Impact of Colour

On
Consumers Buying Behavior
By Aurangzaib, Jun 28, 2007

Abstract:
Purpose – The purpose of this research is to understand colour strategy. Colour strategy
has become part of today’s marketing life. Trends for each year are no longer only
predicted by the fashion industry. Moreover, the psychological value of colour is in
marketing more important than in the fashion industry. Some colour associations and
reactions can be very dangerous for your product. Be aware however, not to lose track of
the origin of a product. On top, some colours can never work for a certain product
whereas they will be perfect for another one.

Introduction
If a marketer can identify consumer buying behavior, He or She will be in a better
position to target products and services at them. Buying behavior is focused upon the
needs of individuals, groups and organization.
The processes of decision and acts of final household consumers related with evaluating,
purchasing, consuming, and discarding products for personal consumption

Literature Review
According to Brown,(2005) “Buying decisions involve many factors that most consumers
are not even aware of them. In every purchase five steps are involved: need recognition,
information search, evaluation of alternatives, purchase decision, and finally post
purchase behavior. Even the simplest purchases can include any or all of these steps”.
Armstorng et al (2005) suggest that “personal, psychological, and social issues are other
variable influenced purchases”. Demographics normally play a major role in the buying
process, since social, religious, and economic factors all influence a person’s thought
processes. (O’Brien).
‘Color’ is one of the important attributes which acts as a driving force in cosmetics use
from a cross-cultural perspective. Use of color cosmetics (right color) satisfies the need to

-1-

look young which leads to confidence for the consumer in an individualistic society. Use
of color cosmetics involves PDI (power distance), UAI (uncertainty avoidance) and IDV.
Mooij further suggested that together with national wealth Hofstede’s cultural dimensions
can explain more than half of the differences in consumption and consumer behavior.
By Spear, “Study of behavior of consumer’s goods and services regarding their buying
patterns and reactions to advertising and marketing”.
Consumer psychology seeks to explain human, or consumer behavior, in two basic ways:
what the consumer wants and what the consumer needs.
According to Krigjsman, “Culture is the set of basic value, perception, wants and
behaviors learned by a member of society from family and other institution”. According
to Pervin, “The body of work considers the role of culture and its impact on consumer
behavior”. The study attempts to provide an in-depth analysis into the way cultural
factors influence consumer’s decision-making processes.
Hofsteede (1980) defines culture as the “interactive aggregate of common characteristics
that influence a group’s response to its environment.”
Social Class

Almost every society has some form of social class structure. Social

classes are society's relatively permanent and ordered divisions whose members share
similar values, interest, and behaviors
Personal Factor A consumer's decision also are influenced by personal characteristics
such as the consumer's age and life cycle stage, occupation, economic situation, lifestyle,
personality and self concept:
Psychological Factor A consumer's buying choices are further influenced by four major
psychological factors: Motivation, Perception, Learning, Beliefs and Attitudes”
Schutte and Ciarlante (1998) suggest that “Consumers form an ‘attitude’ towards the
advertising of a product as well as in the act of buying the product”.
Solomon (1996) says “According to ABC attitude is divided into three components
Affect, Behaviors, and Cognition.
It is commonly accepted that occupation, age, and gender influence car-buying attitudes.
This study uses the Wheel of Consumer Analysis Model to explain how cultural
differences between U.S. and Chinese consumers affect car buying decisions.

-2-

The Wheel of Consumer Analysis consists of three elements (a) environment, (b)
behavior, and (c) affect/cognition, and is a useful model for explaining buyer behavior in
general, and car buying behavior in particular.

Methodology:
Following are the research methods which we will apply in our research process,

Face to face interviews

Questionnaire

Hierarchy of Research Design

Research Design

Sample Selection

Data Collection

Procedures

Surveys and interviews

Sample Selection and Size:
Sample Selection and Size will 600 people which select in different area of the
city and different markets. Some are the people will higher class and some people
will middle class. We will select the sample randomly not very specific
customers. Some will select outlet’s owners, employees and senior employees
who are working on that outlet. All the Sample Selection will select on the base of
observation last 3 to 4 months.

Data Collection Methods:
Create the questionnaire
Brief interviews
Data compilation

-3-

All Data will be collected via survey forms and consumers which use and
purchases product on the bases of its colours and package, some data will collect
on internet and different web sits.

Procedures:
Survey forms will be utilized to capture the consumer psyche and behavior, when
they select different products. Statistical data on psychological impact,
environmental impact, fashion impact and locating impact will be gathered to
support the results.

Surveys and interviews
Surveys are way to systematically find information from a particular group of
people- particularly information that those people know better than anyone else.
Interviews are a specific survey mechanism that tends to require more time from
the individuals responding to questions. Because all surveys take the time of the
people who respond (whether writing on paper, on the Internet, over the phone, or
face-to-face), it is important to limit these methods to information that cannot be
gathered in other ways.
For both interviews and surveys, the basic method involves:
1. Developing a question or set of questions that will measure change in an
indicator,
2. Selecting a group of people to question/survey, and
3. Asking those people to answer the same question or set of questions at different
times during the life of the project.
The nature of the interviewers' questions focused on the color, style or quality, and
price of the different products along with perceived image, consumer budget and
payment procedures. Appendix A contains a copy of the questions used in the
interview. The next section deals with the results of the in-depth interviews of
Outlet’s owner and buyers.
I have interviewed and send questionnaire form to more than 55 people from
Gujrnawala and Gujrat. I made these interviews through meeting personally and
send questionnaire form through email.

-4-

Open – ended interviews
"Open-ended interviews" permit the respondent (interviewee) to provide
additional information, ask broad questions without a fixed set of answers, and
explore paths of questioning which may occur to the interviewer spontaneously
during the interview. An open-ended approach allows for an exploratory approach
to uncover unexpected information, used especially when the exact issues of
interest haven't been identified yet.

Results & Findings:
EDA:
Descriptive Statistics
Market Visit in Month
Brand Conscious

N
280
280

Minimum
1
1

Maximum
4
2

Mean
2.59
1.42

Std. Deviation
.980
.495

Attractiv thing in shop

280

1

4

2.79

1.134

Relation b\w color &
brand

280

1

2

1.36

.481

Quality of Product

280

1

5

4.14

.929

Colors of Product

280

1

5

3.94

.853

Design of Product

280

2

5

4.00

.783

Price of Product

280

1

5

3.60

.990

Trends

280

1

5

3.92

1.166

Attitude

280

1

5

3.69

.936

Emotion

280

1

5

3.66

.982

Personality

280

1

5

3.86

1.044

Fashion

280

1

5

3.72

.973

Product

280

1

5

3.29

1.132

Red

280

1

5

3.29

1.047

Black

280

1

5

3.97

1.097

Green

280

1

5

3.20

1.093

White

280

1

5

3.39

1.219

Blue

280

1

5

3.70

1.106

Orange

280

1

5

2.81

1.240

Yellow

280

1

5

2.57

1.291

Dark Colors

280

1

5

3.32

.964

Light Colors

280

1

5

3.62

.927

Bright Colors

280

1

5

3.50

1.064

Light Colors

280

1

5

3.40

1.046

Dark Bright Colors

280

1

5

2.84

1.221

Income

280

1

4

3.03

1.183

-5-

Spending

280

1

4

3.45

.911

Profession

280

1

4

2.22

.807

Gender

280

1

2

1.42

.495

Age

280

1

6

3.92

1.540

Location

280

1

2

1.43

.496

Valid N (listwise)

280

Case Processing Summary
Cases
Valid
N

Missing

Market Visit in Month
Brand Conscious

280
280

Percent
100.0%
100.0%

Attractiv thing in shop

280

Relation b\w color &
brand

N

Total

0
0

Percent
.0%
.0%

100.0%

0

280

100.0%

Quality of Product

280

Colors of Product
Design of Product

280
280

Percent
100.0%
100.0%

.0%

280

100.0%

0

.0%

280

100.0%

100.0%

0

.0%

280

100.0%

280

100.0%

0

.0%

280

100.0%

280

100.0%

0

.0%

280

100.0%

Price of Product

280

100.0%

0

.0%

280

100.0%

Trends

280

100.0%

0

.0%

280

100.0%

Attitude

280

100.0%

0

.0%

280

100.0%

Emotion

280

100.0%

0

.0%

280

100.0%

Personality

280

100.0%

0

.0%

280

100.0%

Fashion

280

100.0%

0

.0%

280

100.0%

Product

280

100.0%

0

.0%

280

100.0%

Red

280

100.0%

0

.0%

280

100.0%

Black

280

100.0%

0

.0%

280

100.0%

Green

280

100.0%

0

.0%

280

100.0%

White

280

100.0%

0

.0%

280

100.0%

Blue

280

100.0%

0

.0%

280

100.0%

Orange

280

100.0%

0

.0%

280

100.0%

Yellow

280

100.0%

0

.0%

280

100.0%

Dark Colors

280

100.0%

0

.0%

280

100.0%

Light Colors

280

100.0%

0

.0%

280

100.0%

Bright Colors

280

100.0%

0

.0%

280

100.0%

Light Colors

280

100.0%

0

.0%

280

100.0%

Dark Bright Colors

280

100.0%

0

.0%

280

100.0%

Income

280

100.0%

0

.0%

280

100.0%

Spending

280

100.0%

0

.0%

280

100.0%

Profession

280

100.0%

0

.0%

280

100.0%

Gender

280

100.0%

0

.0%

280

100.0%

Age

280

100.0%

0

.0%

280

100.0%

Location

280

100.0%

0

.0%

280

100.0%

-6-

N

Descriptives
Market Visit in Month

Mean
95% Confidence
Interval for Mean

Lower Bound
Upper Bound

2.60

Median

3.00

Variance

.960

Std. Deviation

.980

Minimum

1

Maximum

4

Range

3
1

Skewness
Kurtosis
Mean
95% Confidence
Interval for Mean

Lower Bound
Upper Bound

-.068

.146

-1.001

.290

1.42

.030

1.36
1.48

5% Trimmed Mean

1.41

Median

1.00

Variance

.245

Std. Deviation

.495

Minimum

1

Maximum

2

Range

1

Interquartile Range

1

Skewness
Kurtosis
Attractiv thing in shop

Mean
95% Confidence
Interval for Mean

Std. Error
.059

2.70

5% Trimmed Mean

Interquartile Range

Brand Conscious

Statistic
2.59
2.47

Lower Bound
Upper Bound

.320

.146

-1.911

.290

2.79

.068

2.66
2.92

5% Trimmed Mean

2.82

Median

3.00

Variance

1.285

Std. Deviation

1.134

Minimum

1

Maximum

4

Range

3

Interquartile Range

2

Skewness
Kurtosis

-7-

-.307

.146

-1.350

.290

Relation b\w color &
brand

Mean
95% Confidence
Interval for Mean

1.36
Lower Bound
Upper Bound

1.35

Median

1.00

Variance

.231

Std. Deviation

.481

Minimum

1

Maximum

2

Range

1

Interquartile Range

1

Kurtosis
Quality of Product

Mean
95% Confidence
Interval for Mean

Lower Bound
Upper Bound

.583

.146

-1.672

.290

4.14

.056

4.03
4.25

5% Trimmed Mean

4.22

Median

4.00

Variance

.863

Std. Deviation

.929

Minimum

1

Maximum

5

Range

4

Interquartile Range

1

Skewness
Kurtosis
Colors of Product

1.42

5% Trimmed Mean

Skewness

Mean
95% Confidence
Interval for Mean

.029

1.30

Lower Bound
Upper Bound

-.949

.146

.436

.290

3.94

.051

3.84
4.04

5% Trimmed Mean

4.00

Median

4.00

Variance

.728

Std. Deviation

.853

Minimum

1

Maximum

5

Range

4

Interquartile Range

1

Skewness
Kurtosis

-8-

-.797

.146

.787

.290

Design of Product

Mean
95% Confidence
Interval for Mean

Price of Product

4.00
Lower Bound
Upper Bound

4.10

5% Trimmed Mean

4.04

Median

4.00

Variance

.613

Std. Deviation

.783

Minimum

2

Maximum

5

Range

3

Interquartile Range

1

Skewness

-.367

.146

Kurtosis

-.423

.290

3.60

.059

Mean
95% Confidence
Interval for Mean

Lower Bound
Upper Bound

3.48
3.71

5% Trimmed Mean

3.62

Median

4.00

Variance

.980

Std. Deviation

.990

Minimum

1

Maximum

5

Range

4

Interquartile Range

Trends

.047

3.91

1

Skewness

-.147

.146

Kurtosis

-.636

.290

3.92

.070

Mean
95% Confidence
Interval for Mean

Lower Bound
Upper Bound

5% Trimmed Mean

3.78
4.05
4.01

Median

4.00

Variance

1.359

Std. Deviation

1.166

Minimum

1

Maximum

5

Range

4

Interquartile Range

2

Skewness

-.865

.146

Kurtosis

-.246

.290

-9-

Attitude

Mean
95% Confidence
Interval for Mean

3.69
Lower Bound
Upper Bound

Emotion

3.73

Median

4.00

Variance

.876

Std. Deviation

.936

Minimum

1

Maximum

5

Range

4

Interquartile Range

1
-.815

.146

Kurtosis

.462

.290

Mean

3.66

.059

95% Confidence
Interval for Mean

Lower Bound
Upper Bound

3.54
3.77

5% Trimmed Mean

3.71

Median

4.00

Variance

.964

Std. Deviation

.982

Minimum

1

Maximum

5

Range

4

Interquartile Range

1

Skewness
Kurtosis
Personality

3.80

5% Trimmed Mean

Skewness

.056

3.58

Mean
95% Confidence
Interval for Mean

Lower Bound
Upper Bound

5% Trimmed Mean

-.754

.146

.247

.290

3.86

.062

3.73
3.98
3.92

Median

4.00

Variance

1.091

Std. Deviation

1.044

Minimum

1

Maximum

5

Range

4

Interquartile Range

2

Skewness

-.757

.146

Kurtosis

-.138

.290

- 10 -

Fashion

Mean
95% Confidence
Interval for Mean

Product

3.72
Lower Bound
Upper Bound

3.84

5% Trimmed Mean

3.77

Median

4.00

Variance

.947

Std. Deviation

.973

Minimum

1

Maximum

5

Range

4

Interquartile Range

1

Skewness

-.709

.146

Kurtosis

-.014

.290

3.29

.068

Mean
95% Confidence
Interval for Mean

Lower Bound
Upper Bound

3.16
3.42

5% Trimmed Mean

3.32

Median

3.00

Variance

1.282

Std. Deviation

1.132

Minimum

1

Maximum

5

Range

4

Interquartile Range

Red

.058

3.61

1

Skewness

-.259

.146

Kurtosis

-.607

.290

3.29

.063

Mean
95% Confidence
Interval for Mean

Lower Bound
Upper Bound

5% Trimmed Mean

3.17
3.42
3.33

Median

3.00

Variance

1.097

Std. Deviation

1.047

Minimum

1

Maximum

5

Range

4

Interquartile Range

1

Skewness

-.345

.146

Kurtosis

-.368

.290

- 11 -

Black

Mean
95% Confidence
Interval for Mean

3.97
Lower Bound
Upper Bound

5% Trimmed Mean

4.06
4.00

Variance

1.203

Std. Deviation

1.097

Minimum

1

Maximum

5

Range

4

Interquartile Range

2
-.960

.146

Kurtosis

.139

.290

Mean

3.20

.065

95% Confidence
Interval for Mean

Lower Bound
Upper Bound

3.07
3.33

5% Trimmed Mean

3.23

Median

3.00

Variance

1.195

Std. Deviation

1.093

Minimum

1

Maximum

5

Range

4

Interquartile Range

White

4.10

Median

Skewness
Green

.066

3.84

2

Skewness

-.379

.146

Kurtosis

-.660

.290

3.39

.073

Mean
95% Confidence
Interval for Mean

Lower Bound
Upper Bound

5% Trimmed Mean

3.25
3.53
3.43

Median

4.00

Variance

1.486

Std. Deviation

1.219

Minimum

1

Maximum

5

Range

4

Interquartile Range

2

Skewness

-.422

.146

Kurtosis

-.851

.290

- 12 -

Blue

Mean
95% Confidence
Interval for Mean

3.70
Lower Bound
Upper Bound

5% Trimmed Mean

3.77
4.00

Variance

1.223

Std. Deviation

1.106

Minimum

1

Maximum

5

Range

4

Interquartile Range

1
-.818

.146

Kurtosis

.013

.290

Mean

2.81

.074

95% Confidence
Interval for Mean

Lower Bound
Upper Bound

2.66
2.96

5% Trimmed Mean

2.79

Median

3.00

Variance

1.538

Std. Deviation

1.240

Minimum

1

Maximum

5

Range

4

Interquartile Range

2

Skewness
Kurtosis
Yellow

3.83

Median

Skewness
Orange

.066

3.57

Mean
95% Confidence
Interval for Mean

Lower Bound
Upper Bound

5% Trimmed Mean

.024

.146

-.994

.290

2.57

.077

2.42
2.72
2.52

Median

3.00

Variance

1.666

Std. Deviation

1.291

Minimum

1

Maximum

5

Range

4

Interquartile Range

3

Skewness
Kurtosis

- 13 -

.262

.146

-1.079

.290

Dark Colors

Mean
95% Confidence
Interval for Mean

3.32
Lower Bound
Upper Bound

Light Colors

3.36

Median

3.00

Variance

.929

Std. Deviation

.964

Minimum

1

Maximum

5

Range

4

Interquartile Range

1
-.561

.146

Kurtosis

.039

.290

Mean

3.63

.055

95% Confidence
Interval for Mean

Lower Bound
Upper Bound

3.52
3.73

5% Trimmed Mean

3.66

Median

4.00

Variance

.859

Std. Deviation

.927

Minimum

1

Maximum

5

Range

4

Interquartile Range

1

Skewness
Kurtosis
Bright Colors

3.43

5% Trimmed Mean

Skewness

.058

3.21

Mean
95% Confidence
Interval for Mean

Lower Bound
Upper Bound

5% Trimmed Mean

-.602

.146

.027

.290

3.50

.064

3.37
3.62
3.53

Median

4.00

Variance

1.133

Std. Deviation

1.064

Minimum

1

Maximum

5

Range

4

Interquartile Range

1

Skewness

-.395

.146

Kurtosis

-.616

.290

- 14 -

Light Colors

Mean
95% Confidence
Interval for Mean

3.40
Lower Bound
Upper Bound

5% Trimmed Mean

Dark Bright Colors

3.52
3.43

Median

4.00

Variance

1.094

Std. Deviation

1.046

Minimum

1

Maximum

5

Range

4

Interquartile Range

1

Skewness

-.348

.146

Kurtosis

-.615

.290

2.84

.073

Mean
95% Confidence
Interval for Mean

Lower Bound
Upper Bound

2.70
2.98

5% Trimmed Mean

2.82

Median

3.00

Variance

1.490

Std. Deviation

1.221

Minimum

1

Maximum

5

Range

4

Interquartile Range

2

Skewness
Kurtosis
Income

.063

3.28

Mean
95% Confidence
Interval for Mean

Lower Bound
Upper Bound

5% Trimmed Mean

.025

.146

-.964

.290

3.03

.071

2.89
3.17
3.09

Median

4.00

Variance

1.400

Std. Deviation

1.183

Minimum

1

Maximum

4

Range

3

Interquartile Range

2

Skewness

-.794

.146

Kurtosis

-.964

.290

- 15 -

Spending

Mean
95% Confidence
Interval for Mean

3.45
Lower Bound
Upper Bound

3.56

Median

4.00

Variance

.829

Std. Deviation

.911

Minimum

1

Maximum

4

Range

3

Interquartile Range

1

Kurtosis
Profession

Mean
95% Confidence
Interval for Mean

Lower Bound
Upper Bound

-1.568

.146

1.304

.290

2.22

.048

2.12
2.31

5% Trimmed Mean

2.23

Median

2.00

Variance

.651

Std. Deviation

.807

Minimum

1

Maximum

4

Range

3

Interquartile Range

1

Skewness
Kurtosis
Gender

3.56

5% Trimmed Mean

Skewness

Mean
95% Confidence
Interval for Mean

.054

3.35

Lower Bound
Upper Bound

-.252

.146

-1.111

.290

1.42

.030

1.36
1.48

5% Trimmed Mean

1.41

Median

1.00

Variance

.245

Std. Deviation

.495

Minimum

1

Maximum

2

Range

1

Interquartile Range

1

Skewness
Kurtosis

- 16 -

.320

.146

-1.911

.290

Age

Mean

3.93

95% Confidence
Interval for Mean

Lower Bound
Upper Bound

5% Trimmed Mean

3.96
4.00

Variance

2.371

Std. Deviation

1.540

Minimum

1

Maximum

6

Range

5

Interquartile Range

3

Kurtosis
Mean
95% Confidence
Interval for Mean

Lower Bound
Upper Bound

-.194

.146

-1.277

.290

1.43

.030

1.37
1.49

5% Trimmed Mean

1.42

Median

1.00

Variance

.246

Std. Deviation

.496

Minimum

1

Maximum

2

Range

1

Interquartile Range

1

Skewness
Kurtosis

KMO and Bartlett's Test
Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin Measure of Sampling
Adequacy.
Bartlett's Test of
Sphericity

4.11

Median

Skewness
Location

.092

3.74

.637

Approx. Chi-Square

2548.739

df

496

Sig.

.000

Communalities
Market Visit in Month
Brand Conscious

Initial
1.000
1.000

Extraction
.658
.728

Attractiv thing in shop

1.000

.623

- 17 -

.290

.146

-1.930

.290

Relation b\w color &
brand

1.000

.567

Quality of Product

1.000

.665

Colors of Product

1.000

.652

Design of Product

1.000

.632

Price of Product

1.000

.582

Trends

1.000

.507

Attitude

1.000

.765

Emotion

1.000

.697

Personality

1.000

.573

Fashion

1.000

.632

Product

1.000

.538

Red

1.000

.538

Black

1.000

.607

Green

1.000

.633

White

1.000

.467

Blue

1.000

.551

Orange

1.000

.809

Yellow

1.000

.739

Dark Colors

1.000

.704

Light Colors

1.000

.702

Bright Colors

1.000

.535

Light Colors

1.000

.738

Dark Bright Colors

1.000

.626

Income

1.000

.829

Spending

1.000

.516

Profession

1.000

.808

Gender

1.000

.715

Age

1.000

.755

Location

1.000
.621
Extraction Method: Principal Component Analysis.

Total Variance Explained
Compon
ent

1
2

Initial Eigenvalues
% of
Cumulative
Total
Variance
%
3.745
11.703
11.703
3.242
10.132
21.835

Extraction Sums of Squared
Loadings
% of
Cumulative
Total
Variance
%
3.745
11.703
11.703
3.242
10.132
21.835

Rotation Sums of Squared
Loadings
% of
Cumulative
Total
Variance
%
3.109
9.714
9.714
2.222
6.944
16.658

3

2.299

7.184

29.018

2.299

7.184

29.018

2.167

6.771

23.430

4

1.972

6.162

35.180

1.972

6.162

35.180

1.990

6.217

29.647

5

1.692

5.288

40.468

1.692

5.288

40.468

1.859

5.810

35.457

6

1.491

4.660

45.128

1.491

4.660

45.128

1.817

5.677

41.134

7

1.466

4.582

49.709

1.466

4.582

49.709

1.782

5.570

46.703

8

1.404

4.387

54.096

1.404

4.387

54.096

1.638

5.119

51.823

9

1.233

3.854

57.950

1.233

3.854

57.950

1.510

4.719

56.541

10

1.147

3.584

61.534

1.147

3.584

61.534

1.377

4.303

60.845

- 18 -

11

1.019

3.186

64.720

12

.938

2.931

67.651

13

.915

2.859

70.510

14

.853

2.665

73.176

15

.837

2.615

75.790

16

.791

2.470

78.261

17

.775

2.423

80.683

18

.707

2.211

82.894

19

.654

2.043

84.937

20

.567

1.773

86.710

21

.540

1.689

88.399

22

.514

1.607

90.005

23

.467

1.459

91.464

24

.426

1.331

92.795

25

.401

1.253

94.048

26

.370

1.156

95.205

27

.350

1.094

96.298

28

.334

1.043

97.341

29

.266

.832

98.173

30

.233

.727

98.900

31

.203

.634

99.534

3.186

64.720

1.240

3.875

64.720

.149
.466
100.000
Extraction Method: Principal Component Analysis.

Scree Plot

4
3
2
lu
a
v
n
e
ig
E

32

1.019

1
0

2
3
1
3
0
3
9
2
8
2
7
2
6
2
5
2
4
2
3
2
2
1
2
0
2
9
1
8
1
7
1
6
1
5
1
4
1
3
1
2
1
1
0
1
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Component Number

Component Matrix (a)
Component
1

2

3

4

5

- 19 -

6

7

8

9

10

11

Market Visit in
Month
Brand Conscious

-.22
0
-.23
5

.233

.163

.076

-.060

.012

-.199

.074

-.389

.568

-.021

-.100

.052

.215

-.017

.454

.319

.074

.330

.155

.408

.067

-.298

.203

.456

.163

.145

-.412

-.110

.217

-.066

-.011

-.10
1

-.018

.150

.424

.162

.369

-.207

.103

-.167

.186

.275

Quality of Product

.469

.166

-.080

.032

-.075

-.018

-.392

-.347

-.064

.237

.265

Colors of Product

.017

.377

-.251

-.217

.009

.040

-.235

-.475

.178

.279

-.089

Design of Product

.298

.035

.295

.194

.012

-.421

-.074

.475

-.046

.073

.018

Price of Product

.099

.491

.106

-.209

-.026

.013

.447

.065

.115

-.018

.430

.137

.090

.153

.208

.298

.071

-.012

.338

-.128

.343

-.180

-.284

-.210

.344

-.422

.406

.014

-.162

.043

.557

-.229

-.191

-.295

.293

-.232

.130

-.052

-.084

.123

Personality

.240
-.05
7
-.01
5
-.17
3
.524

.250

-.095

.358

-.087

-.185

-.041

.105

-.113

-.089

.153

Fashion

.291

.296

-.065

.297

.200

-.233

.411

-.165

-.239

.123

.065

Product

.448

.159

.065

.121

.070

.240

.145

.049

-.144

-.429

-.039

Red

.389

.248

.332

-.089

-.088

.141

.068

-.301

-.086

-.230

.152

Black

.161

.510

-.535

-.013

.034

-.054

-.067

.159

-.029

.016

.013

Green

.026

.417

.090

-.154

-.092

-.152

.092

-.026

-.504

-.166

.323

White

.237

.477

-.193

-.098

-.231

-.087

.159

-.033

.134

-.052

-.169

Blue

.199

.370

-.039

-.179

-.003

-.354

.053

.007

.394

.230

.069

Orange

.065

-.011

.693

-.546

-.066

.000

-.014

-.137

-.046

.002

.041

Yellow

.044

.079

.707

-.464

.039

.051

-.062

-.001

.043

.064

-.050

Dark Colors

.258

.214

.108

.299

-.606

.149

.178

.013

.132

.095

-.210

Light Colors

.444

.185

.206

.280

-.398

.275

.155

-.235

.098

.002

-.164

Bright Colors

.432

.273

.147

.142

.408

.142

-.083

-.127

.112

-.104

.012

Light Colors

.340

.413

.097

-.021

.643

.087

-.079

.039

.082

-.071

-.033

.180

.341

-.041

-.147

.409

.257

.048

.238

-.002

.071

-.396

-.040

-.144

.055

-.114

.115

-.202

.053

.063

-.079

.008

-.180

.059

-.060

.115

.023

-.105

-.028

.014

.188

-.131

.047

.120

.086

.397

.216

.270

.104

.438

.074

-.117

-.032

.056

.036

-.089

-.100

.060

.348

.318

-.095

-.387

.055

-.142

Attractive thing in
shop
Relation b\w color
& brand

Trends
Attitude
Emotion

Dark Bright
Colors
Income

-.72
.401
.141
.143
9
Spending
-.38
.479
.243
.116
8
Profession
-.65
.480
.185
.218
5
Gender
.171
-.009
-.186
-.387
Age
-.68
.436
.129
.202
1
Location
-.42
-.053
-.118
-.107
9
Extraction Method: Principal Component Analysis.
11 components extracted.

Rotated Component Matrix (a)

- 20 -

Component
1
Market Visit in
Month
Brand Conscious
Attractive thing in
shop
Relation b\w color
& brand
Quality of Product

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

.138

-.098

.065

-.039

-.153

.075

.080

.133

.085

.738

-.137

.152

-.084

-.051

.157

-.319

-.129

-.024

-.104

-.145

.027

.720

.005

.092

-.029

.066

-.606

.127

-.126

.161

-.335

-.224

-.149

.078

.096

-.106

.014

-.665

.052

.063

.028

.048

.258

.145

.121

-.119

.062

.058

.713

.208

.043

-.081

-.254

.063

-.025

Colors of Product

.101

.132

-.011

.045

.261

-.345

.122

.616

-.120

.142

-.075

Design of Product

-.064

.062

.021

-.025

.012

.764

-.094

-.085

.074

.087

-.103

Price of Product

-.024

.040

.272

.292

-.058

.595

.087

-.162

-.017

.156

.075

Trends

.224

.348

.018

.215

.097

-.040

-.052

-.072

.006

.475

.212

Attitude

-.001

.082

.003

-.012

.023

.052

.869

.006

.007

.000

-.004

Emotion

.246

-.003

-.083

.112

.114

-.140

.720

.127

.186

.113

.055

-.140

.170

-.330

.262

-.012

.421

-.010

.189

.347

-.088

-.073

Fashion

.020

.278

-.282

.156

.158

.082

-.450

.080

.418

.181

.048

Product

-.176

.412

-.033

.315

-.075

.035

.071

-.191

.328

-.279

-.050

Red

-.045

.219

.344

.351

-.028

-.034

-.016

.185

.410

-.203

.005

Black

.019

.252

-.479

-.024

.336

.042

.351

.195

.168

.096

.008

Green

.151

-.011

.094

-.048

.117

.040

.128

.025

.744

.101

-.047

White

.064

.149

-.127

.337

.505

.031

.162

.132

.103

-.026

-.018

Blue

.115

.123

.026

.010

.491

.291

-.029

.388

-.078

.023

.196

Orange

-.023

-.015

.885

-.005

.070

.034

-.018

.034

.132

.006

-.014

Yellow

.049

.136

.832

-.003

.042

.121

.038

-.001

-.006

.090

-.002

Dark Colors

-.007

-.131

-.064

.794

.103

.162

.070

-.004

-.045

.094

.006

Light Colors

-.108

.098

.061

.808

-.036

.016

-.057

.121

.052

-.037

-.015

Bright Colors

-.032

.636

.037

.121

-.135

.090

-.079

.231

.085

-.142

.006

Light Colors

.039

.821

.043

-.126

.002

.112

.004

.155

.080

-.028

.024

-.072

.669

.005

-.004

.185

-.042

.182

-.165

-.134

.238

-.050

.883

-.141

.000

-.055

.034

-.123

.031

-.081

.038

-.014

-.004

Personality

Dark Bright
Colors
Income
Spending

.674

.080

.104

.026

-.012

-.041

-.015

.121

.147

.072

.025

Profession

.888

-.013

-.023

-.032

-.024

.024

.096

-.045

-.036

.047

.029

Gender

-.235

.076

.034

-.183

.294

.018

.062

-.005

.084

-.085

.717

Age

.819

.006

-.067

-.095

-.002

-.023

.083

-.146

-.045

.165

-.108

Location

.067

-.064

-.016

-.062

-.042

-.577

-.009

-.395

.110

.322

.031

Extraction Method: Principal Component Analysis. Rotation Method: Varimax with Kaiser Normalization.
A Rotation converged in 18 iterations.

Component Transformation Matrix
Component
1
2

1
-.686
.537

2
.380
.434

3
.004
-.073

4
.343
.243

5
.100
.334

6
.330
.072

7
-.076
.340

8
.267
.254

9
.195
.328

10
-.182
.234

11
-.025
.006

3

.238

.075

.794

.199

-.291

.331

-.226

-.121

.046

.065

-.045

4

.256

.033

-.576

.377

-.528

.255

-.324

-.033

-.044

.025

-.089

- 21 -

5

.038

.717

-.042

-.588

-.165

-.082

-.307

-.027

-.067

.011

.061

6

-.173

.267

.093

.339

-.452

-.499

.420

-.167

-.118

.104

.304

7

.010

.027

-.054

.251

.391

-.171

-.481

-.485

.216

.053

.484

8

-.103

.058

-.135

-.182

.024

.616

.428

-.543

-.111

.170

.189

9

.212

.082
.036
.138
.189
.149
.002
.246
-.677
-.416
-.10
-.174
.013
-.015
.031
.071
-.181
.354
-.277
.815
8
11
-.23
.045
-.011
-.254
-.306
.142
.065
.322
.487
-.162
2
Extraction Method: Principal Component Analysis. Rotation Method: Varimax with Kaiser Normalization.

.421

10

.228
.628

Reliability
Case Processing Summary
N
Cases

Valid
Excluded
(a)
Total

280

%
100.0

0

.0

280
100.0
List wise deletion based on all variables in the procedure.

Reliability Statistics

Cronbach's
Alpha
.727

Cronbach's
Alpha Based
on
Standardized
Items
.713

N of Items
43

Summary Item Statistics
Mean
Minimum
Maximum
Item Variances
1.025
.231
2.371
Inter-Item Correlations
.055
-.665
.888
The covariance matrix is calculated and used in the analysis.

Range
2.139
1.554

Maximum /
Minimum
10.244
-1.335

Variance
.153
.032

Cross tabs
Case Processing Summary
Cases
Valid
N
Age * Personality

280

Missing
Percent
100.0%

N
0

Age * Personality Crosstabulation
Count

- 22 -

Percent
.0%

Total
N
280

Percent
100.0%

N of Items
43
43

Personality
Not At All
Important
Age

Less then
18
19 to 24

Total
Unimportant

Normal

Important

Very Important

0

0

2

1

8

11

3

1

9

20

27

60

25 to 30

1

4

4

24

13

46

31 to 35

0

9

4

15

7

35

36 to 40

2

13

16

28

19

78

More then
41

0

4

11

23

12

50

6

31

46

111

86

280

Total

Chi-Square Tests

Pearson Chi-Square
Likelihood Ratio
Linear-by-Linear
Association
N of Valid Cases

Value
43.460(a)
46.063
8.007

20
20

Asymp. Sig.
(2-sided)
.002
.001

1

.005

df

280

11 cells (36.7%) have expected count less than 5. The minimum expected count is .24.

Symmetric Measures

Interval by Interval
Ordinal by Ordinal

Pearson's R
Spearman
Correlation

Value
-.169

Asymp.
Std.
Error(a)
.057

Approx.
T(b)
-2.866

Approx. Sig.
.004(c)

-.186

.058

-3.160

.002(c)

N of Valid Cases
280
a Not assuming the null hypothesis.
b Using the asymptotic standard error assuming the null hypothesis.
c Based on normal approximation.

- 23 -

Reference:
O’Brien (Feb 01, 2006) “Marketing Factors: Consumer Buying Behavior”
Jane Spear “Consumer Psychology – What the consumer wants, consumer psychologists
know”
Krigjsman (July 16, 2007) “Characteristic Affecting Consumer Purchase Behavior”
Shahina Pervin, Southampton Business School, “A Cross-Cultural Comparative Study of
Female Consumer Behavior with Regards to the Purchase of Cosmetics by Females in
the UK and Bangladesh”.
“Personal Selling: Consumer Buying Behavior”

- 24 -

Johnson, Chang, (Nova Southeastern University) “A COMPARISON OF CAR BUYING
BEHAVIOR BETWEEN AMERICAN AND CHINESE PEOPLE LIVING IN NORTH
AMERICA: AN EXPLORATORY STUDY
Lisbet Berg, “Competent Consumers? Consumer Competence profiles in Norway”

- 25 -

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