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Hope on the Horizon

How the Refugee Affected and Hosting Areas Programme contributes to the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals

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Hope on the Horizon


How the Refugee Affected and Hosting Areas Programme contributes to the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals

Copyright 2013 United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Refugee Affected and Hosting Areas Programme (RAHA) All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means electronic, mechanic, photocopying, recording or otherwise without prior permission of UNDP. Editor: Mustafa Nazir Ahmad (Media and Communication Officer, RAHA) Photo Credits: Huma Akram/RAHA Staff Printed in June 2013 by PrintMatic, Islamabad Cover and Layout Design: PrintMatic, Islamabad

PREAMBLE
T
he Refugee Affected and Hosting Areas Programme (RAHA) was launched in 2009 to cater to the needs of the people affected by the presence of Afghan refugees in Balochistan, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and FATA. Through a variety of interventions, ranging from livelihood trainings to financial and technical support for community physical infrastructure projects, the programme aims at compensating for the social, economic and environmental losses suffered by the refugee hosting communities. RAHA achieves this goal while working for the accelerated achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). The following MDGs are the centrepiece of the development efforts under RAHA: MDG 1: Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger. MDG 2: Achieve universal primary education. MDG 3: Promote gender equality and empower women. MDG 4: Reduce child mortality. MDG 5: Improve maternal health. MDG6: Combat HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases. MDG7: Ensure environmental sustainability Hope on the Horizon documents some of the successes of RAHA and their contribution to the governments achievement of the MDGs, thus better situating the programme in the overall development context of Pakistan. The success stories included in the compilation have been classified under these MDGs, though some of the interventions may contribute to the achievement of more than one of them. Additionally, it has also been specified that the particular intervention helps achieve which of the following expected results of RAHA: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Greater social cohesion through community empowerment. Improved livelihoods and local economies. Restoration of social services and infrastructure. Improved access to social protection for co-existing Pakistani and Afghan communities. Restoration and improvement of the environment. Return of IDPs anchored and absorption capacity created by small-scale community-based re-integration initiatives.

As these success stories demonstrate, RAHA has not only brought about a positive change in the lives of the target populations, particularly of the most vulnerable groups such as women and the disabled, but also helped the Government of Pakistan by contributing to the achievement of its targets under the MDGs.

UNDP - RAHA Hope on the Horizon

CONTENTS

MDG 1: Eradicate Extreme Poverty and Hunger A Stitch in Time Saves Nine Wheels of Fortune Ensuring His Familys Survival Where There is a Will, There is a Way Feeling at Home MDG 2: Achieve Universal Primary Education Educate a Woman, Educate a Generation MDG 3: Promote Gender Equality and Empower Women Breaking the Shackles Mobilising Communities for Womens Empowerment Solar Solutions MDG 4: Reduce Child Mortality Journey Towards a Bright Future MDG 5: Improve Maternal Health Improving Health and Hygiene of Poor Communities MDG 6: Combat HIV/AIDS, Malaria and Other Diseases The Road to Success They Can Because They Think They Can MDG 7: Ensure Environmental Sustainability Lightening Up Life Breaking Barriers, Building Bridges Bringing Life Back to Normal

4 4 5 6 7 8 9 9 10 10 11 12 13 13 14 14 15 15 16 18 18 20 21

RAHA beneficiaries also include children, our hope for a better future (District Swabi).
UNDP - RAHA Hope on the Horizon

MDG 1: ERADICATE EXTREME POVERTY AND HUNGER

A Stitch in Time Saves Nine

I was brought up in a conservative society dominated by men, but things considerably changed after social organisers of the Refugee Affected and Hosting Areas Programme (RAHA) sensitised our community on womens rights, says Amna Bibi, 16, a resident of Village Ayubabad in Union Council Mera Akora Khattak, District Nowshera. Amnas father, a daily wager, has two wives. She is from her fathers first wife, and has four real sisters and three real brothers. Her mother is an active member of the Women's Community Organisation Roshan Kal. The organisation nominated Amna, who could study only until the primary level because of her family's poverty, for the two-month tailoring and sewing training conducted under RAHA in June 2011 through a resolution, based on her interest to financially support her family. We were allowed to attend the training since the social organisers had won the communitys trust, shares Amna, who also received a sewing machine on successful completion of the training and has set her enterprise at her home. RAHA organises such trainings for community members, particularly the youth, in a variety of vocations under its Skills Development Programme, to improve living standards of the local communities and empower women. The teenager now charges PKR200 for stitching a suit and earns PKR5,000 a month. My mother, who works as a maid in a neighbours house, and I are the sole bread earners of our family, thus most of my earnings are spent on buying basic commodities like staple food, she informs. As Amna started earning, she not only gained confidence but also achieved a better social status. But she dreams of acquiring new skills like sewing gents suits that will enable me to escape the cycle of poverty, invest more in the health and education of my younger brothers and sisters, and better participate in the community.

Wheels of Fortune
afiullah, 36, lost his feet and damaged his backbone in a bomb blast during the Afghan War when he was only one, while his mother lost one of her legs in a missile attack around the same time. Subsequently, the family migrated from Afghanistan to Khazana Refugee Camp on the outskirts of Peshawar. I could not walk or sit properly without the support of another person for eight years, but then the Union Aid For Afghan Refuges sent me to Germany for a four-year treatment that enabled me to move around with the help of a wheelchair, informs Safiullah, an active member of the Community Organisation Khegarha-1 in Union Council Khazana, District Peshawar. The Refugee Affected and Hosting Areas Programme (RAHA), after thorough verification by the social mobilisation team, provided a wheelchair to Safiullah last year to help him enhance his mobility. The wheelchair has made my life easy. Now I can easily go to the market, as well as participate in social activities, he tells gleefully. A sewing machine mechanic for the past seven years, Safiullah earns about PKR6,000 a month to support his family comprising 11 members. Despite extreme poverty, he is happy not to be dependent on anyone else for his basic needs. At the same time, he also plans to expand his business, so as to better support his family.

The wheelchair has made my life easy. Now I can easily go to the market for buying sewing machine materials, as well as participate in social activities, Safiullah tells gleefully.

We were allowed to attend the training since the social organisers had won the communitys trust, shares Amna, who also received a sewing machine on successful completion of the training and has set her enterprise at her home.

This intervention has contributed to the achievement of RAHA ER 2: Improved Livelihoods and Local Economies

This intervention has contributed to the achievement of RAHA ER 4: Improved Access to Social Protection

UNDP - RAHA Hope on the Horizon

UNDP - RAHA Hope on the Horizon

Ensuring His Family's


Survival

Where There is a Will, There is a Way

I was able to set up my business after attending the three-month shawlweaving training conducted under the Refugee Affected and Hosting Areas Programme (RAHA), says Muhammad Asif, a teenager in Village and Union Council Mera Akora Khattak, District Nowshera, who was born with club feet (a birth defect in which feet point down and turn in). Three of Asifs sisters also suffer from the same ailment and his large family comprising 10 members depended only on a small shop outside their home for subsistence before he attended the RAHA training. The training has enabled Asif, who could study only until the primary level because of his family's poverty and the distance of school from his home, to weave three to four shawls (chaddars) a day at a machine he has installed in his home. RAHA organises such trainings for community members, particularly the disabled and the youth, in a variety of vocations under its Skills Development Programme to expand self-employment opportunities for them. A middleman visits Asif every 20 days to collect the shawls, provide raw materials and make payment. Though the middleman does not pay Asif well, he has no choice; his large family mainly depends on the meagre income for its survival. Asif dreams of expanding his business too, so that he could gain enough financial stability to support his family members and improve their lifestyles. Though his setup has started small, given his proven ability to perform well in difficult circumstances and acquire new skills, Asif will hopefully soon succeed in actualising his dream.

aseebullah, whose father passed away about one year ago after a prolonged illness, lives with his eight sisters, two brothers and a mother in Union Council Roghnai-II, District Killa Abdullah. After his fathers death, Naseebullah was rightly worried about his familys survival until a suitable opportunity came his way. Successful mobilisation by the local field team of the Refugee Affected and Hosting Areas Programme (RAHA) had recently led to the formation of a mens community organisation in the area. One of the first activities conducted by the organisation was the one-month domestic electric wiring training under RAHAs vocational skill enhancement component. The community nominated Naseebullah, who has done his matriculation, for the training through a unanimous resolution based on his interest in the field and the poor condition of his large household. He also received an electricians kit and a certificate on successful completion of the training. Before attending the RAHA training, I had no source of income to fulfil even my familys basic needs such as food and clothing, says Naseebullah, who now works in his village and District Headquarters Chaman, and earns enough money to ensure that his familys basic needs are met, as well as contributes to the education of his younger siblings.

Asif dreams of expanding his business too, so that he could gain enough financial stability to support his family members and improve their lifestyles.

The community nominated Naseebullah, who has done his matriculation, for the training through a unanimous resolution based on his interest in the field and the poor condition of his large household.

This intervention has contributed to the achievement of RAHA ER 2: Improved Livelihoods and Local Economies

This intervention has contributed to the achievement of RAHA ER 2: Improved Livelihoods and Local Economies

UNDP - RAHA Hope on the Horizon

UNDP - RAHA Hope on the Horizon

MDG 2: ACHIEVE UNIVERSAL PRIMARY EDUCATION

Educate a Woman, Educate a Generation

I want to become a teacher after completing my education, says 9year old Kulsoom, a student of class 5 in the Government Girls Primary School, Killi Sardar Nabi Bux, Union Council Panjpai. Her classmate Nazima, 10, wants to become a doctor and serve the people. These girls are extremely fortunate to be dreaming high. Only one year ago, their school the only one in the village located just 20 kilometres from provincial capital Quetta was in a shambles with just one classroom and teacher, no furniture or toilets, and a handful of students. The majority of the parents in Killi Sardar Nabi Bux always wanted their daughters to seek education, but could not fulfil their desire because of the appalling condition of the only school located in their vicinity. Hence it came as no wonder when they identified rehabilitation of the girls primary school as their most pressing need after RAHA intervened in the area. Since then, the Sardar Nabi Bux-I, a local womens community organisation, has constructed four classrooms and two toilets with RAHA's support, and the school is now thriving with about 100 students aged between 5 and 12 years. Now the school has three teachers to cater to the increasing number of students. We are thankful to RAHA for helping us construct extra classrooms, since earlier the students had to sit and defecate in the open, says Raziya Kamal, 30, who teaches English and Urdu. Raziya, who also visits mothers of those girls who are not yet enrolled to motivate them, estimates that 80% of the girls of school-going age in the village have been enrolled after the rehabilitation of the school.

Feeling at Home
utti Rehman, 36, an internally displaced person from District Swat, currently lives in Village Haroonabad, Union Council Dag Besud, District Nowshera. The sole bread earner of his family, Rehman works as a labourer and most of his meager income is spent on buying food items for his family. Rehman, who has two boys and girls each, thanks Mehak (a womens community organisation) and Haroonabad Welfare Society (a mens community organisation) for engaging him in the construction of five street pavements and a PCC road as an unskilled labourer in June 2012. Rehman was paid PKR15,750 for 45 days, or PKR350 a day, as per the market rate for the same kind of work. With this money, I bought food items of PKR4,000, non-food items of PKR3,000, paid rent amounting to PKR3,000 and paid loan of PKR3,500; and was still able to save PKR2,250 for future expenses. Besides helping Rehman earn his livelihood near his home, this Refugee Affected and Hosting Areas

Programme (RAHA) intervention has afforded him an opportunity to develop better relations with the local community. Though I am originally from Swat, due to the sympathy shown by the people of Dag Besud, now I feel as if I were living in my own area, Rehman acknowledges with a smile on his face. Rehman, who has established good relations with the host community, does not plan to return to Swat. I am doing labour work and all my family members are happy to live here with dignity and respect, he says.

RAHA interventions have helped improve girls access to education in the village from about 33% to 80% in just one year, as well as contributed to the governments achievement of the targets under MDG 2 related to universal primary education.

These girls are extremely fortunate to be dreaming high. Only one year ago, their school was in a shambles

Besides helping Rehman earn his livelihood near his home, this RAHA intervention has afforded him an opportunity to develop better relations with the local community.

This intervention has contributed to the achievement of RAHA ER 6: Return of IDPs Anchored and Absorption Capacity Created

This intervention has contributed to the achievement of RAHA ER 3: Restoration of Social Services and Infrastructure

UNDP - RAHA Hope on the Horizon

UNDP - RAHA Hope on the Horizon

MDG 3: PROMOTE GENDER EQUALITY AND EMPOWER WOMEN

Breaking the Shackles

My lucky break came when I was selected for the two-month tailoring and sewing training conducted under the Refugee Affected and Hosting Areas Programme (RAHA) in June 2011, tells Nargis Bibi, a resident of Mohallah Ibadat Khail, Village Wazeer Garhi, Union Council Dag Besud, District Nowshera. Nargis, 20, had to leave school after the primary level because of the death of her father, who used to work as a labourer on leased agricultural land. After the death of her father, the responsibility of the household fell on the shoulders of her mother, who is an active member of the Womens Community Organisation Jugnu Khwateen. Nargis used to charge only PKR70 a suit from neighbours before attending the training. The training enhanced my skills and I learnt latest designs, besides receiving a sewing machine with an electric motor controller and a certificate on successful completion. Now my customers happily pay me PKR150 for stitching a suit and I earn about PKR6,000 a month, she tells gleefully. RAHA organises such trainings for community members, particularly the youth, in a variety of vocations under its Skills Development Programme, to improve living standards of the local communities and empower women. Nargis is the sole bread earner of her family; her mother is a heart patient and her only brother is too young to work. I will continue to work hard since I want to see happiness on the faces of my family members, she resolves. Sharing her future plans, Nargis says she wants to establish a vocational training institute for the girls of her area. She fully acknowledges RAHAs contribution to her familys happiness and hopes the programme would continue to provide support in future too.

Mobilising
Communities for Women's Empowerment

Nargis is the sole bread earner of her family; her mother is a heart patient and her only brother is too young to work. I will continue to work hard since I want to see happiness on the faces of my family members, she resolves.

With RAHA's support, Shama Tanzeem successfully completed the construction of the link road in 2012. A living testimony to Jaan's leadership spirit, the road now directly benefits 5,800 and indirectly benefits 6,200 people.

or the first time in her 103 years, Muhammad Jaan feels that she is doing something meaningful and that her life has a purpose. One of the oldest womens community organisation members, Jaan lives in Padhana, a small village in Union Council Dheenda, District Haripur. For Jaan, her village is synonymous to her life. As long as I can remember, I have belonged to Padhana. I was born here, I was raised up here, and all my memories of everything I have loved or lost or endured or celebrated are associated with this village, she says. Of the several womens community organisations formed in Padhana under the Refugee Affected and Hosting Areas Programme (RAHA), Jaan was instrumental in setting up Shama Tanzeem (a womens community organisation), which identified the construction of a link road from the village to the main road as the foremost need of Padhana's residents. The road was first destroyed by the earthquake in 2005 and then the floods in 2010-11, making access to Padhana almost impossible. With RAHAs support, Shama Tanzeem successfully completed the construction of the link road in 2012. A living testimony to Jaans leadership spirit, the road now directly benefits 5,800 and indirectly benefits 6,200 people. RAHA is a breath of fresh air for the local people, especially women. We were earlier restricted to only household chores, but now I conduct a monthly meeting at my place with the help of facilitators. We are more aware of our surroundings and I havent felt so productive in my entire life, Jaan says. Jaan may be old, but her spirit is a force to be reckoned with. Though the canvas of her face is painted with wrinkles and her frail frame may portray a different reality to a passerby, once spoken to, the words that you will hear are only those of endurance and resilience.

This intervention has contributed to the achievement of RAHA ER 2: Improved Livelihoods and Local Economies

This intervention has contributed to the achievement of RAHA ER 1: Greater Social Cohesion Through Community Empowerment

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UNDP - RAHA Hope on the Horizon

UNDP - RAHA Hope on the Horizon

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MDG 4: REDUCE CHILD MORTALITY

Solar Solutions
illi Garangai is located in Union Council Roghani-I, District Killa Abdullah, at a distance of 53 kilometres from District Headquarters Chaman, and has a population of about 2,000. The main sources of livelihood of the villagers are woodcutting and embroidery; the men cut wood and sell it for fire, while the women contribute to the family income through embroidery. Since the women had to perform household chores such as cooking, cleaning, collecting firewood and fetching water, most of their daytime was consumed, leaving no or little time for embroidery. Kerosene lamps, the only source of light at night in the area in the absence of electricity from the national power grid, gradually became too costly to be lit only for the women to do embroidery. To enable increase in the household income through embroidery and improve the living conditions of the people, the best solution was to provide electricity to Garangai. However, that was impossible because the village was situated too far from the national power grid. In this scenario, solar energy offered the most feasible solution.

Solar energy has enabled me to do embroidery after the sunset and I now do twice as much work as I used to do before, Bibi Gul happily tells.

With the support of the Refugee Affected and Hosting Areas Programme (RAHA), the Mansoor Community Organisation successfully implemented a project to provide solar panels to deserving families of the village. Ameer Jan, an active member of the organisation, recently died from cardiac arrest. After his death, the responsibility of his family comprising eight children fell on the shoulders of his widow Bibi Gul. After RAHAs intervention, Bibi Gul was made an honorary member of the Mansoor Community Organisation and given a solar panel. Earlier, most of my time before the sunset was consumed in fetching water, collecting firewood, washing clothes, cooking food and completing other household chores; thus I found very little time for embroidery. But solar energy has enabled me to do embroidery after the sunset and I now do twice as much work as I used to do before, earning about PKR2,000 a month from the activity, Bibi Gul happily tells about the impact of the project on her life.

illi Tarata, a backward village in Union Council Bazar-e-Kona, District Pishin, is situated a few kilometres away from the District Headquarters, but still lacks the basic facilities of life such as safe drinking water and sewerage system. The majority of the residents depend on government jobs and livestock rearing for their livelihood, while others work as labourers in the local market or have small businesses. Traditionally, the womens involvement in the community was limited to carrying water from distant sources in jerry cans or pitchers on their heads and hand trolleys because the local communities did not have water storage tanks in their houses. This practice consumed several hours of the day, thus their daily life was severely affected. On discussion with the women, it became evident that they were well aware of the hardship they faced, but were not sure how they could solve this problem. The majority of the households in Killi Tarata were poor, and could not afford to construct water storage tanks in their houses or pay cash contribution to solve the problem at the village level. A womens community organisation (Storai) was formed in the village through social mobilisation efforts under RAHA. During the subsequent need assessment exercise, the members of the Storai Community Organisation prioritised the need to construct water storage tanks at the household level. RAHA funded the construction of 20 underground water storage tanks at the household level for Killi Tarata. The members of the Storai Community Organisation, in collaboration with the RAHA field team, monitored the construction work until the end of the project. This RAHA intervention has enhanced the water storage capacity of the community and minimised the hardships of the women, helping them focus on their families and other household chores. The availability of clean drinking water has also improved the health of the community, particularly the children. As a result, the women of Killi Tarata are now beginning to see a bright future for themselves and their children.

Journey Towards a Bright Future K

On discussion with the women, it became evident that they were well aware of the hardship they faced, but were not sure how they could solve this problem.

This intervention has contributed to the achievement of RAHA ER 2: Improved Livelihoods and Local Economies

This intervention has contributed to the achievement of RAHA ER 3: Restoration of Social Services and Infrastructure

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UNDP - RAHA Hope on the Horizon

UNDP - RAHA Hope on the Horizon

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MDG 5: IMPROVE MATERNAL HEALTH

MDG 6: COMBAT HIV/AIDS, MALARIA AND OTHER DISEASES

Improving Health and Hygiene of Poor Communities


illi Ziarat Batezai, a remote village in Union Council Saranan, District Pishin, is situated a few kilometres away from the District Headquarters, but still lacks the basic facilities of life such as safe drinking water and sewerage system. A social mobilisation team of the Refugee Affected and Hosting Areas Programme (RAHA) visited Killi Ziarat Batezai and observed that this village was deprived of the basic facilities of life, thus it needed immediate attention. The team gathered the community women and mobilised them to form a community organisation. Killi Ziarat Batezai is a conservative society and the local women lack awareness about their rights, but the efforts of the RAHA social mobilisation team bore fruit in the form of the Gulshan Community Organisation. During the need identification exercise, the members of the organisation prioritised the need to construct latrines at the household level, because open defecation was hazardous for the health and hygiene of the village's residents, as well as for the environment. The Gulshan Community Organisation initiated the RAHA-supported project to construct latrines from the house of Naseema, an active member of the organisation whose husband suffers from tuberculosis and who has seven children to take care of. The construction of latrines at the household level in Killi Ziarat Batezai has improved the health and hygienic of about two dozen poor families, as well as provided them with much needed privacy. The community members express their gratitude to RAHA for providing them support in the construction of latrines, which are contributing to clean and healthy life, and improved maternal health.

The Road to Success


illi Baaz Mohammad, a remote and backward village in Union Council Roghani-II, District Killa Abdullah, consists of 40 households and has a population of more than 1,500. It is situated only nine kilometres away from District Headquarters Chaman and neighbours the Pak-Afghan border. The residents of Killi Baaz Mohammad are mostly illiterate; and earn their livelihood as daily wage labourers and taxi drivers, as well as by rearing cattle such as sheep and goats. The village lacks basic facilities such as electricity, access to drinking water, schools and health services. A social mobilisation team of the Refugee Affected and Hosting Areas Programme (RAHA) visited the village and held several meetings with the local community, which identified construction of a street pavement as its top priority during the subsequent need assessment exercise. Because of increasing population, lack of planning at the town level and absence of a collective approach, the existing street was in a mess. Resembling a pool of mud, particularly during the rainy season, this situation was resulting in different diseases and allergic reactions, in addition to mental stress, among the residents. After a series of meetings, the Istaqlal Community Organisation passed a unanimous resolution for the construction of the street pavement, following which a technical team of the programme visited the village to prepare the feasibility and budget of the scheme. Later, the scheme was approved and funds were released for the construction of the street pavement. The residents of Killi Baaz Mohammad, particularly children and women, are now very happy since the RAHA intervention has greatly helped them: their health and hygiene has improved; the prices of their lands have increased due to better access; and going to school, market or farm, especially during the rainy season, has become easier for them.

The construction of latrines at the household level in Killi Ziarat Batezai has improved the health and hygienic of about two dozen poor families, as well as provided them with much needed privacy.

Because of increasing population, lack of planning at the town level and absence of a collective approach, the existing street was in a mess.

This intervention has contributed to the achievement of RAHA ER 4: Improved Access to Social Protection

This intervention has contributed to the achievement of RAHA ER 3: Restoration of Social Services and Infrastructure

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UNDP - RAHA Hope on the Horizon

UNDP - RAHA Hope on the Horizon

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They Can Because They Think They Can!

bdul Quddus, a small village in Union Council Ziarat Balanosh, District Chagai, consists of about 60 households; and lacks basic facilities such as drinking water, roads, health services, schools and electricity. The Refugee Affected and Hosting Areas Programme (RAHA) started its activities in Abdul Quddus in 2011, initially by forming a mens community organisation of 25 households that provided a platform to the poor residents to discuss their individual and collective problems, as well as suggest possible solutions to them. Next, a RAHA field team conducted the Community Management Skills Training for office-bearers of the organisation. The team also held several meetings with the community, which identified provision of drinking water as its top priority during the subsequent need assessment exercise, mainly because fetching water from a 100-feet deep well was extremely tiresome for the weak and malnourished women and children of the village. The community members, through a unanimous resolution, requested the RAHA staff to help them solve this problem. The possible solutions included installing either a hand pump/wind mill or a solar pump with a water storage tank. However, the latter option was found to be better in terms of water delivery and sustainability. An amount of PKR1,266,916 was granted for the solar pump scheme that aims at providing drinking water to the residents of Abdul Quddus. The community installed the solar pump and also constructed a community water storage tank of 14,000-litre capacity in June 2012. About 28,000 litres of water a day is now available to the community. They have planted trees and started kitchen gardening by harvesting different vegetables. The community members, especially women, are pleased to get drinking water throughout the day without any hassle. There used to be shortage of drinking water, thus the installation of the solar pump is no less than a blessing for the village. We are thankful to RAHA for making our lives easy, says Batay Khan, an elderly man of the village. Since the installation of the solar pump, the women do not have to travel long distances to fetch water since the storage tank remains full and they can get water at any time they need. The solar pump has solved the drinking water problem. Earlier, the water was contaminated because of the open well, resulting in health problems, especially among the children. The women and children are happy too since now they can regularly wash their clothes. says Batay Khan, adding that the strength of RAHA lies in involving the community from planning and implementation of a scheme.

There used to be shortage of drinking water, thus the installation of the solar pump is no less than a blessing for the village. We are thankful to RAHA for making our lives easy, says Batay Khan, an elderly man of the village.

This intervention has contributed to the achievement of RAHA ER 4: Improved Access to Social Protection

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UNDP - RAHA Hope on the Horizon

UNDP - RAHA Hope on the Horizon

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MDG 7: ENSURE ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY

Lightening Up Life
P
enakai is a remote village in Union Council Kach Amakzai, District Loralai, with a population of about 300. The village lacks basic facilities such as electricity, schools, health services, drinking water and roads. The majority of the residents of Penakai work as unskilled labourers; some in the fields, others on daily wages in Loralai, and still others in chrome mines at Muslim Bagh. The rest earn their livelihood through subsistence arid farming and livestock. A field team of the Refugee Affected and Hosting Areas Programme (RAHA) visited Penakai to meet with the village elders. The community organisation, formed after subsequent dialogue and social mobilisation, identified five pressing needs (solar lights, water tanks, water supply lines, water reservoir ponds and flood protection walls), but gave top priority to the provision of solar lights at the household level. These community needs were identified using the participatory rural appraisal (PRA) technique involving 70% male population of the village. The activity was conducted by enumerators who visited households at equitable distances without prior knowledge of the owners; and captured parameters such as farm activities, labour, land size and livestock. Solar lights received the maximum attention in the PRA because the residents of Penakai mostly used kerosene lamps for light in the dark; and, on average, a household consumed seven litres of oil roughly costing PKR700 a month.

Under RAHA, we started working on solar solutions, particularly solar lights and solar water pumps. Based on the success of our projects, now the government is also considering this option on a large scale, says Mr Zahid Saleem, RAHA's National Programme Director in Balochistan.

Solar energy offers perhaps the best solution to the electricity problem in Balochistan, where distances are large and populations are scattered, thus the cost of national electricity grid is much higher than the other provinces. Under RAHA, we started working on solar solutions, particularly solar lights and solar water pumps. Based on the success of our projects, now the government is also considering this option on a large scale, says Mr Zahid Saleem, RAHAs National Programme Director in Balochistan and Additional Secretary, Services and General Administration Department, Government of Balochistan. Many of the problems of the residents were solved after the installation of the solar lights. The project costing PKR1,488,000 (of which the community contributed PKR20,000) was completed in 3 months and now 21 households have access to solar energy. The high cost of kerosene oil was unaffordable for most of us. Without light, our lives were pitiable. Our children were often bit by insects and reptiles, but we were helpless. Home-based solar panels provided by RAHA have now solved many of our problems, says Meharban, a community member. Since the residents complained that it was difficult to offer prayers at night in the village mosque, two solar lights were also installed there. The direct beneficiaries of the project include 101 women and 98 men. The installation of the solar lights has, in particular, benefitted the women of the village since now they can engage in incomegenerating activities, such as embroidery and tailoring, at night. Similarly, now the children have more time to study. I can now do my homework at night and my teachers are very happy with me, tells Mewand Gul, a school boy.

What is PRA?
Participatory rural appraisal (PRA) is a set of participatory techniques for assessing group and community resources, identifying and prioritising problems, and appraising strategies for solving them. It is a research/planning methodology in which a local community studies an issue that concerns the population, prioritises problems, evaluates options for solving the problem(s) and comes up with a community action plan to address the concerns that have been raised. A PRA's main purpose is to capture the multiple perspectives that exist in any community, and that the community itself takes the lead in evaluating its situation and finding solutions. Outsiders may participate as facilitators or to provide technical information, but they should not 'take charge' of the process. In a PRA, a number of different tools are used to gather and analyse information. These tools encourage participation, make it easier for people to express their views, and help to organise information in a way that makes it more useful and accessible to the group that is trying to analyse a given situation.

This intervention has contributed to the achievement of RAHA ER 5: Restoration and Improvement of the Environment

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UNDP - RAHA Hope on the Horizon

UNDP - RAHA Hope on the Horizon

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Bringing Life Back to Normal


W
ater is a precious resource for the people of Balochistan, more so because of the arid climate of the province that causes frequent droughts. After every decade or so, a long dry spell severely affects the agriculture, livestock and livelihoods of the people, forcing them to abandon their native places and roam in search of water like nomads. The residents of Village Gurmai in Union Council Kach Amakzai, District Loralai, most of whom work in the agriculture and livestock sector, have experienced the worst effects of drought over the years. With time, their only source of water a community karez also dried up, failing to meet the increasing needs of the people. With no solution in sight, the residents of Gurmai requested the field staff of the Refugee Affected and Hosting Areas Programme (RAHA) to help them in the restoration of the karez. Subsequently, a RAHA social mobilisation team visited the village and motivated the residents to form community organisations for solution to their problems. A mens community organisation (Gurmai Kharzana) was soon formed. In the need assessment exercise, the community prioritised the need for restoration of the karez and sought RAHAs financial support. After technical evaluation, the scheme worth PKR816,619 (of which the community contributed PKR32,970) was approved for funding. The spirited community, working on a self-help basis, initiated the excavation work from the mother well of the karez. A rock was cut, a 200-feet conduit channel was re-laid and a manhole was constructed to increase the flow of water. Ultimately, the karez was successfully restored for usage by households and farmers alike.

Before RAHA intervened, our karez was not giving enough water for either agriculture or drinking because of numerous blockages in the way, says Muhammad Qasim, the president of a local mens community organisation. Plenty of water is now available for both agriculture and livestock, as well as for catering to drinking, washing and bathing needs of about three dozen households. The community has cultivated an additional eight acres with the extra water made available due to the restoration of the karez. The intervention has directly benefitted 250 and indirectly benefitted 500 people, including 30 Afghan refugees, by increasing livelihood opportunities for them. The shortage of water was severely affecting our crops and orchards, but the restoration of the karez has saved our economy by enabling us to grow vegetables and trees of our choice, says Ali Khan, a local famer. In particular, the women and children have benefitted from the intervention since water is now freely available. In addition, washing pads have been built along the water course coming from the karez to facilitate the women. The intervention is also contributing to improved health and hygiene among the residents of the village.

The shortage of water was severely affecting our crops and orchards, but the restoration of the karez has saved our economy by enabling us to grow vegetables and trees of our choice, says Ali Khan, a local famer.

What is a Karez?
Karez is an indigenous method of irrigation in which groundwater is tapped by a series of tunnels. After running for some distance, the tunnel comes out in the open and the water is conducted to the command area. In Pakistan, karez irrigation is confined to the province of Balochistan. It is a community enterprise managed by tribal traditions and run by social control. Spacing of the karez; their types, life, length and discharge; and water distribution and management are some of the important aspects of karez irrigation. Cleaning of karez is considered as a collective social responsibility and the local people do this on self-help basis.
This intervention has contributed to the achievement of RAHA ER 3: Restoration of Social Services and Infrastructure

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UNDP - RAHA Hope on the Horizon

UNDP - RAHA Hope on the Horizon

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Breaking Barriers, Building Bridges


A
round 4,000 Afghan refugees live in the Sindh Ghara village of Union Council Khazana Payan on the outskirts of Peshawar. They used to enjoy cordial relations with the local community until the resources started to dwindle and livelihood opportunities became scarce. Our elders welcomed the Afghan refugees, even allowing them to settle on common lands in villages besides designated government camps, but now we need the same lands for ourselves, says Ikhtiar Ahmad, who is working to promote social cohesion in Sindh Ghara under the Refugee Affected and Hosting Areas Programme (RAHA). With time, the common adversary of Afghan refugees and the local community in the village remained the floods in the Shalam river that wreaked havoc each year following the monsoon season. After the devastation wrought by the 2010 floods, Ikhtiar Ahmads Khegara (Cooperation) Welfare Youth Organisation, which has been working in the area since 2004, sought financial and technical support from RAHA to construct a flood protection wall.

RAHA DISTRICTS
C H I

Khyber Pakhtunkhwa
A N

FATA
AGENCY

LOWER DIR BUNER HARIPUR ISLAMABAD

PESHAWAR SWABI NOWSHERA

KILLA SAIFULLAH Killa Abdullah PISHIN LORALAI QUETTA

PUNJAB

CHAGAI

The wall is an outcome of joint efforts of two community organisations, one men's and women's each, in line with RAHA's focus on gender.

BALOCHISTAN
I R A N

SINDH
The 100-feet long flood protection wall, which was completed at a cost of PKR3.4 million in June 2012, now protects both the local community and the Afghan refugees, greatly helping in re-establishing the bond between them. The wall is an outcome of joint efforts by two community organisations, one mens and womens each, in line with RAHAs focus on gender. These community organisations later gel together as village organisations to address larger developmental issues. Sindh Ghara has also benefitted in terms of other community-implemented projects such as retention walls, irrigation channels and street pavements to go hand in hand with training in market skills for community members to help them initiate income generation activities.

Balochistan
Chagai Killa Abdullah Killa Saifullah Loralai Pishin Quetta

Khyber Pakhtunkhwa
Buner Haripur Lower Dir Nowshera Peshawar Swabi

FATA This intervention has contributed to the achievement of RAHA ER 5: Restoration and Improvement of the Environment

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UNDP - RAHA Hope on the Horizon

Refugee Affected and Hosting Areas Programme (RAHA) United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) 6th Floor, Serena Business Complex, Khayban-e-Suharwardy, Islamabad. URL:www.undp.org.pk