�����������������
���������������������������������������������������������������������������������
��������������������

• Education • Hersam Acorn Newspapers •

• 18 •

• July 25, 2013 •

Continued from page 14
time to purchase pre-adolescent girls a
training bra or sports bra to provide some
support.
4. Buy new shoes. Shoes are one element of a wardrobe that may need to be
entirely new. Active children tend to wear
out shoes quickly. One pair of sneakers and one pair of dressier shoes, like
oxfords, or ballet flats for girls, may be
adequate.
5. Shop sales. If the weather is warm,
it’s possible to save money on clearance
T-shirts and shorts that stores are putting
on sale to make room for next season’s
items. Don’t fill a student’s wardrobe with
heavy sweatshirts or sweaters at this juncture. Layering options are good because
students can adjust accordingly to feel
comfortable.
6. Intermingle designer with discount.
Not every item in a child’s wardrobe has
to be trendy. Layering items, such as T-

Learn German the FUN WAY
German School of Connecticut

shirts, can often be picked up for a discount in stores like Target or Walmart or
Old Navy. Outer items, like jeans or some
shirts, can be picked up from the trendier
stores. Shop their sales and see if they
offer coupons by signing up to loyalty
websites.
7. Go early in the day. Although it
may be a challenge get the kids up and
dressed to visit stores when they’re in
vacation mode, arriving early means thinner crowds and refreshed children. Kids
who are tired or hungry can be prone
to meltdowns. Pack snacks and drinks
to be on the safe side. Some stores offer
early bird special sales, which can make
shopping once the doors open even more
advantageous.
8. Do some online shopping, too. Once
the children have gone to bed for the evening, do some uninterrupted online shopping. Comparison shop and figure out if
buying online is a good deal after factoring in shipping costs.
School shopping signals the end of
vacation time, so make the most of the
opportunity to save and reduce stress
when shopping.

!

������������������
������������������
���������������������

bridging cultures

��������������

�������������������������������
����������������������������������
���������������������������

A Friendly Center for Language & Culture
�� All Levels: pre-K � Adult
�� Dedicated, Professional Teachers
�� Classes: Saturdays 9:30am-12:15pm
�� Celebrating our 35th year!
��

�������������������������������������
��������������������������������������
��������������������������������
�����������������������������
����������������������������������
�������������������������������
��������������������������������
���������������������������������

����������������������������
REGISTER TODAY at GermanSchoolCT.org
RS
CHE !
TEA COME
W EL Numbers
Call elow
B

����������������������������������
�����������������������������������
��������������������������������������
���������������������������������

COME VISIT US DURING OPEN HOUSE!
West Hartford � Aug. 17, 9am-noon
Stamford � Sept. 7, 8:30-10:00am

West Hartford campus
First Baptist Church
90 North Main Street
(860) 404-8838

Stamford campus
Rippowam Middle School
381 High Ridge Road
(203) 548-0438

www.GermanSchoolCT.org

����������������������������������
��������������������������������������
���������������������������������������������������
���������������������������������
���������������� �� ��������������

I am Whitby.
�������������������������������������
������������������������������
������������������������������
��������������������������
�������������������

OPEN HOUSES:
October 17, 9:30 am
November 3, 1:00 pm

Whitby is an independent co-ed day school
for students age 18 months through Grade 8.
To learn more about Layla and her friends, or
to register for an open house or schedule a tour,
scan the QR code below or visit our website.

�������������������������������������������������������������������
������������������������������������������������������������
�������������������������������������������������������� ���������������
969 Lake Ave, Greenwich, CT | 203 302 3900 | www.whitbyschool.org/Layla

���������������������������

• Education • Hersam Acorn Newspapers •

• July 25, 2013 •

• 19 •

���������������������

��������
�����������
��������

������ �����
������
������
�����
�����
����
����
��������� �������
��������� �������
�������������������������������������
�������������������������������������
������� ���������
������� ���������
��������������������������������������������������������������������������
�������� �����
�������� �����
����

����

��������������
�����������

��������������
������������������
�������
��������������

���
����
�����
��������

����

�������

��������������

��������

�������

��������

���

�������������
����������
������ �������

����

�����

�������

��������������
�������

��������������������
���������

������������

���������
��� ����
���
���
���������������
����� �����
��������������

�������

���

��������������

��������������������
���������

��������

��������

��������

��������

��� ����
���
�����

���
�����

������������
������������
���������

������������
������������
���������

������������
������������
���������

������������
������������
���������

�����������������
������������������

���������������
�������������
����������������

�����������������
������������������

���������������
�������������
����������������

���

��������������������

��������

��������

�������

���

�����
�������������
������ �������
����� �������
�������������������� ����������������������
����������������
����������

�������

�������

���

������������������������
������������������������
�����������������������������

��������

�������������������� ����������������������
����������������
����������

��������

����

��������������
�����������

������������������

�������������������������������������������������������������������������
������������������������������������������������������������������������������
���������������������������������������������������������������������

����

���������������������
��������������������������
�������

��������

��������������������������

�������
������������������
���������������

���

���

����

��������������
��������������
��������������������������������
��������������������������������
��������������
��������������
���������������
���������������

��������������������������������
��������������������������������
��������������������������������������������������������������������

��������������������

�������������������������������������������������������������������
�������������������������������������������������������������������
�����������������������������������������������������������������������
������������������������������������������������������������������������������
�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������
������������

"One"One
test of
the of
correctness
of educational
test
the correctness
procedure is the happiness of the child."

of educational procedure is
-Maria Montessori
the happiness of the child."

���������������

��������������
�����������������

��������������������������������������
��������������������������������
���������������������������������������������������
�������������������������������

������������������������

-Maria Montessori

���������������

�������������������������������
���������������
����������������������������������
����������������������������������������
��������������������������������������������
����������������������������

�������������������������
������������
��������������������������������

����������������������������������������������������������
������������������������������������������������������������������������
��������������������������������������������������������������������������
�������������������������������������������������������������
����������������������������������������������������������������������������������
��������������������������������������������������������������������������������

��������� ������������������
������������������������������������������������
����������������������������������

Character, Resilience,
Discipline and Courage

��������
�����
����������
��������������������������������������������������
����������������������������������������������
����������������������������������������������
����������������������������������������������
��������������������������������������������
������������������������������������������������
����������������������������������������������
�����������������������

��������������������������������
���������������������������
��������������������������������

���

�������

����������������������������������

���������������
�����������������������������������������
���������������������������������

www.gunnery.org - 860-868-7334 - admissions@gunnery.org
99 Green Hill Road, Washington, Connecticut 06793

• Education • Hersam Acorn Newspapers •

• 20 •

• July 25, 2013 •

FALL OPEN HOUSE
Tuesday, October 22, 2013
9:00 a.m.
Pre-Kindergarten�Grade 8
R.S.V.P. 203.869.4000 x 100

������������������������������������������������� �������
������������������������������������ �

����������������
���� �� �

������

� � � � �

������

� �� � �

Greenwich Catholic School
Divine Education
Contact us: info@gcsct.org or 203.869.4000

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful